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Sample records for active microbial biomass

  1. Microbial biomass, activity and community composition in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Truu, Marika; Juhanson, Jaanis; Truu, Jaak

    2009-06-15

    The aim of the current article is to give an overview about microbial communities and their functioning but also about factors affecting microbial activity in the three most common types (surface flow and two types of sub-surface flow) of constructed wetlands. The paper reviews the community composition and structural diversity of the microbial biomass, analyzing different aspects of microbial activity with respect to wastewater properties, specific wetland type, and environmental parameters. A brief introduction about the application of different novel molecular techniques for the assessment of microbial communities in constructed wetlands is also given. Microbially mediated processes in constructed wetlands are mainly dependent on hydraulic conditions, wastewater properties, including substrate and nutrient quality and availability, filter material or soil type, plants, and different environmental factors. Microbial biomass is within similar ranges in both horizontal and vertical subsurface flow and surface flow constructed wetlands. Stratification of the biomass but also a stratified structural pattern of the bacterial community can be seen in subsurface flow systems. Microbial biomass C/N ratio is higher in horizontal flow systems compared to vertical flow systems, indicating the structural differences in microbial communities between those two constructed wetland types. The total activity of the microbial community is in the same range, but heterotrophic growth is higher in the subsurface (vertical flow) system compared to the surface flow systems. Available species-specific data about microbial communities in different types of wetlands is scarce and therefore it is impossible make any general conclusions about the dynamics of microbial community structure in wetlands, its relationship to removal processes and operational parameters.

  2. [Effects of bio-crust on soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities in copper mine tailings].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Yang, Gui-de; Sun, Qing-ye

    2009-09-01

    Bio-crust is the initial stage of natural primary succession in copper mine tailings. With the Yangshanchong and Tongguanshan copper mine tailings in Tongling City of Anhui Province as test objects, this paper studied the soil microbial biomass C and N and the activities of dehydrogenase, catalase, alkaline phosphatase, and urease under different types of bio-crust. The bio-crusts improved the soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities in the upper layer of the tailings markedly. Algal crust had the best effect in improving soil microbial biomass C and N, followed by moss-algal crust, and moss crust. Soil microflora also varied with the type of bio-crust. No'significant difference was observed in the soil enzyme activities under the three types of bio-crust. Soil alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly positively correlated with soil microbial biomass and dehydrogenase and urease activities, but negatively correlated with soil pH. In addition, moss rhizoid could markedly enhance the soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities in moss crust rhizoid.

  3. Physical and Chemical Correlates of Microbial Activity and Biomass in Composting Municipal Sewage Sludge

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, Vicky L.; Vestal, J. Robie

    1985-01-01

    Various physical and chemical parameters were monitored to evaluate their influence on the microbial communities present in composting municipal sewage sludge. Temperature, moisture content, depth, pH, protein content, total nitrogen, total carbon, lipid phosphate biomass, and the rates of microbial incorporation of substrates into lipids were measured at several times throughout the 17- to 19-day composting runs. Temperature was found to have the most consistent and dramatic effect on microbial activity and biomass. When temperatures exceeded 55 to 60°C, microbial activity fell dramatically, usually by more than 1 order of magnitude. Microbial activity was generally greatest in samples taken from the 35 to 50°C areas of the composting piles. Changes in the composition of the compost over time included increased pH, increased protein content, and decreased total organic content. The changes in these parameters appeared to reflect the microbial activity and biomass present. The results of this study indicate that the rate of composting may best be optimized by controlling the composting temperatures, provided that the other parameters fall within reasonable limits in the starting material. PMID:16346940

  4. Effect of roundup ultra on microbial activity and biomass from selected soils.

    PubMed

    Haney, R L; Senseman, S A; Hons, F M

    2002-01-01

    Herbicides applied to soils potentially affect soil microbial activity. The quantity and frequency of Roundup Ultra [RU; N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine; Monsanto, St. Louis, MO] applications have escalated with the advent of Roundup-tolerant crops. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Roundup Ultra on soil microbial biomass and activity across a range of soils varying in fertility. The isoproplyamine salt of glyphosate was applied in the form of RU at a rate of 234 mg active ingredient kg(-1) soil based on an assumed 2-mm glyphosate-soil interaction depth. Roundup Ultra significantly stimulated soil microbial activity as measured by C and N mineralization, as well as soil microbial biomass. Cumulative C mineralization as well as mineralization rate increased above background levels for all soils tested with addition of RU. There were strong linear relationships between C and N mineralized, as well as between soil microbial C and N (r2 = 0.96 and 0.95, respectively). The slopes of the relationships with RU addition approximated three. Since the isopropylamine salt of glyphosate has a C to N ratio of 3:1, the data strongly suggest that RU was the direct cause of the enhanced microbial activity. An increase in the C mineralization rate occurred the first day following RU addition and continued for 14 d. Roundup Ultra appeared to be rapidly degraded by soil microbes regardless of soil type or organic matter content, even at high application rates, without adversely affecting microbial activity.

  5. Microbial Functional Diversity, Biomass and Activity as Affected by Soil Surface Mulching in a Semiarid Farmland.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yufang; Chen, Yingying; Li, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Mulching is widely used to increase crop yield in semiarid regions in northwestern China, but little is known about the effect of different mulching systems on the microbial properties of the soil, which play an important role in agroecosystemic functioning and nutrient cycling. Based on a 4-year spring maize (Zea mays L.) field experiment at Changwu Agricultural and Ecological Experimental Station, Shaanxi, we evaluated the responses of soil microbial activity and crop to various management systems. The treatments were NMC (no mulching with inorganic N fertilizer), GMC (gravel mulching with inorganic N fertilizer), FMC (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer) and FMO (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer and organic manure addition). The results showed that the FMO soil had the highest contents of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, dehydrogenase activity, microbial activity and Shannon diversity index. The relative use of carbohydrates and amino acids by microbes was highest in the FMO soil, whereas the relative use of polymers, phenolic compounds and amines was highest in the soil in the NMC soil. Compared with the NMC, an increased but no significant trend of biomass production and nitrogen accumulation was observed under the GMC treatment. The FMC and FMO led a greater increase in biomass production than GMC and NMC. Compare with the NMC treatment, FMC increased grain yield, maize biomass and nitrogen accumulation by 62.2, 62.9 and 86.2%, but no significant difference was found between the FMO and FMC treatments. Some soil biological properties, i.e. microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, being sensitive to the mulching and organic fertilizer, were significant correlated with yield and nitrogen availability. Film mulching over gravel mulching can serve as an effective measure for crop production and nutrient cycling, and plus organic fertilization additions may thus have improvements in the biological quality of the

  6. Microbial Functional Diversity, Biomass and Activity as Affected by Soil Surface Mulching in a Semiarid Farmland

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yufang; Chen, Yingying; Li, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Mulching is widely used to increase crop yield in semiarid regions in northwestern China, but little is known about the effect of different mulching systems on the microbial properties of the soil, which play an important role in agroecosystemic functioning and nutrient cycling. Based on a 4-year spring maize (Zea mays L.) field experiment at Changwu Agricultural and Ecological Experimental Station, Shaanxi, we evaluated the responses of soil microbial activity and crop to various management systems. The treatments were NMC (no mulching with inorganic N fertilizer), GMC (gravel mulching with inorganic N fertilizer), FMC (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer) and FMO (plastic-film mulching with inorganic N fertilizer and organic manure addition). The results showed that the FMO soil had the highest contents of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, dehydrogenase activity, microbial activity and Shannon diversity index. The relative use of carbohydrates and amino acids by microbes was highest in the FMO soil, whereas the relative use of polymers, phenolic compounds and amines was highest in the soil in the NMC soil. Compared with the NMC, an increased but no significant trend of biomass production and nitrogen accumulation was observed under the GMC treatment. The FMC and FMO led a greater increase in biomass production than GMC and NMC. Compare with the NMC treatment, FMC increased grain yield, maize biomass and nitrogen accumulation by 62.2, 62.9 and 86.2%, but no significant difference was found between the FMO and FMC treatments. Some soil biological properties, i.e. microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, being sensitive to the mulching and organic fertilizer, were significant correlated with yield and nitrogen availability. Film mulching over gravel mulching can serve as an effective measure for crop production and nutrient cycling, and plus organic fertilization additions may thus have improvements in the biological quality of the

  7. Microbial biomass governs enzyme activity decay during aging of worm-worked substrates through vermicomposting.

    PubMed

    Aira, Manuel; Monroy, Fernando; Domínguez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Vermicomposting is the biooxidation and stabilization of organic matter involving the joint action of earthworms and microorganisms, thereby turning wastes into a valuable soil amendment called vermicompost. Studies have focused on the changes in the type of substrates available before and after vermicomposting, but little is known on how these changes take place, especially those changes related with maturation of vermicompost. This study investigated the effects of aging on the microbiological properties of fresh vermicompost produced from pig slurry by analyzing the substrate after the earthworms had left it. We incubated 16-wk-old vermicompost and sampled it after 15, 30, 45, and 60 d analyzing microbial biomass and activity (assessed as microbial biomass N and basal respiration respectively) and four enzymatic activities (beta-glucosidase, cellulase, protease, and alkaline phosphatase). Aging of vermicompost resulted in decreases of microbial biomass and activity. Three of the four enzymes analyzed also showed decrease. An initial increase followed by a rapid decrease in alkaline phosphatase was also recorded. High and significant correlations between microbial biomass and beta-glucosidase (r = 0.62, P < 0.001), cellulase (r = 0.56, P < 0.01), and protease (r = 0.82, P < 0.001) were found. Results suggest that there may be two steps involved in the aging dynamics of vermicompost with regards to extracellular enzyme activity; the first step was characterized by a decrease in microbial populations, which resulted in a reduction in the synthesis of new enzymes. The second step was the degradation of the pool of remaining enzymes. This dynamic does not seem to be affected by earthworms because similar decaying patterns of microbial biomass and activity were found in substrate where earthworms were present.

  8. Tracking Dynamics of Plant Biomass Composting by Changes in Substrate Structure, Microbial Community, and Enzyme Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.; Tucker, M. P.; Baker, J. O.; Harris, M.; Luo, Y. H.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M. E.; Ding, S. Y.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight) and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels.

  9. Tracking dynamics of plant biomass composting by changes in substrate structure, microbial community, and enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. Results In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight) and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. Conclusion The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels. PMID:22490508

  10. Effect of land use on microbial biomass and enzyme activities in tropical soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharjan, Menuka; Sanaullah, Muhammad; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Land use change especially from forest to intensive agriculture for sustaining livelihood causing severe consequence on soil quality. Soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities are very sensitive to change in environment. The objective was to assess effects of three land uses i.e. forest, organic and conventional farming on microbial biomass C and N and enzymes involved in C-cycle (β-glucosidase), N-cycle (leucine-aminopeptidase), P-cycle (Phosphatase) and S-cycle (Sulphatase) at different depth (0-100 cm with 10 cm in interval) of soil in Chitwan, Nepal. The result showed that both carbon and nitrogen content (%) was significantly higher in organic farming than conventional farming and forest. However, the trend decreased in lower depth. Significantly high microbial biomass C and N (μg C and N g-1 soil) were found in organic farming than conventional farming and forest at 0-10 cm but the trend was inconsistent in lower depth. β-glucosidase, leucine-aminopeptidase and sulphatase (nmol g-1 soil) activities were higher in organic and conventional farming compared to forest at 0-20 cm. Phosphatase activity was higher in conventional farming than forest and organic farming at 0-20cm. The activities were inconsistent below 20 cm. Application of farmyard manure and organic matter from the vegetation contributes the higher microbial biomass and enzyme activities in organic farming.

  11. Short-term parasite-infection alters already the biomass, activity and functional diversity of soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Min; Jin, Ze-Xin; Hagedorn, Frank; Li, Mai-He

    2014-11-04

    Native parasitic plants may be used to infect and control invasive plants. We established microcosms with invasive Mikania micrantha and native Coix lacryma-jobi growing in mixture on native soils, with M. micrantha being infected by parasitic Cuscuta campestris at four intensity levels for seven weeks to estimate the top-down effects of plant parasitism on the biomass and functional diversity of soil microbial communities. Parasitism significantly decreased root biomass and altered soil microbial communities. Soil microbial biomass decreased, but soil respiration increased at the two higher infection levels, indicating a strong stimulation of soil microbial metabolic activity (+180%). Moreover, a Biolog assay showed that the infection resulted in a significant change in the functional diversity indices of soil microbial communities. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that microbial biomass declined significantly with decreasing root biomass, particularly of the invasive M. micrantha. Also, the functional diversity indices of soil microbial communities were positively correlated with soil microbial biomass. Therefore, the negative effects on the biomass, activity and functional diversity of soil microbial community by the seven week long plant parasitism was very likely caused by decreased root biomass and root exudation of the invasive M. micrantha.

  12. Short-term parasite-infection alters already the biomass, activity and functional diversity of soil microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Min; Jin, Ze-Xin; Hagedorn, Frank; Li, Mai-He

    2014-01-01

    Native parasitic plants may be used to infect and control invasive plants. We established microcosms with invasive Mikania micrantha and native Coix lacryma-jobi growing in mixture on native soils, with M. micrantha being infected by parasitic Cuscuta campestris at four intensity levels for seven weeks to estimate the top-down effects of plant parasitism on the biomass and functional diversity of soil microbial communities. Parasitism significantly decreased root biomass and altered soil microbial communities. Soil microbial biomass decreased, but soil respiration increased at the two higher infection levels, indicating a strong stimulation of soil microbial metabolic activity (+180%). Moreover, a Biolog assay showed that the infection resulted in a significant change in the functional diversity indices of soil microbial communities. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that microbial biomass declined significantly with decreasing root biomass, particularly of the invasive M. micrantha. Also, the functional diversity indices of soil microbial communities were positively correlated with soil microbial biomass. Therefore, the negative effects on the biomass, activity and functional diversity of soil microbial community by the seven week long plant parasitism was very likely caused by decreased root biomass and root exudation of the invasive M. micrantha. PMID:25367357

  13. Soil microbial biomass, basal respiration and enzyme activity of main forest types in the Qinling Mountains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fei; Peng, Xiaobang; Zhao, Peng; Yuan, Jie; Zhong, Chonggao; Cheng, Yalong; Cui, Cui; Zhang, Shuoxin

    2013-01-01

    Different forest types exert essential impacts on soil physical-chemical characteristics by dominant tree species producing diverse litters and root exudates, thereby further regulating size and activity of soil microbial communities. However, the study accuracy is usually restricted by differences in climate, soil type and forest age. Our objective is to precisely quantify soil microbial biomass, basal respiration and enzyme activity of five natural secondary forest (NSF) types with the same stand age and soil type in a small climate region and to evaluate relationship between soil microbial and physical-chemical characters. We determined soil physical-chemical indices and used the chloroform fumigation-extraction method, alkali absorption method and titration or colorimetry to obtain the microbial data. Our results showed that soil physical-chemical characters remarkably differed among the NSFs. Microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) was the highest in wilson spruce soils, while microbial biomass nitrogen (Nmic) was the highest in sharptooth oak soils. Moreover, the highest basal respiration was found in the spruce soils, but mixed, Chinese pine and spruce stands exhibited a higher soil qCO2. The spruce soils had the highest Cmic/Nmic ratio, the greatest Nmic/TN and Cmic/Corg ratios were found in the oak soils. Additionally, the spruce soils had the maximum invertase activity and the minimum urease and catalase activities, but the maximum urease and catalase activities were found in the mixed stand. The Pearson correlation and principle component analyses revealed that the soils of spruce and oak stands obviously discriminated from other NSFs, whereas the others were similar. This suggested that the forest types affected soil microbial properties significantly due to differences in soil physical-chemical features.

  14. Enhanced electricity generation by using algae biomass and activated sludge in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Naim; Cui, Yu-Feng; Saif Ur Rehman, Muhammad; Han, Jong-In

    2013-07-01

    Recently, interest is growing to explore low-cost and sustainable means of energy production. In this study, we have exploited the potential of sustainable energy production from wastes. Activated sludge and algae biomass are used as substrates in microbial fuel cell (MFC) to produce electricity. Activated sludge is used at anode as inoculum and nutrient source. Various concentrations (1-5 g/L) of dry algae biomass are tested. Among tested concentrations, 5 g/L (5000 mg COD/L) produced the highest voltage of 0.89 V and power density of 1.78 W/m(2) under 1000 Ω electric resistance. Pre-treated algae biomass and activated sludge are also used at anode. They give low power output than without pre-treatment. Spent algae biomass is tested to replace whole (before oil extraction) algae biomass as a substrate, but it gives low power output. This work has proved the concept of using algae biomass in MFC for high energy output.

  15. Earthworms facilitate the stabilization of pelletized dewatered sludge through shaping microbial biomass and activity and community.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoyong; Cui, Guangyu; Huang, Kui; Chen, Xuemin; Li, Fusheng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Li, Fei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the effect of earthworms on microbial features during vermicomposting of pelletized dewatered sludge (PDS) was investigated through comparing two degradation systems with and without earthworm E isenia fetida involvement. After 60 days of experimentation, a relatively stable product with low organic matter and high nitrate and phosphorous was harvested when the earthworms were involved. During the process, earthworms could enhance microbial activity and biomass at the initial stage and thus accelerating the rapid decomposition of PDS. The end products of vermicomposting allowed the lower values of bacterial and eukaryotic densities comparison with those of no earthworm addition. In addition, the presence of earthworms modified the bacterial and fungal diversity, making the disappearances of some pathogens and specific decomposing bacteria of recalcitrant substrates in the vermicomposting process. This study evidences that earthworms can facilitate the stabilization of PDS through modifying microbial activity and number and community during vermicomposting.

  16. [Effects of growing time on Panax ginseng rhizosphere soil microbial activity and biomass].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chun-ping; Yang, Li-min; Ma, Feng-min

    2014-12-01

    Using the field sampling and indoor soil cultivation methods, the dynamic of ginseng rhizosphere soil microbial activity and biomass with three cultivated ages was studied to provide a theory basis for illustrating mechanism of continuous cropping obstacles of ginseng. The results showed that ginseng rhizosphere soil microbial activity and biomass accumulation were inhibited observably by growing time. The soil respiration, soil cellulose decomposition and soil nitrification of ginseng rhizosphere soil microorganism were inhibited significantly (P <0.05), in contrast to the control soil uncultivated ginseng (R0). And the inhibition was gradual augmentation with the number of growing years. The soil microbial activity of 3a ginseng soil (R3) was the lowest, and its activity of soil respiration, soil cellulose decomposition, soil ammonification and soil nitrification was lower than that in R0 with 56.31%, 86.71% and 90. 53% , respectively. The soil ammonification of ginseng rhizosphere soil microbial was significantly promoted compared with R0. The promotion was improved during the early growing time, while the promotion was decreased with the number of growing years. The soil ammonification of R1, R2 and R3 were lower than that in R0 with 32.43%, 80.54% and 66.64% separately. The SMB-C and SMB-N in ginseng rhizosphere soil had a decreased tendency with the number of growing years. The SMB-C difference among 3 cultivated ages was significant, while the SMB-N was not. The SMB of R3 was the lowest. Compared with R0, the SMB-C and the SMB-N were significantly reduced 77.30% and 69.36%. It was considered by integrated analysis that the leading factor of continuous cropping obstacle in ginseng was the changes of the rhizosphere soil microbial species, number and activity as well as the micro-ecological imbalance of rhizosphere soil caused by the accumulation of ginseng rhizosphere secretions.

  17. Microbial biomass and activity in soils with different moisture content heated at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro, Ana; Lombao, Alba; Martin, Angela; Cancelo-González, Javier; Carballas, Tarsy; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that soil properties determining the thermal transmissivity (moisture, texture, organic matter, etc.) and the duration and temperatures reached during soil heating are key factors driving the fire-induced changes in soil microbial communities. However, despite its interest, the information about this topic is scarce. The aim of the present study is to analyze, under laboratory conditions, the impact of the thermal shock (infrared lamps reaching temperatures of 100 °C, 200 °C and 400 °C) on microbial communities of three acid soils under different moisture level (0 %, 25 % and 50 % per soil volume). Soil temperature was measured with thermocouples and the impact of soil heating was evaluated by means of the analysis of the temperature-time curves calculating the maximum temperature reached (Tmax) and the degree-hours (GH) as an estimation of the amount of heat supplied to the samples (fire severity). The bacterial growth (leucine incorporation) and the total microbial biomass (PLFA) were measured immediately after the heating and one month after the incubation of reinoculated soils. The results showed clearly the importance of moisture level in the transmission of heat through the soil and hence in the further direct impact of high temperatures on microorganisms living in soil. In general, the values of microbial parameters analyzed were low, particularly immediately after soil heating at higher temperatures; the bacterial activity measurements (leucine incorporation technique) being more sensitive to detect the thermal shock showed than total biomass measurements (PLFA). After 1 month incubation, soil microbial communities tend to recover due to the proliferation of surviving population using as substrate the dead microorganisms (soil sterilization). Thus, time elapsed after the heating was found to be decisive when examining the relationships between the microbial properties and the soil heating parameters (GH, Tmax). Analysis of results also

  18. Winter climate change affects growing-season soil microbial biomass and activity in northern hardwood forests.

    PubMed

    Durán, Jorge; Morse, Jennifer L; Groffman, Peter M; Campbell, John L; Christenson, Lynn M; Driscoll, Charles T; Fahey, Timothy J; Fisk, Melany C; Mitchell, Myron J; Templer, Pamela H

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to global change remains a major challenge of ecological research. We exploited a natural elevation gradient in a northern hardwood forest to determine how reductions in snow accumulation, expected with climate change, directly affect dynamics of soil winter frost, and indirectly soil microbial biomass and activity during the growing season. Soils from lower elevation plots, which accumulated less snow and experienced more soil temperature variability during the winter (and likely more freeze/thaw events), had less extractable inorganic nitrogen (N), lower rates of microbial N production via potential net N mineralization and nitrification, and higher potential microbial respiration during the growing season. Potential nitrate production rates during the growing season were particularly sensitive to changes in winter snow pack accumulation and winter soil temperature variability, especially in spring. Effects of elevation and winter conditions on N transformation rates differed from those on potential microbial respiration, suggesting that N-related processes might respond differently to winter climate change in northern hardwood forests than C-related processes.

  19. Effect of oxygen on the microbial activities of thermophilic anaerobic biomass.

    PubMed

    Pedizzi, C; Regueiro, L; Rodriguez-Verde, I; Lema, J M; Carballa, M

    2016-07-01

    Low oxygen levels (μgO2L(-1)) in anaerobic reactors are quite common and no relevant consequences are expected. On the contrary, higher concentrations could affect the process. This work aimed to study the influence of oxygen (4.3 and 8.8mgO2L(-1), respectively) on the different microbial activities (hydrolytic, acidogenic and methanogenic) of thermophilic anaerobic biomass and on the methanogenic community structure. Batch tests in presence of oxygen were conducted using specific substrates for each biological activity and a blank (with minimum oxygen) was included. No effect of oxygen was observed on the hydrolytic and acidogenic activities. In contrast, the methane production rate decreased by 40% in all oxygenated batches and the development of active archaeal community was slower in presence of 8.8mgO2L(-1). However, despite this sensitivity of methanogens to oxygen at saturation levels, the inhibition was reversible.

  20. Microbial contribution to carbon biogeochemistry in the Central Mediterranean Sea: Variability of activities and biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Ferla, Rosabruna; Azzaro, Filippo; Azzaro, Maurizio; Caruso, Gabriella; Decembrini, Franco; Leonardi, Marcella; Maimone, Giovanna; Monticelli, Luis S.; Raffa, Francesco; Santinelli, Chiara; Zaccone, Renata; Ribera d'Alcalà, Maurizio

    2005-08-01

    This paper concerns the current debate as to whether oceans are heterotrophic or autotrophic environments. Microbes are responsible for the assimilation and remineralization of CO 2 in the sea and microbial processes are involved in the Earth climatic change. The variability of microbial biomass and activities were studied in the Mediterranean Sea which represents a suitable basin for mapping the trophic regimes by the study of biogeochemical processes. The surveys were carried out in the epi-, meso- and bathy-pelagic zones of the Central Mediterranean Sea from 1996 to 2002. Bacterial abundance, leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and β-glucosidase (β-GLU) activities, bacterial carbon production (BCP), community respiration (R) and primary production (PP) were the main parameters investigated. Biomass and activities seasonally varied in epipelagic and, to some extent, in meso- and bathy-pelagic layers too and several trophic ratios were determined, showing different scenarios in the different areas and seasons. In the euphotic layer, bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) widely ranged between 4% and 50% showing a decreasing trend from estuaries towards pelagic areas in alignment with the trophic gradient from the Northern Adriatic to the Ionian Sea. However, BGE did not correlate to PP and temperature. The Central Mediterranean Sea showed different trophic regimes in the examined areas and seasons. In the Northern Adriatic Sea in winter, the trophic balance appeared to move towards autotrophy and a positive C budget resulted. An opposite scenario happened in summer when the trophic balance moved to heterotrophy and a negative C budget occurred. In the Ionian Sea, the overall balance turned always towards remineralization. However, on annual time scale, the Central Mediterranean Sea seems to show a tendency towards a heterotrophic system.

  1. Repeated application of composted tannery sludge affects differently soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira; Lima, Luciano Moura; Santos, Vilma Maria; Schmidt, Radomir

    2016-10-01

    Repeated application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) changes the soil chemical properties and, consequently, can affect the soil microbial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the responses of soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms to repeated application of CTS. CTS was applied repeatedly during 6 years, and, at the sixth year, the soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms were determined in the soil. The treatments consisted of 0 (without CTS application), 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 t ha(-1) of CTS (dry basis). Soil pH, EC, SOC, total N, and Cr concentration increased with the increase in CTS rate. Soil microbial biomass did not change significantly with the amendment of 2.5 Mg ha(-1), while it decreased at the higher rates. Total and specific enzymes activity responded differently after CTS application. The abundance of bacteria did not change with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment and decreased after this rate, while the abundance of archaea increased significantly with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment. Repeated application of different CTS rates for 6 years had different effects on the soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms as a response to changes in soil chemical properties.

  2. [Effects of organic fish protein liquid fertilizer on enzyme activities and microbial biomass C and N in a silt soil].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiu-Li; Lei, Ping; Shi, Wei-Yong

    2010-08-01

    By the method of thermostatic culture, this paper studied the effects of different application rates (0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 ml x kg(-1)) of organic fish protein liquid fertilizer on the enzyme activities and microbial biomass C and N in a silt soil, and the relationships between these parameters and soil nutrient contents. Under the application of the liquid fertilizer, soil pH varied in the range of 7.07-7.31, but had no significant difference from the control. With the increasing application rate of the liquid fertilizer, the activities of soil phosphatase, urease, and protease, as well as the soil biomass C and N, all increased significantly, and the increment was 127, 190 and 196%, 39.81, 78.06 and 173.24%, 56.37, 108.29 and 199.98%, 167, 395 and 474%, and 121, 243 and 406%, respectively, compared with the control. The peak time of the soil urease and protease activities and microbial biomass C and N differed with the fertilization treatments. Soil phosphase, urease, and protease activities and microbial biomass C and N were significantly positively correlated with soil nutrient contents, suggesting that applying organic fish protein liquid fertilizer to silt soil could improve soil microbial growth and enzyme activities, and accordingly, promote the decomposition and transformation of soil organic matter and the release of soil available nutrient elements.

  3. The effect of D123 wheat as a companion crop on soil enzyme activities, microbial biomass and microbial communities in the rhizosphere of watermelon

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weihui; Wang, Zhigang; Wu, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    The growth of watermelon is often threatened by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon) in successively monocultured soil, which results in economic loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of D123 wheat as a companion crop on soil enzyme activities, microbial biomass and microbial communities in the rhizosphere of watermelon and to explore the relationship between the effect and the incidence of wilt caused by Fon. The results showed that the activities of soil polyphenol oxidase, urease and invertase were increased, the microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and microbial biomass phosphorus (MBP) were significantly increased, and the ratio of MBC/MBN was decreased (P < 0.05). Real-time PCR analysis showed that the Fon population declined significantly in the watermelon/wheat companion system compared with the monoculture system (P < 0.05). The analysis of microbial communities showed that the relative abundance of microbial communities was changed in the rhizosphere of watermelon. Compared with the monoculture system, the relative abundances of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and Sordariomycetes were increased, and the relative abundances of Gammaproteobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Cytophagia, Pezizomycetes, and Eurotiomycetes were decreased in the rhizosphere of watermelon in the watermelon/wheat companion system; importantly, the incidence of Fusarium wilt was also decreased in the watermelon/wheat companion system. In conclusion, this study indicated that D123 wheat as a companion crop increased soil enzyme activities and microbial biomass, decreased the Fon population, and changed the relative abundance of microbial communities in the rhizosphere of watermelon, which may be related to the reduction of Fusarium wilt in the watermelon/wheat companion system. PMID:26388851

  4. [Study on soil enzyme activities and microbial biomass carbon in greenland irrigated with reclaimed water].

    PubMed

    Pan, Neng; Hou, Zhen-An; Chen, Wei-Ping; Jiao, Wen-Tao; Peng, Chi; Liu, Wen

    2012-12-01

    The physicochemical properties of soils might be changed under the long-term reclaimed water irrigation. Its effects on soil biological activities have received great attentions. We collected surface soil samples from urban green spaces and suburban farmlands of Beijing. Soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC), five types of soil enzyme activities (urease, alkaline phosphatase, invertase, dehydrogenase and catalase) and physicochemical indicators in soils were measured subsequently. SMBC and enzyme activities from green land soils irrigated with reclaimed water were higher than that of control treatments using drinking water, but the difference is not significant in farmland. The SMBC increased by 60.1% and 14.2% than those control treatments in 0-20 cm soil layer of green land and farmland, respectively. Compared with their respective controls, the activities of enzymes in 0-20 cm soil layer of green land and farmland were enhanced by an average of 36.7% and 7.4%, respectively. Investigation of SMBC and enzyme activities decreased with increasing of soil depth. Significantly difference was found between 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm soil layer in green land. Soil biological activities were improved with long-term reclaimed water irrigation in Beijing.

  5. [Comparisons of Microbial Numbers, Biomasses and Soil Enzyme Activities Between Paddy Field and Drvland Origins in Karst Cave Wetland].

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen-jiang; Zeng, Hong-hu; Li, Qiang; Cheng, Ya-ping; Tang, Hua-feng; Li, Min; Huang, Bing-fu

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare microbial number, microbial biomass as well as soil enzyme activity between paddy field and dryland originated karst wetland ecosystems. The soil samples (0-20 cm) of uncultivated wetland, paddy field and dryland were collected in Huixian karst cave wetland, Guilin, China. Microbial numbers and biomass were detected using dilute plate incubation counting and chloroform fumigation-extraction, respectively. Microbial DNA was extracted according to the manufacturer's instructions of the kit. Microbial activity was examined using soil enzyme assays as well. The result showed that the bacteria number in paddy filed was (4.36 +/- 2.25) x 10(7) CFU x g(-1), which was significantly higher than those in wetland and dryland. Fungi numbers were (6.41 +/- 2.16) x 10(4) CFU x g(-1) in rice paddy and (6.52 +/- 1.55) x 10(4) CFU x g(-1) in wetland, which were higher than that in dryland. Actinomycetes number was (2.65 +/- 0.72) x 10(6) CFU x g(-1) in dryland, which was higher than that in wetland. Microbial DNA concentration in rice paddy was (11.92 +/- 3.69) microg x g(-1), which was higher than that in dryland. Invertase activity was (66.87 +/- 18.61) mg x (g x 24 h)(-1) in rice paddy and alkaline phosphatase activity was (2.07 +/- 0.99) mg x (g x 2 h)(-1) in wetland, both of which were higher than those in dryland. Statistical analysis showed there was a significant positive correlation of microbial DNA content, alkaline phosphatase activity and microbial carbon with soil pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen, alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen, soil moisture, exchangeable Ca2+ and exchangeable Mg2+, as well as a significant positive correlation of intervase activity with the former three microbial factors. The above results indicated that microbial biomass and function responded much more sensitively to land-use change than microbial number in karst cave wetland system. Soil moisture, SOC and some factors induced by land-use change

  6. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    DOEpatents

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  7. The influence of soil heavy metals pollution on soil microbial biomass, enzyme activity, and community composition near a copper smelter.

    PubMed

    Wang, YuanPeng; Shi, JiYan; Wang, Hui; Lin, Qi; Chen, XinCai; Chen, YingXu

    2007-05-01

    The environmental risk of heavy metal pollution is pronounced in soils adjacent to large industrial complexes. It is important to investigate the functioning of soil microorganisms in ecosystems exposed to long-term contamination by heavy metals. We studied the potential effects of heavy metals on microbial biomass, activity, and community composition in soil near a copper smelter in China. The results showed that microbial biomass C was negatively affected by the elevated metal levels and was closely correlated with heavy metal stress. Enzyme activity was greatly depressed by conditions in the heavy metal-contaminated sites. Good correlation was observed between enzyme activity and the distance from the smelter. Elevated metal loadings resulted in changes in the activity of the soil microbe, as indicated by changes in their metabolic profiles from correlation analysis. Significant decrease of soil phosphatase activities was found in the soils 200 m away from the smelter. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis demonstrated that heavy metals pollution had a significant impact on bacterial and actinomycetic community structure. There were negative correlations between soil microbial biomass, phosphatase activity, and NH(4)NO(3) extractable heavy metals. The soil microorganism activity and community composition could be predicted significantly using the availability of Cu and Zn. By combining different monitoring approaches from different viewpoints, the set of methods applied in this study were sensitive to site differences and contributed to a better understanding of heavy metals effects on the structure, size and activity of microbial communities in soils. The data presented demonstrate the role of heavy metals pollution in understanding the heavy metal toxicity to soil microorganism near a copper smelter in China.

  8. Responses of Soil Microbial Biomass and Enzyme Activities to Tillage and Fertilization Systems in Soybean (Glycine max L.) Production

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Gholamreza; Mohammadi, Khosro; Sohrabi, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    Tillage operation and fertilizer type play important roles in soil properties as far as soil microbial condition is concerned. Information regarding the simultaneous evaluation of the effect of long-term tillage and fertilization on the soil microbial traits of soybean farms is not available. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that, the microbial biomass and enzyme activity, more often than not, respond quickly to changes in soil tillage and fertilization. Therefore, the experiments were aimed at analyzing the responses of soil microbial traits to tillage and fertilization in a soybean field in Kurdistan University, Iran. The field soil is categorized into coarse Loamy, mixed, superactive, calcareous, and mesic Typic Xerorthents. The experiments were arranged in split plot, based on randomized complete block design with three replications. Main plots consisted of long-term (since 2002) tillage systems including conventional tillage (CT), minimum tillage (MT), and no-tillage (NT). Eight fertilization methods were employed in the sub-plots, including (F1): farmyard manure (FYM); (F2): compost; (F3): chemical fertilizers; (F4): FYM + compost; (F5): FYM + chemical fertilizers; (F6): compost + chemical fertilizers; (F7): FYM + compost + chemical fertilizers and (F8): Control (without fertilizer). The highest microbial biomass carbon (385.1 μg) was observed in NT-F4 treatment. The NT treatment comparatively recorded higher values of acid phosphatase (189.1 μg PNP g−1 h−1), alkaline phosphatase (2879.6 μg PNP g−1 h−1) and dehydrogenase activity (68.1 μg PNP g−1 h−1). The soil treated with a mixture of compost and FYM inputs had the maximum urease activity of all tillage treatments. Organically manured treatment (F4) showed more activity in dehydrogenase (85.7 μg PNP g−1 h−1), acid phosphatase (199.1 μg PNP g−1 h−1), and alkaline phosphatase (3183.6 μg PNP g−1 h−1) compared to those treated with chemical fertilizers. In NT-F4 treatment, using

  9. Microbial biomass and activities in deep-sea sediments of the Eastern Mediterranean: trenches are benthic hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boetius, A.; Scheibej, S.; Tselepides, A.; Thiel, H.

    1996-09-01

    The relation of microbial biomass and extracellular enzymatic activities to substrate availability was investigated for the first time in deep-sea sediments of the Eastern Mediterranean basin, along a transect from the Gulf of Taranto (Italy) to the coasts of Egypt and Israel. Chloroplastic pigment equivalents (CPE), indicating the input of phytodetritus to the sediments, decreased from the shallow coastal stations around 200m water depth (4-6 μg cm -2) to the oligotrophic abyssal basins of the Ionian and Levantine Seas around 3000m water depth (0.1-1 μg cm -2). However, at two stations in the Hellenic Trench, at 4620 m and 3750 m, as well as in the Pliny Trench south of Crete at 4260 m, strikingly high accumulations of CPE above 10 μg cm -2 were recorded. The presence of relatively fresh detritus at these depths can only be explained by lateral flux of organic material down the steep slopes and its capture in the adjacent trenches. Consistently, microbial activity potentials in the trenches exceeded those at the abyssal plain by an order of magnitude. Microbial biomass was about 0.1 mg C cm -2 in the trenches and the coastal stations, compared to less than 0.05 mg C cm -2 at the abyssal plain stations. The increased availability of a potential food resource appears to have stimulated the deep-sea microbial assemblages to the same extent as those of shallower stations, suggesting that microbial activity in deep-sea sediments is mainly regulated by the level of food supply.

  10. Microbial Biomass, Activity, and Community Structure of Water and Particulates Retrieved by Backflow from a Waterflood Injection Well

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, Vicky L.; Costerton, J. William; White, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Oil field injection water was allowed to back flow from two wells at the Packard drill site in Los Angeles, Calif., and was sampled at various times to obtain information about the biomass, potential activity, and community structure of the microbiota in the reservoir formation and in the injection water. Biomass was greatest in water samples that came from the zone near the injection site and dropped off sharply in subsequent samples, which were assumed to come from zones farther away from the well. Samples obtained from near the well also had visible exopolysaccharide blankets, as seen in scanning electron microscopic preparations. In one of the wells that was sampled, rates of glucose or acetate incorporation into microbial lipids correlated with biomass; but in the other well, activities correlated with the sampling time (volume of water that back flowed). Transmission electron micrographs showed a diverse, gram-negative bacterial population in a variety of physiological states. The analysis of the phospholipid ester-linked fatty acid profiles of the samples revealed consistently large proportions of 18:1ω7c fatty acids, indicating the presence of many anaerobes, facultative organisms, or both. Proportions of cyclopropyl fatty acids and ratios of trans/cis monoenoic compounds increased with the volume of water that back flowed (analogous with the distance into the formation), while the ratio of unsaturated/saturated compounds decreased, possibly indicating higher levels of stress or starvation in the microbial communities farthest from the injection well. Greater than 90% of the total biomass was trapped on glass fiber filters, indicating that the microbiota were largely attached to particles or were clumped. These sampling techniques and analytical methods may prove useful in monitoring for problems with microbes (e.g., plugging) in waterflood operations and in the preparation of water injection wells for enhanced oil recovery by the use of microbes. Images

  11. Microbial biomass, activity, and community structure of water and particulates retrieved by backflow from a waterflood injection well

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, V.L.; Costerton, J.W.; White, D.C.

    1988-06-01

    Oil field injection water was allowed to back flow from two wells at the Packard drill site in Los Angeles, Calif., and was sampled at various times to obtain information about the biomass, potential activity, and community structure of the microbiota in the reservoir formation and in the injection water. Biomass was greatest in water samples than came from the zone near the injection site and dropped off sharply in subsequent samples, which were assumed to come from zones farther away from the well. Samples obtained from near the well also had visible exopolysaccharide blankets, as seen in scanning electron microscopic preparations. In one of the wells that was sampled, rates of glucose or acetate incorporation into microbial lipids correlated with biomass; but in the other well, activities correlated with the sampling time (volume of water that back flowed). Transmission electron micrographs showed a diverse, gram-negative bacterial population in a variety of physiological states. The analysis of the phospholipid ester-linked fatty acid profiles of the samples revealed consistently large proportions of 18:1 omega7c fatty acids, indicating the presence of many anaerobes, facultative organisms, or both. Proportions of cyclopropyl fatty acids and ratios of trans/cis monoenoic compounds increased with the volume of water that back flowed (analogous with the distance into the formation), while the ratio of unsaturated/saturated compounds decreased, possibly indicating higher levels of stress or starvation in the microbial communities farthest from the injection well. Greater than 90% of the total biomass was trapped on glass fiber filters, indicating that the microbiota were largely attached to particles or were clumped.

  12. Effects of slow-release urea fertilizers on urease activity, microbial biomass, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wenju; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Haijun; Li, Qi; Wang, Peng; Wen, Dazhong

    2005-05-01

    A field experiment was carried out at the Shenyang Experimental Station of Ecology (CAS) in order to study the effects of slow-release urea fertilizers high polymer-coated urea (SRU1), SRU1 mixed with dicyandiamide DCD (SRU2), and SRU1 mixed with calcium carbide CaC2 (SRU3) on urease activity, microbial biomass C and N, and nematode communities in an aquic brown soil during the maize growth period. The results demonstrated that the application of slow-release urea fertilizers inhibits soil urease activity and increases the soil NH4+-N content. Soil available N increment could promote its immobilization by microorganisms. Determination of soil microbial biomass N indicated that a combined application of coated urea and nitrification inhibitors increased the soil active N pool. The population of predators/omnivores indicated that treatment with SRU2 could provide enough soil NH4+-N to promote maize growth and increased the food resource for the soil fauna compared with the other treatments.

  13. Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

    2011-05-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

  14. Microbial Biomass and Activity in Geomorphic Features in Forested and Urban Restored and Degraded Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geomorphic spatial heterogeneity affects sediment denitrification, an anaerobic microbial process that results in the loss of nitrogen (N), and other anaerobic microbial processes such as methanogenesis in urban streams. We measured sediment denitrification potential (DEA), metha...

  15. The effect of Eulaliopsis binata on the physi-chemical properties, microbial biomass, and enzymatic activities in Cd-Pb polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Xiang, Yanci; Zou, Dongsheng

    2016-10-01

    Pot culture experiment using mining wasteland soil was carried out to study the effect of Eulaliopsis binata on the heavy-metal polluted soil with the growth of 90, 180, 270, and 360 days. Soil nutritional components, heavy metal, microbial biomass, and enzymatic activities were analyzed in this study, and the control group had no plants. The results showed that heavy metal contents decreased with E. binata growth, extractable Cd and Pb decreased 28 and 15 % after 1 year, but the difference was not significant compared with the control. While soil nutritional components, microbial biomass and enzymatic activities increased significantly as compared with the control. Comparing with pre-experiment, soil organic matter, N, P, K, microbial biomass C, N, P, invertase, urease, acid phosphatase, and catalase increased 0.9, 1.1, 3.0, 1.1, 0.4, 0.3, and 0.5 times, respectively. The indexes of soil nutritional components, microbial biomass, and enzymatic activities are positively correlated to each other, while they are negatively correlated to heavy metal content respectively. E. binata has positive influence on Cd-Pb pollution soil and broad application prospects in remediating heavy-metal polluted soil.

  16. Seasonal Variation in Soil Microbial Biomass, Bacterial Community Composition and Extracellular Enzyme Activity in Relation to Soil Respiration in a Northern Great Plains Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilton, E.; Flanagan, L. B.

    2014-12-01

    Soil respiration rate is affected by seasonal changes in temperature and moisture, but is this a direct effect on soil metabolism or an indirect effect caused by changes in microbial biomass, bacterial community composition and substrate availability? In order to address this question, we compared continuous measurements of soil and plant CO2 exchange made with an automatic chamber system to analyses conducted on replicate soil samples collected on four dates during June-August. Microbial biomass was estimated from substrate-induced respiration rate, bacterial community composition was determined by 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing, and β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGase) and phenol oxidase enzyme activities were assayed fluorometrically or by absorbance measurements, respectively. Soil microbial biomass declined from June to August in strong correlation with a progressive decline in soil moisture during this time period. Soil bacterial species richness and alpha diversity showed no significant seasonal change. However, bacterial community composition showed a progressive shift over time as measured by Bray-Curtis dissimilarity. In particular, the change in community composition was associated with increasing relative abundance in the alpha and delta classes, and declining abundance of the beta and gamma classes of the Proteobacteria phylum during June-August. NAGase showed a progressive seasonal decline in potential activity that was correlated with microbial biomass and seasonal changes in soil moisture. In contrast, phenol oxidase showed highest potential activity in mid-July near the time of peak soil respiration and ecosystem photosynthesis, which may represent a time of high input of carbon exudates into the soil from plant roots. This input of exudates may stimulate the activity of phenol oxidase, a lignolytic enzyme involved in the breakdown of soil organic matter. These analyses indicated that seasonal change in soil respiration is a complex

  17. Optimization of biomass composition explains microbial growth-stoichiometry relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, O.; Hall, E.K.; Kaiser, C.; Battin, T.J.; Richter, A.

    2011-01-01

    Integrating microbial physiology and biomass stoichiometry opens far-reaching possibilities for linking microbial dynamics to ecosystem processes. For example, the growth-rate hypothesis (GRH) predicts positive correlations among growth rate, RNA content, and biomass phosphorus (P) content. Such relationships have been used to infer patterns of microbial activity, resource availability, and nutrient recycling in ecosystems. However, for microorganisms it is unclear under which resource conditions the GRH applies. We developed a model to test whether the response of microbial biomass stoichiometry to variable resource stoichiometry can be explained by a trade-off among cellular components that maximizes growth. The results show mechanistically why the GRH is valid under P limitation but not under N limitation. We also show why variability of growth rate-biomass stoichiometry relationships is lower under P limitation than under N or C limitation. These theoretical results are supported by experimental data on macromolecular composition (RNA, DNA, and protein) and biomass stoichiometry from two different bacteria. In addition, compared to a model with strictly homeostatic biomass, the optimization mechanism we suggest results in increased microbial N and P mineralization during organic-matter decomposition. Therefore, this mechanism may also have important implications for our understanding of nutrient cycling in ecosystems.

  18. Optimization of biomass composition explains microbial growth-stoichiometry relationships.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Oskar; Hall, Edward K; Kaiser, Christina; Battin, Tom J; Richter, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Integrating microbial physiology and biomass stoichiometry opens far-reaching possibilities for linking microbial dynamics to ecosystem processes. For example, the growth-rate hypothesis (GRH) predicts positive correlations among growth rate, RNA content, and biomass phosphorus (P) content. Such relationships have been used to infer patterns of microbial activity, resource availability, and nutrient recycling in ecosystems. However, for microorganisms it is unclear under which resource conditions the GRH applies. We developed a model to test whether the response of microbial biomass stoichiometry to variable resource stoichiometry can be explained by a trade-off among cellular components that maximizes growth. The results show mechanistically why the GRH is valid under P limitation but not under N limitation. We also show why variability of growth rate-biomass stoichiometry relationships is lower under P limitation than under N or C limitation. These theoretical results are supported by experimental data on macromolecular composition (RNA, DNA, and protein) and biomass stoichiometry from two different bacteria. In addition, compared to a model with strictly homeostatic biomass, the optimization mechanism we suggest results in increased microbial N and P mineralization during organic-matter decomposition. Therefore, this mechanism may also have important implications for our understanding of nutrient cycling in ecosystems.

  19. Microbial production of energy sources from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righelato, R. C.

    1980-02-01

    The biochemical options available for the microbial production of energy sources from biomass is reviewed and some of the technology available for microbial conversion is discussed with particular reference to present limitations and how they may be overcome. Attention is given to the chemical process of anaerobic fermentation emphasizing the chemical reaction of glucose into pyruvic acid. The capital costs and energy consumption of ethanol and methane and their production are discussed. It is concluded that anaerobic fermentation of carbohydrates and digestion of biomass-containing effluents can be used as methods for achieving greater energy availability.

  20. Interactive effect of oxytetracycline and lead on soil enzymatic activity and microbial biomass.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minling; Song, Wenhua; Zhou, Qian; Ma, Xiaojun; Chen, Xiaoying

    2013-09-01

    Interactive effect of oxytetracyline (OTC) and lead on soil enzymatic activity and population of microbes was studied in the paper. The results showed effect of pollutants on bacteria, actinomycetes and enzymatic activity increased in the order: (OTC+Pb)>Pb>OTC, (OTC+Pb)>Pb>OTC and (OTC+Pb)>OTC>Pb, respectively. However, impact of pollutants on fungi decreased in the order: (OTC+Pb)

  1. [Temporal variations of soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities during the secondary succession of primary broadleaved-Pinus koraiensis forests in Changbai Mountains of Northeast].

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Rong-Jiu; Han, Si-Qin; Li, Hui; Xu, Hui

    2013-02-01

    By the method of space-for-time Substitution, and taking the matured (>200 years old) and over-matured (>200 years old) primary broadleaved-Pinus koraiensis forests and, their secondary forests at different succession stages (20-, 30-, 50-, 80-, and 100 years old Betula platphylla forests) in Changbai Mountains of Northeast China as test objects, this paper studied the temporal variations of soil organic carbon, soil microbial biomass, and soil enzyme activities during the secondary succession of primary broadleaved-Pinus koraiensis forests in the Mountains. Under the 20- and 80 years old B. platphylla forests, the soil organic carbon content in humus layer was the highest (154.8 and 154.3 g.kg-1, respectively); while under the matured and over-matured primary broad-leaved-Pinus koraiensis forests, this organic carbon content was relatively low, being 141. 8 and 133. 4 g.kg , respectively. The soil microbial biomass carbon and microbial quotient and the activities of soil cellulase, peroxidase, acid phosphatase, and cellobiase under the 50- and 80 years old B. platphylla forests were the highest, but the activity of soil polyphenol oxidase was the lowest, which revealed that under middle-aged and matured B. platphylla forests, soil organic carbon had a faster turnover rate, and was probably in a stronger accumulation phase. Statistical analysis showed that the soil microbial biomass carbon had significant positive correlations with the soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and available phosphorus (r = 0.943, 0. 963, and 0.953, respectively;

  2. Determination of spatial distributions of zinc and active biomass in microbial biofilms by two-photon laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Hidalgo, Gabriela; Houston, Paul L; Hay, Anthony G; Shuler, Michael L; Abruña, Héctor D; Ghiorse, William C; Lion, Leonard W

    2005-07-01

    The spatial distributions of zinc, a representative transition metal, and active biomass in bacterial biofilms were determined using two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM). Application of 2P-LSM permits analysis of thicker biofilms than are amenable to observation with confocal laser scanning microscopy and also provides selective excitation of a smaller focal volume with greater depth localization. Thin Escherichia coli PHL628 biofilms were grown in a minimal mineral salts medium using pyruvate as the carbon and energy source under batch conditions, and thick biofilms were grown in Luria-Bertani medium using a continuous-flow drip system. The biofilms were visualized by 2P-LSM and shown to have heterogeneous structures with dispersed dense cell clusters, rough surfaces, and void spaces. Contrary to homogeneous biofilm model predictions that active biomass would be located predominantly in the outer regions of the biofilm and inactive or dead biomass (biomass debris) in the inner regions, significant active biomass fractions were observed at all depths in biofilms (up to 350 microm) using live/dead fluorescent stains. The active fractions were dependent on biofilm thickness and are attributed to the heterogeneous characteristics of biofilm structures. A zinc-binding fluorochrome (8-hydroxy-5-dimethylsulfoamidoquinoline) was synthesized and used to visualize the spatial location of added Zn within biofilms. Zn was distributed evenly in a thin (12 microm) biofilm but was located only at the surface of thick biofilms, penetrating less than 20 microm after 1 h of exposure. The relatively slow movement of Zn into deeper biofilm layers provides direct evidence in support of the concept that thick biofilms may confer resistance to toxic metal species by binding metals at the biofilm-bulk liquid interface, thereby retarding metal diffusion into the biofilm (G. M. Teitzel and M. R. Park, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:2313-2320, 2003).

  3. Soil amendment with Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0: lasting effects on soil biological properties in soils low in microbial biomass and activity.

    PubMed

    Fliessbach, Andreas; Winkler, Manuel; Lutz, Matthias P; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Mäder, Paul

    2009-05-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains are used in agriculture as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Nontarget effects of released organisms should be analyzed prior to their large-scale use, and methods should be available to sensitively detect possible changes in the environments the organism is released to. According to ecological theory, microbial communities with a greater diversity should be less susceptible to disturbance by invading organisms. Based on this principle, we laid out a pot experiment with field-derived soils different in their microbial biomass and activity due to long-term management on similar parent geological material (loess). We investigated the survival of P. fluorescens CHA0 that carried a resistance toward rifampicin and the duration of potential changes of the soil microflora caused by the inoculation with the bacterium at the sowing date of spring wheat. Soil microbial biomass (C(mic), N(mic)) basal soil respiration (BR), qCO(2), dehydrogenase activity (DHA), bacterial plate counts, mycorrhiza root colonization, and community level substrate utilization were analyzed after 18 and 60 days. At the initial stage, soils were clearly different with respect to most of the parameters measured, and a time-dependent effect between the first and the second set point were attributable to wheat growth and the influence of roots. The effect of the inoculum was small and merely transient, though significant long-term changes were found in soils with a relatively low level of microbial biomass. Community level substrate utilization as an indicator of changes in microbial community structure was mainly changed by the growth of wheat, while other experimental factors were negligible. The sensitivity of the applied methods to distinguish the experimental soils was in decreasing order N(mic), DHA, C(mic), and qCO(2). Besides the selective enumeration of P. fluorescens CHA0 rif(+), which was only found in amended soils, methods to distinguish the

  4. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  5. The microbial biomass and its activity and structure in the soils of old forests in the European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolnikova, E. V.; Ananyeva, N. D.; Chernova, O. V.

    2011-04-01

    The humus-accumulative layer of soils (podzolic, gray, rzhavozem, burozem, and karbolitozem) of old-age forests (>60-450 years old) localized in various vegetation subzones (middle-taiga, southern taiga, subtaiga, dark coniferous forests outside the boreal region, and mountain forests) of the European part of Russia (22 sites of soil sampling of them, 13 in nature reserves and specially protected territories) was studied. The carbon content of the microbial biomass (Cmic) in the soil was determined by the substrate-induced respiration method. The fungal to bacterial ratio was determined by the selective inhibition technique with antibiotics. The basal respiration ( BR) was also measured. The BR/Cmic = qCO2 ratio and the portion of Cmic in the total organic soil carbon was determined. It was shown that the Cmic and BR in the soils of a separate vegetation subzone varied significantly; however, their values increased from the middle-taiga to dark coniferous subzone and decreased in the mountain-forest zone (348 ± 44, 670 ± 66, 1000 ± 86, 1142 ± 49, 789 ± 79 μkg C/g soil and from 0.68 ± 0.23, 1.85 ± 0.10, 2.13 ± 0.15, 1.56 ± 0.14, 0.92 ± 0.07 μkg CO2-C/soil h, respectively). The fungal component in the humus-accumulative layer of soils is 53-99% of the total Cmic; however, its absolute values increase from the middle subzone to the southern one. The Cmic pool and the total BR in the profile of some soils (mineral horizons and forest litter) were calculated.

  6. Impact of land-use and long-term (>150 years) charcoal accumulation on microbial activity, biomass and community structure in temperate soils (Belgium).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Brieuc; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Dufey, Joseph E.

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade, biochar has been increasingly investigated as a soil amendment for long-term soil carbon sequestration while improving soil fertility. On the short term, biochar application to soil generally increases soil respiration as well as microbial biomass and activity and affects significantly the microbial community structure. However, such effects are relatively short-term and tend to vanish over time. In our study, we investigated the long-term impact of charcoal accumulation and land-use on soil biota in temperate haplic Luvisols developed in the loess belt of Wallonia (Belgium). Charcoal-enriched soils were collected in the topsoil of pre-industrial (>150 years old) charcoal kilns in forest (4 sites) and cropland (5 sites). The topsoil of the adjacent charcoal-unaffected soils was sampled in a comparable way. Soils were characterized (pH, total, organic and inorganic C, total N, exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na, cation exchange capacity and available P) and natural soil organic matter (SOM) and black carbon (BC) contents were determined by differential scanning calorimetry. After rewetting at pF 2.5, soils were incubated during 140 days at 20 °C. At 70 days of incubation, 10 g of each soil were freeze dried in order to measure total microbial biomass and community structure by PLFA analysis. The PLFA dataset was analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) while soil parameters were used as supplementary variables. For both agricultural and forest soils, the respiration rate is highly related to the total microbial biomass (R²=0.90). Both soil respiration and microbial biomass greatly depend on the SOM content, which indicates that the BC pool is relatively inert microbiologically. Land-use explains most of the variance in the PLFA dataset, largely governing the first principal component of the ACP. In forest soils, we observe a larger proportion of gram + bacteria, actinomycetes and an increased bacteria:fungi ratio compared to cropland, where gram

  7. The survival strategy of the soil microbial biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Philip; Kemmitt, Sarah; Dungait, Jennifer; Xu, Jianming

    2014-05-01

    The soil microbial biomass (biomass) is defined as the sum of the masses of all soil microorganisms > 5000 µm3 (e.g. fungi, bacteria, protozoa, yeasts, actinomycetes and algae). Typically comprising about 1 to 3 % of total soil organic matter (SOM), the biomass might be though to live in a highly substrate-rich environment. However, the SOM is, normally, only exceedingly slowly available to the biomass. However the biomass can survive for months or even years on this meagre energy source. Not surprisingly, therefore, the biomass exhibits many features typical of a dormant or resting population. These include a very low rate of basal and specific respiration, a slow rate of cell division (about once every six months on average) and slow turnover rate. These are clearly adaptations to existing in an environment where substrate availability is very low. Yet, paradoxically, the biomass, in soils worldwide, has an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration (around 10 to 12 µmol ATP g-1 biomass C), and an Adenylate Energy Charge (AEC = [(ATP) + (0.5 ADP)]/[(ATP)+(ADP) + (AMP)]) which are typical of microorganisms growing exponentially in a chemostat. This sets us several questions. Firstly, under the condition of extremely limited substrate availability in soil, why does the biomass not mainly exist as spores, becoming active, by increasing both its ATP concentration and AEC, when substrate (plant and animal residues) becomes available? We surmise that a spore strategy may put organisms at a competitive disadvantage, compared to others which are prepared to invest energy, maintaining high ATP and ATP, to take advantage of a 'food event' as soon as it becomes available. Secondly, since SOM is available (although only very slowly) to the biomass, why have some groups not evolved the ability to mineralize it faster, obtain more energy, and so gain a competitive advantage? We believe that the reason why organisms do not use this strategy is, simply, that they cannot. Our

  8. Priming and turnover of soil microbial biomass C and N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voroney, Paul; Paul, Eldor

    2015-04-01

    Priming is the altered rate of mineralization of native soil organic matter (SOM) induced by an organic substrate and, depending on the nature of the amendment, can be either positive or negative. Coupled with the use of tracer (14C, 13C, 15N) techniques, measurements of the rates of CO2 evolution and organic N mineralization are typically used to assess priming effects. In this study priming was also assessed from measurements of soil microbial biomass. Soil was amended with 14C-glucose and 15N-nitrate and incubated for 42 d during which unlabelled and labelled microbial biomass C and N were measured using the chloroform-incubation method. All of the 14C-glucose was metabolized within 24-30 h at a C-use efficiency of ~60%, and resulted in a labelled biomass C:N of 9. After this period of rapid microbial growth, labelled microbial biomass C decayed at a rate of 19.3 x 10-3 d-1. Unlabelled microbial biomass C in the amended treatment decayed at 8.6 x 10-3 d-1 whereas in the unamended soil microbial biomass C decayed at half this rate (4.9 x 10-3 d-1). These data suggest that ~25% of the native microbial biomass C responded to the addition of glucose-C and when it was depleted the newly formed microbial biomass, comprised of both labelled and unlabelled- C, collapsed and subsequently was mineralized. The period of rapid microbial biomass decay coincided with an increased evolution of soil (unlabelled) CO2 and accumulation of (unlabelled) mineral N compared to that in the unamended soil. Thus, the apparent priming of soil C and N following addition of glucose can be attributed to biological recycling and increased turnover of native microbial biomass C and N. There was no evidence of priming of native soil organic matter during the first 21 days of the incubation.

  9. Microbial biomass and productivity in seagrass beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty, D. J.; Boon, P. I.; Hansen, J. A.; Hunt, W. G.; Poiner, I. R.; Pollard, P. C.; Skyring, G. W.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Different methods for measuring the rates of processes mediated by bacteria in sediments and the rates of bacterial cell production have been compared. In addition, net production of the seagrass Zostera capricorni and bacterial production have been compared and some interrelationships with the nitrogen cycle discussed. Seagrass productivity was estimated by measuring the plastochrone interval using a leaf stapling technique. The average productivity over four seasons was 1.28 +/- 0.28 g C m-2 day-1 (mean +/- standard deviation, n = 4). Bacterial productivity was measured five times throughout a year using the rate of tritiated thymidine incorporated into DNA. Average values were 33 +/- 12 mg C m-2 day-1 for sediment and 23 +/- 4 for water column (n = 5). Spatial variability between samples was greater than seasonal variation for both seagrass productivity and bacterial productivity. On one occasion, bacterial productivity was measured using the rate of 32P incorporated into phospholipid. The values were comparable to those obtained with tritiated thymidine. The rate of sulfate reduction was 10 mmol SO4(-2) m-2 day-1. The rate of methanogenesis was low, being 5.6 mg CH4 produced m-2 day-1. A comparison of C flux measured using rates of sulfate reduction and DNA synthesis indicated that anaerobic processes were predominant in these sediments. An analysis of microbial biomass and community structure, using techniques of phospholipid analysis, showed that bacteria were predominant members of the microbial biomass and that of these, strictly anaerobic bacteria were the main components. Ammonia concentration in interstitial water varied from 23 to 71 micromoles. Estimates of the amount of ammonia required by seagrass showed that the ammonia would turn over about once per day. Rapid recycling of nitrogen by bacteria and bacterial grazers is probably important.

  10. Soil microbial biomass and function are altered by 12 years of crop rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, Marshall D.; Grandy, A. Stuart

    2016-11-01

    Declines in plant diversity will likely reduce soil microbial biomass, alter microbial functions, and threaten the provisioning of soil ecosystem services. We examined whether increasing temporal plant biodiversity in agroecosystems (by rotating crops) can partially reverse these trends and enhance soil microbial biomass and function. We quantified seasonal patterns in soil microbial biomass, respiration rates, extracellular enzyme activity, and catabolic potential three times over one growing season in a 12-year crop rotation study at the W. K. Kellogg Biological Station LTER. Rotation treatments varied from one to five crops in a 3-year rotation cycle, but all soils were sampled under a corn year. We hypothesized that crop diversity would increase microbial biomass, activity, and catabolic evenness (a measure of functional diversity). Inorganic N, the stoichiometry of microbial biomass and dissolved organic C and N varied seasonally, likely reflecting fluctuations in soil resources during the growing season. Soils from biodiverse cropping systems increased microbial biomass C by 28-112 % and N by 18-58 % compared to low-diversity systems. Rotations increased potential C mineralization by as much as 53 %, and potential N mineralization by 72 %, and both were related to substantially higher hydrolase and lower oxidase enzyme activities. The catabolic potential of the soil microbial community showed no, or slightly lower, catabolic evenness in more diverse rotations. However, the catabolic potential indicated that soil microbial communities were functionally distinct, and microbes from monoculture corn preferentially used simple substrates like carboxylic acids, relative to more diverse cropping systems. By isolating plant biodiversity from differences in fertilization and tillage, our study illustrates that crop biodiversity has overarching effects on soil microbial biomass and function that last throughout the growing season. In simplified agricultural systems

  11. Influence of microbial biomass on the biodegradability of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kool, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of different types of inocula as well as the amount of inoculum (microbial biomass) on the biodegradation pattern of acetate, 4-nitrophenol, and the three methoxyaniline isomers was investigated in the Modified OECD test and a NPR guideline. Using sediment of the river Rhine as inoculum 4-nitrophenol could not be degraded, while an inoculum from garden soil gave only 60% degradation in the OECD test. Effluent of an activated sludge plant however was able to degrade 4-nitrophenol at a concentration of 19 mg/l in the OECD test completely. Testing the methoxyanilines for biodegradability it was found that at a low inoculum level (OECD protocol) no degradation of the three compounds occurred. Using activated sludge as inoculum 3- and 4-methoxyaniline could be degraded for 60% respectively completely while 2-methoxyaniline was still refractory to degradation. Measuring the microbial biomass by means of ATP during biodegradation strongly suggested that the microbial flora which rapidly metabolize acetate is quite another microflora than the microflora responsible for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol.

  12. USING DIRICHLET TESSELLATION TO HELP ESTIMATE MICROBIAL BIOMASS CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dirichlet tessellation was applied to estimate microbial concentrations from microscope well slides. The use of microscopy/Dirichlet tessellation to quantify biomass was illustrated with two species of morphologically distinct cyanobacteria, and validated empirically by compariso...

  13. Engineering microbial surfaces to degrade lignocellulosic biomass

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Grace L; Anderson, Timothy D; Clubb, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Renewable lignocellulosic plant biomass is a promising feedstock from which to produce biofuels, chemicals, and materials. One approach to cost-effectively exploit this resource is to use consolidating bioprocessing (CBP) microbes that directly convert lignocellulose into valuable end products. Because many promising CBP-enabling microbes are non-cellulolytic, recent work has sought to engineer them to display multi-cellulase containing minicellulosomes that hydrolyze biomass more efficiently than isolated enzymes. In this review, we discuss progress in engineering the surfaces of the model microorganisms: Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We compare the distinct approaches used to display cellulases and minicellulosomes, as well as their surface enzyme densities and cellulolytic activities. Thus far, minicellulosomes have only been grafted onto the surfaces of B. subtilis and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that the absence of an outer membrane in fungi and Gram-positive bacteria may make their surfaces better suited for displaying the elaborate multi-enzyme complexes needed to efficiently degrade lignocellulose. PMID:24430239

  14. Microbial biomass as a significant source of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltner, Anja; Kindler, Reimo; Schweigert, Michael; Achtenhagen, Jan; Bombach, Petra; Fester, Thomas; Kästner, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role for soil fertility and in the global carbon cycle. SOM management should be based on knowledge about the chemical composition as well as the spatial distribution of SOM and its individual components in soils. Both parameters strongly depend on the direct precursors of SOM. In the past, microbial biomass has been neglected as a potential source of SOM, mainly because of its small pool size. Recent studies, however, show that a substantial portion of SOM is derived from microbial biomass residues. We therefore investigated the fate of microbial biomass residues in soils by means of incubation experiments with 13C-labelled microbial biomass. For our studies, we selected model organisms representing the three types of soil microorganisms and their characteristic cell wall structures: Escherichia coli (a Gram-negative bacterium), Bacillus subtilis (a Gram-positive bacterium) and Laccaria bicolor (an ectomycorrhizal fungus). We labelled the organisms by growing them on 13C glucose and incubated them in soil. During incubation, we followed the mineralisation of the labelled C, its incorporation into microbial biomass, and its transformation to non-living SOM. We found that 50-65% of the microbial biomass C remained in the soil during incubation. However, only a small part remained in the microbial biomass, the majority was transformed to SOM. In particular, proteins seemed to be rather stable in our experiments. In addition, we used scanning electron microscopy to identify microbial residues in soils and, for comparison, in artificial groundwater microcosms. Scanning electron micrographs showed a low number of intact cells, but mainly fragments of about 200-500 nm size. Similar fragments were found in artificial groundwater microcosms where the only possible origin was microbial biomass residues. Based on the results obtained, we provide a mechanistic model which explains how microbial biomass residues are formed and

  15. [Biomass energy utilization in microbial fuel cells: potentials and challenges].

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Cheng, Shaoan

    2010-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that can harvest biomass energy from organic wastes through microbial catalysis have garnered more and more attention within the past decade due to its potential benefits to ecological environment. In this article, the updated progress in MFCs is reviewed, with a focus on frontier technologies such as chamber configurations, feedstock varieties and the integration of MFCs with microbial electrolysis cells for hydrogen production. And on the other hand, the challenges like development of cost-effective electrode materials, improvement of biomass energy recovery and power output, design and optimization of commercial MFC devices are presented.

  16. DNA-based determination of microbial biomass suitable for frozen and alkaline soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Blagodatskaya, Evgeniya; Kogut, Boris; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    estimation of microbial biomass in geographically widespread soils after their freezing. The DNA-based approach can also be applied to calculate eco-physiological indexes, e.g. Cmic:Corg ratio. The DNA-Cmic revealed that although the absolute values of microbial biomass in Chernozem were expectedly higher than in Calcisol, the Cmic:Corg ratio was greater in Calcisol versus Chernozem. Therefore, Chernozems can be characterized by a low proportion of microbiologically active C in total Corg. DNA-based determination of Cmic and Cmic:Corg ratios revealed that agrogenic impact does not always lead to negative consequences for soil status and cannot be considered as a solely negative phenomenon.

  17. Microbial activity balance in size fractionated suspended growth biomass from full-scale sidestream combined nitritation-anammox reactors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yijing; Wells, George; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance, distribution and activity of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anammox in size fractionated aggregates from full-scale suspended growth combined nitritation-anammox sidestream reactors. Plants with or without a cyclone device were also studied to assess a purported enrichment of anammox granules. Specific aerobic ammonium oxidation rates (p=0.01) and specific oxygen uptake rates (p=0.02) were significantly greater in flocs than in granules. AOB abundance measured using quantitative FISH was significantly higher in flocs than in granules (p=0.01). Conversely, anammox abundance was significantly greater in granules (p=0.03). The average ratio of anammox/AOB in systems employing hydrocyclone separation devices was 2.4, significantly higher (p=0.02) than the average ratio (0.5) in a system without a hydrocyclone. Our results demonstrate substantial functional and population-level segregation between floccular and granular fractions, and provide a key corroboration that cyclone separation devices can increase anammox levels in such systems.

  18. Measures of Microbial Biomass for Soil Carbon Decomposition Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, M. A.; Dabbs, J.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schadt, C. W.; Kluber, L. A.; Wang, G.; Jagadamma, S.

    2014-12-01

    Explicit parameterization of the decomposition of plant inputs and soil organic matter by microbes is becoming more widely accepted in models of various complexity, ranging from detailed process models to global-scale earth system models. While there are multiple ways to measure microbial biomass, chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE) is commonly used to parameterize models.. However CFE is labor- and time-intensive, requires toxic chemicals, and it provides no specific information about the composition or function of the microbial community. We investigated correlations between measures of: CFE; DNA extraction yield; QPCR base-gene copy numbers for Bacteria, Fungi and Archaea; phospholipid fatty acid analysis; and direct cell counts to determine the potential for use as proxies for microbial biomass. As our ultimate goal is to develop a reliable, more informative, and faster methods to predict microbial biomass for use in models, we also examined basic soil physiochemical characteristics including texture, organic matter content, pH, etc. to identify multi-factor predictive correlations with one or more measures of the microbial community. Our work will have application to both microbial ecology studies and the next generation of process and earth system models.

  19. Microbial conversion of biomass to methane

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory studies have investigated the anaerobic digestion of a variety of feedstocks including sea kelp, water hyacinth, terrestrial herbaceous and woody plants, sewage sludge, municipal solid waste, and biomass-organic waste blends. The results of these and other studies are used to illustrate key factors which influence methane production rates and yields, including feed organic composition, nutrients, inoculum, temperature, retention time, feed concentration, particle size, and mixing. A new process recently developed which combines biological and thermal operations for conversion of biomass to substitute natural gas is described.

  20. Soil microbial biomass nitrogen and Beta-Glucosaminidase activity response to compaction, poultry litter application and cropping in a claypan soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compaction-induced changes in soil physical properties may significantly affect soil microbial activity, especially nitrogen-cycling processes, in many agroecosystems. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of soil compaction on soil microbiological properties related to N in a clay...

  1. Global Distribution of Microbial Abundance and Biomass in Subseafloor Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, J.; Pockalny, R. A.; Adhikari, R. R.; Smith, D. C.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Previously published cell counts were mostly from ocean margins and the eastern equatorial Pacific. Cell counts from these environments are generally similar from site to site and decrease logarithmically with sediment depth, although there can be sharp peaks of high cell densities in zones of anaerobic methane-oxidation. Recent counts from the South Pacific Gyre and the North Pacific Gyre are several orders of magnitude lower and show a more rapid decrease with depth than all previously published datasets. With these new data available, total microbial cell abundance in subseafloor sediment varies between sites by ca. five orders of magnitude. The differences between cell counts from ocean margins and upwelling areas and cell counts from oceanic gyres raise three questions. First, how does the abundance of microbes in subseafloor sediment vary throughout the world ocean? Second, what property or properties are likely to control that variation? Third, how does this variation affect estimates of total subseafloor sedimentary biomass and Earth's total biomass? To address these questions, we compiled our cell counts from the South Pacific Gyre, the North Pacific Gyre and the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean with previously published counts and parameterized the cell distribution at each site and determined two parameters, (i) cell concentration at 1 mbsf and (ii) rate of decrease in cell counts with depth. Both parameters are strongly correlated with mean sedimentation rate and distance to shore. Based on these correlations, we estimate global subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance to be 2.9*1029 cells (corresponding to 4.1 Pg C and ~0.6% of Earth's total living biomass). This estimate of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance is roughly equal to previous estimates of total microbial abundance in seawater and total microbial abundance in soil. It is much lower than previous estimates of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance. In consequence, we estimate

  2. Competitive adsorption of organic compounds by microbial biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Selvakumar, A.; Hsieh, H.N. )

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of competitive adsorption of liquid organic compounds on inactive microbial biomass in bisolute solution systems. Phenol-nitrophenol, phenol-chlorophenol, nitrophenol-chlorophenol, and chlorobenzene-ethylbenzene systems were selected for the analysis. The experimental results suggest that although the amount of each solute adsorbed on the biomass can be reduced significantly by the presence of a second solute, the combined adsorptive capacity was greater than that for either of the individual substances from its pure solution. The octanol/water partition coefficient(K{sub ow}) indicates the relative extent of adsorption better than the aqueous solubility(S).

  3. Changes in enzymatic activities and microbial properties in vermicompost of water hyacinth as affected by pre-composting and fungal inoculation: a comparative study of ergosterol and chitin for estimating fungal biomass.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, P

    2010-01-01

    In this experiment, three different fungal species, viz. Trichoderma viridae, Aspergillus niger and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, were inoculated in 7 day and 15 day partially decomposed water hyacinth to study their effect on enzymatic activities, microbial respiration and fungal biomass of the final stabilized product. The results suggested that increasing the duration of pre-composting from 7 days to 15 days did not show any significant effect on the activities of hydrolytic enzymes. Inoculation of fungi significantly (P < or = 0.05) increased cellulase, protease and acid and alkaline phosphatase activities. The highest value of ergosterol was recorded in A. niger-inoculated vermicomposts. Inoculation of P. chrysosporium in initial organic waste registered the highest chitin content in vermicompost. A comparison of fungal biomass and chitin content revealed a conversion factor of 2.628 with a standard deviation of 0.318. Due to significant correlation (r = 0.864), this conversion factor allows for the calculation of fungal biomass from chitin, which is comparatively more stable than ergosterol.

  4. Microbial respiration per unit microbial biomass increases with carbon-to-nutrient ratios in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, Marie; Chodak, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    The ratio of carbon-to-nutrient in forest floors is usually much higher than the ratio of carbon-to-nutrient that soil microorganisms require for their nutrition. In order to understand how this mismatch affects carbon cycling, the respiration rate per unit soil microbial biomass carbon - the metabolic quotient (qCO2) - was studied. This was done in a field study (Spohn and Chodak, 2015) and in a meta-analysis of published data (Spohn, 2014). Cores of beech, spruce, and mixed spruce-beech forest soils were cut into slices of 1 cm from the top of the litter layer down to 5 cm in the mineral soil, and the relationship between the qCO2 and the soil carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) and the soil carbon-to-phosphorus (C:P) ratio was analyzed. We found that the qCO2 was positively correlated with soil C:N ratio in spruce soils (R = 0.72), and with the soil C:P ratio in beech (R = 0.93), spruce (R = 0.80) and mixed forest soils (R = 0.96). We also observed a close correlation between the qCO2 and the soil C concentration in all three forest types. Yet, the qCO2 decreased less with depth than the C concentration in all three forest types, suggesting that the change in qCO2 is not only controlled by the soil C concentration. We conclude that microorganisms increase their respiration rate per unit biomass with increasing soil C:P ratio and C concentration, which adjusts the substrate to their nutritional demands in terms of stoichiometry. In an analysis of literature data, I tested the effect of the C:N ratio of soil litter layers on microbial respiration in absolute terms and per unit microbial biomass C. For this purpose, a global dataset on the microbial respiration rate per unit microbial biomass C - termed the metabolic quotient (qCO2) - was compiled form literature data. It was found that the qCO2 in the soil litter layers was positively correlated with the litter C:N ratio and negatively related with the litter nitrogen (N) concentration. The positive relation between the qCO2

  5. Microbial biomass dynamics dominate N cycle responses to warming in a sub-arctic peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedon, J. T.; Aerts, R.; Kowalchuk, G. K.; van Bodegom, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    The balance of primary production and decomposition in sub-arctic peatlands may shift with climate change. Nitrogen availability will modulate this shift, but little is known about the drivers of soil nitrogen dynamics in these environments, and how they are influenced by rising soil temperatures. We used a long-term open top chamber warming experiment in Abisko, Sweden, to test for the interactive effects of spring warming, summer warming and winter snow addition on soil organic and inorganic nitrogen fluxes, potential activities of carbon and nitrogen cycle enzymes, and the structure of the soil-borne microbial communities. Summer warming increased the flux of soil organic nitrogen over the growing season, while simultaneously causing a seasonal decrease in microbial biomass, suggesting that N flux is driven by large late-season dieback of microbes. This change in N cycle dynamics was not reflected in any of the measured potential enzyme activities. Moreover, the soil microbial community structure was stable across treatments, suggesting non-specific microbial dieback. To further test whether the observed patterns were driven by direct temperature effects or indirect effects (via microbial biomass dynamics), we conducted follow-up controlled experiments in soil mesocosms. Experimental additions of dead microbial cells had stronger effects on N pool sizes and enzyme activities than either plant litter addition or a 5 °C alteration in incubation temperatures. Peat respiration was positively affected by both substrate addition and higher incubation temperatures, but the temperature-only effect was not sufficient to account for the increases in respiration observed in previous field experiments. We conclude that warming effects on peatland N cycling (and to some extent C cycling) are dominated by indirect effects, acting through alterations to the seasonal flux of microbe-derived organic matter. We propose that climate change models of soil carbon and nitrogen

  6. [Effects of land use pattern on soil microbial biomass carbon in Xishuangbanna].

    PubMed

    Fang, Li-na; Yang, Xiao-dong; Du, Jie

    2011-04-01

    In January 2006 - September 2007, a controlled litter-removal and root-cutting experiment was conducted to study the effects of different land use patterns (secondary forest or rubber plantation) on soil microbial biomass carbon in Xishuangbanna, China. After the secondary forest converted into rubber plantation, soil nutrient contents and plant carbon input decreased obviously, and soil microbial biomass carbon had a significant decrease. These two forest types had a higher soil microbial biomass carbon in rainy season than in dry season. In secondary forest, soil microbial biomass carbon was significantly positively correlated with soil temperature; while in rubber plantation, the microbial biomass carbon was positively correlated with soil moisture. In secondary forest, soil microbial biomass carbon was controlled by the nutrient inputs from plant roots, but less affected by litter amount. Also in secondary forest, soil microbial biomass carbon was significantly positively correlated with fine-root biomass and its C and N inputs. In rubber plantation, both the fine-root biomass and its C and N inputs and the litter amount had lesser effects on soil microbial biomass carbon. These results suggested that planting rubber induced the decreases of soil nutrient contents and pH value, and, added with serious artificial disturbances, reduced the soil microbial biomass carbon and changed its controlling factors, which in turn would affect other soil ecological processes.

  7. De novo prediction of the genomic components and capabilities for microbial plant biomass degradation from (meta-)genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the biological mechanisms used by microorganisms for plant biomass degradation is of considerable biotechnological interest. Despite of the growing number of sequenced (meta)genomes of plant biomass-degrading microbes, there is currently no technique for the systematic determination of the genomic components of this process from these data. Results We describe a computational method for the discovery of the protein domains and CAZy families involved in microbial plant biomass degradation. Our method furthermore accurately predicts the capability to degrade plant biomass for microbial species from their genome sequences. Application to a large, manually curated data set of microbial degraders and non-degraders identified gene families of enzymes known by physiological and biochemical tests to be implicated in cellulose degradation, such as GH5 and GH6. Additionally, genes of enzymes that degrade other plant polysaccharides, such as hemicellulose, pectins and oligosaccharides, were found, as well as gene families which have not previously been related to the process. For draft genomes reconstructed from a cow rumen metagenome our method predicted Bacteroidetes-affiliated species and a relative to a known plant biomass degrader to be plant biomass degraders. This was supported by the presence of genes encoding enzymatically active glycoside hydrolases in these genomes. Conclusions Our results show the potential of the method for generating novel insights into microbial plant biomass degradation from (meta-)genome data, where there is an increasing production of genome assemblages for uncultured microbes. PMID:23414703

  8. Microbial activities in deep subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, T.J.; Raione, E.G.; White, D.C. |; Fliermans, C.B.

    1988-12-31

    Activities of microorganisms residing in terrestrial deep subsurface sediments were examined in forty-six sediment samples from three aseptically sampled boreholes. Radiolabeled time course experiments assessing in situ microbial activities were initiated within 30 minutes of core recovery. [{sup 14}C-1-] Acetate incorporation into lipids. [methyl-{sup 3}H-]thymidine incorporation into DNA, [{sup 14}C-2-]acetate and [{sup 14}C-U-]glucose mineralization in addition to microbial enrichment and enumeration studies were examined in surface and subsurface sediments. Surface soils contained the greatest biomass and activities followed by the shallow aquifer zones. Water saturated subsurface sediments exhibited three to four orders of magnitude greater activity and culturable microorganisms than the dense clay zones. Regardless of depth, sediments which contained more than 20% clays exhibited the lowest activities and culturable microorganisms.

  9. A survey of Opportunities for Microbial Conversion of Biomass to Hydrocarbon Compatible Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, Iva; Jones, Susanne B.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Dai, Ziyu; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2010-09-01

    Biomass is uniquely able to supply renewable and sustainable liquid transportation fuels. In the near term, the Biomass program has a 2012 goal of cost competitive cellulosic ethanol. However, beyond 2012, there will be an increasing need to provide liquid transportation fuels that are more compatible with the existing infrastructure and can supply fuel into all transportation sectors, including aviation and heavy road transport. Microbial organisms are capable of producing a wide variety of fuel and fuel precursors such as higher alcohols, ethers, esters, fatty acids, alkenes and alkanes. This report surveys liquid fuels and fuel precurors that can be produced from microbial processes, but are not yet ready for commercialization using cellulosic feedstocks. Organisms, current research and commercial activities, and economics are addressed. Significant improvements to yields and process intensification are needed to make these routes economic. Specifically, high productivity, titer and efficient conversion are the key factors for success.

  10. Plant diversity drives soil microbial biomass carbon in grasslands irrespective of global environmental change factors.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Madhav Prakash; Milcu, Alexandru; Manning, Pete; Niklaus, Pascal A; Roscher, Christiane; Power, Sally; Reich, Peter B; Scheu, Stefan; Tilman, David; Ai, Fuxun; Guo, Hongyan; Ji, Rong; Pierce, Sarah; Ramirez, Nathaly Guerrero; Richter, Annabell Nicola; Steinauer, Katja; Strecker, Tanja; Vogel, Anja; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-11-01

    Soil microbial biomass is a key determinant of carbon dynamics in the soil. Several studies have shown that soil microbial biomass significantly increases with plant species diversity, but it remains unclear whether plant species diversity can also stabilize soil microbial biomass in a changing environment. This question is particularly relevant as many global environmental change (GEC) factors, such as drought and nutrient enrichment, have been shown to reduce soil microbial biomass. Experiments with orthogonal manipulations of plant diversity and GEC factors can provide insights whether plant diversity can attenuate such detrimental effects on soil microbial biomass. Here, we present the analysis of 12 different studies with 14 unique orthogonal plant diversity × GEC manipulations in grasslands, where plant diversity and at least one GEC factor (elevated CO2 , nutrient enrichment, drought, earthworm presence, or warming) were manipulated. Our results show that higher plant diversity significantly enhances soil microbial biomass with the strongest effects in long-term field experiments. In contrast, GEC factors had inconsistent effects with only drought having a significant negative effect. Importantly, we report consistent non-significant effects for all 14 interactions between plant diversity and GEC factors, which indicates a limited potential of plant diversity to attenuate the effects of GEC factors on soil microbial biomass. We highlight that plant diversity is a major determinant of soil microbial biomass in experimental grasslands that can influence soil carbon dynamics irrespective of GEC.

  11. Microbial biomass in compost during colonization of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Vos, Aurin M; Heijboer, Amber; Boschker, Henricus T S; Bonnet, Barbara; Lugones, Luis G; Wösten, Han A B

    2017-12-01

    Agaricus bisporus mushrooms are commercially produced on a microbe rich compost. Here, fungal and bacterial biomass was quantified in compost with and without colonization by A. bisporus. Chitin content, indicative of total fungal biomass, increased during a 26-day period from 576 to 779 nmol N-acetylglucosamine g(-1) compost in the absence of A. bisporus (negative control). A similar increase was found in the presence of this mushroom forming fungus. The fungal phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA) marker C18:2ω6, indicative of the living fraction of the fungal biomass, decreased from 575 to 280 nmol g(-1) compost in the negative control. In contrast, it increased to 1200 nmol g(-1) compost in the presence of A. bisporus. Laccase activity was absent throughout culturing in the negative control, while it correlated with the fungal PLFA marker in the presence of A. bisporus. PLFA was also used to quantify living bacterial biomass. In the negative control, the bacterial markers remained constant at 3000-3200 nmol PLFA g(-1) compost. In contrast, they decreased to 850 nmol g(-1) compost during vegetative growth of A. bisporus, implying that bacterial biomass decreased from 17.7 to 4.7 mg g(-1) compost. The relative amount of the Gram positive associated PLFA markers a15:0 and a17:0 and the Gram negative PLFA associated markers cy17:0 and cy19:0 increased and decreased, respectively, suggesting that Gram negative bacteria are more suppressed by A. bisporus. Together, these data indicate that fungal biomass can make up 6.8% of the compost after A. bisporus colonization, 57% of which being dead. Moreover, results show that A. bisporus impacts biomass and composition of bacteria in compost.

  12. A meta-analysis of soil microbial biomass responses to forest disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Sandra R.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming is likely to increase the frequency and severity of forest disturbances, with uncertain consequences for soil microbial communities and their contribution to ecosystem C dynamics. To address this uncertainty, we conducted a meta-analysis of 139 published soil microbial responses to forest disturbances. These disturbances included abiotic (fire, harvesting, storm) and biotic (insect, pathogen) disturbances. We hypothesized that soil microbial biomass would decline following forest disturbances, but that abiotic disturbances would elicit greater reductions in microbial biomass than biotic disturbances. In support of this hypothesis, across all published studies, disturbances reduced soil microbial biomass by an average of 29.4%. However, microbial responses differed between abiotic and biotic disturbances. Microbial responses were significantly negative following fires, harvest, and storms (48.7, 19.1, and 41.7% reductions in microbial biomass, respectively). In contrast, changes in soil microbial biomass following insect infestation and pathogen-induced tree mortality were non-significant, although biotic disturbances were poorly represented in the literature. When measured separately, fungal and bacterial responses to disturbances mirrored the response of the microbial community as a whole. Changes in microbial abundance following disturbance were significantly positively correlated with changes in microbial respiration. We propose that the differential effect of abiotic and biotic disturbances on microbial biomass may be attributable to differences in soil disruption and organic C removal from forests among disturbance types. Altogether, these results suggest that abiotic forest disturbances may significantly decrease soil microbial abundance, with corresponding consequences for microbial respiration. Further studies are needed on the effect of biotic disturbances on forest soil microbial communities and soil C dynamics. PMID:23801985

  13. Relationships between bacterial diversity, microbial biomass, and litter quality in soils under different plant covers in northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ndaw, S M; Gama-Rodrigues, A C; Gama-Rodrigues, E F; Sales, K R N; Rosado, A S

    2009-09-01

    Microbial populations are primarily responsible for the decomposition of organic residues, the nutrients cycle, and the flow of energy inside of soil. The present study was undertaken to link soil microbiological and soil biochemical parameters with soil- and litter-quality conditions in the surface layer from 5 sites differing in plant cover, in stand age, and in land-use history. The aim was to see how strongly these differences affect the soil microbial attributes and to identify how microbiological processes and structures can be influenced by soil and litter quality. Soil and litter samples were collected from 5 sites according to different land use: preserved forest, nonpreserved forest, secondary forest, pasture, and eucalyptus plantation. Soil and litter microbial biomass and activity were analysed and DNA was extracted from soil. The DNA concentrations and soil microbial C and N correlated positively and significantly, suggesting that these are decisive nutrients for microbial growth and time required for microbial biomass renewal. The litter microbial biomass represented a source of C and N higher than soil microbial biomass and can be an important layer to contribute to tropical soil with low C and N availability. The litter quality influenced the litter and soil microbial biomass and activity and the soil bacterial diversity. The chemical and nutritional quality of the litter influenced the structure and microbial community composition in the eucalyptus plantation.

  14. Analysis of Low-Biomass Microbial Communities in the Deep Biosphere.

    PubMed

    Morono, Y; Inagaki, F

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the subseafloor biosphere has been explored by scientific ocean drilling to depths of about 2.5km below the seafloor. Although organic-rich anaerobic sedimentary habitats in the ocean margins harbor large numbers of microbial cells, microbial populations in ultraoligotrophic aerobic sedimentary habitats in the open ocean gyres are several orders of magnitude less abundant. Despite advances in cultivation-independent molecular ecological techniques, exploring the low-biomass environment remains technologically challenging, especially in the deep subseafloor biosphere. Reviewing the historical background of deep-biosphere analytical methods, the importance of obtaining clean samples and tracing contamination, as well as methods for detecting microbial life, technological aspects of molecular microbiology, and detecting subseafloor metabolic activity will be discussed.

  15. Field and lab conditions alter microbial enzyme and biomass dynamics driving decomposition of the same leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Rinkes, Zachary L; Sinsabaugh, Robert L; Moorhead, Daryl L; Grandy, A Stuart; Weintraub, Michael N

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in climate and edaphic factors influence field decomposition rates and preclude a complete understanding of how microbial communities respond to plant litter quality. In contrast, laboratory microcosms isolate the intrinsic effects of litter chemistry and microbial community from extrinsic effects of environmental variation. Used together, these paired approaches provide mechanistic insights to decomposition processes. In order to elucidate the microbial mechanisms underlying how environmental conditions alter the trajectory of decay, we characterized microbial biomass, respiration, enzyme activities, and nutrient dynamics during early (<10% mass loss), mid- (10-40% mass loss), and late (>40% mass loss) decay in parallel field and laboratory litter bag incubations for deciduous tree litters with varying recalcitrance (dogwood < maple < maple-oak mixture < oak). In the field, mass loss was minimal (<10%) over the first 50 days (January-February), even for labile litter types, despite above-freezing soil temperatures and adequate moisture during these winter months. In contrast, microcosms displayed high C mineralization rates in the first week. During mid-decay, the labile dogwood and maple litters in the field had higher mass loss per unit enzyme activity than the lab, possibly due to leaching of soluble compounds. Microbial biomass to litter mass (B:C) ratios peaked in the field during late decay, but B:C ratios declined between mid- and late decay in the lab. Thus, microbial biomass did not have a consistent relationship with litter quality between studies. Higher oxidative enzyme activities in oak litters in the field, and higher nitrogen (N) accumulation in the lab microcosms occurred in late decay. We speculate that elevated N suppressed fungal activity and/or biomass in microcosms. Our results suggest that differences in microbial biomass and enzyme dynamics alter the decay trajectory of the same leaf litter under field and lab conditions.

  16. [Effects of forest floor litter and nitrogen addition on soil microbial biomass C and N and microbial activity in a mixed Pinus tabulaeformis and Quercus liaotungensis forest stand in Shanxi Province of China].

    PubMed

    Tu, Yu; You, Ye-Ming; Sun, Jian-Xin

    2012-09-01

    From September 2010 to October 2011, a field experiment with randomized block design was conducted in a mixed Pinus tabulaeformis and Quercus liaotungensis forest stand in Lingkong Mountain of Shanxi Province to study the effects of forest floor litter and nitrogen addition on the soil microbial carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) and microbial activity (MR). The litter treatments included complete litter removal, doubling of leaf litter (L), doubling of woody litter (B), and doubling of mixed leaf and woody litter (LB), and the nitrogen addition rates were 0 (N0), 5 g x m(-2) x yr(-1) (N1), and 10 g x m(-2) x yr(-1) (N2). Except that the treatment of complete litter removal without nitrogen addition decreased the soil organic carbon content significantly, all the other treatments had no significant differences in the effects on soil organic carbon. The soil MBC, MBN, and MR varied in the ranges of 262.42-873.16 mg x kg(-1), 73.55-173.85 mg x kg(-1), and 2.38-3.68 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively, and the MBC and MBN had significant positive correlations with the MR. Nitrogen addition did not show any effect on the MBC, MBN, and MR, whereas litter treatments affected the MR significantly, with the highest MR in treatment LB, followed by treatments L and B, and the lowest in treatment of complete litter removal. There were no interactive effects between litter and nitrogen addition treatments on any of the variables studied. It was suggested that short-term nitrogen addition and forest floor litter change could have limited effects on soil microbial processes.

  17. Passive methods for quantifying the In Situ Flux of Water, Uranium, and Microbial Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. A.; Peacock, A.; Hatfield, K.; Stucker, V.; Cho, J.; Klammler, H.; Ranville, J. F.; Cabaniss, S.; Annable, M. D.; Perminova, I.

    2011-12-01

    /d and 183 mg/d respectively. The uranium flux measured by the PFM sensor and Biomass fluxes estimated from BMLS data and PFM water fluxes will be used to characterize microbial community and active biomass at synonymous wells in order to quantify spatial changes in uranium flux and field-scale rates of uranium attenuation (ambient and stimulated).

  18. Conversion of henequen pulp to microbial biomass by submerged fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Blancas, A.; Alpizar, L.; Larios, G.; Saval, S.; Huitron, C.

    1982-01-01

    Mexico has cellulosic by-products that could be developed as renewable food sources for animal consumption. Sugarcane bagasse and henequen pulp are the most important of these materials because they are abundant, cheap, renewable, and nontoxic, in addition to being underutilized. A significant research and development effort has centered on the production of single-cell protein from sugarcane begasse. Nevertheless, there are no large-scale processes that utilize this substrate as a source of carbon, probably because of the extensive physical or chemical pretreatment that is needed. Henequen pulp is a by-product which is obtained in large amounts in southeastern Mexico in the process of removing fibers from the leaves of agave (sisal). A group has been working on a fermentative process that will increase the protein content of the henequen pulp by microbial conversion. The primary aim is to carry out the conversion without chemical pretreatment of the substrate and without a separation step for cells and residual substrate. A gram-negative cellulolytic bacteria has been isolated which grows well on microcrystalline cellulose, pectin, and xylane and it is able to convert an appreciable fraction of henequen pulp to microbial biomass. In this article, some results on the effect of substrate and nitrogen source concentration, on the protein enrichment of the henequen pulp, as well as the content of essential amino acids of fermented henequen pulp are presented. 4 figures.

  19. Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gangsheng; Mayes, Melanie; Gu, Lianhong; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2014-01-01

    Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

  20. Overview of IEA biomass combustion activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hustad, J. E.

    1994-07-01

    The objectives of the International Energy Agency (IEA) bioenergy program are: (1) to encourage cooperative research, development and use of energy and the increased utilization of alternatives to oil; and (2) to establish increased program and project cooperation between participants in the whole field of bioenergy. There are four Task Annexes to the Implementing Agreement during the period 1992-1994: Efficient and Environmentally Sound Biomass Production Systems; Harvesting and Supply of Woody Biomass for Energy; Biomass Utilization; and Conversion of Municipal Solid Waste Feedstock to Energy. The report describes the following biomass combustion activities during the period 1992-1994: Round robin test of a wood stove; Emissions from biomass combustion; A pilot project cofiring biomass with oil to reduce SO2 emissions; Small scale biomass chip handling; Energy from contaminated wood waste combustion; Modeling of biomass combustion; Wood chip cogeneration; Combustion of wet biomass feedstocks, ash reinjection and carbon burnout; Oxidation of wet biomass; Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances; Characterization of biomass fuels and ashes; Measurement techniques (FTIR).

  1. Do climate factors govern soil microbial community composition and biomass at a regional scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Guo, C.; Lü, X.; Yuan, S.; Wang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Soil microbial communities play important role in organic matter decomposition, nutrient cycling and vegetation dynamic. However, little is known about factors driving soil microbial community composition at large scales. The objective of this study was to determine whether climate dominates among environmental factors governing microbial community composition and biomass at a regional scale. Here, we compared soil microbial communities using phospholipid fatty acid method across 7 land use types from 23 locations in North-East China Transect (850 km x 50 km). The results showed that soil water availability and land use changes exhibited the dominant effects on soil microbial community composition and biomass at the regional scale, while climate factors (expressed as a function of large-scale spatial variation) did not show strong relationships with distribution of microbial community composition. Likewise, factors such as spatial structure, soil texture, nutrient availability and vegetation types were not important. Wetter soils had higher contributions of gram-positive bacteria, whereas drier soils had higher contributions of gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Heavily disturbed soils had lower contributions of gram-negative bacteria and fungi than historically disturbed and undisturbed soils. The lowest microbial biomass appeared in the wettest and driest soils. In conclusion, dominant climate factors, commonly known to structure distribution of macroorganisms, were not the most important drivers governing regional pattern of microbial communities because of inclusion of irrigated and managed practices. In comparison, soil water regime and land use types appear to be primary determinants of microbial community composition and biomass.

  2. A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Thornton, Peter E; Post, Wilfred M

    2013-01-01

    Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

  3. Culture Independent Geochemical Tools for Adressing Microbial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomstein, B. A.; Langerhuus, A. T.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Alperin, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Decades of ocean drilling have demonstrated wide-spread microbial life in deep sub-seafloor sediment, and surprisingly high numbers of microbial cells and endospores. Despite the ubiquity of life in the deep biosphere, the large community sizes are not yet understood given the extremely low energy fluxes. We have developed and applied new approaches to the deep sub-seafloor to quantify distributions and turnover times of living microbial biomass, endospores and microbial necromass. The approach combines sensitive analyses of unique bacterial marker molecules (muramic acid and d-amino acids) and the bacterial endospore marker (dipicolinic acid) with a series of models that link microscopic (e.g., racemization dynamics of stereo-isomeric amino acids) and macroscopic (e.g., porewater geochemistry) properties. Model output includes production rates and turnover times of microbial biomass and necromass, concentration profiles of reactive organic carbon, and rates of organic carbon decomposition. In combination, these results allow us to assess the role of microbial activity in the sub-seafloor carbon budget. One key result is that the turnover time of biomass is far longer than turnover times found in cultures and active surface sediments.

  4. [Effects of different straw recycling and tillage methods on soil respiration and microbial activity].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-sha; Wu, Ning; Liu, Ling; Feng, Yu-peng; Xu, Xu; Han, Hui-fang; Ning, Tang-yuan; Li, Zeng-jia

    2015-06-01

    To explore the effects of different tillage methods and straw recycling on soil respiration and microbial activity in summer maize field during the winter wheat and summer maize double cropping system, substrate induced respiration method and CO2 release method were used to determine soil microbial biomass carbon, microbial activity, soil respiration, and microbial respiratory quotient. The experiment included 3 tillage methods during the winter wheat growing season, i.e., no-tillage, subsoiling and conventional tillage. Each tillage method was companied with 2 straw management patterns, i.e., straw recycling and no straw. The results indicated that the conservation tillage methods and straw recycling mainly affected 0-10 cm soil layer. Straw recycling could significantly improve the microbial biomass carbon and microbial activity, while decrease microbial respiratory quotient. Straw recycling could improve the soil respiration at both seedling stage and anthesis, however, it could reduce the soil respiration at filling stage, wax ripeness, and harvest stage. Under the same straw application, compared with conventional tillage, the soil respiration and microbial respiratory quotient in both subsoiling and no-tillage were reduced, while the microbial biomass carbon and microbial activity were increased. During the summer maize growing season, soil microbial biomass carbon and microbial activity were increased in straw returning with conservation tillage, while the respiratory quotient was reduced. In 0-10 cm soil layer, compared with conventional tillage, straw recycling with subsoiling and no-tillage significantly increased soil microbial biomass carbon by 95.8% and 74.3%, and increased soil microbial activity by 97.1% and 74.2%, respectively.

  5. Microbial enzyme and biomass responses: Deciphering the effects of earthworms and seasonal variation on treating excess sludge.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojie; Xing, Meiyan; Wang, Yin; Xu, Zhe; Yang, Jian

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on a seasonal pattern comparison of microbial enzymatic activities and biomass responses based on a conventional biofilter (BF, without earthworm) and a vermifilter (VF, with earthworm, Eisenia fetida) for excess sludge treatment. The volatile suspended solids (VSS) reduction, viable cell number and enzyme activities were assayed to probe what made the VF operate stably. The results indicated that the earthworm activities can polish the VSS reduction with 27.17% more than the BF. Though the VF had a lower level in the viable cell number compared with the BF, the earthworm strongly improved the microbial enzymatic activities such as INT-dehydrogenase, protease, β-glucosidase and amylase, which can explain the excellent performance of VSS reduction. The correlation analysis documented that the VSS reduction was positively correlated with microbial enzyme activities. More importantly, the earthworm enabled the VF to avoid the detrimental influence of temperature, which guaranteed a stable performance during seasonal variations.

  6. Operational performance, biomass and microbial community structure: impacts of backwashing on drinking water biofilter.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaobin; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Jingxu; Dai, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojian; Xie, Shuguang

    2015-01-01

    Biofiltration has been widely used to reduce organic matter and control the formation of disinfection by-products in drinking water. Backwashing might affect the biofilters' performance and the attached microbiota on filter medium. In this study, the impacts of backwashing on the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and N-nitrosamine precursors by a pilot-scale biological activated carbon (BAC) filtration system were investigated. The impacts of backwashing on biomass and microbial community structure of BAC biofilm were also investigated. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis showed that backwashing reduced nearly half of the attached biomass on granular activated carbon (GAC) particles, followed by a recovery to the pre-backwashing biomass concentration in 2 days after backwashing. Backwashing was found to transitionally improve the removal of DOC, DON and N-nitrosamine precursors. MiSeq sequencing analysis revealed that backwashing had a strong impact on the bacterial diversity and community structure of BAC biofilm, but they could gradually recover with the operating time after backwashing. Phylum Proteobacteria was the largest bacterial group in BAC biofilm. Microorganisms from genera Bradyrhizobium, Hyphomicrobium, Microcystis and Sphingobium might contribute to the effective removal of nitrogenous organic compounds by drinking water biofilter. This work could add some new insights towards the operation of drinking water biofilters and the biological removal of organic matter.

  7. Alterations in soil microbial community composition and biomass following agricultural land use change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Wu, Junjun; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-11-01

    The effect of agricultural land use change on soil microbial community composition and biomass remains a widely debated topic. Here, we investigated soil microbial community composition and biomass [e.g., bacteria (B), fungi (F), Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and Actinomycete (ACT)] using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis, and basal microbial respiration in afforested, cropland and adjacent uncultivated soils in central China. We also investigated soil organic carbon and nitrogen (SOC and SON), labile carbon and nitrogen (LC and LN), recalcitrant carbon and nitrogen (RC and RN), pH, moisture, and temperature. Afforestation averaged higher microbial PLFA biomass compared with cropland and uncultivated soils with higher values in top soils than deep soils. The microbial PLFA biomass was strongly correlated with SON and LC. Higher SOC, SON, LC, LN, moisture and lower pH in afforested soils could be explained approximately 87.3% of total variation of higher total PLFAs. Afforestation also enhanced the F: B ratios compared with cropland. The basal microbial respiration was higher while the basal microbial respiration on a per-unit-PLFA basis was lower in afforested land than adjacent cropland and uncultivated land, suggesting afforestation may increase soil C utilization efficiency and decrease respiration loss in afforested soils.

  8. Alterations in soil microbial community composition and biomass following agricultural land use change

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Wu, Junjun; Yang, Fan; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Quanfa; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The effect of agricultural land use change on soil microbial community composition and biomass remains a widely debated topic. Here, we investigated soil microbial community composition and biomass [e.g., bacteria (B), fungi (F), Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and Actinomycete (ACT)] using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis, and basal microbial respiration in afforested, cropland and adjacent uncultivated soils in central China. We also investigated soil organic carbon and nitrogen (SOC and SON), labile carbon and nitrogen (LC and LN), recalcitrant carbon and nitrogen (RC and RN), pH, moisture, and temperature. Afforestation averaged higher microbial PLFA biomass compared with cropland and uncultivated soils with higher values in top soils than deep soils. The microbial PLFA biomass was strongly correlated with SON and LC. Higher SOC, SON, LC, LN, moisture and lower pH in afforested soils could be explained approximately 87.3% of total variation of higher total PLFAs. Afforestation also enhanced the F: B ratios compared with cropland. The basal microbial respiration was higher while the basal microbial respiration on a per-unit-PLFA basis was lower in afforested land than adjacent cropland and uncultivated land, suggesting afforestation may increase soil C utilization efficiency and decrease respiration loss in afforested soils. PMID:27812029

  9. Increasing the Size of the Microbial Biomass Altered Bacterial Community Structure which Enhances Plant Phosphorus Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pu; Murphy, Daniel Vaughan; George, Suman J.; Lapis-Gaza, Hazel; Xu, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural production can be limited by low phosphorus (P) availability, with soil P being constrained by sorption and precipitation reactions making it less available for plant uptake. There are strong links between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) availability and P cycling within soil P pools, with microorganisms being an integral component of soil P cycling mediating the availability of P to plants. Here we tested a conceptual model that proposes (i) the addition of readily-available organic substrates would increase the size of the microbial biomass thus exhausting the pool of easily-available P and (ii) this would cause the microbial biomass to access P from more recalcitrant pools. In this model it is hypothesised that the size of the microbial population is regulating access to less available P rather than the diversity of organisms contained within this biomass. To test this hypothesis we added mixtures of simple organic compounds that reflect typical root exudates at different C:N ratios to a soil microcosm experiment and assessed changes in soil P pools, microbial biomass and bacterial diversity measures. We report that low C:N ratio (C:N = 12.5:1) artificial root exudates increased the size of the microbial biomass while high C:N ratio (C:N = 50:1) artificial root exudates did not result in a similar increase in microbial biomass. Interestingly, addition of the root exudates did not alter bacterial diversity (measured via univariate diversity indices) but did alter bacterial community structure. Where C, N and P supply was sufficient to support plant growth the increase observed in microbial biomass occurred with a concurrent increase in plant yield. PMID:27893833

  10. Microbial Activity and Silica Degradation in Rice Straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Esther Jin-kyung

    Abundantly available agricultural residues like rice straw have the potential to be feedstocks for bioethanol production. Developing optimized conditions for rice straw deconstruction is a key step toward utilizing the biomass to its full potential. One challenge associated with conversion of rice straw to bioenergy is its high silica content as high silica erodes machinery. Another obstacle is the availability of enzymes that hydrolyze polymers in rice straw under industrially relevant conditions. Microbial communities that colonize compost may be a source of enzymes for bioconversion of lignocellulose to products because composting systems operate under thermophilic and high solids conditions that have been shown to be commercially relevant. Compost microbial communities enriched on rice straw could provide insight into a more targeted source of enzymes for the breakdown of rice straw polysaccharides and silica. Because rice straw is low in nitrogen it is important to understand the impact of nitrogen concentrations on the production of enzyme activity by the microbial community. This study aims to address this issue by developing a method to measure microbial silica-degrading activity and measure the effect of nitrogen amendment to rice straw on microbial activity and extracted enzyme activity during a high-solids, thermophilic incubation. An assay was developed to measure silica-degrading enzyme or silicase activity. This process included identifying methods of enzyme extraction from rice straw, identifying a model substrate for the assay, and optimizing measurement techniques. Rice straw incubations were conducted with five different levels of nitrogen added to the biomass. Microbial activity was measured by respiration and enzyme activity. A microbial community analysis was performed to understand the shift in community structure with different treatments. With increased levels of nitrogen, respiration and cellulose and hemicellulose degrading activity

  11. Energy and power limits for microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, D.; Amend, J.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this presentation is to describe a quantitative framework for determining how energy limits microbial activity, biomass and, ultimately, biogeochemical processes. Although this model can be applied to any environment, its utility is demonstrated in marine sediments, which are an attractive test habitat because they encompass a broad spectrum of energy levels, varying amounts of biomass and are ubiquitous. The potential number of active microbial cells in Arkonas Basin (Baltic Sea) sediments are estimated as a function of depth by quantifying the amount of energy that is available to them and the rate at which it is supplied: power. The amount of power supplied per cubic centimeter of sediment is determined by calculating the Gibbs energy of fermentation and sulfate reduction in combination with the rate of particulate organic carbon, POC, degradation. The Reactive Continuum Model (Boudreau and Ruddick, 1991), RCM, is used to determine the rate at which POC is made available for microbial consumption. The RCM represents POC as containing a range of different types of organic compounds whose ability to be consumed by microorganisms varies as a function of the age of the sediment and on the distribution of compound types that were initially deposited. The sediment age model and RCM parameters determined by (Mogollon et al., 2012) are used. The power available for fermentation and sulfate reduction coupled to H2 and acetate oxidation varies from 10-8 W cm-3 at the sediment water interface to between 10-11 - 10-12 W cm-3 at 3.5 meters below the seafloor, mbsf. Using values of maintenance powers for each of these catabolic activities taken from the literature, the total number of active cells in these sediments similarly decreases from just less than 108 cell cm-3 at the SWI to 4.6 x 104 cells cm-3 at 3.5 mbsf. The number of moles of POC decreases from 2.6 x 10-5 to 9.5 x 10-6, also becoming more recalcitrant with depth. Boudreau, B. P. and Ruddick, B. R

  12. [Effects of Chinese fir litter on soil organic carbon decomposition and microbial biomass carbon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Si-Long; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2013-09-01

    By using 13C stable isotope tracer technique, this paper studied the effects of Chinese fir litter addition on the soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition, microbial biomass carbon, and dissolved organic carbon in 0-5 cm and 40-45 cm layers. The decomposition rate of SOC in 40-45 cm layer was significantly lower than that in 0-5 cm layer, but the priming effect induced by the Chinese fir litter addition showed an opposite trend. The Chinese fir litter addition increased the soil total microbial biomass carbon and the microbial biomass carbon derived from native soil significantly, but had less effects on the soil dissolved organic carbon. Turning over the subsoil to the surface of the woodland could accelerate the soil carbon loss in Chinese fir plantation due to the priming effect induced by the litters.

  13. Determination of carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass of southern-Taiga soils by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, M. I.; Malysheva, T. I.; Maslov, M. N.; Kuznetsova, E. Yu.; Menyailo, O. V.

    2016-06-01

    The results of methods for determining microbial biomass carbon vary in reproducibility among soils. The fumigation-extraction and substrate-induced respiration methods give similar results for Albic Luvisol and Gleyic Fluvisol, while the results of the rehydration method are reliably higher. In Histic Fluvisol, relatively similar results are obtained using the fumigation-extraction and rehydration methods, and the substrate-induced respiration method gives almost halved results. The seasonal dynamics of microbial biomass carbon also varies depending on the method used. The highest difference is typical for the warm period, when the concentrations found by the extraction and substrate-induced methods poorly agree between two out of three soils studied. The concentration of microbial biomass nitrogen is less sensitive to the analytical method: the differences between the results of the fumigation-extraction and rehydration methods are statistically insignificant in the all soils. To reveal stable relationships between the results of determining microbial carbon and the soil properties and analytical method, a large diversity of soils should be studied. This will allow for proposing of conversion factors for the recalculation of the obtained values to the concentrations of carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass for different soils (or soil groups) and, hence, the more correct comparison of the results obtained by different methods.

  14. Total soil DNA quantification as an alternative microbial biomass determination approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    Many studies on geographically widespread soils from arctic permafrost to arid and tropical soils, as well as those studies on extreme events, such as freezing-thawing and drying-rewetting of soils, require immediate freezing of soil after sampling. The two common basic approaches, such as chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE) and substrate-induced respiration (SIR), however, are not applicable in frozen or dry soil samples due to a partial destruction of microbial cells during freezing-thawing and drying-rewetting. This calls for approaches enabling correct estimation of microbial biomass in frozen or dried soil samples. This study was aimed to compare commonly used SIR and CFE techniques with total soil DNA quantification and demonstrate the applicability of DNA-based determination of microbial biomass in carbonate-containing, slightly (Chernozem) and strongly alkaline (Calcisol) soils of semi-arid climates. The samples of natural and agricultural ecosystems were taken throughout the soil profile from long-term static field experiments in the European part of Russia. The linear regression between SIR-Cmic and total soil dsDNA for the Chernozem showed very strong correlation. From the regression equation, the conversion factor of 5.10 with R2 = 0.96 was obtained. The effect of CO2 retention at alkaline pH (>8) and low microbial biomass-C resulted in an inability to obtain any SIR-CO2 release at deeper horizons of Calcisol, i.e. the CO2 retention potential was higher that the CO2 evolution. As a consequence, the values of SIR-Cmic of Calcisol at the horizons with pH > 8.0 were strongly underestimated (by a factor of 2-3). This smoothed the differences in Cmic between soil horizons. Nevertheless, reliable dsDNA values obtained for these soils demonstrated well-pronounced changes in microbial biomass within soil profile. The CFE and DNA-based approaches showed a good correspondence, with R2 = 0.96 for both soil types. The CFE-Cmic to DNA-Cmic factor of 0

  15. Changes in soil microbial biomass and residual indices as ecological indicators of land use change in temperate permanent grassland.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Rajasekaran; Loges, Ralf; Taube, Friedhelm; Sradnick, André; Joergensen, Rainer Georg

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between microbial biomass, residues and their contribution to microbial turnover is important to understand ecosystem C storage. The effects of permanent grassland (100 % ryegrass--PG), conversion to modified grassland (mixture of grass and clover--MG) or maize monoculture (MM) on the dynamics of soil organic C (SOC), microbial biomass, fungal ergosterol and microbial residues (bacterial muramic acid and fungal glucosamine) were investigated. Cattle slurry was applied to quantify the effects of fertilisation on microbial residues and functional diversity of microbial community across land use types. Slurry application significantly increased the stocks of microbial biomass C and S and especially led to a shift in microbial residues towards bacterial tissue. The MM treatment decreased the stocks of SOC, microbial biomass C, N and S and microbial residues compared with the PG and MG treatments at 0-40 cm depth. The MM treatment led to a greater accumulation of saprotrophic fungi, as indicated by the higher ergosterol-to-microbial biomass C ratio and lower microbial biomass C/S ratio compared with the grassland treatments. The absence of a white clover population in the PG treatment caused a greater accumulation of fungal residues (presumably arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which do not contain ergosterol but glucosamine), as indicated by the significantly higher fungal C-to-bacterial C ratio and lower ergosterol-to-microbial biomass C ratio compared with the MG treatment. In addition to these microbial biomass and residual indices, the community level physiological profiles (CLPP) demonstrated distinct differences between the PG and MG treatments, suggesting the potential of these measurements to act as an integrative indicator of soil functioning.

  16. MICROBIAL BIOMASS IN SOILS OF RUSSIA UNDER LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-tilled and tilled plots on a spodosol (C-org 0.65-1.70%; pH 4.1-4.5) and a mollisol (C-org 3.02-3.13%, pH 4.9-5.3), located in the European region of Russia, were investigated to determine variances in soil microbial biomass and microbial community composition. Continuous, lo...

  17. Metal impacts on microbial biomass in the anoxic sediments of a contaminated lake

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, Heidi L.; Dahl, Amy L.; Nolan, Melissa A.; Gaillard, Jean-Francois; Stahl, David A.

    2008-04-26

    Little is known about the long-term impacts of metal contamination on the microbiota of anoxic lake sediments. In this study, we examined microbial biomass and metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, and zinc) in the sediments of Lake DePue, a backwater lake located near a former zinc smelter. Sediment core samples were examined using two independent measures for microbial biomass (total microscopic counts and total phospholipid-phosphate concentrations), and for various fractions of each metal (pore water extracts, sequential extractions, and total extracts of all studied metals and zinc speciation by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). Zinc concentrations were up to 1000 times higher than reported for sediments in the adjacent Illinois River, and ranged from 21,400 mg/kg near the source to 1,680 mg/kg near the river. However, solid metal fractions were not well correlated with pore water concentrations, and were not good predictors of biomass concentrations. Instead, biomass, which varied among sites by as much as two-times, was inversely correlated with concentrations of pore water zinc and arsenic as established by multiple linear regression. Monitoring of other parameters known to naturally influence biomass in sediments (e.g., organic carbon concentrations, nitrogen concentrations, pH, sediment texture, and macrophytes) revealed no differences that could explain observed biomass trends. This study provides strong support for control of microbial abundance by pore water metal concentrations in contaminated freshwater sediments.

  18. Measurements of Microbial Community Activities in Individual Soil Macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; McCue, Lee Ann; Smith, Jeff L.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-05-01

    The functional potential of single soil aggregates may provide insights into the localized distribution of microbial activities better than traditional assays conducted on bulk quantities of soil. Thus, we scaled down enzyme assays for {beta}-glucosidase, N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase, lipase, and leucine aminopeptidase to measure of the enzyme potential of individual aggregates (250-1000 {mu}m diameter). Across all enzymes, the smallest aggregates had the greatest activity and the range of enzyme activities observed in all aggregates supports the hypothesis that functional potential in soil may be distributed in a patchy fashion. Paired analyses of ATP as a surrogate for active microbial biomass and {beta}-glucosidase on the same aggregates suggest the presence of both extracellular {beta}-glucosidase functioning in aggregates with no detectable ATP and also of relatively active microbial communities (high ATP) that have low {beta}-glucosidase potentials. Studying function at a scale more consistent with microbial habitat presents greater opportunity to link microbial community structure to microbial community function.

  19. [Development and succession of biological soil crusts and the changes of microbial biomasses].

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Zhang, Gao-Ke; Chen, Xiao-Guo; Lan, Shu-Bin; Zhang, De-Lu; Hu, Chun-Xiang

    2014-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) play important ecological roles in vegetation and ecological restoration in desert regions, and different crust developmental and successional stages have different ecological functions. In this experiment, the BSCs in Shapotou region (at southeast edge of Tengger Desert) were investigated to study crust development and succession through field investigation, microscopic observation combined with quantitative analysis of microbial biomasses. The results showed that BSCs in this region generally developed and succeeded from algal crusts, lichen crusts to moss crusts. With the development and succession of BSCs, crust photosynthetic biomass gradually increased, while microalgal biomass showed a first increasing and then decreasing trend. Among the crust algae (cyanobacteia), Microcoleus vaginatus, as the first dominant species, occupied the most algal biomass and reached a maximum of 0.33 mm3 x g(-1) crusts in algal crusts; while Scytonema javanicum and Nostoc sp. have their maximal biomasses in the later lichen crusts. In addition, it was found that the heterotrophic microbial biomass began to increase in algal crusts, and then decreased in lichen crusts; followed by another increase and the increase achieved the maximum at last in moss crusts. Through the correlation analysis, it was found that bacterial biomass significantly positively correlated with crust organic carbon and Na+ content, while fungal biomass positively correlated with K+ and Na+ content (P < 0.05). In conclusion, this study investigated the developmental and successional patterns of BSCs in Shapotou region, and discussed the effects of crust development and succession on several microbial biomasses from the point of view of environmental adaptation and functional requirement, which may be helpful for us to understand crust development and succession, and provide theoretical and practical significances for crust maintenance and management in ecological restoration of

  20. Extraction of solubles from plant biomass for use as microbial growth stimulant and methods related thereto

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Ming Woei

    2015-12-08

    A method for producing a microbial growth stimulant (MGS) from a plant biomass is described. In one embodiment, an ammonium hydroxide solution is used to extract a solution of proteins and ammonia from the biomass. Some of the proteins and ammonia are separated from the extracted solution to provide the MGS solution. The removed ammonia can be recycled and the proteins are useful as animal feeds. In one embodiment, the method comprises extracting solubles from pretreated lignocellulosic biomass with a cellulase enzyme-producing growth medium (such T. reesei) in the presence of water and an aqueous extract.

  1. Distribution of Microbial Biomass and Potential for Anaerobic Respiration in Hanford Site 300 Area Subsurface Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David; Peacock, Aaron; McKinley, James; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, James

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface sediments were recovered from a 52-m-deep borehole cored in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to assess the potential for biogeochemical transformation of radionuclide contaminants. Microbial analyses were made on 17 sediment samples traversing multiple geological units: the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation (9 to 17.4 m), the oxic fine-grained upper Ringold formation (17.7 to 18.1 m), and the reduced Ringold formation (18.3 to 52 m). Microbial biomass (measured as phospholipid fatty acids) ranged from 7 to 974 pmols per g in discrete samples, with the highest numbers found in the Hanford formation. On average, strata below 17.4 m had 13-fold less biomass than those from shallower strata. The nosZ gene that encodes nitrous oxide reductase (measured by quantitative real-time PCR) had an abundance of 5 to 17 relative to that of total 16S rRNA genes below 18.3 m and <5 above 18.1 m. Most nosZ sequences were affiliated with Ochrobactrum anthropi (97 sequence similarity) or had a nearest neighbor of Achromobacter xylosoxidans (90 similarity). Passive multilevel sampling of groundwater geochemistry demonstrated a redox gradient in the 1.5-m region between the Hanford-Ringold formation contact and the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface. Within this zone, copies of the dsrA gene and Geobacteraceae had the highest relative abundance. The majority of dsrA genes detected near the interface were related to Desulfotomaculum spp. These analyses indicate that the region just below the contact between the Hanford and Ringold formations is a zone of active biogeochemical redox cycling. PMID:22138990

  2. Digestion of algal biomass for electricity generation in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    Algal biomass serves as a fuel for electricity generation in microbial fuel cells. This study constructed a model consortium comprised of an alga-digesting Lactobacillus and an iron-reducing Geobacter for electricity generation from photo-grown Clamydomonas cells. Total power-conversion efficiency (from Light to electricity) was estimated to be 0.47%.

  3. ACCUMULATION RATE OF MICROBIAL BIOMASS AT TWO PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of mineral precipitates and microbial biomass are key factors that impact the long-term performance of in-situ Permeable Reactive Barriers for treating contaminated groundwater. Both processes can impact remedial performance by decreasing zero-valent iron reactivity...

  4. Effect of silica nanoparticles on microbial biomass and silica availability in maize rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Rangaraj, Suriyaprabha; Gopalu, Karunakaran; Rathinam, Yuvakkumar; Periasamy, Prabu; Venkatachalam, Rajendran; Narayanasamy, Kannan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of silica nanoparticles and conventional silica sources on the changes in microbial biomass and silica availability to pure soil and maize rhizosphere was studied. Nanosilica (20-40 nm) was synthesized from rice husk and comprehensively characterized. The efficiency of nanosilica was evaluated in terms of its effects on beneficial microbial population such as phosphate solubilizers, nitrogen fixers, silicate solubilizers, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen content, and silica content in comparison with other silica sources such as microsilica, sodium silicate, and silicic acid. Nanosilica significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced microbial populations, total biomass content (C = 1508 μg g(-1) and N = 178 μg g(-1) ), and silica content (14.75 mg mL(-1) ). Although microsilica sources enhanced factors associated with soil fertility, their use by maize roots and silicification in soil was found to be less. The results show that nanosilica plays a vital role in influencing soil nutrient content and microbial biota and, hence, may promote the growth of maize crop.

  5. Planktonic food web structure at a coastal time-series site: I. Partitioning of microbial abundances and carbon biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, David A.; Connell, Paige E.; Schaffner, Rebecca A.; Schnetzer, Astrid; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Countway, Peter D.; Kim, Diane Y.

    2017-03-01

    Biogeochemistry in marine plankton communities is strongly influenced by the activities of microbial species. Understanding the composition and dynamics of these assemblages is essential for modeling emergent community-level processes, yet few studies have examined all of the biological assemblages present in the plankton, and benchmark data of this sort from time-series studies are rare. Abundance and biomass of the entire microbial assemblage and mesozooplankton (>200 μm) were determined vertically, monthly and seasonally over a 3-year period at a coastal time-series station in the San Pedro Basin off the southwestern coast of the USA. All compartments of the planktonic community were enumerated (viruses in the femtoplankton size range [0.02-0.2 μm], bacteria + archaea and cyanobacteria in the picoplankton size range [0.2-2.0 μm], phototrophic and heterotrophic protists in the nanoplanktonic [2-20 μm] and microplanktonic [20-200 μm] size ranges, and mesozooplankton [>200 μm]. Carbon biomass of each category was estimated using standard conversion factors. Plankton abundances varied over seven orders of magnitude across all categories, and total carbon biomass averaged approximately 60 μg C l-1 in surface waters of the 890 m water column over the study period. Bacteria + archaea comprised the single largest component of biomass (>1/3 of the total), with the sum of phototrophic protistan biomass making up a similar proportion. Temporal variability at this subtropical station was not dramatic. Monthly depth-specific and depth-integrated biomass varied 2-fold at the station, while seasonal variances were generally <50%. This study provides benchmark information for investigating long-term environmental forcing on the composition and dynamics of the microbes that dominate food web structure and function at this coastal observatory.

  6. Microbial biodiesel production by direct methanolysis of oleaginous biomass.

    PubMed

    Thliveros, Panagiotis; Uçkun Kiran, Esra; Webb, Colin

    2014-04-01

    Biodiesel is usually produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils and animal fats with methanol, catalyzed by strong acids or bases. This study introduces a novel biodiesel production method that features direct base-catalyzed methanolysis of the cellular biomass of oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides Y4. NaOH was used as catalyst for transesterification reactions and the variables affecting the esterification level including catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, reaction time, solvent loading (methanol) and moisture content were investigated using the oleaginous yeast biomass. The most suitable pretreatment condition was found to be 4gL(-1) NaOH and 1:20 (w/v) dried biomass to methanol ratio for 10h at 50°C and under ambient pressure. Under these conditions, the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield was 97.7%. Therefore, the novel method of direct base-catalyzed methanolysis of R. toruloides is a much simpler, less tedious and time-consuming, process than the conventional processes with higher FAME (biodiesel) conversion yield.

  7. Representing Microbial Dormancy in Soil Decomposition Models Improves Model Performance and Reveals Key Ecosystem Controls on Microbial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Yang, J.; Zhuang, Q.; Wang, G.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Climate feedbacks from soils can result from environmental change and subsequent responses of plant and microbial communities and nutrient cycling. Explicit consideration of microbial life history traits and strategy may be necessary to predict climate feedbacks due to microbial physiology and community changes and their associated effect on carbon cycling. In this study, we developed an explicit microbial-enzyme decomposition model and examined model performance with and without representation of dormancy at six temperate forest sites with observed soil efflux ranged from 4 to 10 years across different forest types. We then extrapolated the model to all temperate forests in the Northern Hemisphere (25-50°N) to investigate spatial controls on microbial and soil C dynamics. Both models captured the observed soil heterotrophic respiration (RH), yet no-dormancy model consistently exhibited large seasonal amplitude and overestimation in microbial biomass. Spatially, the total RH from temperate forests based on dormancy model amounts to 6.88PgC/yr, and 7.99PgC/yr based on no-dormancy model. However, no-dormancy model notably overestimated the ratio of microbial biomass to SOC. Spatial correlation analysis revealed key controls of soil C:N ratio on the active proportion of microbial biomass, whereas local dormancy is primarily controlled by soil moisture and temperature, indicating scale-dependent environmental and biotic controls on microbial and SOC dynamics. These developments should provide essential support to modeling future soil carbon dynamics and enhance the avenue for collaboration between empirical soil experiment and modeling in the sense that more microbial physiological measurements are needed to better constrain and evaluate the models.

  8. Biofuel intercropping effects on soil carbon and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Michael S; Leggett, Zakiya H; Sucre, Eric B; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels will help meet rising demands for energy and, ideally, limit climate change associated with carbon losses from the biosphere to atmosphere. Biofuel management must therefore maximize energy production and maintain ecosystem carbon stocks. Increasingly, there is interest in intercropping biofuels with other crops, partly because biofuel production on arable land might reduce availability and increase the price of food. One intercropping approach involves growing biofuel grasses in forest plantations. Grasses differ from trees in both their organic inputs to soils and microbial associations. These differences are associated with losses of soil carbon when grasses become abundant in forests. We investigated how intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgalum), a major candidate for cellulosic biomass production, in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations affects soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial dynamics. Our design involved four treatments: two pine management regimes where harvest residues (i.e., biomass) were left in place or removed, and two switchgrass regimes where the grass was grown with pine under the same two biomass scenarios (left or removed). Soil variables were measured in four 1-ha replicate plots in the first and second year following switchgrass planting. Under switchgrass intercropping, pools of mineralizable and particulate organic matter carbon were 42% and 33% lower, respectively. These declines translated into a 21% decrease in total soil carbon in the upper 15 cm of the soil profile, during early stand development. The switchgrass effect, however, was isolated to the interbed region where switchgrass is planted. In these regions, switchgrass-induced reductions in soil carbon pools with 29%, 43%, and 24% declines in mineralizable, particulate, and total soil carbon, respectively. Our results support the idea that grass inputs to forests can prime the activity of soil organic carbon degrading microbes, leading to net reductions in stocks

  9. Soil microbial biomass and mineralizable carbon as a function of crop rotation and soil acidity amendment in a no-tillage system in Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical climate and weathered soil conditions create significant challenges for increasing soil organic matter content. However, crop management strategies could affect short-term dynamics of active fractions of soil organic matter. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the microbial biomass and mineraliza...

  10. Comparison between geochemical and biological estimates of subsurface microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Phelps, T J; Murphy, E M; Pfiffner, S M; White, D C

    1994-01-01

    Geochemical and biological estimates of in situ microbial activities were compared from the aerobic and microaerophilic sediments of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Radioisotope time-course experiments suggested oxidation rates greater than millimolar quantities per year for acetate and glucose. Geochemical analyses assessing oxygen consumption, soluble organic carbon utilization, sulfate reduction, and carbon dioxide production suggested organic oxidation rates of nano- to micromolar quantities per year. Radiotracer timecourse experiments appeared to overestimate rates of organic carbon oxidation, sulfate reduction, and biomass production by a factor of 10(3)-10(6) greater than estimates calculated from groundwater analyses. Based on the geochemical evidence, in situ microbial metabolism was estimated to be in the nano- to micromolar range per year, and the average doubling time for the microbial community was estimated to be centuries.

  11. Evaluating digestion efficiency in full-scale anaerobic digesters by identifying active microbial populations through the lens of microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Ran; Narihiro, Takashi; Nobu, Masaru K.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a common technology to biologically stabilize wasted solids produced in municipal wastewater treatment. Its efficiency is usually evaluated by calculating the reduction in volatile solids, which assumes no biomass growth associated with digestion. To determine whether this assumption is valid and further evaluate digestion efficiency, this study sampled 35 digester sludge from different reactors at multiple time points together with the feed biomass in a full-scale water reclamation plant at Chicago, Illinois. The microbial communities were characterized using Illumina sequencing technology based on 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene (rDNA). 74 core microbial populations were identified and represented 58.7% of the entire digester community. Among them, active populations were first identified using the ratio of 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA (rRNA/rDNA) for individual populations, but this approach failed to generate consistent results. Subsequently, a recently proposed mass balance model was applied to calculate the specific growth rate (μ), and this approach successfully identified active microbial populations in digester (positive μ) that could play important roles than those with negative μ. It was further estimated that 82% of microbial populations in the feed sludge were digested in comparison with less than 50% calculated using current equations.

  12. Evaluating digestion efficiency in full-scale anaerobic digesters by identifying active microbial populations through the lens of microbial activity

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Ran; Narihiro, Takashi; Nobu, Masaru K.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a common technology to biologically stabilize wasted solids produced in municipal wastewater treatment. Its efficiency is usually evaluated by calculating the reduction in volatile solids, which assumes no biomass growth associated with digestion. To determine whether this assumption is valid and further evaluate digestion efficiency, this study sampled 35 digester sludge from different reactors at multiple time points together with the feed biomass in a full-scale water reclamation plant at Chicago, Illinois. The microbial communities were characterized using Illumina sequencing technology based on 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene (rDNA). 74 core microbial populations were identified and represented 58.7% of the entire digester community. Among them, active populations were first identified using the ratio of 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA (rRNA/rDNA) for individual populations, but this approach failed to generate consistent results. Subsequently, a recently proposed mass balance model was applied to calculate the specific growth rate (μ), and this approach successfully identified active microbial populations in digester (positive μ) that could play important roles than those with negative μ. It was further estimated that 82% of microbial populations in the feed sludge were digested in comparison with less than 50% calculated using current equations. PMID:27666090

  13. Annual Removal of Aboveground Plant Biomass Alters Soil Microbial Responses to Warming

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Kai; Yuan, Mengting M.; Xie, Jianping; Li, Dejun; Qin, Yujia; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clipping (i.e., harvesting aboveground plant biomass) is common in agriculture and for bioenergy production. However, microbial responses to clipping in the context of climate warming are poorly understood. We investigated the interactive effects of grassland warming and clipping on soil properties and plant and microbial communities, in particular, on microbial functional genes. Clipping alone did not change the plant biomass production, but warming and clipping combined increased the C4 peak biomass by 47% and belowground net primary production by 110%. Clipping alone and in combination with warming decreased the soil carbon input from litter by 81% and 75%, respectively. With less carbon input, the abundances of genes involved in degrading relatively recalcitrant carbon increased by 38% to 137% in response to either clipping or the combined treatment, which could weaken long-term soil carbon stability and trigger positive feedback with respect to warming. Clipping alone also increased the abundance of genes for nitrogen fixation, mineralization, and denitrification by 32% to 39%. Such potentially stimulated nitrogen fixation could help compensate for the 20% decline in soil ammonium levels caused by clipping alone and could contribute to unchanged plant biomass levels. Moreover, clipping tended to interact antagonistically with warming, especially with respect to effects on nitrogen cycling genes, demonstrating that single-factor studies cannot predict multifactorial changes. These results revealed that clipping alone or in combination with warming altered soil and plant properties as well as the abundance and structure of soil microbial functional genes. Aboveground biomass removal for biofuel production needs to be reconsidered, as the long-term soil carbon stability may be weakened. PMID:27677789

  14. Annual Removal of Aboveground Plant Biomass Alters Soil Microbial Responses to Warming.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai; Yuan, Mengting M; Xie, Jianping; Li, Dejun; Qin, Yujia; Hale, Lauren E; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Luo, Yiqi; Tiedje, James M; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-09-27

    Clipping (i.e., harvesting aboveground plant biomass) is common in agriculture and for bioenergy production. However, microbial responses to clipping in the context of climate warming are poorly understood. We investigated the interactive effects of grassland warming and clipping on soil properties and plant and microbial communities, in particular, on microbial functional genes. Clipping alone did not change the plant biomass production, but warming and clipping combined increased the C4 peak biomass by 47% and belowground net primary production by 110%. Clipping alone and in combination with warming decreased the soil carbon input from litter by 81% and 75%, respectively. With less carbon input, the abundances of genes involved in degrading relatively recalcitrant carbon increased by 38% to 137% in response to either clipping or the combined treatment, which could weaken long-term soil carbon stability and trigger positive feedback with respect to warming. Clipping alone also increased the abundance of genes for nitrogen fixation, mineralization, and denitrification by 32% to 39%. Such potentially stimulated nitrogen fixation could help compensate for the 20% decline in soil ammonium levels caused by clipping alone and could contribute to unchanged plant biomass levels. Moreover, clipping tended to interact antagonistically with warming, especially with respect to effects on nitrogen cycling genes, demonstrating that single-factor studies cannot predict multifactorial changes. These results revealed that clipping alone or in combination with warming altered soil and plant properties as well as the abundance and structure of soil microbial functional genes. Aboveground biomass removal for biofuel production needs to be reconsidered, as the long-term soil carbon stability may be weakened.

  15. Does agricultural crop diversity enhance soil microbial biomass and organic matter dynamics? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, M D; Tiemann, L K; Grandy, A S

    2014-04-01

    Our increasing dependence on a small number of agricultural crops, such as corn, is leading to reductions in agricultural biodiversity. Reductions in the number of crops in rotation or the replacement of rotations by monocultures are responsible for this loss of biodiversity. The belowground implications of simplifying agricultural plant communities remain unresolved; however, agroecosystem sustainability will be severely compromised if reductions in biodiversity reduce soil C and N concentrations, alter microbial communities, and degrade soil ecosystem functions as reported in natural communities. We conducted a meta-analysis of 122 studies to examine crop rotation effects on total soil C and N concentrations, and the faster cycling microbial biomass C and N pools that play key roles in soil nutrient cycling and physical processes such as aggregate formation. We specifically examined how rotation crop type and management practices influence C and N dynamics in different climates and soil types. We found that adding one or more crops in rotation to a monoculture increased total soil C by 3.6% and total N by 5.3%, but when rotations included a cover crop (i.e., crops that are not harvested but produced to enrich the soil and capture inorganic N), total C increased by 8.5% and total N 12.8%. Rotations substantially increased the soil microbial biomass C (20.7%) and N (26.1%) pools, and these overwhelming effects on microbial biomass were not moderated by crop type or management practices. Crop rotations, especially those that include cover crops, sustain soil quality and productivity by enhancing soil C, N, and microbial biomass, making them a cornerstone for sustainable agroecosystems.

  16. Performance and microbial community of carbon nanotube fixed-bed microbial fuel cell continuously fed with hydrothermal liquefied cornstalk biomass.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhidan; He, Yanhong; Shen, Ruixia; Zhu, Zhangbing; Xing, Xin-Hui; Li, Baoming; Zhang, Yuanhui

    2015-06-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is a green technology for biomass pretreatment with the omission of hazardous chemicals. This study reports a novel integration of HTL and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fixed-bed microbial fuel cell (FBMFC) for continuous electricity generation from cornstalk biomass. Two FBMFCs in parallel achieved similar performance fed with cornstalk hydrolysate at different organic loading rates (OLRs) (0.82-8.16g/L/d). About 80% of Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and Total organic carbon (TOC) was removed from low-Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)/COD (0.16) cornstalk hydrolysate at 8.16g/L/d, whereas a maximum power density (680mW/m(3)) was obtained at 2.41g/L/d, and a smallest internal resistance (Rin) (28Ω) at 3.01g/L/d. Illumina MiSeq sequencing reveals the diverse microbial structure induced by the complex composition of cornstalk hydrolysate. Distinguished from Proteobacteria, which a number of exoelectrogens belong to, the identified dominant genus Rhizobium in FBMFC was closely related to degradation of cellulosic biomass.

  17. Photosynthetic membrane-less microbial fuel cells to enhance microalgal biomass concentration.

    PubMed

    Uggetti, Enrica; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the net increase in microalgal biomass concentration induced by photosynthetic microbial fuel cells (PMFC). The experiment was conducted on six lab-scale PMFC constituted by an anodic chamber simulating an anaerobic digester connected to a cathodic chamber consisting of a mixed algae consortia culture. Three PMFC were operated at closed circuit (PMFC(+)) whereas three PMFC were left unconnected as control (PMFC(-)). PMFC(+) produced a higher amount of carbon dioxide as a product of the organic matter oxidation that resulted in 1.5-3 times higher biomass concentration at the cathode compartment when compared to PMFC(-).

  18. Mercury in water and biomass of microbial communities in hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, S.A.; Behnke, S.; Slack, K.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Burr, M.D.; Striegl, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    Ultra-clean sampling methods and approaches typically used in pristine environments were applied to quantify concentrations of Hg species in water and microbial biomass from hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, features that are geologically enriched with Hg. Microbial populations of chemically-diverse hot springs were also characterized using modern methods in molecular biology as the initial step toward ongoing work linking Hg speciation with microbial processes. Molecular methods (amplification of environmental DNA using 16S rDNA primers, cloning, denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) screening of clone libraries, and sequencing of representative clones) were used to examine the dominant members of microbial communities in hot springs. Total Hg (THg), monomethylated Hg (MeHg), pH, temperature, and other parameters influential to Hg speciation and microbial ecology are reported for hot springs water and associated microbial mats. Several hot springs indicate the presence of MeHg in microbial mats with concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 ng g-1 (dry weight). Concentrations of THg in mats ranged from 4.9 to 120,000 ng g-1 (dry weight). Combined data from surveys of geothermal water, lakes, and streams show that aqueous THg concentrations range from l to 600 ng L-1. Species and concentrations of THg in mats and water vary significantly between hot springs, as do the microorganisms found at each site. ?? 2006.

  19. Functional activity of soil microbial communities in post-fire pine stands of Tolyatti, Samara oblast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, E. Yu.; Kudinova, A. G.; Abakumov, E. V.

    2017-02-01

    The state of microbial communities in gray-humus soils (Eutric Fluvic Arenosols (Ochric)) of pine stands in the city of Tolyatti after forest fires of 2010 is analyzed. It is shown that fires exert negative effects on the structure and metabolic activity of microbial communities in the postpyrogenic soils. The content of the carbon of microbial biomass and the intensity of microbial respiration in the upper organic horizons of the post-fire plots decrease by 6.5 and 3.4 times, respectively, in comparison with those in the soils of background plots. However, the fire has not affected the studied microbiological parameters of the soils at the depths of more than 10 cm. The maximum content of the carbon of microbial biomass carbon and the maximum intensity of microbial respiration have been found in the subsurface AY2 and AC horizons two-three years the fire. An increase in the microbial metabolic quotient (the ratio of soil respiration to microbial biomass) attests to the disturbance of the ecophysiological state of soil microbial communities after the pyrogenic impact.

  20. [Microbial biomass and its correlations with carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in the sediments of Taihu Lake].

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Xu, De-Lin; Guo, Xuan; Wu, Xiao-Qing; An, Shu-Qing

    2012-07-01

    To explore the responses and feedbacks of the microbes in the sediments of Taihu Lake to the sediment nutrients, an investigation was made on the microbial biomass carbon (MB(C)), microbial biomass nitrogen (MB(N)), microbial biomass phosphorus (MB(P)), and their correlations with the total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) in the sediments. The microbial biomass in the sediments was 184.66 mg x kg(-1), being higher at the lakeside than in the mid-lake region. The MB(C) was higher in the western coastal region, Zhushan Bay, and Meiliang Bay, with an average of 127.57 mg x kg(-1), MB(N) was higher in Meiliang Bay, Gonghu Bay, mid-lake region close to Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay, and eastern costal region, with an average of 19.25 mg x kg(-1), and MB(P) was higher in the eastern region and parts of the mid-lake region, with an average was 19.09 mg x kg(-1). The TOC high value zone (> or = 2.30 g x kg(-1)) was mainly in Zhushan Bay, western coastal region, Meiliang Bay, and Gonghu Bay, with an average of 1.59 g x kg(-1), TN high value zone (> or = 0.30 g x kg(-1)) was mainly in the Gonghu Bay, Meiliang Bay, Zhushan Bay, and western costal region, with an average of 0.21 g x kg(-1), and TP high value zone (> or = 1.20 g x kg(-1)) was mainly in the eastern coastal region and parts of the mid-lake region, with an average of 0.55 g x kg(-1). The TOC/TN ratio in the sediments was 7-19, with an average of 8.97, which showed that the organic substances in the sediments had obvious dual sources, among which, terrestrial organisms were mainly in the west side of the lake. The microbial biomass in the sediments was significantly positively correlated with sediment TOC and TN but had less correlation with sediment TP, and the MB(C)/MB(N) was significantly correlated with sediment TOC/TN, suggesting that the microbes in the sediments of Taihu Lake were mainly affected by the sediment TOC and TN, and the changes of the TOC/TN had significant

  1. [Progress in electricity generation from biomass using microbial fuel cell MFC)].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu-Jie; Wang, Xin; Li, He; Yang, Qiao; Qu, You-Peng; Shi, Xin-Xin; Liu, Jia; He, Wei-Hua; Xie, Ming-Li

    2010-10-01

    By applying bacteria as anodic catalyst, microbial fuel cell (MFC) can directly convert biomass energy into electrical energy, provided a new way for biomass utilization. Previous studies showed that the substrates and their concentration substantially affected performance of MFC. High power output was obtained when simple organic such as volatile fatty acids (VFA), alcohols or glucose was used as substrate. However, physical, chemical or even biological pretreatment methods were needed when substrate was complex organic. Addition of simple organic as co-substrate was also demonstrated to be an efficient way for refractory compounds degradation in MFC. Using biomass as substrates, MFC will be applied in area such as bioenergy recovery from wastewater, power supply in outfield and biosensors.

  2. Production of algal biomass (Chlorella vulgaris) using sediment microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyeon Jin; Seo, Kyu-won; Lee, Sang Hyun; Yang, Yung-Hun; Kumaran, Rangarajulu Senthil; Kim, Sunghyun; Hong, Seok Won; Choi, Yong Su; Kim, Hyung Joo

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a novel algal biomass production method using a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) system was assessed. Under the experimental conditions, CO(2) generation from the SMFC and its rate of increase were found to be dependent on the current generated from the SMFC. However, the CH(4) production rate from the SMFC was inhibited by the generation of current. When Chlorella vulgaris was inoculated into the cathode compartment of the SMFC and current was generated under 10 Ω resistance, biomass production from the anode compartment was observed to be closely associated with the rate of current generation from the SMFC. The experimental results demonstrate that 420 mg/L of algae (dry cell weight) was produced when the current from the SMFC reached 48.5 mA/m(2). Therefore, SMFC could provide a means for producing algal biomass via CO(2) generated by the oxidation of organics upon current generation.

  3. Activated carbon briquettes from biomass materials.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Alejandro; Medero, Natalia; Tancredi, Néstor; Silva, Hugo; Deiana, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Disposal of biomass wastes, produced in different agricultural activities, is frequently an environmental problem. A solution for such situation is the recycling of these residues for the production of activated carbon, an adsorbent which has several applications, for instance in the elimination of contaminants. For some uses, high mechanical strength and good adsorption characteristics are required. To achieve this, carbonaceous materials are conformed as pellets or briquettes, in a process that involves mixing and pressing of char with adhesive materials prior to activation. In this work, the influence of the operation conditions on the mechanical and surface properties of briquettes was studied. Eucalyptus wood and rice husk from Uruguay were used as lignocellulosic raw materials, and concentrated grape must from Cuyo Region-Argentina, as a binder. Different wood:rice and solid:binder ratios were used to prepare briquettes in order to study their influence on mechanical and surface properties of the final products.

  4. Biomass assessment of microbial surface communities by means of hyperspectral remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Paul, Max; Tamm, Alexandra; Caesar, Jennifer; Büdel, Burkhard; Escribano, Paula; Hill, Joachim; Weber, Bettina

    2017-05-15

    Dryland vegetation developed morphological and physiological strategies to cope with drought. However, as aridity increases, vascular plant coverage gets sparse and microbially-dominated surface communities (MSC), comprising cyanobacteria, algae, lichens and bryophytes together with heterotropic bacteria, archaea and fungi, gain relevance. Nevertheless, the relevance of MSC net primary productivity has only rarely been considered in ecosystem scale studies, and detailed information on their contribution to the total photosynthetic biomass reservoir is largely missing. In this study, we mapped the spatial distribution of two different MSC (biological soil crusts and quartz fields hosting hypolithic crusts) at two different sites within the South African Succulent Karoo (Soebatsfontein and Knersvlakte). Then we characterized both types of MSC in terms of chlorophyll content, and combining these data with the biocrust and quartz field maps, we estimated total biomass values of MSCs and their spatial patterns within the two different ecosystems. Our results revealed that MSC are important vegetation components of the South African Karoo biome, revealing clear differences between the two sites. At Soebatsfontein, MSC occurred as biological soil crusts (biocrusts), which covered about one third of the landscape reaching an overall biomass value of ~480gha(-1) of chlorophyll a+b at the landscape scale. In the Knersvlakte, which is characterized by harsher environmental conditions (i.e. higher solar radiation and potential evapotranspiration), MSC occurred as biocrusts, but also formed hypolithic crusts growing on the lower soil-immersed parts of translucent quartz pebbles. Whereas chlorophyll concentrations of biocrusts and hypolithic crusts where insignificantly lower in the Knersvlakte, the overall MSC biomass reservoir was by far larger with ~780gha(-1) of chlorophyll a+b. Thus, the complementary microbially-dominated surface communities promoted biomass formation

  5. Distribution of chromium contamination and microbial activity in soil aggregates.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Wan, Jiamin; Hazen, Terry C; Schwartz, Egbert; Firestone, Mary K; Sutton, Stephen R; Newville, Matthew; Olson, Keith R; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Rao, William

    2003-01-01

    Biogeochemical transformations of redox-sensitive chemicals in soils can be strongly transport-controlled and localized. This was tested through experiments on chromium diffusion and reduction in soil aggregates that were exposed to chromate solutions. Reduction of soluble Cr(VI) to insoluble Cr(II) occurred only within the surface layer of aggregates with higher available organic carbon and higher microbial respiration. Sharply terminated Cr diffusion fronts develop when the reduction rate increases rapidly with depth. The final state of such aggregates consists of a Cr-contaminated exterior, and an uncontaminated core, each having different microbial community compositions and activity. Microbial activity was significantly higher in the more reducing soils, while total microbial biomass was similar in all of the soils. The small fraction of Cr(VI) remaining unreduced resides along external surfaces of aggregates, leaving it potentially available to future transport down the soil profile. Using the Thiele modulus, Cr(VI) reduction in soil aggregates is shown to be diffusion rate- and reaction rate-limited in anaerobic and aerobic aggregates, respectively. Thus, spatially resolved chemical and microbiological measurements are necessary within anaerobic soil aggregates to characterize and predict the fate of Cr contamination. Typical methods of soil sampling and analyses that average over redox gradients within aggregates can erase important biogeochemical spatial relations necessary for understanding these environments.

  6. Organic nitrogen rearranges both structure and activity of the soil-borne microbial seedbank

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Márcio F. A.; Pan, Yao; Bloem, Jaap; Berge, Hein ten; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2017-01-01

    Use of organic amendments is a valuable strategy for crop production. However, it remains unclear how organic amendments shape both soil microbial community structure and activity, and how these changes impact nutrient mineralization rates. We evaluated the effect of various organic amendments, which range in Carbon/Nitrogen (C/N) ratio and degradability, on the soil microbiome in a mesocosm study at 32, 69 and 132 days. Soil samples were collected to determine community structure (assessed by 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequences), microbial biomass (fungi and bacteria), microbial activity (leucine incorporation and active hyphal length), and carbon and nitrogen mineralization rates. We considered the microbial soil DNA as the microbial seedbank. High C/N ratio favored fungal presence, while low C/N favored dominance of bacterial populations. Our results suggest that organic amendments shape the soil microbial community structure through a feedback mechanism by which microbial activity responds to changing organic inputs and rearranges composition of the microbial seedbank. We hypothesize that the microbial seedbank composition responds to changing organic inputs according to the resistance and resilience of individual species, while changes in microbial activity may result in increases or decreases in availability of various soil nutrients that affect plant nutrient uptake. PMID:28198425

  7. [Influence of freshwater marsh tillage on microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing-Yu; Song, Chang-Chun; Song, Yan-Yu; Liu, De-Yan; Wan, Zhong-Mei; Liao, Yu-Jing

    2008-05-01

    The changes in microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) were examined in order to assess the effect of surface layer soil (0 - 10 cm) under different land-use types after freshwater marshes tillage in the Sanjiang Plain Northeast China. Land uses were Deyeuxia angustifolia freshwater marshes ((DAM), cultivated land (CL), recovery freshwater marsh (RFM), constructed woodland (CW). After DAM soil tillage, MBC, MBN, DOC and DON declined strongly in agricultural surface soil layer, decreased 63.8%-80.5% (MBC), 56.3%-67.1% (MBN), 43.1%-44.3% (DOC) and 25.2%-56.1% (DON) respectively. In contrast, these C, N fraction had significant recovered in RFM and CW surface soil, increased 36.1%-59.9% (MBC), 46.7%-65.9% (MBN), 67.0%-69.3% (DOC)and 81.2%-88.3% (DON) respectively. Cultivation and land-use affected soil MBC, MBN, DOC and DON intensely. Therefore these labile C, N fractions have the significant relative under different land-use types. However DOC was more obvious controlled than DON by the land-use types. The relative between DOC and MBC, MBN have much difference than DON, the main reason of this distinction is the diverse source in available carbon and nitrogen that taken by microbial property under different land uses.

  8. Looking inside the box: using Raman microspectroscopy to deconstruct microbial biomass stoichiometry one cell at a time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Edward K.; Singer, Gabriel A.; Pölzl, Marvin; Hämmerle, Ieda; Schwarz, Christian; Daims, Holger; Maixner, Frank; Battin, Tom J.

    2011-01-01

    Stoichiometry of microbial biomass is a key determinant of nutrient recycling in a wide variety of ecosystems. However, little is known about the underlying causes of variance in microbial biomass stoichiometry. This is primarily because of technological constraints limiting the analysis of macromolecular composition to large quantities of microbial biomass. Here, we use Raman microspectroscopy (MS), to analyze the macromolecular composition of single cells of two species of bacteria grown on minimal media over a wide range of resource stoichiometry. We show that macromolecular composition, determined from a subset of identified peaks within the Raman spectra, was consistent with macromolecular composition determined using traditional analytical methods. In addition, macromolecular composition determined by Raman MS correlated with total biomass stoichiometry, indicating that analysis with Raman MS included a large proportion of a cell's total macromolecular composition. Growth phase (logarithmic or stationary), resource stoichiometry and species identity each influenced each organism's macromolecular composition and thus biomass stoichiometry. Interestingly, the least variable peaks in the Raman spectra were those responsible for differentiation between species, suggesting a phylogenetically specific cellular architecture. As Raman MS has been previously shown to be applicable to cells sampled directly from complex environments, our results suggest Raman MS is an extremely useful application for evaluating the biomass stoichiometry of environmental microorganisms. This includes the ability to partition microbial biomass into its constituent macromolecules and increase our understanding of how microorganisms in the environment respond to resource heterogeneity.

  9. Looking inside the box: using Raman microspectroscopy to deconstruct microbial biomass stoichiometry one cell at a time.

    PubMed

    Hall, Edward K; Singer, Gabriel A; Pölzl, Marvin; Hämmerle, Ieda; Schwarz, Christian; Daims, Holger; Maixner, Frank; Battin, Tom J

    2011-02-01

    Stoichiometry of microbial biomass is a key determinant of nutrient recycling in a wide variety of ecosystems. However, little is known about the underlying causes of variance in microbial biomass stoichiometry. This is primarily because of technological constraints limiting the analysis of macromolecular composition to large quantities of microbial biomass. Here, we use Raman microspectroscopy (MS), to analyze the macromolecular composition of single cells of two species of bacteria grown on minimal media over a wide range of resource stoichiometry. We show that macromolecular composition, determined from a subset of identified peaks within the Raman spectra, was consistent with macromolecular composition determined using traditional analytical methods. In addition, macromolecular composition determined by Raman MS correlated with total biomass stoichiometry, indicating that analysis with Raman MS included a large proportion of a cell's total macromolecular composition. Growth phase (logarithmic or stationary), resource stoichiometry and species identity each influenced each organism's macromolecular composition and thus biomass stoichiometry. Interestingly, the least variable peaks in the Raman spectra were those responsible for differentiation between species, suggesting a phylogenetically specific cellular architecture. As Raman MS has been previously shown to be applicable to cells sampled directly from complex environments, our results suggest Raman MS is an extremely useful application for evaluating the biomass stoichiometry of environmental microorganisms. This includes the ability to partition microbial biomass into its constituent macromolecules and increase our understanding of how microorganisms in the environment respond to resource heterogeneity.

  10. Assessing microbial activities in metal contaminated agricultural volcanic soils--An integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Parelho, C; Rodrigues, A S; Barreto, M C; Ferreira, N G C; Garcia, P

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources, extensively used for agricultural purposes and with particular physicochemical properties that may result in accumulation of toxic substances, such as trace metals. Trace metal contaminated soils have significant effects on soil microbial activities and hence on soil quality. The aim of this study is to determine the soil microbial responses to metal contamination in volcanic soils under different agricultural land use practices (conventional, traditional and organic), based on a three-tier approach: Tier 1 - assess soil microbial activities, Tier 2 - link the microbial activity to soil trace metal contamination and, Tier 3 - integrate the microbial activity in an effect-based soil index (Integrative Biological Response) to score soil health status in metal contaminated agricultural soils. Our results showed that microbial biomass C levels and soil enzymes activities were decreased in all agricultural soils. Dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase activities, soil basal respiration and microbial biomass C were the most sensitive responses to trace metal soil contamination. The Integrative Biological Response value indicated that soil health was ranked as: organic>traditional>conventional, highlighting the importance of integrative biomarker-based strategies for the development of the trace metal "footprint" in Andosols.

  11. Impact of microbial inoculation on biomass accumulation by Sulla carnosa provenances, and in regulating nutrition, physiological and antioxidant activities of this species under non-saline and saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Hidri, R; Barea, J M; Mahmoud, O Metoui-Ben; Abdelly, C; Azcón, Rosario

    2016-08-20

    Bacteria (Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp.) and/or the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus intraradices were able to improve growth, physiological and biochemical characteristics of four Sulla carnosa Desf. provenances (Sidi khlif, Thelja, Kalbia and Kerker) from Tunisia under both saline and non-saline conditions. S. carnosa is a salt-tolerant legume plant, native from North Africa. The intrinsic bacterial characteristics evidenced the fitness of these bacteria to support salt stress and to stimulate plant growth. Bacillus sp. produced more indol acetic acid (IAA) than Pseudomonas sp. and showed a great surviving capacity under salt conditions supporting its capacity to improve plant growth under stress conditions. The microorganisms applied also have a different potential to increase the nutritional and related plant growth parameters. It is noticeable that some provenances reached the highest level of growth when inoculated with Bacillus sp. in Sidi khlif or by Bacillus plus AMF in Kalbia, which increased shoot by 318% and root by 774%. In contrast, in Thelja and Kerker the impact of the test microorganisms was mainly evidenced at increasing nutritional and physiological functions. Salinity reduced some growth and physiological variables as stomatal conductance, photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic efficiency and increased electrolyte leakage. However, the microbial inoculants compensated these detrimental effects in a degree depending on the S. carnosa provenance. These microorganisms also orchestrate antioxidant activities involved in adaptative responses in S. carnosa provenances. The intrinsic ability of inoculants allow us to select the provenance/microorganism combination which maximizes S. carnosa growth, nutrition and physiological/biochemical responses under salt and non-salt conditions. The results obtained support that the target microbial inocula are beneficial for the ecological stability if this Mediterranean legume.

  12. Monitoring microbial biomass and respiration in different soils from the Czech Republic--a summary of results.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jakub; Dusek, Ladislav; Klánová, Jana; Bezchlebová, Jitka; Holoubek, Ivan

    2004-03-01

    The microbial biomass (Cbio), respiration (basal respiration (BR) and potential respiration (PR)), and derived indices for 520 independent soil samples of 117 different soils from the Czech Republic were statistically analysed. The broad range of soil samples allowed the stepwise breakdown of the database into six reasonable categories of soil: arable soils, loamy grassland soils, sandy grassland soils with weak organic matter content, sandy grassland soils with moderate organic matter content, forest soils with moderate organic matter content, and forest organic soils with rich organic matter content. Because soil microbiology lacks benchmarking values, the ranges of the microbial characteristics for these categories were stated and are presented here. The separation into soil groups narrowed the ranges enough to be useful for comparative purposes. The groups displayed significant differences in basal microbial parameters. The lowest microbial biomass was found in arable soils and grassland sandy soils with weak organic matter content. The highest microbial biomass was shown by loamy grassland soils and organic forest soils. Respiration displayed similar results to the microbial biomass. The derived indices revealed less significant differences confirming their inner-standard nature. The relationships between the soil contamination and microbial parameters were not explored because of the confounding effect of soil organic matter. However, it was not shown by the category of grassland sandy soils with weak organic matter content suggesting they could be especially suitable for the biomonitoring of harmful effects of chemicals on soil microorganisms.

  13. Microbial activity at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.M.; Meike, A.

    1995-09-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy is engaged in a suitability study for a potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the containment and storage of commercially generated spent fuel and defense high-level nuclear waste. There is growing recognition of the role that biotic factors could play in this repository, either directly through microbially induced corrosion (MIC), or indirectly by altering the chemical environment or contributing to the transport of radionuclides. As a first step toward describing and predicting these processes, a workshop was held on April 10-12, 1995, in Lafayette, California. The immediate aims of the workshop were: (1) To identify microbially related processes relevant to the design of a radioactive waste repository under conditions similar to those at Yucca Mountain. (2) To determine parameters that are critical to the evaluation of a disturbed subterranean environment. (3) To define the most effective means of investigating the factors thus identified.

  14. Microbial biomass and basal respiration in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic soils in the areas of some Russian polar stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumov, E.; Mukhametova, N.

    2014-03-01

    Antarctica is the unique place for pedological investigations. Soils of Antarctica have been studied intensively during the last century. Antarctic logistic provides the possibility to scientists access the terrestrial landscapes mainly in the places of polar stations. That is why the main and most detailed pedological investigations were conducted in Mc Murdo Valleys, Transantarctic Mountains, South Shetland Islands, Larsemann hills and Schirmacher Oasis. Investigations were conducted during the 53rd and 55th Russian Antarctic expeditions on the base of soil pits and samples collected in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic regions. Soils of diverse Antarctic landscapes were studied with aim to assess the microbial biomass level, basal respiration rates and metabolic activity of microbial communities. The investigation conducted shows that soils of Antarctic are quite different in profile organization and carbon content. In general, Sub-Antarctic soils are characterized by more developed humus (sod) organo-mineral horizons as well as the upper organic layer. The most developed organic layers were revealed in peat soils of King-George Island, where its thickness reach even 80 cm. These soils as well as soils under guano are characterized by the highest amount of total organic carbon (TOC) 7.22-33.70%. Coastal and continental soils of Antarctic are presented by less developed Leptosols, Gleysols, Regolith and rare Ornhitosol with TOC levels about 0.37-4.67%. The metabolic ratios and basal respiration were higher in Sub-Antarctic soils than in Antarctic ones which can be interpreted as result of higher amounts of fresh organic remnants in organic and organo-mineral horizons. Also the soils of King-George island have higher portion of microbial biomass (max 1.54 mg g-1) than coastal (max 0.26 mg g-1) and continental (max 0.22 mg g-1) Antarctic soils. Sub-Antarctic soils mainly differ from Antarctic ones in increased organic layers thickness and total organic carbon content

  15. Effects of harvester ant (Messor spp.) activity on soil properties and microbial communities in a Negev Desert ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvester ants (Messor spp.) function as an essential link between aboveground resources and belowground biota such as the microbial community. We examined changes in soil microbial biomass and functional diversity resulting from harvester ant (Messor spp.) activity in the Negev Desert, Israel. Abi...

  16. Microbial Biomass Distribution and Compositional Changes Associated with a Warmer Climate in Boreal Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, L.; Jérôme, J.; Billings, S. A.; Edwards, K.; Morrill, P. L.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting the physiological and structural changes of the microbial community in warming soils is essential for a functional understanding of climate feedback mechanisms. Laboratory and field experiments have often found that warming increases soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization and decreases microbial biomass, but remain more inconclusive regarding microbial community structure. These experiments, however, have been limited to responses on a time scale of months to years, while soil properties change over decades to centuries. Studies along climate gradients may prove helpful in elucidating how climate history affects soil properties, including microbial community structure. We present the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) based community characterization of the organic (L, F, H) and mineral (B; top 10cm) horizons of podzols from two mesic boreal forest sites similar in most aspects (e.g. stand type, class and age) but differing in mean annual temperature (MAT) by almost 6°C. This temperature difference is similar to the warming predicted for this region by 2100. Results are compared to respiration rates in laboratory incubations. We observed consistent PLFA derived biomass per unit SOC throughout the profile, independent of depth or site. The organic horizons contained similar amounts of SOC and PLFA as the top 10 cm of the mineral horizon (2.5-3.4 kg C m-2; 10.3-12.6 mmol PLFA m-2). Within the organic horizon, the greatest proportion of SOC and PLFA were found in the F horizon. The overall distribution of PLFA among the soil horizons was largely unaffected by climate regime, except that biomass was shifted from F to L horizons at the warmer site (from 12% to 29% of total organic horizon PLFA located in L) indicating that biomass was located closer to the surface in warmer sites. A similar shift was found in respiration (26 vs. 42% of organic horizon CO2 from L). As expected, community structure changed with depth. The abundance of fungal and protozoan PLFA

  17. Influence of earthworm activity on microbial communities related with the degradation of persistent pollutants.

    PubMed

    Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Lee, Iwa; Verweij, Rudo A; Morais, Paula V; Van Velzen, Martin J M; Sousa, José Paulo; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2012-04-01

    Earthworms may promote the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil, but the mechanism through which they exert such influence is still unknown. To determine if the stimulation of PAH degradation by earthworms is related to changes in microbial communities, a microcosm experiment was conducted consisting of columns with natural uncontaminated soil covered with PAH-contaminated dredge sediment. Columns without and with low and high Eisenia andrei densities were prepared. Organic matter and PAH content, microbial biomass, and dehydrogenase activity (DHA) were measured in soil and sediment over time. Biolog Ecoplate™ and polymerase chain reaction using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were used to evaluate changes in metabolic and structural diversity of the microbial community, respectively. Earthworm activity promoted PAH degradation in soil, which was significant for biphenyl, benzo[a]pyrene, and benzo[e]pyrene. Microbial biomass and DHA activity generally did not change over the experiment. Earthworm activity did change microbial community structure, but this did not affect its functioning in terms of carbon substrate consumption. Results suggest no relationship between changes in the microbial community by earthworm activity and increased PAH disappearance. The role of shifts in soil microbial community structure induced by earthworms in PAH removal needs further investigation.

  18. [Dynamics of soil microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen under flooded condition].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shaojun; Peng, Peiqin; Rong, Xiangmin; Liu, Qiang; Tang, Qi

    2006-11-01

    With reddish yellow soil (RYS) and alluvial purple soil (APS), the two typical paddy soils in the Dongting Lake floodplain of China as test soils, an incubation test was conducted at 25 degrees C to study the dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen under flooded condition. Three treatments were installed, i.e., control (CK), ammonium sulfate (N), and rice straw powder plus ammonium sulfate (S-N). The results showed that during incubation, soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (SMBN), soil dissolved organic carbon (SDOC), and soil dissolved organic nitrogen (SDON) reached their maximum initially, decreased thereafter, and tended to be stable. After amending the substrates to the two soils, the averages of SMBC to soil total carbon, SMBN to soil total nitrogen, SDOC to soil total carbon, and SDON to soil total nitrogen were 2% - 3%, 2% - 3%, 1% or so, and 5% - 6%, respectively. In the two soils, the peak values of SMBC in treatment N and those of SMBN, SDOC and SDON in treatment S-N were the highest, while those of SMBC in treatments N and S-N had no significant difference. The peak values of SMBN, SDOC and SDON in RYS were significantly different between treatments N and S-N, while no significant difference was observed between the peak values of SMBN and SDOC in APS, because the fertility of RYS was lower than that of APS. In the first 7 days of incubation, SMBC/SMBN ratio was < 10, while after 14 days of incubation, this ratio was higher in treatment N than in treatment S-N at the same time in the same soil. The SDOC/SDON ratio in all treatments was the highest at the 3rd d, and the lowest at the 28th d of incubation.

  19. Effects of carbon amendment on in situ atrazine degradation and total microbial biomass.

    PubMed

    Ngigi, Anastasiah N; Getenga, Zachary M; Dörfler, Ulrike; Boga, Hamadi I; Kuria, Benson; Ndalut, Paul; Schroll, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This study elucidates the effects of carbon amendment on metabolic degradation of atrazine (6-chloro-N(2)-ethyl-N(4)-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and total microbial biomass in soil. Degradation of (14)C-ring-labelled atrazine was monitored in laboratory incubations of soils supplemented with 0, 10, 100 and 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose concentrations. An experiment to determine the effect of carbon amendment on total microbial biomass and soil respiration was carried out with different concentrations of sucrose and non-labelled atrazine. The soils were incubated at a constant temperature and constant soil moisture at water potential of -15 kPa and a soil density of 1.3 g cm(-3). Mineralization of (14)C-ring-labelled atrazine was monitored continuously over a period of 59 d in the first experiment. The CO(2) production was monitored for 62 d in the second experiment and microbial biomass determined at the end of the incubation period. The addition of 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose reduced atrazine mineralization to 43.5% compared to 51.7% of the applied amount for the treatment without sucrose. The addition of 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose modified the transformation products to 1.08 μg g(-1) deisopropylatrazine (DIA), 0.32 μg g(-1) desethylatrazine (DEA) and 0.18 μg g(-1) deisopropyl-2-hydroxyatrazine (OH-DIA). Treatment without sucrose resulted in formation of 0.64 μg g(-1) hydroxyatrazine (HA), 0.28 μg g(-1) DIA and 0.20 μg g(-1) OH-DIA. Atrazine dealkylation was enhanced in treatments with 100 and 1000 μg g(-1) of sucrose added. HA metabolite was formed in the control (no sucrose) and in the presence of 10 μg g(-1) of sucrose, whereas DEA was only detected in treatment with 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose. Results indicate that total microbial biomass increased significantly (P < 0.001) with the addition of 1000 μg g(-1) sucrose.

  20. Soil microbial biomass and root growth in Bt and non-Bt cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, D. K. Y.; Broughton, K.; Knox, O. G.; Hulugalle, N. R.

    2012-04-01

    The introduction of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) has had a substantial impact on pest management in the cotton industry. While there has been substantial research done on the impact of Bt on the above-ground parts of the cotton plant, less is known about the effect of Bt genes on below ground growth of cotton and soil microbial biomass. The aim of this research was to test the hypothesis that Bt [Sicot 80 BRF (Bollgard II Roundup Ready Flex®)] and non-Bt [Sicot 80 RRF (Roundup Ready Flex®)] transgenic cotton varieties differ in root growth and root turnover, carbon indices and microbial biomass. A field experiment was conducted in Narrabri, north-western NSW. The experimental layout was a randomised block design and used minirhizotron and core break and root washing methods to measure cotton root growth and turnover during the 2008/09 season. Root growth in the surface 0-0.1 m of the soil was measured using the core break and root washing methods, and that in the 0.1 to 1 m depth was measured with a minirhizotron and an I-CAP image capture system. These measurements were used to calculate root length per unit area, root carbon added to the soil through intra-seasonal root death, carbon in roots remaining at the end of the season and root carbon potentially added to the soil. Microbial biomass was also measured using the ninhydrin reactive N method. Root length densities and length per unit area of non-Bt cotton were greater than Bt cotton. There were no differences in root turnover between Bt and non-Bt cotton at 0-1 m soil depth, indicating that soil organic carbon stocks may not be affected by cotton variety. Cotton variety did not have an effect on soil microbial biomass. The results indicate that while there are differences in root morphology between Bt and non-Bt cotton, these do not change the carbon turnover dynamics in the soil.

  1. Temperature and Microbial Activity Effects on Soil Carbon Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissore, C.; van Diepen, L.; Wixon, D.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Giardina, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainties on the importance of environmental controls on soil C stabilization and turnover limit accurate predictions of the rate and magnitude of the response of soils to climate change. Here we report results from a study of interactions among vegetation and soil microbial communities in North American forests across a highly constrained, 22OC gradient mean annual temperature (MAT) as a proxy for understanding changes with climate. Previous work indicated that turnover and amount of labile SOC responded negatively to MAT, whereas stable SOC was insensitive to temperature variation. Hardwood forests stored a larger amount of stable SOC, but with shorter mean residence times than paired pine forests. Our findings suggest that the interaction between vegetation composition and microbial communities may affect SOC accumulation and stabilization responses to rising temperature. To investigate these relationships, we characterized the microbial communities with Phospholipid Fatty Acid (PLFA) analysis. PLFA analyses indicate complex microbial responses to increased MAT and vegetation composition. Microbial biomass declined with MAT in conifer forests and increased in hardwood forests. Relative abundance of actinomycetes increased with MAT for both forest types, and was correlated with amount and turnover of active SOC. The relative abundance of fungi decreased with increasing MAT, while gram+ bacteria increased, such that fungi:bacteria ratio decreased with MAT, with this trend being more pronounced for hardwood cover type. These results are consistent with a long-term warming experiment in a hardwood forest at the Harvard Forest LTER site, where after 12 years of warming the relative abundance of gram positive bacteria and actinomycetes increased, while fungal biomass decreased. In contrast, relationships between microbial groups and the stable fraction of SOC along the gradient were only observed in conifers. Increases in mean residence time of stable SOC were

  2. The good, the bad or the ugly: Microbial biomass of biogas residues as a contributor to soil carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coban, H.; Miltner, A.; Kaestner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Loss of soil organic matter is a recent problem in soils all over the world. This can be related to enhanced mineralization of the soil organic matter due to land use change, which is a source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide increase. For example, the carbon input from plant residues is reduced because of the increased cultivation of bioenergy crops. In order to avoid soil degradation, application of biogas residues is a common practice in such areas. Biogas residues are side products of biogas production and contain microbial biomass. Application of these residues as soil additive influences the soil microorganisms as well as the carbon cycle. We study this effect by incubating 13C-labeled biogas residues in an arable soil from the Static Fertilization Experiment in Bad Lauchstaedt, Germany. Labeled residues were produced via labeling of active microbial biomass by addition of KH13CO3 to biogas reactors. High enrichment in the various phospholipid fatty acids proved the successful labeling of the biomass. The labeled biogas residues are being long-term incubated in the soil. During incubation, we monitor the fate of the carbon by analyzing the label in phospholipid fatty acids, amino acids as well as carbon dioxide. This allows us to trace the fate of the biogas residues-derived C in soil and to quantify the effect on the transformation of the natural soil organic matter (e.g. negative effects such as priming effects). Also, microbial community dynamics will be determined using molecular biology tools such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR). In order to prevent potentially negative effects, various additives such as charred biomaterials, clays and chopped bark will be tested to improve the carbon storage in soil. In conclusion, this study investigates the fate and impact of biogas residues used as a soil additive on the soil microbial community and amount of soil organic matter. It is aimed to understand and

  3. Association of Microbial Community Composition and Activity with Lead, Chromium, and Hydrocarbon Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Shi, W.; Becker, J.; Bischoff, M.; Turco, R. F.; Konopka, A. E.

    2002-01-01

    Microbial community composition and activity were characterized in soil contaminated with lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), and hydrocarbons. Contaminant levels were very heterogeneous and ranged from 50 to 16,700 mg of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) kg of soil−1, 3 to 3,300 mg of total Cr kg of soil−1, and 1 to 17,100 mg of Pb kg of soil−1. Microbial community compositions were estimated from the patterns of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA); these were considerably different among the 14 soil samples. Statistical analyses suggested that the variation in PLFA was more correlated with soil hydrocarbons than with the levels of Cr and Pb. The metal sensitivity of the microbial community was determined by extracting bacteria from soil and measuring [3H]leucine incorporation as a function of metal concentration. Six soil samples collected in the spring of 1999 had IC50 values (the heavy metal concentrations giving 50% reduction of microbial activity) of approximately 2.5 mM for CrO42− and 0.01 mM for Pb2+. Much higher levels of Pb were required to inhibit [14C]glucose mineralization directly in soils. In microcosm experiments with these samples, microbial biomass and the ratio of microbial biomass to soil organic C were not correlated with the concentrations of hydrocarbons and heavy metals. However, microbial C respiration in samples with a higher level of hydrocarbons differed from the other soils no matter whether complex organic C (alfalfa) was added or not. The ratios of microbial C respiration to microbial biomass differed significantly among the soil samples (P < 0.05) and were relatively high in soils contaminated with hydrocarbons or heavy metals. Our results suggest that the soil microbial community was predominantly affected by hydrocarbons. PMID:12147482

  4. Association of microbial community composition and activity with lead, chromium, and hydrocarbon contamination.

    PubMed

    Shi, W; Becker, J; Bischoff, M; Turco, R F; Konopka, A E

    2002-08-01

    Microbial community composition and activity were characterized in soil contaminated with lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), and hydrocarbons. Contaminant levels were very heterogeneous and ranged from 50 to 16,700 mg of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) kg of soil(-1), 3 to 3,300 mg of total Cr kg of soil(-1), and 1 to 17,100 mg of Pb kg of soil(-1). Microbial community compositions were estimated from the patterns of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA); these were considerably different among the 14 soil samples. Statistical analyses suggested that the variation in PLFA was more correlated with soil hydrocarbons than with the levels of Cr and Pb. The metal sensitivity of the microbial community was determined by extracting bacteria from soil and measuring [(3)H]leucine incorporation as a function of metal concentration. Six soil samples collected in the spring of 1999 had IC(50) values (the heavy metal concentrations giving 50% reduction of microbial activity) of approximately 2.5 mM for CrO(4)2- and 0.01 mM for Pb2+. Much higher levels of Pb were required to inhibit [14C]glucose mineralization directly in soils. In microcosm experiments with these samples, microbial biomass and the ratio of microbial biomass to soil organic C were not correlated with the concentrations of hydrocarbons and heavy metals. However, microbial C respiration in samples with a higher level of hydrocarbons differed from the other soils no matter whether complex organic C (alfalfa) was added or not. The ratios of microbial C respiration to microbial biomass differed significantly among the soil samples (P < 0.05) and were relatively high in soils contaminated with hydrocarbons or heavy metals. Our results suggest that the soil microbial community was predominantly affected by hydrocarbons.

  5. Flexible C, N and P allocation in maize plants and soil microbial biomass under recurrent and long-term drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionova, Alla; Semenov, Vyacheslav; Yevdokimov, Ilya; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2016-04-01

    One of the negative effects of the global warming is increasing aridity worldwide. Alterations in plant and microbial C, N and P in response to drought events can differ considerably in magnitude and direction. Therefore, synchronization between C, N and P in plants, dissolved forms and microbial biomass in soil is of great interest. Our objective was to evaluate C:N:P stoichiometry relations in plants and soil as affected by moderate water shortage and severe drought with subsequent rewetting. We tested the sensitivity of stoichiometry ratios in plants, dissolved compounds and soil microbial biomass in greenhouse experiment with maize. Three treatments were used: i) control with constant soil moisture (CTL); ii) soil with constantly low wetness of 25% WHC (DRY) and iii) soil exposed to drying-rewetting events (DRW). N dynamics was the most sensitive to water stress in maize plants and soil, while P dynamics was almost unaffected by drought and rewetting. As a result, C:N and N:P ratios were also sensitive to water treatment indicating that C, N and P cycles were decoupled by the water stresses. High C:N ratios in CTL and low C:N ratios in DRY and DRW treatments indicate stoichiometric flexibility in plants and soil microbes. N allocation was found to respond to N shortage in CTL and increased salt concentrations in soil solution in DRY and DRW treatments. C:N:P stoichiometry in soil microbes was found flexible during active plant growth, while that at the end of growth season turned to almost homeostatic ratio. The research was supported by Russian Science Foundation (project 14-14-00625)

  6. [Characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in three types of plantations in southern subtropical area of China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Xia; Shi, Zuo-Min; Luo, Da; Liu, Shi-Rong; Lu, Li-Hua

    2013-07-01

    By using fumigation-extraction method and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis, this paper studied the characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in the Erythrophleum fordii, Castanopsis hystrix, and Pinus massoniana plantations in south subtropical China. The soil microbial biomass, total PLFAs, bacterial PLFAs, and fungal PLFAs in the plantations were significantly affected by the plantation type and season, and the soil microbial biomass, total PLFAs, and individual PLFA signatures were higher in dry season than in rainy season. The C. hystrix plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass carbon and total PLFAs, while the E. fordii plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass nitrogen. There was a significant positive correlation between the soil pH and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) PLFA (16:1omega5c). The soil total PLFAs, gram-positive bacterial PLFAs, saprophytic fungal PLFA (18:2omega6,9c), and the ratio of gram-positive to gram-negative bacterial PLFAs were significantly positively correlated with soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus, suggesting that the soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus contents were the most important nutrient factors affecting the numbers and types of the soil microorganisms. In addition, the ectomycorrhizae fungal PLFA (18:1omega9c) and AMF PLFA were significantly correlated with the soil C/N ratio.

  7. Effects of Biochar on Soil Microbial Biomass after Four Years of Consecutive Application in the North China Plain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-zhong; Dijkstra, Feike A.; Liu, Xing-ren; Wang, Yi-ding; Huang, Jian; Lu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The long term effect of biochar application on soil microbial biomass is not well understood. We measured soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) in a field experiment during a winter wheat growing season after four consecutive years of no (CK), 4.5 (B4.5) and 9.0 t biochar ha−1 yr−1 (B9.0) applied. For comparison, a treatment with wheat straw residue incorporation (SR) was also included. Results showed that biochar application increased soil MBC significantly compared to the CK treatment, and that the effect size increased with biochar application rate. The B9.0 treatment showed the same effect on MBC as the SR treatment. Treatments effects on soil MBN were less strong than for MBC. The microbial biomass C∶N ratio was significantly increased by biochar. Biochar might decrease the fraction of biomass N mineralized (KN), which would make the soil MBN for biochar treatments underestimated, and microbial biomass C∶N ratios overestimated. Seasonal fluctuation in MBC was less for biochar amended soils than for CK and SR treatments, suggesting that biochar induced a less extreme environment for microorganisms throughout the season. There was a significant positive correlation between MBC and soil water content (SWC), but there was no significant correlation between MBC and soil temperature. Biochar amendments may therefore reduce temporal variability in environmental conditions for microbial growth in this system thereby reducing temporal fluctuations in C and N dynamics. PMID:25025330

  8. Comparative toxicity of chlorpyrifos and its oxon derivatives to soil microbial activity by combined methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yao, Jun; Chen, Huilun; Chen, Ke; Trebse, Polonca; Zaray, Gyula

    2010-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of the pesticide Chlorpyrifos (CPF) and its oxon derivative (CPO) on soil microbial activity were evaluated through the measurement of metabolic parameters and the microbial urease enzyme. The thermodynamic parameters related to microbial activity were measured and recorded as power-time curves. Microbial growth rate constant k, total heat evolution Q(T), metabolic enthalpy DeltaH(met), mass specific heat rate J(Q/S), microbial biomass C and inhibitory ratio I were calculated. They showed the linear relationship with doses of CPF and CPO. Thereinto, the linear correlations, k versus biomass C and DeltaH(met) versus biomass C, elucidated that k and DeltaH(met) were growth yield dependent. In this work, 20% inhibitory ratio IC(20) was obtained with 9.8 microg g(-1) for CPF and 0.37 microg g(-1) CPO, meaning that the acute toxicity of CPO was 26 times that of CPF, since the CPO had more potent toxicity to living organism due to its active functional group. Comparing the change tendency of DeltaH(met) and other parameter, the values almost kept constant when exposure to CPF (<5.0 microg g(-1)). It illustrates that individual reacted to stress resulted from environment change by shifting resources from other biological activities (such as reproduction or growth) toward survival to some extent. Urease activity responses in relation to the CPF and CPO exposure were observed and consistent with above thermodynamic parameters.

  9. Biomass I. Science Activities in Energy [and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to biomass as a form of energy. (The word biomass is used to describe all solid material of animal or vegetable origin from which energy may be extracted.) Twelve student activities using art, economics,…

  10. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization and straw amendment on soil microbial biomass and soil functions after heat stress].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Shi; Liu, Man-Qiang; Jiao, Jia-Guo; Li, Hui-Xin; Hu, Feng

    2013-02-01

    A 60-day incubation experiment was conducted to study the effects of nitrogen fertilization (N), rice straw amendment (R), and their combination (RN) on the changes of soil microbial biomass and soil functions (basal respiration, substrate-induced respiration, and straw decomposition) after heat stress (40 degrees C for 18 h). Heat stress tended to promote the soil microbial biomass and soil functions, but the effects were weak and transient. Either with or without heating, treatment R and especially RN could greatly stimulate soil microbial biomass, basal respiration, substrate-induced respiration and straw decomposition, as compared to no straw amendment and with nitrogen fertilization alone, but the parameters in treatment N had less change, and even, presented a decreasing trend. It was suggested that straw amendment and its combination with nitrogen fertilization could improve soil functions in natural conditions or after environmental stress.

  11. Fractionating soluble microbial products in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Zeng, Raymond J; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-04-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) are the pool of organic compounds originating from microbial growth and decay, and are usually the major component of the soluble organic matters in effluents from biological treatment processes. In this work, SMP in activated sludge were characterized, fractionized, and quantified using integrated chemical analysis and mathematical approach. The utilization-associated products (UAP) in SMP, produced in the substrate-utilization process, were found to be carbonaceous compounds with a molecular weight (MW) lower than 290 kDa which were quantified separately from biomass-associated products (BAP). The BAP were mainly cellular macromolecules with an MW in a range of 290-5000 kDa, and for the first time were further classified into the growth-associated BAP (GBAP) with an MW of 1000 kDa, which were produced in the microbial growth phase, and the endogeny-associated BAP (EBAP) with an MW of 4500 kDa, which were generated in the endogenous phase. Experimental and modeling results reveal that the UAP could be utilized by the activated sludge and that the BAP would accumulate in the system. The GBAP and EBAP had different formation rates from the hydrolysis of extracellular polymeric substances and distinct biodegradation kinetics. This study provides better understanding of SMP formation mechanisms and becomes useful for subsequent effluent treatment.

  12. Correlation Between in-situ Redox Reaction Rates and Microbial Biomass Distribution in Porous Media Influenced by Different Transport Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thullner, M.; Pallud, C.; van Cappellen, P.; Regnier, P.

    2004-12-01

    Microbially mediated redox transformations of organic carbon play an important role for the fate of reactive species in porous media. The terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) involved in such reactions depend on the amount and degradability of the organic carbon species and lead to a succession of redox reactions where the TEAs are used-up in a temporal or, in case transport is considered, spatial sequence of decreasing energy yields. A direct characterization of redox stratified systems is challenged by our ability to measure reaction rates in-situ. One novel approach consists in quantifying and characterizing microorganisms in aquifers and sediments and to use such results to predict in-situ redox reaction rates. However, the existence of a spatial correlation between microbial abundance and associated in-situ redox reaction rates should be questioned. Here, we investigate this correlation for porous media having different transport regimes. In the environment, these regimes vary between systems such as aquifers, where advective transport in the water phase is the dominant transport mechanism, and aquatic sediments, where close to the sediment water interface the mixing activity of benthic macrofauna contributes significantly to transport. Results from estuarine sediments show that for such systems, the spatial distributions of redox reaction rates and the associated microorganisms are not correlated. This observation is supported by reactive transport simulations, which show that the ratio of the time scale of the mixing processes to the time scale of microbial growth is controlling the spatial correlation between redox reaction rates and the distribution of microorganisms. For sediments highly affected by mixing, the correlation is missing or weak, while in advection controlled systems such as aquifers, a good correlation between redox rates and microbial biomass distribution can be expected.

  13. Biomass Production from Electricity Using Ammonia as an Electron Carrier in a Reverse Microbial Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    West, Alan C.; Chandran, Kartik; Banta, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC) that fixes CO2 into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production. PMID:23028643

  14. Biomass production from electricity using ammonia as an electron carrier in a reverse microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Khunjar, Wendell O; Sahin, Asli; West, Alan C; Chandran, Kartik; Banta, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC) that fixes CO₂ into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production.

  15. A method for enhanced control of biomass activity and distribution in biofilters

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.H.; Kinney, K.A.

    1999-07-01

    Long-term performance of vapor-phase bioreactors can be unreliable because of uneven distribution of biomass and microbial activity throughout the bioreactors. One method to improve biomass distribution and maintain high removal efficiencies for continuous long-term use is to operate the bioreactor in a directionally-switching (DS) mode, in which the contaminant inlet is periodically switched between the top and bottom of the reactor column. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of DS operation on biomass distribution and activity. Two identical lab-scale biofilters were operated for 96 days at an inlet toluene concentration of 200 ppmv and an EBCT of 1 minute. One bioreactor operated in a unidirectional (UD) mode where the air stream was continuously fed to the bottom of the reactor, and the other operated in a DS mode in which the direction of the air stream through the bioreactor was reversed every 3 days. After an initial acclimation period, toluene removal efficiencies of over 99.9% were achieved in both bioreactors for over 40 days of operation. However, toluene removal efficiencies in the UD biofilter declined after 70 days and the pressure drop across the reactor increased quickly, whereas the DS reactor maintained relatively stable operation throughout the same period. The biomass distribution determined by volatile solids and plate counts indicates that the biomass was well distributed in the DS reactor, while excess biomass accumulated in the inlet section of the UD bioreactor. INT (iodonitrotetrazolium chloride) formazan assays were performed to estimate the biomass activity along the length of both bioreactors. These results reveal that biomass activity was more evenly distributed and sustained in the DS bioreactor, but in the UD bioreactor most of the bioactivity was confined to the front half of the bed.

  16. Photosynthetic microbial desalination cells (PMDCs) for clean energy, water and biomass production.

    PubMed

    Kokabian, Bahareh; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2013-12-01

    Current microbial desalination cell (MDC) performances are evaluated with chemical catalysts such as ferricyanide, platinum catalyzed air-cathodes or aerated cathodes. All of these methods improve power generation potential in MDCs, however, they are not preferable for large scale applications due to cost, energy and environmental toxicity issues. In this study, performance of microbial desalination cells with an air cathode and an algae biocathode (Photosynthetic MDC - PMDC) were evaluated, both under passive conditions (no mechanical aeration or mixing). The results indicate that passive algae biocathodes perform better than air cathodes and enhance COD removal and utilize treated wastewater as the growth medium to obtain valuable biomass for high value bioproducts. Maximum power densities of 84 mW m(-3) (anode volume) or 151 mW m(-3) (biocathode volume) and a desalination rate of 40% were measured with 0.9 : 1 : 0.5 volumetric ratios of anode, desalination and algae biocathode chambers respectively. This first proof-of-concept study proves that the passive mechanisms can be beneficial in enhancing the sustainability of microbial desalination cells.

  17. Fluorometric Determination of Adenosine Nucleotide Derivatives as Measures of the Microfouling, Detrital, and Sedimentary Microbial Biomass and Physiological Status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William M.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N6-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  18. Microbial biomass in a shallow, urban aquifer contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons: analysis by phospholipid fatty acid content and composition.

    PubMed

    Franzmann, P D; Patterson, B M; Power, T R; Nichols, P D; Davis, G B

    1996-06-01

    The city of Perth contains a number of sites that have been contaminated with hydrocarbons due to leakage from petroleum underground storage tanks. Microbial biomass in groundwater and sediment cores from above and below the water table, and from within and outside a plume of hydrocarbon contamination, was examined using phospholipid fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Microbial numbers, calculated from the phospholipid content, ranged from 0.9 x 10(6) to 7.8 x 10(6) 'Escherichia coli equivalent cells' g-1 dry wt of sediment. Over 96% of the microbial biomass was attached to the sediment and the proportion of attached cells did not decrease within the plume of contaminants. The amount of biomass within aquifer samples seemed to be related more to the proximity of the rhizosphere to the shallow aquifer, and other unknown urban inputs, rather than to the effects of the plume of contaminants. Fatty acids common to many bacterial groups dominated within the plume, and as such the analyses gave limited insight into microbial community structure. For site assessment of intrinsic remediation of shallow aquifers in urban areas, estimates of microbial biomass may not provide information that is readily applicable to plume management.

  19. Impact of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid upon iron speciation and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere of wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeTourneau, M.; Marshall, M.; Grant, M.; Freeze, P.; Cliff, J. B.; Lai, B.; Strawn, D. G.; Thomashow, L. S.; Weller, D. M.; Harsh, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is a redox-active antibiotic produced by diverse bacterial taxa, and has been shown to facilitate interactions between biofilms and iron (hydr)oxides in culture systems (Wang et al. 2011, J Bacteriol 192: 365). Because rhizobacterial biofilms are a major sink for plant-derived carbon and source for soil organic matter (SOM), and Fe (hydr)oxides have reactive surfaces that influence the stability of microbial biomass and SOM, PCA-producing rhizobacteria could influence soil carbon fluxes. Large populations of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains producing PCA in concentrations up to 1 μg/g root have been observed in the rhizosphere of non-irrigated wheat fields covering 1.56 million hectares of central Washington state. This is one of the highest concentrations ever reported for a natural antibiotic in a terrestrial ecosystem (Mavrodi et al. 2012, Appl Environ Microb 78: 804). Microscopic comparisons of PCA-producing (PCA+) and non-PCA-producing (PCA-) rhizobacterial colony morphologies, and comparisons of Fe extractions from rhizosphere soil inoculated with PCA+ and PCA- strains suggest that PCA promotes biofilm development as well as dramatic Fe transformations throughout the rhizosphere (unpublished data). In order to illustrate PCA-mediated interactions between biofilms and Fe (hydr)oxides in the rhizosphere, identify the specific Fe phases favored by PCA, and establish the ramifications for stability and distribution of microbial biomass and SOM, we have collected electron micrographs, X-ray fluorescence images, X-ray absorption near-edge spectra, and secondary-ion mass spectrometry images of wheat root sections inoculated with 15N-labelled PCA+ or PCA- rhizobacteria. These images and spectra allow us to assess the accumulation, turnover, and distribution of microbial biomass, the associations between Fe and other nutrients such as phosphorus, and the redox status and speciation of iron in the presence and absence of PCA. This

  20. Microbial respiration, but not biomass, responded linearly to increasing light fraction organic matter input: Consequences for carbon sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Yichao; Murphy, Daniel V.; Wang, Xiaoli; Hoyle, Frances C.

    2016-01-01

    Rebuilding ‘lost’ soil carbon (C) is a priority in mitigating climate change and underpinning key soil functions that support ecosystem services. Microorganisms determine if fresh C input is converted into stable soil organic matter (SOM) or lost as CO2. Here we quantified if microbial biomass and respiration responded positively to addition of light fraction organic matter (LFOM, representing recent inputs of plant residue) in an infertile semi-arid agricultural soil. Field trial soil with different historical plant residue inputs [soil C content: control (tilled) = 9.6 t C ha−1 versus tilled + plant residue treatment (tilled + OM) = 18.0 t C ha−1] were incubated in the laboratory with a gradient of LFOM equivalent to 0 to 3.8 t C ha−1 (0 to 500% LFOM). Microbial biomass C significantly declined under increased rates of LFOM addition while microbial respiration increased linearly, leading to a decrease in the microbial C use efficiency. We hypothesise this was due to insufficient nutrients to form new microbial biomass as LFOM input increased the ratio of C to nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur of soil. Increased CO2 efflux but constrained microbial growth in response to LFOM input demonstrated the difficulty for C storage in this environment. PMID:27752083

  1. Microbial respiration, but not biomass, responded linearly to increasing light fraction organic matter input: Consequences for carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Yichao; Murphy, Daniel V.; Wang, Xiaoli; Hoyle, Frances C.

    2016-10-01

    Rebuilding ‘lost’ soil carbon (C) is a priority in mitigating climate change and underpinning key soil functions that support ecosystem services. Microorganisms determine if fresh C input is converted into stable soil organic matter (SOM) or lost as CO2. Here we quantified if microbial biomass and respiration responded positively to addition of light fraction organic matter (LFOM, representing recent inputs of plant residue) in an infertile semi-arid agricultural soil. Field trial soil with different historical plant residue inputs [soil C content: control (tilled) = 9.6 t C ha‑1 versus tilled + plant residue treatment (tilled + OM) = 18.0 t C ha‑1] were incubated in the laboratory with a gradient of LFOM equivalent to 0 to 3.8 t C ha‑1 (0 to 500% LFOM). Microbial biomass C significantly declined under increased rates of LFOM addition while microbial respiration increased linearly, leading to a decrease in the microbial C use efficiency. We hypothesise this was due to insufficient nutrients to form new microbial biomass as LFOM input increased the ratio of C to nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur of soil. Increased CO2 efflux but constrained microbial growth in response to LFOM input demonstrated the difficulty for C storage in this environment.

  2. Unravelling the active microbial community in a thermophilic anaerobic digester-microbial electrolysis cell coupled system under different conditions.

    PubMed

    Cerrillo, Míriam; Viñas, Marc; Bonmatí, August

    2017-03-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) of pig slurry coupled to a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with a recirculation loop was studied at lab-scale as a strategy to increase AD stability when submitted to organic and nitrogen overloads. The system performance was studied, with the recirculation loop both connected and disconnected, in terms of AD methane production, chemical oxygen demand removal (COD) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations. Furthermore, the microbial population was quantitatively and qualitatively assessed through DNA and RNA-based qPCR and high throughput sequencing (MiSeq), respectively to identify the RNA-based active microbial populations from the total DNA-based microbial community composition both in the AD and MEC reactors under different operational conditions. Suppression of the recirculation loop reduced the AD COD removal efficiency (from 40% to 22%) and the methane production (from 0.32 to 0.03 m(3) m(-3) d(-1)). Restoring the recirculation loop led to a methane production of 0.55 m(3) m(-3) d(-1) concomitant with maximum MEC COD and ammonium removal efficiencies of 29% and 34%, respectively. Regarding microbial analysis, the composition of the AD and MEC anode populations differed from really active microorganisms. Desulfuromonadaceae was revealed as the most active family in the MEC (18%-19% of the RNA relative abundance), while hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanobacteriaceae) dominated the AD biomass.

  3. D:L-AMINO Acids and the Turnover of Microbial Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomstein, B. A.; Braun, S.; Mhatre, S. S.; Jørgensen, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    Decades of ocean drilling have demonstrated wide spread microbial life in deep sub-seafloor sediment, and surprisingly high microbial cell numbers. Despite the ubiquity of life in the deep biosphere, the large community sizes and the low energy fluxes in the vast buried ecosystem are still poorly understood. It is not know whether organisms of the deep biosphere are specifically adapted to extremely low energy fluxes or whether most of the observed cells are in a maintenance state. Recently we developed and applied a new culture independent approach - the D:L-amino acid model - to quantify the turnover times of living microbial biomass, microbial necromass and mean metabolic rates. This approach is based on the built-in molecular clock in amino acids that very slowly undergo chemical racemization until they reach an even mixture of L- and D- forms, unless microorganisms spend energy to keep them in the L-form that dominates in living organisms. The approach combines sensitive analyses of amino acids, the unique bacterial endospore marker (dipicolinic acid) with racemization dynamics of stereo-isomeric amino acids. Based on a heating experiment, we recently reported kinetic parameters for racemization of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark. The obtained racemization rate constants were faster than the racemization rate constants of free amino acids, which we have previously applied in Holocene sediment from Aarhus Bay and in up to 10 mio yr old sediment from ODP Leg 201. Another important input parameter for the D:L-amino acid model is the cellular carbon content. It has recently been suggested that the cellular carbon content most likely is lower than previously thought. In recognition of these new findings, previously published data based on the D:L-amino acid model were recalculated and will be presented together with new data from an Arctic Holocene setting with constant sub-zero temperatures.

  4. The effect of metal ions on the microbial attachment ability of flocculent activate sludge.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wen; Lv, Junping; Li, Yaochen; Chen, Lisha; Zhu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    As a kind of biofilm structure, microbial attachment was believed to play an important role in the aggregation and stability of flocculent activated sludge (FAS), and also its translation to aerobic granular activated sludge (AGAS). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Ca2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Zn2+, K+, and Na+, which were frequently found in the biological wastewater-treatment systems on the microbial attachment of FAS, in order to provide a new strategy for the cultivation of FAS and AGAS. The results showed that different metal ions had different effects on the process of microbial attachment of FAS; in particular, Cu2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ could increase the microbial attachment ability of FAS at appropriate concentrations, and disrupted the process at higher concentrations. Mg2+ would greatly enhance the microbial attachment of FAS at lower concentrations but then the biomass of attachment was fallen down to a level close to that of the control. However, Ca2+), K+, and Na+ always exhibited a positive impact on the microbial attachment of FAS. Besides, the concentration of FAS suspension and the culture time both had an effect on the microbial attachment of FAS. Moreover, the acyl-homoserine-lactones-based quorum-sensing system, the content of EPS, and the relative hydrophobicity of FAS had been greatly influenced by metal ions. As all these parameters had close relationships with microbial attachment process, changes in these parameters may affect the microbial attachment of FAS.

  5. Distribution of microbial biomass and the potential for anaerobic respiration in Hanford Site 300 Area subsurface sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Peacock, Aaron D.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-02-01

    Subsurface sediments were recovered from a 52 m deep borehole cored in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to assess the potential for biogeochemical transformation of radionuclide contaminants. Microbial analyses were made on 17 sediment samples traversing multiple geological units: the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation (9-17.4 m), the oxic fine-grained upper Ringold Formation (17.7-18.1 m), and the reduced Ringold Formation (18.3-52m). Microbial biomass (measured as phospholipid) ranged from 7-974 pmols per g in discrete samples, with the highest numbers found in the Hanford formation. On average, strata below 17.4 m had 13-fold less biomass than those from shallower strata. The nosZ gene encoding nitrous oxide reductase had an abundance of 5-17% relative to total 16S rRNA genes below 18.3 m and <5% above 18.1 m. Most nosZ sequences were affiliated with Ochrobactrum anthropi (97% sequence similarity) or had a nearest neighbor of Achromobacter xylosoxidans (90% similarity). Passive multilevel sampling of groundwater geochemistry demonstrated a redox gradient in the 1.5 m region between the Hanford-Ringold formation contact and the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface. Within this zone, copies of the dsrA gene and Geobacteraceae had the highest relative abundance. The majority of dsrA genes detected near the interface were related to Desulfotomaculum sp.. These analyses indicate that the region just below the contact between the Hanford and Ringold formations is a zone of active biogeochemical redox cycling.

  6. Microbial population in the biomass adhering to supporting material in a packed-bed reactor degrading organic solid waste.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kengo; Haruta, Shin; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2007-06-01

    An anaerobic packed-bed reactor using carbon fiber textiles (CFT) as the supporting material was continuously operated using an artificial garbage slurry. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that many bacteria in the biomass adhering to CFT were closely related to those observed from other anaerobic environments, although a wide variety of unidentified bacteria were also found. Dot blot hybridization results clarified that 16S rRNA levels of methanogens in the adhering biomass were higher than those in the effluent. Based on microscopic observation, the adhering biomass consisted of microorganisms, organic material, and void areas. Bacteria and Archaea detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization were distributed from the surface to the inner regions of the adhering biomass. Methanosarcina sp. tended to be more abundant in the inner part of the adhering biomass than at the surface. This is the first report to elucidate the structure of the microbial community on CFT in a packed-bed reactor.

  7. Microbial dynamics and enzyme activities in tropical Andosols depending on land use and nutrient inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mganga, Kevin; Razavi, Bahar; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter is mediated by enzymes and is a key source of terrestrial CO2 emissions. Microbial and enzyme activities are necessary to understand soil biochemical functioning and identify changes in soil quality. However, little is known about land use and nutrients availability effects on enzyme activities and microbial processes, especially in tropical soils of Africa. This study was conducted to examine how microbial and enzyme activities differ between different land uses and nutrient availability. As Andosols of Mt. Kilimanjaro are limited by nutrient concentrations, we hypothesize that N and P additions will stimulate enzyme activity. N and P were added to soil samples (0-20 cm) representing common land use types in East Africa: (1) savannah, (2) maize fields, (3) lower montane forest, (4) coffee plantation, (5) grasslands and (6) traditional Chagga homegardens. Total CO2 efflux from soil, microbial biomass and activities of β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase and phosphatase involved in C, N and P cycling, respectively was monitored for 60 days. Total CO2 production, microbial biomass and enzyme activities varied in the order forest soils > grassland soils > arable soils. Increased β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase activities after N addition of grassland soils suggest that microorganisms increased N uptake and utilization to produce C-acquiring enzymes. Low N concentration in all soils inhibited chitinase activity. Depending on land use, N and P addition had an inhibitory or neutral effect on phosphatase activity. We attribute this to the high P retention of Andosols and low impact of N and P on the labile P fractions. Enhanced CO2 production after P addition suggests that increased P availability could stimulate soil organic matter biodegradation in Andosols. In conclusion, land use and nutrients influenced soil enzyme activities and microbial dynamics and demonstrated the decline in soil quality after landuse

  8. Microbial biomass and carbon mineralization in agricultural soils as affected by pesticide addition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anjani; Nayak, A K; Shukla, Arvind K; Panda, B B; Raja, R; Shahid, Mohammad; Tripathi, Rahul; Mohanty, Sangita; Rath, P C

    2012-04-01

    A laboratory study was conducted with four pesticides, viz. a fungicide (carbendazim), two insecticides (chlorpyrifos and cartap hydrochloride) and an herbicide (pretilachlor) applied to a sandy clay loam soil at a field rate to determine their effect on microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and carbon mineralization (C(min)). The MBC content of soil increased with time up to 30 days in cartap hydrochloride as well as chlorpyrifos treated soil. Thereafter, it decreased and reached close to the initial level by 90th day. However, in carbendazim treated soil, the MBC showed a decreasing trend up to 45 days and subsequently increased up to 90 days. In pretilachlor treated soil, MBC increased through the first 15 days, and thereafter decreased to the initial level. Application of carbendazim, chlorpyrifos and cartap hydrochloride decreased C(min) for the first 30 days and then increased afterwards, while pretilachlor treated soil showed an increasing trend.

  9. Assessment of microbial biomass carbon nitrogen of native and non native perennial pasture soil using hyperspectral data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen (MBC/MBN) are integral parts of soil organic matter, and if left out of nutrient calculations may suggest increased need of fertilizer resulting in increased production costs and chemical runoff. Timely and cost-effective methods are needed to assess MBC a...

  10. Assessment of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen of native and non native perennial pasture soil using hyperspetral

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen (MBC/MBN) are integral parts of soil organic matter, and if left out of nutrient calculations may suggest increased need of fertilizer resulting in increased production costs and chemical runoff. Timely and cost-effective methods are needed to assess MBC a...

  11. Assessment of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen of native and non-native perennial pasture soils using hyperspectral data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) are integral parts to soil organic matter. Increased production costs and chemical runoff can result from excessive application of fertilizer if these measurements are not used in total nutrient calculations. More timely and cost-effective me...

  12. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Microbial Biomass C and N along an Elevational Gradient on the Eastern Tibetan Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Gou, Xiaolin; Tan, Bo; Wu, Fuzhong; Yang, Wanqin; Xu, Zhengfeng; Li, Zhiping; Zhang, Xitao

    2015-01-01

    Little information is available on the seasonal response of soil microbial biomass to climate warming even though it is very sensitive to climate change. A two-year field experiment was conducted in the subalpine and alpine forests of the eastern Tibetan Plateau, China. The intact soil cores from 3,600 m site were incubated in three elevations (3,000 m, 3,300 m and 3,600 m) to simulate climate warming. Soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) were measured at different periods (early growing season [EG], late growing season [LG], onset of soil freezing period [OF], deep soil frozen period [DF] and soil thawing period [ET]) from May 2010 to August 2012. Average air temperature and soil temperature increased with the decrease of elevation during the experimental period. MBC and MBN showed a sharp decrease during the OF and ET in both organic layer and mineral layer at the three sites. Additionally, a relatively high MBC was observed during the DF. MBC and MBN in the soil organic layer decreased with the decrease of elevation but the opposite was true in the mineral soil layer. Warming had stronger effects on soil microbial biomass in the organic layer than in the mineral soil layer. The results indicated that future warming would alter soil microbial biomass and biogeochemical cycling in the forest ecosystems on the eastern Tibetan Plateau.

  13. Seasonal changes on microbial metabolism and biomass in the euphotic layer of Sicilian Channel.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, R; Caruso, G; Leonardi, M; Maimone, G; Monticelli, L S; Azzaro, M; Cuttitta, A; Patti, B; La Ferla, R

    2015-12-01

    As a part of a wider project on fisheries ecology, several biological and environmental parameters were monitored during two oceanographic cruises (BANSIC 2012 and NOVESAR 2013) in the Sicily Channel, which connects the Western and Eastern Mediterranean basins. The prokaryotic abundances and biomass as well as hydrolysis rates on organic matter were investigated in the euphotic layer of a retention area for fish larval stages including anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus, Linnaeus, 1758) with the aim to investigate the different biogeochemical signatures in two seasonal conditions. The environmental parameters, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen together with heterotrophic production were also measured. Results showed significant increases for most of the studied parameters with increasing temperature during summer. This had effects on the Carbon cycle and recycling of nutrients; in fact total prokaryotic abundance and biomass, as well as carbon hydrolyzed by two enzymes (Leucine aminopeptidase and β-glucosidase), increased significantly during summer. Conversely Alkaline phosphatase activity, Chlorophyll concentration and Oxygen increased during winter. The same environmental parameters affected also the presence of fish eggs. Moreover high percentages of free enzymes (i.e., enzymes not associated with cells) were measured, accounting for percentages variable from 12 to 95 % of the total enzymatic activity, with values generally higher in summer than in winter. In this oligotrophic environment, the prokaryotic biomass was supported by the C hydrolyzed by enzymatic activities. The ratio between the hydrolyzed C and prokaryotic biomass was higher in winter than in summer, indicating that alkaline phosphatase activity contribute to an efficient incorporation of C into biomass in winter.

  14. Assessing Microbial Activity in Marcellus Shale Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishart, J. R.; Morono, Y.; Itoh, M.; Ijiri, A.; Hoshino, T.; Inagaki, F.; Verba, C.; Torres, M. E.; Colwell, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (HF) produces millions of gallons of waste fluid which contains a microbial community adapted to harsh conditions such as high temperatures, high salinities and the presence of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we present evidence for microbial activity in HF production fluids. Fluids collected from a Marcellus shale HF well were supplemented with 13C-labeled carbon sources and 15N-labeled ammonium at 25°C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Samples were analyzed for 13C and 15N incorporation at sub-micrometer scale by ion imaging with the JAMSTEC NanoSIMS to determine percent carbon and nitrogen assimilation in individual cells. Headspace CO2 and CH4 were analyzed for 13C enrichment using irm-GC/MS. At 32 days incubation carbon assimilation was observed in samples containing 1 mM 13C-labeled glucose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with a maximum of 10.4 and 6.5% total carbon, respectively. Nitrogen assimilation of 15N ammonium observed in these samples were 0.3 and 0.8% of total nitrogen, respectively. Head space gas analysis showed 13C enrichment in CH4 in anaerobic samples incubated with 1mM 13C-labeled bicarbonate (2227 ‰) or methanol (98943 ‰). Lesser 13C enrichment of CO2 was observed in anaerobic samples containing 1 mM 13C-labeled acetate (13.7 ‰), methanol (29.9 ‰) or glucose (85.4 ‰). These results indicate metabolic activity and diversity in microbial communities present in HF flowback fluids. The assimilation of 13C-labeled glucose demonstrates the production of biomass, a critical part of cell replication. The production of 13CO2 and 13CH4 demonstrate microbial metabolism in the forms of respiration and methanogenesis, respectively. Methanogenesis additionally indicates the presence of an active archaeal community. This research shows that HF production fluid chemistry does not entirely inhibit microbial activity or growth and encourages further research regarding biogeochemical processes occurring in

  15. Microbial inhibitors: formation and effects on acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Baral, Nawa Raj; Shah, Ajay

    2014-11-01

    Biobutanol is a promising biofuel due to the close resemblance of its fuel properties to gasoline, and it is produced via acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation using Clostridium species. However, lignin in the crystalline structure of the lignin-cellulose-hemicellulose biomass complex is not readily consumed by the Clostridium; thus, pretreatment is required to degrade this complex. During pretreatment, some fractions of cellulose and hemicellulose are converted into fermentable sugars, which are further converted to ABE. However, a major setback resulting from common pretreatment processes is the formation of sugar and lignin degradation compounds, including weak acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds, which have inhibitory effects on the Clostridium. In addition, butanol concentration above 13 g/L in the fermentation broth is itself toxic to most Clostridium strain(s). This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art knowledge on the formation of microbial inhibitors during the most common lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment processes. Metabolic effects of inhibitors and their impacts on ABE production, as well as potential solutions for reducing inhibitor formation, such as optimizing pretreatment process parameters, using inhibitor tolerant strain(s) with high butanol yield ability, continuously recovering butanol during ABE fermentation, and adopting consolidated bioprocessing, are also discussed.

  16. Effect of forest and soil type on microbial biomass carbon and respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habashi, Hashem

    2016-09-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the variation of soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and microbial respiration (MR) in three types soil (Chromic Cambisols, Chromic Luvisols and Eutric Leptosols) of mixed beech forest (Beech- Hornbeam and Beech- Maple). Soil was randomly sampled from 0-10 cm layer (plant litter removed), 90 soil samples were taken. Cmic determined by the fumigation-extraction method and MR by closed bottle method. Soil Corg, Ntot and pH were measured. There are significant differences between the soil types concerning the Cmic content and MR. These parameters were highest in Chromic Cambisols following Chromic Luvisols, while the lowest were in Eutric Leptosols. A similar trend of Corg and Ntot was observed in studied soils. Two-way ANOVA indicated that soil type and forest type have significantly effect on the most soil characteristics. Chromic Cambisols shows a productive soil due to have the maximum Cmic, MR, Corg and Ntot. In Cambisols under Beech- Maple forest the Cmic value and soil C/N ratio were higher compared to Beech-Hornbeam (19.5 and 4.1 mg C g-1, and 16.3 and 3.3, respectively). This fact might be indicated that Maple litter had more easy decomposable organic compounds than Hornbeam. According to regression analysis, 89 and 68 percentage of Cmic variability could explain by soil Corg and Ntot respectively.

  17. New perspectives on viable microbial communities in low-biomass cleanroom environments

    PubMed Central

    Vaishampayan, Parag; Probst, Alexander J; La Duc, Myron T; Bargoma, Emilee; Benardini, James N; Andersen, Gary L; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2013-01-01

    The advent of phylogenetic DNA microarrays and high-throughput pyrosequencing technologies has dramatically increased the resolution and accuracy of detection of distinct microbial lineages in mixed microbial assemblages. Despite an expanding array of approaches for detecting microbes in a given sample, rapid and robust means of assessing the differential viability of these cells, as a function of phylogenetic lineage, remain elusive. In this study, pre-PCR propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment was coupled with downstream pyrosequencing and PhyloChip DNA microarray analyses to better understand the frequency, diversity and distribution of viable bacteria in spacecraft assembly cleanrooms. Sample fractions not treated with PMA, which were indicative of the presence of both live and dead cells, yielded a great abundance of highly diverse bacterial pyrosequences. In contrast, only 1% to 10% of all of the pyrosequencing reads, arising from a few robust bacterial lineages, originated from sample fractions that had been pre-treated with PMA. The results of PhyloChip analyses of PMA-treated and -untreated sample fractions were in agreement with those of pyrosequencing. The viable bacterial population detected in cleanrooms devoid of spacecraft hardware was far more diverse than that observed in cleanrooms that housed mission-critical spacecraft hardware. The latter was dominated by hardy, robust organisms previously reported to survive in oligotrophic cleanroom environments. Presented here are the findings of the first ever comprehensive effort to assess the viability of cells in low-biomass environmental samples, and correlate differential viability with phylogenetic affiliation. PMID:23051695

  18. Simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biomass production by an immobilized photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    He, Huanhuan; Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Hu, Youshuang; Zhao, Yingying

    2014-05-01

    A photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC) was constructed by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells to fulfill electricity generation, biomass production and wastewater treatment. The immobilization conditions, including the concentration of immobilized matrix, initial inoculation concentration and cross-linking time, were investigated both for the growth of C. vulgaris and power generation. It performed the best at 5 % sodium alginate and 2 % calcium chloride as immobilization matrix, initial inoculation concentration of 10(6) cell/mL and cross-linking time of 4 h. Our findings indicated that C. vulgaris immobilization was an effective and promising approach to improve the performance of PAMFC, and after optimization the power density and Coulombic efficiency improved by 258 and 88.4 %, respectively. Important parameters such as temperature and light intensity were optimized on the performance. PAMFC could achieve a COD removal efficiency of 92.1 %, and simultaneously the maximum power density reached 2,572.8 mW/m(3) and the Coulombic efficiency was 14.1 %, under the light intensity of 5,000 lux and temperature at 25 °C.

  19. [Variation characteristics of soil microbial activities in the Tarim Desert Highway shelter forests, Xinjiang of Northwast China].

    PubMed

    Jin, Zheng-Zhong; Lei, Jia-Qiang; Li, Sheng-Yu; Xu, Xin-Wen

    2013-09-01

    By the methods of Biolog, fumigation extraction, and colorimetric titration, this paper determined the soil carbon sources metabolic intensities, microbial biomass, and enzyme activities in the Tarim Desert Highway shelter-forests with different plantation times, and analyzed the variation characteristics of soil microbial activities in these shelter forests. With the increasing planting years of the shelter forests, the soil microbial metabolic activities (AWCD) and microbial diversity indices enhanced obviously, but the AWCD values in different soil layers had no significant differences. The soil catalase activity among the forests had no significant difference, but the soil cellulase and sucrase activities varied significantly. The soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen increased with the increasing planting years of the shelter forests, having a significant difference among the forests, but the microbial biomass phosphorus had no significant difference. The AWCD values had significant correlations with soil available nutrient contents, but less correlations with soil bulk density and moisture content. It was suggested that under the present management patterns and climate conditions, the soil metabolic activities in the Tarim Desert Highway shelter forests would be improved continuously with the increasing planting years of the forests.

  20. Discovery of genes coding for carbohydrate-active enzyme by metagenomic analysis of lignocellulosic biomasses

    PubMed Central

    Montella, Salvatore; Ventorino, Valeria; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a high-throughput sequencing approach was applied to discover novel biocatalysts for lignocellulose hydrolysis from three dedicated energy crops, Arundo donax, Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Populus nigra, after natural biodegradation. The microbiomes of the three lignocellulosic biomasses were dominated by bacterial species (approximately 90%) with the highest representation by the Streptomyces genus both in the total microbial community composition and in the microbial diversity related to GH families of predicted ORFs. Moreover, the functional clustering of the predicted ORFs showed a prevalence of poorly characterized genes, suggesting these lignocellulosic biomasses are potential sources of as yet unknown genes. 1.2%, 0.6% and 3.4% of the total ORFs detected in A. donax, E. camaldulensis and P. nigra, respectively, were putative Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZymes). Interestingly, the glycoside hydrolases abundance in P. nigra (1.8%) was higher than that detected in the other biomasses investigated in this study. Moreover, a high percentage of (hemi)cellulases with different activities and accessory enzymes (mannanases, polygalacturonases and feruloyl esterases) was detected, confirming that the three analyzed samples were a reservoir of diversified biocatalysts required for an effective lignocellulose saccharification. PMID:28198423

  1. Effects of soil type and farm management on soil ecological functional genes and microbial activities

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, Jennifer; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne; Kang, S.; Zhou, Jizhong; Reganold, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between soil microbial diversity and soil function are the subject of much debate. Process-level analyses have shown that microbial function varies with soil type and responds to soil management. However, such measurements cannot determine the role of community structure and diversity in soil function. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of gene frequency and diversity, measured by microarray analysis, on soil processes. The study was conducted in an agro-ecosystem characterized by contrasting management practices and soil types. Eight pairs of adjacent commercial organic and conventional strawberry fields were matched for soil type, strawberry variety, and all other environmental conditions. Soil physical, chemical and biological analyses were conducted including functional gene microarrays (FGA). Soil physical and chemical characteristics were primarily determined by soil textural type (coarse vs fine-textured), but biological and FGA measures were more influenced by management (organic vs conventional). Organically managed soils consistently showed greater functional activity as well as FGA signal intensity (SI) and diversity. Overall FGA SI and diversity were correlated to total soil microbial biomass. Functional gene group SI and/or diversity were correlated to related soil chemical and biological measures such as microbial biomass, cellulose, dehydrogenase, ammonium and sulfur. Management was the dominant determinant of soil biology as measured by microbial gene frequency and diversity, which paralleled measured microbial processes.

  2. Metalliferous Biosignatures for Deep Subsurface Microbial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, John; Brolly, Connor; Spinks, Sam; Bowden, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of microbes and metals is widely assumed to have occurred in surface or very shallow subsurface environments. However new evidence suggests that much microbial activity occurs in the deep subsurface. Fluvial, lacustrine and aeolian `red beds' contain widespread centimetre-scale reduction spheroids in which a pale reduced spheroid in otherwise red rocks contains a metalliferous core. Most of the reduction of Fe (III) in sediments is caused by Fe (III) reducing bacteria. They have the potential to reduce a range of metals and metalloids, including V, Cu, Mo, U and Se, by substituting them for Fe (III) as electron acceptors, which are all elements common in reduction spheroids. The spheroidal morphology indicates that they were formed at depth, after compaction, which is consistent with a microbial formation. Given that the consequences of Fe (III) reduction have a visual expression, they are potential biosignatures during exploration of the terrestrial and extraterrestrial geological record. There is debate about the energy available from Fe (III) reduction on Mars, but the abundance of iron in Martian soils makes it one of the most valuable prospects for life there. Entrapment of the microbes themselves as fossils is possible, but a more realistic target during the exploration of Mars would be the colour contrasts reflecting selective reduction or oxidation. This can be achieved by analysing quartz grains across a reduction spheroid using Raman spectroscopy, which demonstrates its suitability for life detection in subsurface environments. Microbial action is the most suitable explanation for the formation of reduction spheroids and may act as metalliferous biosignatures for deep subsurface microbial activity.

  3. Spatial Distribution, Structure, Biomass, and Physiology of Microbial Assemblages across the Southern Ocean Frontal Zones during the Late Austral Winter

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Roger B.; Lowery, H. Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    We examined the spatial distributions of picoplankton, nanoplankton, and microplankton biomass and physiological state relative to the hydrography of the Southern Ocean along 90° W longitude and across the Drake Passage in the late austral winter. The eastern South Pacific Ocean showed some large-scale biogeographical differences and size class variability. Microbial ATP biomass was greatest in euphotic surface waters. The horizontal distributions of microbial biomass and physiological state (adenylate energy charge ratio) coincided with internal currents (fronts) of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. In the Drake Passage, the biological scales in the euphotic and aphotic zones were complex, and ATP, total adenylate, and adenylate energy charge ratio isopleths were compressed due to the extension of the sea ice from Antarctica and constriction of the Circumpolar Current through the narrow passage. The physiological state of microbial assemblages and biomass were much higher in the Drake Passage than in the eastern South Pacific Ocean. The temperature of Antarctic waters, not dissolved organic carbon, was the major variable controlling picoplankton growth. Estimates of picoplankton production based on ATP increments with time suggest that production under reduced predation pressure was 1 to 10 μg of carbon per liter per day. Our results demonstrate the influence of large-scale hydrographic processes on the distribution and structure of microplankton, nanoplankton, and picoplankton across the Southern Ocean. PMID:16346777

  4. Response of soil microbial biomass and community structures to conventional and organic farming systems under identical crop rotations.

    PubMed

    Esperschütz, Jürgen; Gattinger, Andreas; Mäder, Paul; Schloter, Michael; Fliessbach, Andreas

    2007-07-01

    In this study the influence of different farming systems on microbial community structure was analyzed using soil samples from the DOK long-term field experiment in Switzerland, which comprises organic (BIODYN and BIOORG) and conventional (CONFYM and CONMIN) farming systems as well as an unfertilized control (NOFERT). We examined microbial communities in winter wheat plots at two different points in the crop rotation (after potatoes and after maize). Employing extended polar lipid analysis up to 244 different phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and phospholipid ether lipids (PLEL) were detected. Higher concentrations of PLFA and PLEL in BIODYN and BIOORG indicated a significant influence of organic agriculture on microbial biomass. Farmyard manure (FYM) application consistently revealed the strongest, and the preceding crop the weakest, influence on domain-specific biomass, diversity indices and microbial community structures. Esterlinked PLFA from slowly growing bacteria (k-strategists) showed the strongest responses to long-term organic fertilization. Although the highest fungal biomass was found in the two organic systems of the DOK field trial, their contribution to the differentiation of community structures according to the management regime was relatively low. Prokaryotic communities responded most strongly to either conventional or organic farming management.

  5. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate.

  6. Influence of interfaces on microbial activity.

    PubMed Central

    van Loosdrecht, M C; Lyklema, J; Norde, W; Zehnder, A J

    1990-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion in natural and artificial systems has been critically reviewed to investigate the influences exerted by the presence of interfaces. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that, in the presence of a solid phase, the activity of bacterial cultures is changed. Reviewing relevant literature, two problems were encountered. One is of an experimental nature. Due to lack of similarity in experimental conditions, disparate experiments often cannot be compared; their results may even appear conflicting. The other problem is of an interpretational nature: several hypothetical theories exist which try to explain the effect of surfaces on microbial activity. These theories often confuse changes in the medium and limitations in mass transfer which are due to the presence of solid surfaces (indirect influences) with changes in cell properties (direct influences). Whenever a surface is reported to influence the metabolism of bacteria, the action is found almost exclusively to be due to changes in the medium or environment and is therefore indirect. Based on data reported in the literature, and by using thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, it is concluded that so far neither experimental nor theoretical evidence exists for a direct influence of interfaces on microbial activity. PMID:2181260

  7. Earthworm Biomass Measurement: A Science Activity for Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskett, Jonathan; Levine, Elissa; Carey, Pauline B.; Niepold III, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity on biomass measurement which, in this case, is the weight of a group of living things in a given area. The earthworm activity gives students a greater understanding of ecology, practical math applications, and the scientific method. (ASK)

  8. [Effects of urease/nitrification inhibitors on soil available N and microbial biomass N and on N uptake of wheat].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wenju; Chen, Lijun; Jiang, Yong; Wen, Dazhong

    2004-10-01

    With an aquic brown earth as test soil, this paper studied the effects of urease inhibitor (NBPT), nitrification inhibitor (DCD) and their combinations on the dynamics of soil available N and microbial biomass N. The results showed that the treatments of inhibitors, especially the combined application of NBPT and DCD, could increase soil NH4+-N by 2%-53%, inhibit NH4+ oxidation, decrease soil NO3(-)-N concentration, increase soil total available N by 34%-44%, and increase wheat N uptake by 0.26%-6.79%. The best treatment was urease inhibitor combined with nitrification inhibitor. The application of inhibitors increased soil microbial biomass N immobilization at the early growth stage of wheat, and promoted soil N mineralization at filling stage.

  9. No enhancement of cyanobacterial bloom biomass decomposition by sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian-Ran; Song, Na; Chen, Mo; Yan, Zai-Sheng; Jiang, He-Long

    2016-11-01

    The sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) has potential application to control the degradation of decayed cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) in sediment in eutrophic lakes. In this study, temperatures from 4 to 35 °C were investigated herein as the major impact on SMFC performance in CBB-amended sediment. Under low temperature conditions, the SMFC could still operate, and produced a maximum power density of 4.09 mW m(-2) at 4 °C. Coupled with the high substrate utilization, high output voltage was generated in SMFCs at high temperatures. The application of SMFC affected the anaerobic fermentation progress and was detrimental to the growth of methanogens. At the same time, organic matter of sediments in SMFC became more humified. As a result, the fermentation of CBB was not accelerated with the SMFC application, and the removal efficiency of the total organic matter was inhibited by 5% compared to the control. Thus, SMFC could operate well year round in sediments with a temperature ranging from 4 to 35 °C, and also exhibit practical value by inhibiting quick CBB decomposition in sediments in summer against the pollution of algae organic matter.

  10. [Impact of tillage practices on microbial biomass carbon in top layer of black soils].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing-jie; Jia, Shu-xia; Zhang, Xiao-ping; Liang, Ai-zhen; Chen, Xue-wen; Zhang, Shi-xiu; Liu, Si-yi; Chen, Sheng-long

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted on a long-term (13 years) tillage and rotation experiment on black soil in northeast China to determine the effects of tillage, time and soil depth on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC). Tillage systems included no tillage (NT), ridge tillage (RT) and mould-board plough (MP). Soil sampling was done at 0-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm depths in June, August and September, 2013, and April, 2014 in the corn phase of corn-soybean rotation plots. MBC content was measured by the chloroform fumigation extraction (CFE) method. The results showed that the MBC content varied with sampling time and soil depth. Soil MBC content was the lowest in April for all three tillage systems, and was highest in June for MP, and highest in August for NT and RT. At each sampling time, tillage system had a significant effect on soil MBC content only in the top 0-5 cm layer. The MBC content showed obvious stratification under NT and RT with a higher MBC content in the top 0-5 cm layer than under MP. The stratification ratios under NT and RT were greatest in September when they were respectively 67.8% and 95.5% greater than under MP. Our results showed that soil MBC contents were greatly affected by the time and soil depth, and were more apparently accumulated in the top layer under NT and RT.

  11. [Characteristics of soil organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon in hilly red soil region].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoyon; Huang, Daoyou; Tong, Chengli; Zhang, Wenju; Xiao, Heai; Su, Yirong; Wu, Jinshui

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, 535 soil samples (0 to approximately 20 cm) were taken from the woodland, orchard, upland, and paddy field in the hilly red soil region of south China, and the quantitative characteristics of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil microbial biomass carbon (SMB-C) were studied. The results showed that SOC content was the highest (16.0 g x kg(-1)) in paddy field and the lowest (8.4 g x kg(-1)) in woodland, while SMB-C content was the highest in paddy field (830 mg x kg(-1)) and the lowest in orchard (200 mg x kg(-1)). There was a highly significant positive correlation (P < 0.01) between the contents of SOC and SMB-C in the four land-use types. It was suggested that the changes of SMB-C content could sensitively indicate the dynamics of SOC. The transition from woodland to orchard or cultivated land in hilly red soil region would not decrease the SOC content.

  12. Influence of Deep Ocean Sewage Outfalls on the Microbial Activity of the Surrounding Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Novitsky, James A.; Karl, David M.

    1985-01-01

    The microbial activity near two deep ocean sewage outfalls off the coast of the island of Oahu, Hawaii, was characterized. Water samples and sediment samples to a depth of 4.5 cm were analyzed from an area of approximately 4.5 × 104 m2 surrounding the outfalls. Although the effluent water at both sites exhibited heterotrophic activity that was 2 orders of magnitude greater than water from a control site, ambient water samples taken within 1 m of the discharge ports exhibited activity only twice that of the control water. The heterotrophic activity of the outfall sediment was only elevated above that of the control site for surface samples collected within 10 m of the outfall. Likewise, the rates of microbial nucleic acid synthesis and carbon production in the sediment were only elevated immediately adjacent to the outfalls. Total microbial biomass, as determined by the ATP content of the sediment, varied spatially but was generally elevated at the outfall sites. The specific growth rates calculated for the sediment microbial populations, however, were not greater at the outfall sites. At one site the rocks surrounding the diffuser pipe were covered with copious amounts of slime that appeared to be composed entirely of microbial cells and filaments. This microbial mat was extremely active with respect to heterotrophic activity and biomass production. Overall, it appears that the impact of the sewage discharge on the ambient seawater microbiota is slight and that the effect on the sediment microbiota is confined to an area immediately adjacent to the diffuser ports. In the sand itself, the effect is limited to the upper 2 cm at most. PMID:16346944

  13. Physicochemical properties influencing denitrification rate and microbial activity in denitrification bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    The use of N-based fertilizer will need to increase to meet future demands, yet existing applications have been implicated as the main source of coastal eutrophication and hypoxic zones. Producing sufficient crops to feed a growing planet will require efficient production in combination with sustainable treatment solutions. The long-term success of denitrification bioreactors to effectively remove nitrate (NO¬3), indicates this technology is a feasible treatment option. Assessing and quantifying the media properties that affect NO¬3 removal rate and microbial activity can improve predictions on bioreactor performance. It was hypothesized that denitrification rates and microbial biomass would be correlated with total C, NO¬3 concentration, metrics of organic matter quality, media surface area and laboratory measures of potential denitrification rate. NO¬3 removal rates and microbial biomass were evaluated in mesocosms filled with different wood treatments and the unique influence of these predictor variables was determined using a multiple linear regression analysis. NO3 reduction rates were independent of NO¬3 concentration indicating zero order reaction kinetics. Temperature was strongly correlated with denitrification rate (r2=0.87; Q10=4.7), indicating the variability of bioreactor performance in differing climates. Fiber quality, and media surface area were strong (R>0.50), unique predictors of rates and microbial biomass, although C:N ratio and potential denitrification rate did not predict actual denitrification rate or microbial biomass. Utilizing a stepwise multiple linear regression, indicates that the denitrification rate can be effectively (r2=0.56;p<0.0001) predicted if the groundwater temperature, neutral detergent fiber and surface area alone are quantified. These results will assist with the widespread implementation of denitrification bioreactors to achieve significant N load reductions in large watersheds. The nitrate reduction rate as a

  14. Food web structure in the recently flooded Sep Reservoir as inferred from phytoplankton population dynamics and living microbial biomass.

    PubMed

    Tadonléké, R D; Jugnia, L B; Sime-Ngando, T; Devaux, J; Romagoux, J C

    2002-01-01

    Phytoplankton dynamics, bacterial standing stocks and living microbial biomass (derived from ATP measurements, 0.7-200 mm size class) were examined in 1996 in the newly flooded (1995) Sep Reservoir ('Massif Central,' France), for evidence of the importance of the microbial food web relative to the traditional food chain. Phosphate concentrations were low, N:P ratios were high, and phosphate losses converted into carbon accounted for <50% of phytoplankton biomass and production, indicating that P was limiting phytoplankton development during the study. The observed low availability of P contrasts with the high release of "directly" assimilable P often reported in newly flooded reservoirs, suggesting that factors determining nutrient dynamics in such ecosystems are complex. The phosphate availability, but also the water column stability, seemed to be among the major factors determining phytoplankton dynamics, as (i) large-size phytoplankton species were prominent during the period of increasing water column stability, whereas small-size species dominated phytoplankton assemblages during the period of decreasing stability, and (ii) a Dinobryon divergens bloom occurred during a period when inorganic P was undetectable, coinciding with the lowest values of bacterial standing stocks. Indication of grazing limitation of bacterial populations by the mixotrophic chrysophyte D. divergens (in late spring) and by other potential grazers (mainly rotifers in summer) seemed to be confirmed by the Model II or functional slopes of the bacterial vs phytoplankton regressions, which were always <0.63. Phytoplankton biomass was not correlated with phosphorus sources and its contribution was remarkably low relative to the living microbial biomass which, in contrast, was positively correlated with total phosphorus in summer. We conclude that planktonic microheterotrophs are strongly implicated in the phosphorus dynamics in the Sep Reservoir, and thus support the idea that an important

  15. Comparative resistance and resilience of soil microbial communities and enzyme activities in adjacent native forest and agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Chaer, Guilherme; Fernandes, Marcelo; Myrold, David; Bottomley, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Degradation of soil properties following deforestation and long-term soil cultivation may lead to decreases in soil microbial diversity and functional stability. In this study, we investigated the differences in the stability (resistance and resilience) of microbial community composition and enzyme activities in adjacent soils under either native tropical forest (FST) or in agricultural cropping use for 14 years (AGR). Mineral soil samples (0 to 5 cm) from both areas were incubated at 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C, 60 degrees C, or 70 degrees C for 15 min in order to successively reduce the microbial biomass. Three and 30 days after the heat shocks, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis, cellulase and laccase activities, and phospholipid-derived fatty acids-based microbial community composition were measured. Microbial biomass was reduced up to 25% in both soils 3 days after the heat shocks. The higher initial values of microbial biomass, enzyme activity, total and particulate soil organic carbon, and aggregate stability in the FST soil coincided with higher enzymatic stability after heat shocks. FDA hydrolysis activity was less affected (more resistance) and cellulase and laccase activities recovered more rapidly (more resilience) in the FST soil relative to the AGR counterpart. In the AGR soil, laccase activity did not show resilience to any heat shock level up to 30 days after the disturbance. Within each soil type, the microbial community composition did not differ between heat shock and control samples at day 3. However, at day 30, FST soil samples treated at 60 degrees C and 70 degrees C contained a microbial community significantly different from the control and with lower biomass regardless of high enzyme resilience. Results of this study show that deforestation followed by long-term cultivation changed microbial community composition and had differential effects on microbial functional stability. Both soils displayed similar resilience to FDA hydrolysis, a

  16. Activity assessment of microbial fibrinolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kotb, Essam

    2013-08-01

    Conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin inside blood vessels results in thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In general, there are four therapy options: surgical operation, intake of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or fibrinolytic enzymes. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted much more attention than typical thrombolytic agents because of the expensive prices and the side effects of the latter. The fibrinolytic enzymes were successively discovered from different microorganisms, the most important among which is the genus Bacillus. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes, especially those from food-grade microorganisms, have the potential to be developed as functional food additives and drugs to prevent or cure thrombosis and other related diseases. There are several assay methods for these enzymes; this may due to the insolubility of substrate, fibrin. Existing assay methods can be divided into three major groups. The first group consists of assay of fibrinolytic activity with natural proteins as substrates, e.g., fibrin plate methods. The second and third groups of assays are suitable for kinetic studies and are based on the determination of hydrolysis of synthetic peptide esters. This review will deal primarily with the microorganisms that have been reported in literature to produce fibrinolytic enzymes and the first review discussing the methods used to assay the fibrinolytic activity.

  17. Black Nitrogen as a source for the built-up of microbial biomass in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Martín, María; Milter, Anja; Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    In areas with frequent wildfires, soil organic nitrogen (SON) is sequestered in pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) due to heat-induced transformation of proteinaceous compounds into N-heterocycles, i.e. pyrrole, imidazole and indole compounds. These newly formed structures, known as Black Nitrogen (BN), have been assumed to be hardly degradable by microorganisms, thus being efficiently sequestered from the N cycle. On the other hand, a previous study showed that nitrogen of BN can be used by plants for the built-up of their biomass (de la Rosa and Knicker 2011). Thus, BN may play an important role as an N source during the recovery of the forest after a fire event. In order to obtain a more profound understanding of the role of BN within the N cycle in soils, we studied the bioavailability and incorporation of N derived from PyOM into microbial amino acids. For that, pots with soil from a burnt and an unburnt Cambisol located under a Mediterranean forest were covered with different amendments. The toppings were mixtures of unlabeled KNO3 with 15N labeled grass or 15N-labeled PyOM from burned grass and K15NO3 mixed with unlabeled grass material or PyOM. The pots were kept in the greenhouse under controlled conditions for 16 months and were sampled after 0.5, 1, 5, 8 and 16 months. From all samples the amino acids were extracted after hydrolysis (6 M HCl, 22 h, 110 °C) and quantified via gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The fate of 15N was followed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The results show that the contribution of extractable amino acids to total soil organic matter was always higher in the unburnt than in the burnt soil. However, with ongoing incubation their amount decreased. Already after 0.5 months, some PyOM-derived 15N was incorporated into the extractable amino acids and the amount increased with experiment time. Since this can only occur after prior microbial degradation of PyOM our results clearly support a lower biochemical

  18. Soil microbial activity is affected by Roundup WeatherMax and pesticides applied to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Sarah H; Haney, Richard L; Senseman, Scott A; Hons, Frank M; Chandler, James M

    2006-09-20

    Adoption of glyphosate-based weed control systems has led to increased use of the herbicide with continued use of additional pesticides. Combinations of pesticides may affect soil microbial activity differently than pesticides applied alone. Research was conducted to evaluate the influence of glyphosate-based cotton pest management systems on soil microbial activity. Soil was treated with commercial formulations of trifluralin, aldicarb, and mefenoxam + pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) with or without glyphosate (applied as Roundup WeatherMax). The soil microbial activity was measured by quantifying C and N mineralization. Soil microbial biomass was determined using the chloroform fumigation-incubation method. Soils treated with glyphosate alone exhibited greater cumulative C mineralization 30 days after treatment than all other treatments, which were similar to the untreated control. The addition of Roundup WeatherMax reduced C mineralization in soils treated with fluometuron, aldicarb, or mefenoxam + PCNB formulations. These results indicate that glyphosate-based herbicides alter the soil microbial response to other pesticides.

  19. Factors Controlling Soil Microbial Biomass and Bacterial Diversity and Community Composition in a Cold Desert Ecosystem: Role of Geographic Scale.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, David J; Van Horn, M Lee; Barrett, John E; Gooseff, Michael N; Altrichter, Adam E; Geyer, Kevin M; Zeglin, Lydia H; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D

    2013-01-01

    Understanding controls over the distribution of soil bacteria is a fundamental step toward describing soil ecosystems, understanding their functional capabilities, and predicting their responses to environmental change. This study investigated the controls on the biomass, species richness, and community structure and composition of soil bacterial communities in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, at local and regional scales. The goals of the study were to describe the relationships between abiotic characteristics and soil bacteria in this unique, microbially dominated environment, and to test the scale dependence of these relationships in a low complexity ecosystem. Samples were collected from dry mineral soils associated with snow patches, which are a significant source of water in this desert environment, at six sites located in the major basins of the Taylor and Wright Valleys. Samples were analyzed for a suite of characteristics including soil moisture, pH, electrical conductivity, soil organic matter, major nutrients and ions, microbial biomass, 16 S rRNA gene richness, and bacterial community structure and composition. Snow patches created local biogeochemical gradients while inter-basin comparisons encompassed landscape scale gradients enabling comparisons of microbial controls at two distinct spatial scales. At the organic carbon rich, mesic, low elevation sites Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria were prevalent, while Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were dominant at the high elevation, low moisture and biomass sites. Microbial parameters were significantly related with soil water content and edaphic characteristics including soil pH, organic matter, and sulfate. However, the magnitude and even the direction of these relationships varied across basins and the application of mixed effects models revealed evidence of significant contextual effects at local and regional scales. The results highlight the importance of the geographic scale of sampling when

  20. Abrolhos Bank Reef Health Evaluated by Means of Water Quality, Microbial Diversity, Benthic Cover, and Fish Biomass Data

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Thiago; Meirelles, Pedro M.; Garcia, Gizele; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Rezende, Carlos E.; de Moura, Rodrigo L.; Filho, Ronaldo-Francini; Coni, Ericka O. C.; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza; Amado Filho, Gilberto; Hatay, Mark; Schmieder, Robert; Edwards, Robert; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2012-01-01

    The health of the coral reefs of the Abrolhos Bank (southwestern Atlantic) was characterized with a holistic approach using measurements of four ecosystem components: (i) inorganic and organic nutrient concentrations, [1] fish biomass, [1] macroalgal and coral cover and (iv) microbial community composition and abundance. The possible benefits of protection from fishing were particularly evaluated by comparing sites with varying levels of protection. Two reefs within the well-enforced no-take area of the National Marine Park of Abrolhos (Parcel dos Abrolhos and California) were compared with two unprotected coastal reefs (Sebastião Gomes and Pedra de Leste) and one legally protected but poorly enforced coastal reef (the “paper park” of Timbebas Reef). The fish biomass was lower and the fleshy macroalgal cover was higher in the unprotected reefs compared with the protected areas. The unprotected and protected reefs had similar seawater chemistry. Lower vibrio CFU counts were observed in the fully protected area of California Reef. Metagenome analysis showed that the unprotected reefs had a higher abundance of archaeal and viral sequences and more bacterial pathogens, while the protected reefs had a higher abundance of genes related to photosynthesis. Similar to other reef systems in the world, there was evidence that reductions in the biomass of herbivorous fishes and the consequent increase in macroalgal cover in the Abrolhos Bank may be affecting microbial diversity and abundance. Through the integration of different types of ecological data, the present study showed that protection from fishing may lead to greater reef health. The data presented herein suggest that protected coral reefs have higher microbial diversity, with the most degraded reef (Sebastião Gomes) showing a marked reduction in microbial species richness. It is concluded that ecological conditions in unprotected reefs may promote the growth and rapid evolution of opportunistic microbial

  1. Factors Controlling Soil Microbial Biomass and Bacterial Diversity and Community Composition in a Cold Desert Ecosystem: Role of Geographic Scale

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, David J.; Van Horn, M. Lee; Barrett, John E.; Gooseff, Michael N.; Altrichter, Adam E.; Geyer, Kevin M.; Zeglin, Lydia H.; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding controls over the distribution of soil bacteria is a fundamental step toward describing soil ecosystems, understanding their functional capabilities, and predicting their responses to environmental change. This study investigated the controls on the biomass, species richness, and community structure and composition of soil bacterial communities in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, at local and regional scales. The goals of the study were to describe the relationships between abiotic characteristics and soil bacteria in this unique, microbially dominated environment, and to test the scale dependence of these relationships in a low complexity ecosystem. Samples were collected from dry mineral soils associated with snow patches, which are a significant source of water in this desert environment, at six sites located in the major basins of the Taylor and Wright Valleys. Samples were analyzed for a suite of characteristics including soil moisture, pH, electrical conductivity, soil organic matter, major nutrients and ions, microbial biomass, 16 S rRNA gene richness, and bacterial community structure and composition. Snow patches created local biogeochemical gradients while inter-basin comparisons encompassed landscape scale gradients enabling comparisons of microbial controls at two distinct spatial scales. At the organic carbon rich, mesic, low elevation sites Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria were prevalent, while Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were dominant at the high elevation, low moisture and biomass sites. Microbial parameters were significantly related with soil water content and edaphic characteristics including soil pH, organic matter, and sulfate. However, the magnitude and even the direction of these relationships varied across basins and the application of mixed effects models revealed evidence of significant contextual effects at local and regional scales. The results highlight the importance of the geographic scale of sampling when

  2. Abrolhos bank reef health evaluated by means of water quality, microbial diversity, benthic cover, and fish biomass data.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Thiago; Meirelles, Pedro M; Garcia, Gizele; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Rezende, Carlos E; de Moura, Rodrigo L; Filho, Ronaldo-Francini; Coni, Ericka O C; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza; Amado Filho, Gilberto; Hatay, Mark; Schmieder, Robert; Edwards, Robert; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2012-01-01

    The health of the coral reefs of the Abrolhos Bank (Southwestern Atlantic) was characterized with a holistic approach using measurements of four ecosystem components: (i) inorganic and organic nutrient concentrations, [1] fish biomass, [1] macroalgal and coral cover and (iv) microbial community composition and abundance. The possible benefits of protection from fishing were particularly evaluated by comparing sites with varying levels of protection. Two reefs within the well-enforced no-take area of the National Marine Park of Abrolhos (Parcel dos Abrolhos and California) were compared with two unprotected coastal reefs (Sebastião Gomes and Pedra de Leste) and one legally protected but poorly enforced coastal reef (the "paper park" of Timbebas Reef). The fish biomass was lower and the fleshy macroalgal cover was higher in the unprotected reefs compared with the protected areas. The unprotected and protected reefs had similar seawater chemistry. Lower vibrio CFU counts were observed in the fully protected area of California Reef. Metagenome analysis showed that the unprotected reefs had a higher abundance of archaeal and viral sequences and more bacterial pathogens, while the protected reefs had a higher abundance of genes related to photosynthesis. Similar to other reef systems in the world, there was evidence that reductions in the biomass of herbivorous fishes and the consequent increase in macroalgal cover in the Abrolhos Bank may be affecting microbial diversity and abundance. Through the integration of different types of ecological data, the present study showed that protection from fishing may lead to greater reef health. The data presented herein suggest that protected coral reefs have higher microbial diversity, with the most degraded reef (Sebastião Gomes) showing a marked reduction in microbial species richness. It is concluded that ecological conditions in unprotected reefs may promote the growth and rapid evolution of opportunistic microbial pathogens.

  3. [Effects of Slope Position and Soil Horizon on Soil Microbial Biomass and Abundance in Karst Primary Forest of Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu-zhen; Su, Yi-rong; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiang-bi; He, Xun-yang

    2015-10-01

    To explore the effects of slope position and soil horizon on soil microbial biomass and abundance, chloroform fumigation extraction methods and real-time fluorescence-based quantitative PCR (Real-time PCR) were adopted to quantify the changes of soil microbial biomass C, N and abundance of bacteria and fungi, respectively. Soil samples were harvested from three horizons along profile, i. e., leaching horizon (A, 0-10 cm), transitional horizon (AB, 30-50 cm) and alluvial horizon (B, 70-100 cm), which were collected from the upper, middle and lower slope positions of a karst primary forest ecosystem. The results showed that slope position, soil horizon and their interaction significantly influenced the soil microbial biomass and abundance (P < 0.05). Different from A horizon, where SMBC was greater in lower than in upper slope position (P < 0.05), SMBC in AB and B horizons were highest in middle slope position. Similarly, SMBN was greater in lower than in upper slope position for A, AB and B horizons. Besides soil bacterial abundance in B horizon and fungal abundance in AB layer, the middle slope position had the highest value for all the three soil horizons (P < 0.05). Stepwise regression analysis showed that soil organic carbon, available nitrogen and pH were the key factors responsible for SMBC and SMBN variation, respectively, while the important factors responsible for the variation of bacteria abundance were available nitrogen and available phosphorus, and that for fungi abundance variation were available potassium.

  4. [Effects of adding straw carbon source to root knot nematode diseased soil on soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si-Hui; Lian, Jian-Hong; Cao, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Li

    2013-06-01

    A field experiment with successive planting of tomato was conducted to study the effects of adding different amounts of winter wheat straw (2.08 g x kg(-1), 1N; 4.16 g x kg(-1), 2N; and 8.32 g x kg(-1), 4N) to the soil seriously suffered from root knot nematode disease on the soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance. Adding straw carbon source had significant effects on the contents of soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and the abundance of soil protozoa, which all decreased in the order of 4N > 2N > 1N > CK. The community structure of soil protozoa also changed significantly under straw addition. In the treatments with straw addition, the average proportion of fagellate, amoeba, and ciliates accounted for 36.0%, 59.5%, and 4.5% of the total protozoa, respectively. Under the same adding amounts of wheat straw, there was an increase in the soil MBC and MBN contents, MBC/MBN ratio, and protozoa abundance with increasing cultivation period.

  5. Organic and inorganic fertilizer effect on soil CO2 flux, microbial biomass, and growth of Nigella sativa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Aliyeh; Fallah, Seyfollah; Sourki, Ali Abasi

    2017-01-01

    Cattle manure has a high carbon/nitrogen ratio and may not decompose; therefore, full-dose application of urea fertilizer might improve biological properties by increasing manure decomposition. This study aimed to investigate the effect of combining cattle manure and urea fertilizer on soil CO2 flux, microbial biomass carbon, and dry matter accumulation during Nigella sativa L. (black cumin) growth under field conditions. The treatments were control, cattle manure, urea, different levels of split and full-dose integrated fertilizer. The results showed that integrated application of cattle manure and chemical fertilizer significantly increased microbial biomass carbon by 10%, soil organic carbon by 2.45%, total N by 3.27%, mineral N at the flowering stage by 7.57%, and CO2 flux by 9% over solitary urea application. Integrated application increased microbial biomass carbon by 10% over the solitary application and the full-dose application by 5% over the split application. The soil properties and growth parameters of N. sativa L. benefited more from the full-dose application than the split application of urea. Cattle manure combined with chemical fertilizer and the full-dose application of urea increased fertilizer efficiency and improved biological soil parameters and plant growth. This method decreased the cost of top dressing urea fertilizer and proved beneficial for the environment and medicinal plant health.

  6. Evidence of ancient microbial activity on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Jamie; Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Wallis, Daryl H.; Miyake, Nori; Wallis, M. K.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2015-09-01

    We report for the first time in situ observations of a relatively rare secondary iron arsenate-sulphate mineral named bukovskýite - Fe3+ 2(As5+O4)(S6+O4)(OH)•7(H2O) - found in a shock melt vein of the Tissint Martian meteorite. It is hypothesised that the mineral formed when high concentrations of aqueous H+, Fe(III), SO4 and AsO4 were maintained for long periods of time in microenvironments created within wet subsurface Martian clays. The aqueous H+, Fe(III), SO4 and AsO4 species arose from the microbial oxidation of FeS2 with concurrent release of sequestrated As. The availability of aqueous AsO4 would also be complemented by dissolution by-products of the microbial reduction of Feoxides influenced by dissolved organic matter that alters the redox state and the complexation of As, thus shifting As partitioning in favour of the solute phase. This hypothesis is substantially supported by SEM analysis of a 15μm spherical structure comprising of a carbonaceous outer coating with a inner core of FeS2 (pyrite) that showed the pyrite surface with spherical pits, and chains of pits, with morphologies distinct from abiotic alteration features. The pits and channels have a clustered, geometric distribution, typical of microbial activity, and are closely comparable to biologically mediated microstructures created by Fe- and S-oxidising microbes in the laboratory. These microstructures are interpreted as trace fossils resulting from the attachment of bacteria to the pyrite surfaces.

  7. Soil Microbial Community Structure and Metabolic Activity of Pinus elliottii Plantations across Different Stand Ages in a Subtropical Area

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zeyan; Haack, Stacey Elizabeth; Lin, Wenxiong; Li, Bailian; Wu, Linkun; Fang, Changxun; Zhang, Zhixing

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbes play an essential role in the forest ecosystem as an active component. This study examined the hypothesis that soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity would vary with the increasing stand ages in long-term pure plantations of Pinus elliottii. The phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) combined with community level physiological profiles (CLPP) method was used to assess these characteristics in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii. We found that the soil microbial communities were significantly different among different stand ages of P. elliottii plantations. The PLFA analysis indicated that the bacterial biomass was higher than the actinomycic and fungal biomass in all stand ages. However, the bacterial biomass decreased with the increasing stand ages, while the fungal biomass increased. The four maximum biomarker concentrations in rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii for all stand ages were 18:1ω9c, 16:1ω7c, 18:3ω6c (6,9,12) and cy19:0, representing measures of fungal and gram negative bacterial biomass. In addition, CLPP analysis revealed that the utilization rate of amino acids, polymers, phenolic acids, and carbohydrates of soil microbial community gradually decreased with increasing stand ages, though this pattern was not observed for carboxylic acids and amines. Microbial community diversity, as determined by the Simpson index, Shannon-Wiener index, Richness index and McIntosh index, significantly decreased as stand age increased. Overall, both the PLFA and CLPP illustrated that the long-term pure plantation pattern exacerbated the microecological imbalance previously described in the rhizospheric soils of P. elliottii, and markedly decreased the soil microbial community diversity and metabolic activity. Based on the correlation analysis, we concluded that the soil nutrient and C/N ratio most significantly contributed to the variation of soil microbial community structure and metabolic activity in different stand ages of P

  8. Production and characterization of lignocellulosic biomass-derived activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Namazi, A B; Jia, C Q; Allen, D G

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work is to establish the technical feasibility of producing activated carbon from pulp mill sludges. KOH chemical activation of four lignocellulosic biomass materials, two sludges from pulp mills, one sludge for a linerboard mill, and cow manure, were investigated experimentally, with a focus on the effects of KOH/biomass ratio (1/1, 1.5/1 and 2/1), activation temperature (400-600 °C) and activation time (1 to 2 h) on the development of porosity. The activation products were characterized for their physical and chemical properties using a surface area analyzer, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out to establish the effectiveness of the lignocellulosic biomass-derived activated carbon in removing methylene blue (MB), a surrogate of large organic molecules. The results show that the activated carbon are highly porous with specific surface area greater than 500 m²/g. The yield of activated carbon was greater than the percent of fixed carbon in the dry sludge, suggesting that the activation process was able to capture a substantial amount of carbon from the organic matter in the sludge. While 400 °C was too low, 600 °C was high enough to sustain a substantial rate of activation for linerboard sludge. The KOH/biomass ratio, activation temperature and time all play important roles in pore development and yield control, allowing optimization of the activation process. MB adsorption followed a Langmuir isotherm for all four activated carbon, although the adsorption capacity of NK-primary sludge-derived activated carbon was considerably lower than the rest, consistent with its lower specific surface area.

  9. Combined effects of bacterial-feeding nematodes and prometryne on the soil microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jihai; Li, Xuechao; Jiang, Ying; Wu, Yue; Chen, Jiandong; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2011-09-15

    Microcosm experiments were carried out to study the effects of bacterial-feeding nematodes and indigenous microbes and their interactions on the degradation of prometryne and soil microbial activity in contaminated soil. The results showed that soil indigenous microbes could degrade prometryne up to 59.6-67.9%; bacterial-feeding nematodes accelerated the degradation of prometryne in contaminated soil, and prometryne degradation was raised by 8.36-10.69%. Soil microbial biomass C (C(mic)), basal soil respiration (BSR), and respiratory quotient (qCO(2)) increased in the beginning of the experiment and decreased in the later stage of the experiment. Nematodes grew and reproduced quite fast, and did increase the growth of soil microbes and enhance soil microbial activity in prometryne contaminated soil during the incubation period.

  10. Microbial production, enzyme activity, and carbon turnover in surface sediments of the Hudson River estuary.

    PubMed

    Sinsabaugh, R L; Findlay, S

    1995-09-01

    The detrital food web is a major nexus of energy flow in nearly all aquatic ecosystems. Energy enters this nexus by microbial assimilation of detrital carbon. To link microbiological variables with ecosystem process, it is necessary to understand the regulatory hierarchy that controls the distribution of microbial biomass and activity. Toward that goal, we investigated variability in microbial abundance and activities within the tidal freshwater estuary of the Hudson River. Surface sediments were collected from four contrasting sites: a mid-channel shoal, two types of wetlands, and a tributary confluence. These samples, collected in June to August 1992, were sorted into two to four size fractions, depending on the particle size distribution at each site. Each fraction was analyzed for bacterial biomass (by acridine orange direct counting), bacterial production (by (3)H-thymidine incorporation into DNA), fungal biomass (by ergosterol extraction), fungal production (by biomass accrual), and the potential activities of seven extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of detrital structural molecules. Decomposition rates for particulate organic carbon (POC) were estimated from a statistical model relating mass loss rates to endocellulase activity. Within samples, bacterial biomass and productivity were negatively correlated with particle size: Standing stocks and rates in the <63-μm class were roughly twofold greater than in the >4-mm class. Conversely, fungal biomass was positively correlated with particle size, with standing stocks in the largest size class more than 1OX greater than in the smallest. Extracellular enzyme activities also differed significantly among size classes, with high carbohydrase activities associated with the largest particles, while oxidative activities predominated in the smallest size classes. Among sites, the mid-channel sediments had the lowest POC standing stock (2% of sediment dry mass) and longest turnover time (approximately 1

  11. Influence of lead acetate on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two different soils with the growth of Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis).

    PubMed

    Liao, Min; Chen, Cheng-Li; Zeng, Lu-Sheng; Huang, Chang-Yong

    2007-01-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of different concentrations of lead acetate on soil microbial biomass and community structure during growth of Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis) in two different soils. The field soils were used for a small pot, short-term 60-day growth chamber study. The soils were amended with different Pb concentrations, ranging from 0 to 900mgkg(-1) soil. The experimental design was a 2 soilx2 vegetation/non-vegetationx6 treatments (Pb)x3 replicate factorial experiment. At 60 days the study was terminated and soils were analyzed for microbial parameters, namely, microbial biomass, basal respiration and PLFAs. The results indicated that the application of Pb at lower concentrations (100 and 300mgkg(-1)) as lead acetate resulted in a slight increase in soil microbial biomass, whereas Pb concentrations >500mgkg(-1) caused an immediate gradual significant decline in biomass. However, the degree of impact on soil microbial biomass and basal respiration by Pb was related to management (plant vegetation) or the contents of clay and organic matter in soils. The profiles of 21 phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were used to assess whether observed changes in functional microbial parameters were accompanied by changes in the composition of the microbial communities after Pb application at 0, 300 and 900mg Pbkg(-1) soil. The results of principal component analyses (PCA) indicated that there were significant increases in fungi biomarkers of 18:3omega6c, 18:1omega9c and a decrease in cy17:0, which is an indicator of gram-negative bacteria for the high levels of Pb treatments In a word, soil microbial biomass and community structure, therefore, may be sensitive indicators reflecting environmental stress in soil-Pb-plant system. However, further studies will be needed to better understand how these changes in microbial community structure might actually impact soil microbial community function.

  12. Long term tillage, cover crop and fertilization effects on microbial community structure and activity: Implications on soil quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reduced tillage, cover crops and fertilization are associated with greater microbial biomass and activity that are linked to improvements in soil quality, but their impacts vary widely with climate, soils and cropping systems. This study aimed to characterize the impact of long term (31 years) tilla...

  13. Effect of monospecific and mixed sea-buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) plantations on the structure and activity of soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuan; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Zhong; Liu, Jinliang; Zhang, Shunxiang

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of different afforestation models on soil microbial composition in the Loess Plateau in China. In particular, we determined soil physicochemical properties, enzyme activities, and microbial community structures in the top 0 cm to 10 cm soil underneath a pure Hippophae rhamnoides (SS) stand and three mixed stands, namely, H. rhamnoides and Robinia pseucdoacacia (SC), H. rhamnoides and Pinus tabulaeformis (SY), and H. rhamnoides and Platycladus orientalis (SB). Results showed that total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen, and ammonium (NH4(+)) contents were higher in SY and SB than in SS. The total microbial biomass, bacterial biomass, and Gram+ biomass of the three mixed stands were significantly higher than those of the pure stand. However, no significant difference was found in fungal biomass. Correlation analysis suggested that soil microbial communities are significantly and positively correlated with some chemical parameters of soil, such as TOC, total phosphorus, total potassium, available phosphorus, NH4(+) content, nitrate content (NH3(-)), and the enzyme activities of urease, peroxidase, and phosphatase. Principal component analysis showed that the microbial community structures of SB and SS could clearly be discriminated from each other and from the others, whereas SY and SC were similar. In conclusion, tree species indirectly but significantly affect soil microbial communities and enzyme activities through soil physicochemical properties. In addition, mixing P. tabulaeformis or P. orientalis in H. rhamnoides plantations is a suitable afforestation model in the Loess Plateau, because of significant positive effects on soil nutrient conditions, microbial community, and enzyme activities over pure plantations.

  14. Mercury in soils and microbial biomass of the South Kirgizstan subregion of the biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadim, Ermakov; Valentina, Danilova; Ul'yana, Gulyaeva

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to clear up the role of soil microflora in the mercury concentration by microorganisms as they are related to a problem of the soil remediation. To complete the tasks as assigned, 150 samples of both various soils formed over the ore bodies outside the ore occurrence zones and waste dumps have been taken in the areas of South Kirgizstan Some 45 soil samples (horizon A, 0-20 cm) and dumps were used for microbiological analyses [1, 2]. The soil cover as seen in the work areas is represented by Haplic Calcisols (gray) soils. All the soils are generally calcareous, in some cases salted, and have various compositions. To grow the microbial biomass in order to determine mercury content levels in there, some soil media characterized by natural concentrations, ratios and forms of the compounds of these metals were used The results showed that the mercury concentrations in soils of the sampling area varied from 0.028 to 357.3 mg/kg. The highest metal content indices (up to 357.3 mg/kg) were found for soils formed over ores, and waste dumps. The lowest mercury content (0.028 to 0.066 mg/kg) was found for soils of the control area. The data on mercury and/or antimony accumulation by the biomass of soil microorganisms grown in soil media are represented. The soil samples having various mercury levels were collected in the South Kirgizstan subregion of the biosphere. It was established that the accumulation of the metals by soil microflora depends on their content in the soil, the microorganism growth is strongly inhibited at mercury concentration of 300 mg/kg in soil. A direct and reliable correlation between the metal content level in soils and their concentration by microorganisms is found. Within the background sites a tendency of increase in mercury extraction from the soil with 1 M HCl solution, in particular from salted soils is observed. In contrast, in the conditions of an excess of mercury content in soils of ore grounds, a weak

  15. Soil resources and climate jointly drive variations in microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in China's forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. H.; Wang, C. K.

    2015-07-01

    Microbial metabolism plays a key role in regulating the biogeochemical cycle of forest ecosystems, but the mechanisms driving microbial growth are not well understood. Here, we synthesized 689 measurements on soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and nitrogen (Nmic) and related parameters from 207 independent studies published during the past 15 years across China's forest ecosystems. Our objectives were to (1) examine patterns in Cmic, Nmic, and microbial quotient (i.e., Cmic / Csoil and Nmic / Nsoil rates) by climate zones and management regimes for these forests; and (2) identify the factors driving the variability in the Cmic, Nmic, and microbial quotient. There was a large variability in Cmic (390.2 mg kg-1), Nmic (60.1 mg kg-1), Cmic : Nmic ratio (8.25), Cmic / Csoil rate (1.92 %), and Nmic/ Nsoil rate (3.43 %) across China's forests, with coefficients of variation varying from 61.2 to 95.6 %. The natural forests had significantly greater Cmic and Nmic than the planted forests, but had less Cmic : Nmic ratio and Cmic / Csoil rate. Soil resources and climate together explained 24.4-40.7 % of these variations. The Cmic : Nmic ratio declined slightly with the Csoil : Nsoil ratio, and changed with latitude, mean annual temperature and precipitation, suggesting a plastic homeostasis of microbial carbon-nitrogen stoichiometry. The Cmic/ Csoil and Nmic / Nsoil rates were responsive to soil resources and climate differently, suggesting that soil microbial assimilation of carbon and nitrogen be regulated by different mechanisms. We conclude that soil resources and climate jointly drive microbial growth and metabolism, and also emphasize the necessity of appropriate procedures for data compilation and standardization in cross-study syntheses.

  16. Microbial Nursery Production of High-Quality Biological Soil Crust Biomass for Restoration of Degraded Dryland Soils.

    PubMed

    Velasco Ayuso, Sergio; Giraldo Silva, Ana; Nelson, Corey; Barger, Nichole N; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2017-02-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are slow-growing, phototroph-based microbial assemblages that develop on the topsoils of drylands. Biocrusts help maintain soil fertility and reduce erosion. Because their loss through human activities has negative ecological and environmental health consequences, biocrust restoration is of interest. Active soil inoculation with biocrust microorganisms can be an important tool in this endeavor. We present a culture-independent, two-step process to grow multispecies biocrusts in open greenhouse nursery facilities, based on the inoculation of local soils with local biocrust remnants and incubation under seminatural conditions that maintain the essence of the habitat but lessen its harshness. In each of four U.S. Southwest sites, we tested and deployed combinations of factors that maximized growth (gauged as chlorophyll a content) while minimizing microbial community shifts (assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing and bioinformatics), particularly for crust-forming cyanobacteria. Generally, doubling the frequency of natural wetting events, a 60% reduction in sunlight, and inoculation by slurry were optimal. Nutrient addition effects were site specific. In 4 months, our approach yielded crusts of high inoculum quality reared on local soil exposed to locally matched climates, acclimated to desiccation, and containing communities minimally shifted in composition from local ones. Our inoculum contained abundant crust-forming cyanobacteria and no significant numbers of allochthonous phototrophs, and it was sufficient to treat ca. 6,000 m(2) of degraded dryland soils at 1 to 5% of the typical crust biomass concentration, having started from a natural crust remnant as small as 6 to 30 cm(2) IMPORTANCE: Soil surface crusts can protect dryland soils from erosion, but they are often negatively impacted by human activities. Their degradation causes a loss of fertility, increased production of fugitive dust and intensity of dust storms with associated

  17. The biomass derived activated carbon for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, S. T.; Selvan, R. Kalai; Melo, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the activated carbon was prepared from biowaste of Eichhornia crassipes by chemical activation method using KOH as the activating agent at various carbonization temperatures (600 °C, 700 °C and 800 °C). The disordered nature, morphology and surface functional groups of ACs were examined by XRD, SEM and FT-IR. The electrochemical properties of AC electrodes were studied in 1M H2SO4 in the potential range of -0.2 to 0.8 V using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques in a three electrode system. Subsequently, the fabricated supercapacitor using AC electrode delivered the higher specific capacitance and energy density of 509 F/g at current density of 1 mA/cm2 and 17 Wh/kg at power density of 0.416 W/g.

  18. Vertical and horizontal distributions of microbial abundances and enzymatic activities in propylene-glycol-affected soils.

    PubMed

    Biró, Borbála; Toscano, Giuseppe; Horváth, Nikoletta; Matics, Heléna; Domonkos, Mónika; Scotti, Riccardo; Rao, Maria A; Wejden, Bente; French, Helen K

    2014-01-01

    The natural microbial activity in the unsaturated soil is vital for protecting groundwater in areas where high loads of biodegradable contaminants are supplied to the surface, which usually is the case for airports using aircraft de-icing fluids (ADF) in the cold season. Horizontal and vertical distributions of microbial abundance were assessed along the western runway of Oslo Airport (Gardermoen, Norway) to monitor the effect of ADF dispersion with special reference to the component with the highest chemical oxygen demand (COD), propylene glycol (PG). Microbial abundance was evaluated by several biondicators: colony-forming units (CFU) of some physiological groups (aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs and microscopic fungi), most probable numbers (MPN) of PG degraders, selected catabolic enzymatic activities (fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolase, dehydrogenase, and β-glucosidase). High correlations were found between the enzymatic activities and microbial counts in vertical soil profiles. All microbial abundance indicators showed a steep drop in the first meter of soil depth. The vertical distribution of microbial abundance can be correlated by a decreasing exponential function of depth. The horizontal trend of microbial abundance (evaluated as total aerobic CFU, MPN of PG-degraders, and FDA hydrolase activity) assessed in the surface soil at an increasing distance from the runway is correlated negatively with the PG and COD loads, suggesting the relevance of other chemicals in the modulation of microbial growth. The possible role of potassium formate, component of runway de-icers, has been tested in the laboratory by using mixed cultures of Pseudomonas spp., obtained by enrichment with a selective PG medium from soil samples taken at the most contaminated area near the runway. The inhibitory effect of formate on the growth of PG degraders is proven by the reduction of biomass yield on PG in the presence of formate.

  19. [Effects of the decomposition of poplar and alder mixed leaf litters on soil microbial biomass].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Fang, Sheng-Zuo; Tian, Ye

    2012-08-01

    An incubation test was conducted to study the effects of the decomposition of poplar and trabeculate alder leaf litters with different mixed ratios and under different application ways on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN). The mixed ratio of the litters had significant effects on soil MBC and MBN. On the 30th day of incubation, soil MBC and MBN were significantly higher in the treatments with > or = 50% of alder litter than in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control. On the 75th day of incubation, the soil MBC in the treatments with > or = 40% of alder litter and the soil MBN in the treatments with > or = 30% of alder litter were significantly greater than those in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control. After 135 days incubation, soil MBC and MBN were significant higher in the treatments with > or = 20% and > or = 40% of alder litter than in the treatment with poplar litter only and the control, respectively. There was no significant difference in the soil MBC/MBN between the treatments with different mixed ratios of poplar and alder leaf litters and the control. Overall, soil MBC/MBN increased during the early period of incubation and decreased in the later period, suggesting that soil microflora changed during the decomposition of the litters. In the whole incubation period, the application ways of the litters had lesser effects on the soil MBC, MBN, and MBC/MBN, indicating that the addition ways of the litters did not affect soil microflora.

  20. [Effects of precipitation variation on growing seasonal dynamics of soil microbial biomass in broadleaved Korean pine mixed forest].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Mei-ju; Li, Shi-lan; Wang, Nan-nan; Feng, Fu-juan; Han, Shi-jie

    2015-05-01

    Broadleaved Korean pine mixed forest is the zonal climax vegetation in Northeast China and it plays a significant role in maintaining the ecological security. Changbai Mountains is a suitable region to study the positive and negative feedback mechanisms of temperate forest for precipitation variation. This study analyzed responses of soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (SMBN) to precipitation variation (± 30%) in original broadleaved Korean pine mixed forest of Changbai Mountains. The results showed that, during the growing seasons (from May to September), the averages of SMBC and SMBN were 879.09 and 100.03 mg · kg(-1), respectively. Moreover, both of these two parameters gradually decreased with the soil depth. The contents of SMBC and SMBN all increased with the increasing precipitation, and the changes of SMBC and SMBN in the 0-5 cm soil layer were stronger than in the 5-10 cm soil layer. The value of SMBC/SMBN declined with the increase of precipitation. The precipitation variation significantly influenced the means of SMBC and SMBN. Compared with precipitation reduction, precipitation enhancement affected the indices much significantly. Both SMBC and SMBN showed similar seasonal patterns, which were the lowest in May, and after that, they increased and then decreased and increased again, showing 1-2 peaks in the growing season. However, the value and occurring time of the peaks varied with the precipitation and soil layer, and the seasonal variations of SMBC and SMBN in the 0-5 cm soil layer were higher than in the 5-10 cm soil layer. SMBC and SMBN had significant positive correlation with organic matter and total nitrogen content. The variances of soil physical and chemical properties caused by precipitation variation were closely related with the difference in spatial-temporal patterns of the soil microbial biomass in the forest. In conclusion, the precipitation variations could cause the change of the soil microbial

  1. Tracking heavy water (D2O) incorporation for identifying and sorting active microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Mader, Esther; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woebken, Dagmar; Wang, Yun; Zhu, Di; Palatinszky, Marton; Schintlmeister, Arno; Schmid, Markus C; Hanson, Buck T; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Rauch, Isabella; Decker, Thomas; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen; Gibson, Christopher M; Fowler, Patrick W; Huang, Wei E; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-13

    Microbial communities are essential to the function of virtually all ecosystems and eukaryotes, including humans. However, it is still a major challenge to identify microbial cells active under natural conditions in complex systems. In this study, we developed a new method to identify and sort active microbes on the single-cell level in complex samples using stable isotope probing with heavy water (D2O) combined with Raman microspectroscopy. Incorporation of D2O-derived D into the biomass of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and archaea could be unambiguously detected via C-D signature peaks in single-cell Raman spectra, and the obtained labeling pattern was confirmed by nanoscale-resolution secondary ion MS. In fast-growing Escherichia coli cells, label detection was already possible after 20 min. For functional analyses of microbial communities, the detection of D incorporation from D2O in individual microbial cells via Raman microspectroscopy can be directly combined with FISH for the identification of active microbes. Applying this approach to mouse cecal microbiota revealed that the host-compound foragers Akkermansia muciniphila and Bacteroides acidifaciens exhibited distinctive response patterns to amendments of mucin and sugars. By Raman-based cell sorting of active (deuterated) cells with optical tweezers and subsequent multiple displacement amplification and DNA sequencing, novel cecal microbes stimulated by mucin and/or glucosamine were identified, demonstrating the potential of the nondestructive D2O-Raman approach for targeted sorting of microbial cells with defined functional properties for single-cell genomics.

  2. Reviews and syntheses: Soil resources and climate jointly drive variations in microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen in China's forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. H.; Wang, C. K.

    2015-11-01

    Microbial metabolism plays a key role in regulating the biogeochemical cycle of forest ecosystems, but the mechanisms driving microbial growth are not well understood. Here, we synthesized 689 measurements on soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and nitrogen (Nmic) and related parameters from 207 independent studies published up to November 2014 across China's forest ecosystems. Our objectives were to (1) examine patterns in Cmic, Nmic, and microbial quotient (i.e., Cmic / Csoil and Nmic / Nsoil rates) by climate zones and management regimes for these forests; and (2) identify the factors driving the variability in the Cmic, Nmic, and microbial quotient. There was a large variability in Cmic (390.2 mg kg-1), Nmic (60.1 mg kg-1, Cmic : Nmic ratio (8.25), Cmic / Csoil rate (1.92 %), and Nmic / Nsoil rate (3.43 %) across China's forests. The natural forests had significantly greater Cmic (514.1 mg kg-1 vs. 281.8 mg kg-1) and Nmic (82.6 mg kg-1 vs. 39.0 mg kg-1) than the planted forests, but had less Cmic : Nmic ratio (7.3 vs. 9.2) and Cmic / Csoil rate (1.7 % vs. 2.1 %). Soil resources and climate together explained 24.4-40.7 % of these variations. The Cmic : Nmic ratio declined slightly with Csoil : Nsoil ratio, and changed with latitude, mean annual temperature and precipitation, suggesting a plasticity of microbial carbon-nitrogen stoichiometry. The Cmic / Csoil rate decreased with Csoil : Nsoil ratio, whereas the Nmic / Nsoil rate increased with Csoil : Nsoil ratio; the former was influenced more by soil resources than by climate, whereas the latter was influenced more by climate. These results suggest that soil microbial assimilation of carbon and nitrogen are jointly driven by soil resources and climate, but may be regulated by different mechanisms.

  3. Microbial biomass at land water interface and its role in regulating ecosystem properties of a fresh water dry tropical woodland lake.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J

    2008-05-01

    This study was aimed at determining microbial biomass at land water interface and the role it plays in regulating ecosystem properties of a fresh water dry tropical woodland lake. Four microbial variables namely biomass-C (Cmic), fumigated CO2-C, substrate induced respiration (SIR) and basal respiration (BR) were measured in humus samples collected from land water interface over a period of one year Microbial biomass (Cmic) was maximum during February (718 micorg CO2-C g(-1)). Similar was the case of fumigated CO2-C (560 microg CO2-C g(-1) 10 d(-1)), SIR (2900 microg CO2-C g(-1)) and BR (480 microg CO2-C g(-1)). Humus-N appeared maximum (1.60%) during November and phenolics (204 microg g(-1)) during December Gross primary productivity (GPP) was found maximum (3.30 g Cm(-2)d(-1)) during March. Almost similar trend appeared for chlorophyll and phytoplankton density. Variation in microbial biomass at land water interface can be explained by seasonality and the quality of substrate material. Asynchrony in the peaks of microbial variables with phytoplankton pulsation and GPP suggested that the microbial biomass through nutrient mineralization regulates ecosystem functioning of a fresh water woodland lake. This has relevance for evaluating the nature of anthropogenic perturbations and for maintenance of fresh water lakes void of human disturbances.

  4. Leaf-Cutter Ant Fungus Gardens Are Biphasic Mixed Microbial Bioreactors That Convert Plant Biomass to Polyols with Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Somera, Alexandre F.; Lima, Adriel M.; dos Santos-Neto, Álvaro J.; Lanças, Fernando M.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf-cutter ants use plant matter to culture the obligate mutualistic basidiomycete Leucoagaricus gongylophorus. This fungus mediates ant nutrition on plant resources. Furthermore, other microbes living in the fungus garden might also contribute to plant digestion. The fungus garden comprises a young sector with recently incorporated leaf fragments and an old sector with partially digested plant matter. Here, we show that the young and old sectors of the grass-cutter Atta bisphaerica fungus garden operate as a biphasic solid-state mixed fermenting system. An initial plant digestion phase occurred in the young sector in the fungus garden periphery, with prevailing hemicellulose and starch degradation into arabinose, mannose, xylose, and glucose. These products support fast microbial growth but were mostly converted into four polyols. Three polyols, mannitol, arabitol, and inositol, were secreted by L. gongylophorus, and a fourth polyol, sorbitol, was likely secreted by another, unidentified, microbe. A second plant digestion phase occurred in the old sector, located in the fungus garden core, comprising stocks of microbial biomass growing slowly on monosaccharides and polyols. This biphasic operation was efficient in mediating symbiotic nutrition on plant matter: the microbes, accounting for 4% of the fungus garden biomass, converted plant matter biomass into monosaccharides and polyols, which were completely consumed by the resident ants and microbes. However, when consumption was inhibited through laboratory manipulation, most of the plant polysaccharides were degraded, products rapidly accumulated, and yields could be preferentially switched between polyols and monosaccharides. This feature might be useful in biotechnology. PMID:25911490

  5. Leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens are biphasic mixed microbial bioreactors that convert plant biomass to polyols with biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Somera, Alexandre F; Lima, Adriel M; Dos Santos-Neto, Álvaro J; Lanças, Fernando M; Bacci, Maurício

    2015-07-01

    Leaf-cutter ants use plant matter to culture the obligate mutualistic basidiomycete Leucoagaricus gongylophorus. This fungus mediates ant nutrition on plant resources. Furthermore, other microbes living in the fungus garden might also contribute to plant digestion. The fungus garden comprises a young sector with recently incorporated leaf fragments and an old sector with partially digested plant matter. Here, we show that the young and old sectors of the grass-cutter Atta bisphaerica fungus garden operate as a biphasic solid-state mixed fermenting system. An initial plant digestion phase occurred in the young sector in the fungus garden periphery, with prevailing hemicellulose and starch degradation into arabinose, mannose, xylose, and glucose. These products support fast microbial growth but were mostly converted into four polyols. Three polyols, mannitol, arabitol, and inositol, were secreted by L. gongylophorus, and a fourth polyol, sorbitol, was likely secreted by another, unidentified, microbe. A second plant digestion phase occurred in the old sector, located in the fungus garden core, comprising stocks of microbial biomass growing slowly on monosaccharides and polyols. This biphasic operation was efficient in mediating symbiotic nutrition on plant matter: the microbes, accounting for 4% of the fungus garden biomass, converted plant matter biomass into monosaccharides and polyols, which were completely consumed by the resident ants and microbes. However, when consumption was inhibited through laboratory manipulation, most of the plant polysaccharides were degraded, products rapidly accumulated, and yields could be preferentially switched between polyols and monosaccharides. This feature might be useful in biotechnology.

  6. Specific features of the structure of microbial biomass in soils of annular mesodepressions in Lipetsk and Volgograd oblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanskaya, L. V.; Sukhanova, N. I.; Chakmazyan, K. V.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    In the studied mesodepressions, the total microbial biomass in the gray forest and chernozemic soils decreases by two-three times under the impact of hydrogen flux from the subsoil horizons and soil waterlogging. The biomass decrease is especially pronounced in the lower soil horizons. The population density of bacteria in the soil samples subjected to the impact of hydrogen fluxes and temporary waterlogging decreases by two-three times in the upper horizons and by ten times in the lower horizons in comparison with that in the control samples. These factors also affect the length of fungal mycelium: it decreases by three-four times in the upper horizons and may completely disappear in the lower horizons. The reduction of the microbial biomass can be explained by the fact that hydrogen and waterlogging sharply decrease the soil redox potential, which retards the development of most microbes, except for methanogens and some other specialized groups of microorganisms. The domination of bacteria with diameter ≥0.23 and ≥0.38 μm and the decrease in the total number of bacteria have been found with the use of the cascade filtration method.

  7. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-09-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m-2·yr-1), P addition (15 g P m-2·yr-1), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m-2·yr-1, respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests.

  8. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-09-23

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m(-2)·yr(-1)), P addition (15 g P m(-2)·yr(-1)), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m(-2)·yr(-1), respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests.

  9. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures: lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xu; Berg, Matty P; Butenschoen, Olaf; Murray, Phil J; Bartish, Igor V; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, Andreas

    2015-05-07

    Phylogenetic distances of coexisting species differ greatly within plant communities, but their consequences for decomposers and decomposition remain unknown. We hypothesized that large phylogenetic distance of leaf litter mixtures increases differences of their litter traits, which may, in turn, result in increased resource complementarity or decreased resource concentration for decomposers and hence increased or decreased chemical transformation and reduction of litter. We conducted a litter mixture experiment including 12 common temperate tree species (evolutionarily separated by up to 106 Myr), and sampled after seven months, at which average mass loss was more than 50%. We found no effect of increased phylogenetic distance on litter mass loss or on abundance and diversity of invertebrate decomposers. However, phylogenetic distance decreased microbial biomass and increased carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of litter mixtures. Consistently, four litter traits showed (marginally) significant phylogenetic signal and in three of these traits increasing trait difference decreased microbial biomass and increased C/N. We suggest that phylogenetic proximity of litter favours microbial decomposers and chemical transformation of litter owing to a resource concentration effect. This leads to a new hypothesis: closely related plant species occurring in the same niche should promote and profit from increased nutrient availability.

  10. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m−2·yr−1), P addition (15 g P m−2·yr−1), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m−2·yr−1, respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests. PMID:26395406

  11. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures: lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xu; Berg, Matty P.; Butenschoen, Olaf; Murray, Phil J.; Bartish, Igor V.; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic distances of coexisting species differ greatly within plant communities, but their consequences for decomposers and decomposition remain unknown. We hypothesized that large phylogenetic distance of leaf litter mixtures increases differences of their litter traits, which may, in turn, result in increased resource complementarity or decreased resource concentration for decomposers and hence increased or decreased chemical transformation and reduction of litter. We conducted a litter mixture experiment including 12 common temperate tree species (evolutionarily separated by up to 106 Myr), and sampled after seven months, at which average mass loss was more than 50%. We found no effect of increased phylogenetic distance on litter mass loss or on abundance and diversity of invertebrate decomposers. However, phylogenetic distance decreased microbial biomass and increased carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of litter mixtures. Consistently, four litter traits showed (marginally) significant phylogenetic signal and in three of these traits increasing trait difference decreased microbial biomass and increased C/N. We suggest that phylogenetic proximity of litter favours microbial decomposers and chemical transformation of litter owing to a resource concentration effect. This leads to a new hypothesis: closely related plant species occurring in the same niche should promote and profit from increased nutrient availability. PMID:25876845

  12. Assessment of the living and total biomass of microbial communities in the background chestnut soil and in the paleosols under burial mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomutova, T. E.; Kashirskaya, N. N.; Demkin, V. A.

    2011-12-01

    The contents of phospholipids and carbon of the total microbial biomass were determined in the modern chestnut soil and in the paleosols buried under mounds of the Bronze and Early Iron Ages (5000-1800 years ago) in the dry steppe of the Lower Volga River basin. Judging from data on the ratio between the contents of phospholipids and organic carbon in the microbial cells, the carbon content of the living microbial biomass was calculated and compared with the total microbial biomass and total organic carbon in the studied soils. In the background chestnut soil, the content of phospholipids in the A1, B1, and B2 horizons amounted to 452, 205, and 189 nmol/g, respectively; in the paleosols, it was 28-130% of the present-day level. The maximum content was measured in the paleosols buried 5000 and 2000 years ago, in the periods with an increased humidity of the climate. In the background chestnut soil, the total microbial biomass was estimated at 5680 (the A1 horizon), 3380 (B1), and 4250 (B2) μg C/g; in the paleosols, it was by 2.5-7.0 times lower. In the upper horizons of the background soil, the portion of the living microbial biomass in the total biomass was much less than that in the paleosols under the burial mounds; it varied within 8.5-15.3% and 15-81%, respectively. The portion of living microbial biomass in the total organic carbon content of the background chestnut soil was about 4-8%. In the paleosols buried in the Early Iron Age (2000 and 1800 years ago), this value did not exceed 3-8%; in the paleosols of the Bronze Age (5000-4000 years ago), it reached 40% of the total organic carbon.

  13. Microbial biomass and basal respiration of selected Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic soils in the areas of some Russian polar stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumov, E.; Mukhametova, N.

    2014-07-01

    Antarctica is a unique place for soil, biological, and ecological investigations. Soils of Antarctica have been studied intensively during the last century, when different national Antarctic expeditions visited the sixth continent with the aim of investigating nature and the environment. Antarctic investigations are comprised of field surveys mainly in the terrestrial landscapes, where the polar stations of different countries are situated. That is why the main and most detailed soil surveys were conducted in the McMurdo Valleys, Transantarctic Mountains, South Shetland Islands, Larsemann Hills and the Schirmacher Oasis. Our investigations were conducted during the 53rd and 55th Russian Antarctic expeditions in the base of soil pits, and samples were collected in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic regions. Sub-Antarctic or maritime landscapes are considered to be very different from Antarctic landscapes due to differing climatic and geogenic conditions. Soils of diverse zonal landscapes were studied with the aim of assessing the microbial biomass level, basal respiration rates and metabolic activity of microbial communities. This investigation shows that Antarctic soils are quite diverse in profile organization and carbon content. In general, Sub-Antarctic soils are characterized by more developed humus (sod) organo-mineral horizons as well as by an upper organic layer. The most developed organic layers were revealed in peat soils of King George Island, where its thickness reach, in some cases, was 80 cm. These soils as well as soils formed under guano are characterized by the highest amount of total organic carbon (TOC), between 7.22 and 33.70%. Coastal and continental Antarctic soils exhibit less developed Leptosols, Gleysols, Regolith and rare Ornhitosol, with TOC levels between 0.37 and 4.67%. The metabolic ratios and basal respiration were higher in Sub-Antarctic soils than in Antarctic ones, which can be interpreted as a result of higher amounts of fresh organic

  14. Comparison of biomass from integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS), moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating recalcitrant organics: Importance of attached biomass.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunkai; Shi, Yijing; Xue, Jinkai; Zhang, Yanyan; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Liu, Yang

    2017-03-15

    This study compared microbial characteristics and oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) treatment performance of five types of microbial biomass (MBBR-biofilm, IFAS-biofilm, IFAS-floc, MBR-aerobic-floc, and MBR-anoxic-floc) cultivated from three types of bioreactors (MBBR, IFAS, and MBR) in batch experiments. Chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonium, acid extractable fraction (AEF), and naphthenic acids (NAs) removals efficiencies were distinctly different between suspended and attached bacterial aggregates and between aerobic and anoxic suspended flocs. MBR-aerobic-floc and MBR-anoxic-floc demonstrated COD removal efficiencies higher than microbial aggregates obtained from MBBR and IFAS, MBBR and IFAS biofilm had higher AEF removal efficiencies than those obtained using flocs. MBBR-biofilm demonstrated the most efficient NAs removal from OSPW. NAs degradation efficiency was highly dependent on the carbon number and NA cyclization number according to UPLC/HRMS analysis. Mono- and di-oxidized NAs were the dominant oxy-NA species in OSPW samples. Microbial analysis with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) indicated that the bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundance was significantly higher in the batch bioreactors with suspended flocs than in those with biofilm, the NSR gene abundance in the MBR-anoxic bioreactor was significantly lower than that in aerobic batch bioreactors, and denitrifiers were more abundant in the suspended phase of the activated sludge flocs.

  15. Effects of nutrient enrichment on the decomposition of wood and associated microbial activity in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gulis, V.; Rosemond, A.D.; Suberkropp, K.; Weyers, H.S.; Benstead, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    1. We determined the effects of nutrient enrichment on wood decomposition rates and microbial activity during a 3-year study in two headwater streams at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, NC, U.S.A. After a 1-year pretreatment period, one of the streams was continuously enriched with inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) for 2 years while the other stream served as a reference. We determined the effects of enrichment on both wood veneers and sticks, which have similar carbon quality but differ in physical characteristics (e.g. surface area to volume ratios, presence of bark) that potentially affect microbial colonisation and activity. 2. Oak wood veneers (0.5 mm thick) were placed in streams monthly and allowed to decompose for approximately 90 days. Nutrient addition stimulated ash-free dry mass loss and increased mean nitrogen content, fungal biomass and microbial respiration on veneers in the treatment stream compared with the reference. The magnitude of the response to enrichment was great, with mass loss 6.1 times, and per cent N, fungal biomass and microbial respiration approximately four times greater in the treatment versus reference stream. 3. Decomposition rate and nitrogen content of maple sticks (ca. 1-2 cm diameter) also increased; however, the effect was less pronounced than for veneers. Wood response overall was greater than that determined for leaves in a comparable study, supporting the hypothesis that response to enrichment may be greater for lower quality organic matter (high C:N) than for higher quality (low C:N) substrates. 4. Our results show that moderate nutrient enrichment can profoundly affect decomposition rate and microbial activity on wood in streams. Thus, the timing and availability of wood that provides retention, structure, attachment sites and food in stream ecosystems may be affected by nutrient concentrations raised by human activities.

  16. Primary succession of soil enzyme activity and heterotrophic microbial communities along the chronosequence of Tianshan Mountains No. 1 Glacier, China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jun; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Lou, Kai; Eusufzai, Moniruzzaman Khan; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Qing; Shi, Ying-Wu; Yang, Hong-Mei; Li, Zhong-Qing

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the primary successions of soil enzyme activity and heterotrophic microbial communities at the forefields of the Tianshan Mountains No. 1 Glacier by investigating soil microbial processes (microbial biomass and nitrogen mineralization), enzyme activity and community-level physiological profiling. Soils deglaciated between 1959 and 2008 (0, 5, 17, 31 and 44 years) were collected. Soils >1,500 years in age were used as a reference (alpine meadow soils). Soil enzyme activity and carbon-source utilization ability significantly increased with successional time. Amino-acid utilization rates were relatively higher in early, unvegetated soils (0 and 5 years), but carbohydrate utilization was higher in later stages (from 31 years to the reference soil). Discriminant analysis, including data on microbial processes and soil enzyme activities, revealed that newly exposed soils (0-5 years) and older soils (17-44 years) were well-separated from each other and obviously different from the reference soil. Correlation analysis revealed that soil organic carbon, was the primary factor influencing soil enzyme activity and heterotrophic microbial community succession. Redundancy analysis suggested that soil pH and available P were also affect microbial activity to a considerable degree. Our results indicated that glacier foreland soils have continued to develop over 44 years and soils were significantly affected by the geographic location of the glacier and the local topography. Soil enzyme activities and heterotrophic microbial communities were also significantly influenced by these variables.

  17. [Microbial activity and functional diversity in rhizosphere of cucumber under different subsurface drip irrigation scheduling].

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; He, Hong-Jun; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Zi-Kun

    2014-08-01

    The effects of subsurface drip irrigation scheduling on microbial activity and functional diversity in rhizosphere of cucumber in solar greenhouse were studied in this paper. The results showed that the soil microbial biomass C and N, basal respiration, metabolic quotient and values of AWCD, Shannon and McIntosh indexes were increased at first and then decreased with the increase of irrigation water amount. The values of microbial C and N, basal respiration and metabolic quotient in I2 treatments were significantly higher than those in I1 treatments at the 0.8E(p) irrigation level. The numbers of bacteria, actinomyces and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and the activities of urease, phosphatase, sucrase, catalase and polyhenoloxidase were significantly higher in the 0.8E(p) treatment than in the other treatments. The numbers of bacteria and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, the activities of urease, phosphatase and sucrase in I2 treatments were significantly higher than in I1 treatment, the actinomyces number and activities of catalase and polyhenoloxidase had no significant difference between I1 and I2 treatments, however, the fungi number in I2 treatments were significantly lower than in I2 treaments at the 0.8E(p) irrigation level. The microbial activity and functional diversity in rhizosphere of cucumber were strengthened in the I20.8E(p) treatment, meanwhile, the soil microflora was improved and the soil enzymes activities were enhanced, therefore, the cucumber growth was promoted as well.

  18. Structure of the microbial biomass and trophic groups of nematodes in soddy-podzolic soils of a postagrogenic succession in the southern taiga (Tver oblast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migunova, V. D.; Kurakov, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The structure of the microbial biomass and trophic nematode groups were studied in soddy-podzolic soils under phytocenoses of a secondary succession initiated by the growth of forests on agricultural lands in the southern taiga. The microbial biomass became greater with the increasing amount of fungal mycelium, and the bacterial pool little changed in these soils. Bacteriovorous nematodes predominated (64% of the total number of nematodes) in the soils of a potato field, where the bacterial biomass was maximal; it was greater or close to the fungal biomass. In the soil under a mown meadow, where the fungal biomass was greater, the populations of fungivorous and bacteriovorous nematodes were close in number and share in the nematode complex (by 40%). In the soil under a spruce forest (climax stage), the main biomass pool was composed of fungi (97%), whose biomass is maximal, while fungivorous nematodes and nematodes with a mixed type of feeding occupy the dominant positions (69% in the nematode complex). In the course of the succession, the number of fungivorous and bacteriovorous nematodes decreased, but their ratio increased from 0.4 in the soil of the potato field to 0.8-1.0 under the meadows and mixed forest and to 2.0 in the soil under the sorrel spruce forest. These changes corresponded to the increasing microbial pool and the share of the fungal biomass in it.

  19. Population density and total biomass of microbial communities in chestnut soils and solonetzes of the dry steppe zone in the Lower Volga region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashirskaya, N. N.; Khomutova, T. E.; Chernysheva, E. V.; El'tsov, M. V.; Demkin, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    The population density and total biomass of microbial communities were determined in chestnut soils and solonetzes of the dry steppe zone in the Lower Volga region with the use of the methods of sequential fractionation of the soil and direct counting. The mean weighted values of the population density of the microbial communities in the soil profiles (A1 + B1 + B2 horizons) in the studied soils varied within 3.8-8.0 × 1011 cells/g of soil. The total microbial biomass in the soils of the Privolzhskaya Upland reached 0.9-2.4 mg C/g of soil; in the soils of the Ergeni Upland, it was 20 to 75% lower. The microbial cells in the soils of the Privolzhskaya Upland were larger than those in the soils of the Ergeni Upland. Sequential fractionation of the soil prior to direct counting contributed to the more complete assessment of the population density of the microbial communities.

  20. Changes of soil organic matter and microbial activity in irrigated and non irrigated olive groves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavvadias, Victor; Papadopoulou, Maria; Theocharopoulos, Sideris; Vavoulidou, Evagelia; Doula, Maria; Reppas, Spiros

    2014-05-01

    The implementation of olive cultivation techniques in Greece has not been systematically tested under the prevailing Mediterranean conditions. A LIFE+ project was initiated (oLIVE-CLIMA; LIFE 11/ENV/000942) aiming to introduce new management practices in olive tree crops that lead to increased carbon dioxide uptake by plants as well as carbon sequestration from the atmosphere and reverse the trend of soil organic matter decline, erosion and desertification. This paper presents data on soil organic matter and microbial activity from a soil campaign in a pilot region in Greece, and particularly in the area of Chora, prefecture of Messinia, South west Peloponnese. The soil campaign took place during the period December 2012-February 2013. Twelve soil parcels of olive groves were selected (6 irrigated and 6 rainfed) and in each soil parcel six composite soil samples were taken from 0-10 cm depth at equal intervals along a straight line of the trunk of the tree to the middle of the distance from the nearest tree of the next tree series. The first three samples were under olive tree canopy. An additional composite sample was taken at depth of 10-40 cm. Soil samples were analyzed for soil physicochemical and biological properties. In this study results for total organic carbon (TOC), soil basal microbial respiration (BR), microbial biomass C (MB-C) from the region of Messinia, are presented. Organic matter was determined by dichromate oxidation. The microbial activity was measured by the amount of CO2 evolution, while microbial biomass C was determined by substrate-induced respiration, after the addition of glucose. The results showed considerable differences in TOC, BR and MB-C associated with the sampling position and soil depth. The higher TOC, BR and MB-C values, in most cases, were determined in samples taken from points under the canopy, but not close to the tree trunk compared to the sampling points outside the canopy. This indicates the positive effect of

  1. Comparison of microbial activity in anaerobic and microaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Jenicek, P; Celis, C A; Koubova, J; Pokorna, D

    2011-01-01

    Microaerobic alternative of anaerobic digestion offers many advantages especially when sulfide concentration in the digester is high. For better understanding of the microaerobic technology more detailed characterization of biomass activity is needed. Two equal digesters were operated under the same condition except of microaeration in one of them. During long term operation of anaerobic and microaerobic digesters the sludge quality and the biomass activity was monitored. The activity of sulfide oxidizing bacteria of microaerobic biomass was significantly higher in comparison with anaerobic biomass. The activity of sulfate reducing bacteria was comparable. The activity of methanogenic bacteria activity depended on sulfide concentration more than on microaeration. The extent of foaming problems was lower in the microaerobic than in the anaerobic digester.

  2. Microbial communities of biomethanization digesters fed with raw and heat pre-treated microalgae biomasses.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Jose Luis; Rojas, Patricia; Morato, Ana; Mendez, Lara; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Microalgae biomasses are considered promising feedstocks for biofuel and methane productions. Two Continuously Stirred Tank Reactors (CSTR), fed with fresh (CSTR-C) and heat pre-treated (CSTR-T) Chlorella biomass were run in parallel in order to determine methane productions. The methane yield was 1.5 times higher in CSTR-T with regard to CSTR-C. Aiming to understand the microorganism roles within of the reactors, the sludge used as an inoculum (I), plus raw (CSTR-C) and heat pre-treated (CSTR-T) samples were analyzed by high-throughput pyrosequencing. The bacterial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi and Firmicutes. Spirochaetae and Actinobacteria were only detected in sample I. Proteobacteria, mainly Alfaproteobacteria, were by far the dominant phylum within of the CSTR-C bioreactor. Many of the sequences retrieved were related to bacteria present in activated sludge treatment plants and they were absent after thermal pre-treatment. Most of the sequences affiliated to the Bacteroidetes were related to uncultured groups. Anaerolineaceae was the sole family found of the Chloroflexi phylum. All of the genera identified of the Firmicutes phylum carried out macromolecule hydrolysis and by-product fermentation. The proteolytic bacteria were prevalent over the saccharolytic microbes. The percentage of the proteolytic genera increased from the inoculum to the CSTR-T sample in a parallel fashion with an available protein increase owing to the high protein content of Chlorella. To relate the taxa identified by high-throughput sequencing to their functional roles remains a future challenge.

  3. Nitrogen deposition and management practices increase soil microbial biomass carbon but decrease diversity in Moso bamboo plantations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Song, Xinzhang; Gu, Honghao; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Because microbial communities play a key role in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, changes in the soil microbial community may directly affect ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of N deposition and management practices on soil microbes are still poorly understood. We studied the effects of these two factors on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and community composition in Moso bamboo plantations using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Plantations under conventional (CM) or intensive management (IM) were subjected to one of four N treatments for 30 months. IM and N addition, both separately and in combination, significantly increased soil MBC while decreasing bacterial diversity. However, increases in soil MBC were inhibited when N addition exceeded 60 kg N∙ha−1∙yr−1. IM increased the relative abundances of Actinobacteria and Crenarchaeota but decreased that of Acidobacteria. N addition increased the relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Actinobacteria but decreased that of Proteobacteria. Soil bacterial diversity was significantly related to soil pH, C/N ratio, and nitrogen and available phosphorus content. Management practices exerted a greater influence over regulation of the soil MBC and microbial diversity compared to that of N deposition in Moso bamboo plantations. PMID:27302857

  4. Nitrogen deposition and management practices increase soil microbial biomass carbon but decrease diversity in Moso bamboo plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Song, Xinzhang; Gu, Honghao; Gao, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Because microbial communities play a key role in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, changes in the soil microbial community may directly affect ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of N deposition and management practices on soil microbes are still poorly understood. We studied the effects of these two factors on soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and community composition in Moso bamboo plantations using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Plantations under conventional (CM) or intensive management (IM) were subjected to one of four N treatments for 30 months. IM and N addition, both separately and in combination, significantly increased soil MBC while decreasing bacterial diversity. However, increases in soil MBC were inhibited when N addition exceeded 60 kg N•ha‑1•yr‑1. IM increased the relative abundances of Actinobacteria and Crenarchaeota but decreased that of Acidobacteria. N addition increased the relative abundances of Acidobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Actinobacteria but decreased that of Proteobacteria. Soil bacterial diversity was significantly related to soil pH, C/N ratio, and nitrogen and available phosphorus content. Management practices exerted a greater influence over regulation of the soil MBC and microbial diversity compared to that of N deposition in Moso bamboo plantations.

  5. Changes in the Size of the Active Microbial Pool Explain Short-Term Soil Respiratory Responses to Temperature and Moisture

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Villegas, Alejandro; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrophic respiration contributes a substantial fraction of the carbon flux from soil to atmosphere, and responds strongly to environmental conditions. However, the mechanisms through which short-term changes in environmental conditions affect microbial respiration still remain unclear. Microorganisms cope with adverse environmental conditions by transitioning into and out of dormancy, a state in which they minimize rates of metabolism and respiration. These transitions are poorly characterized in soil and are generally omitted from decomposition models. Most current approaches to model microbial control over soil CO2 production relate responses to total microbial biomass (TMB) and do not differentiate between microorganisms in active and dormant physiological states. Indeed, few data for active microbial biomass (AMB) exist with which to compare model output. Here, we tested the hypothesis that differences in soil microbial respiration rates across various environmental conditions are more closely related to differences in AMB (e.g., due to activation of dormant microorganisms) than in TMB. We measured basal respiration (SBR) of soil incubated for a week at two temperatures (24 and 33°C) and two moisture levels (10 and 20% soil dry weight [SDW]), and then determined TMB, AMB, microbial specific growth rate, and the lag time before microbial growth (tlag) using the Substrate-Induced Growth Response (SIGR) method. As expected, SBR was more strongly correlated with AMB than with TMB. This relationship indicated that each g active biomass C contributed ~0.04 g CO2-C h−1 of SBR. TMB responded very little to short-term changes in temperature and soil moisture and did not explain differences in SBR among the treatments. Maximum specific growth rate did not respond to environmental conditions, suggesting that the dominant microbial populations remained similar. However, warmer temperatures and increased soil moisture both reduced tlag, indicating that favorable

  6. Abundance and biomass responses of microbial food web components to hydrology and environmental gradients within a floodplain of the River Danube.

    PubMed

    Palijan, Goran

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the relationships of time-dependent hydrological variability and selected microbial food web components. Samples were collected monthly from the Kopački Rit floodplain in Croatia, over a period of 19 months, for analysis of bacterioplankton abundance, cell size and biomass; abundance of heterotrophic nanoflagellates and nanophytoplankton; and concentration of chlorophyll a. Similar hydrological variability at different times of the year enabled partition of seasonal effects from hydrological changes on microbial community properties. The results suggested that, unlike some other studies investigating sites with different connectivity, bacterioplankton abundance, and phytoplankton abundance and biomass increased during lentic conditions. At increasing water level, nanophytoplankton showed lower sensitivity to disturbance in comparison with total phytoplankton biomass: this could prolong autotrophic conditions within the floodplain. Bacterioplankton biomass, unlike phytoplankton, was not impacted by hydrology. The bacterial biomass less affected by hydrological changes can be an important additional food component for the floodplain food web. The results also suggested a mechanism controlling bacterial cell size independent of hydrology, as bacterial cell size was significantly decreased as nanoflagellate abundance increased. Hydrology, regardless of seasonal sucession, has the potential to structure microbial food webs, supporting microbial development during lentic conditions. Conversely, other components appear unaffected by hydrology or may be more strongly controlled by biotic interactions. This research, therefore, adds to understanding on microbial food web interactions in the context of flood and flow pulses in river-floodplain ecosystems.

  7. Effect of Malathion on the Microbial Ecology of Activated Sludge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    EFFECT OF MALATHION ON THE MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE THESIS Seth K. Martin, Senior Master Sergeant, USAF AFIT-ENV-MS-15-M-095 DEPARTMENT...Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENV-MS-15-M-095 EFFECT OF MALATHION ON THE MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF ACTIVATED...UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENV-MS-15-M-095 EFFECT OF MALATHION ON THE MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE THESIS Seth K. Martin, B.S. Senior Master Sergeant

  8. Pyrosequencing reveals highly diverse microbial communities in microbial electrolysis cells involved in enhanced H2 production from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Ren, Nanqi

    2012-05-01

    Renewable H(2) production from a plentiful biomass, waste activated sludge (WAS), can be achieved by fermentation, but the yields are low. The use of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) can increase the H(2) production yields to several times that of fermentation. We have proved that the enhancement of H(2) production was due to the ability of MECs to use a wider range of organic matter in WAS than in fermentation. To support this result strongly, we here investigated the microbial community structures of WAS and anode biofilms in WAS-fed MECs. A pyrosequencing analysis based on the bacterial 16S rRNA gene showed that dominant populations in MECs were more diverse than those in WAS (inoculum and substrate) after enrichment, and there was a clear distinction between MECs and WAS in microbial community structure. Diverse acid-producing bacteria and exoelectrogens (predominance of Geobacter) were detected in MECs but they were only rarely found in WAS. It has been reported that these acid-producing bacteria can ferment various sugars and amines with acetate, propionate, and butyrate as their major by-products. This was consistent with our chemical analyses. Detected exoelectrogens are known to use these organic acids (mainly acetate) and certain sugars to directly produce current for H(2) generation at the cathodes in the MECs. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we demonstrated that a consistent feed of alkaline-pretreated WAS containing large amounts of acetate led to a predominance of acetoclastic methanogens, while hydrogenotrophic methanogens were abundant in MECs fed both raw and alkaline-pretreated WAS. Syntrophic interactions between phylogenetically diverse microbial populations in anodophilic biofilms were found to drive the efficient cascade utilization of organic matter in WAS.

  9. The subzero microbiome: microbial activity in frozen and thawing soils.

    PubMed

    Nikrad, Mrinalini P; Kerkhof, Lee J; Häggblom, Max M

    2016-06-01

    Most of the Earth's biosphere is characterized by low temperatures (<5°C) and cold-adapted microorganisms are widespread. These psychrophiles have evolved a complex range of adaptations of all cellular constituents to counteract the potentially deleterious effects of low kinetic energy environments and the freezing of water. Microbial life continues into the subzero temperature range, and this activity contributes to carbon and nitrogen flux in and out of ecosystems, ultimately affecting global processes. Microbial responses to climate warming and, in particular, thawing of frozen soils are not yet well understood, although the threat of microbial contribution to positive feedback of carbon flux is substantial. To date, several studies have examined microbial community dynamics in frozen soils and permafrost due to changing environmental conditions, and some have undertaken the complicated task of characterizing microbial functional groups and how their activity changes with changing conditions, either in situ or by isolating and characterizing macromolecules. With increasing temperature and wetter conditions microbial activity of key microbes and subsequent efflux of greenhouse gases also increase. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of microbial activity in seasonally frozen soils and permafrost. With a more detailed understanding of the microbiological activities in these vulnerable soil ecosystems, we can begin to predict and model future expectations for carbon release and climate change.

  10. Metabolically active microbial communities in uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Akob, Denise M; Mills, Heath J; Kostka, Joel E

    2007-01-01

    In order to develop effective bioremediation strategies for radionuclide contaminants, the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities need to be better understood, especially in highly contaminated subsurface sediments for which little cultivation-independent information is available. In this study, we characterized metabolically active and total microbial communities associated with uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments along geochemical gradients. DNA and RNA were extracted and amplified from four sediment-depth intervals representing moderately acidic (pH 3.7) to near-neutral (pH 6.7) conditions. Phylotypes related to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Beta-, Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria), Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Planctomycetes were detected in DNA- and RNA-derived clone libraries. Diversity and numerical dominance of phylotypes were observed to correspond to changes in sediment geochemistry and rates of microbial activity, suggesting that geochemical conditions have selected for well-adapted taxa. Sequences closely related to nitrate-reducing bacteria represented 28% and 43% of clones from the total and metabolically active fractions of the microbial community, respectively. This study provides the first detailed analysis of total and metabolically active microbial communities in radionuclide-contaminated subsurface sediments. Our microbial community analysis, in conjunction with rates of microbial activity, points to several groups of nitrate-reducers that appear to be well adapted to environmental conditions common to radionuclide-contaminated sites.

  11. Shifts in microbial community in response to dissolved oxygen levels in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Trilok Chandra; Khardenavis, Anshuman A; Kapley, Atya

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the degradative efficiency of activated biomass collected from a Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) under three different dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, 1, 2 and 4mgl(-1). The change in bacterial diversity with reference to DO levels was also analyzed. Results demonstrate that degradative efficiency was the highest, when the reactor was maintained at 4mgl(-1) DO, but amplicon library analysis showed a greater diversity of bacteria in the reactor maintained at 2mgl(-1) DO. Bacteria belonging to the order Desulfuromonadales, Entomoplasmatales, Pasteurellales, Thermales and Chloroflexales have only been detected in this reactor. Ammonia and nitrate levels in all three reactors indicated efficient nitrification process. Results of this study offer new insights into understanding the performance of activated biomass vis-à-vis microbial diversity and degradative efficiency with reference to DO. This information would be useful in improving the efficiency of any wastewater treatment plant.

  12. Rapid and direct estimation of active biomass on granular activated carbon through adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) determination.

    PubMed

    Velten, Silvana; Hammes, Frederik; Boller, Markus; Egli, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration is used during drinking water treatment for the removal of micropollutants such as taste and odour compounds, halogenated hydrocarbons, pesticides and pharmaceuticals. In addition, the active microbial biomass established on GAC is responsible for the removal of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon compounds present in water or formed during oxidation (e.g., ozonation and chlorination) processes. In order to conduct correct kinetic evaluations of DOC removal during drinking water treatment, and to assess the state and performance of full-scale GAC filter installations, an accurate and sensitive method for active biomass determination on GAC is required. We have developed a straight-forward method based on direct measurement of the total adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) content of a GAC sample and other support media. In this method, we have combined flow-cytometric absolute cell counting and ATP analysis to derive case-specific ATP/cell conversion values. In this study, we present the detailed standardisation of the ATP method. An uncertainty assessment has shown that heterogeneous colonisation of the GAC particles makes the largest contribution to the combined standard uncertainty of the method. The method was applied for the investigation of biofilm formation during the start-up period of a GAC pilot-scale plant treating Lake Zurich water. A rapid increase in the biomass of up to 1.1 x 10(10)cells/g GAC dry weight (DW) within the first 33 days was observed, followed by a slight decrease to an average steady-state concentration of 7.9 x 10(9)cells/g GAC DW. It was shown that the method can be used to determine the biomass attached to the GAC for both stable and developing biofilms.

  13. Microbial catabolic activities are naturally selected by metabolic energy harvest rate

    PubMed Central

    González-Cabaleiro, Rebeca; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Lema, Juan M; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental trade-off between yield and rate of energy harvest per unit of substrate has been largely discussed as a main characteristic for microbial established cooperation or competition. In this study, this point is addressed by developing a generalized model that simulates competition between existing and not experimentally reported microbial catabolic activities defined only based on well-known biochemical pathways. No specific microbial physiological adaptations are considered, growth yield is calculated coupled to catabolism energetics and a common maximum biomass-specific catabolism rate (expressed as electron transfer rate) is assumed for all microbial groups. Under this approach, successful microbial metabolisms are predicted in line with experimental observations under the hypothesis of maximum energy harvest rate. Two microbial ecosystems, typically found in wastewater treatment plants, are simulated, namely: (i) the anaerobic fermentation of glucose and (ii) the oxidation and reduction of nitrogen under aerobic autotrophic (nitrification) and anoxic heterotrophic and autotrophic (denitrification) conditions. The experimentally observed cross feeding in glucose fermentation, through multiple intermediate fermentation pathways, towards ultimately methane and carbon dioxide is predicted. Analogously, two-stage nitrification (by ammonium and nitrite oxidizers) is predicted as prevailing over nitrification in one stage. Conversely, denitrification is predicted in one stage (by denitrifiers) as well as anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation). The model results suggest that these observations are a direct consequence of the different energy yields per electron transferred at the different steps of the pathways. Overall, our results theoretically support the hypothesis that successful microbial catabolic activities are selected by an overall maximum energy harvest rate. PMID:26161636

  14. Sub-soil microbial activity under rotational cotton crops in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polain, Katherine; Knox, Oliver; Wilson, Brian; Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Soil microbial communities contribute significantly to soil organic matter formation, stabilisation and destabilisation, through nutrient cycling and biodegradation. The majority of soil microbial research examines the processes occurring in the top 0 cm to 30 cm of the soil, where organic nutrients are easily accessible. In soils such as Vertosols, the high clay content causes swelling and cracking. When soil cracking is coupled with rain or an irrigation event, a flush of organic nutrients can move down the soil profile, becoming available for subsoil microbial community use and potentially making a significant contribution to nutrient cycling and biodegradation in soils. At present, the mechanisms and rates of soil nutrient turnover (such as carbon and nitrogen) at depth under cotton rotations are mostly speculative and the process-response relationships remain unclear, although they are undoubtedly underpinned by microbial activity. Our research aims to determine the contribution and role of soil microbiota to the accumulation, cycling and mineralisation of carbon and nitrogen through the whole root profile under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and cotton-maize rotations in regional New South Wales, Australia. Through seasonal work, we have established both baseline and potential microbial activity rates from 0 cm to 100 cm down the Vertosol profile, using respiration and colourimetric methods. Further whole soil profile analyses will include determination of microbial biomass and isotopic carbon signatures using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) methodology, identification of microbial communities (sequencing) and novel experiments to investigate potential rates of nitrogen mineralisation and quantification of associated genes. Our preliminary observations and the hypotheses tested in this three-year study will be presented.

  15. Heavy metal pollution decreases microbial abundance, diversity and activity within particle-size fractions of a paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junhui; He, Feng; Zhang, Xuhui; Sun, Xuan; Zheng, Jufeng; Zheng, Jinwei

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and microbial characterisations of particle-size fractions (PSFs) from a rice paddy soil subjected to long-term heavy metal pollution (P) and nonpolluted (NP) soil were performed to investigate whether the distribution of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) regulates microbial community activity, abundance and diversity at the microenvironment scale. The soils were physically fractionated into coarse sand, fine sand, silt and clay fractions. Long-term heavy metal pollution notably decreased soil basal respiration (a measurement of the total activity of the soil microbial community) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) across the fractions by 3-45% and 21-53%, respectively. The coarse sand fraction was more affected by pollution than the clay fraction and displayed a significantly lower MBC content and respiration and dehydrogenase activity compared with the nonpolluted soils. The abundances and diversities of bacteria were less affected within the PSFs under pollution. However, significant decreases in the abundances and diversities of fungi were noted, which may have strongly contributed to the decrease in MBC. Sequencing of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis bands revealed that the groups Acidobacteria, Ascomycota and Chytridiomycota were clearly inhibited under pollution. Our findings suggest that long-term heavy metal pollution decreased the microbial biomass, activity and diversity in PSFs, particularly in the large-size fractions.

  16. Effects of fertilization and clipping on carbon, nitrogen storage, and soil microbial activity in a natural grassland in southern China.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhimin; Xie, Yan; Hu, Liqun; Hu, Longxing; Xu, Shendong; Li, Daoxin; Wang, Gongfang; Fu, Jinmin

    2014-01-01

    Grassland managements can affect carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage in grassland ecosystems with consequent feedbacks to climate change. We investigated the impacts of compound fertilization and clipping on grass biomass, plant and soil (0-20 cm depth) C, N storage, plant and soil C: N ratios, soil microbial activity and diversity, and C, N sequestration rates in grassland in situ in the National Dalaoling Forest Park of China beginning July, 2011. In July, 2012, the fertilization increased total biomass by 30.1%, plant C by 34.5%, plant N by 79.8%, soil C by 18.8% and soil N by 23.8% compared with the control, respectively. Whereas the clipping decreased total biomass, plant C and N, soil C and N by 24.9%, 30.3%, 39.3%, 18.5%, and 19.4%, respectively, when compared to the control. The plant C: N ratio was lower for the fertilization than for the control and the clipping treatments. The soil microbial activity and diversity indices were higher for the fertilization than for the control. The clipping generally exhibited a lower level of soil microbial activity and diversity compared to the control. The principal component analysis indicated that the soil microbial communities of the control, fertilization and clipping treatments formed three distinct groups. The plant C and N sequestration rates of the fertilization were significantly higher than the clipping treatment. Our results suggest that fertilization is an efficient management practice in improving the C and N storage of the grassland ecosystem via increasing the grass biomass and soil microbial activity and diversity.

  17. A multi-year assessment of the environmental impact of transgenic Eucalyptus trees harboring a bacterial choline oxidase gene on biomass, precinct vegetation and the microbial community.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Taichi; Kashimura, Yuko; Mimura, Makiko; Yu, Xiang; Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Shimada, Teruhisa; Kikuchi, Akira; Watanabe, Kazuo N

    2014-10-01

    A 4-year field trial for the salt tolerant Eucalyptus globulus Labill. harboring the choline oxidase (codA) gene derived from the halobacterium Arthrobacter globiformis was conducted to assess the impact of transgenic versus non-transgenic trees on biomass production, the adjacent soil microbial communities and vegetation by monitoring growth parameters, seasonal changes in soil microbes and the allelopathic activity of leaves. Three independently-derived lines of transgenic E. globulus were compared with three independent non-transgenic lines including two elite clones. No significant differences in biomass production were detected between transgenic lines and non-transgenic controls derived from same seed bulk, while differences were seen compared to two elite clones. Significant differences in the number of soil microbes present were also detected at different sampling times but not between transgenic and non-transgenic lines. The allelopathic activity of leaves from both transgenic and non-transgenic lines also varied significantly with sampling time, but the allelopathic activity of leaves from transgenic lines did not differ significantly from those from non-transgenic lines. These results indicate that, for the observed variables, the impact on the environment of codA-transgenic E. globulus did not differ significantly from that of the non-transformed controls on this field trial.

  18. Using respirometric techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization to evaluate the heterotrophic active biomass in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A; Wentzel, M C; Bux, F

    2007-10-15

    The separation and accurate quantification of active biomass components in activated sludge is of paramount importance in models, used for the management and design of waste water (WW) treatment plants. Accurate estimates of microbial population concentrations and the direct, in situ determination of kinetic parameters could improve the calibration and validation of existing models of biological nutrient removal activated sludge systems. The aim of this study was to obtain correlations between heterotrophic active biomass (Z(BH)) concentrations predicted by mathematical models and quantitative information obtained by Fluorescent in situ hybridizations (FISH). Respirometric batch test were applied to mixed liquors drawn from a well-defined parent anoxic/aerobic activated sludge system to quantify the Z(BH) concentrations. Similarly fluorescent labeled, 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes specific for ammonia and nitrite oxidizers were used in combination with DAPI staining to validate the Z(BH) active biomass component in activate sludge respirometric batch tests. For the direct enumeration and simultaneous in situ analysis of the distribution of nitrifying bacteria, in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes were used. Probes (NSO 1225, NSR 1156, and NIT3) were used to target the nitrifiers and the universal probe (EUB MIX) was used to target all Eubacteria. Deducting the lithoautotrophic population from the total bacteria population revealed the Z(BH) population. A conversion factor of 8.49 x 10(-11) mg VSS/cell was applied to express the Z(BH) in terms of COD concentration. Z(BH) values obtained by molecular probing correlated closely with values obtained from the modified batch test. However, the trend of consistently poor correspondence of measured and theoretical concentrations were evident. Therefore, the focus of this study was to investigate alternative technology, such as FISH to validate or replace kinetic parameters which are invariably

  19. Changes in microbial properties and nutrient dynamics in bagasse and coir during vermicomposting: quantification of fungal biomass through ergosterol estimation in vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, P

    2010-05-01

    In this experiment, different microorganisms viz., Trichoderma viridae, Aspergillus niger and Bacillus megaterium were inoculated in bagasse and coir with the objective to study their effect on nutrient dynamics and microbial properties, specially effect on fungal status in these waste materials. Fungal biomass (FBC) was calculated from the ergosterol content in the vermicompost samples. Inoculation of B. megaterium registered comparatively higher TP content in the final stabilized product. Vermicomposting increased microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) content in bagasse and coir. Microbial biomass carbon to nitrogen ratio (MBC/ MBN) was comparatively narrower in fungi inoculated vermicomposts and FBC/MBC ratio was increased up to 11.69 from 9.51 of control during vermicomposting.

  20. [Effects of land use type on soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen contents in Karst region of South China].

    PubMed

    Li, Xinai; Xiao, Heai; Wu, Jinshui; Su, Yirong; Huang, Daoyou; Huang, Min; Liu, Shoulong; Peng, Hongcui

    2006-10-01

    A total of 721 surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were collected from the paddy field, upland, and woodland in the Karst region of Dacai, Huanjiang County, Guangxi Province, and the contents of their organic carbon (Oc ), total nitrogen (TN), microbial biomass carbon (Bc) , and microbial biomass nitrogen (BN) were determined. The results showed that the Oc and BN contents and soil pH value showed the trend of paddy field = woodland > upland, while TN and Bc contents had the trend of woodland > paddy field > upland. There was a significant positive correlation between Bc and Oc, and between B5 and TN. Soil microbial biomass C and N had rapid responses to the changes of land use type, which could be used as the sensitive biological indicators in evaluating soil quality and fertility in Karst region.

  1. Microbial ecology of terrestrial Antarctica: Are microbial systems at risk from human activities?

    SciTech Connect

    White, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    Many of the ecological systems found in continental Antarctica are comprised entirely of microbial species. Concerns have arisen that these microbial systems might be at risk either directly through the actions of humans or indirectly through increased competition from introduced species. Although protection of native biota is covered by the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, strict measures for preventing the introduction on non-native species or for protecting microbial habitats may be impractical. This report summarizes the research conducted to date on microbial ecosystems in continental Antarctica and discusses the need for protecting these ecosystems. The focus is on communities inhabiting soil and rock surfaces in non-coastal areas of continental Antarctica. Although current polices regarding waste management and other operations in Antarctic research stations serve to reduce the introduction on non- native microbial species, importation cannot be eliminated entirely. Increased awareness of microbial habitats by field personnel and protection of certain unique habitats from physical destruction by humans may be necessary. At present, small-scale impacts from human activities are occurring in certain areas both in terms of introduced species and destruction of habitat. On a large scale, however, it is questionable whether the introduction of non-native microbial species to terrestrial Antarctica merits concern.

  2. Finding Biomass Degrading Enzymes Through an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP).

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongyan; Delafield, Daniel G; Wang, Zhe; You, Jianlan; Wu, Si

    2017-04-01

    The microbial secretome, known as a pool of biomass (i.e., plant-based materials) degrading enzymes, can be utilized to discover industrial enzyme candidates for biofuel production. Proteomics approaches have been applied to discover novel enzyme candidates through comparing protein expression profiles with enzyme activity of the whole secretome under different growth conditions. However, the activity measurement of each enzyme candidate is needed for confident "active" enzyme assignments, which remains to be elucidated. To address this challenge, we have developed an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP) that systematically correlates protein-level enzymatic activity patterns and protein elution profiles using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach. The ACPP optimized a high performance anion exchange separation for efficiently fractionating complex protein samples while preserving enzymatic activities. The detected enzymatic activity patterns in sequential fractions using microplate-based assays were cross-correlated with protein elution profiles using a customized pattern-matching algorithm with a correlation R-score. The ACPP has been successfully applied to the identification of two types of "active" biomass-degrading enzymes (i.e., starch hydrolysis enzymes and cellulose hydrolysis enzymes) from Aspergillus niger secretome in a multiplexed fashion. By determining protein elution profiles of 156 proteins in A. niger secretome, we confidently identified the 1,4-α-glucosidase as the major "active" starch hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.96) and the endoglucanase as the major "active" cellulose hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.97). The results demonstrated that the ACPP facilitated the discovery of bioactive enzymes from complex protein samples in a high-throughput, multiplexing, and untargeted fashion. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Finding Biomass Degrading Enzymes Through an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongyan; Delafield, Daniel G.; Wang, Zhe; You, Jianlan; Wu, Si

    2017-01-01

    The microbial secretome, known as a pool of biomass (i.e., plant-based materials) degrading enzymes, can be utilized to discover industrial enzyme candidates for biofuel production. Proteomics approaches have been applied to discover novel enzyme candidates through comparing protein expression profiles with enzyme activity of the whole secretome under different growth conditions. However, the activity measurement of each enzyme candidate is needed for confident "active" enzyme assignments, which remains to be elucidated. To address this challenge, we have developed an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP) that systematically correlates protein-level enzymatic activity patterns and protein elution profiles using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach. The ACPP optimized a high performance anion exchange separation for efficiently fractionating complex protein samples while preserving enzymatic activities. The detected enzymatic activity patterns in sequential fractions using microplate-based assays were cross-correlated with protein elution profiles using a customized pattern-matching algorithm with a correlation R-score. The ACPP has been successfully applied to the identification of two types of "active" biomass-degrading enzymes (i.e., starch hydrolysis enzymes and cellulose hydrolysis enzymes) from Aspergillus niger secretome in a multiplexed fashion. By determining protein elution profiles of 156 proteins in A. niger secretome, we confidently identified the 1,4-α-glucosidase as the major "active" starch hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.96) and the endoglucanase as the major "active" cellulose hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.97). The results demonstrated that the ACPP facilitated the discovery of bioactive enzymes from complex protein samples in a high-throughput, multiplexing, and untargeted fashion.

  4. Modeling of decomposition activity and priming effect in soil using the versatile index of microbial physiological state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskiy, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The implementation of microbial biomass in soil organic matter (SOM) models is still unresolved issue. The approaches using explicit description of microbial biomass (decomposer) interaction with SOM usually cannot be easily verified by means of experimental estimating of total microbial biomass dynamics. Standard experimental methods, such as fumigation extraction or direct microscopic count, does not represent microbial activity (Blagodatskaya and Kuzyakov, 2013), which is essential for the control of decomposition rate. More advanced approaches, explicitly simulating intracellular metabolic activity (Resat et al., 2012) and e.g. production and turnover of extracellular enzymes (Lawrence et al., 2009) are prohibitively complex for the field and larger scales, which are most often under demand for SOM modelling. One possible parsimonious solution is an application of index of microbial physiological state (r), which describes the adaptive variation of the cell composition and metabolic activity by one variable (Panikov, 1995). This variable (r) can reflect the microbial response to the availability of carbon and nitrogen and shift of microbial biomass between active and dormant state (Blagodatsky and Richter, 1998), but also can be used for the description of the effect of external factors, such as temperature and moisture, on microbial activity. This approach is extremely useful for the description of priming effect (Blagodatsky et al., 2010) and the influence of substrate availability and external factors on the size and dynamics of priming. Distinguishing of these two types of driving forces for priming is crucial for modelling of SOM dynamics and steady-state stocks of different SOM pools. I will present the analysis of model response on combination of limiting factors presented as functions controlling the change of microbial physiological state and size of priming effect. Alternatively, the direct effect of the same factors on decomposition rate and priming

  5. Soil moisture and land use are major determinants of soil microbial community composition and biomass at a regional scale in northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L.; Guo, C.; Lü, X.; Yuan, S.; Wang, R.

    2015-04-01

    Global environmental factors impact soil microbial communities and further affect organic matter decomposition, nutrient cycling and vegetation dynamic. However, little is known about the relative contributions of climate factors, soil properties, vegetation types, land management practices and spatial structure (which serves as a proxy for underlying effects of temperature and precipitation for spatial variation) on soil microbial community composition and biomass at large spatial scales. Here, we compared soil microbial communities using phospholipid fatty acid method across 7 land use types from 23 locations at a regional scale in northeastern China (850 × 50 km). The results showed that soil moisture and land use changes were most closely related to microbial community composition and biomass at the regional scale, while soil total C content and climate effects were weaker but still significant. Factors such as spatial structure, soil texture, nutrient availability and vegetation types were not important. Higher contributions of gram-positive bacteria were found in wetter soils, whereas higher contributions of gram-negative bacteria and fungi were observed in drier soils. The contributions of gram-negative bacteria and fungi were lower in heavily disturbed soils than historically disturbed and undisturbed soils. The lowest microbial biomass appeared in the wettest and driest soils. In conclusion, dominant climate and soil properties were not the most important drivers governing microbial community composition and biomass because of inclusion of irrigated and managed practices, and thus soil moisture and land use appear to be primary determinants of microbial community composition and biomass at the regional scale in northeastern China.

  6. Soil microbial activity and structure in mineralized terranes of the Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecker, S. W.; Stillings, L. L.; Decrappeo, N.; Ippolito, J.

    2009-12-01

    Mineralized terranes (areas enriched in metal-bearing minerals) occur throughout the Western US, and are characterized by highly variable soil trace metal concentrations across small spatial scales. Assuming that non-lithologic (extrinsic) soil forming factors are relatively constant between mineralized and unmineralized zones, these mineralized areas allowed us to evaluate the effect of lithology on soil microbial activity. We established the following study sites: 1) sage-grassland on a Mo/Cu deposit (Battle Mountain, NV); 2) pine-chaparral on Ni/Cr bearing rocks (Chinese Camp, CA); and 3) two pine woodland sites on acid-sulfate altered rocks (Reno, NV; Bridgeport, CA). Microbial, physical and chemical measurements were performed on soils from undisturbed mineralized areas and adjacent unmineralized areas to determine baseline conditions for comparison to sites disturbed by mining. A host of abiotic soil parameters, along with bioavailable (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable) and total metals, were measured to examine their correlation with the following measures of microbial activity: enzyme assays (arylsulfatase, phosphatase, fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis), C/N mineralization potential, C substrate utilization (Biolog Ecoplate), and microbial biomass and community structure (phospholipid fatty acid analysis). Within the Battle Mountain study area, both microbial activity and structure were statistically similar between mineralized and unmineralized soils. Nutrient and metal concentrations were also similar; the only differences being higher Cu and lower P in the mineralized soils. Within the Chinese Camp study area, soil organic carbon and total nitrogen concentrations were similar between the serpentine (Ni/Cr bearing) and adjacent andesite soils, while differences were noted for other nutrients (S, P, Ca, Mg). For the serpentine soils, Co, Fe, Mn, and Ni showed the strongest correlations with microbial activity, where Cr, Mn showed the

  7. Are variations in heterotrophic soil respiration related to changes in substrate availability and microbial biomass carbon in the subtropical forests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hui; Chen, Xiaomei; Xiao, Guoliang; Guenet, Bertrand; Vicca, Sara; Shen, Weijun

    2015-12-01

    Soil temperature and moisture are widely-recognized controlling factors on heterotrophic soil respiration (Rh), although they often explain only a portion of Rh variability. How other soil physicochemical and microbial properties may contribute to Rh variability has been less studied. We conducted field measurements on Rh half-monthly and associated soil properties monthly for two years in four subtropical forests of southern China to assess influences of carbon availability and microbial properties on Rh. Rh in coniferous forest was significantly lower than that in the other three broadleaf species-dominated forests and exhibited obvious seasonal variations in the four forests (P < 0.05). Temperature was the primary factor influencing the seasonal variability of Rh while moisture was not in these humid subtropical forests. The quantity and decomposability of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were significantly important to Rh variations, but the effect of DOC content on Rh was confounded with temperature, as revealed by partial mantel test. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC) was significantly related to Rh variations across forests during the warm season (P = 0.043). Our results suggest that DOC and MBC may be important when predicting Rh under some conditions, and highlight the complexity by mutual effects of them with environmental factors on Rh variations.

  8. Are variations in heterotrophic soil respiration related to changes in substrate availability and microbial biomass carbon in the subtropical forests?

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hui; Chen, Xiaomei; Xiao, Guoliang; Guenet, Bertrand; Vicca, Sara; Shen, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    Soil temperature and moisture are widely-recognized controlling factors on heterotrophic soil respiration (Rh), although they often explain only a portion of Rh variability. How other soil physicochemical and microbial properties may contribute to Rh variability has been less studied. We conducted field measurements on Rh half-monthly and associated soil properties monthly for two years in four subtropical forests of southern China to assess influences of carbon availability and microbial properties on Rh. Rh in coniferous forest was significantly lower than that in the other three broadleaf species-dominated forests and exhibited obvious seasonal variations in the four forests (P < 0.05). Temperature was the primary factor influencing the seasonal variability of Rh while moisture was not in these humid subtropical forests. The quantity and decomposability of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were significantly important to Rh variations, but the effect of DOC content on Rh was confounded with temperature, as revealed by partial mantel test. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC) was significantly related to Rh variations across forests during the warm season (P = 0.043). Our results suggest that DOC and MBC may be important when predicting Rh under some conditions, and highlight the complexity by mutual effects of them with environmental factors on Rh variations. PMID:26670822

  9. Arctic Gypsum Endoliths: a biogeochemical characterization of a viable and active microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziolkowski, L. A.; Mykytczuk, N. C. S.; Omelon, C. R.; Johnson, H.; Whyte, L. G.; Slater, G. F.

    2013-02-01

    Extreme environmental conditions such as those found in the polar regions on Earth are thought to test the limits of life. Microorganisms living in these environments often seek protection from environmental stresses such as high UV exposure, desiccation and rapid temperature fluctuations, with one protective habitat found within rocks. Such endolithic microbial communities, which often consist of bacteria, fungi, algae and lichens, are small-scale ecosystems comprised of both producers and consumers. However, the harsh environmental conditions experienced by polar endolithic communities are thought to limit microbial diversity and the rate at which they cycle carbon. In this study, we characterized the microbial community diversity, turnover, and microbe-mineral interactions of a gypsum-based endolithic community in the polar desert of the Canadian high Arctic. 16S/18S rRNA pyrotag sequencing demonstrated the presence of a diverse community of phototrophic and heterotrophic bacteria, algae and fungi. Stable carbon isotope analysis of the viable microbial membranes, as phospholipid fatty acids and glycolipid fatty acids, confirmed the diversity observed by molecular techniques and indicated that atmospheric carbon is assimilated into the microbial community biomass. Uptake of radiocarbon from atmospheric radioweapons testing during the 1960s into microbial lipids was used as a pulse label to determine that the microbial community turns over carbon on the order of 10 yr, equivalent to 4.4 g C m-2 yr-1 gross primary productivity. SEM micrographs indicated that mechanical weathering of gypsum by freeze-thaw cycles leads to increased porosity, which ultimately increases the habitability of the rock. In addition, while bacteria were adhered to these mineral surfaces there was little evidence for microbial alteration of minerals, which contrasts with other gypsum endolithic habitats. While it is possible that these communities turn over carbon quickly and leave little

  10. Effects of Environmental Toxicants on Metabolic Activity of Natural Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Carole L. H.; Vestal, J. Robie

    1983-01-01

    Two methods of measuring microbial activity were used to study the effects of toxicants on natural microbial communities. The methods were compared for suitability for toxicity testing, sensitivity, and adaptability to field applications. This study included measurements of the incorporation of 14C-labeled acetate into microbial lipids and microbial glucosidase activity. Activities were measured per unit biomass, determined as lipid phosphate. The effects of various organic and inorganic toxicants on various natural microbial communities were studied. Both methods were useful in detecting toxicity, and their comparative sensitivities varied with the system studied. In one system, the methods showed approximately the same sensitivities in testing the effects of metals, but the acetate incorporation method was more sensitive in detecting the toxicity of organic compounds. The incorporation method was used to study the effects of a point source of pollution on the microbiota of a receiving stream. Toxic doses were found to be two orders of magnitude higher in sediments than in water taken from the same site, indicating chelation or adsorption of the toxicant by the sediment. The microbiota taken from below a point source outfall was 2 to 100 times more resistant to the toxicants tested than was that taken from above the outfall. Downstream filtrates in most cases had an inhibitory effect on the natural microbiota taken from above the pollution source. The microbial methods were compared with commonly used bioassay methods, using higher organisms, and were found to be similar in ability to detect comparative toxicities of compounds, but were less sensitive than methods which use standard media because of the influences of environmental factors. PMID:16346432

  11. Effects of heavy metals contained in soil irrigated with a mixture of sewage sludge and effluent for thirty years on soil microbial biomass and plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanda, Y.; Mushonga, C.; Banganayi, F.; Nyamangara, J.

    The use of sewage effluent as a source of nutrients and water in peri-urban crop production is widespread in developing countries. A study was conducted in 2005 at Crowborough and Firle farms (near Harare) to assess effect of Cd on microbial biomass and activity, effect of sewage sludge and effluent on soybean (Glycine max L (Merr)) nodulation, and uptake of Zn and Cu by lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.), mustard rape ( Brassica juncea L.), covo ( Brassica napus) and star grass ( Cynodon nlemfuensis). The soil that was used had been irrigated with sewage sludge and effluent for 30 years. Soil collected from Crowborough farm was enriched with Cd to different concentrations (0.4-5 mg Cd kg -1 soil) using Cd(NO 3) 2 and microbial biomass C and N (chloroform-incubation extraction) and respiration rates (CO 2 evolution) determined. A similar experiment to determine the effect of repeated addition of small amounts of Cd to soil over time on the same parameters was conducted. Three vegetables and star grass were grown in a pot experiment and harvested at six weeks after transplanting for the determination of above ground dry matter yield, and Zn and Cu, uptake. In another pot experiment, two soybean varieties, Magoye and Solitaire, were harvested after eight weeks and nodule number and effectiveness, and above ground dry matter yield were then determined. Cd significantly decreased biomass C (68%) and N (73%). Microbial respiration also significantly decreased. It was concluded that long-term application of sewage sludge and effluent to soil has negative effects on soil micro organisms, including Rhizobia. These micro organisms are essential for N-fixation. The damage to Rhizobia, caused diminished nodulation of soybean. Mustard rape and lettuce can accumulate Zn and Cu beyond toxic limits without apparent reduction in growth thereby posing a serious concern to the food chain. The consumption of mustard rape and lettuce grown on soil amended with sewage sludge and effluent at

  12. Functional diversity of carbohydrate-active enzymes enabling a bacterium to ferment plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Nogue, Pierre-Yves; Alberti, Adriana; Weissenbach, Jean; Salanoubat, Marcel; Tolonen, Andrew C

    2014-11-01

    Microbial metabolism of plant polysaccharides is an important part of environmental carbon cycling, human nutrition, and industrial processes based on cellulosic bioconversion. Here we demonstrate a broadly applicable method to analyze how microbes catabolize plant polysaccharides that integrates carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) assays, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and anaerobic growth screening. We apply this method to study how the bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans ferments plant biomass components including glucans, mannans, xylans, galactans, pectins, and arabinans. These polysaccharides are fermented with variable efficiencies, and diauxies prioritize metabolism of preferred substrates. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals how this bacterium responds to polysaccharides by up-regulating specific groups of CAZymes, transporters, and enzymes to metabolize the constituent sugars. Fifty-six up-regulated CAZymes were purified, and their activities show most polysaccharides are degraded by multiple enzymes, often from the same family, but with divergent rates, specificities, and cellular localizations. CAZymes were then tested in combination to identify synergies between enzymes acting on the same substrate with different catalytic mechanisms. We discuss how these results advance our understanding of how microbes degrade and metabolize plant biomass.

  13. Patterns of microbial community biomass, composition and HPLC diagnostic pigments in the Costa Rica upwelling dome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew G.; Landry, Michael R.; Freibott, Alexandra; Selph, Karen E.; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We investigated biomass, size-structure, composition, depth distributions and spatial variability of the phytoplankton community in the Costa Rica Dome (CRD) in June–July 2010. Euphotic zone profiles were sampled daily during Lagrangian experiments in and out of the dome region, and the community was analyzed using a combination of digital epifluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and HPLC pigments. The mean depth-integrated biomass of phytoplankton ranged 2-fold, from 1089 to 1858 mg C m−2 (mean ± SE = 1378 ± 112 mg C m−2), among 4 water parcels tracked for 4 days. Corresponding mean (±SE) integrated values for total chlorophyll a (Chl a) and the ratio of autotrophic carbon to Chl a were 24.1 ± 1.5 mg Chl a m−2 and 57.5 ± 3.4, respectively. Absolute and relative contributions of picophytoplankton (∼60%), Synechococcus (>33%) and Prochlorococcus (17%) to phytoplankton community biomass were highest in the central dome region, while >20 µm phytoplankton accounted for ≤10%, and diatoms <2%, of biomass in all areas. Nonetheless, autotrophic flagellates, dominated by dinoflagellates, exceeded biomass contributions of Synechococcus at all locations. Order-of-magnitude discrepancies in the relative contributions of diatoms (overestimated) and dinoflagellates (underestimated) based on diagnostic pigments relative to microscopy highlight potential significant biases associated with making community inferences from pigments. PMID:27275024

  14. Conversion of orange peel waste biomass to bioelectricity using a mediator-less microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Miran, Waheed; Nawaz, Mohsin; Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-03-15

    Microorganisms have the potential to become a game-changer in sustainable energy production in the coming generations. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as an alternative renewable technology can capture bioenergy (electricity) from carbon-based sources by utilizing microorganisms as biocatalysts. This study demonstrated that MFC technology can be explored for bioelectricity production from orange peel waste (OPW), an agricultural byproduct and an organic substrate, without any chemical pretreatment or the addition of extra mediators. A maximum voltage generation of 0.59 ± 0.02 V (at 500 Ω) was achieved in a dual chamber MFC during stable voltage generation stages. The maximum power density and current density obtained were 358.8 ± 15.6 mW/m(2) and 847 ± 18.4 mA/m(2), respectively. Key components of OPW, namely pectin and cellulose, were also tested in their pure form, with pectin giving a stable current, while no significant current generation was achieved using cellulose alone as the substrate, thus demonstrating the absence of cellulose-degrading bacteria. Maximum pectinase and polygalacturonase enzyme activities of 18.55 U/g and 9.04 U/g (per gram of substrate), respectively were achieved during orange peel degradation in MFCs. Bacterial identification using 16S rRNA analysis of the initial inoculum fed to the MFC, the biofilm attached to the anode, and the anode suspension, showed significant diversity in community composition. A well-known exoelectrogen, Pseudomonas, was present among the predominant genera in the anode biofilm.

  15. The impact of hydrogen emission on the structure of soil microbial biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanskaya, L. M.; Stepanov, A. L.; Chakmazyan, K. V.

    2017-01-01

    Population density and biomass of microorganisms were studied in background soils and in soils affected by hydrogen degassing. These parameters were lower in the latter soils. Actinomycetes and fungal mycelium could not be isolated from the soils treated with hydrogen already on the fourteenth day of the experiment; the number and biomass of fungal spores decreased to zero levels even earlier, on the seventh day. Fungi represent a specific physiological group, and their capacity for environmental adaptation is much lower than that of bacteria.

  16. Modification of soil microbial activity and several hydrolases in a forest soil artificially contaminated with copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellas, Rosa; Leirós, Mā Carmen; Gil-Sotres, Fernando; Trasar-Cepeda, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Soils have long been exposed to the adverse effects of human activities, which negatively affect soil biological activity. As a result of their functions and ubiquitous presence microorganisms can serve as environmental indicators of soil pollution. Some features of soil microorganisms, such as the microbial biomass size, respiration rate, and enzyme activity are often used as bioindicators of the ecotoxicity of heavy metals. Although copper is essential for microorganisms, excessive concentrations have a negative influence on processes mediated by microorganisms. In this study we measured the response of some microbial indicators to Cu pollution in a forest soil, with the aim of evaluating their potential for predicting Cu contamination. Samples of an Ah horizon from a forest soil under oakwood vegetation (Quercus robur L.) were contaminated in the laboratory with copper added at different doses (0, 120, 360, 1080 and 3240 mg kg-1) as CuCl2×2H2O. The soil samples were kept for 7 days at 25 °C and at a moisture content corresponding to the water holding capacity, and thereafter were analysed for carbon and nitrogen mineralization capacity, microbial biomass C, seed germination and root elongation tests, and for urease, phosphomonoesterase, catalase and ß-glucosidase activities. In addition, carbon mineralization kinetics were studied, by plotting the log of residual C against incubation time, and the metabolic coefficient, qCO2, was estimated. Both organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization were lower in polluted samples, with the greatest decrease observed in the sample contaminated with 1080 mg kg-1. In all samples carbon mineralization followed first order kinetics; the C mineralization constant was lower in contaminated than in uncontaminated samples and, in general, decreased with increasing doses of copper. Moreover, it appears that copper contamination not only reduced the N mineralization capacity, but also modified the N mineralization process, since in

  17. Is there a seamount effect on microbial community structure and biomass? The case study of Seine and Sedlo seamounts (northeast Atlantic).

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Ana; Arístegui, Javier; Vilas, Juan Carlos; Montero, Maria Fernanda; Ojeda, Alicia; Espino, Minerva; Martins, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Seamounts are considered to be "hotspots" of marine life but, their role in oceans primary productivity is still under discussion. We have studied the microbial community structure and biomass of the epipelagic zone (0-150 m) at two northeast Atlantic seamounts (Seine and Sedlo) and compared those with the surrounding ocean. Results from two cruises to Sedlo and three to Seine are presented. Main results show large temporal and spatial microbial community variability on both seamounts. Both Seine and Sedlo heterotrophic community (abundance and biomass) dominate during winter and summer months, representing 75% (Sedlo, July) to 86% (Seine, November) of the total plankton biomass. In Seine, during springtime the contribution to total plankton biomass is similar (47% autotrophic and 53% heterotrophic). Both seamounts present an autotrophic community structure dominated by small cells (nano and picophytoplankton). It is also during spring that a relatively important contribution (26%) of large cells to total autotrophic biomass is found. In some cases, a "seamount effect" is observed on Seine and Sedlo microbial community structure and biomass. In Seine this is only observed during spring through enhancement of large autotrophic cells at the summit and seamount stations. In Sedlo, and despite the observed low biomasses, some clear peaks of picoplankton at the summit or at stations within the seamount area are also observed during summer. Our results suggest that the dominance of heterotrophs is presumably related to the trapping effect of organic matter by seamounts. Nevertheless, the complex circulation around both seamounts with the presence of different sources of mesoscale variability (e.g. presence of meddies, intrusion of African upwelling water) may have contributed to the different patterns of distribution, abundances and also changes observed in the microbial community.

  18. Arctic gypsum endoliths: a biogeochemical characterization of a viable and active microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziolkowski, L. A.; Mykytczuk, N. C. S.; Omelon, C. R.; Johnson, H.; Whyte, L. G.; Slater, G. F.

    2013-11-01

    Extreme environmental conditions such as those found in the polar regions on Earth are thought to test the limits of life. Microorganisms living in these environments often seek protection from environmental stresses such as high UV exposure, desiccation and rapid temperature fluctuations, with one protective habitat found within rocks. Such endolithic microbial communities, which often consist of bacteria, fungi, algae and lichens, are small-scale ecosystems comprised of both producers and consumers. However, the harsh environmental conditions experienced by polar endolithic communities are thought to limit microbial diversity and therefore the rate at which they cycle carbon. In this study, we characterized the microbial community diversity, turnover rate and microbe-mineral interactions of a gypsum-based endolithic community in the polar desert of the Canadian high Arctic. 16S/18S/23S rRNA pyrotag sequencing demonstrated the presence of a diverse community of phototrophic and heterotrophic bacteria, archaea, algae and fungi. Stable carbon isotope analysis of the viable microbial membranes, as phospholipid fatty acids and glycolipid fatty acids, confirmed the diversity observed by molecular techniques and indicated that present-day atmospheric carbon is assimilated into the microbial community biomass. Uptake of radiocarbon from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing during the 1960s into microbial lipids was used as a pulse label to determine that the microbial community turns over carbon on the order of 10 yr, equivalent to 4.4 g C m-2 yr-1 gross primary productivity. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs indicated that mechanical weathering of gypsum by freeze-thaw cycles leads to increased porosity, which ultimately increases the habitability of the rock. In addition, while bacteria were adhered to these mineral surfaces, chemical analysis by micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) spectroscopy suggests little evidence for microbial alteration of minerals

  19. Microbial biodiesel production from oil palm biomass hydrolysate using marine Rhodococcus sp. YHY01.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Kim, Junyoung; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Hyun Joong; Jeon, Jong-Min; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Yoon, Jeong-Jun; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Yun-Gon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2017-02-20

    The effect of various biomass derived inhibitors (i.e. furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), vanillin, 4-hydroxy benzaldehyde (4-HB) and acetate) was investigated for fatty acid accumulation in Rhodococcus sp. YHY 01. Rhodococcus sp. YHY01 was able to utilize acetate, vanillin, and 4-HB for biomass production and fatty acid accumulation. The IC50 value for furfural (3.1mM), HMF (3.2mM), vanillin (2.0mM), 4-HB (2.7mM) and acetate (3.7mM) was calculated. HMF and vanillin affect fatty acid composition and increase saturated fatty acid content. Rhodococcus sp. YHY 01 cultured with empty fruit bunch hydrolysate (EFBH) as the main carbon source resulted in enhanced biomass (20%) and fatty acid productivity (37%), in compression to glucose as a carbon source. Overall, this study showed the beneficial effects of inhibitory molecules on growth and fatty acid production, and support the idea of biomass hydrolysate utilization for biodiesel production by avoiding complex efforts to remove inhibitory compounds.

  20. RESPONSE OF SOIL MICROBIAL BIOMASS AND COMMUNITY COMPOSITION TO CHRONIC NITROGEN ADDITIONS AT HARVARD FOREST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil microbial communities may respond to anthropogenic increases in ecosystem nitrogen (N) availability, and their response may ultimately feedback on ecosystem carbon and N dynamics. We examined the long-term effects of chronic N additions on soil microbes by measuring soil mi...

  1. [Effects of forest gap on seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial biomass car- bon in Picea asperata forest in Miyaluo of Western Sichuan, Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi-Gui; Hao, Kai-Jie; Li, Xian-Wei; Fan, Chuan; Chen, Yue-Lin; Liu, Yun-Ke; Wang, Xie

    2014-09-01

    Effects of gap sizes (50, 100 and 150 m2) on seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in soil surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface (15-30 cm) were investigated in a 50-year old Picea asperata plantation in Miyaluo forest, Western Si- chuan, China. In the four seasons, the SOC and MBC contents were higher in the soil surface than in soil subsurface in the four treatments, and varied insignificantly in different seasons. Compared with the control, the SOC content increased by 35.4%, 21.2% and 10.3% in soil surface, and by 45.5%, 25.0% and 12.1% in soil subsurface with the forest gaps of 50, 100 and 150 m2, respectively. The MBC content increased by 26.7%, 16.7%, 11.3% and 24.4%, 12.6%, 7.3% in soil surface and subsurface, respectively. There were significant negative relationship between soil SOC content and the soil pH and moisture, and significant positive relationship between soil SOC content and soil temperature. Significant effects of SOC content, soil pH, soil temperature, soil moisture on MBC content were observed, suggesting that forest gaps could significantly affect envi- ronmental conditions, and increasing gaps could reduce microbial activity and decomposition rate and decrease soil SOC and MBC contents.

  2. Microbial activity in surface sediments of Chacopata-Bocaripo lagoon axis, Sucre State, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Segnini de B, Mary Isabel; Gómez, Irma; Brito, Leonor; Acosta, Vanessa; Troccoli, Luis

    2015-02-28

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the microbial activity of the surface sediments (0-10 cm) of the Chacopata-Bocaripo lagoon axis (Ch-BLA) through microbiological parameters: microbial biomass (Cmic) dehydrogenase activity (DHS), fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (HFDA), arginine ammonification (AA) and biochemical parameters: phosphatase (PHa) and urease (URa) activity. They were determined during transition (July 2010) and upwelling (March 2011) periods. Total organic carbon (TOC) did not vary significantly (p⩾0.05) between climatic periods. All the parameters studied were higher in upwelling season: Cmic (191.79 mg Cmic kg(-1)), DHS (228.70 μg TFF g(-1) 24 h(-1)), HFDA (204.09 μg fluorescein g(-1) 24 h(-1)), AA (13.09 μg NH4-N g(-1) h(-1)), PHa (132.31 μg pNF g(-1) h(-1)), URa (12.90 μg NH4-N g(-1) h(-1)). They appear to be controlled by the availability and quality of nutrients in each climatic period, and were useful tools for evaluating changes in microbial activity in marine sediments.

  3. Coarse Woody Debris Increases Microbial Community Functional Diversity but not Enzyme Activities in Reclaimed Oil Sands Soils.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jin-Hyeob; Chang, Scott X; Naeth, M Anne; Schaaf, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Forest floor mineral soil mix (FMM) and peat mineral soil mix (PMM) are cover soils commonly used for upland reclamation post open-pit oil sands mining in northern Alberta, Canada. Coarse woody debris (CWD) can be used to regulate soil temperature and water content, to increase organic matter content, and to create microsites for the establishment of microorganisms and vegetation in upland reclamation. We studied the effects of CWD on soil microbial community level physiological profile (CLPP) and soil enzyme activities in FMM and PMM in a reclaimed landscape in the oil sands. This experiment was conducted with a 2 (FMM vs PMM) × 2 (near CWD vs away from CWD) factorial design with 6 replications. The study plots were established with Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen) CWD placed on each plot between November 2007 and February 2008. Soil samples were collected within 5 cm from CWD and more than 100 cm away from CWD in July, August and September 2013 and 2014. Microbial biomass was greater (p<0.05) in FMM than in PMM, in July, and August 2013 and July 2014, and greater (p<0.05) near CWD than away from CWD in FMM in July and August samplings. Soil microbial CLPP differed between FMM and PMM (p<0.01) according to a principal component analysis and CWD changed microbial CLPP in FMM (p<0.05) but not in PMM. Coarse woody debris increased microbial community functional diversity (average well color development in Biolog Ecoplates) in both cover soils (p<0.05) in August and September 2014. Carbon degrading soil enzyme activities were greater in FMM than in PMM (p<0.05) regardless of distance from CWD but were not affected by CWD. Greater microbial biomass and enzyme activities in FMM than in PMM will increase organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling, improving plant growth. Enhanced microbial community functional diversity by CWD application in upland reclamation has implications for accelerating upland reclamation after oil sands mining.

  4. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon and Microbial Biomass Carbon in Relation to Water Erosion and Tillage Erosion

    PubMed Central

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the 137Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of 137Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. 137Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the <0.002-mm clay shows that water erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion. PMID:23717530

  5. [Responses of microbial biomass P to the changes of organic C and P in paddy soils under different fertilization systems].

    PubMed

    Chen, An-Lei; Wang, Kai-Rong; Xie, Xiao-Li; Liu, Ying-Xin

    2007-12-01

    Based on a fifteen years field experiment in double rice-cropping region of subtropical China, the responses of microbial biomass P (MB-P) to organic C and P in red paddy soils under different fertilization systems were investigated. The results indicated that a long-term input of organic carbon sources and the increasing soil organic carbon made soil microbial biomass remain at a high level (MB-C > 800 mg x kg(-1)), being a main reason of the increase of MB-P. Under long-term zero chemical P fertilization, there was a significant decrease in soil total P (P < 0.05), but soil organic P increased by 29.3% on average. The inorganic P forms in deficit were mainly Al-P, Fe-P, Ca-P and O-P, with the lowest content of Al-P (only 0.5 mg x kg(-1) on average). The content of soil MB-P under zero chemical P fertilization was much higher than that of Olsen-P. Correlation analysis showed that there was a significant relationship (P < 0.05) between MB-P and Al-P, from which, it was deduced that the utilization of Al-P, Fe-P, Ca-P and O-P by soil microbes could be the key approach of promoting these P forms transformed into available P. Chemical P fertilization combined with organic nutrient recycling could not only enlarge the soil P pool, but also improve the P availability.

  6. Dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon in relation to water erosion and tillage erosion.

    PubMed

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the (137)Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of (137)Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. (137)Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the <0.002-mm clay shows that water erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion.

  7. Effects of sludge retention time, carbon and initial biomass concentrations on selection process: From activated sludge to polyhydroxyalkanoate accumulating cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Huang, Long; Wen, Qinxue; Zhang, Huichao; Guo, Zirui

    2017-02-01

    Four sequence batch reactors (SBRs) fed by fermented sugar cane wastewater were continuously operated under the aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) mode with different configurations of sludge retention time (SRT), carbon and initial biomass concentrations to enrich polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulating mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) from municipal activated sludge. The stability of SBRs was investigated besides the enrichment performance. The microbial community structures of the enriched MMCs were analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The optimum operating conditions for the enrichment process were: SRT of 5days, carbon concentration of 2.52g COD/L and initial biomass concentration of 3.65g/L. The best enrichment performance in terms of both operating stability and PHA storage ability of enriched cultures (with the maximum PHA content and PHA storage yield (YPHA/S) of 61.26% and 0.68mg COD/mg COD, respectively) was achieved under this condition. Effects of the SRT, carbon concentration and initial biomass concentration on the PHA accumulating MMCs selection process were discussed respectively. A new model including the segmentation of the enrichment process and the effects of SRT on each phase was proposed.

  8. Factors limiting microbial activity in volcanic tuff at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T.L.; Kovacik, W.P.; Taylor, J.

    1996-09-01

    Samples of tuff aseptically collected from 10 locations in the Exploratory Shaft Facility at the site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site were analyzed for microbiological populations, activities, and factors limiting microbial activity. Radiotracer assays ({sup 14}C-labeled organic substrate mineralization), direct microscopic counts, and plate counts were used. Radiolabeled substrates were glucose, acetate, and glutamate. Radiotracer experiments were carried out with and without moisture and inorganic nutrient amendments to determine factors limiting to microbial activities. Nearly all samples showed the presence of microorganisms with the potential to mineralize organic substrates. Addition of inorganic nutrients stimulated activities in a small number of samples. The presence of viable microbial communities within the tuff has implications for transport of contaminants.

  9. Optimizations of particle size and pulp density for solubilization of rock phosphate by a microbial consortium from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chunqiao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Tingting; Xu, Guang; Chi, Ruan

    2016-12-29

    Microbial solubilization of rock phosphate is getting more and more attention recently. However, the microorganisms used in previous studies were mostly single or known species, and seldom studies focused on the mixed microorganisms or microbial consortia from natural environments. In this study, a microbial consortium taken from activated sludge was used to solubilize two different mid-low-grade rock phosphates. The results showed that the microbial consortium could effectively solubilize the rock phosphates in National Botanical Research Institute's phosphate growth medium and released soluble phosphorus in the broth. The biomass increased gradually, whereas the pH decreased sharply during the solubilizing process. The maximum phosphorus solubilization was recorded at particle size of 150 µm. Higher or lower than this optimal particle size, the phosphorus solubilization decreased. The phosphorus solubilization gradually decreased with a larger pulp density from 1 to 5%, and the optimal pulp density was 1%. The solubilization level of microbial consortium varied with different rock phosphates. The results revealed that the soluble phosphorus released from high-silicon ore was higher than which from high-magnesium ore. A strong positive correlation between biomass and phosphorus solubilization in the broth was observed from regression analysis results, and the phosphorus solubilization also had a significant negative correlation with pH in the broth.

  10. Soil-Derived Microbial Consortia Enriched with Different Plant Biomass Reveal Distinct Players Acting in Lignocellulose Degradation.

    PubMed

    de Lima Brossi, Maria Julia; Jiménez, Diego Javier; Cortes-Tolalpa, Larisa; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Here, we investigated how different plant biomass, and-for one substrate-pH, drive the composition of degrader microbial consortia. We bred such consortia from forest soil, incubated along nine aerobic sequential - batch enrichments with wheat straw (WS1, pH 7.2; WS2, pH 9.0), switchgrass (SG, pH 7.2), and corn stover (CS, pH 7.2) as carbon sources. Lignocellulosic compounds (lignin, cellulose and xylan) were best degraded in treatment SG, followed by CS, WS1 and WS2. In terms of composition, the consortia became relatively stable after transfers 4 to 6, as evidenced by PCR-DGGE profiles obtained from each consortium DNA. The final consortia differed by ~40 % (bacteria) and ~60 % (fungi) across treatments. A 'core' community represented by 5/16 (bacteria) and 3/14 (fungi) bands was discerned, next to a variable part. The composition of the final microbial consortia was strongly driven by the substrate, as taxonomically-diverse consortia appeared in the different substrate treatments, but not in the (WS) different pH one. Biodegradative strains affiliated to Sphingobacterium kitahiroshimense, Raoultella terrigena, Pseudomonas putida, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila (bacteria), Coniochaeta ligniaria and Acremonium sp. (fungi) were recovered in at least three treatments, whereas strains affiliated to Delftia tsuruhatensis, Paenibacillus xylanexedens, Sanguibacter inulus and Comamonas jiangduensis were treatment-specific.

  11. To prevent the occurrence of black water agglomerate through delaying decomposition of cyanobacterial bloom biomass by sediment microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Li; Jiang, He-Long; Cai, Hai-Yuan

    2015-04-28

    Settlement of cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) into sediments in eutrophic lakes often induced the occurrence of black water agglomerate and then water quality deterioration. This study investigated the effect of sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) on CBB removal in sediments and related water pollution. Sediment bulking and subsequent black water from decomposition of settled CBB happened without SMFC, but were not observed over 100-day experiments with SMFC employment. While CBB in sediments improved power production from SMFC, the removal efficiency of organic matters in CBB-amended sediments with SMFC was significantly lower than that without SMFC. Pyrosequencing analysis showed higher abundances of the fermentative Clostridium and acetoclastic methanogen in CBB-amended bulk sediments without SMFC than with SMFC at the end of experiments. Obviously, SMFC operation changed the microbial community in CBB-amended sediments, and delayed the CBB degradation against sediment bulking. Thus, SMFC could be potentially applied as pollution prevention in CBB-settled and sensitive zones in shallow lakes.

  12. Cost-effective Chlorella biomass production from dilute wastewater using a novel photosynthetic microbial fuel cell (PMFC).

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Junyao; Waite, T David; Wu, Zhichao

    2017-01-01

    While microalgae have been suggested as a promising substitute to conventional fossil fuels, their cost effective cultivation and harvesting constitutes a major challenge. In the work described here, a novel photosynthetic microbial fuel cell (PMFC) in which a stainless steel mesh with biofilm formed on it serves as both the cathode and filtration material has been developed. Results of this study reveal that, in addition to inducing oxygen reduction reactions under illumination, the biocathode is effective in preventing the washout of algae during continuous operation, resulting in retained biomass concentrations reaching 3.5-6.5 g L(-1). The maximum output current density reached ∼200 mA m(-2) under irradiation, which is comparable with recent PMFC studies. Microbial diversity analyses targeting 16S and 18S rRNA genes indicated that the eukaryotic species belonging to the genus Chlorella was able to sustain its community dominance (>96%) over other competing species over the course of the studies. In the absence of catalysts such as Pt, a consortium of photosynthetic organisms including plant growth-promoting bacteria such as Azospirillum and Rhizobium were overrepresented in the biofilm, with these organisms most likely contributing to cathodic electron transfer. Energy flow analysis suggested that the PMFC system held the potential to achieve theoretical energy balance in simultaneous algae production and wastewater treatment.

  13. BioDry: An Inexpensive, Low-Power Method to Preserve Aquatic Microbial Biomass at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Tuorto, Steven J.; Brown, Chris M.; Bidle, Kay D.; McGuinness, Lora R.; Kerkhof, Lee J.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes BioDry (patent pending), a method for reliably preserving the biomolecules associated with aquatic microbial biomass samples, without the need of hazardous materials (e.g. liquid nitrogen, preservatives, etc.), freezing, or bulky storage/sampling equipment. Gel electrophoresis analysis of nucleic acid extracts from samples treated in the lab with the BioDry method indicated that molecular integrity was protected in samples stored at room temperature for up to 30 days. Analysis of 16S/18S rRNA genes for presence/absence and relative abundance of microorganisms using both 454-pyrosequencing and TRFLP profiling revealed statistically indistinguishable communities from control samples that were frozen in liquid nitrogen immediately after collection. Seawater and river water biomass samples collected with a portable BioDry “field unit", constructed from off-the-shelf materials and a battery-operated pumping system, also displayed high levels of community rRNA preservation, despite a slight decrease in nucleic acid recovery over the course of storage for 30 days. Functional mRNA and protein pools from the field samples were also effectively conserved with BioDry, as assessed by respective RT-PCR amplification and western blot of ribulose-1-5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Collectively, these results demonstrate that BioDry can adequately preserve a suite of biomolecules from aquatic biomass at ambient temperatures for up to a month, giving it great potential for high resolution sampling in remote locations or on autonomous platforms where space and power are limited. PMID:26710122

  14. Microbial Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Current Processes and Market

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Biological production of organic acids from conversion of biomass derivatives has received increased attention among scientists and engineers and in business because of the attractive properties such as renewability, sustainability, degradability, and versatility. The aim of the present review is to summarize recent research and development of short chain fatty acids production by anaerobic fermentation of nonfood biomass and to evaluate the status and outlook for a sustainable industrial production of such biochemicals. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) such as acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid have many industrial applications and are currently of global economic interest. The focus is mainly on the utilization of pretreated lignocellulosic plant biomass as substrate (the carbohydrate route) and development of the bacteria and processes that lead to a high and economically feasible production of VFA. The current and developing market for VFA is analyzed focusing on production, prices, and forecasts along with a presentation of the biotechnology companies operating in the market for sustainable biochemicals. Finally, perspectives on taking sustainable product of biochemicals from promise to market introduction are reviewed. PMID:27556042

  15. Microbial Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Current Processes and Market.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Ivan; Westermann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Biological production of organic acids from conversion of biomass derivatives has received increased attention among scientists and engineers and in business because of the attractive properties such as renewability, sustainability, degradability, and versatility. The aim of the present review is to summarize recent research and development of short chain fatty acids production by anaerobic fermentation of nonfood biomass and to evaluate the status and outlook for a sustainable industrial production of such biochemicals. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) such as acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid have many industrial applications and are currently of global economic interest. The focus is mainly on the utilization of pretreated lignocellulosic plant biomass as substrate (the carbohydrate route) and development of the bacteria and processes that lead to a high and economically feasible production of VFA. The current and developing market for VFA is analyzed focusing on production, prices, and forecasts along with a presentation of the biotechnology companies operating in the market for sustainable biochemicals. Finally, perspectives on taking sustainable product of biochemicals from promise to market introduction are reviewed.

  16. Chemosynthetic microbial activity at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirsen, Carl O.; Jannasch, Holger W.; Molyneaux, Stephen J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemosynthetic production of microbial biomass, determined by 14CO2 fixation and enzymatic (RuBisCo) activity, at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) 23° and 26°N vent sites was found in various niches: warm water emissions, loosely rock-attached flocculent material, dense morphologically diverse bacterial mats covering the surfaces of polymetal sulfide deposits, and filamentous microbes on the carapaces of shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata). The bacterial mats on polymetal sulfide surfaces contained unicellular and filamentous bacteria which appeared to use as their chemolithotrophic electron or energy source either dissolved reduced minerals from vent emissions, mainly sulfur compounds, or solid metal sulfide deposits, mainly pyrite. Moderately thermophilic Chemosynthetic activity was observed in carbon dioxide fixation experiments and in enrichments, but no thermophilic aerobic sulfur oxidizers could be isolated. Both obligate and facultative chemoautotrophs growing at mesophilic temperatures were isolated from all chemosynthetically active surface scrapings. The obligate autotrophs could oxidize sterilized MAR natural sulfide deposits as well as technical pyrite at near neutral pH, in addition to dissolved reduced sulfur compounds. While the grazing by shrimp on the surface mats of MAR metal sulfide deposits was observed and deemed important, the animals' primary occurrence in dense swarms near vent emissions suggests that they were feeding at these sites, where conditions for Chemosynthetic growth of their filamentous microbial epiflora were optimal. The data show that the transformation of geothermal energy at the massive polymetal sulfide deposits of the MAR is based on the lithoautotrophic oxidation of soluble sulfides and pyrites into microbial biomass.

  17. Deep-Subterranean Microbial Habitats in the Hishikari Epithermal Gold Mine: Active Thermophilic Microbial Communities and Endolithic Ancient Microbial Relicts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, H.; Takai, K.; Inagaki, F.; Horikoshi, K.

    2001-12-01

    Deep subterranean microbial community structures in an epithermal gold-silver deposit, Hishikari gold mine, southern part of Kyusyu Japan, were evaluated through the combined use of enrichment culture methods and culture-independent molecular surveys. The geologic setting of the Hishikari deposit is composed of three lithologies; basement oceanic sediments of the Cretaceous Shimanto Supergroup, Quaternary andesites, and auriferous quartz vein. We studied the drilled core rock of these, and the geothermal hot waters from the basement aquifers collected by means of the dewatering system located at the deepest level in the mining sites. Culture-independent molecular phylogenetic analyses of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA (rDNA) recovered from drilled cores suggested that the deep-sea oceanic microbial communities were present as ancient indigenous relicts confined in the Shimanto basement. On the other hand, genetic signals of active thermophilic microbial communities, mainly consisting of thermophilic hydrogen-oxidizer within Aquificales, thermophilic methanotroph within g-Proteobacteria and yet-uncultivated bacterium OPB37 within b-Proteobacteria, were detected with these of oceanic relicts from the subterranean geothermal hot aquifers (temp. 70-100ºC). Successful cultivation and FISH analyses strongly supported that these thermophilic lithotrophic microorganisms could be exactly active and they grew using geochemically produced hydrogen and methane gasses as nutrients. Based on these results, the deep-subsurface biosphere occurring in the Hishikari epithermal gold mine was delineated as endolithic ancient microbial relicts and modern habitats raising active lithotrophic thermophiles associated with the geological and geochemical features of the epithermal gold deposit.

  18. Effects of treated wastewater irrigation on contents and dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jüschke, E.; Marschner, B.; Chen, Y.; Tarchitzky, J.

    2009-04-01

    In many arid and semi-arid regions, the demand for freshwater as drinking water and other domestic uses is constantly growing due to demographic growth and increasing standard of living. Therefore, less freshwater is available for agricultural irrigation and new water sources are needed. Treated wastewater (TWW) already serves as an important water source in Jordan, the Palestinian Territories and Israel. Related to its high loads with nutrients, salts and organic materials within its use as irrigation water major effects on the soil physical and chemical properties can occur, in the worst case leading to soil degradation. In an ongoing study we are investigated in the effects of TWW irrigation on agricultural soils in the region. Here we present results from analyses of total soil carbon contents and qualities in soils irrigated with freshwater and TWW. Furthermore microbiological parameters were investigated as microbial biomass, microbial activities and enzyme activities. In several sites, subsoils (50-160 cm) from TWW irrigated plots were depleted in soil organic matter with the largest differences occurring in sites with the longest TWW irrigation history. Laboratory incubation experiments with additions of 14C-labelled compounds to the soils showed that microbial activity in freshwater irrigated soils was much more stimulated by sugars or amino acids than in TWW irrigated soils. The lack of such "priming effects" (Hamer & Marschner 2005) in the TWW irrigated soils indicates that here the microorganisms are already operating at their optimal metabolic activity due to the continuous substrate inputs with soluble organic compounds from the TWW. Apparently, this higher microbial activity is causing an increased depletion of soil organic matter, which may have negative long-term effects on soil quality.

  19. Seasonal and spatial distribution of extracellular enzymatic activities and microbial incorporation of dissolved organic substrates in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Reil, L.

    1987-08-01

    Seasonal and spatial distributions of extracellular enzymatic activities and microbial incorporations of dissolved organic substrates were followed in sediments of the brackish water Kiel Bight (Baltic Sea). Enzymatic hydrolysis of polymeric organic compounds was determined by means of fluorogenic substrates; incorporation of dissolved organic substrates into microbial biomass was measured by using tritiated substances (acetate, leucine, and thymidine). Based on a recently developed core injection technique, substrates were injected in microliter portions into undisturbed sediment cores. Enzymatic and incorporation activities underwent strong seasonal variations related to the enrichment of organic material in the sediment surface following sedimentation events. The input of the phytoplankton bloom during autumn caused stimulation of both enzymatic hydrolysis of polymeric organic compounds and microbial incorporation of dissolved organic substrates. Following input by spring phytoplankton bloom, mainly incorporation activities were stimulated. In late spring the development of the benthic fauna obviously greatly influenced microbial activities. During summer individual periods of high microbial activities were observed which might be traced back to short-term sedimentation events.

  20. Influence of short-time imidacloprid and acetamiprid application on soil microbial metabolic activity and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yao, Jun; Chen, Huilun; Yi, Zhengji; Choi, Martin M F

    2014-09-01

    The influence of two neonicotinoids, i.e., imidacloprid (IMI) and acetamiprid (ACE), on soil microbial activities was investigated in a short period of time using a combination of the microcalorimetric approach and enzyme tests. Thermodynamic parameters such as Q T (J g(-1) soil), ∆H met (kJ mol(-1)), J Q/S (J g(-1) h(-1)), k (h(-1)), and soil enzymatic activities, dehydrogenase, phosphomonoesterase, arginine deaminase, and urease, were used to evaluate whole metabolic activity changes and acute toxicity following IMI and ACE treatment. Various profiles of thermogenic curves reflect different soil microbial activities. The microbial growth rate constant k, total heat evolution Q T (expect for IMI), and inhibitory ratio I show linear relationship with the doses of IMI and ACE. Q T for IMI increases at 0.0-20 μg g(-1) and then decreases at 20-80 μg g(-1), possibly attributing to the presence of tolerant microorganisms. The 50 % inhibitory ratios (IC50) of IMI and ACE are 95.7 and 77.2 μg g(-1), respectively. ACE displays slightly higher toxicity than IMI. Plots of k and Q T against microbial biomass-C indicate that the k and Q T are growth yield-dependent. IMI and ACE show 29.6; 40.4 and 23.0; and 23.3, 21.7, and 30.5 % inhibition of dehydrogenase, phosphomonoesterase, and urease activity, respectively. By contrast, the arginine deaminase activity is enhanced by 15.2 and 13.2 % with IMI and ACE, respectively. The parametric indices selected give a quantitative dose-response relationship of both insecticides and indicate that ACE is more toxic than IMI due to their difference in molecular structures.

  1. Residual effect of pre-emergence herbicides on microbial activities in relation to mineralization of C, N and P in the Gangetic alluvial soil of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Barman, Saurav; Das, Amal Chandra

    2015-07-01

    An experiment has been conducted under laboratory conditions to investigate the residual effect of three pre-emergence herbicides (thiobencarb, pendimethalin and pretilachlor) at fivefold field application rates (7.5, 10.0 and 2.5 kg a.i. ha(-1), respectively), on the changes of microbial activities and some biochemical processes in the Gangetic alluvial soil of West Bengal. Application of herbicides in general significantly increased microbial biomass resulting in greater mineralization of C, N and P in soil. The highest stimulation of microbial biomass C was recorded with thiobencarb (24.4%) followed by pendimethalin (23.4%). Microbial biomass N was highly induced under pretilachlor (54.5%) and thiobencarb (52.7%), while the stimulation of microbial biomass P was at par in the herbicide-treated soils. Compared to untreated control, the highest amount of organic C was retained with thiobencarb followed by pendimethalin. A similar trend was recorded with thiobencarb for total N, while pendimethalin induced exchangeable NH4 (+) and soluble NO3 (-) to the highest extent (42.2 and 34.5%, respectively). Regarding the availability of P in soil, pretilachlor manifested greater stimulation (33.1%) than thiobencarb (21.6%) and pendimethalin (11.4%). As compared to untreated control, thiobencarb harboured maximum number of bacteria (107.9%), while pretilachlor exerted the highest stimulations towards the proliferations of actinomycetes (132.6%) and fungi (149.5%) in soil.

  2. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases microbial growth rates and enzymes activity in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the belowground translocation of assimilated carbon by plants grown under elevated CO2 can cause a shift in the structure and activity of the microbial community responsible for the turnover of organic matter in soil. We investigated the long-term effect of elevated CO2 in the atmosphere on microbial biomass and specific growth rates in root-free and rhizosphere soil. The experiments were conducted under two free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems: in Hohenheim and Braunschweig, as well as in the intensively managed forest mesocosm of the Biosphere 2 Laboratory (B2L) in Oracle, AZ. Specific microbial growth rates (μ) were determined using the substrate-induced respiration response after glucose and/or yeast extract addition to the soil. We evaluated the effect of elevated CO2 on b-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase to estimate the potential enzyme activity after soil amendment with glucose and nutrients. For B2L and both FACE systems, up to 58% higher μ were observed under elevated vs. ambient CO2, depending on site, plant species and N fertilization. The μ-values increased linearly with atmospheric CO2 concentration at all three sites. The effect of elevated CO2 on rhizosphere microorganisms was plant dependent and increased for: Brassica napus=Triticum aestivummicrobial growth rates directly (N limitation) and indirectly (changing the quantity of fine roots). So, 50% decrease in N fertilization caused the overall increase or decrease of microbial growth rates depending on plant species. The μ-value increase was lower for microorganisms growing on yeast extract then for those growing on glucose, i.e. the effect of elevated CO2 was smoothed on rich vs. simple substrate. So, the r/K strategies ratio can be better revealed by studying growth on simple (glucose) than on rich substrate mixtures (yeast extract). After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were

  3. Biogeography of Metabolically Active Microbial Populations within the Subseafloor Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, B. K.; Shepard, A.; St. Peter, C.; Mills, H. J.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial life in deep marine sediments is widespread, metabolically active and diverse. Evidence of prokaryotic communities in sediments as deep as 800 m below the seafloor (mbsf) have been found. By recycling carbon and nutrients through biological and geochemical processes, the deep subsurface has the potential to remain metabolically active over geologic time scales. While a vast majority of the subsurface biosphere remains under studied, recent advances in molecular techniques and an increased focus on microbiological sampling during IODP expeditions have provided the initial steps toward better characterizations of the microbial communities. Coupling of geochemistry and RNA-based molecular analysis is essential to the description of the active microbial populations within the subsurface biosphere. Studies based on DNA may describe the taxa and metabolic pathways from the total microbial community within the sediment, whether the cells sampled were metabolically active, quiescent or dead. Due to a short lifespan within a cell, only an RNA-based analysis can be used to identify linkages between active populations and observed geochemistry. This study will coalesce and compare RNA sequence and geochemical data from Expeditions 316 (Nankai Trough), 320 (Pacific Equatorial Age Transect), 325 (Great Barrier Reef) and 329 (South Pacific Gyre) to evaluate the biogeography of microbial lineages actively altering the deep subsurface. The grouping of sediments allows for a wide range of geochemical environments to be compared, including two environments limited in organic carbon. Significant to this study is the use of similar extraction, amplification and simultaneous 454 pyrosequencing on all sediment populations allowing for robust comparisons with similar protocol strengths and biases. Initial trends support previously described reduction of diversity with increasing depth. The co-localization of active reductive and oxidative lineages suggests a potential cryptic

  4. The removal of uranium from mining waste water using algal/microbial biomass.

    PubMed

    Kalin, Margarete; Wheeler, W N; Meinrath, G

    2005-01-01

    We describe a three step process for the removal of uranium (U) from dilute waste waters. Step one involves the sequestration of U on, in, and around aquatic plants such as algae. Cell wall ligands efficiently remove U(VI) from waste water. Growing algae continuously renew the cellular surface area. Step 2 is the removal of U-algal particulates from the water column to the sediments. Step 3 involves reducing U(VI) to U(IV) and transforming the ions into stable precipitates in the sediments. The algal cells provide organic carbon and other nutrients to heterotrophic microbial consortia to maintain the low E(H), within which the U is transformed. Among the microorganisms, algae are of predominant interest for the ecological engineer because of their ability to sequester U and because some algae can live under many extreme environments, often in abundance. Algae grow in a wide spectrum of water qualities, from alkaline environments (Chara, Nitella) to acidic mine drainage waste waters (Mougeotia, Ulothrix). If they could be induced to grow in waste waters, they would provide a simple, long-term means to remove U and other radionuclides from U mining effluents. This paper reviews the literature on algal and microbial adsorption, reduction, and transformation of U in waste streams, wetlands, lakes and oceans.

  5. Substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: a framework for Earth system models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Schimel, Joshua P; Thornton, Peter E; Song, Xia; Yuan, Fengming; Goswami, Santonu

    2014-05-01

    A mechanistic understanding of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is important to improve Earth system models' ability to simulate carbon-climate feedbacks. A simple modelling framework was developed to investigate how substrate quality and environmental controls over microbial activity regulate microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and on the size of the microbial biomass. Substrate quality has a positive effect on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: higher substrate quality leads to higher ratio of microbial carbon to soil organic carbon. Microbial biomass carbon peaks and then declines as cumulative activity increases. The simulated ratios of soil microbial biomass to soil organic carbon are reasonably consistent with a recently compiled global data set at the biome level. The modelling framework developed in this study offers a simple approach to incorporate microbial contributions to the carbon cycling into Earth system models to simulate carbon-climate feedbacks and explain global patterns of microbial biomass.

  6. Biomass development in slow sand filters.

    PubMed

    Campos, L C; Su, M F J; Graham, N J D; Smith, S R

    2002-11-01

    Microbial biomass development in the sand and schmutzdecke layer was determined in two full-scale slow sand filters, operated with and without a light excluding cover. A standard chloroform fumigation-extraction technique was adapted to routinely measure microbial biomass concentrations in the sand beds. Sand was sampled to a depth of 10 cm and schmutzdecke was also collected at the same random positions on the uncovered filter. Interstitial microbial biomass in the uncovered sand bed increased with time and decreased with sampling depth. There was a small accumulation of sand biomass with time in the covered filter, but no relationship was apparent between biomass concentration and depth in this filter. Schmutzdecke did not develop on the covered filter and was spatially highly variable in the uncovered condition compared to the consistent patterns observed in interstitial biomass production. It is speculated that microbial biomass in the sand of uncovered filters is largely related to carbon inputs from photosynthetic activity in the schmutzdecke and involves mechanisms that spatially distribute carbon substrate from the schmutzdecke to the sand. However, total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon removals were similar in both filters suggesting that relatively small biomass populations in covered filters are sufficient to remove residual labile carbon during advanced water treatment and little further advantage to water purification and organic carbon removal is gained by the increased production of biomass in uncovered slow sand filter beds.

  7. Trichoderma reesei FS10-C enhances phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil by Sedum plumbizincicola and associated soil microbial activities

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Ying; Luo, Yang; Ma, Wenting; Zhu, Lingjia; Ren, Wenjie; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter; Li, Zhengao

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of Trichoderma reesei FS10-C on the phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil by the hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola and on soil fertility. The Cd tolerance of T. reesei FS10-C was characterized and then a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the growth and Cd uptake of S. plumbizincicola with the addition of inoculation agents in the presence and absence of T. reesei FS10-C. The results indicated that FS10-C possessed high Cd resistance (up to 300 mg L-1). All inoculation agents investigated enhanced plant shoot biomass by 6–53% of fresh weight and 16–61% of dry weight and Cd uptake by the shoots by 10–53% compared with the control. All inoculation agents also played critical roles in increasing soil microbial biomass and microbial activities (such as biomass C, dehydrogenase activity and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis activity). Two inoculation agents accompanied by FS10-C were also superior to the inoculation agents, indicating that T. reesei FS10-C was effective in enhancing both Cd phytoremediation by S. plumbizincicola and soil fertility. Furthermore, solid fermentation powder of FS10-C showed the greatest capacity to enhance plant growth, Cd uptake, nutrient release, microbial biomass and activities, as indicated by its superior ability to promote colonization by Trichoderma. The solid fermentation powder of FS10-C might serve as a suitable inoculation agent for T. reesei FS10-C to enhance both the phytoremediation efficiency of Cd-contaminated soil and soil fertility. PMID:26113858

  8. Trichoderma reesei FS10-C enhances phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil by Sedum plumbizincicola and associated soil microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ying; Luo, Yang; Ma, Wenting; Zhu, Lingjia; Ren, Wenjie; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter; Li, Zhengao

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of Trichoderma reesei FS10-C on the phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil by the hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola and on soil fertility. The Cd tolerance of T. reesei FS10-C was characterized and then a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the growth and Cd uptake of S. plumbizincicola with the addition of inoculation agents in the presence and absence of T. reesei FS10-C. The results indicated that FS10-C possessed high Cd resistance (up to 300 mg L(-1)). All inoculation agents investigated enhanced plant shoot biomass by 6-53% of fresh weight and 16-61% of dry weight and Cd uptake by the shoots by 10-53% compared with the control. All inoculation agents also played critical roles in increasing soil microbial biomass and microbial activities (such as biomass C, dehydrogenase activity and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis activity). Two inoculation agents accompanied by FS10-C were also superior to the inoculation agents, indicating that T. reesei FS10-C was effective in enhancing both Cd phytoremediation by S. plumbizincicola and soil fertility. Furthermore, solid fermentation powder of FS10-C showed the greatest capacity to enhance plant growth, Cd uptake, nutrient release, microbial biomass and activities, as indicated by its superior ability to promote colonization by Trichoderma. The solid fermentation powder of FS10-C might serve as a suitable inoculation agent for T. reesei FS10-C to enhance both the phytoremediation efficiency of Cd-contaminated soil and soil fertility.

  9. Soil disturbance increases soil microbial enzymatic activity in arid ecoregion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional diversity of the soil microbial community is commonly used in the assessment of soil health as it relates to the activity of soil microflora involved in carbon cycling. Soil microbes in different microenvironments will have varying responses to different substrates, thus catabolic fingerp...

  10. Measurements of microbial community activities in individual soil macroaggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The functional potential of single soil aggregates may provide insights into the localized distribution of microbial activities better than traditional assays conducted on bulk quantities of soil. Thus, we scaled down enzyme assays for ß-glucosidase, N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase, lipase, and leucine...

  11. Expediting COD removal in microbial electrolysis cells by increasing biomass concentration.

    PubMed

    Aboutalebi, Hanieh; Sathasivan, Arumugam; Krishna, K C Bal; Kohpaei, Ahmad Jabari

    2011-02-01

    Microorganisms catalyse the reaction and in this study, mainly the effect of different concentration of biomass on COD removal was investigated. Three sets of two-compartment reactors were established. The cation exchange membrane (CEM) was employed in each reactor and 0.5 V of electricity was supplied. Graphite rod employed in cathodic part and a combination of graphite rod and graphite granules were used in anodic chamber. The highest rate of COD removal (40 ± 2.0 ppm/h) was achieved in the reactor which had initial VSS at 6130 mg/l, whereas the slowest rate of 23 ± 1.2 ppm/h in the reactor started with 3365 mgVSS/l. Some ammonia removal was also noticed during the operation. Further understanding and improvement is needed to be competitive against traditional wastewater treatment processes.

  12. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus; Eisenhauer, Nico; Sierra, Carlos A; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christoph; Griffiths, Robert I; Mellado-Vázquez, Perla G; Malik, Ashish A; Roy, Jacques; Scheu, Stefan; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Thomson, Bruce C; Trumbore, Susan E; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-07

    Plant diversity strongly influences ecosystem functions and services, such as soil carbon storage. However, the mechanisms underlying the positive plant diversity effects on soil carbon storage are poorly understood. We explored this relationship using long-term data from a grassland biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment) and radiocarbon ((14)C) modelling. Here we show that higher plant diversity increases rhizosphere carbon inputs into the microbial community resulting in both increased microbial activity and carbon storage. Increases in soil carbon were related to the enhanced accumulation of recently fixed carbon in high-diversity plots, while plant diversity had less pronounced effects on the decomposition rate of existing carbon. The present study shows that elevated carbon storage at high plant diversity is a direct function of the soil microbial community, indicating that the increase in carbon storage is mainly limited by the integration of new carbon into soil and less by the decomposition of existing soil carbon.

  13. Bioremediation of oil refinery sludge by landfarming in semiarid conditions: influence on soil microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Marin, J A; Hernandez, T; Garcia, C

    2005-06-01

    Bioremediation of a refinery sludge containing hydrocarbons in a semi-arid climate using landfarming techniques is described. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of this technique to reduce the total hydrocarbon content added to the soil with the refinery sludge in semiarid climate (low rain and high temperature). In addition, we have evaluated the effect of this technique on the microbial activity of the soil involved. For this, biological parameters (carbon fractions, microbial biomass carbon, basal respiration and ATP) and biochemical parameters(different enzymatic activities) were determined. The results showed that 80% of the hydrocarbons were eliminated in eleven months, half of this reduction taking place during the first three months. The labile carbon fractions, MBC, basal respiration and ATP of the soils submitted to landfarming showed higher values than the control soil during the first months of the process, although these values fell down by the end of the experimental period as the hydrocarbons were degraded by mineralisation. All the enzymatic activities studied: oxidoreductases such as dehydrogenase activity, and hydrolases of C(beta-glucosidase activity) and N Cycle (urease and protease) showed higher values in the soils amended with the refinery sludge than in the control. As in the case of the previous parameters, these value fell down as the bioremediation of the hydrocarbons progressed, many of them reaching levels similar to those of the control soil after eleven months.

  14. Evasion of inflammasome activation by microbial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ulland, Tyler K.; Ferguson, Polly J.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to infection with a wide array of pathogenic microbes. The inflammasome serves as a platform to activate caspase-1, which results in the subsequent processing and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 and the initiation of an inflammatory cell death pathway termed pyroptosis. Effective inflammasome activation is essential in controlling pathogen replication as well as initiating adaptive immune responses against the offending pathogens. However, a number of pathogens have developed strategies to evade inflammasome activation. In this Review, we discuss these pathogen evasion strategies as well as the potential infectious complications of therapeutic blockade of IL-1 pathways. PMID:25642707

  15. EFFECT OF VAPOR-PHASE BIOREACTOR OPERATION ON BIOMASS ACCUMULATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND ACTIVITY. (R826168)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess biomass accumulation and activity loss in vapor-phase bioreactors (VPBs) can lead to unreliable long-term operation. In this study, temporal and spatial variations in biomass accumulation, distribution and activity in VPBs treating toluene-contaminated air were monitored o...

  16. Factors Limiting Microbial Growth and Activity at a Proposed High-Level Nuclear Repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, T. L.; Kovacik, W. P.; Ringelberg, D. B.; White, D. C.; Haldeman, D. L.; Amy, P. S.; Hersman, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the characterization of Yucca Mountain, Nev., as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste, volcanic tuff was analyzed for microbial abundance and activity. Tuff was collected aseptically from nine sites along a tunnel in Yucca Mountain. Microbial abundance was generally low: direct microscopic cell counts were near detection limits at all sites (3.2 x 10(sup4) to 2.0 x 10(sup5) cells g(sup-1) [dry weight]); plate counts of aerobic heterotrophs ranged from 1.0 x 10(sup1) to 3.2 x 10(sup3) CFU g(sup-1) (dry weight). Phospholipid fatty acid concentrations (0.1 to 3.7 pmol g(sup-1)) also indicated low microbial biomasses; diglyceride fatty acid concentrations, indicative of dead cells, were in a similar range (0.2 to 2.3 pmol g(sup-1)). Potential microbial activity was quantified as (sup14)CO(inf2) production in microcosms containing radiolabeled substrates (glucose, acetate, and glutamic acid); amendments with water and nutrient solutions (N and P) were used to test factors potentially limiting this activity. Similarly, the potential for microbial growth and the factors limiting growth were determined by performing plate counts before and after incubating volcanic tuff samples for 24 h under various conditions: ambient moisture, water-amended, and amended with various nutrient solutions (N, P, and organic C). A high potential for microbial activity was demonstrated by high rates of substrate mineralization (as much as 70% of added organic C in 3 weeks). Water was the major limiting factor to growth and microbial activity, while amendments with N and P resulted in little further stimulation. Organic C amendments stimulated growth more than water alone. PMID:16535670

  17. Effects of Organic-Loading-Rate Reduction on Sludge Biomass and Microbial Community in a Deteriorated Pilot-Scale Membrane Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuya; Hori, Tomoyuki; Navarro, Ronald R.; Naganawa, Ryuichi; Habe, Hiroshi; Ogata, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    The effects of a precipitous decrease in the inlet organic loading rate on sludge reductions and the microbial community in a membrane bioreactor were investigated. The sludge biomass was markedly reduced to 47.4% of the initial concentration (approximately 15,000 mg L−1) within 7 d after the organic loading rate was decreased by half (450 to 225 mg chemical oxygen demand L−1 d−1). An analysis of the microbial community structure using high-throughput sequencing revealed an increase in the abundance of facultative predatory bacteria-related operational taxonomic units as well as microorganisms tolerant to environmental stress belonging to the classes Deinococci and Betaproteobacteria. PMID:27431196

  18. Microbial activity in the marine deep biosphere: progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Beth N.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Colwell, Frederick S.; Glazer, Brian T.; Reese, Brandi Kiel; Kirkpatrick, John B.; Lapham, Laura L.; Mills, Heath J.; Sylvan, Jason B.; Wankel, Scott D.; Wheat, C. Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The vast marine deep biosphere consists of microbial habitats within sediment, pore waters, upper basaltic crust and the fluids that circulate throughout it. A wide range of temperature, pressure, pH, and electron donor and acceptor conditions exists—all of which can combine to affect carbon and nutrient cycling and result in gradients on spatial scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. Diverse and mostly uncharacterized microorganisms live in these habitats, and potentially play a role in mediating global scale biogeochemical processes. Quantifying the rates at which microbial activity in the subsurface occurs is a challenging endeavor, yet developing an understanding of these rates is essential to determine the impact of subsurface life on Earth's global biogeochemical cycles, and for understanding how microorganisms in these “extreme” environments survive (or even thrive). Here, we synthesize recent advances and discoveries pertaining to microbial activity in the marine deep subsurface, and we highlight topics about which there is still little understanding and suggest potential paths forward to address them. This publication is the result of a workshop held in August 2012 by the NSF-funded Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) “theme team” on microbial activity (www.darkenergybiosphere.org). PMID:23874326

  19. Imidacloprid induces changes in the structure, genetic diversity and catabolic activity of soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Markowicz, Anna; Borymski, Sławomir; Wójcik, Marcin; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2013-12-15

    This is the first report describing the effect of imidacloprid applied at field rate (FR, 1 mg/kg of soil) and 10 times the FR (10*FR, 10 mg/kg of soil) on the structural, genetic and physiological diversity of soil bacterial community as determined by the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and the community level physiological profile (CLPP) approaches. PLFA profiles showed that imidacloprid significantly shifted the microbial community structure and decreased the biomass of the total, bacterial and fungal PLFAs, however, this effect was transient at the FR dosage. The alterations in DGGE patterns caused by imidacloprid application, confirmed considerable changes in the overall richness and diversity of dominant bacteria. Although, as a result of imidacloprid application, the metabolic activity of microbial communities was generally lower, the richness and functional biodiversity of the soil microbial community were not negatively affected. In general, the analysis of the variance indicated that the measured parameters were significantly affected by treatment and the incubation time, however, the incubation time effect explained most of the observed variance. Imidacloprid degradation and the appearance of some new bands in DGGE profiles suggest the evolution of bacteria capable of degrading imidacloprid among indigenous microflora.

  20. Microbial production of sensory-active miraculin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keisuke; Asakura, Tomiko; Morita, Yuji; Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Koizumi, Ayako; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Ishiguro, Masaji; Terada, Tohru; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2007-08-24

    Miraculin (MCL), a tropical fruit protein, is unique in that it has taste-modifying activity to convert sourness to sweetness, though flat in taste at neutral pH. To obtain a sufficient amount of MCL to examine the mechanism involved in this sensory event at the molecular level, we transformed Aspergillus oryzae by introducing the MCL gene. Transformants were expressed and secreted a sensory-active form of MCL yielding 2 mg/L. Recombinant MCL resembled native MCL in the secondary structure and the taste-modifying activity to generate sweetness at acidic pH. Since the observed pH-sweetness relation seemed to reflect the imidazole titration curve, suggesting that histidine residues might be involved in the taste-modifying activity. H30A and H30,60A mutants were generated using the A. oryzae-mediated expression system. Both mutants found to have lost the taste-modifying activity. The result suggests that the histidine-30 residue is important for the taste-modifying activity of MCL.

  1. Psychrophilic Biomass Producers in the Trophic Chain of the Microbial Community of Lake Untersee, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    The study of photosynthetic microorganisms from the Lake Untersee samples showed dispersed distribution of phototrophs within 80 m water column. Lake Untersee represents a unique ecosystem that experienced complete isolation: sealed by the Anuchin Glacier for many millennia. Consequently, its biocenosis has evolved over a significant period of time without exchange or external interaction with species from other environments. The major producers of organic matter in Lake Untersee are represented by phototrophic and chemolithotrophic microorganisms. This is the traditional trophic scheme for lacustrine ecosystems on Earth. Among the phototrophs, diatoms were not found, which differentiates this lake from other known ecosystems. The dominant species among phototrophs was Chlamydomonas sp. with typical morphostructure: green chloroplasts, bright red round spot, and two polar flagella near the opening. As expected, the physiology of studied phototrophs was limited by low temperature, which defined them as obligate psychrophilic microorganisms. By the quantity estimation of methanogenesis in this lake, the litho-autotrophic production of organic matter is competitive with phototrophic production. However, pure cultures of methanogens have not yet been obtained. We discuss the primary producers of organic matter and the participation of our novel psychrophilic homoacetogen into the litho-autotrophic link of biomass production in Lake Untersee.

  2. Immobilization of microbial cell and yeast cell and its application to biomass conversion using radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaetsu, Isao; Kumakura, Minoru; Fujimura, Takashi; Kasai, Noboru; Tamada, Masao

    The recent results of immobilization of cellulase-producing cells and ethanol-fermentation yeast by radiation were reported. The enzyme of cellulase produced by immobilized cells was used for saccharification of lignocellulosic wastes and immobilized yeast cells were used for fermentation reaction from glucose to ethanol. The wastes such as chaff and bagasse were treated by γ-ray or electron-beam irradiation in the presence of alkali and subsequent mechanical crushing, to form a fine powder less than 50 μm in diameter. On the other hand, Trichoderma reesei as a cellulase-producing microbial cell was immobilized on a fibrous carrier having a specific porous structure and cultured to produce cellulase. The enzymatic saccharification of the pretreated waste was carried out using the produced cellulase. The enhanced fermentation process to produce ethanol from glucose with the immobilized yeast by radiation was also studied. The ethanol productivity of immobilized growing yeast cells thus obtained was thirteen times that of free yeast cells in a 1:1 volume of liquid medium to immobilized yeast cells.

  3. Production of Microbial Biomass Protein from Potato Processing Wastes by Cephalosporium eichhorniae

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Coleen A.; Gregory, Kenneth F.

    1987-01-01

    The use of Cephalosporium eichhorniae 152 (ATCC 38255) (reclassified as Acremonium alabamense; see Addendum in Proof), a thermophilic, acidophilic, amylolytic fungus, for the conversion of potato processing wastes into microbial protein for use as animal feed was studied. The fungus was not inhibited by α-solanine or β-2-chaconine, antimicrobial compounds in potatoes, or by morpholine or cyclohexylamine (additives to steam used in the peeling process) at levels likely to be encountered in this substrate. Mixed effluent from holding tanks at a potato-processing plant contained about 109 bacteria per ml and inhibited fungal growth. The fungus grew well on fresh potato wastes containing up to 5% total carbohydrate and utilized both starch and protein at 45°C and pH 3.75. On potato homogenate medium containing 2% carbohydrate (about 14% fresh potato) supplemented with monoammonium phosphate (0.506 g/liter) and ferric iron (0.1 g/liter), with pH control (at 3.75) and additional nitrogen supplied by the automatic addition of ammonium hydroxide, typical yields were 0.61 g (dry weight) of product and 0.3 g of crude protein per g of carbohydrate supplied. An aerobic, spore-forming bacterium, related to Bacillus brevis, commonly contaminated nonsterilized batch cultures but was destroyed by heating for 15 min at 100°C. PMID:16347277

  4. Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phophatases

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A.; Martial Taillefert

    2006-06-01

    The following is a summary of progress in our project ''Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phosphatases'' during the second year of the project. (1). Assignment of microbial phosphatases to molecular classes. One objective of this project is to determine the relationship of phosphatase activity to metal resistance in subsurface strains and possible contributions of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) to the dissemination of nonspecific acid phosphatase genes. Non-specific acid phosphohydrolases are a broad group of secreted microbial phosphatases that function in acidic-to-neutral pH ranges and utilize a wide range of organophosphate substrates. To address this objective we have designed a collection of PCR primer sets based on known microbial acid phosphatase sequences. Genomic DNA is extracted from subsurface FRC isolates and amplicons of the expected sizes are sequenced and searched for conserved signature motifs. During this reporting period we have successfully designed and tested a suite of PCR primers for gram-positive and gram-negative groups of the following phosphatase classes: (1) Class A; (2) Class B; and (3) Class C (gram negative). We have obtained specific PCR products for each of the classes using the primers we have designed using control strains as well as with subsurface isolates.

  5. The Rhizosphere Zone: A Hot Spot of Microbial Activity and Methylmercury Production in Saltmarsh Sediments of San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windham-Myers, L.; Marvin-Dipasquale, M.; Voytek, M.; Kirshtein, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Agee, J. L.; Cox, M.; Kakouros, E.; Collins, J. N.; Yee, D.

    2008-12-01

    Tidal marshes of varying hydrology and salinity have been shown to have high rates of microbial methylmercury (MeHg) production, especially the periodically flooded, higher elevations which are densely vegetated with shallowly rooted plants. The specific influence of emergent wetland plants and their active rhizosphere (root zone) on mercury (Hg) biogeochemistry, however, is poorly understood. Seasonal and spatial patterns of Hg biogeochemistry were examined in 2005 and 2006 at three marshes along a salinity gradient of the Petaluma River, in Northern San Francisco Bay, California. In addition, to directly examine the influence of rhizosphere activity on MeHg production, a suite of devegetation experiments was conducted in 2006 within each marsh using paired vegetated and devegetated plots in two marsh subhabitats: poorly- drained interior sites and well-drained "edge" sites near slough channels. Surface sediment (0-2cm) was sampled in both April and August from these plots, as well as from 1st and 3rd order slough channels that were naturally free of vegetation. Vegetated marsh sites produced 3- to19-fold more MeHg than did slough sites, and MeHg production rates were greater in marsh interior sites compared to more oxic marsh "edge" sites. Microbial biomass (ng DNA gdrysed) was greater in vegetated marsh settings, compared to slough channels, and increased significantly between April and August at all marsh sites. Despite this seasonal increase in microbial biomass, MeHg concentrations and production rates decreased from April to August in vegetated surface sediments. Microbial indicators of methylation also decreased from April to August, including rates of microbial sulfate reduction and the abundance of iron- and sulfate- reducing bacterial DNA. Results from the devegetated plots suggest that root exudation of fermentative labile carbon to surface soils is responsible for the higher microbial biomass, and the higher relative abundance of iron- and sulfate

  6. Impact of grazing on soil carbon and microbial biomass in typical steppe and desert steppe of Inner Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Zhang, Yingjun; Chang, Shujuan; Kan, Haiming; Lin, Lijun

    2012-01-01

    The potential of grazing lands to sequester carbon must be understood to develop effective soil conservation measures and sustain livestock production. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of grazing on soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in Typical steppe and Desert steppe ecosystems, which are both important grassland resources for animal grazing and ecological conservation in China, and to derive region-specific soil C changes associated with different stocking rates (ungrazed, UG; lightly grazed, LG; moderately grazed, MG; heavily grazed, HG). This study substantiated that significant higher SOC, TN and MBC appeared with the treatment of LG in typical steppe. From 2004 to 2010, grazing treatments increased soil carbon storage in desert steppe, which was partly due to the grazing history. The higher MBC concentration and MBC/SOC suggest a great potential for carbon sequestration in the desert steppe ecosystem. The greater MBC in desert steppe than typical steppe was mainly the result of higher precipitation and temperature, instead of soil substrate. The change of MBC and the strong positive relationships between MBC and SOC indicated that MBC in the soil was a sensitive index to indicate the dynamics of soil organic carbon in both steppes in Inner Mongolia of China.

  7. Harnessing microbial activities for environmental cleanup.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Frank E; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2006-06-01

    Human activities have released large amounts of toxic organic and inorganic chemicals into the environment. Toxic waste streams threaten dwindling drinking water supplies and impact terrestrial, estuarine and marine ecosystems. Cleanup is technically challenging and the costs based on traditional technologies are exceeding the economic capabilities of even the richest countries. Recent advances in our understanding of the microbiology contributing to contaminant transformation and detoxification has led to successful field demonstrations. Hence, harnessing the activity of naturally occurring bacteria, particularly the power of anaerobic reductive processes, is a promising approach to restore contaminated subsurface environments, protect drinking water reservoirs and to safeguard ecosystem health.

  8. Effect of fire on soil microbial composition and activity in a Pinus canariensis forest and over time recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez Rojas, Irene; Fernández Lugo, Silvia; Arévalo Sierra, Jose Ramon; Pérez Fernández, María

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires are recurrent disturbances to forest ecosystems of Pinus canariensis, but their effects on soil microbial communities are not well characterized and have not previously been compared directly. Effects of fires on soil biotic properties are strongly dependent on the intensity of the fire, as well as on the type of soil and vegetation cover. This study aims at developing a comprehensive picture of the soil and vegetation dynamics to natural fries in an experiment comprising prescribed burning. The study was conducted at sites with similar soil, climatic, and other properties in a Canary pine forest in the Canary Islands, Spain. Soil microbial communities were assessed following four treatments: control, burnt soil the day after the fire, burnt soil three months after the fire and burnt soil six months after the. Burn treatments were conducted by the stuff from Cabildo de Canarias (Spain) on the 4th and 5th of June 2014. As a general rule, the organic carbon and the microbial biomass tend to decrease in the surface horizon after the fire, but the system responds increasing microbial activities and restoring soil variables in the subsequent months after the burning. Microbial biomass carbon significantly decreased in the burnt soils with their maximum negative effect immediately after the fire and during autumn, six months after the fire. Microbial biomass nitrogen also decreased in the burnt site immediately after the fire but increased in the following months, probably because of microbial assimilation of the increased amounts of available NH4+ and NO3- due to burning. Bacterial community composition was analyzed by metagenomics analyses Illumina showing strong variations amongst horizons and burning treatment both in total numbers and their composition. Changes in plant community were also monitored at the level of germination and plant recovery. Although fire negatively affects germination, seedling survival improves by increased growth rates of seedlings

  9. Soil microbial activity as influenced by compaction and straw mulching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siczek, A.; Frąc, M.

    2012-02-01

    Field study was performed on Haplic Luvisol soil to determine the effects of soil compaction and straw mulching on microbial parameters of soil under soybean. Treatments with different compaction were established on unmulched and mulched with straw soil. The effect of soil compaction and straw mulching on the total bacteria number and activities of dehydrogenases, protease, alkaline and acid phosphatases was studied. The results of study indicated the decrease of enzymes activities in strongly compacted soil and their increase in medium compacted soil as compared to no-compacted treatment. Mulch application caused stimulation of the bacteria total number and enzymatic activity in the soil under all compaction levels. Compaction and mulch effects were significant for all analyzed microbial parameters (P<0.001).

  10. Microbial Community Structure and Enzyme Activities in Semiarid Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Martinez, V. A.; Zobeck, T. M.; Gill, T. E.; Kennedy, A. C.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of agricultural management practices on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of semiarid soils of different textures in the Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in rotations with peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and had different water management (irrigated or dryland) and tillage (conservation or conventional). Microbial community structure was investigated using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis by gas chromatography and enzyme activities, involved in C, N, P and S cycling of soils, were measured (mg product released per kg soil per h). The activities of b-glucosidase, b-glucosaminidase, alkaline phosphatase, and arylsulfatase were significantly (P<0.05) increased in soils under cotton rotated with sorghum or wheat, and due to conservation tillage in comparison to continuous cotton under conventional tillage. Principal component analysis showed FAME profiles of these soils separated distinctly along PC1 (20 %) and PC2 (13 %) due to their differences in soil texture and management. No significant differences were detected in FAME profiles due to management practices for the same soils in this sampling period. Enzyme activities provide early indications of the benefits in microbial populations and activities and soil organic matter under crop rotations and conservation tillage in comparison to the typical practices in semiarid regions of continuous cotton and conventional tillage.

  11. Variations in Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Re-Vegetation of Hilly Slopes with Purple Soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning; Zou, Dongsheng; Yang, Manyuan; Lin, Zhonggui

    2016-01-01

    Crust restoration is increasingly being done but we lack quantitative information on soil improvements. The study aimed to elucidate the dynamics involving soil microbial biomass carbon and soil dissolved organic carbon in the re-vegetation chronosequences of a hillslope land with purple soil in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil can cause serious disasters with both soil erosion and seasonal drought, and also becomes a typical representative of ecological disaster area in South China. Using the space-for-time method, we selected six typical sampling plots, designated as follows: grassplot community, meadow thicket community, frutex community, frutex and arbor community, arbor community, and top-level vegetation community. These plots were established to analyze the changes in soil microbial biomass carbon, soil microbial quotien, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon, and soil basal respiration in 0-10, 10-20, and 20-40 cm soil layers. The relationships of these parameters with soils physic-chemical properties were also determined. The ecological environment of the 6 plant communities is similar and typical; they denoted six different successive stages of restoration on hillslopes with purple soils in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil microbial biomass carbon and soil basal respiration contents decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with re-vegetation. By contrast, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and re-vegetation. From 0-10 cm soil layer to 20-40 cm soil layer, the dissolved organic carbon content decreased in different re-vegetation stages. In the process of re-vegetation, the dissolved organic carbon content increased in the 0-10 and 10-20 cm soil layers, whereas the dissolved organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase in the 20-40 cm soil layers. Meanwhile, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased with re

  12. Variations in Soil Microbial Biomass Carbon and Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon in the Re-Vegetation of Hilly Slopes with Purple Soil

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ning; Zou, Dongsheng; Yang, Manyuan; Lin, Zhonggui

    2016-01-01

    Crust restoration is increasingly being done but we lack quantitative information on soil improvements. The study aimed to elucidate the dynamics involving soil microbial biomass carbon and soil dissolved organic carbon in the re-vegetation chronosequences of a hillslope land with purple soil in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil can cause serious disasters with both soil erosion and seasonal drought, and also becomes a typical representative of ecological disaster area in South China. Using the space-for-time method, we selected six typical sampling plots, designated as follows: grassplot community, meadow thicket community, frutex community, frutex and arbor community, arbor community, and top-level vegetation community. These plots were established to analyze the changes in soil microbial biomass carbon, soil microbial quotien, dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon, and soil basal respiration in 0–10, 10–20, and 20–40 cm soil layers. The relationships of these parameters with soils physic-chemical properties were also determined. The ecological environment of the 6 plant communities is similar and typical; they denoted six different successive stages of restoration on hillslopes with purple soils in Hengyang, Hunan Province. The soil microbial biomass carbon and soil basal respiration contents decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with re-vegetation. By contrast, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and re-vegetation. From 0–10 cm soil layer to 20–40 cm soil layer, the dissolved organic carbon content decreased in different re-vegetation stages. In the process of re-vegetation, the dissolved organic carbon content increased in the 0–10 and 10–20 cm soil layers, whereas the dissolved organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase in the 20–40 cm soil layers. Meanwhile, dissolved organic carbon/soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased

  13. Seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols in the outdoor environment of the Qingdao coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xi; Qi, Jianhua; Li, Hongtao; Dong, Lijie; Gao, Dongmei

    2016-09-01

    Microbial activities in the atmosphere can indicate the physiological processes of microorganisms and can indirectly affect cloud formation and environmental health. In this study, the microbial activity in bioaerosols collected in the Qingdao coastal region was investigated using the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis method to detect the enzyme activity of microorganisms. The results showed that the microbial activity ranged from 5.49 to 102 ng/m3 sodium fluorescein from March 2013 to February 2014; the average value was 34.4 ng/m3. Microbial activity has no statistical correlation with total microbial quantity. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that meteorological factors such as atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and wind speed accounted for approximately 35.7% of the variation of the microbial activity, although their individual impacts on microbial activity varied. According to the correlation analysis, atmospheric temperature and wind speed had a significant positive and negative influence on microbial activity, respectively, whereas relative humidity and wind direction had no significant influence. The seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols was in the order of summer > autumn > winter > spring, with high fluctuations in the summer and autumn. Microbial activity in bioaerosols differed in different weather conditions such as the sunny, foggy, and hazy days of different seasons. Further in situ observations in different weather conditions at different times and places are needed to understand the seasonal distribution characteristics of microbial activity in bioaerosols and the influence factors of microbial activity.

  14. Distributions of microbial activities in deep subseafloor sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Hondt, Steven; Jorgensen, Bo Barker; Miller, D. Jay; Batzke, Anja; Blake, Ruth; Cragg, Barry A.; Cypionka, Heribert; Dickens, Gerald R.; Ferdelman, Timothy; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Holm, Nils G.; Mitterer, Richard; Spivack, Arthur; Wang, Guizhi; Bekins, Barbara; Engelen, Bert; Ford, Kathryn; Gettemy, Glen; Rutherford, Scott D.; Sass, Henrik; Skilbeck, C. Gregory; Aiello, Ivano W.; Guerin, Gilles; House, Christopher H.; Inagaki, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Diverse microbial communities and numerous energy-yielding activities occur in deeply buried sediments of the eastern Pacific Ocean. Distributions of metabolic activities often deviate from the standard model. Rates of activities, cell concentrations, and populations of cultured bacteria vary consistently from one subseafloor environment to another. Net rates of major activities principally rely on electron acceptors and electron donors from the photosynthetic surface world. At open-ocean sites, nitrate and oxygen are supplied to the deepest sedimentary communities through the underlying basaltic aquifer. In turn, these sedimentary communities may supply dissolved electron donors and nutrients to the underlying crustal biosphere.

  15. New and highly active microbial phosphotriesterase sources.

    PubMed

    Santillan, Julia Y; Dettorre, Lucas A; Lewkowicz, Elizabeth S; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2016-12-01

    Many toxic insecticides used worldwide as well as some chemical warfare agents are phosphotriester derivatives. Therefore, detoxification of organophosphorus compounds has become the subject of many studies and in particular bioremediation, based on the phosphotriesterase catalysed hydrolysis of these compounds, has shown to be an effective and ecological methodology. In order to identify new bacterial phosphotriesterases, a simple and sensitive fluorimetric screening method on solid media was employed that allowed the selection of six strains with phosphotriesterase activity. Since pH and temperature are important parameters for bioremediation of contaminated soils and waters, the influence of these variables on the rate of the enzymatic hydrolysis was assessed. This study afforded notable results, being the most remarkable one the increased activity exhibited by Nocardia asteroides and Streptomyces setonii strains at 50°C, 7 and 30 times higher than at 30°C, respectively. Compared with the results obtained with Brevundimonas diminuta, whose activity is usually considered as reference, an increase of 26 and 75 times is observed, respectively.

  16. Targeted Proteomics Approaches To Monitor Microbial Activity In Basalt Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszczynski, A. J.; Paidisetti, R.

    2007-12-01

    Microorganisms play a major role in biogeochemical cycles of the Earth. Information regarding microbial community composition can be very useful for environmental monitoring since the short generation times of microorganisms allows them to respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Microbial mediated attenuation of toxic chemicals offers great potential for the restoration of contaminated environments in an ecologically acceptable manner. Current knowledge regarding the structure and functional activities of microbial communities is limited, but more information is being acquired every day through many genomic- and proteomic- based methods. As of today, only a small fraction of the Earth's microorganisms has been cultured, and so most of the information regarding the biodegradation and therapeutic potentials of these uncultured microorganisms remains unknown. Sequence analysis of DNA and/or RNA has been used for identifying specific microorganisms, to study the community composition, and to monitor gene expression providing limited information about metabolic state of given microbial system. Proteomic studies can reveal information regarding the real-time metabolic state of the microbial communities thereby aiding in understanding their interaction with the environment. In research described here the involvement of microbial communities in the degradation of anthropogenic contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The co- metabolic degradation of TCE in the groundwater of the Snake River Plain Aquifer at the Test Area North (TAN) site of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was monitored by the characterization of peptide sequences of enzymes such as methane monooxygenases (MMOs). MMOs, expressed by methanotrophic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of methane and non-specific co-metabolic oxidation of TCE. We developed a time- course cell lysis method to release proteins from complex microbial

  17. Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity (MCHCA) for Enhanced Biogas Production

    PubMed Central

    Poszytek, Krzysztof; Ciezkowska, Martyna; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    The use of lignocellulosic biomass as a substrate in agricultural biogas plants is very popular and yields good results. However, the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, and thus biogas production, is not always satisfactory due to the slow or incomplete degradation (hydrolysis) of plant matter. To enhance the solubilization of the lignocellulosic biomass various physical, chemical and biological pretreatment methods are used. The aim of this study was to select and characterize cellulose-degrading bacteria, and to construct a microbial consortium, dedicated for degradation of maize silage and enhancing biogas production from this substrate. Over 100 strains of cellulose-degrading bacteria were isolated from: sewage sludge, hydrolyzer from an agricultural biogas plant, cattle slurry and manure. After physiological characterization of the isolates, 16 strains (representatives of Bacillus, Providencia, and Ochrobactrum genera) were chosen for the construction of a Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity, called MCHCA. The selected strains had a high endoglucanase activity (exceeding 0.21 IU/mL CMCase activity) and a wide range of tolerance to various physical and chemical conditions. Lab-scale simulation of biogas production using the selected strains for degradation of maize silage was carried out in a two-bioreactor system, similar to those used in agricultural biogas plants. The obtained results showed that the constructed MCHCA consortium is capable of efficient hydrolysis of maize silage, and increases biogas production by even 38%, depending on the inoculum used for methane fermentation. The results in this work indicate that the mesophilic MCHCA has a great potential for application on industrial scale in agricultural biogas plants. PMID:27014244

  18. Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity (MCHCA) for Enhanced Biogas Production.

    PubMed

    Poszytek, Krzysztof; Ciezkowska, Martyna; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    The use of lignocellulosic biomass as a substrate in agricultural biogas plants is very popular and yields good results. However, the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, and thus biogas production, is not always satisfactory due to the slow or incomplete degradation (hydrolysis) of plant matter. To enhance the solubilization of the lignocellulosic biomass various physical, chemical and biological pretreatment methods are used. The aim of this study was to select and characterize cellulose-degrading bacteria, and to construct a microbial consortium, dedicated for degradation of maize silage and enhancing biogas production from this substrate. Over 100 strains of cellulose-degrading bacteria were isolated from: sewage sludge, hydrolyzer from an agricultural biogas plant, cattle slurry and manure. After physiological characterization of the isolates, 16 strains (representatives of Bacillus, Providencia, and Ochrobactrum genera) were chosen for the construction of a Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity, called MCHCA. The selected strains had a high endoglucanase activity (exceeding 0.21 IU/mL CMCase activity) and a wide range of tolerance to various physical and chemical conditions. Lab-scale simulation of biogas production using the selected strains for degradation of maize silage was carried out in a two-bioreactor system, similar to those used in agricultural biogas plants. The obtained results showed that the constructed MCHCA consortium is capable of efficient hydrolysis of maize silage, and increases biogas production by even 38%, depending on the inoculum used for methane fermentation. The results in this work indicate that the mesophilic MCHCA has a great potential for application on industrial scale in agricultural biogas plants.

  19. Influence of moisture content on microbial activity and silage quality during ensilage of food processing residues.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Yates, Matthew; Aung, Hnin; Cheng, Yu-Shen; Yu, Chaowei; Guo, Hongyun; Zhang, Ruihong; Vandergheynst, Jean; Jenkins, Bryan M

    2011-10-01

    Seasonally produced biomass such as sugar beet pulp (SBP) and tomato pomace (TP) needs to be stored properly to meet the demand of sustainable biofuel production industries. Ensilage was used to preserve the feedstock. The effect of moisture content (MC) on the performance of ensilage and the relationship between microorganism activities and MC were investigated. For SBP, MC levels investigated were 80, 55, 30, and 10% on a wet basis. For TP, MC levels investigated were 60, 45, 30, and 10%. Organic acids, ethanol, ammonia, pH and water soluble carbohydrates (WSC) were measured to evaluate the silage quality. Ensilage improved as the MC decreased from 80 to 55% for SBP and from 60 to 45% for TP. When the MC decreased to 30%, a little microbial activity was detected for both feedstocks. Storage at 10% MC prevented all the microbial activity. The naturally occurring microorganisms in TP were found to preserve TP during silage and were isolated and determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results suggest that partial drying followed by ensilage may be a good approach for stabilization of food processing residues for biofuels production.

  20. Active microbial sulfur disproportionation in the Mesoproterozoic.

    PubMed

    Johnston, David T; Wing, Boswell A; Farquhar, James; Kaufman, Alan J; Strauss, Harald; Lyons, Timothy W; Kah, Linda C; Canfield, Donald E

    2005-12-02

    The environmental expression of sulfur compound disproportionation has been placed between 640 and 1050 million years ago (Ma) and linked to increases in atmospheric oxygen. These arguments have their basis in temporal changes in the magnitude of 34S/32S fractionations between sulfate and sulfide. Here, we present a Proterozoic seawater sulfate isotope record that includes the less abundant sulfur isotope 33S. These measurements imply that sulfur compound disproportionation was an active part of the sulfur cycle by 1300 Ma and that progressive Earth surface oxygenation may have characterized the Mesoproterozoic.

  1. Microbial killing activity of peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Thamlikitkul, V; Trakulsomboon, S; Louisirirotchanakul, S; Chaiprasert, A; Foongladda, S; Thipsuvan, K; Arjratanakool, W; Kunyok, R; Wasi, C; Santiprasitkul, S; Danchaivijitr, S

    2001-10-01

    In vitro killing activity of peracetic acid (Perasafe) at a concentration of 0.26 per cent w/v was tested against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella paratyphi A, Acinetobacter baumannii, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis spore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immuno-deficiency virus type I. Exposure to Peracetic acid (0.26% w/v) for 10 minutes resulted in massive killing of all the aforementioned organisms and spore.

  2. Dung biomass smoke activates inflammatory signaling pathways in human small airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Claire E; Duffney, Parker F; Gelein, Robert; Thatcher, Thomas H; Elder, Alison; Phipps, Richard P; Sime, Patricia J

    2016-12-01

    Animal dung is a biomass fuel burned by vulnerable populations who cannot afford cleaner sources of energy, such as wood and gas, for cooking and heating their homes. Exposure to biomass smoke is the leading environmental risk for mortality, with over 4,000,000 deaths each year worldwide attributed to indoor air pollution from biomass smoke. Biomass smoke inhalation is epidemiologically associated with pulmonary diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, and respiratory infections, especially in low and middle-income countries. Yet, few studies have examined the mechanisms of dung biomass smoke-induced inflammatory responses in human lung cells. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dung biomass smoke causes inflammatory responses in human lung cells through signaling pathways involved in acute and chronic lung inflammation. Primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAECs) were exposed to dung smoke at the air-liquid interface using a newly developed, automated, and reproducible dung biomass smoke generation system. The examination of inflammatory signaling showed that dung biomass smoke increased the production of several proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes in SAECs through activation of the activator protein (AP)-1 and arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) but not nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. We propose that the inflammatory responses of lung cells exposed to dung biomass smoke contribute to the development of respiratory diseases.

  3. Enhanced microbial biomass assay using mutant luciferase resistant to benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Noriaki; Sakakibara, Tatsuya; Kajiyama, Naoki; Igarashi, Toshinori; Maeda, Masako; Murakami, Seiji

    2003-08-15

    In a biomass assay based on adenosine 5(')-triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence, extracellular ATP is removed; then intracellular ATP is extracted from the microorganism by an ATP extractant and subsequently reacted with luciferase. To provide a highly sensitive assay, the concentration of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) in the ATP extractant was optimized by using a mutant luciferase resistant to BAC. The use of 0.2% BAC, which was acceptable for the luciferase, simultaneously achieved the maximum extraction of intracellular ATP from microorganisms and the inactivation of the ATP-eliminating enzymes for removal of extracellular ATP. The detection limit (blank+3 SD) for ATP was 1.8x10(-14)M (1.8x10(-18)mol/assay) in the presence of the ATP extractant with coefficients of variation of 0.7 to 6.3%. The reagent system coupled with the ATP-eliminating enzymes allowed for the detection of 93 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, 170CFU/ml of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, 170CFU/ml of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 29906, 68CFU/ml of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and 7.7CFU/ml of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051. The yeast cell of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IFO 10217 could be detected at 1CFU/ml. With 54 kinds of microorganisms, the average ATP extraction efficiency compared to the trichloroacetic acid extraction method was 81.0% in 24 strains among gram-negative bacteria, 99.4% in 13 strains among gram-positive bacteria, and 97.0% in 17 strains among yeast. The ATP contents of the gram-negative bacteria, gram-positive bacteria, and yeasts ranged from 0.40 to 2.70x10(-18)mol/CFU (mean=1.5x10(-18)mol/CFU), from 0.41 to 16.7x10(-18)mol/CFU (mean=5.5x10(-18)mol/CFU), and from 0.714 to 54.6x10(-16)mol/CFU (mean=8.00x10(-16)mol/CFU), respectively.

  4. Evaluation of siderite and magnetite formation in BIFs by pressure-temperature experiments of Fe(III) minerals and microbial biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halama, Maximilian; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria potentially contributed to the deposition of Archean banded iron formations (BIFs), before the evolution of cyanobacterially-generated molecular oxygen (O2), by using sunlight to oxidize aqueous Fe(II) and precipitate Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. Once deposited at the seafloor, diagenetic reduction of the Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides by heterotrophic bacteria produced secondary Fe(II)-bearing minerals, such as siderite (FeCO3) and magnetite (Fe3O4), via the oxidation of microbial organic carbon (i.e., cellular biomass). During deeper burial at temperatures above the threshold for life, thermochemical Fe(III) reduction has the potential to form BIF-like minerals. However, the role of thermochemical Fe(III) reduction of primary BIF minerals during metamorphism, and its impact on mineralogy and geochemical signatures in BIFs, is poorly understood. Consequently, we simulated the metamorphism of the precursor and diagenetic iron-rich minerals (ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite) at low-grade metamorphic conditions (170 °C, 1.2 kbar) for 14 days by using (1) mixtures of abiotically synthesized Fe(III) minerals and either microbial biomass or glucose as a proxy for biomass, and (2) using biogenic minerals formed by phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Mössbauer spectroscopy and μXRD showed that thermochemical magnetite formation was limited to samples containing ferrihydrite and glucose, or goethite and glucose. No magnetite was formed from Fe(III) minerals when microbial biomass was present as the carbon and electron sources for thermochemical Fe(III) reduction. This could be due to biomass-derived organic molecules binding to the mineral surfaces and preventing solid-state conversion to magnetite. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed siderite contents of up to 17% after only 14 days of incubation at elevated temperature and pressure for all samples with synthetic Fe(III) minerals and biomass, whereas 6% of the initial Fe(III) was

  5. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefert, Martial

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined that both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".

  6. High-throughput sequencing-based microbial characterization of size fractionated biomass in an anoxic anammox reactor for low-strength wastewater at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenru; Yang, Dianhai; Chen, Wenjing; Gu, Xiao

    2017-05-01

    The microbial characterization of three size-fractionated sludge obtained from a suspended-growth anoxic anammox reactor treating low-strength wastewater at low temperatures were investigated by using high-throughput sequencing. Particularly, the spatial variability in relative abundance of microorganisms involved in nitrogen metabolism were analyzed in detail. Results showed that population segregation did occur in the reactor. It was found, for the first time, that the genus Nitrotoga was enriched only in large granules (>400μm). Three anammox genus including Candidatus Jettenia, Brocadia and Kuenenia were detected. Among them, Candidatus Brocadia and Kuenenia preferred to grow in large-sized granules (>400μm), whereas Candidatus Jettenia dominated in small- and moderate-sized sludge (<400μm). The members of genus Candidatus Jettenia appeared to play the vital role in nitrogen removal, since sludge with diameters smaller than 400μm accounted for 81.55% of the total biomass. However, further studies are required to identify the activity of different-size sludge.

  7. Enhancement of the microbial community biomass and diversity during air sparging bioremediation of a soil highly contaminated with kerosene and BTEX.

    PubMed

    Kabelitz, Nadja; Machackova, Jirina; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Brennerova, Maria; Pieper, Dietmar H; Heipieper, Hermann J; Junca, Howard

    2009-03-01

    In order to obtain insights in complexity shifts taking place in natural microbial communities under strong selective pressure, soils from a former air force base in the Czech Republic, highly contaminated with jet fuel and at different stages of a bioremediation air sparging treatment, were analyzed. By tracking phospholipid fatty acids and 16S rRNA genes, a detailed monitoring of the changes in quantities and composition of the microbial communities developed at different stages of the bioventing treatment progress was performed. Depending on the length of the air sparging treatment that led to a significant reduction in the contamination level, we observed a clear shift in the soil microbial community being dominated by Pseudomonads under the harsh conditions of high aromatic contamination to a status of low aromatic concentrations, increased biomass content, and a complex composition with diverse bacterial taxonomical branches.

  8. Main factors controlling microbial community structure, growth and activity after reclamation of a tailing pond with aided phytostabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Acosta, José A.; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Faz, Ángel; Bååth, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Reclamation on bare tailing ponds has the potential to represent soil genesis in Technosols favoring the understanding of the changes of microbial communities and function. In this study we used phytostabilization aided with calcium carbonate and pig slurry/manure to reclaim an acidic bare tailing pond with the aim of investigating the effect of amending and different species on microbial community structure and function. We sampled after two years of amending and planting: unamended tailing soil (UTS), non-rhizospheric amended tailing soil (ATS), rhizospheric soil from four species, and non-rhizospheric native forest soil (NS), which acted as reference. The application of amendments increased pH up to neutrality, organic carbon (Corg), C/N and aggregate stability, while decreased salinity and heavy metals availability. No effect of rhizosphere was observed on physicochemical properties, metals immobilization and microbial community structure and function. To account for confounding effects due to soil organic matter, microbial properties were expressed per Corg. The high increments in pH and Corg have been the main factors driving changes in microbial community structure and function. Bacterial biomass was higher in UTS, without significant differences among the rest of soils. Fungal biomass followed the trend UTS < ATS = rhizospheric soils < NS. Bacterial growth increased and fungal growth decreased with increasing pH, despite the high availability of metals at low pH. Enzyme activities were lower in UTS, being β-glucosidase and β-glucosaminidase activities highly correlated with bacterial growth. Microbial activities were not correlated with the exchangeable fraction of heavy metals, indicating that microbial function is not strongly affected by these metals, likely due to the efficiency of the reclamation procedure to reduce metals toxicity. Changes in microbial community composition were largely explained by changes in pH, heavy metals availability and Corg

  9. Direct Experimental Assessment of Microbial Activity in North Pond Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdelman, T. G.; Picard, A.; Morando, M.; Ziebis, W.

    2009-12-01

    North Pond, an isolated sediment pond located at 22°45’N on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, offered the opportunity to study microbial activities in deeply-buried low-activity sediments. About 8 x 15 km in size with sediment maximum thickness of about 300 m, North Pond is completely surrounded by exposed 7 Ma old basement. North Pond lies above the carbonate compensation depth at a water depth about 4500 m; hydrostatic pressure at the seafloor is about 45 MPa and the temperature is near 2°C. During the a R/V MS Merian cruise (MSM-11/1) in February -March 2009, 14 gravity cores of up to 9 m length were successfully obtained, from which samples were taken with 1-m resolution for experimental activity measurements. The goal of the experimental work was 1) to examine potential metabolic pathways in North Pond sediments and carbon assimilation pathways in this low-energy environment, and 2) explore the effects of pressure on microbial metabolic activities. As dissolved oxygen penetrated through all depths, sediments were aerobically sampled, processed and incubated at 4°C. Selected samples were immediately stored at in situ pressure until further use. The microbial uptake of both organic and inorganic carbon in selected North Pond sediment samples was investigated by following the fate of 14C in radio-labeled organic and organic compounds in North Pond sediment slurry incubations. Shipboard and on-shore experiments using 14C-leucine, 14C-glucose and 14C-bicarbonate were performed on selected cores. Day- to month- incubations were performed at 4°C. Parallel incubations were conducted at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) and in situ pressure (~45 MPa). Either whole cell extraction (Kallmeyer et al., Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 6, 2008, 238-245) or protein-DNA extraction was carried on after various incubations to determine the fraction of 14C incorporated into cellular components. Formation of 14C-labeled CO2 was determined on samples incubated with 14C

  10. Direct Observations Of Microbial Activity At Extreme Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Scott, J. H.; Cody, G. D.; Fogel, M.; Hazen, R. M.; Hemley, R. J.; Huntress, W. T.

    2002-12-01

    Microbial communities adapt to a wide range of pressures, temperatures, salinities, pH, and oxidation states. Although, significant attention has been focused on the effects of high and low temperature on physiology, there is some evidence that elevated pressure may also manifest interesting effects on cellular physiology, such as enzyme inactivation, cell-membrane breach, and suppression of protein interactions with various substrates. However, exactly how these factors affect intact cells is not well understood. In this study, we have adapted diamond anvil cells to explore the effects of high pressure on microbial life. We used the rate of microbial formate oxidation as a probe of metabolic viability. The utilization of formate by microorganisms is a fundamental metabolic process in anaerobic environments. We monitored in-situ microbial formate oxidation via molecular spectroscopy for Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 at high pressures (68 to 1060 MPa). At pressures of 1200 to 1600 MPa, living bacteria resided in fluid inclusions in ice-VI crystals and continued to be viable upon subsequent release to ambient pressures (0.1 MPa). Furthermore, direct microscopic observations indicate that these cells maintain their ability for cellular division upon decompression from such high pressures. Evidence of microbial viability and activity at these extreme pressures expands by an order of magnitude the range of conditions representing the habitable zone in the solar system. These results imply that pressure may not be a significant impediment to life. The maximum pressure explored in this work is equivalent to a depth of ~ 50 km below Earth's crust, or ~ 160 km in a hypothetical ocean. The pressures encountered at the depths of thick ice caps and deep crustal subsurface may not be a limiting factor for the existence of life. This suggests that deep (water/ice) layers of Europa, Callisto, or Ganymede, subduction zones on Earth, and the

  11. Carbon-Based Microbial-Fuel-Cell Electrodes: From Conductive Supports to Active Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Cheng, Chong; Thomas, Arne

    2017-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have attracted considerable interest due to their potential in renewable electrical power generation using the broad diversity of biomass and organic substrates. However, the difficulties in achieving high power densities and commercially affordable electrode materials have limited their industrial applications to date. Carbon materials, which can exhibit a wide range of different morphologies and structures, usually possess physiological activity to interact with microorganisms and are therefore fast-emerging electrode materials. As the anode, carbon materials can significantly promote interfacial microbial colonization and accelerate the formation of extracellular biofilms, which eventually promotes the electrical power density by providing a conductive microenvironment for extracellular electron transfer. As the cathode, carbon-based materials can function as catalysts for the oxygen-reduction reaction, showing satisfying activities and efficiencies nowadays even reaching the performance of Pt catalysts. Here, first, recent advancements on the design of carbon materials for anodes in MFCs are summarized, and the influence of structure and surface functionalization of different types of carbon materials on microorganism immobilization and electrochemical performance is elucidated. Then, synthetic strategies and structures of typical carbon-based cathodes in MFCs are briefly presented. Furthermore, future applications of carbon-electrode-based MFC devices in the energy, environmental, and biological fields are discussed, and the emerging challenges in transferring them from laboratory to industrial scale are described.

  12. Slow pyrolysis of poultry litter and pine woody biomass: impact of chars and bio-oils on microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Das, K C; Garcia-Perez, M; Bibens, B; Melear, N

    2008-06-01

    Accidental or prescribed fires in forests and in cultivated fields, as well as primitive charcoal production practices, are responsible for the release of large amounts of gases, char and condensable organic molecules into the environment. This paper describes the impact of condensable organic molecules and chars resulting from the slow pyrolysis of poultry litter, pine chips and pine pellets on the growth of microbial populations in soil and water. The proximate and elemental analyses as well as the content of proteins, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and ash for each of these bio-materials are reported. The yields and some properties of char and condensable liquids are also documented. The behavior of microbial populations in soil and water is followed through respiration studies. It was found that biological activity was highest when aqueous fractions from poultry litter were applied in water. Cumulative oxygen consumption over a 120-h period was highest in the aqueous phases from poultry litter coarse fraction (1.82 mg/g). On average the oxygen consumption when oily fractions from poultry litter were applied represented 44 to 62% of that when aqueous fractions were applied. Pine chip and pine pellet derived liquids and chars produced respiration activity that were an order of magnitude lower than that of poultry litter liquid fractions. These results suggest that the growth observed is due to the effect of protein-derived molecules.

  13. Assessment of industrial activity in the utilization of biomass for energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The objective of this report is to help focus the federal programs in biomass energy, by identifying the status and objectives of private sector activity in the biomass field as of mid-1979. In addition, the industry's perceptions of government activities are characterized. Findings and conclusions are based principally on confidential interviews with executives in 95 companies. These included forest products companies, agricultural products companies, equipment manufacturers, electric and gas utilities petroleum refiners and distributors, research and engineering firms, and trade organizations, as listed in Exhibit 1. Interview findings have been supplemented by research of recent literature. The study focused on four key questions: (1) what is the composition of the biomass industry; (2) what are the companies doing; (3) what are their objectives and strategies; and (4) what are the implications for government policy. This executive summary provides highlights of the key findings and conclusions. The summary discussion is presented in seven parts: (1) overview of the biomass field; (2) structure of the biomass industry today; (3) corporate activities in biomass-related areas; (4) motivations for these activities; (5) industry's outlook on the future for energy-from-biomass; (6) industry's view of government activities; and (7) implications for Federal policy.

  14. Dynamics of microbiological parameters, enzymatic activities and worm biomass production during vermicomposting of effluent treatment plant sludge of bakery industry.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anoop; Suthar, S; Garg, V K

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the changes in microbial parameters and enzymatic activities during vermicomposting of effluent treatment plant sludge (ETPS) of bakery industry spiked with cow dung (CD) by Eisenia fetida. Six vermibins containing different ratios of ETPS and CD were maintained under controlled laboratory conditions for 15 weeks. Total bacterial and total fungal count increased upto 7th week and declined afterward in all the bins. Maximum bacterial and fungal count was 31.6 CFU × 10(6) g(-1) and 31 CFU × 10(4) g(-1) in 7th week. Maximum dehydrogenase activity was 1921 μg TPF g(-1) h(-1) in 9th week in 100 % CD containing vermibin, whereas maximum urease activity was 1208 μg NH4 (-)N g(-1) h(-1) in 3rd week in 100 % CD containing vermibin. The enzyme activity and microbial counts were lesser in ETPS containing vermibins than control (100 % CD). The growth and fecundity of the worms in different vermibins were also investigated. The results showed that initially biomass and fecundity of the worms increased but decreased at the later stages due to non-availability of the palatable feed. This showed that quality and palatability of food directly affect biological parameters of the system.

  15. Long-term impact of sewage sludge application on soil microbial biomass: An evaluation using meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Alex; Sakrabani, Ruben; Tyrrel, Sean; Rivas Casado, Monica; McGrath, Steve P; Crooks, Bill; Cooper, Pat; Campbell, Colin D

    2016-12-01

    The Long-Term Sludge Experiments (LTSE) began in 1994 as part of continuing research into the effects of sludge-borne heavy metals on soil fertility. The long-term effects of Zn, Cu, and Cd on soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) were monitored for 8 years (1997-2005) in sludge amended soils at nine UK field sites. To assess the statutory limits set by the UK Sludge (Use in Agriculture) Regulations the experimental data has been reviewed using the statistical methods of meta-analysis. Previous LTSE studies have focused predominantly on statistical significance rather than effect size, whereas meta-analysis focuses on the magnitude and direction of an effect, i.e. the practical significance, rather than its statistical significance. The results presented here show that significant decreases in Cmic have occurred in soils where the total concentrations of Zn and Cu fall below the current UK statutory limits. For soils receiving sewage sludge predominantly contaminated with Zn, decreases of approximately 7-11% were observed at concentrations below the UK statutory limit. The effect of Zn appeared to increase over time, with increasingly greater decreases in Cmic observed over a period of 8 years. This may be due to an interactive effect between Zn and confounding Cu contamination which has augmented the bioavailability of these metals over time. Similar decreases (7-12%) in Cmic were observed in soils receiving sewage sludge predominantly contaminated with Cu; however, Cmic appeared to show signs of recovery after a period of 6 years. Application of sewage sludge predominantly contaminated with Cd appeared to have no effect on Cmic at concentrations below the current UK statutory limit.

  16. Probing Microbial Activity in a Perched Water Body Located in a Deep Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Y.; Taylor, J. L.; Henriksen, J. R.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Hubbard, S. S.; Spycher, N.; Weathers, T. S.; Ginn, T. R.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Smith, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    Waste releases to the vadose zone are a legacy of past activities at a number of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), 90Sr has been detected in perched water bodies underlying the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) facility. Microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) using urea-hydrolyzing microbes is one proposed approach for immobilization of 90Sr in the subsurface. The sequestration mechanism is co-precipitation in calcite, promoted by the production of carbonate alkalinity from ureolysis. In order to assess the potential efficacy of MICP at INTEC a field study was conducted at the INL Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP). The VZRP is located approximately 3 km from INTEC and shares many of the same hydrologic and lithologic features but in a non-contaminated setting. We conducted experiments over two field seasons in a perched water body located approximately 15 meters below land surface, using a 5-spot wellfield design. During the first season amendments (molasses and urea) were injected into the central well and water was extracted from two wells on either side, located along a diagonal. Water samples were characterized for microbial abundance, ureolytic activity and ureC gene numbers, along with solution composition. Before, during and after the injections cross-borehole geophysical imaging was performed, using various combinations of the available wells. During the second field season in situ static experiments were conducted to specifically characterize attached and unattached microbial communities, using surrogate substrates colonized during a 12 week incubation. Based on the field data a first order in situ urea hydrolysis rate constant of 0.034 d-1 was estimated. This was more than an order of magnitude higher than rate constants estimated above-ground using water samples, suggesting that attached microorganisms were responsible for >90% of the observed urea hydrolysis activity. The

  17. Effect of cerium dioxide, titanium dioxide, silver, and gold nanoparticles on the activity of microbial communities intended in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    García, Ana; Delgado, Lucía; Torà, Josep A; Casals, Eudald; González, Edgar; Puntes, Víctor; Font, Xavier; Carrera, Julián; Sánchez, Antoni

    2012-01-15

    Growth in production and use of nanoparticles (NPs) will result increased concentrations of these in industrial and urban wastewaters and, consequently, in wastewater-treatment facilities. The effect of this increase on the performance of the wastewater-treatment process has not been studied systematically and including all the microbial communities involved in wastewater treatment. The present work investigates, by using respiration tests and biogas-production analysis, the inhibitory effect of four different commonly used metal oxide (CeO(2) and TiO(2)) and zero-valent metal (Ag and Au) nanoparticles on the activity of the most important microbial communities present in a modern wastewater-treatment plant. Specifically, the actions of ordinary heterotrophic organisms, ammonia oxidizing bacteria, and thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic bacteria were tested in the presence and absence of the nanoparticles. In general, CeO(2) nanoparticles caused the greatest inhibition in biogas production (nearly 100%) and a strong inhibitory action of other biomasses; Ag nanoparticles caused an intermediate inhibition in biogas production (within 33-50%) and a slight inhibition in the action of other biomasses, and Au and TiO(2) nanoparticles caused only slight or no inhibition for all tested biomasses.

  18. Sedimentary organic biomarkers suggest detrimental effects of PAHs on estuarine microbial biomass during the 20th century in San Francisco Bay, CA, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, Elena B.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrocarbon contaminants are ubiquitous in urban aquatic ecosystems, and the ability of some microbial strains to degrade certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is well established. However, detrimental effects of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination on nondegrader microbial populations and photosynthetic organisms have not often been considered. In the current study, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) biomarkers in the sediment record were used to assess historical impacts of petroleum contamination on microbial and/or algal biomass in South San Francisco Bay, CA, USA. Profiles of saturated, branched, and monounsaturated fatty acids had similar concentrations and patterns downcore. Total PAHs in a sediment core were on average greater than 20× higher above ∼200 cm than below, which corresponds roughly to the year 1900. Isomer ratios were consistent with a predominant petroleum combustion source for PAHs. Several individual PAHs exceeded sediment quality screening values. Negative correlations between petroleum contaminants and microbial and algal biomarkers – along with high trans/cis ratios of unsaturated FA, and principle component analysis of the PAH and fatty acid records – suggest a negative impacts of petroleum contamination, appearing early in the 20th century, on microbial and/or algal ecology at the site.

  19. Influence of different anoxic time exposures on active biomass, protozoa and filamentous bacteria in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Perez, S; Fermoso, F G; Arnaiz, C

    Medium-sized wastewater treatment plants are considered too small to implement anaerobic digestion technologies and too large for extensive treatments. A promising option as a sewage sludge reduction method is the inclusion of anoxic time exposures. In the present study, three different anoxic time exposures of 12, 6 and 4 hours have been studied to reduce sewage sludge production. The best anoxic time exposure was observed under anoxic/oxic cycles of 6 hours, which reduced 29.63% of the biomass production compared with the oxic control conditions. The sludge under different anoxic time exposures, even with a lower active biomass concentration than the oxic control conditions, showed a much higher metabolic activity than the oxic control conditions. Microbiological results suggested that both protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria decrease under anoxic time exposures compared to oxic control conditions. The anoxic time exposures 6/6 showed the highest reduction in both protozoa density, 37.5%, and abundance of filamentous bacteria, 41.1%, in comparison to the oxic control conditions. The groups of crawling ciliates, carnivorous ciliates and filamentous bacteria were highly influenced by the anoxic time exposures. Protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria have been shown as promising bioindicators of biomass production reduction.

  20. Inhibition of biomass activity in the via nitrite nitrogen removal processes by veterinary pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Alvarino, Teresa; Katsou, Evina; Malamis, Simos; Suarez, Sonia; Omil, Francisco; Fatone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of two veterinary pharmaceuticals was studied for different types of biomass involved in via nitrite nitrogen removal processes. Batch tests were conducted to determine the inhibition level of acetaminophen (PAR) and doxycycline (DOX) on the activity of short-cut nitrifying, denitrifying and anoxic ammonium oxidation (anammox) biomass and phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs). All biomass types were affected by PAR and DOX, with anammox being the most sensitive bacteria. DOX inhibited more the biomass treating high strength nitrogenous effluents (HSNE) than low strength nitrogenous effluents (LSNE). The phosphorus uptake inhibition under anoxic conditions was lower than 25% in the presence of PAR up to 400 mg L(-1). The same DOX concentration inhibited anoxic phosphorus uptake more than 65% for biomass treating LSNE and HSNE. Heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria seem to be more robust at high DOX and PAR concentrations than anammox. Both veterinary products inactivated ammonium oxidizing, Accumulibacter phosphatis and denitrifying bacteria.

  1. Microbial respiration and kinetics of extracellular enzymes activities through rhizosphere and detritusphere at agricultural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löppmann, Sebastian; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Rhizosphere and detritusphere are soil microsites with very high resource availability for microorganisms affecting their biomass, composition and functions. In the rhizosphere low molecular compounds occur with root exudates and low available polymeric compounds, as belowground plant senescence. In detritusphere the substrate for decomposition is mainly a polymeric material of low availability. We hypothesized that microorganisms adapted to contrasting quality and availability of substrates in the rhizosphere and detritusphere are strongly different in affinity of hydrolytic enzymes responsible for decomposition of organic compounds. According to common ecological principles easily available substrates are quickly consumed by microorganisms with enzymes of low substrate affinity (i.e. r-strategists). The slow-growing K-strategists with enzymes of high substrate affinity are better adapted for growth on substrates of low availability. Estimation of affinity of enzyme systems to the substrate is based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics, reflecting the dependency of decomposition rates on substrate amount. As enzymes-mediated reactions are substrate-dependent, we further hypothesized that the largest differences in hydrolytic activity between the rhizosphere and detritusphere occur at substrate saturation and that these differences are smoothed with increasing limitation of substrate. Affected by substrate limitation, microbial species follow a certain adaptation strategy. To achieve different depth gradients of substrate availability 12 plots on an agricultural field were established in the north-west of Göttingen, Germany: 1) 4 plots planted with maize, reflecting lower substrate availability with depth; 2) 4 unplanted plots with maize litter input (0.8 kg m-2 dry maize residues), corresponding to detritusphere; 3) 4 bare fallow plots as control. Maize litter was grubbed homogenously into the soil at the first 5 cm to ensure comparable conditions for the herbivore and

  2. Coarse Woody Debris Increases Microbial Community Functional Diversity but not Enzyme Activities in Reclaimed Oil Sands Soils

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jin-Hyeob; Chang, Scott X.; Naeth, M. Anne; Schaaf, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Forest floor mineral soil mix (FMM) and peat mineral soil mix (PMM) are cover soils commonly used for upland reclamation post open-pit oil sands mining in northern Alberta, Canada. Coarse woody debris (CWD) can be used to regulate soil temperature and water content, to increase organic matter content, and to create microsites for the establishment of microorganisms and vegetation in upland reclamation. We studied the effects of CWD on soil microbial community level physiological profile (CLPP) and soil enzyme activities in FMM and PMM in a reclaimed landscape in the oil sands. This experiment was conducted with a 2 (FMM vs PMM) × 2 (near CWD vs away from CWD) factorial design with 6 replications. The study plots were established with Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen) CWD placed on each plot between November 2007 and February 2008. Soil samples were collected within 5 cm from CWD and more than 100 cm away from CWD in July, August and September 2013 and 2014. Microbial biomass was greater (p<0.05) in FMM than in PMM, in July, and August 2013 and July 2014, and greater (p<0.05) near CWD than away from CWD in FMM in July and August samplings. Soil microbial CLPP differed between FMM and PMM (p<0.01) according to a principal component analysis and CWD changed microbial CLPP in FMM (p<0.05) but not in PMM. Coarse woody debris increased microbial community functional diversity (average well color development in Biolog Ecoplates) in both cover soils (p<0.05) in August and September 2014. Carbon degrading soil enzyme activities were greater in FMM than in PMM (p<0.05) regardless of distance from CWD but were not affected by CWD. Greater microbial biomass and enzyme activities in FMM than in PMM will increase organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling, improving plant growth. Enhanced microbial community functional diversity by CWD application in upland reclamation has implications for accelerating upland reclamation after oil sands mining. PMID:26618605

  3. Microbial diversity in European alpine permafrost and active layers.

    PubMed

    Frey, Beat; Rime, Thomas; Phillips, Marcia; Stierli, Beat; Hajdas, Irka; Widmer, Franco; Hartmann, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Permafrost represents a largely understudied genetic resource. Thawing of permafrost with global warming will not only promote microbial carbon turnover with direct feedback on greenhouse gases, but also unlock an unknown microbial diversity. Pioneering metagenomic efforts have shed light on the permafrost microbiome in polar regions, but temperate mountain permafrost is largely understudied. We applied a unique experimental design coupled to high-throughput sequencing of ribosomal markers to characterize the microbiota at the long-term alpine permafrost study site 'Muot-da-Barba-Peider' in eastern Switzerland with an approximate radiocarbon age of 12 000 years. Compared to the active layers, the permafrost community was more diverse and enriched with members of the superphylum Patescibacteria (OD1, TM7, GN02 and OP11). These understudied phyla with no cultured representatives proposedly feature small streamlined genomes with reduced metabolic capabilities, adaptations to anaerobic fermentative metabolisms and potential ectosymbiotic lifestyles. The permafrost microbiota was also enriched with yeasts and lichenized fungi known to harbour various structural and functional adaptation mechanisms to survive under extreme sub-zero conditions. These data yield an unprecedented view on microbial life in temperate mountain permafrost, which is increasingly important for understanding the biological dynamics of permafrost in order to anticipate potential ecological trajectories in a warming world.

  4. Experimental warming effects on the microbial community of a temperate mountain forest soil.

    PubMed

    Schindlbacher, A; Rodler, A; Kuffner, M; Kitzler, B; Sessitsch, A; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S

    2011-07-01

    Soil microbial communities mediate the decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM). The amount of carbon (C) that is respired leaves the soil as CO(2) (soil respiration) and causes one of the greatest fluxes in the global carbon cycle. How soil microbial communities will respond to global warming, however, is not well understood. To elucidate the effect of warming on the microbial community we analyzed soil from the soil warming experiment Achenkirch, Austria. Soil of a mature spruce forest was warmed by 4 °C during snow-free seasons since 2004. Repeated soil sampling from control and warmed plots took place from 2008 until 2010. We monitored microbial biomass C and nitrogen (N). Microbial community composition was assessed by phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) and by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of ribosomal RNA genes. Microbial metabolic activity was estimated by soil respiration to biomass ratios and RNA to DNA ratios. Soil warming did not affect microbial biomass, nor did warming affect the abundances of most microbial groups. Warming significantly enhanced microbial metabolic activity in terms of soil respiration per amount of microbial biomass C. Microbial stress biomarkers were elevated in warmed plots. In summary, the 4 °C increase in soil temperature during the snow-free season had no influence on microbial community composition and biomass but strongly increased microbial metabolic activity and hence reduced carbon use efficiency.

  5. Characterization of autotrophic and heterotrophic soluble microbial product (SMP) fractions from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-Ming; Ni, Bing-Jie; Seviour, Thomas; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-12-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) generated by microbial populations can adversely affect the efficiency of biological wastewater treatment systems and secondary effluent quality. In this work, both experimental and modeling approaches were used to investigate the formation of SMP by both heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria. Strategies to control and reduce SMP in activated sludge systems were thus evaluated. SMP produced by heterotrophs were found to account for more than 92% of total SMP. The SMP produced by autotrophs contributed to less than 8% of the total SMP, with 5% attributable to the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and 3% to the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). When external organic substrate was present, the utilization-associated products (UAP) were the main component of SMP. When external organic substrate was completely consumed, biomass-associated products (BAP) from the hydrolysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) dominated the SMP. The model developed in this study described the fractions and dynamics of UAP and BAP produced by heterotrophs, AOB and NOB. Solids retention time of the reactor had a significant effect on SMP production, while the effect of the hydraulic retention time was only minor. Decreasing the solids retention time from 15 to 0.5 d reduced SMP production in the reactor by 62%.

  6. Structural stability, microbial biomass and community composition of sediments affected by the hydric dynamics of an urban stormwater infiltration basin. Dynamics of physical and microbial characteristics of stormwater sediment.

    PubMed

    Badin, Anne Laure; Monier, Armelle; Volatier, Laurence; Geremia, Roberto A; Delolme, Cécile; Bedell, Jean-Philippe

    2011-05-01

    The sedimentary layer deposited at the surface of stormwater infiltration basins is highly organic and multicontaminated. It undergoes considerable moisture content fluctuations due to the drying and inundation cycles (called hydric dynamics) of these basins. Little is known about the microflora of the sediments and its dynamics; hence, the purpose of this study is to describe the physicochemical and biological characteristics of the sediments at different hydric statuses of the infiltration basin. Sediments were sampled at five time points following rain events and dry periods. They were characterized by physical (aggregation), chemical (nutrients and heavy metals), and biological (total, bacterial and fungal biomasses, and genotypic fingerprints of total bacterial and fungal communities) parameters. Data were processed using statistical analyses which indicated that heavy metal (1,841 μg/g dry weight (DW)) and organic matter (11%) remained stable through time. By contrast, aggregation, nutrient content (NH₄⁺, 53-717 μg/g DW), pH (6.9-7.4), and biological parameters were shown to vary with sediment water content and sediment biomass, and were higher consecutive to stormwater flows into the basin (up to 7 mg C/g DW) than during dry periods (0.6 mg C/g DW). Coinertia analysis revealed that the structure of the bacterial communities is driven by the hydric dynamics of the infiltration basin, although no such trend was found for fungal communities. Hydric dynamics more than rain events appear to be more relevant for explaining variations of aggregation, microbial biomass, and shift in the microbial community composition. We concluded that the hydric dynamics of stormwater infiltration basins greatly affects the structural stability of the sedimentary layer, the biomass of the microbial community living in it and its dynamics. The decrease in aggregation consecutive to rewetting probably enhances access to organic matter (OM), explaining the consecutive release

  7. Iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in activated carbons prepared from hydrothermally treated waste biomass.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenming; Björkman, Eva; Yun, Yifeng; Lilliestråle, Malte; Hedin, Niklas

    2014-03-01

    Particles of iron oxide (Fe3O4 ; 20–40 nm) were embedded within activated carbons during the activation of hydrothermally carbonized (HTC) biomasses in a flow of CO2. Four different HTC biomass samples (horse manure, grass cuttings, beer production waste, and biosludge) were used as precursors for the activated carbons. Nanoparticles of iron oxide formed from iron catalyst included in the HTC biomasses. After systematic optimization, the activated carbons had specific surface areas of about 800 m2g1. The pore size distributions of the activated carbons depended strongly on the degree of carbonization of the precursors. Activated carbons prepared from highly carbonized precursors had mainly micropores, whereas those prepared from less carbonized precursors contained mainly mesopores. Given the strong magnetism of the activated carbon–nano-Fe3O4 composites, they could be particularly useful for water purification.

  8. Seasonal, interannual, and long-term variabilities in biomass burning activity over South Asia.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, P; Naja, M; Kumar, R; Chandola, H C

    2016-03-01

    The seasonal, interannual, and long-term variations in biomass burning activity and related emissions are not well studied over South Asia. In this regard, active fire location retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS Terra, and tropospheric column NO2 from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) are used to understand the effects of biomass burning on the tropospheric pollution loadings over South Asia during 2003-2013. Biomass burning emission estimates from Global Fire Emission Database (GFED) and Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) are also used to quantify uncertainties and regional discrepancies in the emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and black carbon (BC) due to biomass burning in South Asia. In the Asian continent, the frequency of fire activity is highest over Southeast Asia, followed by South Asia and East Asia. The biomass burning activity in South Asia shows a distinct seasonal cycle that peaks during February-May with some differences among four (north, central, northeast, and south) regions in India. The annual biomass burning activity in north, central, and south regions shows an increasing tendency, particularly after 2008, while a decrease is seen in northeast region during 2003-2013. The increase in fire counts over the north and central regions contributes 24 % of the net enhancement in fire counts over South Asia. MODIS AOD and OMI tropospheric column NO2 retrievals are classified into high and low fire activity periods and show that biomass burning leads to significant enhancement in tropospheric pollution loading over both the cropland and forest regions. The enhancement is much higher (110-176 %) over the forest region compared to the cropland (34-62 %) region. Further efforts are required to understand the implications of biomass burning on the regional air quality and climate of South Asia.

  9. An Evaluation of Subsurface Microbial Activity Conditional to Subsurface Temperature, Porosity, and Permeability at North American Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.; Mordensky, S.; Verba, Circe; Rabjohns, K.; Colwell, F.

    2016-06-21

    Several nations, including the United States, recognize global climate change as a force transforming the global ecosphere. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a greenhouse gas that contributes to the evolving climate. Reduction of atmospheric CO2 levels is a goal for many nations and carbon sequestration which traps CO2 in the Earth’s subsurface is one method to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels. Among the variables that must be considered in developing this technology to a national scale is microbial activity. Microbial activity or biomass can change rock permeability, alter artificial seals around boreholes, and play a key role in biogeochemistry and accordingly may determine how CO2 is sequestered underground. Certain physical parameters of a reservoir found in literature (e.g., temperature, porosity, and permeability) may indicate whether a reservoir can host microbial communities. In order to estimate which subsurface formations may host microbes, this report examines the subsurface temperature, porosity, and permeability of underground rock formations that have high potential to be targeted for CO2 sequestration. Of the 268 North American wellbore locations from the National Carbon Sequestration Database (NATCARB; National Energy and Technology Laboratory, 2015) and 35 sites from Nelson and Kibler (2003), 96 sequestration sites contain temperature data. Of these 96 sites, 36 sites have temperatures that would be favorable for microbial survival, 48 sites have mixed conditions for supporting microbial populations, and 11 sites would appear to be unfavorable to support microbial populations. Future studies of microbe viability would benefit from a larger database with more formation parameters (e.g. mineralogy, structure, and groundwater chemistry), which would help to increase understanding of where CO2 sequestration could be most efficiently implemented.

  10. [Microbial community and its activities in canopy- and understory humus of two montane forest types in Ailao Mountains, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-jie; Liu, Wen-yao; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Han-bo; Wang, Gao-sheng

    2010-09-01

    Mid-montane moist evergreen broadleaved forest (MMF) and top-montane dwarf mossy forest (DMF) are the two major natural forest types in subtropical mountainous area of Ailao Mountains, Northwest China. In this paper, a comparative study was made on the microbial composition, quantity, biochemical activity, metabolic activity, and their seasonal dynamics in the canopy- and understory humus of the two forest types. The composition, quantity, and metabolic activity of the microbes in the canopy humus of dominant tree species in MMF and DMF were also analyzed. In the canopy humus of the two forest types, the amounts of fungi and actinomycetes, microbial biomass C and N, and intensities of nitrogen fixation and cellulose decomposition were significantly higher than those in understory humus. Meanwhile, the amount of cellulose-decomposing microbes (ACDM), cellulose decomposition intensity, microbial biomass C and N, and metabolic activity in the canopy humus of MMF were significantly higher than those of DMF. The amounts of bacteria, fungi, and aerobic nitrogen-fixing bacteria (ANFB) and the metabolic activity in the canopy humus of MMF and DMF were significantly higher in wet season than in dry season, while a contradictory trend was observed on the amount of actinomycetes. No significant difference was observed on the amount of ACDM between wet season and dry season. For the two forest types, the amounts of microbes and their biochemical activities in canopy humus had a larger seasonal variation range than those in understory humus. There was a significant difference in the amounts of the microbes in canopy humus among the dominant tree species in MMF and DMF, especially in wet season. The microbes in canopy humus played important roles in maintaining the biodiversity of epiphytes in the canopy, and in supplying the needed nutrients for the vigorous growth of the epiphytes.

  11. Inflammasome Activity in Non-Microbial Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ather, Jennifer L.; Martin, Rebecca A.; Ckless, Karina; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of interleukin-1 (IL-1) family cytokines in inflammatory disease has rapidly developed, due in part to the discovery and characterization of inflammasomes, which are multi-subunit intracellular protein scaffolds principally enabling recognition of a myriad of cellular stimuli, leading to the activation of caspase-1 and the processing of IL-1β and IL-18. Studies continue to elucidate the role of inflammasomes in immune responses induced by both microbes and environmental factors. This review focuses on the current understanding of inflammasome activity in the lung, with particular focus on the non-microbial instigators of inflammasome activation, including inhaled antigens, oxidants, cigarette smoke, diesel exhaust particles, mineral fibers, and engineered nanomaterials, as well as exposure to trauma and pre-existing inflammatory conditions such as metabolic syndrome. Inflammasome activity in these sterile inflammatory states contribute to diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive disease, acute lung injury, ventilator-induced lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. PMID:25642415

  12. Effects of Potassium Permanganate Oxidation on Subsurface Microbial Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, Martin A.; Brubaker, Gaylen R.; Westray, Mark; Morris, Damon; Kohler, Keisha; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation has the potential for degrading large quantities of organic contaminants and can be more effective and timely than traditional ex situ treatment methods. However, there is a need to better characterize the potential effects of this treatment on natural processes. This study focuses on potential inhibition to anaerobic dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in soils from a large manufacturing facility as a result of in situ oxidation using potassium permanganate (KMn04)Previous microcosm studies established that natural attenuation occurs on-site and that it is enhanced by the addition of ethanol to the system. A potential remediation scheme for the site involves the use of potassium permanganate to reduce levels of TCE in heavily contaminated areas, then to inject ethanol into the system to "neutralize" excess oxidant and enhance microbial degradation. However, it is currently unknown whether the exposure of indigenous microbial populations to potassium permanganate may adversely affect biological reductive dechlorination by these microorganisms. Consequently, additional microcosm studies were conducted to evaluate this remediation scheme and assess the effect of potassium permanganate addition on biological reductive dechlorination of TCE. Samples of subsurface soil and groundwater were collected from a TCE-impacted area of the site. A portion of the soil was pretreated with nutrients and ethanol to stimulate microbial activity, while the remainder of the soil was left unamended. Soil/groundwater microcosms were prepared in sealed vials using the nutrient-amended and unamended soils, and the effects of potassium permanganate addition were evaluated using two permanganate concentrations (0.8 and 2.4 percent) and two contact times (1 and 3 weeks). TCE was then re-added to each microcosm and TCE and dichloroethene (DCE) concentrations were monitored to determine the degree to which microbial dechlorination occurred following chemical

  13. Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wang

    2004-11-18

    ''Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry'' focuses on the potential for microbial communities that could be active in repository emplacement drifts to influence the in-drift bulk chemical environment. This report feeds analyses to support the inclusion or exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), but this work is not expected to generate direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. The purpose was specified by, and the evaluation was performed and is documented in accordance with, ''Technical Work Plan For: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Analyses'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172402], Section 2.1). This report addresses all of the FEPs assigned by the technical work plan (TWP), including the development of exclusion arguments for FEPs that are not carried forward to the TSPA-LA. Except for an editorial correction noted in Section 6.2, there were no other deviations from the TWP. This report documents the completion of all assigned tasks, as follows (BSC 2004 DIRS 172402, Section 1.2.1): (1) Perform analyses to evaluate the potential for microbial activity in the waste emplacement drift under the constraints of anticipated physical and chemical conditions. (2) Evaluate uncertainties associated with these analyses. (3) Determine whether the potential for microbes warrants a feed to TSPA-LA to account for predicted effects on repository performance. (4) Provide information to address the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NUREG-1804) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) and Key Technical Issues and agreements, as appropriate. (5) Develop information for inclusion or exclusion of FEPs.

  14. Rain Basin Design Implications for Soil Microbial Activity and N-mineralization in a Semi-arid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, C.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rain basins have been an increasingly popular Green Infrastructure (GI) solution to the redistribution of water flow caused by urbanization. This study was conducted to examine how different approaches to basin design, specifically mulching (gravel vs. compost and gravel), influence the water availability of rain basins and the effects this has on the soil microbial activity of the basins. Soil microbes are a driving force of biogeochemical process and may impact the carbon and nitrogen dynamics of rain basin GI. In this study we sampled 12 different residential-scale rain basins, differing in design established at Biosphere 2, Arizona in 2013. Soil samples and measurements were collected before and after the onset of the monsoon season in 2014 to determine how the design of basins mediates the transition from dry to wet conditions. Soil abiotic factors were measured, such as moisture content, soil organic matter (SOM) content, texture and pH, and were related to the microbial biomass size within the basins. Field and lab potential N-mineralization and soil respiration were measured to determine how basin design influences microbial activity and N dynamics. We found that pre-monsoon basins with compost had higher moisture contents and that there was a positive correlation between the moisture content and the soil microbial biomass size of the basins. Pre-monsoon data also suggests that N-mineralization rates for basins with compost were higher than those with only gravel. These design influences on basin-scale biogeochemical dynamics and nitrogen retention may have important implications for urban biogeochemistry at neighborhood and watershed scales.

  15. Microbial solar cells: applying photosynthetic and electrochemically active organisms.

    PubMed

    Strik, David P B T B; Timmers, Ruud A; Helder, Marjolein; Steinbusch, Kirsten J J; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2011-01-01

    Microbial solar cells (MSCs) are recently developed technologies that utilize solar energy to produce electricity or chemicals. MSCs use photoautotrophic microorganisms or higher plants to harvest solar energy, and use electrochemically active microorganisms in the bioelectrochemical system to generate electrical current. Here, we review the principles and performance of various MSCs in an effort to identify the most promising systems, as well as the bottlenecks and potential solutions, for "real-life" MSC applications. We present an outlook on future applications based on the intrinsic advantages of MSCs, specifically highlighting how these living energy systems can facilitate the development of an electricity-producing green roof.

  16. Chromium Isotope Behaviour During Aerobic Microbial Reduction Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Amor, K.; Porcelli, D.; Thompson, I.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial activity is a very important, and possibly even the dominant, reduction mechanism for many metals in natural water systems. Isotope fractionations during microbial metal reduction can reflect one major mechanism in metal cycling in the environment, and isotopic signatures can be used to identify and quantify reduction processes during biogeochemical cycling in the present environment as well as in the past. There are many Cr (VI)-reducing bacteria that have been discovered and isolated from the environment, and Cr isotopes were found to be fractionated during microbial reduction processes. In this study, Cr reduction experiments have been undertaken to determine the conditions under which Cr is reduced and the corresponding isotope signals that are generated. The experiments have been done with a facultative bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300, and several parameters that have potential impact on reduction mechanisms have been investigated. Electron donors are important for bacteria growth and metabolism. One factor that can control the rate of Cr reduction is the nature of the electron donor. The results show that using citrate as an electron donor can stimulate bacteria reduction activity to a large extent; the reduction rate is much higher (15.10 mgˑL-1hour-1) compared with experiments using glucose (6.65 mgˑL-1ˑhour-1), acetate (4.88 mgˑL-1hour-1) or propionate (4.85 mgˑL-1hour-1) as electron donors. Groups with higher electron donor concentrations have higher reduction rates. Chromium is toxic, and when increasing Cr concentrations in the medium, the bacteria reduction rate is also higher, which reflects bacteria adapting to the toxic environment. In the natural environment, under different pH conditions, bacteria may metabolise in different ways. In our experiments with pH, bacteria performed better in reducing Cr (VI) when pH = 8, and there are no significant differences between groups with pH = 4 or pH = 6. To investigate this further, Cr

  17. Temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration, nitrogen mineralization, and potential soil enzyme activities in organic alpine soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Oliver; Tscherko, Dagmar; Kandeler, Ellen

    2007-12-01

    Investigations focusing on the temperature sensitivity of microbial activity and nutrient turnover in soils improve our understanding of potential effects of global warming. This study investigates the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization, N mineralization, and potential enzyme activities involved in the C and N cycle (tyrosine amino-peptidase, leucine amino-peptidase, ß-glucosidase, ß-xylosidase, N-acetyl-ß-glucosaminidase). Four different study sites in the Austrian alpine zone were selected, and soils were sampled in three seasons (summer, autumn, and winter). A simple first-order exponential equation was used to calculate constant Q10 values for the C and N mineralization over the investigated temperature range (0-30°C). The Q10 values of the C mineralization (average 2.0) for all study sites were significantly higher than for the N mineralization (average 1.7). The Q10 values of both activities were significantly negatively related to a soil organic matter quality index calculated by the ratios of respiration to the organic soil carbon and mineralized N to the total soil nitrogen. The chemical soil properties or microbial biomass did not affect the Q10 values of C and N mineralization. Moreover, the Q10 values showed no distinct pattern according to sampling date, indicating that the substrate quality and other factors are more important. Using a flexible model function, the analysis of relative temperature sensitivity (RTS) showed that the temperature sensitivity of activities increased with decreasing temperature. The C and N mineralization and potential amino-peptidase activities (tyrosine and leucine) showed an almost constant temperature dependence over 0-30°C. In contrast, ß-glucosidase, ß-xylosidase, and N-acetyl-ß-glucosaminidase showed a distinctive increase in temperature sensitivity with decreasing temperature. Low temperature at the winter sampling date caused a greater increase in the RTS of all microbial activities than for the

  18. Microbial community abundance and biomass along a 180° transect in the equatorial Pacific during an El Niño-Southern Oscillation cold phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Susan L.; Landry, Michael R.; Neveux, Jacques; Dupouy, CéCile

    2003-12-01

    As part of the French Joint Global Ocean Flux Study Etude du Broutage en Zone Equatoriale program, we investigated the distributions of microorganisms (bacteria and protists <200 μm) in the upper 120 m of the equatorial Pacific from 8°S to 8°N, along 180°. Population distributions, determined by a combination of flow cytometry, microscopy and spectrofluorometry, were closely related to physical features across the study site. Phytoplankton biomass, ranging from 1.2 to 34.2 μg C L-1 and averaging 15.5 μg C L-1, was most enhanced in the divergence zone. Carbon to chlorophyll ratios were also enhanced in the divergence zone and showed distinct latitudinal variations. Heterotrophic biomass, excluding ciliates, was patchy across the area, ranging from 5 to 36 μg C L-1 and averaging 13 μg C L-1. Prokaryotic species (Prochlorococcus spp., Synechococcus spp., and heterotrophic bacteria) showed similar patterns of abundance, with the main feature being their distributional asymmetry to the south of the equator. Both autotrophic and heterotrophic biomass were enriched in the convergent zone at 4°-5°N between the South Equatorial Current and the North Equatorial Counter Current. Heterotrophic biomass exceeded phytoplankton biomass in the more nutrient-impoverished waters to the north and in the branch of a tropical instability wave eddy. Microplankton represented only a small portion of the total autotrophic carbon and was comprised mostly of dinoflagellates. Large species dominated the relatively modest diatom biomass. Food web interactions and biogeochemical fluxes in the central equatorial Pacific may be significantly influenced by temporal and spatial variability of the microbial community associated with physical features of the region.

  19. Assessment of industrial activity in the utilization of biomass for energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    Federal programs in biomass energy are defined by identifying the status and objectives of private sector activity in the biomass field as of mid 1979. The industry's perceptions of government activites are characterized. Findings and conclusions are based principally on confidential interviews with executives in 95 companies. These included forest products companies, agricultural products companies, equipment manufacturers, electric and gas utilities, petroleum refiners and distributors, research and engineering firms, and trade organizations. The study focused on four key questions: (1) what is the composition of the biomass industry? (2) what are the companies doing? (3) what are their objectives and strategies? (4) what are the implications for government policy?

  20. Experimental warming differentially affects microbial structure and activity in two contrasted moisture sites in a Sphagnum-dominated peatland.

    PubMed

    Delarue, Frédéric; Buttler, Alexandre; Bragazza, Luca; Grasset, Laurent; Jassey, Vincent E J; Gogo, Sébastien; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Several studies on the impact of climate warming have indicated that peat decomposition/mineralization will be enhanced. Most of these studies deal with the impact of experimental warming during summer when prevalent abiotic conditions are favorable to decomposition. Here, we investigated the effect of experimental air warming by open-top chambers (OTCs) on water-extractable organic matter (WEOM), microbial biomasses and enzymatic activities in two contrasted moisture sites named Bog and Fen sites, the latter considered as the wetter ones. While no or few changes in peat temperature and water content appeared under the overall effect of OTCs, we observed that air warming smoothed water content differences and led to a decrease in mean peat temperature at the warmed Bog sites. This thermal discrepancy between the two sites led to contrasting changes in microbial structure and activities: a rise in hydrolytic activity at the warmed Bog sites and a relative enhancement of bacterial biomass at the warmed Fen sites. These features were not associated with any change in WEOM properties namely carbon and sugar contents and aromaticity, suggesting that air warming did not trigger any shift in OM decomposition. Using various tools, we show that the use of single indicators of OM decomposition can lead to fallacious conclusions. Lastly, these patterns may change seasonally as a consequence of complex interactions between groundwater level and air warming, suggesting the need to improve our knowledge using a high time-resolution approach.

  1. Metaproteomic analysis reveals microbial metabolic activities in the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Zhi; Xie, Zhang-Xian; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Wang, Ming-Hua; Zhang, Hao; Kong, Ling-Fen; Lin, Lin

    2016-04-01

    The deep sea is the largest habitat on earth and holds many and varied microbial life forms. However, little is known about their metabolic activities in the deep ocean. Here, we characterized protein profiles of particulate (>0.22 μm) and dissolved (between 10 kDa and 0.22 μm) fractions collected from the deep South China Sea using a shotgun proteomic approach. SAR324, Alteromonadales and SAR11 were the most abundant groups, while Prasinophyte contributed most to eukaryotes and cyanophage to viruses. The dominant heterotrophic activity was evidenced by the abundant transporters (33%). Proteins participating in nitrification, methanogenesis, methyltrophy and CO2 fixation were detected. Notably, the predominance of unique cellular proteins in dissolved fraction suggested the presence of membrane structures. Moreover, the detection of translation proteins related to phytoplankton indicated that other process rather than sinking particles might be the downward export of living cells. Our study implied that novel extracellular activities and the interaction of deep water with its overlying water could be crucial to the microbial world of deep sea.

  2. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  3. [Effect of plastic film mulching on soil microbial biomass in spring wheat field in semi-arid loess area].

    PubMed

    Song, Qiuhua; Li, Fengmin; Liu, Hongsheng; Wang, Jun; Li, Shiqing

    2003-09-01

    This paper studied the effect of different periods of plastic film mulching (M0-no mulching, M30-mulching for 30 days, M60-mulching for 60 days, and M-mulching for whole growth period) on soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) of spring wheat field in semi-arid loess plateau. The mean SMBC in 1999 and 2000 was 335.3 and 259.3 mg.kg-1 dry soil, respectively. It was 29.3% higher in 1999 than in 2000. The highest SMBC was recorded at the harvest stage in M treatment for the two years. In 1999, a wet year with more rainfall, the SMBC of M60 and M treatments was significantly higher than those of M0 and M30 in the mid-period of growth, reached its top at the end of the growth period. The highest grain yield was also achieved in M60. It was a dry year in 2000, but rainfall was rich in the latter growth period of spring wheat. SMBC increased at the beginning period of growth, and did not increase during the mid-growth period. It increased again during the latter period of growth, and showed a significant difference among the treatments. At the harvest stage of 2000, SMBC in M0 was the highest among all the treatments. It was similar between M and M60, and lower than that of M30. In the two years, the ratio of C/N ranged between 7.732-9.042, being lower than the threshold of 11.3, and the ratio of C/P was 300.8-719.6, being higher than the threshold of 300. The two parameters showed that the increase of SMBC was inhibited because of the competition of soil available nutrients between soil microbes and crops. These indicated that soil organic matter content was so shortage that it became the key factor to restrict crop productivity. Under this condition, increasing crop productivity through the input of chemical fertilizers would conceal the problem of soil degradation, and result in a further decrease of soil quality. A long term plastic film mulching would make the problem more serious.

  4. Signature lipid biomarkers for in situ microbial biomass, community structure and nutritional status of deep subsurface microbiota in relation to geochemical gradients. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C.; Ringelberg, D.B.

    1998-02-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the microbial ecology of the deep subsurface, it was necessary to employ alternate techniques for the identification of microorganisms in situ. Classical microbiological techniques assay only those organisms which are culturable with bias occurring towards the media selected. Since culturable microorganisms typically represents only 0.1 to 10% of the extant microbiota, techniques for the direct assay of microorganisms in situ were needed. The analysis of cellular lipid biomarkers is a technique whereby microbial communities can be assayed directly in a variety of environmental matrices. Through the quantitative recovery of lipid biomarkers, estimations of cell biomass, community composition and community nutritional and/or physiological status can be obtained.

  5. Microbial life in cold, hydrologically active oceanic crustal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J. L.; Jaekel, U.; Girguis, P. R.; Glazer, B. T.; Huber, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is estimated that at least half of Earth's microbial biomass is found in the deep subsurface, yet very little is known about the diversity and functional roles of these microbial communities due to the limited accessibility of subseafloor samples. Ocean crustal fluids, which may have a profound impact on global nutrient cycles given the large volumes of water moving through the crustal aquifer, are particularly difficult to sample. Access to uncontaminated ocean crustal fluids is possible with CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories, installed through the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Here we present the first microbiological characterization of the formation fluids from cold, oxygenated igneous crust at North Pond on the western flank of the Mid Atlantic Ridge. Fluids were collected from two CORKs installed at IODP boreholes 1382A and 1383C and include fluids from three different depth horizons within oceanic crust. Collection of borehole fluids was monitored in situ using an oxygen optode and solid-state voltammetric electrodes. In addition, discrete samples were analyzed on deck using a comparable lab-based system as well as a membrane-inlet mass spectrometer to quantify all dissolved volatiles up to 200 daltons. The instruments were operated in parallel and both in situ and shipboard geochemical measurements point to a highly oxidized fluid, revealing an apparent slight depletion of oxygen in subsurface fluids (~215μM) relative to bottom seawater (~245μM). We were unable to detect reduced hydrocarbons, e.g. methane. Cell counts indicated the presence of roughly 2 x 10^4 cells per ml in all fluid samples, and DNA was extracted and amplified for the identification of both bacterial and archaeal community members. The utilization of ammonia, nitrate, dissolved inorganic carbon, and acetate was measured using stable isotopes, and oxygen consumption was monitored to provide an estimate of the rate of respiration per cell per day

  6. Uncharted Microbial World: Microbes and Their Activities in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, Caroline; Buckley, Merry

    2007-12-31

    Microbes are the foundation for all of life. From the air we breathe to the soil we rely on for farming to the water we drink, everything humans need to survive is intimately coupled with the activities of microbes. Major advances have been made in the understanding of disease and the use of microorganisms in the industrial production of drugs, food products and wastewater treatment. However, our understanding of many complicated microbial environments (the gut and teeth), soil fertility, and biogeochemical cycles of the elements is lagging behind due to their enormous complexity. Inadequate technology and limited resources have stymied many lines of investigation. Today, most environmental microorganisms have yet to be isolated and identified, let alone rigorously studied. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium in Seattle, Washington, in February 2007, to deliberate the way forward in the study of microorganisms and microbial activities in the environment. Researchers in microbiology, marine science, pathobiology, evolutionary biology, medicine, engineering, and other fields discussed ways to build on and extend recent successes in microbiology. The participants made specific recommendations for targeting future research, improving methodologies and techniques, and enhancing training and collaboration in the field. Microbiology has made a great deal of progress in the past 100 years, and the useful applications for these new discoveries are numerous. Microorganisms and microbial products are now used in industrial capacities ranging from bioremediation of toxic chemicals to probiotic therapies for humans and livestock. On the medical front, studies of microbial communities have revealed, among other things, new ways for controlling human pathogens. The immediate future for research in this field is extremely promising. In order to optimize the effectiveness of community research efforts in the future, scientists should include manageable

  7. Soil degradation and amendment effects on soil properties, microbial communities, and plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, M.; Fehmi, J. S.; Rasmussen, C.; Gallery, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities that disrupt soil properties are fundamentally changing ecosystems. Soil degradation, caused by anthropogenic disturbance can decrease microbial abundance and activity, leading to changes in nutrient availability, soil organic matter, and plant establishment. The addition of amendments to disturbed soils have the potential ameliorate these negative consequences. We studied the effects of soil degradation, via an autoclave heat shock method, and the addition of amendments (biochar and woodchips) on microbial activity, soil carbon and nitrogen availability, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen content, and plant growth of ten plant species native to the semi-arid southwestern US. Relative to non-degraded soils, microbial activity, measured via extracellular enzyme assays, was significantly lower for all seven substrates assayed. These soils also had significantly lower amounts of carbon assimilated into microbial biomass but no change in microbial biomass nitrogen. Soil degradation had no effect on plant biomass. Amendments caused changes in microbial activity: biochar-amended soils had significant increases in potential activity with five of the seven substrates measured; woodchip amended soils had significant increases with two. Soil carbon increased with both amendments but this was not reflected in a significant change in microbial biomass carbon. Biochar-amended soils had increases in soil nitrogen availability but neither amendment caused changes in microbial biomass nitrogen. Biochar amendments had no significant effect on above- or belowground plant biomass while woodchips significantly decreased aboveground plant biomass. Results show that soil degradation decreases microbial activity and changes nutrient dynamics, but these are not reflected in changes in plant growth. Amendments provide nutrient sources and change soil pore space, which cause microbial activities to fluctuate and may, in the case of woodchips, increase plant drought

  8. Design and composition of synthetic fungal-bacterial microbial consortia that improve lignocellulolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiajun; Xue, Yiyun; Guo, Hongcheng; Gao, Min-Tian; Li, Jixiang; Zhang, Shiping; Tsang, Yiu Fai

    2017-03-01

    Microbial interactions are important for metabolism as they can improve or reduce metabolic efficiency. To improve lignocellulolytic enzyme activity, a series of synergistic microbial consortia of increasing diversity and complexity were devised using fungal strains, including Trichoderma reesei, Penicillium decumbens, Aspergillus tubingensis, and Aspergillus niger. However, when a screened microbial community with cellulolytic capacity was added to the consortia to increase the number of strains, it engendered more microbial interactions with the above strains and universally improved the β-glucosidase activity of the consortia. Analysis of the microbial community structure revealed that the bacteria in the consortia are more important for lignocellulolytic enzyme activity than the fungi. One fungal and 16 bacterial genera in the consortia may interact with T. reesei and are potential members of a devised synergistic microbial consortium. Such devised microbial consortia may potentially be applied to effectively and economically degrade lignocellulose.

  9. Antimicrobial and mosquitocidal activity of microbial synthesized silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Soni, Namita; Prakash, Soam

    2015-03-01

    Microbial synthesis of nanoparticles is a green approach that interconnects nanotechnology and microbial biotechnology. Here, we synthesized the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using bacterial strains of Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilius and Streptomyces anulatus. We tested the efficacy of AgNPs against the larvae, pupae and adults of Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus. We have also investigated the antifungal activity of AgNPs against the soil keratinophilic fungus of Chrysosporium keratinophilum. The efficacy tests were then performed at different concentrations and varying numbers of hours by probit analysis. The results were obtained using a UV-visible spectrophotometer, and the images were recorded with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The synthesized AgNPs were in varied shape and sizes. The larvae and pupae of Cx. quinquefasciatus were found highly susceptible to AgNPs synthesized using the L. monocytogenes, B. subtilius and S. anulatus than the An. stephensi, while the adults of An. stephensi were found more susceptible to the AgNPs synthesized using the L. monocytogenes, B. subtilius and S. anulatus the Cx. quinquefasciatus. Further, these nanoparticles have also been tested as antifungal activity against the entomopathogenic fungus C. keratinophilum. The higher zone of inhibition occurred at the concentration level of 50 μl. This study gives an innovative approach to develop eco-friendly AgNPs which act as an effective antifungal agent/fungicide and insecticide.

  10. Stable N isotope values of black spruce ecosystem components integrate source N isotope values, soil fertility, and microbial biomass: a natural and experimental study from Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, J. R.; Schuur, T.; Mack, M. C.; Nettelton Hollingsworth, T.; Bååth, E.

    2009-12-01

    The productivity and ecosystem dynamics of many northern ecosystems are limited by nitrogen (N) availability. Understanding N dynamics is especially important in boreal forests where slight changes in N availability can have profound effects on ecosystem productivity and diversity of plants and microbes. However, because N cycling processes vary profoundly in time and space, assessing ecosystem N supply and cycling pathways are difficult even with frequent measurements. Recent soil, plant, and fungal meta-analyses have indicated that stable isotopes of N may provide just such an integrative measure of N cycling by recording pathways of N flux through ecosystems. Here we present N stable isotope patterns across 30 plots varying in natural fertility and in 4 blocks of 16 experimentally fertilized plots of mature black spruce forest in central Alaska. We measured soil N isotope ratios of NO3, NH4, and salt extracted dissolved organic N (DON) using persulfate oxidation coupled to the bacterial denitrifier technique. The soil N isotope values varied from 15 to -26‰ across the landscape and were a poor predictor of the variability in plant N isotope values ranging from 5-11‰. Instead a combination of fungal biomass (PLFA 18:2ω6,9), fungal ingrowth, cation exchange capacity, and resin extractable phosphate (P) were better explanatory variables in a multiple regression context. This suggests that plant N isotope ratios are a product of numerous soil and microbial processes and not simply a direct reflection of source N pools. Denitrification in soils and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) assimilation and delivery of N were also likely causal as each influence pathways of N cycling that can alter the N isotope values of source and receiving pools. In contrast with the very low N environment present in our natural gradient, we found that N fertilization, both singly and in conjunction with P, caused the N isotope values of foliage, fine roots, soil N, and fungal fruiting bodies to

  11. Geophysical Monitoring of Microbial Activity within a Wetland Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, M.; Zhang, C.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.

    2007-05-01

    We performed Induced Polarization (IP) and Self Potential (SP) measurements to record the geoelectrical signatures of microbial activity within a wetland soil. The experiment was conducted in laboratory, utilizing an open flow column set up. Soil samples from Kearny Marsh (KM), a shallow water wetland, were collected and stored at 4o Celsius prior to the start of the experiment. Two columns were dry packed with a mix of KM soil and sterile Ottawa sand (50% by weight). One column was sterilized and used as a control while the other column retained the biologically active soil sample. Both columns were saturated with a minimal salts medium capable of supporting microbial life; after saturation, a steady flow rate of one pore volume per day was maintained throughout the experiment. Ambient temperature and pressure changes (at the inflow and outflow of each column) were continuously monitored throughout the experiment. Common geochemical parameters, such as Eh, pH, and fluid conductivity were measured at the inflow and outflow of each column at regular intervals. IP and SP responses were continuously recorded on both columns utilizing a series of electrodes along the column length; additionally for the SP measurements we used a reference electrode at the inflow tube. Strong SP anomalies were observed for all the locations along the active column. Black visible mineral precipitant also formed in the active column. The observed precipitation coincided with the times that SP anomalies developed at each electrode position. These responses are associated with microbial induced sulfide mineralization. We interpret the SP signal as the result of redox processes associated with this mineralization driven by gradients in ionic concentration and mobility within the column, similar to a galvanic cell mechanism. IP measurements show no correlation with these visual and SP responses. Destructive analysis of the samples followed the termination of the experiment. Scanning electron

  12. Conservation tillage, optimal water and organic nutrient supply enhance soil microbial activities during wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pankaj; Singh, Geeta; Singh, Rana P.

    2011-01-01

    The field experiments were conducted on sandy loam soil at New Delhi, during 2007 and 2008 to investigate the effect of conservation tillage, irrigation regimes (sub-optimal, optimal and supra-optimal water regimes), and integrated nutrient management (INM) practices on soil biological parameters in wheat cultivation. The conservation tillage soils has shown significant (p<0.05) increase in soil respiration (81.1%), soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) (104%) and soil dehydrogenase (DH) (59.2%) compared to the conventional tillage soil. Optimum water supply (3-irrigations) enhanced soil respiration over sub-optimum and supra-optimum irrigations by 13.32% and 79% respectively. Soil dehydrogenase (DH) activity in optimum water regime has also increased by 23.33% and 8.18% respectively over the other two irrigation regimes. Similarly, SMBC has also increased by 12.14% and 27.17% respectively in soil with optimum water supply compared to that of sub-optimum and supra-optimum water regime fields. The maximum increase in soil microbial activities is found when sole organic source (50% Farm Yard Manure+25% biofertilizer+25% Green Manure) has been used in combination with the conservation tillage and the optimum water supply. Study demonstrated that microbial activity could be regulated by tillage, water and nitrogen management in the soil in a sustainable manner. PMID:24031665

  13. Effects of surfactant and Zn (II) at various concentrations on microbial activity and ethylbenzene removal in biotricking filter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yang, Chunping; Cheng, Yan; Huang, Jian; He, Huijun; Zeng, Guangming; Lu, Li

    2013-11-01

    The effects of Tween-20, a non-ionic surfactant, and Zn (II) on microbial activity and removal performance for ethylbenzene in a biotrickling filter (BTF) were evaluated. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the surfactant and Zn (II) at various concentrations for their toxicity to microorganisms, and results indicated that Tween-20 was beneficial to microbial activity at all the tested concentration, while Zn (II) affected adversely when the concentration overpassed 5.0mgL(-1). Then effects of the two additives on removal efficiency of ethylbenzene were evaluated in a BTF at an empty-bed retention time of 30s and an ethylbenzene concentration of 1100mgm(-3). Results showed that the optimal concentrations of Tween-20 and Zn (II) were about 12 and 1.0mgL(-1), respectively. Compared to the results when neither of the two additives was added, Tween-20 improved ethylbenzene removal efficiency from 67% to 86% at the optimal condition, while on that basis, Zn (II) just increased the removal efficiency from 86% to 90%. The promoting effects of the two additives on recovering microbial activity and removing excessive biomass were also observed in this article.

  14. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, R.; Wu, C. H.; Beazley, M. J.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.; Taillefert, M.; Sobecky, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Soils and groundwater contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides remain a legacy of Cold War nuclear weapons development. Due to the scale of environmental contamination, in situ sequestration of heavy metals and radionuclides remain the most cost-effective strategy for remediation. We are currently investigating a remediation approach that utilizes periplasmic and extracellular microbial phosphatase activity of soil bacteria capable promoting in situ uranium phosphate sequestration. Our studies focus on the contaminated soils from the DOE Field Research Center (ORFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. We have previously demonstrated that ORFRC strains with phosphatase-positive phenotypes were capable of promoting the precpitation of >95% U(VI) as a low solubility phosphate mineral during growth on glycerol phosphate as a sole carbon and phosphorus source. Here we present culture-independent soil slurry studies aimed at understanding microbial community dynamics resulting from exogenous organophosphate additions. Soil slurries containing glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) or glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and nitrate as the sole C, P and N sources were incubated under oxic growth conditions at pH 5.5 or pH 6.8. Following treatments, total DNA was extracted and prokaryotic diversity was assessed using high-density 16S oligonucleotide microarray (PhyloChip) analysis. Treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G2P required 36 days to accumulate 4.8mM and 2.2 mM phosphate, respectively. In contrast, treatments at pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 amended with G3P accumulated 8.9 mM and 8.7 mM phosphate, respectively, after 20 days. A total of 2120 unique taxa representing 46 phyla, 66 classes, 110 orders, and 186 families were detected among all treatment conditions. The phyla that significantly (P<0.05) increased in abundance relative to incubations lacking organophosphate amendments included: Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Members from the classes Bacteroidetes

  15. Impact of Nano-Silver Exposure on Microbial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, V. L.; Braga, R. A., Jr.; Spiers, A. J.

    2012-04-01

    A key gap in environmental impact assessments of emerging contaminants is the change in biological activity of microorganisms exposed to toxic substances. Silver-nanoparticles are among the top cytotoxic nanomaterials suspected to threaten microbial functions of natural and engineered systems. In this study, a novel light-interference technique termed 'bio-speckle' is employed to determine real-time biological activity of monocultures and biologically complex samples. Bio-speckle uses laser illumination of biological samples to create interference patterns of the scattered light that can be used to quantify intracellular organelle movement as a measurement of biological activity. To test the potential of bio-speckle technique for toxicity assays, filter paper microcosms of the model environmental bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SBW25 were exposed to uncoated nano-silver suspensions for 2, 24, 48, and 72 hours. At the end of each exposure period, biological activity was quantitatively determined as the dynamic speckle pattern's moment of inertia. Results suggest that the biological activity of bacteria decreases exponentially with the time of exposure of the colonies to the silver nanoparticles.

  16. Do Chernobyl-like contaminations with (137)Cs and (90)Sr affect the microbial community, the fungal biomass and the composition of soil organic matter in soil?

    PubMed

    Niedrée, Bastian; Berns, Anne E; Vereecken, Harry; Burauel, Peter

    2013-04-01

    (137)Cs and (90)Sr are the main radionuclides responsible for contamination of agricultural soils due to core melts in nuclear power plants such as Chernobyl or Fukushima. The present study focused on effects of Chernobyl-like contaminations on the bacterial and fungal community structure, the fungal biomass and the formation of soil organic matter in native and in sterilized and reinoculated soils. 2% wheat straw [m/m] was applied to a typical agricultural soil, artificially contaminated with (137)Cs and (90)Sr, and it was then incubated in microcosms for three months at 20 °C and 50% of the water-holding capacity. The development of the microbial communities was monitored with 16S and 18S rDNA denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The quantification of the ergosterol content was used as a proxy for changes in the fungal biomass. Changes in the soil organic matter were determined using the (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnet resonance technique ((13)C-CP/MAS NMR). Slight but significant population shifts in the DGGE gel patterns could be related to the applied radionuclides. However, radiation-induced impacts could not be seen in either the chemical composition of the soil organic matter or in the development of the fungal biomass. Impacts caused by sterilization and reinoculation prevailed in the microcosms of the present study. Contaminations with (137)Cs or (90)Sr up to 50-fold that of the hotspots occurring in Chernobyl led to minor changes in soil microbial functions suggesting a strong resilience of natural soils with respect to radioactive contamination.

  17. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Plant Biomass and the Rhizosphere Microbial Community Structure of Mesquite Grown in Acidic Lead/Zinc Mine Tailings

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Domínguez, Fernando A.; Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M.

    2011-01-01

    Mine tailings in arid and semi-arid environments are barren of vegetation and subject to eolian dispersion and water erosion. Revegetation is a cost-effective strategy to reduce erosion processes and has wide public acceptance. A major cost of revegetation is the addition of amendments, such as compost, to allow plant establishment. In this paper we explore whether arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can help support plant growth in tailings at a reduced compost concentration. A greenhouse experiment was performed to determine the effects of three AMF inocula on biomass, shoot accumulation of heavy metals, and changes in the rhizosphere microbial community structure of the native plant Prosopis juliflora (mesquite). Plants were grown in an acidic lead/zinc mine tailings amended with 10% (w/w) compost amendment, which is slightly sub-optimal for plant growth in these tailings. After two months, AMF-inoculated plants showed increased dry biomass and root length (p < 0.05) and effective AMF colonization compared to controls grown in uninoculated compost-amended tailings. Mesquite shoot tissue lead and zinc concentrations did not exceed domestic animal toxicity limits regardless of whether AMF inoculation was used. The rhizosphere microbial community structure was assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of the small subunit RNA gene for bacteria and fungi. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of DGGE profiles showed that the rhizosphere fungal community structure at the end of the experiment was significantly different from the community structure in the tailings, compost, and AMF inocula prior to planting. Further, CCA showed that AMF inoculation significantly influenced the development of both the fungal and bacterial rhizosphere community structures after two months. The changes observed in the rhizosphere microbial community structure may be either a direct effect of the AMF inocula, caused by changes in plant physiology induced by

  18. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass and the rhizosphere microbial community structure of mesquite grown in acidic lead/zinc mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Solís-Domínguez, Fernando A; Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M

    2011-02-15

    Mine tailings in arid and semi-arid environments are barren of vegetation and subject to eolian dispersion and water erosion. Revegetation is a cost-effective strategy to reduce erosion processes and has wide public acceptance. A major cost of revegetation is the addition of amendments, such as compost, to allow plant establishment. In this paper we explore whether arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can help support plant growth in tailings at a reduced compost concentration. A greenhouse experiment was performed to determine the effects of three AMF inocula on biomass, shoot accumulation of heavy metals, and changes in the rhizosphere microbial community structure of the native plant Prosopis juliflora (mesquite). Plants were grown in an acidic lead/zinc mine tailings amended with 10% (w/w) compost amendment, which is slightly sub-optimal for plant growth in these tailings. After two months, AMF-inoculated plants showed increased dry biomass and root length (p<0.05) and effective AMF colonization compared to controls grown in uninoculated compost-amended tailings. Mesquite shoot tissue lead and zinc concentrations did not exceed domestic animal toxicity limits regardless of whether AMF inoculation was used. The rhizosphere microbial community structure was assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of the small subunit RNA gene for bacteria and fungi. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of DGGE profiles showed that the rhizosphere fungal community structure at the end of the experiment was significantly different from the community structure in the tailings, compost, and AMF inocula prior to planting. Further, CCA showed that AMF inoculation significantly influenced the development of both the fungal and bacterial rhizosphere community structures after two months. The changes observed in the rhizosphere microbial community structure may be either a direct effect of the AMF inocula, caused by changes in plant physiology induced by

  19. Response of soil microbial activity and community structure to land use changes in a mountain rainforest region of Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthast, Karin; Hamer, Ute; Makeschin, Franz

    2010-05-01

    Over the past several decades the mountain rainforest region of Southern Ecuador, a hotspot of biodiversity, is undergoing a rapid conversion to pastureland through slash and burn practice. Frequently this pastureland is invaded by the tropical bracken fern. When the bracken becomes dominant on the pasture sites the productivity decreases and the sites are abandoned. To assess the effect of these land use changes on nutrient turnover and on ecosystem functioning, a study was conducted in the area of the German research station Estación Científica San Francisco (ECSF) in Southern Ecuador. At 2000 m above sea level three adjacent sites were selected: a mountain rainforest site, an active pasture site dominated by the grass species Setaria sphacelata and an abandoned pasture site overgrown by bracken. Mineral soil samples of all three sites (0-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm) as well as samples from the organic layer (Oi and Oa) of the natural forest site were taken to analyze biogeochemical properties. Besides pH-value, total organic C and N contents, the amounts of microbial biomass (CFE-method), microbial activity (basal respiration, net N mineralization (KCl-extraction); gross N mineralization (15N dilution technique) rates) and microbial community structure (PLFA-analysis) were determined. 17 years after pasture establishment, twofold higher stocks of soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and nitrogen (Nmic) as well as significant lower C:N ratios were determined compared to the natural forest including the 11 cm thick organic layer. 10 years after bracken invasion and pasture abandonment the microbial biomass (Cmic) decreased and the C:N ratio increased again to forest levels. Generally, land use change from forest to pasture and from pasture to abandoned pasture induced shifts in the soil microbial community structure. The relative abundance of the fast growing copiotrophic Gram(-) bacteria was positively correlated with the amounts of readily available organic carbon

  20. Concurrent bio-electricity and biomass production in three Plant-Microbial Fuel Cells using Spartina anglica, Arundinella anomala and Arundo donax.

    PubMed

    Helder, M; Strik, D P B T B; Hamelers, H V M; Kuhn, A J; Blok, C; Buisman, C J N

    2010-05-01

    In a Plant Microbial Fuel Cell (P-MFC) three plants were tested for concurrent biomass and bio-electricity production and maximization of power output. Spartina anglica and Arundinella anomala concurrently produced biomass and bio-electricity for six months consecutively. Average power production of the P-MFC with S. anglica during 13weeks was 16% of the theoretical maximum power and 8% during 7weeks for A. anomala. The P-MFC with Arundo donax, did not produce electricity with a stable output, due to break down of the system. The highest obtained power density in a P-MFC was 222mW/m(2) membrane surface area with S. anglica, over twice as high as the highest reported power density in a P-MFC. High biomass yields were obtained in all P-MFC's, with a high root:shoot ratio, probably caused nutrient availability and anaerobia in the soil. Power output maximization via adjusting load on the system lead to unstable performance of the P-MFC.

  1. Restoration of areas degraded by alluvial sand mining: use of soil microbiological activity and plant biomass growth to assess evolution of restored riparian vegetation.

    PubMed

    Venson, Graziela R; Marenzi, Rosemeri C; Almeida, Tito César M; Deschamps-Schmidt, Alexandre; Testolin, Renan C; Rörig, Leonardo R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2017-03-01

    River or alluvial sand mining is causing a variety of environmental problems in the Itajaí-açú river basin in Santa Catarina State (south of Brazil). When this type of commercial activity degrades areas around rivers, environmental restoration programs need to be executed. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess the evolution of a restored riparian forest based on data on the soil microbial activity and plant biomass growth. A reference site and three sites with soil degradation were studied over a 3-year period. Five campaigns were performed to determine the hydrolysis of the soil enzyme fluorescein diacetate (FDA), and the biomass productivity was determined at the end of the studied period. The variation in the enzyme activity for the different campaigns at each site was low, but this parameter did differ significantly according to the site. Well-managed sites showed the highest biomass productivity, and this, in turn, showed a strong positive correlation with soil enzyme activity. In conclusion, soil enzyme activity could form the basis for monitoring and the early prediction of the success of vegetal restoration programs, since responses at the higher level of biological organization take longer, inhibiting the assessment of the project within an acceptable time frame.

  2. Citrate and malonate increase microbial activity and alter microbial community composition in uncontaminated and diesel-contaminated soil microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Belinda C.; George, Suman J.; Price, Charles A.; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Ball, Andrew S.; Tibbett, Mark; Ryan, Megan H.

    2016-09-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) are among the most prevalent sources of environmental contamination. It has been hypothesized that plant root exudation of low molecular weight organic acid anions (carboxylates) may aid degradation of PHCs by stimulating heterotrophic microbial activity. To test their potential implication for bioremediation, we applied two commonly exuded carboxylates (citrate and malonate) to uncontaminated and diesel-contaminated microcosms (10 000 mg kg-1; aged 40 days) and determined their impact on the microbial community and PHC degradation. Every 48 h for 18 days, soil received 5 µmol g-1 of (i) citrate, (ii) malonate, (iii) citrate + malonate or (iv) water. Microbial activity was measured daily as the flux of CO2. After 18 days, changes in the microbial community were assessed by a community-level physiological profile (CLPP) and 16S rRNA bacterial community profiles determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Saturated PHCs remaining in the soil were assessed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Cumulative soil respiration increased 4- to 6-fold with the addition of carboxylates, while diesel contamination resulted in a small, but similar, increase across all carboxylate treatments. The addition of carboxylates resulted in distinct changes to the microbial community in both contaminated and uncontaminated soils but only a small increase in the biodegradation of saturated PHCs as measured by the n-C17 : pristane biomarker. We conclude that while the addition of citrate and malonate had little direct effect on the biodegradation of saturated hydrocarbons present in diesel, their effect on the microbial community leads us to suggest further studies using a variety of soils and organic acids, and linked to in situ studies of plants, to investigate the role of carboxylates in microbial community dynamics.

  3. Promoting uranium immobilization by the activities of microbial phophatases

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2005-06-01

    The first objective of this project is to determine the relationship of phosphatase activity to metal resistance in subsurface strains and the role of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in dissemination of nonspecific acid phosphatase genes. Nonspecific acid phosphohydrolases are a broad group of secreted microbial phosphatases that function in acidic-to-neutral pH ranges and utilize a wide range of organophosphate substrates. We have previously shown that PO43- accumulation during growth on a model organophosphorus compound was attributable to the overproduction of alkaline phosphatase by genetically modified subsurface pseudomonads [Powers et al. (2002) FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 41:115-123]. During this report period, we have extended these results to include indigenous metal resistant subsurface microorganisms cultivated from the Field Research Center (FRC), in Oak Ridge Tennessee.

  4. Which Members of the Microbial Communities Are Active? Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Brandon E. L.

    only at the early stages of understanding the microbial processes that occur in petroliferous formations and the surrounding subterranean environment. Important first steps in characterising the microbiology of oilfield systems involve identifying the microbial community structure and determining how population diversity changes are affected by the overall geochemical and biological parameters of the system. This is relatively easy to do today by using general 16S rRNA primers for PCR and building clone libraries. For example, previous studies using molecular methods characterised many dominant prokaryotes in petroleum reservoirs (Orphan et al., 2000) and in two Alaskan North Slope oil facilities (Duncan et al., 2009; Pham et al., 2009). However, the problem is that more traditional molecular biology approaches, such as 16S clone libraries, fail to detect large portions of the community perhaps missing up to half of the biodiversity (see Hong et al., 2009) and require significant laboratory time to construct large libraries necessary to increase the probability of detecting the majority of even bacterial biodiversity. In the energy sector, the overarching desire would be to quickly assess the extent of in situ hydrocarbon biodegradation or to disrupt detrimental processes such as biofouling, and in these cases it may not be necessary to identify specific microbial species. Rather, it would be more critical to evaluate metabolic processes or monitor gene products that are implicated in the specific activity of interest. Research goals such as these are well suited for a tailored application of microarray technology.

  5. Soluble microbial products (SMPs) release in activated sludge systems: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the characterization, production and implications of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in biological wastewater treatment. The precise definition of SMPs is open to talk about, but is currently regarded as “the pool of organic compounds that are released into solution from substrate metabolism and biomass decay”'. Some of the SMPs have been identified as humic acids, polysaccharides, proteins, amino acids, antibiotics, extracellular enzymes and structural components of cells and products of energy metabolism. They adversely affect the kinetic activity, flocculating and settling properties of sludge. This review outlines some important findings with regard to biodegradability and treatability of SMPs and also the effect of process parameters on their production. As SMPs are produced during biological treatment process, their trace amounts normally remain in the effluent that defines the highest COD removal efficiency. Their presence in effluent represents a high potential risk of toxic by-product formation during chlorine disinfection. Studies have indicated that among all wastewater post-treatment processes, the adsorption by granular activated carbon combined with biologically induced degradation is the most effective method for removal of SMPs. However, it may be concludes that the knowledge regarding SMPs is still under progress and more work is required to fully understand their contribution to the treatment process. PMID:23369231

  6. Soluble microbial products (SMPs) release in activated sludge systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Azami, Hamed; Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Mehrnia, Mohammad Reza

    2012-12-18

    This review discusses the characterization, production and implications of soluble microbial products (SMPs) in biological wastewater treatment. The precise definition of SMPs is open to talk about, but is currently regarded as "the pool of organic compounds that are released into solution from substrate metabolism and biomass decay"'. Some of the SMPs have been identified as humic acids, polysaccharides, proteins, amino acids, antibiotics, extracellular enzymes and structural components of cells and products of energy metabolism. They adversely affect the kinetic activity, flocculating and settling properties of sludge. This review outlines some important findings with regard to biodegradability and treatability of SMPs and also the effect of process parameters on their production. As SMPs are produced during biological treatment process, their trace amounts normally remain in the effluent that defines the highest COD removal efficiency. Their presence in effluent represents a high potential risk of toxic by-product formation during chlorine disinfection. Studies have indicated that among all wastewater post-treatment processes, the adsorption by granular activated carbon combined with biologically induced degradation is the most effective method for removal of SMPs. However, it may be concludes that the knowledge regarding SMPs is still under progress and more work is required to fully understand their contribution to the treatment process.

  7. Geoelectrical measurement and modeling of biogeochemical breakthrough behavior during microbial activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slater, L.D.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; O'Brien, M.; Yee, N.

    2009-01-01

    We recorded bulk electrical conductivity (??b) along a soil column during microbially-mediated selenite oxyanion reduction. Effluent fluid electrical conductivity and early time ??b were modeled according to classic advectivedispersive transport of the nutrient medium. However, ??b along the column exhibited strongly bimodal breakthrough which cannot be explained by changes in the electrical conductivity of the pore fluid. We model the anomalous breakthrough by adding a conduction path in parallel with the fluid phase, with a time dependence described by a microbial population-dynamics model. We incorporate a delay time to show that breakthrough curves along the column satisfy the same growth model parameters and offer a possible explanation based on biomass-limited growth that is delayed with distance from influent of the nutrient medium. Although the mechanism causing conductivity enhancement in the presence of biomass is uncertain, our results strongly , suggest that biogeochemical breakthrough curves have been captured in geoelectrical datasets. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Interactions between properties of amended strip mine spoils and microbial activities

    SciTech Connect

    Utsalo, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Properties of strip mine spoils before and after amendment with varying levels of carbon and nitrogen sources are characterized and compared with properties of similarly amended garden soil samples. Changes in spoils as reflected in the stimulation of microbial populations, rate of nitrate formation, the turnover of microbial biomass and the growth yields of white clover and rye grass are evaluated. Limed spoils and garden soils were fertilized and incubated at 25/sup 0/C following amendments with organic substrates. Changes in parameters related to soil fertility status were analyzed on a weekly basis. The possible identity and the toxic effects on white clover and a Rhizobium of acidity factors present in strip mine spoils were evaluated using soil experiments and pure culture studies in artificial culture media. The results indicate that acid spoils contain low numbers of viable microorganisms which readily respond to soil amendment with substrates. No nitrification occurs in acid spoils but liming and inoculation with compost infusion stimulate active nitrification. Aluminum, manganese and acidity appear to be important factors which inhibit the survival of plants and microbes in spoils. Adequate liming improves rhizobial survival and growth and nodulation of white clover in spoils. Acidity factors have greater impact on Rhizobium than on the white clover host under nutritionally independent conditions. Increase in inoculum size enhances nodulation and growth of clover at low aluminum levels. Reducing the time of exposure of rhizobia to acidity factors outside the symbiotic host does not appear to enhance the growth yield of clover under symbiotic conditions. Molds appear to contribute more to the increased aggregate stability observed in amended soils than bacteria and actinomycetes.

  9. Mesophilic and Thermophilic Conditions Select for Unique but Highly Parallel Microbial Communities to Perform Carboxylate Platform Biomass Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Emily B.; Forrest, Andrea K.; Wilkinson, Heather H.; Ebbole, Daniel J.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Holtzapple, Mark T.; Gentry, Terry J.

    2012-01-01

    The carboxylate platform is a flexible, cost-effective means of converting lignocellulosic materials into chemicals and liquid fuels. Although the platform's chemistry and engineering are well studied, relatively little is known about the mixed microbial communities underlying its conversion processes. In this study, we examined the metagenomes of two actively fermenting platform communities incubated under contrasting temperature conditions (mesophilic 40°C; thermophilic 55°C), but utilizing the same inoculum and lignocellulosic feedstock. Community composition segregated by temperature. The thermophilic community harbored genes affiliated with Clostridia, Bacilli, and a Thermoanaerobacterium sp, whereas the mesophilic community metagenome was composed of genes affiliated with other Clostridia and Bacilli, Bacteriodia, γ-Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Although both communities were able to metabolize cellulosic materials and shared many core functions, significant differences were detected with respect to the abundances of multiple Pfams, COGs, and enzyme families. The mesophilic metagenome was enriched in genes related to the degradation of arabinose and other hemicellulose-derived oligosaccharides, and the production of valerate and caproate. In contrast, the thermophilic community was enriched in genes related to the uptake of cellobiose and the transfer of genetic material. Functions assigned to taxonomic bins indicated that multiple community members at either temperature had the potential to degrade cellulose, cellobiose, or xylose and produce acetate, ethanol, and propionate. The results of this study suggest that both metabolic flexibility and functional redundancy contribute to the platform's ability to process lignocellulosic substrates and are likely to provide a degree of stability to the platform's fermentation processes. PMID:22761870

  10. Microbial Activity in the Subseafloor Sediments of ODP Leg 201

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Honst, S.; Joergensen, B. B.; Blake, R.; Dickens, G.; Hinrichs, K.; Holm, N.; Mitterer, R.; Spivack, A.

    2002-12-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201 was the first ocean drilling expedition dedicated to the study of life deep beneath the seafloor. Its equatorial Pacific and Peru Margin sites were selected to represent the general range of subsurface environments that exists in marine sediments throughout most of the world's oceans. In water depths as great as 5300 meters and as shallow as 150 meters, the expedition drilled up to 420 meters into oceanic sediments and the underlying basaltic crust. The sediments ranged in temperature from 1° C to 25° C and in age from 0 to almost 40 million years. Leg 201 scientists found biogeochemical evidence of metabolic activity throughout the sediment column at every site. This activity is supported at all sites by the diffusion of sulfate down from the overlying ocean, as well as by the dissolution of iron- and manganese-bearing minerals. At the open ocean sites, metabolic activity deep beneath the seafloor is also supported by the transport of sulfate, nitrate and oxygen from water circulating through the underlying basaltic crust. At both the open ocean sites and the Peru margin sites, multiple metabolic activities (sulfate reduction, iron reduction, manganese reduction and methanogenesis) co-occur. Chemical flux estimates suggest that sulfate is generally the principal terminal electron acceptor in these subseafloor sediments. However, at the open ocean sites with the lowest rates of microbial respiration, manganese may rival sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. The recovered sediments and fluids are being studied further to document the controls on rates of subsurface activity, the influence of past oceanographic conditions on current activity in deeply buried sediments, and the effects of subseafloor biogeochemical processes on Earth's surface world.

  11. [Effects of long-term fertilization on microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen and on carbon source utilization of microbes in a red soil].

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng-xia; Zhang, Wei-hua; Xu, Ming-gang; Zhang, Wen-ju; Li, Zhao-qiang; Zhang, Jing-ye

    2010-11-01

    In order to explore the effects of long-term fertilization on the microbiological characters of red soil, soil samples were collected from a 19-year long-term experimental field in Qiyang of Hunan, with their microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN) and microbial utilization ratio of carbon sources analyzed. The results showed that after 19-year fertilization, the soil MBC and MBN under the application of organic manure and of organic manure plus inorganic fertilizers were 231 and 81 mg x kg(-1) soil, and 148 and 73 mg x kg(-1) soil, respectively, being significantly higher than those under non-fertilization, inorganic fertilization, and inorganic fertilization plus straw incorporation. The ratio of soil MBN to total N under the application of organic manure and of organic manure plus inorganic fertilizers was averagely 6.0%, significantly higher than that under non-fertilization and inorganic fertilization. Biolog-ECO analysis showed that the average well color development (AWCD) value was in the order of applying organic manure plus inorganic fertilizers = applying organic manure > non-fertilization > inorganic fertilization = inorganic fertilization plus straw incorporation. Under the application of organic manure or of organic manure plus inorganic fertilizers, the microbial utilization rate of carbon sources, including carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, amino acids, polymers, phenols, and amines increased; while under inorganic fertilization plus straw incorporation, the utilization rate of polymers was the highest, and that of carbohydrates was the lowest. Our results suggested that long-term application of organic manure could increase the red soil MBC, MBN, and microbial utilization rate of carbon sources, improve soil fertility, and maintain a better crop productivity.

  12. DMPP-added nitrogen fertilizer affects soil N2O emission and microbial activity in Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Luca; De Marco, Anna; Maglione, Giuseppe; Polimeno, Franca; Di Tommasi, Paul; Magliulo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    Arable sites contributes to global N2O emission due to massive utilization of nitrogen fertilizers. N2O derives from the biological processes such as nitrification and denitrification influenced by soil nitrogen availability. The use of nitrogen fertilizers added with nitrification inhibitors represents one among the proposed strategy to reduce soil N2O emission form arable sites. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 3,4-dimethylphyrazole phosphate (DMPP), a nitrification inhibitor, on N2O emission and microbial activity of a soil cropped to potato in Southern Italy. The experiment was a randomized block design with two treatments applied and three replicates: control (C) and DMPP (Entec®, K+S Nitrogen) plots, both supplied with the same amount of ammonium nitrate. The nitrogen fertilizer was supplied in three events: at 0 Day After Sowing (DAS; 100 kg N ha-1), at 57 DAS (30 kg N ha-1), and at 71 DAS (30 kg N ha-1). Soil N2O emission was monitored by both dynamic and static chambers. Static chambers were located both on hills and furrows whereas dynamic chambers were located on furrows. Air samples were collected from chambers at different times and analysed by a gas chromatograph (SRI 8610C, Gas Chromatograph). Fluxes were estimated as a linear interpolation of N2O changes over a 30 min time. Microbial biomass and basal respiration were determined as CO2 evolution, analysed by means of an IRGA (Li6200, Licor), on 2 g of fresh soil over a 4h incubation time. Microbial biomass was determined by Substrate Induced Respiration method. Data show no statistical differences in N2O fluxes measured with either dynamic chambers between C and DMPP plots in studied period. However, after the first fertilization event, when the fertilizer was applied as 100 kg N ha-1, the average N2O fluxes measured with static chambers were higher in DMPP plots compared to C plots. In the same period, the microbial biomass significantly decreased in DMPP plots as compared to C

  13. Comparison of electrode reduction activities of Geobacter sulfurreducens and an enriched consortium in an air-cathode microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Shun'ichi; Watanabe, Kazuya; Yabuki, Soichi; Logan, Bruce E; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2008-12-01

    An electricity-generating bacterium, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA, was inoculated into a single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) in order to determine the maximum electron transfer rate from bacteria to the anode. To create anodic reaction-limiting conditions, where electron transfer from bacteria to the anode is the rate-limiting step, anodes with electrogenic biofilms were reduced in size and tests were conducted using anodes of six different sizes. The smallest anode (7 cm(2), or 1.5 times larger than the cathode) achieved an anodic reaction-limiting condition as a result of a limited mass of bacteria on the electrode. Under these conditions, the limiting current density reached a maximum of 1,530 mA/m(2), and power density reached a maximum of 461 mW/m(2). Per-biomass efficiency of the electron transfer rate was constant at 32 fmol cell(-1) day(-1) (178 micromol g of protein(-1) min(-1)), a rate comparable to that with solid iron as the electron acceptor but lower than rates achieved with fumarate or soluble iron. In comparison, an enriched electricity-generating consortium reached 374 micromol g of protein(-1) min(-1) under the same conditions, suggesting that the consortium had a much greater capacity for electrode reduction. These results demonstrate that per-biomass electrode reduction rates (calculated by current density and biomass density on the anode) can be used to help make better comparisons of electrogenic activity in MFCs.

  14. Soil microbial diversity and activity as terroir elements of Sangiovese vineyards in the Chianti Classico region (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiani, Arturo; Mocali, Stefano; Priori, Simone; Valboa, Giuseppe; Vignozzi, Nadia; Pellegrini, Sergio; Storchi, Paolo; Perria, Rita; Costantini, Edoardo

    2016-04-01

    Linking the uniqueness and quality of grapes and wine to the environment they are produced, based on the terroir concept, have recently become popular in many parts of world. The natural components of terroir are actually a set of processes, which together create a delicate equilibrium and regulation of its effect on products in both space and time. Climate, geology, geomorphology and soil are therefore the main environmental factors which make up the terroir effect on different scales. However, information on the impact of soil microbial communities on soil functions, grapevine plants and wine quality is still lacking. Thus, four of the most suitable areas (so called "cru") for the production of Sangiovese wine were chosen within the Barone Ricasoli farm of Brolio, the largest winery in the Chianti Classico area in central Italy: Fattoio, Miniera, Ceni and Colli-Agresto. Based on previous pedological and sensing technologies surveys, each area was further divided into two distinct homogeneous areas of about 1.5 ha called Basic Terroir Unit (UTB), which were monitored over 3 years (2012-2014) for the soil the chemical-physical variability (moisture, organic matter, nitrogen, potassium), the vineyard physiological status (water stress, grape production, characteristics of the grapes and wine) and the structure and activity of soil microbial communities (determined through DGGE, soil respiration and microbial biomass, respectively). The aim of the work was to assess the relationships among soil parameters and vine quality at intra- and inter- UTB level and, in particular, the potential impact of microbial composition and/or function on the terroir concept. The overall results highlighted a microbial community structure specific for each cru area and, in particular, associated to each UTB. Furthermore, microbial activity in Miniera and Ceni appeared to be positively related to Sangiovese quality, as determined through the Sangiovese Performance Index. However, except

  15. Thermophilic and cellulolytic consortium isolated from composting plants improves anaerobic digestion of cellulosic biomass: Toward a microbial resource management approach.

    PubMed

    Kinet, R; Destain, J; Hiligsmann, S; Thonart, P; Delhalle, L; Taminiau, B; Daube, G; Delvigne, F

    2015-01-01

    A cellulolytic consortium was i