Science.gov

Sample records for active microwave measurements

  1. Active microwave measurement of soil water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Cihlar, J.; Moore, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of radar backscatter from bare soil at 4.7, 5.9, and 7.1 GHz for incident angles of 0-70 deg have been analyzed to determine sensitivity to soil moisture. Because the effective depth of penetration of the radar signal is only about one skin depth, the observed signals were correlated with the moisture in a skin depth as characterized by the attenuation coefficient (reciprocal of skin depth). Since the attenuation coefficient is a monotonically increasing function of moisture density, it may also be used as a measure of moisture content over the distance involved, which varies with frequency and moisture content. The measurements show an approximately linear increase in scattering with attenuation coefficient of the soil at angles within 10 deg of vertical and all frequencies. At 4.7 GHz this increase continues relatively large out to 70 deg incidence, but by 7.1 GHz the sensitivity is much less even at 20 deg and practically gone at 50 deg.

  2. A Comparison between Lightning Activity and Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kevin, Driscoll T.; Hugh, Christian J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    1999-01-01

    A recent examination of data from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) suggests that storm with the highest frequency of lightning also possess the most pronounced microwave scattering signatures at 37 and 85 GHz. This study demonstrates a clear dependence between lightning and the passive microwave measurements, and accentuates how direct the relationship really is between cloud ice and lightning activity. In addition, the relationship between the quantity of ice content and the frequency of lightning (not just the presence of lightning) , is consistent throughout the seasons in a variety of regimes. Scatter plots will be presented which show the storm-averaged brightness temperatures as a function of the lightning density of the storms (L/Area) . In the 85 GHz and 37 GHz scatter plots, the brightness temperature is presented in the form Tb = k1 x log10(L/Area) + k2, where the slope of the regression, k1, is 58 for the 85 GHz relationship and 30.7 for the 37 GHz relationship. The regression for both these fits showed a correlation of 0.76 (r2 = 0.58), which is quite promising considering the simple procedure used to make the comparisons, which have not yet even been corrected for the view angle differences between the instruments, or the polarization corrections in the microwave imager.

  3. Active and passive microwave measurements of soil moisture in FIFE

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.R. ); Gogineni, S.P.; Ampe, J. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. This paper reports on the application of active and passive microwave measurement systems to the simultaneous determination of soil moisture. These systems have been tested on common targets very few times. Here C and X band scatterometer data from a helicopter base is compared with L band push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR) data taken from the NASA C-130 aircraft. The regions sampled over FIFE encompass areas with different surface treatments. The scatterometers proved to be sensitive to soil moisture over most of the areas studied, while the radiometer lost sensitivity in regions which had been unburned for years, and which thus had substantial dead organic accumulation. The correlation of soil moisture and backscattered signal was observed to increase with off normal angles.

  4. Utilization of active microwave roughness measurements to improve passive microwave soil moisture estimates over bare soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theis, S. W.; Blanchard, B. J.; Blanchard, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    Multisensor aircraft data were used to establish the potential of the active microwave sensor response to be used to compensate for roughness in the passive microwave sensor's response to soil moisture. Only bare fields were used. It is found that the L-band radiometer's capability to estimate soil moisture significantly improves when surface roughness is accounted for with the scatterometers.

  5. Utilization of active microwave roughness measurements to improve passive microwave soil moisture estimates over bare soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theis, S. W.; Blanchard, A. J.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    Multisensor aircraft data were used to establish the potential of the active microwave sensor response to be used to compensate for roughness in the passive microwave sensor's response to soil moisture. Only bare fields were used. It is found that the L-band radiometer's capability to estimate soil moisture significantly improves when surface roughness is accounted for with the scatterometers.

  6. Active microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1994-01-01

    Research on the use of active microwaves in remote sensing, presented during plenary and poster sessions, is summarized. The main highlights are: calibration techniques are well understood; innovative modeling approaches have been developed which increase active microwave applications (segmentation prior to model inversion, use of ERS-1 scatterometer, simulations); polarization angle and frequency diversity improves characterization of ice sheets, vegetation, and determination of soil moisture (X band sensor study); SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry potential is emerging; use of multiple sensors/extended spectral signatures is important (increase emphasis).

  7. Active and passive microwave measurements of soil moisture in FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Gogineni, S. P.; Ampe, J.

    1992-01-01

    During the intensive field campaigns of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) in May-October of 1987, several nearly simultaneous measurements were made with low-altitude flights of the L-band radiometer and C- and X-band scatterometers over two transects in the Konza Prairie Natural Research Area, some 8 km south of Manhattan, Kansas. These measurements showed that although the scatterometers were sensitive to soil moisture variations in most regions under the flight path, the L-band radiometer lost most of its sensitivity in regions unburned for many years. The correlation coefficient derived from the regression between the radar backscattering coefficient and the soil moisture was found to improve with the increase in antenna incidence angle. This is attributed to a steeper falloff of the backscattering coefficient as a function of local incidence at angles near nadir than at angles greater than 30 deg.

  8. NASA's Potential Contributions to Avalanche Forecasting Using Active and Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir

    2007-01-01

    This Candidate Solution is based on using active and passive microwave measurements acquired from NASA satellites to improve USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) Forest Service forecasting of avalanche danger. Regional Avalanche Centers prepare avalanche forecasts using ground measurements of snowpack and mountain weather conditions. In this Solution, range of the in situ observations is extended by adding remote sensing measurements of snow depth, snow water equivalent, and snowfall rate acquired by satellite missions that include Aqua, CloudSat, future GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement), and the proposed SCLP (Snow and Cold Land Processes). Measurements of snowpack conditions and time evolution are improved by combining the in situ and satellite observations with a snow model. Recurring snow observations from NASA satellites increase accuracy of avalanche forecasting, which helps the public and the managers of public facilities make better avalanche safety decisions.

  9. Identifying the Influence of Variable Ice Types on Passive and Active Microwave Measurements for the Purpose of SWE Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, G. E.; Duguay, C. R.; Derksen, C.

    2010-12-01

    Dual polarized airborne passive microwave (PM) brightness temperatures (Tbs) at 6.9, 19 and 37 GHz H/V and satellite X-band (9.65 GHz VV/VH) active microwave backscatter measurements were combined with coincident in-situ measurements of snow and ice characteristics to determine the potential of unique emission/interaction caused by variable ice properties. Algorithms designed to estimate snow water equivalent (SWE) using the common brightness temperature difference approach (37GHz - 19 GHz) continually underestimate in-situ levels when applied to pure-ice pixels in the Canadian subarctic. Ice thickness measurements were positively correlated with 19 GHz vertically polarised (V pol) passive microwave emissions (R= 0.67), and negatively with 19 GHz horizontally polarised (H pol) emissions (R = -0.79), indicating that surface conditions at the ice/snow interface affect the emissivity at H pol. This study examines the effect of ice types on coincident passive and active microwave measurements for free-floating ice in two lakes (Sitidgi, Husky Lakes). Ice types are delineated using the SAR segmentation program MAGIC (MAp Guided Ice Classification) that has previously been used to characterize sea ice types. Based on output ice types produced by MAGIC, the relationship between active and passive microwave measurements is examined. Output ice classes corresponded well to those measured at coincident in-situ sampling sites. Emissions at 19 GHz H and cross-polarised X-band backscatter (9.65 GHz) increase coincident to ice types that exhibit more scattering potential. Clear ice exhibits the lowest return, followed by a transition zone between clear ice and grey ice. Grey ice exhibits higher returns as a result of the inclusion of spherical air bubbles, followed by rafted ice, which exhibits an excess of scattering potential. Concurrently, transects of dual polarized 6.9 and 19 GHz PM Tbs exhibited a positive relationship with cross-polarized active microwave backscatter (VH

  10. Active microwave measurements of sea ice under fall conditions: The RADARSAT/FIREX fall experiment. [in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, R. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Moore, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    A series of measurements of the active microwave properties of sea ice under fall growing conditions was conducted. Ice in the inland waters of Mould Bay, Crozier Channel, and intrepid inlet and ice in the Arctic Ocean near Hardinge Bay was investigated. Active microwave data were acquired using a helicopter borne scatterometer. Results show that multiyear ice frozen in grey or first year ice is easily detected under cold fall conditions. Multiyear ice returns were dynamic due to response to two of its scene constituents. Floe boundaries between thick and thin ice are well defined. Multiyear pressure ridge returns are similar in level to background ice returns. Backscatter from homogeneous first year ice is seen to be primarily due to surface scattering. Operation at 9.6 GHz is more sensitive to the detailed changes in scene roughness, while operation at 5.6 GHz seems to track roughness changes less ably.

  11. Temperature measurement during microwave cooking.

    PubMed

    Mullin, J; Bows, J

    1993-01-01

    Product development of microwavable foods originally suffered from a high degree of non-uniform heating which is generic in microwave heating. Typically, foods have suffered from either overheated edges or under heated centres. This was compounded by short reheat times which allowed little opportunity for temperature equilibration. A crucial step in overcoming this problem has been the understanding provided from time-temperature data. Conventional temperature measurements by thermocouple, etc. are inappropriate in microwave cooking due to the high electric fields which are present (ca 15 kV/m). The result is either very significant interference, or even failure of the sensor. Therefore, alternative methods were developed to meet the need, some of which are discussed in this paper. One such measurement system is the now commonplace fibre optic probe, originally from Luxtron. The discrete data provided from this system are compared with the surface imaging data delivered by thermal imaging. These techniques are discussed in the context of microwave packaging materials heated in situ in a microwave oven and the need for temperature data as a basis for establishing testing regimes.

  12. Applications of active microwave imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, F. P.; Childs, L. F.; Gilbert, R.; Harlan, J. C.; Hoffer, R. M.; Miller, J. M.; Parsons, J.; Polcyn, F.; Schardt, B. B.; Smith, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics were discussed in reference to active microwave applications: (1) Use of imaging radar to improve the data collection/analysis process; (2) Data collection tasks for radar that other systems will not perform; (3) Data reduction concepts; and (4) System and vehicle parameters: aircraft and spacecraft.

  13. Microwave-assisted regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-09-01

    Microwave heating was used in the regeneration of methylene blue-loaded activated carbons produced from fibers (PFAC), empty fruit bunches (EFBAC) and shell (PSAC) of oil palm. The dye-loaded carbons were treated in a modified conventional microwave oven operated at 2450 MHz and irradiation time of 2, 3 and 5 min. The virgin properties of the origin and regenerated activated carbons were characterized by pore structural analysis and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement and determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue (MB). Microwave irradiation preserved the pore structure, original active sites and adsorption capacity of the regenerated activated carbons. The carbon yield and the monolayer adsorption capacities for MB were maintained at 68.35-82.84% and 154.65-195.22 mg/g, even after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. The findings revealed the potential of microwave heating for regeneration of spent activated carbons.

  14. DSS-24 microwave holography measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.; Withington, P. M.; Jackson, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The JPL DSN Microwave Antenna Holography System (MAHST) was applied to the newly constructed DSS-24 34-m beam-waveguide antenna at Goldstone, California. The application of MAHST measurements and corrections at DSS 24 provided the critical RF performance necessary to not only meet the project requirements and goals, but to surpass them. A performance increase of 0.35 dB at X-band (8.45 GHz) and 4.9 dB at Ka-band (32 GHz) was provided by MAHST, resulting in peak efficiencies of 75.25 percent at X-band and 60.6 percent at Ka-band (measured from the Cassegrain focus at f1). The MAHST enabled setting the main reflector panels of DSS 24 to 0.25-mm rms, making DSS 24 the highest precision antenna in the NASA/JPL DSN. The precision of the DSS-24 antenna (diameter/rms) is 1.36 x 10(exp 5), and its gain limit is at 95 GHz.

  15. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 1 - Microwave remote sensing fundamentals and radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The three components of microwave remote sensing (sensor-scene interaction, sensor design, and measurement techniques), and the applications to geoscience are examined. The history of active and passive microwave sensing is reviewed, along with fundamental principles of electromagnetic wave propagation, antennas, and microwave interaction with atmospheric constituents. Radiometric concepts are reviewed, particularly for measurement problems for atmospheric and terrestrial sources of natural radiation. Particular attention is given to the emission by atmospheric gases, clouds, and rain as described by the radiative transfer function. Finally, the operation and performance characteristics of radiometer receivers are discussed, particularly for measurement precision, calibration techniques, and imaging considerations.

  16. Microwave radiometry for cement kiln temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Karl D; Wang, Lingyun; Ryza, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The maximum temperature inside a cement kiln is a critical operating parameter, but is often difficult or impossible to measure. We present here the first data that show a correlation between cement kiln temperature measured using a microwave radiometer and product chemistry over an eight-hour period. The microwave radiometer senses radiation in the 12-13 GHz range and has been described previously [Stephan and Pearce (2002), JMPEE 37: 112-124].

  17. High Precision Noise Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Eugene; Tobar, Michael

    2009-04-23

    We describe microwave noise measurement system capable of detecting the phase fluctuations of rms amplitude of 2{center_dot}10{sup -11} rad/{radical}(Hz). Such resolution allows the study of intrinsic fluctuations in various microwave components and materials, as well as precise tests of fundamental physics. Employing this system we discovered a previously unknown phenomenon of down-conversion of pump oscillator phase noise into the low-frequency voltage fluctuations.

  18. Microwave techniques for physical property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M.

    1993-01-01

    Industrial processing of metals and ceramics is now being streamlined by the development of theoretical models. High temperature thermophysical properties of these materials are required to successfully apply these theories. Unfortunately, there is insufficient experimental data available for many of these properties, particularly in the molten state. Microwave fields can be used to measure specific heat, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and dielectric constants at high temperatures. We propose to (1) develop a microwave flash method (analogous to the laser flash technique) that can simultaneously measure the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of insulators and semiconductors at high temperatures, (2) an appropriate theory and experimental apparatus to demonstrate the measurement of the specific heat of a metal using a new microwave ac specific heat technique, and (3) experimental methods for noncontact measurement of the real and imaginary dielectric constants.

  19. Microwave-induced thermogenetic activation of single cells

    SciTech Connect

    Safronov, N. A.; Fedotov, I. V.; Ermakova, Yu. G.; Matlashov, M. E.; Belousov, V. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-04-20

    Exposure to a microwave field is shown to enable thermogenetic activation of individual cells in a culture of cell expressing thermosensitive ion channels. Integration of a microwave transmission line with an optical fiber and a diamond quantum thermometer has been shown to allow thermogenetic single-cell activation to be combined with accurate local online temperature measurements based on an optical detection of electron spin resonance in nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond.

  20. Summary of the active microwave users workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A coordinated microwave applications development program was initiated to improve the capability to: (1) identify, monitor, and assess the earth's resources; and (2) monitor the earth's environment and predict significant changes. The program consists of the scientific, technical, and programmatic activities required to develop microwave remote sensing into an operational tool for systematic earth observations.

  1. Radar Microwave Link (RML) electromagnetic compatibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. G.

    1980-03-01

    Two different microwave relay transmitter and receiver combinations operating in the frequency ranges of 7.125 to 8.4 GHz and 14.4 to 15.25 GHz were tested. Measurements to determine interference characteristics included: receiver off channel rejection; receiver intermodulation; transmitter spectrums; transmitter intermodulation; and second harmonics. Results indicate that adjacent frequency spacing should be at least 20 MHz and 50 MHz for radar microwave link-4 and TerraCom equipment, respectively. Additional measurements are rec-om-mended on new equipment in the 14.4 to 15.25 GHz range for valid criteria for the handbook in preparation.

  2. Microwave soil moisture measurements and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W.; Howell, T. A.; Nieber, J. L.; Vanbavel, C. H. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    An effort to develop a model that simulates the distribution of water content and of temperature in bare soil is documented. The field experimental set up designed to acquire the data to test this model is described. The microwave signature acquisition system (MSAS) field measurements acquired in Colby, Kansas during the summer of 1978 are pesented.

  3. Microwave moisture measurement for wood drying

    SciTech Connect

    Moschler, William W; Hanson, Gregory R; Gee, Timothy Felix; Killough, Stephen M; Wilgen, John B

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a prototype moisture sensor system suitable for a hardwood dry kiln based on the microwave transmission measurements of the complex dielectric constant of the wood. In this project, prototypes of two designs of microwave-based moisture sensor probes (launchers) working in the frequency range from 4.5 GHz to 6 GHz were developed and tested. A prototype set of battery powered electronics that both provides the microwave excitation and records the amplitude and phase of the returned signal after passing through the wood was built and tested. The sensors and electronics built in this project allow a swept frequency microwave transmission measurement through a small area of a board. Using the prototype electronics and launchers, measurements of moisture content (MC) over a range of 6 percent to 70 percent MC for red oak and 6 percent to 100 percent for yellow-poplar with standard deviations of less than 1.5 percent MC have been obtained.

  4. Multifrequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Oneill, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometer experiments are carried out to investigate the effects of moisture, temperature, and roughness on microwave emission from bare soils. The measurements are made at frequencies of 0.6-0.9, 1.4, and 10.7 GHz using van-mounted radiometers to observe prepared soil sites in Kern County, CA. Brightness temperature variations of approximately 15 K at 1.4 GHz and 25 K at 10.7 GHz are observed as a result of diurnal changes in the soil temperature. Increasing the soil moisture content from 2% to 15% by volume is found to result in brightness temperature decreases of approximately 70 K at 0.775 and 1.4 GHz and 40 K at 10.7 GHz, depending, to a lesser extent, on polarization and viewing angle. The results attest the significance of soil temperature in deriving soil moisture from microwave radiometer measurements. Comparisons of the microwave measurements with theoretical predictions using smooth surface models give reasonable agreement and support previous results of this nature obtained with other soil types.

  5. IR temperature measurements in microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccurullo, G.; Berardi, P. G.; Carfagna, R.; Pierro, V.

    2002-06-01

    In this paper a technique for the evaluation of the dielectric constant of a sample placed inside a microwave oven and confined in a cylindrical box is proposed. The box acts as a waveguide so that a simple model for the propagating wave can be assumed. Since traditional techniques for temperature measurements cannot be applied in microwave heating, the IR thermography shows to be an useful tool for measuring the sample surface temperature. The measure of the surface temperature evolution in the sample along with application of a simple analytical model allows to obtain the dielectric constant of the sample as a function of chemical composition, temperature and frequency. Preliminary results are presented and discussed with reference to pure water.

  6. [Noncontact and noninvasive microwave biological measurements].

    PubMed

    Misawa, T; Kutsumi, Y; Tada, H; Kim, S S; Nakai, T; Miyabo, S; Hamada, T; Arai, I; Suzuki, T

    1990-01-01

    Without contact probes, the signals of small human body surface movements were obtained with microwave Doppler sensors using a two-phase interferometric method. The signals were then compared with mechanocardiographic records routinely obtained by contact transducers. Furthermore, this system was applied to patients wearing clothes. The study subjects consisted of 20 cardiac patients and 10 normal controls. 1. The microwave signals obtained in the cervical and precordial regions were similar to those of the mechanocardiographic recordings, such as the carotid pulse and jugular venous pulse tracings and the apexcardiogram. There was a significant correlation between left ventricular ejection time (LVET) obtained by microwave Doppler sensors and that by the carotid pulse tracing (r = 0.95). 2. The signals of the microwave Doppler sensor were obtained from the patients wearing clothes. The heart beat components were distinguished from respiratory motion and patients' movements using band-pass filters. These results suggest that this method is capable of evaluating cardiac function noninvasively and thus has a distinct advantage in the field of non-contact measurements.

  7. Active Microwave Properties of Vegetation Canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    Potential users of radar imagery need a better fundamental understanding of the capabilities of radar systems for vegetation studies than past studies provide. One approach is the use of theoretical models to predict observable active microwave properties of vegetation. This in turn requires accurate observations of backscattering coefficients and other active microwave properties in field research studies. The background document for the SRAEC program emphasizes the need to relate electromagnetic parameters to classical biophysical descriptors and to understand the role of polarization, especially cross-polarization. The broad goal of this study is to increase the understanding of the effects of canopy structure on the active microwave properties of vegetation canopies, with particular attention to polarization.

  8. Microwave radiometry for continuous non-contact temperature measurements during microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Karl D; Pearce, John A

    2005-01-01

    Temperature measurement during microwave heating in industrial and commercial processes can improve quality, throughput, and energy conservation. Conventional ways of measuring temperature inside a microwave oven cavity are costly, inconvenient, or unsuitable for high-volume industrial applications. In this paper, we describe the theory of microwave radiometry as applied to the measurement of temperature during microwave heating. By extending the theory of radiative transfer to the case of thermal microwave radiation inside a cavity, we show that the same characteristics which make a microwave cavity suitable for heating materials also assist in obtaining meaningful temperature data with microwave radiometry. We present experimental data from the heating of liquid and solid materials which confirm the essential features of the theory, and show agreement between this method and more conventional methods of +/-4 degrees C.

  9. Infrared and microwave measurements across the ITC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wexler, R.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis is presented of data obtained from Nimbus 3 infrared measurements of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITC) over the tropical oceans. The ITC is characterized by a cloud belt with a varied structure of single to double lines or clusters along latitudes O to 10N depending on the season. The infrared radiometers in the Nimbus satellite provided data for interpreting relative cloud heights and fields of vertical motions in the ITC. Supplementary aircraft measurements with infrared and microwave radiometers during the Nimbus 3 overpass are also analyzed.

  10. A microwave pressure sounder. [for remote measurement of atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckham, G. E.; Flower, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for the remote measurement of atmospheric surface pressure will be described. Such measurements could be made from a satellite in polar orbit and would cover many areas for which conventional meteorological data are not available. An active microwave instrument is used to measure the strength of return echoes from the ocean surface at a number of frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. Factors which affect the accuracy with which surface pressure can be deduced from these measurements will be discussed and an instrument designed to test the method by making measurements from an aircraft will be described.

  11. Killing activity of microwaves in milk.

    PubMed

    Kindle, G; Busse, A; Kampa, D; Meyer-König, U; Daschner, F D

    1996-08-01

    The killing activity of microwaves of 2450 MHz frequency and 600 W power on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter sakazakii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Mycobacterium terrae and poliomyelitis vaccine-virus suspended in five infant formula preparations was investigated. The samples were brought to the boil (85-100 s depending on milk type). They had reached average temperatures of 82-93 degrees C at this point. Most of the vegetative organisms were killed. In those samples where growth was still detectable after microwave treatment, a significant reduction in viable micro-organisms (at least 5000-fold) was noted. We conclude that microwave beating to the boil is a convenient and fast method to reduce microbial contamination of infant feeds. However, care should be taken to ensure that milk is adequately cooled to the required temperature before it is fed to an infant. PMID:8864939

  12. Spectral measurements of the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.J.

    1989-04-01

    Three experiments have measured the intensity of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at wavelengths 4.0, 3.0, and 0.21 cm. The measurement at 4.0 cm used a direct-gain total-power radiometer to measure the difference in power between the zenith sky and a large cryogenic reference target. Foreground signals are measured with the same instrument and subtracted from the zenith signal, leaving the CMB as the residual. The reference target consists of a large open-mouth cryostat with a microwave absorber submerged in liquid helium; thin windows block the radiative heat load and prevent condensation atmospheric gases within the cryostat. The thermodynamic temperature of the CMB at 4.0 cm is 2.59 +- 0.07 K. The measurement at 3.0 cm used a superheterodyne Dicke-switched radiometer with a similar reference target to measure the zenith sky temperature. A rotating mirror allowed one of the antenna beams to be redirected to a series of zenith angles, permitting automated atmospheric measurements without moving the radiometer. A weighted average of 5 years of data provided the thermodynamic temperature of the CMB at 3.0 cm of 2.62 +- 0.06 K. The measurement at 0.21 cm used Very Large Array observations of interstellar ortho-formaldehyde to determine the CMB intensity in molecular clouds toward the giant HII region W51A (G49.5-0.4). Solutions of the radiative transfer problem in the context of a large velocity gradient model provided estimates of the CMB temperature within the foreground clouds. Collisional excitation from neutral hydrogen molecules within the clouds limited the precision of the result. The thermodynamic temperature of the CMB at 0.21 cm is 3.2 +- 0.9 K. 72 refs., 27 figs., 38 tabs.

  13. Active microwave users working group program planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bare, J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Childs, L. F.; Dellwig, L. F.; Heighway, J. E.; Joosten, R.; Lewis, A. J.; Linlor, W.; Lundien, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed programmatic and technical development plan for active microwave technology was examined in each of four user activities: (1) vegetation; (2) water resources and geologic applications, and (4) oceanographic applications. Major application areas were identified, and the impact of each application area in terms of social and economic gains were evaluated. The present state of knowledge of the applicability of active microwave remote sensing to each application area was summarized and its role relative to other remote sensing devices was examined. The analysis and data acquisition techniques needed to resolve the effects of interference factors were reviewed to establish an operational capability in each application area. Flow charts of accomplished and required activities in each application area that lead to operational capability were structured.

  14. Radiated microwave power transmission system efficiency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.; Brown, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The measured and calculated results from determining the operating efficiencies of a laboratory version of a system for transporting electric power from one point to another via a wireless free space radiated microwave beam are reported. The system's overall end-to-end efficiency as well as intermediated conversion efficiencies were measured. The maximum achieved end-to-end dc-to-ac system efficiency was 54.18% with a probable error of + or - 0.94%. The dc-to-RF conversion efficiency was measured to be 68.87% + or - 1.0% and the RF-to-dc conversion efficiency was 78.67 + or - 1.1%. Under these conditions a dc power of 495.62 + or - 3.57 W was received with a free space transmitter antenna receiver antenna separation of 170.2 cm (67 in).

  15. Airborne microwave measurements of the southern Greenland ice sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, C.T.; Hayes, P.S.; Herd, J.S.; Jones, W.L.; Delmore, V.E.

    1985-02-01

    Microwave remote sensing measurements were collected over Greenland with the NASA C-130 aircraft used as a platform. The principal instruments were a C band radiometer and an X band scatterometer, which simultaneously collected both active and passive microwave remote sensing data. The data collected fully support the conclusions drawn by others that volume scattering from subsurface ice lenses and glands is the major influence on microwave signature. Both thermal emission and radar backscattering results are self-consistent with rather simple theories of volume scattering. The remote sensing measurements also provide a relative measure of the number density of scatterers; however, additional theoretical work is required to establish the cross section per scatterer in order to measure absolute number density. Along this avenue of thought, the data rule out Rayleigh scattering and strongly support a high frequency model. The measured anisotropy over the ice cap appears to be a new observation, and future exploitation of remote sensing techniques may provide information relating to the average shape of subsurface patterns and information relative to glacial flow. 14 references, 10 figures.

  16. Measurement and Simulation Results of Ti Coated Microwave Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ding; McGinnis, Dave; /Fermilab

    1998-11-01

    When microwave absorbers are put in a waveguide, a layer of resistive coating can change the distribution of the E-M fields and affect the attenuation of the signal within the microwave absorbers. In order to study such effect, microwave absorbers (TT2-111) were coated with titanium thin film. This report is a document on the coating process and measurement results. The measurement results have been used to check the simulation results from commercial software HFSS (High Frequency Structure Simulator.)

  17. Method and apparatus for thickness measurement using microwaves

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul [Bedford, MA; Lamar, David A [West Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The method for measuring the thickness of a material which transmits a detectable amount of microwave radiation includes irradiating the material with coherent microwave radiation tuned over a frequency range. Reflected microwave radiation is detected, the reflected radiation having maxima and minima over the frequency range as a result of coherent interference of microwaves reflected from reflecting surfaces of the material. The thickness of the material is determined from the period of the maxima and minima along with knowledge of the index of refraction of the material.

  18. Some comments on passive microwave measurement of rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, Thomas T.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that because microwave radiation interacts much more strongly with hydrometeors than with cloud particles, microwave measurements from space offer a significant chance of making global precipitation estimates. Over oceans, passive microwave measurements are essentially attenuation measurements that can be very closely related to the rain rate independently of the details of the drop-size distribution. Over land, scattering of microwave radiation by the hydrometeors, especially in the ice phase, can be used to estimate rainfall. In scattering, the details of the drop-size distribution are very important and it is therefore more difficult to achieve a high degree of accuracy. The SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager), a passive microwave imaging sensor that will be launched soon, will have dual-polarized channels at 85.5 GHz that will be very sensitive to scattering by frozen hydrometeors. Other sensors being considered for the future space missions would extend the ability to estimate rain rates from space. The ideal spaceborne precipitation-measurement system would use the complementary strengths of passive microwave, radar, and visible/infrared measurements.

  19. Microwave measurements of the water content of bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Latorre, V.R.; Glenn, H.D.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of operation of microwave coaxial resonators is described. Sample preparation and the application of resonator techniques to the measurement of the permittivity (dielectric constant) of bentonite is discussed. The results indicate a fairly linear change in resonant frequency for saturation levels at 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90%. The results clearly demonstrate that this microwave technique is a viable method for measuring water content of soils. A discussion of additional applications of microwave methods for determining water content in materials is presented. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Quantitative measurement of sheet resistance by evanescent microwave probe

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhengyu; Kelly, Michael A.; Shen Zhixun; Shao Lin; Chu, W.-K.; Edwards, Hal

    2005-04-11

    Quantitative measurement of microwave sheet resistance by a novel type of near-field microwave microscope -Evanescent Microwave Probe (EMP) - has been demonstrated. The data cover a wide range of sheet resistance from the metal limit to the insulator limit. Both finite element analysis (FEA) and a simple coaxial ring model have been shown to fit the data well. The demonstration of sheet resistance measurement with high spatial resolution in the GHz range shows the potential of EMP for semiconductor metrology applications. The data also reveal issues related to the large penetration depth, allowing substrate properties to affect the signal.

  1. A Prototype System for Measuring Microwave Frequency Reflections from the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Bourqui, J.; Sill, J. M.; Fear, E. C.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave imaging of the breast is of interest for monitoring breast health, and approaches to active microwave imaging include tomography and radar-based methods. While the literature contains a growing body of work related to microwave breast imaging, there are only a few prototype systems that have been used to collect data from humans. In this paper, a prototype system for monostatic radar-based imaging that has been used in an initial study measuring reflections from volunteers is discussed. The performance of the system is explored by examining the mechanical positioning of sensor, as well as microwave measurement sensitivity. To gain insight into the measurement of reflected signals, simulations and measurements of a simple phantom are compared and discussed in relation to system sensitivity. Finally, a successful scan of a volunteer is described. PMID:22611372

  2. Active microwave responses - An aid in improved crop classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    A study determined the feasibility of using visible, infrared, and active microwave data to classify agricultural crops such as corn, sorghum, alfalfa, wheat stubble, millet, shortgrass pasture and bare soil. Visible through microwave data were collected by instruments on board the NASA C-130 aircraft over 40 agricultural fields near Guymon, OK in 1978 and Dalhart, TX in 1980. Results from stepwise and discriminant analysis techniques indicated 4.75 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 0.4 GHz cross-polarized microwave frequencies were the microwave frequencies most sensitive to crop type differences. Inclusion of microwave data in visible and infrared classification models improved classification accuracy from 73 percent to 92 percent. Despite the results, further studies are needed during different growth stages to validate the visible, infrared, and active microwave responses to vegetation.

  3. The microwave Hall effect measured using a waveguide tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, J. E.; Anderson, J. R.; Johnson, W. B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. The advantage of this technique is that it does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing the semiconductor wafer into a slot cut in an X-band (8-12 GHz) waveguide series tee, injecting microwave power into the two opposite arms of the tee, and measuring the microwave output at the third arm. A magnetic field applied perpendicular to the wafer gives a microwave Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. The microwave Hall signal is proportional to the semiconductor mobility, which we compare for calibration purposes with d.c. mobility measurements obtained using the van der Pauw method. We obtain the resistivity by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. This paper presents data for silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. The measured mobilities ranged from 270 to 3000 cm2/(V s).

  4. The Microwave Hall Effect Measured Using a Waveguide Tee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William; Coppock, Joyce; Anderson, J. Robert

    We describe a simple microwave apparatus to measure the Hall effect in semiconductor wafers. This technique does not require contacts on the sample or the use of a resonant cavity. Our method consists of placing a semiconductor wafer into a slot in an X-band (8 - 12 GHz) waveguide series tee, injecting microwave power into the two opposite arms of the tee, and measuring the microwave output at the third arm. A magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the wafer and produces a microwave Hall signal that is linear in the magnetic field and which reverses phase when the magnetic field is reversed. The microwave Hall signal is proportional to the semiconductor mobility, which we compare for calibration purposes with d. c. mobility measurements obtained using the van der Pauw method. We obtain the resistivity by measuring the microwave reflection coefficient of the sample. We determine a calibration constant as a function of the ratio of thickness to skin depth for two and three inch silicon and germanium samples doped with boron or phosphorus. The measured mobilities ranged from 270 to 3000 cm2 / (Vsec)

  5. Dynamic measurement of starch granule swelling during microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Casasnovas, Johnny; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2016-10-20

    The size of starch granules in dilute aqueous suspension was measured in-line during gelatinization in a microwave-heated, well-mixed system. The results were compared with those of a previous study conducted with conventional heating. For the starches used (common corn, waxy maize, and cross-linked waxy maize), no significant difference was found between microwave and conventional heating in terms of maximum diameter, temperature of maximum rate of diameter increase, or diameter vs. temperature behavior. These results suggest that there are no differences in the swelling behavior of common and modified maize starches between microwave and conventional heating. PMID:27474654

  6. AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Slob, Evert; Turk, Ahmet Serdar; Crocco, Lorenzo; Catapano, Ilaria; Di Matteo, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-IRSES project AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging is based on a well-combined network among research institutions of EU, Associate and Third Countries (National Research Council of Italy - Italy, Technische Universiteit Delft - The Netherlands, Yildiz Technical University - Turkey, Bauman Moscow State Technical University - Russia, Usikov Institute for Radio-physics and Electronics and State Research Centre of Superconductive Radioelectronics "Iceberg" - Ukraine and University of Sao Paulo - Brazil) with the aims of achieving scientific advances in the framework of microwave and millimeter imaging systems and techniques for security and safety social issues. In particular, the involved partners are leaders in the scientific areas of passive and active imaging and are sharing their complementary knowledge to address two main research lines. The first one regards the design, characterization and performance evaluation of new passive and active microwave devices, sensors and measurement set-ups able to mitigate clutter and increase information content. The second line faces the requirements to make State-of-the-Art processing tools compliant with the instrumentations developed in the first line, suitable to work in electromagnetically complex scenarios and able to exploit the unexplored possibilities offered by new instrumentations. The main goals of the project are: 1) Development/improvement and characterization of new sensors and systems for active and passive microwave imaging; 2) Set up, analysis and validation of state of art/novel data processing approach for GPR in critical infrastructure and subsurface imaging; 3) Integration of state of art and novel imaging hardware and characterization approaches to tackle realistic situations in security, safety and subsurface prospecting applications; 4) Development and feasibility study of bio-radar technology (system and data processing) for vital signs detection and

  7. Phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Chen, Zhengyu; Xu, Zhiguo; Gao, Yingjie

    2015-10-01

    Microwave photonic links (MPLs) can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial and waveguide solutions due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth, superior stability and immunity to external interference. It has been considered in various applications such as: the transmission of radio frequency (RF) signal over optical carriers, video television transmission, radar and communication systems. Stability of phase of the microwave photonic links is a critical issue in several realistic applications. The delay line technique for phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links is measured for the first time. Using this approach, the input signal noise and power supply noise can be effectively cancelled, and it does not require phase locking. The phase noise of a microwave photonic links with a 10 GHz sinusoidal signal is experimentally demonstrated.

  8. Measured microwave scattering cross sections of three meteorite specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    Three meteorite specimens were used in a microwave scattering experiment to determine the scattering cross sections of stony meteorites and iron meteorites in the frequency range from 10 to 14 GHz. The results indicate that the stony meteorites have a microwave scattering cross section that is 30 to 50 percent of their projected optical cross section. Measurements of the iron meteorite scattering were inconclusive because of specimen surface irregularities.

  9. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-01

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  10. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  11. A microwave systems approach to measuring root zone soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W.; Paris, J. F.; Clark, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Computer microwave satellite simulation models were developed and the program was used to test the ability of a coarse resolution passive microwave sensor to measure soil moisture over large areas, and to evaluate the effect of heterogeneous ground covers with the resolution cell on the accuracy of the soil moisture estimate. The use of realistic scenes containing only 10% to 15% bare soil and significant vegetation made it possible to observe a 60% K decrease in brightness temperature from a 5% soil moisture to a 35% soil moisture at a 21 cm microwave wavelength, providing a 1.5 K to 2 K per percent soil moisture sensitivity to soil moisture. It was shown that resolution does not affect the basic ability to measure soil moisture with a microwave radiometer system. Experimental microwave and ground field data were acquired for developing and testing a root zone soil moisture prediction algorithm. The experimental measurements demonstrated that the depth of penetration at a 21 cm microwave wavelength is not greater than 5 cm.

  12. Active microwave computed brain tomography: the response to a challenge.

    PubMed

    Almirall, H; Broquetas, A; Jofre, L

    1991-02-01

    The potential application of active microwave techniques to brain imaging is studied by numerical simulations and experimentally using a recently developed cylindrical microwave scanner. The potential advantages and limitations of this method in static and dynamic brain imaging are presented and compared with other imaging techniques. PMID:2062119

  13. Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.

    2012-02-20

    Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

  14. ESTAR - A synthetic aperture microwave radiometer for measuring soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Griffis, A.; Swift, C. T.; Jackson, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of soil moisture from space requires putting relatively large microwave antennas in orbit. Aperture synthesis, an interferometric technique for reducing the antenna aperture needed in space, offers the potential for a practical means of meeting these requirements. An aircraft prototype, electronically steered thinned array L-band radiometer (ESTAR), has been built to develop this concept and to demonstrate its suitability for the measurement of soil moisture. Recent flights over the Walnut Gulch Watershed in Arizona show good agreement with ground truth and with measurements with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR).

  15. Measurement of microwave radiation from electron beam in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, I. S.; Akimune, H.; Fukushima, M.; Ikeda, D.; Inome, Y.; Matthews, J. N.; Ogio, S.; Sagawa, H.; Sako, T.; Shibata, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-02-01

    We report the use of an electron light source (ELS) located at the Telescope Array Observatory in Utah, USA, to measure the isotropic microwave radiation from air showers. To simulate extensive air showers, the ELS emits an electron beam into the atmosphere and a parabola antenna system for the satellite communication is used to measure the microwave radiation from the electron beam. Based on this measurement, an upper limit on the intensity of a 12.5 GHz microwave radiation at 0.5 m from a 1018 eV air shower was estimated to be 3.96×10-16 W m-2 Hz-1 with a 95% confidence level.

  16. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeff Sweterlitsch

    2004-04-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photoacoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photoacoustic signals in an off-line configuration. A second off-line instrument was constructed based in part on lessons learned with the first instrument, but which also expands the capabilities of the first instrument. Improvements include a control loop to allow more constant microwave power output and an ability to operate over a range of microwave frequencies. The third instrument, the on-line version of the fly ash monitor, has been designed, constructed, and initial efficiency tests have been conducted on the monitor's electrical components. Photoacoustic measurements were collected using the off-line MEPA spectrometer with different microwave frequencies in order to develop photoacoustic microwave spectra of several fly ash samples. Microwaves from 500 MHz to 1800 MHz were used. Modifications to the on-line thermal elastic fly ash monitor include the improving the operation of the agitator for the bottom hopper, and installing a second diaphragm assembly in the freeboard section of the fly ash monitor. This second diaphragm assembly can be used with a second MEMS-based accelerometer and in conjunction with the primary accelerometer as a method of active noise control. Repeatability and linearity experiments have begun using the on-line fly ash monitor, with some results presented in this quarterly technical report.

  17. Solar Activity Studies using Microwave Imaging Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the status of solar cycle 24 based on polar prominence eruptions (PEs) and microwave brightness enhancement (MBE) information obtained by the Nobeyama radioheliograph. The north polar region of the Sun had near-zero field strength for more than three years (2012-2015) and ended only in September 2015 as indicated by the presence of polar PEs and the lack of MBE. The zero-polar-field condition in the south started only around 2013, but it ended by June 2014. Thus the asymmetry in the times of polarity reversal switched between cycle 23 and 24. The polar MBE is a good proxy for the polar magnetic field strength as indicated by the high degree of correlation between the two. The cross-correlation between the high- and low-latitude MBEs is significant for a lag of approximately 5.5 to 7.3 years, suggesting that the polar field of one cycle indicates the sunspot number of the next cycle in agreement with the Babcock-Leighton mechanism of solar cycles. The extended period of near-zero field in the north-polar region should result in a weak and delayed sunspot activity in the northern hemisphere in cycle 25.

  18. Active microwave sensing of the atmosphere, chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The use of active microwave systems to study atmospheric phenomena is studied. Atmospheric pollution, weather prediction, climate and weather modification, weather danger and disaster warning, and atmospheric processes and interactions are covered.

  19. Microwave plasma burner and temperature measurements in its flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Cho, Soon Cheon; Bang, Chan Uk; Shin, Dong Hun; Kim, Jong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup; Yi, Won Ju

    2006-05-15

    An apparatus for generating flames and more particularly the microwave plasma burner for generating high-temperature large-volume plasma flame was presented. The plasma burner is operated by injecting liquid hydrocarbon fuels into a microwave plasma torch in air discharge and by mixing the resultant gaseous hydrogen and carbon compounds with air or oxygen gas. The microwave plasma torch can instantaneously vaporize and decompose the hydrogen and carbon containing fuels. It was observed that the flame volume of the burner was more than 50 times that of the torch plasma. While the temperature of the torch plasma flame was only 550 K at a measurement point, that of the plasma-burner flame with the addition of 0.025 lpm (liters per minute) kerosene and 20 lpm oxygen drastically increased to about 1850 K. A preliminary experiment was carried out, measuring the temperature profiles of flames along the radial and axial directions.

  20. Measuring Microwaves via Absorption and Dispersion in Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, Daniel; Kunz, Paul; Meyer, David; Solmeyer, Neal

    2016-05-01

    Weak microwave frequency electromagnetic fields can be difficult to detect and fully characterize with traditional methods. However it is possible to transduce the measurement of these fields from the microwave domain to the optical domain via resonant transitions between Rydberg levels in atomic vapors using electromagnetically-induced transparency and the Autler-Townes effect. This technique allows for sensitive measurements of the microwave field amplitude, polarization, and spatial waveform (via the position of the probe and coupling laser beams) as compared to measurements performed with dipole antennas. We are able to obtain these quantities by monitoring the properties of a probe laser beam as it passes through a rubidium vapor cell. Previous experiments using Rydberg spectroscopy have typically relied on measuring the absorption of the probe laser as it passed through the atomic system. We report on progress to use the polarization rotation of the probe as it passes through the atoms in a static magnetic field, which corresponds to the real part of the susceptibility of the atomic medium, for measuring the characteristics of a microwave frequency signal. This effect is known as Nonlinear Magneto Optical Rotation (NMOR) and has been used for sensitive magnetometry.

  1. Snowfall Rate Retrieval using NPP ATMS Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Wang, Nai-Yu; Dong, Jun; Zavodsky, Bradley; Yan, Banghua; Zhao, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed recently. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. The model employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derive the probability of snowfall (Kongoli et al., 2014). In addition, a set of NWP model based filters is also employed to improve the accuracy of snowfall detection. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model (Yan et al., 2008). A method developed by Heymsfield and Westbrook (2010) is adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. The ATMS SFR product is validated against radar and gauge snowfall data and shows that the ATMS algorithm outperforms the AMSU/MHS SFR.

  2. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  3. Phase noise measurement of wideband microwave sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dengjian; Zhang, Fangzheng; Zhou, Pei; Pan, Shilong

    2015-04-01

    An approach for phase noise measurement of microwave signal sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter is proposed. Using the same optical carrier, the microwave signal under test is applied to generate two +1st-order optical sidebands by two stages of electro-optical modulations. A time delay is introduced between the two sidebands through a span of fiber. By beating the two +1st-order sidebands at a photodetector, frequency down-conversion is implemented, and phase noise of the signal under test can be calculated thereafter. The system has a very large operation bandwidth thanks to the frequency conversion in the optical domain, and good phase noise measurement sensitivity can be achieved since the signal degradation caused by electrical amplifiers is avoided. An experiment is carried out. The phase noise measured by the proposed system agrees well with that measured by a commercial spectrum analyzer or provided by the datasheet. A large operation bandwidth of 5-40 GHz is demonstrated using the proposed system. Moreover, good phase noise floor is achieved (-123  dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -137  dBc/Hz at 10 kHz at 10 GHz), which is nearly constant over the full measurement range.

  4. Phase noise measurement of wideband microwave sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dengjian; Zhang, Fangzheng; Zhou, Pei; Pan, Shilong

    2015-04-01

    An approach for phase noise measurement of microwave signal sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter is proposed. Using the same optical carrier, the microwave signal under test is applied to generate two +1st-order optical sidebands by two stages of electro-optical modulations. A time delay is introduced between the two sidebands through a span of fiber. By beating the two +1st-order sidebands at a photodetector, frequency down-conversion is implemented, and phase noise of the signal under test can be calculated thereafter. The system has a very large operation bandwidth thanks to the frequency conversion in the optical domain, and good phase noise measurement sensitivity can be achieved since the signal degradation caused by electrical amplifiers is avoided. An experiment is carried out. The phase noise measured by the proposed system agrees well with that measured by a commercial spectrum analyzer or provided by the datasheet. A large operation bandwidth of 5-40 GHz is demonstrated using the proposed system. Moreover, good phase noise floor is achieved (-123  dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -137  dBc/Hz at 10 kHz at 10 GHz), which is nearly constant over the full measurement range. PMID:25831324

  5. Satellite Remote Sensing: Passive-Microwave Measurements of Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite passive-microwave measurements of sea ice have provided global or near-global sea ice data for most of the period since the launch of the Nimbus 5 satellite in December 1972, and have done so with horizontal resolutions on the order of 25-50 km and a frequency of every few days. These data have been used to calculate sea ice concentrations (percent areal coverages), sea ice extents, the length of the sea ice season, sea ice temperatures, and sea ice velocities, and to determine the timing of the seasonal onset of melt as well as aspects of the ice-type composition of the sea ice cover. In each case, the calculations are based on the microwave emission characteristics of sea ice and the important contrasts between the microwave emissions of sea ice and those of the surrounding liquid-water medium.

  6. Measurements of plasma potential in high-pressure microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasova, A. V.; Podder, N. K.; Clothiaux, E. J.

    2009-04-15

    Plasma potential of a high-pressure ({approx}1 Torr) microwave-generated argon plasma is measured using a Langmuir probe and a cold emissive probe. The operation of a hot emissive probe in a high-pressure plasma has been very difficult due to frequent burn-outs and significantly reduced lifetime of the probe filament, which, in turn, limits the possibility of collecting a wide range of data. The I-V characteristics from both Langmuir and emissive probes are interpreted using the collisionless probe theory since the collision correction factor is not very significant. The plasma potential determined from both Langmuir and cold emissive probe characteristics agrees well with one another and is observed to be dependent on the operating gas pressure but relatively unchanged as a function of the microwave power. An average plasma potential determined over the operating range of microwave powers varies nonlinearly with the gas pressure.

  7. Measurements of plasma potential in high-pressure microwave plasmas.

    PubMed

    Tarasova, A V; Podder, N K; Clothiaux, E J

    2009-04-01

    Plasma potential of a high-pressure ( approximately 1 Torr) microwave-generated argon plasma is measured using a Langmuir probe and a cold emissive probe. The operation of a hot emissive probe in a high-pressure plasma has been very difficult due to frequent burn-outs and significantly reduced lifetime of the probe filament, which, in turn, limits the possibility of collecting a wide range of data. The I-V characteristics from both Langmuir and emissive probes are interpreted using the collisionless probe theory since the collision correction factor is not very significant. The plasma potential determined from both Langmuir and cold emissive probe characteristics agrees well with one another and is observed to be dependent on the operating gas pressure but relatively unchanged as a function of the microwave power. An average plasma potential determined over the operating range of microwave powers varies nonlinearly with the gas pressure.

  8. Microwave measurement of the mass of frozen hydrogen pellets

    DOEpatents

    Talanker, Vera; Greenwald, Martin

    1990-01-01

    A nondestructive apparatus and method for measuring the mass of a moving object, based on the perturbation of the dielectric character of a resonant microwave cavity caused by the object passing through the cavity. An oscillator circuit is formed with a resonant cavity in a positive feedback loop of a microwave power amplifier. The moving object perturbs the resonant characteristics of the cavity causing a shift in the operating frequency of the oscillator proportional to the ratio of the pellet volume to the volume of the cavity. Signals from the cavity oscillation are mixed with a local oscillator. Then the IF frequency from the mixer is measured thereby providing a direct measurement of pellet mass based upon known physical properties and relationships. This apparatus and method is particularly adapted for the measurement of frozen hydrogen pellets.

  9. Microwave Sensor for Blade Tip Clearance and Structural Health Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    The use of microwave based sensors for the health monitoring of rotating machinery is being explored at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The microwave sensor works on the principle of sending a continuous signal towards a rotating component and measuring the reflected signal. The phase shift of the reflected signal is proportional to the distance between the sensor and the component that is being measured. This type of sensor is beneficial in that it has the ability to operate at extremely high temperatures and is unaffected by contaminants that may be present in the rotating machinery. It is intended to use these probes in the hot sections of turbine engines for closed loop turbine clearance control and structural health measurements. Background on the sensors, an overview of their calibration and preliminary results from using them to make blade tip clearance and health measurements on a large axial vane fan will be presented.

  10. Microwave dielectrometry measurements of glass reinforced polyester resins

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, J.L.; Wagner, J.W.; Green, R.E. Jr.

    1999-10-01

    This study describes measurements of dielectric constant as a function of glass reinforcement concentration in polyester resins to use as a control parameter for online process monitoring. Microwave interferometers were constructed in the X and V bands at 9.35 and 60 GHz in both homodyne and heterodyne configurations to measure the phase difference associated with the material. This phase difference is then used to calculate the real part of the dielectric constant from the index of refraction at a microwave frequency. The homodyne X and V band measurements yielded a linear between phase difference and glass concentration. Heterodyne V band measurements produced a nonlinear relationship. Further investigation into the microscopic interactions between the reinforcement particle and the polymer resin is necessary to determine how different concentrations affect the bulk macroscopic material properties.

  11. Microwave Permittivity and Permeability Measurement on Lunar Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin; Steinfeld, David; Begley, Shelley B.; Winterhalter, Daniel; Allen, Carlton

    2011-01-01

    There has been interest in finding ways to process the lunar regolith since the early analyses of lunar samples returned from the Apollo moon missions. This fact has led to proposals for using microwaves to perform in-situ processing of the lunar soil to support future colonization of the moon. More recently, there has been speculation that the excellent microwave absorption of lunar soil came from the nanophase iron content in the regolith. The motivation for the present study was to begin obtaining a more fundamental understanding of the dielectric and magnetic properties of the regolith at microwave frequencies. A major objective of this study was to obtain information that would help answer the question about whether nanophase iron plays a major role in heating lunar soils. These new measurements over a wide frequency range can also determine the magnitude of the dielectric and magnetic absorption and if there are any resonant features that could be used to enhance processing of the regolith in the future. In addition, these microwave measurements would be useful in confirming that new simulants being developed, particularly those containing nanophase iron, would have the correct composition to simulate the lunar regolith. The results of this study suggest that nanophase iron does not play a major role in heating lunar regolith.

  12. An interferometric scanning microwave microscope and calibration method for sub-fF microwave measurements.

    PubMed

    Dargent, T; Haddadi, K; Lasri, T; Clément, N; Ducatteau, D; Legrand, B; Tanbakuchi, H; Theron, D

    2013-12-01

    We report on an adjustable interferometric set-up for Scanning Microwave Microscopy. This interferometer is designed in order to combine simplicity, a relatively flexible choice of the frequency of interference used for measurements as well as the choice of impedances range where the interference occurs. A vectorial calibration method based on a modified 1-port error model is also proposed. Calibrated measurements of capacitors have been obtained around the test frequency of 3.5 GHz down to about 0.1 fF. Comparison with standard vector network analyzer measurements is shown to assess the performance of the proposed system.

  13. A novel microwave cancellation circuit for measuring nonlinear dielectric changes of polar solution under microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao-Ran; Huang, Ka-Ma

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an experimental set-up based on a novel microstrip cancellation circuit is presented for investigating the effects of external microwave fields on the dielectric properties of polar solution. The circuit consists of a 3 dB Wilkinson power combiner, a conventional 20 dB backward coupler, and a specially designed 20 dB single-sectioned forward coupler. Besides, in order to realize a uniform electric field in the tested solution, a nicked microstrip ring is designed in the circuit. An improvement of measurement sensitivity in the proposed circuit was obtained when compared to the conventional transmission lines method. We exploit interference cancellation processes to suppress the probing signal at the output port under the principle that two identical amplitude signals with 180° phase difference will completely cancel each other. The measurements are carried out at the frequency of 2.45 GHz, and the temperature effects caused by microwave heating are excluded by the flowing fluid. Experimental results show that the dielectric properties of DMSO-methanol/ethanol mixtures change at the electric field intensity of 105 V m  -  1 and present a distinctly nonlinear dielectric change with the electric fields. The study of the microwave-material interaction has expanded our insights into the high-power microwave’s industry application.

  14. Microwave Hall effect measurements on biological and organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Zoubi, A. Y.; Hasan, O. M.

    2005-01-01

    Microwave Hall effect measurements have been performed by improved 10 GHz bimodal cavity resonators with hybrid end walls used to avoid the background signal that obscures the measurements on low mobility materials. Hall mobility results on copper phthalocyanines CuPc and other organic semiconductors, in the range of 8 cm2/V s to 60 cm2/V s, provide evidence of acoustic phonon scattering as the dominant conduction mechanism. Presently, the microwave Hall effect seems to represent the only means available for quantitative measurements on biological substances like DNA and proteins, which yield mobility values lower than 10 cm2/V s, and are therefore consistent with conduction mechanism involving hopping of charge carriers between localized energy sites.

  15. Microwave remote sensing measurements of oil pollution on the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croswell, W. F.; Blume, H.-J. C.; Johnson, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Microwave and optical remote sensors were flown over fresh and weathered crude oil released from a surface research vessel and also over a slick formed on the sea by frozen oleyl alcohol cubes released from a helicopter. For the crude oil experiments, microwave radiometric measurements at 1.43, 2.65, 22, and 31 GHz are reported, along with the variable incidence angle scattering measurements at 13.9 GHz. For these experiments, unusual depressions in the L-band brightness temperature were observed, possibly related to dispersants applied to the crude oil. Similar depressions, but with much larger values, were observed over the oleyl alcohol monomolecular slicks. Images obtained at 31 and 22 GHz were used to infer oil volume, yielding values which bound the known amounts spilled. Ku band measurements obtained in repeated passes over crude oil slicks are also discussed.

  16. Microwave Moisture Measurement System for Hardwood Lumber Drying

    SciTech Connect

    Moschler, William W; Hanson, Gregory R

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a prototype microwave-based moisture sensor system suitable for the kiln drying of hardwood lumber. The moisture sensors developed are battery powered and are capable of communicating with a host kiln control system via spread spectrum wireless communications. We have developed two designs of the sensors working at 4.5 to 6 GHz with linear response to moisture content (MC) over a range of 6-100%. These sensors allow us to make a swept frequency microwave transmission measurement through a small area of a board. Using the prototype electronics and sensors, we have obtained measurements of MC over the above MC range for red oak and yellow poplar with standard deviations of less than 1.5% MC. We have developed data for board thickness corrections and for temperature corrections for the MC measurement system.

  17. A broadband toolbox for scanning microwave microscopy transmission measurements.

    PubMed

    Lucibello, Andrea; Sardi, Giovanni Maria; Capoccia, Giovanni; Proietti, Emanuela; Marcelli, Romolo; Kasper, Manuel; Gramse, Georg; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present in detail the design, both electromagnetic and mechanical, the fabrication, and the test of the first prototype of a Scanning Microwave Microscope (SMM) suitable for a two-port transmission measurement, recording, and processing the high frequency transmission scattering parameter S21 passing through the investigated sample. The S21 toolbox is composed by a microwave emitter, placed below the sample, which excites an electromagnetic wave passing through the sample under test, and is collected by the cantilever used as the detector, electrically matched for high frequency measurements. This prototype enhances the actual capability of the instrument for a sub-surface imaging at the nanoscale. Moreover, it allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the material under test obtained through the measurement of the reflection (S11) and transmission (S21) parameters at the same time. The SMM operates between 1 GHz and 20 GHz, current limit for the microwave matching of the cantilever, and the high frequency signal is recorded by means of a two-port Vector Network Analyzer, using both contact and no-contact modes of operation, the latter, especially minded for a fully nondestructive and topography-free characterization. This tool is an upgrade of the already established setup for the reflection mode S11 measurement. Actually, the proposed setup is able to give richer information in terms of scattering parameters, including amplitude and phase measurements, by means of the two-port arrangement. PMID:27250429

  18. A broadband toolbox for scanning microwave microscopy transmission measurements.

    PubMed

    Lucibello, Andrea; Sardi, Giovanni Maria; Capoccia, Giovanni; Proietti, Emanuela; Marcelli, Romolo; Kasper, Manuel; Gramse, Georg; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present in detail the design, both electromagnetic and mechanical, the fabrication, and the test of the first prototype of a Scanning Microwave Microscope (SMM) suitable for a two-port transmission measurement, recording, and processing the high frequency transmission scattering parameter S21 passing through the investigated sample. The S21 toolbox is composed by a microwave emitter, placed below the sample, which excites an electromagnetic wave passing through the sample under test, and is collected by the cantilever used as the detector, electrically matched for high frequency measurements. This prototype enhances the actual capability of the instrument for a sub-surface imaging at the nanoscale. Moreover, it allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the material under test obtained through the measurement of the reflection (S11) and transmission (S21) parameters at the same time. The SMM operates between 1 GHz and 20 GHz, current limit for the microwave matching of the cantilever, and the high frequency signal is recorded by means of a two-port Vector Network Analyzer, using both contact and no-contact modes of operation, the latter, especially minded for a fully nondestructive and topography-free characterization. This tool is an upgrade of the already established setup for the reflection mode S11 measurement. Actually, the proposed setup is able to give richer information in terms of scattering parameters, including amplitude and phase measurements, by means of the two-port arrangement.

  19. A broadband toolbox for scanning microwave microscopy transmission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucibello, Andrea; Sardi, Giovanni Maria; Capoccia, Giovanni; Proietti, Emanuela; Marcelli, Romolo; Kasper, Manuel; Gramse, Georg; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present in detail the design, both electromagnetic and mechanical, the fabrication, and the test of the first prototype of a Scanning Microwave Microscope (SMM) suitable for a two-port transmission measurement, recording, and processing the high frequency transmission scattering parameter S21 passing through the investigated sample. The S21 toolbox is composed by a microwave emitter, placed below the sample, which excites an electromagnetic wave passing through the sample under test, and is collected by the cantilever used as the detector, electrically matched for high frequency measurements. This prototype enhances the actual capability of the instrument for a sub-surface imaging at the nanoscale. Moreover, it allows the study of the electromagnetic properties of the material under test obtained through the measurement of the reflection (S11) and transmission (S21) parameters at the same time. The SMM operates between 1 GHz and 20 GHz, current limit for the microwave matching of the cantilever, and the high frequency signal is recorded by means of a two-port Vector Network Analyzer, using both contact and no-contact modes of operation, the latter, especially minded for a fully nondestructive and topography-free characterization. This tool is an upgrade of the already established setup for the reflection mode S11 measurement. Actually, the proposed setup is able to give richer information in terms of scattering parameters, including amplitude and phase measurements, by means of the two-port arrangement.

  20. Measuring Soil Hydraulic Conductivity With Microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.; Oneill, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Soil mapping for large or small areas done rapidly. Technique requires simple radiometric measurements of L-band (15 to 30 cm) and thermal infrared emissions from ground within 2 days after saturation of surface. Technique based on observation that correlation exists between L-band emissivity and hydraulic conductivity of soil.

  1. Passive Microwave Measurements of Salinity: The Gulf Stream Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Koblinsky, C.; Haken, M.; Howden, S.; Bingham, F.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Passive microwave sensors at L-band (1.4 GHz) operating from aircraft have demonstrated that salinity can be measured with sufficient accuracy (I psu) to be scientifically meaningful in coastal waters. However, measuring salinity in the open ocean presents unresolved issues largely because of the much greater accuracy (approximately 0.2 psu) required of global maps to be scientifically viable. The development of a satellite microwave instrument to make global measurements of SSS (Sea Surface Salinity) is the focus of a joint JPL/GSFC/NASA ocean research program called Aquarius. In the summer of 1999 a series of measurements called, The Gulf Stream Experiment, were conducted as part of research at the Goddard Space Flight Center to test the potential for passive microwave remote sensing of salinity in the open ocean. The measurements consisted of airborne microwave instruments together with ships and drifters for surface truth. The study area was a 200 km by 100 km rectangle about 250 km east of Delaware Bay between the continental shelf waters and north wall of the Gulf Stream. The primary passive instruments were the ESTAR radiometer (L-band, H-pol) and the SLFMR radiometer (L-band, V-pol). In addition, the instruments on the aircraft included a C-band radiometer (ACMR), an ocean wave scatterometer (ROWS) and an infrared radiometer (for surface temperature). These instruments were mounted on the NASA P-3 Orion aircraft. Sea surface measurements consisted of thermosalinograph data provided by the R/V Cape Henlopen and the MN Oleander, and data from salinity and temperature sensors on three surface drifters deployed from the R/V Cape Henlopen. The primary experiment period was August 26-September 2, 1999. During this period the salinity field within the study area consisted of a gradient on the order of 2-3 psu in the vicinity of the shelf break and a warm core ring with a gradient of 1-2 psu. Detailed maps were made with the airborne sensors on August 28 and 29 and

  2. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an "inline" calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an "offline" calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a "cold test" on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the "inline" calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device's power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the "offline" calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the "cold tests," and the experiments show good agreement. PMID:26724055

  3. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an "inline" calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an "offline" calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a "cold test" on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the "inline" calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device's power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the "offline" calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the "cold tests," and the experiments show good agreement.

  4. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-15

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an “inline” calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an “offline” calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a “cold test” on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the “inline” calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device’s power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the “offline” calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the “cold tests,” and the experiments show good agreement.

  5. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Calorimetric radar absorptivity measurement using a microwave oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    1999-06-01

    The measurement of the microwave absorptivity of materials typically requires expensive and arcane equipment and methods. I show that, for moderately absorbing materials (loss tangent icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="TOP"/>icons/Journals/Common/simeq" ALT="simeq" ALIGN="TOP"/>0.005 or higher), useful measurements can be easily made using a thermometer and a normal domestic microwave oven: the heat absorbed for suitably designed sample size and geometry relates directly to the absorptivity. This technique, although not supremely accurate, is quick and inexpensive and may be useful for rapid investigations, educational projects and situations in which samples are awkward to handle. I show that water ice spiked with even only 0.2% ammonia is about three orders of magnitude more absorbing than is pure ice at -80 °C.

  6. Optimization of the imaging response of scanning microwave microscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sardi, G. M.; Lucibello, A.; Proietti, E.; Marcelli, R.; Kasper, M.; Gramse, G.; Kienberger, F.

    2015-07-20

    In this work, we present the analytical modeling and preliminary experimental results for the choice of the optimal frequencies when performing amplitude and phase measurements with a scanning microwave microscope. In particular, the analysis is related to the reflection mode operation of the instrument, i.e., the acquisition of the complex reflection coefficient data, usually referred as S{sub 11}. The studied configuration is composed of an atomic force microscope with a microwave matched nanometric cantilever probe tip, connected by a λ/2 coaxial cable resonator to a vector network analyzer. The set-up is provided by Keysight Technologies. As a peculiar result, the optimal frequencies, where the maximum sensitivity is achieved, are different for the amplitude and for the phase signals. The analysis is focused on measurements of dielectric samples, like semiconductor devices, textile pieces, and biological specimens.

  7. Dielectric measurements of selected ceramics at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahiya, J. N.; Templeton, C. K.

    1994-01-01

    Dielectric measurements of strontium titanate and lead titanate zirconate ceramics are conducted at microwave frequencies using a cylindrical resonant cavity in the TE(sub 011) mode. The perturbations of the electric field are recorded in terms of the frequency shift and Q-changes of the cavity signal. Slater's perturbation equations are used to calculate e' and e" of the dielectric constant as a function of temperature and frequency.

  8. Technique for Performing Dielectric Property Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Jackson, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    A paper discusses the need to perform accurate dielectric property measurements on larger sized samples, particularly liquids at microwave frequencies. These types of measurements cannot be obtained using conventional cavity perturbation methods, particularly for liquids or powdered or granulated solids that require a surrounding container. To solve this problem, a model has been developed for the resonant frequency and quality factor of a cylindrical microwave cavity containing concentric cylindrical samples. This model can then be inverted to obtain the real and imaginary dielectric constants of the material of interest. This approach is based on using exact solutions to Maxwell s equations for the resonant properties of a cylindrical microwave cavity and also using the effective electrical conductivity of the cavity walls that is estimated from the measured empty cavity quality factor. This new approach calculates the complex resonant frequency and associated electromagnetic fields for a cylindrical microwave cavity with lossy walls that is loaded with concentric, axially aligned, lossy dielectric cylindrical samples. In this approach, the calculated complex resonant frequency, consisting of real and imaginary parts, is related to the experimentally measured quantities. Because this approach uses Maxwell's equations to determine the perturbed electromagnetic fields in the cavity with the material(s) inserted, one can calculate the expected wall losses using the fields for the loaded cavity rather than just depending on the value of the fields obtained from the empty cavity quality factor. These additional calculations provide a more accurate determination of the complex dielectric constant of the material being studied. The improved approach will be particularly important when working with larger samples or samples with larger dielectric constants that will further perturb the cavity electromagnetic fields. Also, this approach enables the ability to have a

  9. Microwave/Sonic Apparatus Measures Flow and Density in Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Ngo, Phong; Carl, J. R.; Byerly, Kent A.

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the rate of flow and the mass density of a liquid or slurry includes a special section of pipe instrumented with microwave and sonic sensors, and a computer that processes digitized readings taken by the sensors. The apparatus was conceived specifically for monitoring a flow of oil-well-drilling mud, but the basic principles of its design and operation are also applicable to monitoring flows of other liquids and slurries.

  10. Skylab S-193 Radscat microwave measurements of sea surface winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.; Young, J. D.; Claassen, J. P.; Chan, H. L.; Afarani, M.; Pierson, W. J.; Cardone, V. J.; Hayes, J.; Spring, W.; Greenwood, C.

    1975-01-01

    The S-193 Radscat made extensive measurements of many sea conditions. Measurements were taken in a tropical hurricane (Ava), a tropical storm (Christine), and in portions of extratropical cyclones. Approximately 200 scans of ocean data at 105 kilometer spacings were taken during the first two Skylab missions and another 200 during the final mission when the characteristics of the measurements changed due to damage of the antenna. Backscatter with four transmit/receive polarization combinations and emissions with horizontal and vertical receive polarizations were measured. Other surface parameters investigated for correlation with the measurements included sea temperature, air/sea temperature difference, and gravity-wave spectrum. Methods were developed to correct the microwave measurements for atmospheric effects. The radiometric data were corrected accurately for clear sky and light cloud conditions only. The radiometer measurements were used to recover the surface scattering characteristics for all atmospheric conditions excluding rain. The radiometer measurements also detected the presence of rain which signaled when the scattering measurement should not be used for surface wind estimation. Regression analysis was used to determine empirically the relation between surface parameters and the microwave measurements, after correction for atmospheric effects. Results indicate a relationship approaching square-law at 50 deg between differential scattering coefficient and wind speed with horizontally polarized scattering data showing slightly more sensitivity to wind speed than vertically polarized data.

  11. Microwave radiometer for subsurface temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Bechis, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A UHF radiometer, operating at a frequency of 800 MHz, was modified to provide an integral, three frequency voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) circuit in the radio frequency (RF) head. The VSWR circuit provides readings of power transmission at the antenna-material interface with an accuracy of plus or minus 5 percent. The power transmission readings are numerically equal to the emissivity of the material under observation. Knowledge of material emissivity is useful in the interpretation of subsurface apparent temperatures obtained on phantom models of biological tissue. The emissivities of phantom models consisting of lean beefsteak were found to lie in the range 0.623 to 0.779, depending on moisture content. Radiometric measurements performed on instrumented phantoms showed that the radiometer was capable of sensing small temperature changes occurring at depths of at least 19 to 30 mm. This is consistent with previously generated data which showed that the radiometer could sense temperatures at a depth of 38 mm.

  12. Narrow bandpass cryogenic filter for microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, B. I.; Klimenko, D. N.; Sultanov, A. N.; Il'ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2013-05-01

    An ultra-wide stopband hairpin bandpass filter with integrated nonuniform transmission lines was designed and fabricated for highly sensitive measurements at cryogenic temperatures down to millikelvin and a frequency range of 10 Hz-10 GHz. The scattering matrices of the filter were characterized at T = 4.2 K. The filter provides a stopband from 10 Hz to 2.2 GHz and from 2.3 GHz to 10 GHz with more than 50 dB and 40 dB of amplitude suppression, respectively. The center frequency of the passband is f0 = 2.25 GHz with a bandwidth Δf = 80 MHz. The maximum insertion loss in the passband is 4 dB. The filter has a 50 Ω input and output impedance, SubMiniature version A connector termination, and significantly reduced form factor. The wide stopband frequency range and narrow passband in conjunction with small dimensions make the filter suitable to use it as a part of a high sensitive readout for superconducting quantum circuits, such as superconducting quantum bits and cryogenic parametric amplifiers.

  13. Measurements of emission levels during microwave and shortwave diathermy treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggera, P.S.

    1980-05-01

    Shortwave and microwave diathermy treatments are used to relieve pain through the noninvasive application of electromagnetic energy to body tissues. In administering these treatments, not all of the energy is confined to the treatment area. This stray radiation exposes unintended tissue of the patient and also can expose the operator (physical therapist, coach, and so forth). This study was conducted to quantify the exposure levels experienced by the operator during diathermy treatments. For the three microwave units surveyed, with the operator standing at the controls of the diathermy console, the maximum measured power density was 1.3 mW/cm/sup 2/ (equivalent to 70 V/m and 0.19 A/m in free space). For the six shortwave units surveyed, with the operator standing at the controls of the diathermy console, the maximum measured field strengths were 0.47 A/m and 250 V/m (equivalent to free-space power densities of 8.3 mw/cm/sup 2/ and 16.6 mW/cm/sup 2/). If the operator moved closer to the applicator during the treatment, the exposures would be much higher. This survey indicates a need for suppression of unnecessary radiation from the applicators of microwave diathermy units, and from the applicators and cables of shortwave diathermy units.

  14. Determination of precipitation profiles from airborne passive microwave radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Hakkarinen, Ida M.; Pierce, Harold F.; Weinman, James A.

    1991-01-01

    This study presents the first quantitative retrievals of vertical profiles of precipitation derived from multispectral passive microwave radiometry. Measurements of microwave brightness temperature (Tb) obtained by a NASA high-altitude research aircraft are related to profiles of rainfall rate through a multichannel piecewise-linear statistical regression procedure. Statistics for Tb are obtained from a set of cloud radiative models representing a wide variety of convective, stratiform, and anvil structures. The retrieval scheme itself determines which cloud model best fits the observed meteorological conditions. Retrieved rainfall rate profiles are converted to equivalent radar reflectivity for comparison with observed reflectivities from a ground-based research radar. Results for two case studies, a stratiform rain situation and an intense convective thunderstorm, show that the radiometrically derived profiles capture the major features of the observed vertical structure of hydrometer density.

  15. Microwave Cavity for Anapole Moment Measurement in Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiehang; Sheng, Dong; Orozco, Luis

    2011-05-01

    We present a study of the Polka-Dot microwave plano-spherical mirror for a Fabry-Perot resonator. The microwave resonator is an essential element of the apparatus to measure the anapole moment in francium. A crucial requirement for the cavity is the mode-matching into the fundamental Gaussian TEM00 mode. We investigate new coupling mechanisms of the radiation into the cavity to suppress unwanted higher order modes. We are exploring the method of printing two dimensional array of holes and feeding in through horn antennas. According to a HFSS simulation, this method should improve significantly the mode purity in contrast to conventional antenna. We fabricate the mirrors on standard optical blank using standard film deposition techniques with lithographic method to print the pattern. Preliminary tests show resonances, with potential improvements of the Q factors. Work supported by DOE and NSF

  16. Evaluations of microphysics schemes from the microwave rainfall measurement perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Shin, D.

    2008-12-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing of precipitation has been successfully used to monitor the global hydrologic cycle and rainfall retrieval algorithms continue to improve for accurate measurement. In the framework of current retrieval algorithms, the cloud resolving model (CRM) and its microphysical processes play an important role together with the radiative transfer model and their inversion technique. In this study, we construct various a-priori databases using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with four different microphysics schemes. Due to different characteristics of microphysical processes especially in their frozen hydrometeors, retrieval results of precipitation fields and rainfall amounts are found to be different. This study discusses a sensitivity of microwave rainfall retrievals to microphysical parameterization in the CRM.

  17. Removing Overprints, and Measuring Their Magnetic Vectors Using Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, D.; Bohnel, H.

    2008-05-01

    Microwaves are strongly absorbed by generating spin waves in magnetic particles. They are also absorbed in dielectrics, but this is usually much weaker. Apart from the uniform mode where all the spins rotate in phase spin waves cannot exist whose wavelength is greater than twice the dimension of the particle in the propagation direction. Thus, the spin wave levels are quantized. For small particles the level separation is very large, and this means that particles of a given size can only absorb microwaves over a narrow range of frequencies. Thus, it is possible to selectively demagnetize the contributions of grains of different sizes to the magnetic moment of the sample, thereby identifying the original remanence and any subsequent overprints. In particular it should be possible to measure the viscous contribution in ceramics, thereby providing an accurate dating method. Details of the required instrumentation will be discussed, and recent experimental results will be presented.

  18. Measurement of the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity using optical fiber DTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaros, Jakub; Papes, Martin; Liner, Andrej; Vašinek, Vladimir; Smira, Pavel; Nasswettrova, Andrea; Cubik, Jakub; Kepak, Stanislav

    2014-06-01

    Researcher's teams were dealing with the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity problem since the microwaves were used. One possible way, how to measure electromagnetic field is the measurement on inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the irradiated sample, which can cause problems as in other material processing, so in the undesirable change of properties and even security. Inhomogeneity of electromagnetic field is specific by creating spots with higher or lower temperature called "hot spots". This inhomogeneity strongly affects the temperature distribution in the cross section of the material and its resultant heating. Given the impossibility of using classical electronic devices with metal temperature sensors were various indirect methods used in the past. This paper deals with experimental measurement of the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity (2.45 GHz) using the optical fiber DTS. The greatest advantage of this sensor system is just in using of the optical fiber (electromagnetic resistance, small size, safety using in inflammable and explosive area, easy installation). Due to these properties of the optical fiber sensor it's possible to measure the temperature of the sample in real time. These sensor are able to measure the temperature along the fiber, in some cases they use nonlinear effect in optical fiber (Raman nonlinear effect). The verification of non-homogeneity consists in experimental measuring of the temperature distribution within the wooden sample. The method is based on heat exchange in an isolated system where wooden sample serves as an absorber of the irradiated energy. To identify locations with different power density was used DTS system, based on nonlinear phenomena in optical fibers.

  19. Snow property measurements correlative to microwave emission at 35 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert E.; Dozier, Jeff; Chang, Alfred T. C.

    1987-01-01

    Snow microstructure, measured by plane section analysis, and snow wetness, measured by the dilution method, are used to calculate input parameters for a microwave emission model that uses the radiative transfer method. The scattering and absorbing properties are calculated by Mie theory. The effects of different equivalent sphere conversions, adjustments for near-field interference, and different snow wetness characterizations are compared for various snow conditions. The concentric shell geometry of liquid water in snow yields higher emissivities and better model results than the separate-sphere configuration for liquid water contents greater than 0.05, while at lower liquid water contents the separate-sphere treatment gives better results.

  20. Snow property measurements correlative to microwave emission at 35 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. E.; Dozier, J.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1986-01-01

    Snow microstructure, measured by plane section analysis, and snow wetness, measured by the dilution method, are used to calculate input parameters for a microwave emission model that uses the radiative transfer method. The scattering and absorbing properties are calculated by Mie theory. The effects of different equivalent sphere conversions, adjustments for near-field interference, and different snow wetness characterizations are compared for various snow conditions. The concentric shell geometry of liquid water in snow yields higher emissivities and better model results than the separate-sphere configuration for liquid water contents greater than 0.05, while at lower liquid water contents the separate-sphere treatment gives better results.

  1. Microwave noise field: active radiometry principles and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polivka, Jiri

    2012-06-01

    Principles of Active Radiometry are presented. Noise radiators are used to generate the low-coherence microwave noise field, and radiometers to evaluate its intensity, polarization and coherence. Several types of noise radiators are described as well as radiometers and antennas. The following applications are introduced: Material evaluation where insertion loss and reflectivity of grainy, irregular and moving objects are preferable. Microwave Coherence Tomography allowing the depth irregularity to be detected in low-loss objects. Near-Field antenna testing, field coherence evaluation, and spatial combining of noise radiators.

  2. Active Microwave Remote Sensing Observations of Weddell Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.

    1997-01-01

    Since July 1991, the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites have acquired radar data of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. The Active Microwave Instrument on board ERS has two modes; SAR and Scatterometer. Two receiving stations enable direct downlink and recording of high bit-rate, high resolution SAR image data of this region. When not in an imaging mode, when direct SAR downlink is not possible, or when a receiving station is inoperable, the latter mode allows normalized radar cross-section data to be acquired. These low bit-rate ERS scatterometer data are tape recorded, downlinked and processed off-line. Recent advances in image generation from Scatterometer backscatter measurements enable complementary medium-scale resolution images to be made during periods when SAR images cannot be acquired. Together, these combined C-band microwave image data have for the first time enabled uninterrupted night and day coverage of the Weddell Sea region at both high (25 m) and medium-scale (-20 km) resolutions. C-band ERS-1 radar data are analyzed in conjunction with field data from two simultaneous field experiments in 1992. Satellite radar signature data are compared with shipborne radar data to extract a regional and seasonal signature database for recognition of ice types in the images. Performance of automated sea-ice tracking algorithms is tested on Antarctic data to evaluate their success. Examples demonstrate that both winter and summer ice can be effectively tracked. The kinematics of the main ice zones within the Weddell Sea are illustrated, together with the complementary time-dependencies in their radar signatures. Time-series of satellite images are used to illustrate the development of the Weddell Sea ice cover from its austral summer minimum (February) to its winter maximum (September). The combination of time-dependent microwave signatures and ice dynamics tracking enable various drift regimes to be defined which relate closely to the circulation of the

  3. Active microwave remote sensing of oceans, chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A rationale is developed for the use of active microwave sensing in future aerospace applications programs for the remote sensing of the world's oceans, lakes, and polar regions. Summaries pertaining to applications, local phenomena, and large-scale phenomena are given along with a discussion of orbital errors.

  4. Technology advances in active and passive microwave sensing through 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    As a result of a growing awareness by the remote sensing community of the unique capabilities of passive and active microwave sensors, these instruments are expected to grow in the next decade in numbers, versatility and complexity. The Nimbus-G and Seasat-A Scanning Multichannel Microwave Spectrometer (SMMR), the Seasat-A radar altimeter, scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar represent the first systematic attempt at exploring a wide variety of applications utilizing microwave sensing techniques and are indicators of the directions in which the pertinent technology is likely to evolve. The trend is toward high resolution multi-frequency imagers spanning wide frequency ranges and wide swaths requiring sophisticated receivers, real-time data processors and most importantly, complex antennas.

  5. Measurement of core electrical parameters at ultrahigh and microwave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, R.N.; Wharton, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    The Electromagnetic Propagation Tool (EPT) has demonstrated that the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of rocks at microwave frequencies are different from those at low frequencies. These differences are helpful in determining the properties of the rocks and the fluids they contain and thus contribute to improved formation evaluation. Electrical parameters of rocks are found generally complex. A technique has been developed for measuring the complex dielectric permittivity, conductivity, and magnetic permeability over a range of frequencies in the ultrahigh frequency (UHF) and microwave frequency bands (100 MHz to 2.0 GHz). The sample core constitutes the dielectric of a coaxial transmission-line sample holder. With an S-parameter setup, two-port S-parameter measurements are made. The complex constituent parameters (epsilon', epsilon'', sigma, ..mu..) of the core samples then are computed from the S-parameters. Measurements on bulk water of various salinities demonstrate the salinity dependence of the dielectric constant (epsilon'/epsilon /SUB o/ ) of water at high salinities. The total measured loss is separated into a conductivity loss (sigma) and a dielectric loss (epsilon''/epsilon /SUB O/ ), since the frequency dependence of conductivity loss is well-known. Computed conductivity of bulk water shows little dispersion and is in good agreement with measured low-frequency (400-Hz) values.

  6. Floating data acquisition system for microwave calorimeter measurements on MTX

    SciTech Connect

    Sewall, N.R.; Meassick, S. )

    1989-09-13

    A microwave calorimeter has been designed for making 140-GHz absorption measurements on the MTX. Measurement of the intensity and spatial distribution of the FEL-generated microwave beam on the inner wall will indicate the absorption characteristics of the plasma when heated with a 140 GHz FEL pulse. The calorimeter works by monitoring changes of temperature in silicon carbide tiles located on the inner wall of the tokamak. Thermistors are used to measure the temperature of each tile. The tiles are located inside the tokamak about 1 cm outside of the limiter radius at machine potential. The success of this measurement depends on our ability to float the data acquisition system near machine potential and isolate it from the rest of the vault ground system. Our data acquisition system has 48 channels of thermistor signal conditioning, a multiplexer and digitizer section, a serial data formatter, and a fiber-optic transmitter to send the data out. Additionally, we bring timing signals to the interface through optical fibers to tell it when to begin measurement, while maintaining isolation. The receiver is an HP 200 series computer with a serial data interface; the computer provides storage and local display for the shot temperature profile. Additionally, the computer provides temporary storage of the data until it can be passed to a shared resource management system for archiving. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Assimilation of Passive and Active Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, C. S.; Reichle, R. H.; DeLannoy, G. J. M.; Liu, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Root-zone soil moisture is an important control over the partition of land surface energy and moisture, and the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture has been shown to improve model profile soil moisture [1]. To date, efforts to assimilate remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture at large scales have focused on soil moisture derived from the passive microwave Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the active Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT; together with its predecessor on the European Remote Sensing satellites (ERS. The assimilation of passive and active microwave soil moisture observations has not yet been directly compared, and so this study compares the impact of assimilating ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture data, both separately and together. Since the soil moisture retrieval skill from active and passive microwave data is thought to differ according to surface characteristics [2], the impact of each assimilation on the model soil moisture skill is assessed according to land cover type, by comparison to in situ soil moisture observations.

  8. Ion gyroscale fluctuation measurement with microwave imaging reflectometer on KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Leem, J.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Ko, S. H.; Wang, W. X.; Budny, R. V.; Luhmann, N. C.; Kim, K. W.

    2016-11-01

    Ion gyroscale turbulent fluctuations with the poloidal wavenumber kθ ˜ 3 cm-1 have been measured in the core region of the neutral beam (NB) injected low confinement (L-mode) plasmas on Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research. The turbulence poloidal wavenumbers are deduced from the frequencies and poloidal rotation velocities in the laboratory frame, measured by the multichannel microwave imaging reflectometer. Linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations also predict the unstable modes with the normalized wavenumber kθρs ˜ 0.4, consistent with the measurement. Comparison of the measured frequencies with the intrinsic mode frequencies from the linear simulations indicates that the measured ones are primarily due to the E × B flow velocity in the NB-injected fast rotating plasmas.

  9. Airborne microwave Doppler measurements of ocean wave directional spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Reeves, A. B.; Uliana, E. A.; Johnson, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is presented for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from aircraft using microwave Doppler radar. The technique involves backscattering coherent microwave radiation from a patch of sea surface which is small compared to dominant ocean wavelengths in the antenna look direction, and large compared to these lengths in the perpendicular (azimuthal) direction. The mean Doppler shift of the return signal measured over short time intervals is proportional to the mean sea surface velocity of the illuminated patch. Variable sea surface velocities induced by wave motion therefore produce time-varying Doppler shifts in the received signal. The large azimuthal dimension of the patch implies that these variations must be produced by surface waves traveling near the horizontal antenna look direction thus allowing determination of the direction of wave travel. Linear wave theory is used to convert the measured velocities into ocean wave spectral densities. Spectra measured simultaneously with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with a surface buoy, are presented. Applications and limitations of this airborne Doppler technique are discussed.

  10. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeff Sweterlitsch

    2004-10-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photoacoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photoacoustic signals in an off-line configuration. A second off-line instrument was constructed based in part on lessons learned with the first instrument, but which also expands the capabilities of the first instrument. Improvements include a control loop to allow more constant microwave power output and an ability to operate over a range of microwave frequencies. The third instrument, the on-line version of the fly ash monitor, has been designed, constructed, and initial efficiency tests have been conducted on the monitor's electrical components. Off-line photoacoustic microwave spectra of fly ash and coal were collected and analyzed, and the spectra demonstrated a linear correlation between the photoacoustic response and the carbon content in either fly ash or coal. Modifications were made to the on-line fly ash monitor to incorporate a dual-accelerometer system that would provide active noise control. Several experiments were conducted with flowing and non-flowing fly ash samples.

  11. Comparison of remote measurements of infrared surface temperatures and microwave soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Eileen M.; Carlson, Toby N.

    1987-01-01

    Scatterometric measurements of active microwave soil water content and radiometric measurements of thermal IR surface temperatures were made simultaneously fron an aircraft flying 400 m over an agricultural region of France after harvesting. The surface temperatures were used to deterine soil moisture availability estimates according to the Carlson (1986) model. Surface temperature or soil moisture availability and microwave soil moisture were correlated. The standard error in the IR temperature and soil moisture availability due to influences other than soil moisture is found to be + or - 2 C. The standard deviation of the temperature/moisture availability is greater than this standard error. It is shown that correlations between soil water content and moisture availability improve with increasing spatial or temporal variance in the measure surface temperatures.

  12. Synergistic use of active and passive microwave in soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Chauhan, N.; Jackson, T.; Saatchi, S.

    1992-01-01

    Data gathered during the MACHYDRO experiment in central Pennsylvania in July 1990 have been utilized to study the synergistic use of active and passive microwave systems for estimating soil moisture. These data sets were obtained during an eleven-day period with NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) and Push-Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over an instrumented watershed which included agricultural fields with a number of different crop covers. Simultaneous ground truth measurements were also made in order to characterize the state of vegetation and soil moisture under a variety of meteorological conditions. A combination algorithm is presented as applied to a representative corn field in the MACHYDRO watershed.

  13. Measuring Radiofrequency and Microwave Radiation from Varying Signal Strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bette; Gaul, W. C.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the process of measuring radiofrequency and microwave radiation from various signal strengths. The topics include: 1) Limits and Guidelines; 2) Typical Variable Standard (IEEE) Frequency Dependent; 3) FCC Standard 47 CFR 1.1310; 4) Compliance Follows Unity Rule; 5) Multiple Sources Contribute; 6) Types of RF Signals; 7) Interfering Radiations; 8) Different Frequencies Different Powers; 9) Power Summing - Peak Power; 10) Contribution from Various Single Sources; 11) Total Power from Multiple Sources; 12) Are You Out of Compliance?; and 13) In Compliance.

  14. Measure of Arctic Sea ice characteristics using microwave scatterometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, B. L.; Stanley, W. D.; Jones, W. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Results from a radar scatterometer used in the NASA microwave remote sensing experiment off the Alaska north shore are presented. The experiment was performed to determine whether various radars could be used from aircraft to provide definitive measurement of ice parameters such as pressure ridge height and direction, ice age, and ice type. With the aircraft at 300 m altitude, the 13.9 GHz scatterometer measured the normalized radar cross section of the ice using a pencil beam horizontally polarized antenna which pointed at either nadir or 50 deg incidence angle. Simultaneous laser altimeter and stereo photography measurements are presented as the 'surface truth' for comparison with the radar measurements. The results demonstrate that the scatterometer backscattered power is modulated by ice features and that a correlation exists between the radar cross section and the 'surface truth' derived from these ancillary instruments.

  15. Inflatable Antenna Microwave Radiometer for Soil Moisture Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Kendall, Bruce M.; Schroeder, Lyle C.; Harrington, Richard F.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave measurements of soil moisture are not being obtained at the required spatial Earth resolution with current technology. Recently, new novel designs for lightweight reflector systems have been developed using deployable inflatable antenna structures which could enable lightweight real-aperture radiometers. In consideration of this, a study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to determine the feasibility of developing a microwave radiometer system using inflatable reflector antenna technology to obtain high spatial resolution radiometric measurements of soil moisture from low Earth orbit and which could be used with a small and cost effective launch vehicle. The required high resolution with reasonable swath width coupled with the L-band measurement frequency for soil moisture dictated the use of a large (30 meter class) real aperture antenna in conjunction with a pushbroom antenna beam configuration and noise-injection type radiometer designs at 1.4 and 4.3 GHz to produce a 370 kilometer cross-track swath with a 10 kilometer resolution that could be packaged for launch with a Titan 2 class vehicle. This study includes design of the inflatable structure, control analysis, structural and thermal analysis, antenna and feed design, radiometer design, payload packaging, orbital analysis, and electromagnetic losses in the thin membrane inflatable materials.

  16. Optic-microwave mixing velocimeter for superhigh velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Weng Jidong; Wang Xiang; Tao Tianjiong; Liu Cangli; Tan Hua

    2011-12-15

    The phenomenon that a light beam reflected off a moving object experiences a Doppler shift in its frequency underlies practical interferometric techniques for remote velocity measurements, such as velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR), displacement interferometer system for any reflector (DISAR), and photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). While VISAR velocimeters are often bewildered by the fringe loss upon high-acceleration dynamic process diagnosis, the optic-fiber velocimeters such as DISAR and PDV, on the other hand, are puzzled by high velocity measurement over 10 km/s, due to the demand for the high bandwidth digitizer. Here, we describe a new optic-microwave mixing velocimeter (OMV) for super-high velocity measurements. By using currently available commercial microwave products, we have constructed a simple, compact, and reliable OMV device, and have successfully obtained, with a digitizer of bandwidth 6 GH only, the precise velocity history of an aluminum flyer plate being accelerated up to 11.2 km/s in a three stage gas-gun experiment.

  17. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  18. Microwave cavity study for Anapole measurement in francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Jonathan; Sheng, Dong; Orozco, Luis

    2010-03-01

    We present a detailed study of the mode structure and diffraction loses of a microwave spherical resonator using analytical and numerical methods. The resonator is an essential part of the apparatus to measure the anapole moment in francium [1]. The sensitivity of the measurement to polarization, alignment, and mode purity requires a study beyond the well-established paraxial methods. Our studies have found regions of parameter space where it is possible to satisfy the experimental requirements. Investigations of the coupling mechanisms of the radiation into the cavity point towards quasi-optical methods that can suppress the existence of traveling waves to acceptable methods. [4pt] [1] E. Gomez, S. Aubin, G. D. Sprouse, L. A. Orozco, and D. P. DeMille, ``Measurement method for the nuclear anapole moment of laser-trapped alkali-metal atoms,'' Phys. Rev. A 75, 033418 (2007).

  19. Active microwave investigation of snowpacks: Experimental documentation, Colorado 1979-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiles, W. H.; Ulaby, F. T.; Aslam, A.; Abdelrazik, M.

    1981-01-01

    During the winter of 1979-1980, the University of Kansas Microwave Active Spectrometer systems measured the backscattering properties of snowpacks under varying conditions at four test sites in Colorado. In addition to the radar data over 1-35 GHz, ground-truth measurements of the atmospheric, snow, and soil characteristics were obtained for each radar data set. The test sites, data acquisition procedures, and data that were acquired in this experiment are presented and described.

  20. Effects of microwave exposure on the hamster immune system. I. Natural killer cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.K.; Cain, C.A.; Lockwood, J.; Tompkins, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Hamsters were exposed to repeated or single doses of microwave energy and monitored for changes in core body temperature, circulating leukocyte profiles, serum corticosteroid levels, and natural killer (NK) cell activity in various tissues. NK cytotoxicity was measured in a /sup 51/Cr-release assay employing baby hamster kidney (BHK) targets or BHK infected with herpes simplex virus. Repeated exposure of hamsters at 15 mW/cm2 for 60 min/day had no significant effect on natural levels of spleen-cell NK activity against BHK targets. Similarly, repeated exposure at 15 mW/cm2 over a 5-day period had no demonstrable effect on the induction of spleen NK activity by vaccinia virus immunization, that is, comparable levels of NK were induced in untreated and microwave-treated animals. In contrast, treatment of hamsters with a single 60-min microwave exposure at 25 mW/cm2 caused a significant suppression in induced spleen NK activity. A similar but less marked decrease in spleen NK activity was observed in sham-exposed animals. Moreover, the sham effects on NK activity were not predictable and appeared to represent large individual animal variations in the response to stress factors. Depressed spleen NK activity was evident as early as 4 h postmicrowave treatment and returned to normal levels by 8 h. Hamsters exposed at 25 mW/cm2 showed an elevated temperature of 3.0-3.5 degrees C that returned to normal within 60 min after termination of microwave exposure. These animals also showed a marked lymphopenia and neutrophilia by 1 h posttreatment that returned to normal by 8-10 h. Serum glucocorticosteroids were elevated between 1 aNd 8 h after microwave treatment. Sham-exposed animals did not demonstrate significant changes in core body temperature, peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) profile, or glucocorticosteroid levels as compared to minimum-handling controls.

  1. Crystallization and activation of silicon by microwave rapid annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shunsuke; Ota, Kosuke; Hasumi, Masahiko; Suzuki, Ayuta; Ushijima, Mitsuru; Sameshima, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    A combination of the carbon-powder absorber with microwave irradiation is proposed as a rapid heat method. 2-μm-diameter carbon powders with a packing density of 0.08 effectively absorbed 2.45 GHz 1000-W-microwave and heated themselves to 1163 °C for 26 s. The present heat treatment recrystallized n-type crystalline silicon surfaces implanted with 1.0 × 10^{15}hbox {-cm}^{-2}-boron and phosphorus atoms with crystalline volume ratios of 0.99 and 0.93, respectively, by microwave irradiation at 1000 W for 20 s. Activation and carrier generation were simultaneously achieved with a sheet resistivity of 62 Ω / hbox {sq}. A high photo-induced-carrier effective lifetime of 1.0 × 10^{-4} s was also achieved. Typical electrical current-rectified characteristic and solar cell characteristic with an efficiency of 12.1 % under 100-mW/cm2-air-mass-1.5 illumination were obtained. Moreover, heat treatment with microwave irradiation at 1000 W for 22 s successfully crystallized silicon thin films with thicknesses ranging from 2.4 to 50 nm formed on quartz substrates. Nano-crystalline cluster structure with a high volume ratio of 50 % was formed in the 1.8-nm (initial 2.4-nm)-thick silicon films. Photoluminescence around 1.77 eV was observed for the 1.8-nm-thick silicon films annealed at 260 °C in 1.3 × 106-Pa-H2O-vapor for 3 h after the microwave heating.

  2. Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies with Archeops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, A.

    Archeops is a balloon-borne instrument dedicated to measuring cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies at high angular resolution (about 8 arcminutes) over a large fraction (30%) of the sky in the millimetre domain (from 143 to 545 GhZ). Here, we describe the latest results from the instument during the 2 main flights that happened during the Arctic night from Kiruna (Sweden) to Russia in 2001 and 2002. Various sources of noise are discussed, including atmospheric noise, parasitic noise, photon noise, cosmic variance, ... The white noise sensitivity of the experiment is about 90 microKCMB per 20 arcminute size pixel. Best estimates of the angular power spectrum of the CMB anisotropies are presented. The consequences in terms of cosmological parameters are outlined. Other results include the first measurement of polarisation and accurate maps of the galactic plane diffuse millimetre emission.

  3. Analysis of aircraft microwave measurements of the ocean surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willand, J. H.; Fowler, M. G.; Reifenstein, E. C., III; Chang, D. T.

    1973-01-01

    A data system was developed to process, from calibrated brightness temperature to computation of estimated parameters, the microwave measurements obtained by the NASA CV-990 aircraft during the 1972 Meteorological Expedition. A primary objective of the study was the implementation of an integrated software system at the computing facility of NASA/GSFC, and its application to the 1972 data. A single test case involving measurements away from and over a heavy rain cell was chosen to examine the effect of clouds upon the ability to infer ocean surface parameters. The results indicate substantial agreement with those of the theoretical study; namely, that the values obtained for the surface properties are consistent with available ground-truth information, and are reproducible except within the heaviest portions of the rain cell, at which nonlinear (or saturation) effects become apparent. Finally, it is seen that uncorrected instrumental effects introduce systematic errors which may limit the accuracy of the method.

  4. A Microwave Radiometer for Internal Body Temperature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Robert Patterson

    This thesis presents the analysis and design of a microwave radiometer for internal body temperature measurements. There is currently no available method for non-invasive temperature measurement inside the human body. However, knowledge of both relative and absolute temperature variations over time is important to a number of medical applications. The research presented in this thesis details a proof-of-concept near-field microwave radiometer demonstrating relative thermometry of a multi-layer phantom. There are a number of technical challenges addressed in this thesis for radiometric determination of sub-degree temperature variations in the human body. A theoretical approach is developed for determining sensing depth from known complex layered tissues, which is defined as a figure of merit, and is shown to be dependent on frequency, electrical properties of the tissues, and the near-field probe. In order to obtain depth resolution, multiple frequency operation can be used, so multi-frequency probes are designed and demonstrated in this work. The choice of frequencies is determined not only by the tissue material properties, but also by the ever increasing radio interference in the environment. In this work, quiet bands allocated to radio astronomy are investigated. The radiometer and probe need to be compact to be wearable, and several advancements are made towards a fully wearable device: multi-frequency low-profile probes are designed and fabricated on a flexible substrate and the process of on-chip integration is demonstrated by a GaAs MMIC cold noise source for radiometer calibration. The implemented proof-of-concept device consists of two radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 2.7 GHz, designed with commercial inexpensive devices that can enable sufficient sensitivity. The device is tested on a phantom with two water layers whose temperatures are varied in a controlled manner, and focused on the human body temperature range. Measured results are discussed qualitatively

  5. Effective dopant activation via low temperature microwave annealing of ion implanted silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao; David Theodore, N.; Vemuri, Rajitha N. P.; Das, Sayantan; Lu, Wei; Lau, S. S.; Alford, T. L.

    2013-11-01

    Susceptor-assisted microwave annealing enables effective dopant activation, at low temperatures, in ion-implanted Si. Given similar thermal budgets for microwave annealing and rapid thermal annealing (RTA), sheet resistances of microwave annealed Si, with either B+ or P+ implants, are lower than the values obtained using RTA. The fraction of dopants activated is as high as 18% for B+ implants and 64% for P+ implants. Dopant diffusion is imperceptible after microwave annealing, but significant after RTA, for P+ implanted Si samples with the same dopant activation. Microwave annealing achieves such properties using shorter anneal times and lower peak temperatures compared to RTA.

  6. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ozone measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; Margitan, J. J.; McDermid, I. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Braathen, G.; Deshler, T.; Fishman, J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz. Analyses described here focus on the MLS Version 3 data (the first set of files made publicly available). We describe results of simulations performed to assess the quality of the retrieval algorithms, in terms of both mixing ratio and radiance closure. From actual MLS observations, the 205-GHz ozone retrievals give better closure (smaller radiance residuals) than that from the 183-GHz measurements and should be considered more accurate from the calibration aspects. However, the 183-GHz data are less noise limited in the mesosphere and can provide the most useful scientific results in that region. We compare the retrieved 205-GHz ozone profiles in the middle-to lower stratosphere to ozonesonde measurements at a wide range of latitudes and seasons. Ground-based lidar data from Table Mountain, California, provide a good reference for comparisons at higher altitudes. Based on these analyses, comparisons with balloon-borne measurements and others, as well as a detailed budget of estimated uncertainties, MLS results appear to be generally of high quality, with some biases worth mentioning. Results for the lowermost stratosphere (˜50 to 100 hPa) are still in need of improvement. A set of estimated precision and accuracy values is derived for the MLS ozone data sets. We also comment on recent updates in the retrieval algorithms and their impact on ozone values.

  7. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; Margitan, J. J.; McDermid, I. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Braathen, G.; Deshler, T.; Fishman, J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz. Analyses described here focus on the MLS Version 3 data (the first set of files made publicly available). We describe results of simulations performed to assess the quality of the retrieval algorithms, in terms of both mixing ratio and radiance closure. From actual MLS observations, the 205-GHz ozone retrievals give better closure (smaller radiance residuals) than that from the 183-GHz measurements and should be considered more accurate from the calibration aspects. However, the 183-GHz data are less noise limited in the mesosphere and can provide the most useful scientific results in that region. We compare the retrieved 205-GHz ozone profiles in the middle-to lower stratosphere to ozonesonde measurements at a wide range of latitudes and seasons. Ground-based lidar data from Table Mountain, California, provide a good reference for comparisons at higher altitudes. Based on these analyses, comparisons with balloon-borne measurements and others, as well as a detailed budget of estimated uncertainties, MLS results appear to be generally of high quality, with some biases worth mentioning. Results for the lowermost stratosphere (approx. 50 to 100 bPa) are still in need of improvement. A set of estimated precision and accuracy values is derived for the MLS ozone data sets. We also comment on recent updates in the retrieval algorithms and their impact on ozone values.

  8. Development of Microwave Superconducting Microresonators for Neutrino Mass Measurement in the Holmes Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachero, A.; Day, P. K.; Falferi, P.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Giordano, C.; Maino, M.; Margesin, B.; Mezzena, R.; Nizzolo, R.; Nucciotti, A.; Puiu, A.; Zanetti, L.

    2016-07-01

    The European Research Council has recently funded HOLMES, a project with the aim of performing a calorimetric measurement of the electron neutrino mass measuring the energy released in the electron capture decay of 163Ho. The baseline for HOLMES are microcalorimeters coupled to transition edge sensors read-out with rf-SQUIDs, for microwave multiplexing purposes. A promising alternative solution is based on superconducting microwave resonators that have undergone rapid development in the last decade. These detectors, called Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs), are inherently multiplexed in the frequency domain and suitable for even larger-scale pixel arrays, with theoretical high energy resolution and fast response. The aim of our activity is to develop arrays of microresonator detectors for X-ray spectroscopy and suitable for the calorimetric measurement of the energy spectra of 163Ho. Superconductive multilayer films composed by a sequence of pure Titanium and stoichiometric TiN layers show many ideal properties for MKIDs, such as low loss, large sheet resistance, large kinetic inductance, and tunable critical temperature T_c. We developed Ti/TiN multilayer microresonators with T_c within the range from 70 mK to 4.5 K and with good uniformity. In this contribution, we present the design solutions adopted, the fabrication processes, and the characterization results.

  9. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI): Instrument Overview and Early On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, David W.; Newell, David A.; Wentz, Frank J.; Krimchansky, Sergey; Jackson, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international satellite mission that uses measurements from an advanced radar/radiometer system on a core observatory as reference standards to unify and advance precipitation estimates made by a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. The GPM core observatory was launched on February 27, 2014 at 18:37 UT in a 65? inclination nonsun-synchronous orbit. GPM focuses on precipitation as a key component of the Earth's water and energy cycle, and has the capability to provide near-real-time observations for tracking severe weather events, monitoring freshwater resources, and other societal applications. The GPM microwave imager (GMI) on the core observatory provides the direct link to the constellation radiometer sensors, which fly mainly in polar orbits. The GMI sensitivity, accuracy, and stability play a crucial role in unifying the measurements from the GPM constellation of satellites. The instrument has exhibited highly stable operations through the duration of the calibration/validation period. This paper provides an overview of the GMI instrument and a report of early on-orbit commissioning activities. It discusses the on-orbit radiometric sensitivity, absolute calibration accuracy, and stability for each radiometric channel. Index Terms-Calibration accuracy, passive microwave remote sensing, radiometric sensitivity.

  10. Assimilation of passive and active microwave soil moisture retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, C. S.; Reichle, R. H.; De Lannoy, G. J. M.; Liu, Q.

    2012-02-01

    Near-surface soil moisture observations from the active microwave ASCAT and the passive microwave AMSR-E satellite instruments are assimilated, both separately and together, into the NASA Catchment land surface model over 3.5 years using an ensemble Kalman filter. The impact of each assimilation is evaluated using in situ soil moisture observations from 85 sites in the US and Australia, in terms of the anomaly time series correlation-coefficient, R. The skill gained by assimilating either ASCAT or AMSR-E was very similar, even when separated by land cover type. Over all sites, the mean root-zone R was significantly increased from 0.45 for an open-loop, to 0.55, 0.54, and 0.56 by the assimilation of ASCAT, AMSR-E, and both, respectively. Each assimilation also had a positive impact over each land cover type sampled. For maximum accuracy and coverage it is recommended that active and passive microwave observations be assimilated together.

  11. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ClO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Lungu, T. A.; Perun, V. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Burke, J. R.; Hardy, J. C.; Nakamura, L. L.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Thurstans, R. P.; Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; Dezafra, R. L.; Shindell, D. T.

    1996-04-01

    Validation of stratospheric ClO measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is described. Credibility of the measurements is established by (1) the consistency of the measured ClO spectral emission line with the retrieved ClO profiles and (2) comparisons of ClO from MLS with that from correlative measurements by balloon-based, ground-based, and aircraft-based instruments. Values of "noise" (random), "scaling" (multiplicative), and "bias" (additive) uncertainties are determined for the Version 3 data, the first version publicly released, and known artifacts in these data are identified. Comparisons with correlative measurements indicate agreement to within the combined uncertainties expected for MLS and the other measurements being compared. It is concluded that MLS Version 3 ClO data, with proper consideration of the uncertainties and "quality" parameters produced with these data, can be used for scientific analyses at retrieval surfaces between 46 and 1 hPa (approximately 20-50 km in height). Future work is planned to correct known problems in the data and improve their quality.

  12. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ClO Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Lungu, T. A.; Perun, V. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Burke, J. R.; Hardy, J. C.; Nakamura, L. L.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Thurstans, R. P.; Thurstans, R. P.; Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; deZafra, R. L.; Shindell, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Validation of stratospheric ClO measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is described. Credibility of the measurements is established by (1) the consistency of the measured ClO spectral emission line with the retrieved ClO profiles and (2) comparisons of ClO from MLS with that from correlative measurements by balloon-based, ground-based, and aircraft-based instruments. Values of "noise" (random), "scaling" (multiplicative), and "bias" (additive) uncertainties are determined for the Version 3 data, in the first version public release of the known artifacts in these data are identified. Comparisons with correlative measurements indicate agreement to within the combined uncertainties expected for MLS and the other measurements being compared. It is concluded that MLS Version 3 ClO data, with proper consideration of the uncertainties and "quality" parameters produced with these data, can be used for scientific analyses at retrieval surfaces between 46 and 1 hPa (approximately 20-50 km in height). Future work is planned to correct known problems in the data and improve their quality.

  13. Passive microwave measurements of temperature and salinity in coastal zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, H.-J. C.; Kendall, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental methods and results from the maritime remote sensing (MARSEN) experiments using dual frequency microwave radiometer detecting systems on board aircraft are described. The radiometers were operated at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz and flown above U.S. Atlantic coastal areas, Chesapeake Bay, around Puerto Rico, and over the German Bight. The advanced switched radiometers used were configured to be independent of gain variations and errors originating from front-end losses and determined the absolute brightness temperatures to within a few tenths Kelvin. Corrections to the observed brightness temperature of the ocean are analytically defined, including accounts made for roughness, the cosmic background radiation, and the solar radio source. The coastal flight data for salinity gradients and surface temperatures were compared with sea truth measured from ships and found to be accurate to within 1 C and 1 pph.

  14. Measuring picosecond isomerization kinetics via broadband microwave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dian, Brian C; Brown, Gordon G; Douglass, Kevin O; Pate, Brooks H

    2008-05-16

    The rotational spectrum of a highly excited molecule is qualitatively different from its pure rotational spectrum and contains information about the intramolecular dynamics. We have developed a broadband Fourier transform microwave spectrometer that uses chirped-pulse excitation to measure a rotational spectrum in the 7.5- to 18.5-gigahertz range in a single shot and thereby reduces acquisition time sufficiently to couple molecular rotational spectroscopy with tunable laser excitation. After vibrationally exciting a single molecular conformation of cyclopropane carboxaldehyde above the barrier to C-C single-bond isomerization, we applied line-shape analysis of the dynamic rotational spectrum to reveal a product yield and picosecond reaction rate that were significantly different from statistical predictions. The technique should be widely applicable to dynamical studies of radical intermediates, molecular complexes, and conformationally flexible molecules with biological interest.

  15. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tudisco, O.; Falcetta, C.; De Angelis, R.; Florean, M.; Neri, C.; Mazzotta, C.; Pollastrone, F.; Rocchi, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Lucca Fabris, A.; Manente, M.; Ferri, F.; Tasinato, L.; Trezzolani, F.; Accatino, L.; Selmo, A.

    2013-03-15

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10{sup 16} m{sup -3} and 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small ({lambda}= 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02 Degree-Sign has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}.

  16. Aircraft measurements of microwave emission from Arctic Sea ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilheit, T.; Nordberg, W.; Blinn, J.; Campbell, W.; Edgerton, A.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of the microwave emission from Arctic Sea ice were made with aircraft at 8 wavelengths ranging from 0.510 to 2.81 cm. The expected contrast in emissivities between ice and water was observed at all wavelengths. Distributions of sea ice and open water were mapped from altitudes up to 11 km in the presence of dense cloud cover. Different forms of ice also exhibited strong contrasts in emissivity. Emissivity differences of up to 0.2 were observed between two types of ice at the 0.811-cm wavelength. The higher emissivity ice type is tentatively identified as having been formed more recently than the lower emissivity ice. ?? 1971.

  17. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements.

    PubMed

    Tudisco, O; Lucca Fabris, A; Falcetta, C; Accatino, L; De Angelis, R; Manente, M; Ferri, F; Florean, M; Neri, C; Mazzotta, C; Pavarin, D; Pollastrone, F; Rocchi, G; Selmo, A; Tasinato, L; Trezzolani, F; Tuccillo, A A

    2013-03-01

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10(16) m(-3) and 10(19) m(-3)) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small (λ = 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02° has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 × 10(16) m(-3).

  18. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder temperature and pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lungu, T.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Singh, U.; Gross, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-04-01

    The accuracy and precision of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) atmospheric temperature and tangent-point pressure measurements are described. Temperatures and tangent-point pressure (atmospheric pressure at the tangent height of the field of view boresight) are retrieved from a 15-channel 63-GHz radiometer measuring O2 microwave emissions from the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Version 3 data (first public release) contains scientifically useful temperatures from 22 to 0.46 hPa. Accuracy estimates are based on instrument performance, spectroscopic uncertainty and retrieval numerics, and range from 2.1 K at 22 hPa to 4.8 K at 0.46 hPa for temperature and from 200 m (equivalent log pressure) at 10 hPa to 300 m at 0.1 hPa. Temperature accuracy is limited mainly by uncertainty in instrument characterization, and tangent-point pressure accuracy is limited mainly by the accuracy of spectroscopic parameters. Precisions are around 1 K and 100 m. Comparisons are presented among temperatures from MLS, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) stratospheric analysis and lidar stations at Table Mountain, California, Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP), France, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, Maryland. MLS temperatures tend to be 1-2 K lower than NMC and lidar, but MLS is often 5 - 10 K lower than NMC in the winter at high latitudes, especially within the northern hemisphere vortex. Winter MLS and OHP (44°N) lidar temperatures generally agree and tend to be lower than NMC. Problems with Version 3 MLS temperatures and tangent-point pressures are identified, but the high precision of MLS radiances will allow improvements with better algorithms planned for the future.

  19. Microwave radiometric measurements of soil moisture in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macelloni, G.; Paloscia, S.; Pampaloni, P.; Santi, E.; Tedesco, M.

    Within the framework of the MAP and RAPHAEL projects, airborne experimental campaigns were carried out by the IFAC group in 1999 and 2000, using a multifrequency microwave radiometer at L, C and X bands (1.4, 6.8 and 10 GHz). The aim of the experiments was to collect soil moisture and vegetation biomass information on agricultural areas to give reliable inputs to the hydrological models. It is well known that microwave emission from soil, mainly at L-band (1.4 GHz), is very well correlated to its moisture content. Two experimental areas in Italy were selected for this project: one was the Toce Valley, Domodossola, in 1999, and the other, the agricultural area of Cerbaia, close to Florence, where flights were performed in 2000. Measurements were carried out on bare soils, corn and wheat fields in different growth stages and on meadows. Ground data of soil moisture (SMC) were collected by other research teams involved in the experiments. From the analysis of the data sets, it has been confirmed that L-band is well related to the SMC of a rather deep soil layer, whereas C-band is sensitive to the surface SMC and is more affected by the presence of surface roughness and vegetation, especially at high incidence angles. An algorithm for the retrieval of soil moisture, based on the sensitivity to moisture of the brightness temperature at C-band, has been tested using the collected data set. The results of the algorithm, which is able to correct for the effect of vegetation by means of the polarisation index at X-band, have been compared with soil moisture data measured on the ground. Finally, the sensitivity of emission at different frequencies to the soil moisture profile was investigated. Experimental data sets were interpreted by using the Integral Equation Model (IEM) and the outputs of the model were used to train an artificial neural network to reproduce the soil moisture content at different depths.

  20. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Temperature and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, E. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lungu, T.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Singh, U.; Gross, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) atmospheric temperature and tangent-point pressure measurements are described. Temperatures and tangent- point pressure (atmospheric pressure at the tangent height of the field of view boresight) are retrieved from a 15-channel 63-GHz radiometer measuring O2 microwave emissions from the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Version 3 data (first public release) contains scientifically useful temperatures from 22 to 0.46 hPa. Accuracy estimates are based on instrument performance, spectroscopic uncertainty and retrieval numerics, and range from 2.1 K at 22 hPa to 4.8 K at 0.46 hPa for temperature and from 200 m (equivalent log pressure) at 10 hPa to 300 m at 0.1 hPa. Temperature accuracy is limited mainly by uncertainty in instrument characterization, and tangent-point pressure accuracy is limited mainly by the accuracy of spectroscopic parameters. Precisions are around 1 K and 100 m. Comparisons are presented among temperatures from MLS, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) stratospheric analysis and lidar stations at Table Mountain, California, Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP), France, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, Maryland. MLS temperatures tend to be 1-2 K lower than NMC and lidar, but MLS is often 5 - 10 K lower than NMC in the winter at high latitudes, especially within the northern hemisphere vortex. Winter MLS and OHP (44 deg N) lidar temperatures generally agree and tend to be lower than NMC. Problems with Version 3 MLS temperatures and tangent-point pressures are identified, but the high precision of MLS radiances will allow improvements with better algorithms planned for the future.

  1. Measurements of the microwave power in the wall at EBT-I/S

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Hankins, O.E.

    1982-01-01

    An understanding of the microwave propagation and absorption in Elmo bumpy torus is critical because the plasma production, the heating, and the stabilization provided by the hot electron rings are dependent on these processes. A microwave power balance model was proposed earlier for EBT. This paper will describe a series of simple experiments designed to test this model by comparing its predictions and assumptions to both calorimetric and broad beam antenna measurements of microwave power at the wall in EBT-I/S.

  2. Microwave pulse propagation measurements in left-handed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Gennaro, Emiliano; Parimi, Patanjali V.; Vodo, Plarenta; Lu, Wentao; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2004-03-01

    Left handed electromagnetism is well established in media with negative permeability and permittivity and in photonic crystals [1]. In such media the negative refractive index is accompanied by large dispersion dn/dω, and consequently a very low group velocity is predicted for left-handed metamaterial (LHM). It is well known that an artificial material consisting of interleaved arrays of wires and split ring resonators in a certain microwave frequency range shows left handed behavior. We have carried out pulse measurements on LHM using a transition analyzer in order to measure the group velocity. Time delay measurements are performed in an X-band and parallel plate waveguide. Sending a 100ns width pulse with a carrier frequency ranging between 9 and 11 GHz, we analyze the signal delay due to the sample. The results suggest that the group velocity in the LHM is very low. Pulse delay measurements in photonic crystals are also discussed. Work supported by NSF & AFRL [1]. P. V. Parimi et al., submitted (2003).

  3. Potential of jackfruit peel as precursor for activated carbon prepared by microwave induced NaOH activation.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-05-01

    The feasibility of preparing activated carbon (JPAC) from jackfruit peel, an industrial residue abundantly available from food manufacturing plants via microwave-assisted NaOH activation was explored. The influences of chemical impregnation ratio, microwave power and radiation time on the properties of activated carbon were investigated. JPAC was examined by pore structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherm, elemental analysis, surface acidity/basicity and zeta potential measurements. The adsorptive behavior of JPAC was quantified using methylene blue as model dye compound. The best conditions resulted in JPAC with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 400.06 mg/g and carbon yield of 80.82%. The adsorption data was best fitted to the pseudo-second-order equation, while the adsorption mechanism was well described by the intraparticle diffusion model. The findings revealed the versatility of jackfruit peels as good precursor for preparation of high quality activated carbon.

  4. Microwave-assisted preparation and adsorption performance of activated carbon from biodiesel industry solid reside: influence of operational parameters.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-01-01

    Preparation of activated carbon has been attempted using KOH as activating agent by microwave heating from biodiesel industry solid residue, oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFBAC). The significance of chemical impregnation ratio (IR), microwave power and activation time on the properties of activated carbon were investigated. The optimum condition has been identified at the IR of 1.0, microwave power of 600 W and activation time of 7 min. EFBAC was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement, determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue as dye model compound. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 395.30 mg/g and carbon yield of 73.78%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume were corresponding to 1372 m2/g and 0.76 cm3/g, respectively.

  5. Optical Measurements of Strong Microwave Fields with Rydberg Atoms in a Vapor Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. A.; Miller, S. A.; Raithel, G.; Gordon, J. A.; Butler, M. L.; Holloway, C. L.

    2016-03-01

    We present a spectral analysis of Rydberg atoms in strong microwave fields using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) as an all-optical readout. The measured spectroscopic response enables optical, atom-based electric-field measurements of high-power microwaves. In our experiments, microwaves are irradiated into a room-temperature rubidium vapor cell. The microwaves are tuned near the two-photon 65 D -66 D Rydberg transition and reach an electric-field strength of 230 V /m , about 20% of the microwave-ionization threshold of these atoms. A Floquet treatment is used to model the Rydberg-level energies and their excitation rates. We arrive at an empirical model for the field-strength distribution inside the spectroscopic cell that yields excellent overall agreement between the measured and calculated Rydberg EIT-Floquet spectra. Using spectral features in the Floquet maps, we achieve an absolute strong-field measurement precision of 6%.

  6. Measurement of Localized Nonlinear Microwave Response of Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sheng-Chiang; Palmer, Benjamin; Maiorov, B.

    2005-03-01

    We measure the local harmonic generation from superconducting thin films at microwave frequencies to investigate the intrinsic nonlinear Meissner effect near T/c in zero magnetic field. Both second and third harmonic generation are measured to identify time-reversal symmetry breaking (TRSB) and time-reversal symmetric (TRS) nonlinearities. The microscope can measure the local nonlinear response of a bicrystal grain boundary [Sheng-Chiang Lee and Steven M. Anlage, Physica C 408-410, 324 (2004); cond-mat/0408170]. We also performed a systematic doping-dependent study of the nonlinear response and find that the TRS characteristic nonlinearity current density scale follows the doping dependence of the de-pairing critical current density [cond-mat/0405595]. We extract a spontaneous TRSB characteristic current density scale that onsets at T/c, grows with decreasing temperature, and systematically decreases in magnitude (at fixed T/T/c) with under-doping. The origin of this current scale could be Josephson circulating currents or the spontaneous magnetization associated with a TRSB order parameter.

  7. Microwave Imager Measures Sea Surface Temperature Through Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image was acquired over Tropical Atlantic and U.S. East Coast regions on Aug. 22 - Sept. 23, 1998. Cloud data were collected by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data were collected aboard the NASA/NASDA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite by The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). TMI is the first satellite microwave sensor capable of accurately measuring sea surface temperature through clouds, as shown in this scene. For years scientists have known there is a strong correlation between sea surface temperature and the intensity of hurricanes. But one of the major stumbling blocks for forecasters has been the precise measurement of those temperatures when a storm begins to form. In this scene, clouds have been made translucent to allow an unobstructed view of the surface. Notice Hurricane Bonnie approaching the Carolina Coast (upper left) and Hurricane Danielle following roughly in its path (lower right). The ocean surface has been falsely colored to show a map of water temperature--dark blues are around 75oF, light blues are about 80oF, greens are about 85oF, and yellows are roughly 90oF. A hurricane gathers energy from warm waters found at tropical latitudes. In this image we see Hurricane Bonnie cross the Atlantic, leaving a cooler trail of water in its wake. As Hurricane Danielle followed in Bonnie's path, the wind speed of the second storm dropped markedly, as available energy to fuel the storm dropped off. But when Danielle left Bonnie's wake, wind speeds increased due to temperature increases in surface water around the storm. As a hurricane churns up the ocean, it's central vortex draws surface heat and water into the storm. That suction at the surface causes an upwelling of deep water. At depth, tropical ocean waters are significantly colder than water found near the surface. As they're pulled up to meet the storm, those colder waters essentially leave a footprint in the storm's wake

  8. Active microwave remote sensing of earth/land, chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Geoscience applications of active microwave remote sensing systems are examined. Major application areas for the system include: (1) exploration of petroleum, mineral, and ground water resources, (2) mapping surface and structural features, (3) terrain analysis, both morphometric and genetic, (4) application in civil works, and (5) application in the areas of earthquake prediction and crustal movements. Although the success of radar surveys has not been widely publicized, they have been used as a prime reconnaissance data base for mineral exploration and land-use evaluation in areas where photography cannot be obtained.

  9. Measuring the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization with SPT-POL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, Abigail; SPT-POL Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    A new polarization-sensitive camera, SPT-POL, designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), was deployed on the 10 meter South Pole Telescope in January 2012. The goal of the project is to exploit the high resolution of the telescope (1 arcminute beam) and the high sensitivity afforded by the 1536 detector camera to characterize the B-mode polarization induced by the gravitational lensing of the primordial E-mode CMB polarization, as well as to detect or set an upper limit on the level of the B-mode polarization from inflationary gravitational waves. The lensing B-modes will be used to constrain the sum of the neutrino masses by measuring large scale structure, while the inflationary B-modes are sensitive to the energy scale of inflation. I will discuss the development of the SPT-POL camera including the cryogenic design and the transition edge sensor (TES) detectors as well as the science goals and status of the ongoing of the SPT-POL program.

  10. Measuring the cosmic microwave background polarization with POLARBEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Darcy; Polarbear Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    POLARBEAR is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. POLARBEAR-1 started observations in 2012, and in 2014, the POLARBEAR team published results from its first season of observations on a small fraction of the sky. These results include the first measurement of a non-zero B-mode polarization angular power spectrum, measured at sub-degree scales where the dominant signal is gravitational lensing of the CMB. We also published a measurement of the large-scale gravitational structure deflection power spectrum derived from CMB polarization alone, which demonstrates a powerful technique that can be used to measure nearly all of the gravitational structure in the universe. Improving these measurements requires precision characterization of the CMB polarization signal over large fractions of the sky, at multiple frequencies. To achieve these goals, POLARBEAR has begun expanding to include an additional two 3.5 meter telescopes with multi-chroic receivers, known as the Simons Array. Phased upgrades to receiver technology will improve sensitivity and capabilities, while continuing a deep survey of 80% of the sky. POLARBEAR-2 is the next receiver that will be installed in 2015 on a new telescope, with a larger area focal plane with dichroic pixels, with bands at 95 GHz and 150 GHz, and a total of 7,588 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers. The focal plane is cooled to 250 milliKelvin, and the bolometers will be read-out by SQUID amplifiers with 40x frequency domain multiplexing. The array is designed to have a noise equivalent temperature of 5.7 μK√s.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring butterfat and protein content using microwave absorption techniques

    DOEpatents

    Fryer, Michael O.; Hills, Andrea J.; Morrison, John L.

    2000-01-01

    A self calibrating method and apparatus for measuring butterfat and protein content based on measuring the microwave absorption of a sample of milk at several microwave frequencies. A microwave energy source injects microwave energy into the resonant cavity for absorption and reflection by the sample undergoing evaluation. A sample tube is centrally located in the resonant cavity passing therethrough and exposing the sample to the microwave energy. A portion of the energy is absorbed by the sample while another portion of the microwave energy is reflected back to an evaluation device such as a network analyzer. The frequency at which the reflected radiation is at a minimum within the cavity is combined with the scatter coefficient S.sub.11 as well as a phase change to calculate the butterfat content in the sample. The protein located within the sample may also be calculated in a likewise manner using the frequency, S.sub.11 and phase variables. A differential technique using a second resonant cavity containing a reference standard as a sample will normalize the measurements from the unknown sample and thus be self-calibrating. A shuttered mechanism will switch the microwave excitation between the unknown and the reference cavities. An integrated apparatus for measuring the butterfat content in milk using microwave absorption techniques is also presented.

  12. Migration testing of plastics and microwave-active materials for high-temperature food-use applications.

    PubMed

    Castle, L; Jickells, S M; Gilbert, J; Harrison, N

    1990-01-01

    Temperatures have been measured using a fluoro-optic probe at the food/container or food/packaging interfaces as appropriate, for a range of foods heated in either a microwave or a conventional oven. Reheating ready-prepared foods packaged in plastics pouches, trays or dishes in the microwave oven, according to the manufacturers' instructions, resulted in temperatures in the range 61-121 degrees C. Microwave-active materials (susceptors) in contact with ready-prepared foods frequently reached local spot temperatures above 200 degrees C. For foods cooked in a microwave oven according to published recipes, temperatures from 91 degrees C to 200 degrees C were recorded, whilst similar temperatures (92-194 degrees C) were attained in a conventional oven, but over longer periods of time. These measurements form the basis for examining compliance with specific and overall migration limits for plastics materials. The testing conditions proposed depend on the intended use of the plastic - for microwave oven use for aqueous foods, for all lidding materials, and for reheating of foods, testing would only be required with aqueous simulants for 1 h at 100 degrees C; for unspecified microwave oven use, testing with olive oil would be required for 30 min at 150 degrees C; and for unspecified use in a conventional oven testing with olive oil would be required for 2 h at 175 degrees C. For microwave-active materials, it is proposed that testing is carried out in the microwave oven using a novel semi-solid simulant comprising olive oil and water absorbed onto an inert support of diatomaceous earth. The testing in this instance is carried out with the simulant instead of food in a package and heating in the microwave oven at 600 W for 4 min for every 100 g of simulant employed. There is an option in every case to test for migration using real foods rather than simulants if it can be demonstrated that results using simulants are unrepresentative of those for foods. The proposed

  13. A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, Keung L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers is described. This method consists of a wet chemical treatment (surface cleaning, oxidation in solution, and measurement in HF solution) to passivate the silicon surfaces, a laser diode array for carrier excitation, and a microwave bridge measuring system which is more sensitive than the microwave systems used previously for lifetime measurement. Representative experimental data are presented to demonstrate this technique. The result reveals that this method is useful for the determination of bulk lifetime of commercial silicon wafers.

  14. Low temperature regeneration of activated carbons using microwaves: revising conventional wisdom.

    PubMed

    Calışkan, E; Bermúdez, J M; Parra, J B; Menéndez, J A; Mahramanlıoğlu, M; Ania, C O

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to explore the application of microwaves for the low temperature regeneration of activated carbons saturated with a pharmaceutical compound (promethazine). Contrary to expectations, microwave-assisted regeneration did not lead to better results than those obtained under conventional electric heating. At low temperatures the regeneration was incomplete either under microwave and conventional heating, being this attributed to the insufficient input energy. At mild temperatures, a fall in the adsorption capacity upon cycling was obtained in both devices, although this was much more pronounced for the microwave. These results contrast with previous studies on the benefits of microwaves for the regeneration of carbon materials. The fall in the adsorption capacity after regeneration was due to the thermal cracking of the adsorbed molecules inside the carbon porous network, although this effect applies to both devices. When microwaves are used, along with the thermal heating of the carbon bed, a fraction of the microwave energy seemed to be directly used in the decomposition of promethazine through the excitation of the molecular bonds by microwaves (microwave-lysis). These results point out that the nature of the adsorbate and its ability to interact with microwave are key factors that control the application of microwaves for regeneration of exhausted activated carbons.

  15. The Cassini mission: Infrared and microwave spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunde, V. G.

    1989-01-01

    The Cassini Orbiter and Titan Probe model payloads include a number of infrared and microwave instruments. This document describes: (1) the fundamental scientific objectives for Saturn and Titan which can be addressed by infrared and microwave instrumentation, (2) the instrument requirements and the accompanying instruments, and (3) the synergism resulting from the comprehensive coverage of the total infrared and microwave spectrum by the complement of individual instruments. The baseline consists of four instruments on the orbiter and two on the Titan probe. The orbiter infrared instruments are: (1) a microwave spectrometer and radiometer; (2) a far to mid-infrared spectrometer; (3) a pressure modulation gas correlation spectrometer, and (4) a near-infrared grating spectrometer. The two Titan probe infrared instruments are: (1) a near-infrared instrument, and (2) a tunable diode laser infrared absorption spectrometer and nephelometer.

  16. Summary of the Active Microwave Workshop, chapter 1. [utilization in applications and aerospace programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of the utility, feasibility, and advantages of active microwave sensors for a broad range of applications, including aerospace. In many instances, the material provides an in-depth examination of the applicability and/or the technology of microwave remote sensing, and considerable documentation is presented in support of these techniques. An assessment of the relative strengths and weaknesses of active microwave sensor data indicates that satisfactory data are obtainable for several significant applications.

  17. Electric field measurement in microwave discharge ion thruster with electro-optic probe

    SciTech Connect

    Ise, Toshiyuki; Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Togo, Hiroyoshi; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2012-12-15

    In order to understand the internal phenomena in a microwave discharge ion thruster, it is important to measure the distribution of the microwave electric field inside the discharge chamber, which is directly related to the plasma production. In this study, we proposed a novel method of measuring a microwave electric field with an electro-optic (EO) probe based on the Pockels effect. The probe, including a cooling system, contains no metal and can be accessed in the discharge chamber with less disruption to the microwave distribution. This method enables measurement of the electric field profile under ion beam acceleration. We first verified the measurement with the EO probe by a comparison with a finite-difference time domain numerical simulation of the microwave electric field in atmosphere. Second, we showed that the deviations of the reflected microwave power and the beam current were less than 8% due to inserting the EO probe into the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. Finally, we successfully demonstrated the measurement of the electric-field profile in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. These measurements show that the electric field distribution in the thruster dramatically changes in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration as the propellant mass flow rate increases. These results indicate that this new method using an EO probe can provide a useful guide for improving the propulsion of microwave discharge ion thrusters.

  18. Microwave transmission measurements through wire array photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Graeme; Souther, Nathan; Johnson, Michael

    2008-03-01

    We have measured the microwave transmission between 12.4 and 18.0 GHz through wire arrays formed into two dimensional square lattices. One array made of copper wire 0.16 mm in radius consisted of five rows by 21 columns having a lattice constant of 5.15 mm. This array exhibited a pass band above 15 GHz, in good agreement with the calculated plasma frequency found from an expression for the permittivity^1 derived in the long wavelength limit. A second array was made with wire of radius 18 microns and lattice constant 0.8 mm. This array was filled with dielectric loaded with powdered magnetite. A sample of this metamaterial 5.8 mm thick and with no externally applied magnetic field exhibited a pass band above 16 GHz. Implications for creating metamaterials with a negative index of refraction from wire arrays embedded in a magnetic host will be discussed. ^1G. Dewar, in Complex Mediums III: Beyond Linear Isotropic Dielectrics, Akhlesh Lakhtakai, Graeme Dewar, Martin W. McCall, Editors, Proceedings of SPIE Vol. 4806, 156-166 (2002).

  19. Microwave photonic bandgap devices with active plasma elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Benjamin; Colon Quinones, Roberto; Biggs, David; Underwood, Thomas; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Cappelli, Mark; Stanford Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2015-09-01

    A 3-D alumina rod based microwave photonic crystal device with integrated gaseous plasma elements is designed and characterized. Modulation of the plasma density of the active plasma elements is shown to allow for high fidelity modulation of the output signal of the photonic crystal device. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations of the device are presented, and the functional effects of the plasma electron density, plasma collision frequency, and plasma dimensions are studied. Experimental characterization of the transmission of the device shows active tunability through adjustments of plasma parameters, including discharge current and plasma size. Additional photonic crystal structures with integrated plasma elements are explored. Sponsored by the AFSOR MURI and DOD NDSEG.

  20. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder HCl Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Jiang, Y. B.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Fuller, R. A.; Marcy, T. P.; Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Jucks, K. W.; Stachnik, R. A.; Toon, G. C.; Christensen, L. E.; Webster, C. R.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Walker, K. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Harwood, R. S.; Manney, G. L.; Schwartz, M. J.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite has provided daily global HCl profiles since August 2004. We provide a characterization of the resolution, random and systematic uncertainties, and known issues for the version 2.2 MLS HCl data. The MLS sampling allows for comparisons with many (1500 to more than 3000) closely matched profiles from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). These data sets provide HCl latitudinal distributions that are, overall, very similar to those from (coincident) MLS profiles, although there are some discrepancies in the upper stratosphere between the MLS and HALOE gradients. As found in previous work, MLS and ACE HCl profiles agree very well (within approximately 5%, on average), but the MLS HCl abundances are generally larger (by 10-20%) than HALOE HCl. The bias versus HALOE is unlikely to arise mostly from MLS, as a similar systematic bias (of order 15%) is not observed between average MLS and balloon-borne measurements of HCl, obtained over Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 2004 and 2005. At the largest pressure (147 hPa) for MLS HCl, a high bias (approximately 0.2 ppbv) is apparent in analyses of low to midlatitude data versus in situ aircraft chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) HCl measurements from the Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaigns in 2004, 2005, and 2006; this bias is also observed in comparisons of MLS and aircraftHCl/O3 correlations. Good agreement between MLS and CIMS HCl is obtained at 100 to 68 hPa. The recommended pressure range for MLS HCl is from 100 to 0.15 hPa.

  1. Microwave pyrolysis of oily sludge with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Rong

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to explore catalytic microwave pyrolysis of crude oil storage tank sludge for fuels using granular activated carbon (GAC) as a catalyst. The effect of GAC loading on the yield of pyrolysis products was also investigated. Heating rate of oily sludge and yield of microwave pyrolysis products such as oil and fuel gas was found to depend on the ratio of GAC to oily sludge. The optimal GAC loading was found to be 10%, while much smaller and larger feed sizes adversely influenced production. During oily sludge pyrolysis, a maximum oil yield of 77.5% was achieved. Pyrolytic oils with high concentrations of diesel oil and gasoline (about 70 wt% in the pyrolytic oil) were obtained. The leaching of heavy metals, such as Cr, As and Pb, was also suppressed in the solid residue after pyrolysis. This technique provides advantages such as harmless treatment of oily sludge and substantial reduction in the consumption of energy, time and cost.

  2. Activation of VEGF/Flk-1-ERK Pathway Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Injury After Microwave Exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Feng; Li, Xiang; Gao, Ya-Bing; Wang, Shui-Ming; Zhao, Li; Dong, Ji; Yao, Bin-Wei; Xu, Xin-Ping; Chang, Gong-Min; Zhou, Hong-Mei; Hu, Xiang-Jun; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2015-08-01

    Microwaves have been suggested to induce neuronal injury and increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but the mechanism remains unknown. The role of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/Flk-1-Raf/MAPK kinase (MEK)/extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway in structural and functional injury of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following microwave exposure was examined. An in vitro BBB model composed of the ECV304 cell line and primary rat cerebral astrocytes was exposed to microwave radiation (50 mW/cm(2), 5 min). The structure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the permeability was assessed by measuring transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transmission. Activity and expression of VEGF/Flk-1-ERK pathway components and occludin also were examined. Our results showed that microwave radiation caused intercellular tight junctions to broaden and fracture with decreased TEER values and increased HRP permeability. After microwave exposure, activation of the VEGF/Flk-1-ERK pathway and Tyr phosphorylation of occludin were observed, along with down-regulated expression and interaction of occludin with zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). After Flk-1 (SU5416) and MEK1/2 (U0126) inhibitors were used, the structure and function of the BBB were recovered. The increase in expression of ERK signal transduction molecules was muted, while the expression and the activity of occludin were accelerated, as well as the interactions of occludin with p-ERK and ZO-1 following microwave radiation. Thus, microwave radiation may induce BBB damage by activating the VEGF/Flk-1-ERK pathway, enhancing Tyr phosphorylation of occludin, while partially inhibiting expression and interaction of occludin with ZO-1.

  3. Improved detectability in medical microwave radio-thermometers as obtained by active antennas.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein

    2008-12-01

    Microwave radiometry is a spectral measurement technique for resolving blackbody radiation of heated matter above absolute zero. The emission levels vary with frequency and are at body temperatures maximized in the infrared spectral band. Medical radio-thermometers are mostly noninvasive short-range instruments that can provide temperature distributions in subcutaneous biological tissues when operated in the microwave region. However, a crucial limitation of the microwave radiometric observation principle is the extremely weak signal level of the thermal noise emitted by the lossy material (-174 dBm/Hz at normal body temperature). To improve the radiometer SNR, we propose to integrate a tiny, moderate gain, low-noise preamplifier (LNA) close to the antenna terminals as to obtain increased detectability of deep seated thermal gradients within the volume under investigation. The concept is verified experimentally in a lossy phantom medium by scanning an active antenna across a thermostatically controlled water phantom with a hot object embedded at 38 mm depth. Three different setups were investigated with decreasing temperature contrasts between the target and ambient medium. As a direct consequence of less ripple on the raw radiometric signal, statistical analysis shows a marked increase in signal-to-clutter ratio of the brightness temperature spatial scan profiles, when comparing active antenna operation with conventional passive setups.

  4. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit devices for active array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    Two different aspects of active antenna array design were investigated. The transition between monolithic microwave integrated circuits and rectangular waveguides was studied along with crosstalk in multiconductor transmission lines. The boundary value problem associated with a discontinuity in a microstrip line is formulated. This entailed, as a first step, the derivation of the propagating as well as evanescent modes of a microstrip line. The solution is derived to a simple discontinuity problem: change in width of the center strip. As for the multiconductor transmission line problem. A computer algorithm was developed for computing the crosstalk noise from the signal to the sense lines. The computation is based on the assumption that these lines are terminated in passive loads.

  5. Molecular Structure of o-Benzyne from Microwave Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukolich, Stephen G.; McCarthy, Michael C.; Thaddeus, Patrick

    The o-benzyne mol. has been known for many years to be an important, but short-lived, reaction intermediate in substitution reactions and more recently in cyclization reactions of enediynes. Although there has been widespread interest in this transient mol., previous exptl. structural data were very limited. In the present work, rotational transitions for o-benzyne were measured with a pulsed-beam, Fourier transform microwave spectrometer for all unique, singly substituted 13C and single-D isotopomers. The o-benzyne was efficiently produced by flowing a dil. mixt. of isotopically enriched benzene in neon through a pulsed-DC discharge beam source. The new data, combined with previous data for the normal isotopomer, provide a complete set of structural parameters for this mol. The rs substitution coordinates and the coordinates from a least-squares fit are reported and are in good agreement. When using the least-squares fit to obtain structural parameters, correction terms arising from harmonic terms in the vibrational averaging were subtracted from the measured rotational consts. to obtain a better representation of the planar equil. structure. Further improvements in the fits were obtained by applying small, mass-dependent adjustments to the atom coordinates. Structural parameters obtained from the fit to these modified rotational consts. are an acetylenic C1.tplbond.C2 bond length of 1.264(3) .ANG., and the other bond lengths C2-C3 = 1.390(3) .ANG., C3-C4 = 1.403(3) .ANG., C4-C5 = 1.404(3) .ANG., C3-H1 = 1.095(9) .ANG., and C4-H2 = 1.099(4) .ANG.. The C1.tplbond.C2 bond is only 0.057 .ANG. longer than the free acetylene bond. The other C-C bond lengths are within 0.01 .ANG. of those of benzene C-C bonds. New spectral data for the single-D isotopomers were used to obtain better values for the deuterium quadrupole coupling. Bond-axis deuterium quadrupole coupling consts. are eQqzz(D1) = 188(2) kHz, and eQqzz(D2) = 185(10) kHz, which agree well with the value for

  6. Passive microwave remote and in situ measurements of Arctic and subarctic snow covers in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Sturm, M.; Chacho, E.; Benson, C. S.; Garbeil, H.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne and satellite passive microwave measurements acquired simultaneously with ground measurements of depth, density, and stratigraphy of the snow in central and northern Alaska between March 11 and 19, 1988, are reported. A good correspondence in brightness temperature (TB) trends between the aircraft and satellite data was found. An expected inverse correlation between depth hoar thickness and TB was not found to be strong. A persistent TB minimum in both the aircraft and the satellite data was detected along the northern foothills of the Brooks Range. In an area located at about 68 deg 60 min N, 149 deg 20 min W, the TB as recorded from the aircraft microwave sensor dropped by 55 K. Satellite microwave measurements showed a TB decrease of up to 45 K at approximately the same location. An examination of microwave satellite data from 1978 to 1987 revealed that similar low late-winter values were found in approximately the same locations as those observed in March 1988.

  7. A feasibility study of a microwave water vapor measurement from a space probe along an occultation path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longbothum, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Stratospheric and mesospheric water vapor measurements were taken using the microwave lines at 22 GHz (22.235 GHz) and 183 GHz (183.31 GHz). The resonant cross sections for both the 22 GHz and the 183 GHz lines were used to model the optical depth of atmospheric water vapor. The range of optical depths seen by a microwave radiometer through the earth's limb was determined from radiative transfer theory. Radiometer sensitivity, derived from signal theory, was compared with calculated optical depths to determine the maximum height to which water vapor can be measured using the following methods: passive emission, passive absorption, and active absorption. It was concluded that measurements using the 22 GHz line are limited to about 50 km whereas the 183 GHz line enables measurements up to and above 100 km for water vapor mixing ratios as low as 0.1 ppm under optimum conditions.

  8. Alignment Measurements of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Instrument in a Thermal/Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Michael D.; Herrera, Acey A.; Crane, J. Allen; Packard, Edward A.; Aviado, Carlos; Sampler, Henry P.

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory, scheduled for a fall 2000 launch, is designed to measure temperature fluctuations (anisotropy) and produce a high sensitivity and high spatial resolution (approximately 0.2 degree) map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation over the entire sky between 22 and 90 GHz. MAP utilizes back-to-back Gregorian telescopes to focus the microwave signals into 10 differential microwave receivers, via 20 feed horns. Proper alignment of the telescope reflectors and the feed horns at the operating temperature of 90 K is a critical element to ensure mission success. We describe the hardware and methods used to validate the displacement/deformation predictions of the reflectors and the microwave feed horns during thermal/vacuum testing of the reflectors and the microwave instrument. The smallest deformation predictions to be measured were on the order of +/- 0.030 inches (+/- 0.762 mm). Performance of these alignment measurements inside a thermal/vacuum chamber with conventional alignment equipment posed several limitations. The most troublesome limitation was the inability to send personnel into the chamber to perform the measurements during the test due to vacuum and the temperature extremes. The photogrammetry (PG) system was chosen to perform the measurements since it is a non- contact measurement system, the measurements can be made relatively quickly and accurately, and the photogrammetric camera can be operated remotely. The hardware and methods developed to perform the MAP alignment measurements using PG proved to be highly successful. The measurements met the desired requirements, for the metal structures enabling the desired distortions to be measured resolving deformations an order of magnitude smaller than the imposed requirements. Viable data were provided to the MAP Project for a full analysis of the on-orbit performance of the Instrument's microwave system.

  9. New potentially active pyrazinamide derivatives synthesized under microwave conditions.

    PubMed

    Jandourek, Ondrej; Dolezal, Martin; Kunes, Jiri; Kubicek, Vladimir; Paterova, Pavla; Pesko, Matus; Buchta, Vladimir; Kralova, Katarina; Zitko, Jan

    2014-01-01

    A series of 18 N-alkyl substituted 3-aminopyrazine-2-carboxamides was prepared in this work according to previously experimentally set and proven conditions using microwave assisted synthesis methodology. This approach for the aminodehalogenation reaction was chosen due to higher yields and shorter reaction times compared to organic reactions with conventional heating. Antimycobacterial, antibacterial, antifungal and photosynthetic electron transport (PET) inhibiting in vitro activities of these compounds were investigated. Experiments for the determination of lipophilicity were also performed. Only a small number of substances with alicyclic side chain showed activity against fungi which was the same or higher than standards and the biological efficacy of the compounds increased with rising lipophilicity. Nine pyrazinamide derivatives also inhibited PET in spinach chloroplasts and the IC50 values of these compounds varied in the range from 14.3 to 1590.0 μmol/L. The inhibitory activity was connected not only with the lipophilicity, but also with the presence of secondary amine fragment bounded to the pyrazine ring. Structure-activity relationships are discussed as well. PMID:24995919

  10. Passive/Active Microwave Soil Moisture Disaggregation Using SMAPVEX12 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.; Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.; Colliander, A.

    2015-12-01

    The SMAPVEX12 experiment was conducted during June-July 2012 in Manitoba, Canada with the goal of collecting remote sensing data and ground measurements for the development and testing of soil moisture retrieval algorithms under different vegetation and soil conditions for the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite launched in January 2015. The aircraft based soil moisture data provided by the passive/active microwave sensor PALS (Passive and Active L and S band System) has a nominal spatial resolution of 1500 m. In this study, a change detection algorithm is used for disaggregation of coarse passive microwave soil moisture retrievals with radar backscatter coefficients obtained with the higher spatial resolution UAVSAR (Unmanned Air Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar). The accuracy of the disaggregated change in soil moisture was evaluated using ground based soil moisture measurements. Results show that the disaggregation products are well correlated to in situ measurements. Based on the R2, the highest resolution disaggregated product at 5 m exhibits soil moisture heterogeneity that reflects the distribution of the crops. The difference of spatial standard deviation between the disaggregated and in situ soil moisture ranges from <0.001-0.131 m3/m3 also proves the spatial capability of the change detection algorithm at 5 m scale.

  11. Diagnostics principle of microwave cut-off probe for measuring absolute electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Hyun-Su

    2014-08-15

    A generalized diagnostics principle of microwave cut-off probe is presented with a full analytical solution. In previous studies on the microwave cut-off measurement of weakly ionized plasmas, the cut-off frequency ω{sub c} of a given electron density is assumed to be equal to the plasma frequency ω{sub p} and is predicted using electromagnetic simulation or electric circuit model analysis. However, for specific plasma conditions such as highly collisional plasma and a very narrow probe tip gap, it has been found that ω{sub c} and ω{sub p} are not equal. To resolve this problem, a generalized diagnostics principle is proposed by analytically solving the microwave cut-off condition Re[ε{sub r,eff}(ω = ω{sub c})] = 0. In addition, characteristics of the microwave cut-off condition are theoretically tested for correct measurement of the absolute electron density.

  12. Hardening measures for bipolar transistors against microwave-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Chang-Chun; Ma, Zhen-Yang; Ren, Xing-Rong; Yang, Yin-Tang; Zhao, Ying-Bo; Yu, Xin-Hai

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper we study the influences of the bias voltage and the external components on the damage progress of a bipolar transistor induced by high-power microwaves. The mechanism is presented by analyzing the variation in the internal distribution of the temperature in the device. The findings show that the device becomes less vulnerable to damage with an increase in bias voltage. Both the series diode at the base and the relatively low series resistance at the emitter, Re, can obviously prolong the burnout time of the device. However, Re will aid damage to the device when the value is sufficiently high due to the fact that the highest hot spot shifts from the base-emitter junction to the base region. Moreover, the series resistance at the base Rb will weaken the capability of the device to withstand microwave damage.

  13. A high speed compact microwave interferometer for density fluctuation measurements in Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, H.; Tan, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xie, H. Q.; Gao, Z.

    2016-11-01

    A single-channel 3 mm interferometer has been developed for plasma density diagnostics in the Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST). The extremely compact microwave interferometer utilizes one corrugated feed horn antenna for both emitting and receiving the microwave. The beam path lies on the equatorial plane so the system would not suffer from beam path deflection problems due to the symmetry of the cross section. A focusing lens group and an oblique vacuum window are carefully designed to boost the signal to noise ratio, which allows this system to show good performance even with the small-diameter central column itself as a reflector, without a concave mirror. The whole system discards the reference leg for maximum compactness, which is particularly suitable for the small-sized tokamak. An auto-correcting algorithm is developed to calculate the phase evolution, and the result displays good phase stability of the whole system. The intermediate frequency is adjustable and can reach its full potential of 2 MHz for best temporal resolution. Multiple measurements during ohmic discharges proved the interferometer's capability to track typical density fluctuations in SUNIST, which enables this system to be utilized in the study of MHD activities.

  14. BOREAS HYD-2 Estimated Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) from Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Hugh; Chang, Alfred T. C.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The surface meteorological data collected at the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) tower and ancillary sites are being used as inputs to an energy balance model to monitor the amount of snow storage in the boreal forest region. The BOREAS Hydrology (HYD)-2 team used Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) derived from an energy balance model and in situ observed SWE to compare the SWE inferred from airborne and spaceborne microwave data, and to assess the accuracy of microwave retrieval algorithms. The major external measurements that are needed are snowpack temperature profiles, in situ snow areal extent, and SWE data. The data in this data set were collected during February 1994 and cover portions of the Southern Study Area (SSA), Northern Study Area (NSA), and the transect areas. The data are available from BORIS as comma-delimited tabular ASCII files. The SWE data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  15. Sensitivity of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Soil Moisture during Growing Corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, J.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Liu, P.; De Roo, R. D.; England, A. W.; Nagarajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) in the root zone is a key factor governing water and energy fluxes at the land surface and its accurate knowledge is critical to predictions of weather and near-term climate, nutrient cycles, crop-yield, and ecosystem productivity. Microwave observations, such as those at L-band, are highly sensitive to soil moisture in the upper few centimeters (near-surface). The two satellite-based missions dedicated to soil moisture estimation include, the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) [4] mission. The SMAP mission will include active and passive sensors at L-band to provide global observations of SM, with a repeat coverage of every 2-3 days. These observations can significantly improve root zone soil moisture estimates through data assimilation into land surface models (LSMs). Both the active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave sensors measure radiation quantities that are functions of soil dielectric constant and exhibit similar sensitivities to SM. In addition to the SM sensitivity, radar backscatter is highly sensitive to roughness of soil surface and scattering within the vegetation. These effects may produce a much larger dynamic range in backscatter than that produced due to SM changes alone. In this study, we discuss the field observations of active and passive signatures of growing corn at L-band from several seasons during the tenth Microwave, Water and Energy Balance Experiment (MicroWEX-10) conducted in North Central Florida, and to understand the sensitivity of these signatures to soil moisture under dynamic vegetation conditions. The MicroWEXs are a series of season-long field experiments conducted during the growing seasons of sweet corn, cotton, and energy cane over the past six years (for example, [22]). The corn was planted on July 5 and harvested on September 23, 2011 during MicroWEX-10. The size of the field was 0.04 km2 and the soils

  16. Measurements Using a Scanning Near-Field Coaxial Probe Microwave Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, David E.; Vlahacos, C. P.; Dutta, Sudeep; Wellstood, F. C.; Anlage, Steven M.

    1997-03-01

    We have developed a scanning near-field microwave microscope using an open-ended coaxial probe.(C. P. Vlahacos, et al.) Appl. Phys. Lett. 69, 3272 (1996)^,(S. M. Anlage, et al.) IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. (1997) The probe is connected to a coaxial transmission line, which acts as a resonant microwave circuit. The probe is scanned over a sample while microwave energy is fed into the other end of the coaxial line. The quantities that can be measured simultaneously during a scan are shifts in the resonant frequencies, amplitude of the resonant peaks, quality factor of the circuit, and changes in phase relative to the microwave source. We will show images and discuss the theory of how the data are related to properties of the sample.

  17. A search in the infrared to microwave for astroengineering activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slysh, V. I.

    Huge space power plants (Dyson Spheres) utilizing most of a star's energy should be detectable as infrared or microwave sources. A recent far infrared all-sky survey has revealed many sources with a spectrum peaking on this region which is characteristic of the thermal emission of the hypothetical Dyson spheres. The possibility of confusing them with thick circumstellar dust shells around evolved red giant stars is discussed. Microwave detection of cool extended Dyson Spheres by all-sky surveys searching for microwave background fluctuations is also considered.

  18. In situ temperature measurements of reaction spaces under microwave irradiation using photoluminescent probes.

    PubMed

    Ano, Taishi; Kishimoto, Fuminao; Sasaki, Ryo; Tsubaki, Shuntaro; Maitani, Masato M; Suzuki, Eiichi; Wada, Yuji

    2016-05-11

    We demonstrate two novel methods for the measurement of the temperatures of reaction spaces locally heated by microwaves, which have been applied here to two example systems, i.e., BaTiO3 particles covered with a SiO2 shell (BaTiO3-SiO2) and layered tungstate particles. Photoluminescent (PL) probes showing the temperature-sensitivity in their PL lifetimes are located in the nanospaces of the above systems. In the case of BaTiO3-SiO2 core-shell particles, rhodamine B is loaded into the mesopores of the SiO2 shell covering the BaTiO3 core, which generates the heat through the dielectric loss of microwaves. The inner nanospace temperature of the SiO2 shell is determined to be 28 °C higher than the bulk temperature under microwave irradiation at 24 W. On the other hand, Eu(3+) is immobilized in the interlayer space of layered tungstate as the PL probe, showing that the nanospace temperature of the interlayer is only 4 °C higher than the bulk temperature. This method for temperature-measurement is powerful for controlling microwave heating and elucidates the ambiguous mechanisms of microwave special effects often observed in chemical reactions, contributing greatly to the practical application of microwaves in chemistry and materials sciences. PMID:27136754

  19. Effects of low power microwave radiation on biological activity of Collagenase enzyme and growth rate of S. Cerevisiae yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsuhaim, Hamad S.; Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, microwave radiation, a type/subset of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) has been widely used in industry, medicine, as well as food technology and mobile communication. Use of mobile phones is rapidly growing. Four years from now, 5.1 billion people will be mobile phone users around the globe - almost 1 billion more mobile users than the 4.3 billion people worldwide using them now. Consequently, exposure to weak radiofrequency/microwave radiation generated by these devices is markedly increasing. Accordingly, public concern about potential hazards on human health is mounting [1]. Thermal effects of radiofrequency/microwave radiation are very well-known and extensively studied. Of particular interest are non-thermal effects of microwave exposures on biological systems. Nonthermal effects are described as changes in cellular metabolism caused by both resonance absorption and induced EMR and are often accompanied by a specific biological response. Non-thermal biological effects are measurable changes in biological systems that may or may not be associated with adverse health effects. In this study we studied non-thermal effects of low power microwave exposures on kinetics of L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and growth rate of yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains type II. The selected model systems were continuously exposed to microwave radiation at the frequency of 968MHz and power of 10dBm using the designed and constructed (custom made) Transverse Electro-Magnetic (TEM) cell [2]. The findings reveal that microwave radiation at 968MHz and power of 10dBm inhibits L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity by 26% and increases significantly (15%) the proliferation rate of yeast cells.

  20. Error analysis for the ground-based microwave ozone measurements during STOIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Brian J.; Parrish, Alan; Tsou, Jung-Jung; McCormick, M. Patrick

    1995-05-01

    We present a formal error analysis and characterization of the microwave measurements made during the Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison Campaign (STOIC). The most important error sources are found to be determination of the tropospheric opacity, the pressure-broadening coefficient of the observed line, and systematic variations in instrument response as a function of frequency ("baseline"). Net precision is 4-6% between 55 and 0.2 mbar, while accuracy is 6-10%. Resolution is 8-10 km below 3 mbar and increases to 17 km at 0.2 mbar. We show the "blind" microwave measurements from STOIC and make limited comparisons to other measurements. We use the averaging kernels of the microwave measurement to eliminate resolution and a priori effects from a comparison to SAGE II. The STOIC results and comparisons are broadly consistent with the formal analysis.

  1. Error analysis for the ground-based microwave ozone measurements during STOIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, Brian J.; Parrish, Alan; Tsou, Jung-Jung; McCormick, M. Patrick

    1995-01-01

    We present a formal error analysis and characterization of the microwave measurements made during the Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison Campaign (STOIC). The most important error sources are found to be determination of the tropospheric opacity, the pressure-broadening coefficient of the observed line, and systematic variations in instrument response as a function of frequency ('baseline'). Net precision is 4-6% between 55 and 0.2 mbar, while accuracy is 6-10%. Resolution is 8-10 km below 3 mbar and increases to 17km at 0.2 mbar. We show the 'blind' microwave measurements from STOIC and make limited comparisons to other measurements. We use the averaging kernels of the microwave measurement to eliminate resolution and a priori effects from a comparison to SAGE 2. The STOIC results and comparisons are broadly consistent with the formal analysis.

  2. Quantitative scanning near-field microwave microscopy for thin film dielectric constant measurement.

    PubMed

    Karbassi, A; Ruf, D; Bettermann, A D; Paulson, C A; van der Weide, Daniel W; Tanbakuchi, H; Stancliff, R

    2008-09-01

    We combine a scanning near-field microwave microscope with an atomic force microscope for use in localized thin film dielectric constant measurement, and demonstrate the capabilities of our system through simultaneous surface topography and microwave reflection measurements on a variety of thin films grown on low resistivity silicon substrates. Reflection measurements clearly discriminate the interface between approximately 38 nm silicon nitride and dioxide thin films at 1.788 GHz. Finite element simulation was used to extract the dielectric constants showing the dielectric sensitivity to be Deltaepsilon(r)=0.1 at epsilon(r)=6.2, for the case of silicon nitride. These results illustrate the capability of our instrument for quantitative dielectric constant measurement at microwave frequencies.

  3. Quantitative scanning near-field microwave microscopy for thin film dielectric constant measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Karbassi, A.; Ruf, D.; Bettermann, A. D.; Paulson, C. A.; Weide, Daniel W. van der; Tanbakuchi, H.; Stancliff, R.

    2008-09-15

    We combine a scanning near-field microwave microscope with an atomic force microscope for use in localized thin film dielectric constant measurement, and demonstrate the capabilities of our system through simultaneous surface topography and microwave reflection measurements on a variety of thin films grown on low resistivity silicon substrates. Reflection measurements clearly discriminate the interface between {approx}38 nm silicon nitride and dioxide thin films at 1.788 GHz. Finite element simulation was used to extract the dielectric constants showing the dielectric sensitivity to be {delta}{epsilon}{sub r}=0.1 at {epsilon}{sub r}=6.2, for the case of silicon nitride. These results illustrate the capability of our instrument for quantitative dielectric constant measurement at microwave frequencies.

  4. Short term prediction of dynamic hydra precipitation activity using a microwave radiometer over Eastern Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.

    2015-12-01

    First ever study of the feasibility of ground based radiometric study to predict a very short term based rain precipitation study has been conducted in eastern Himalaya, Darjeeling (27.01°N, 88.15°E, 2200 masl). Short term prediction or nowcasting relates to forecasting convective precipitation for time periods less than a few hours to avoid its effect on agriculture, aviation and lifestyle. Theoretical models involving radiometric predictions are not well understood and lack in temporal and spatial resolution. In this study specific utilization of a microwave Radiometer (Radiometrics Corporation, USA) for online monitoring of precipitable rainfall activity has been observed repeatability of data has been established. Previous few studies have shown the increase of water vapour and corresponding Brightness Temperature, but in mountain climatic conditions over Darjeeling, due to presence of fog 90 % of the year, water vapour monitoring related predictions can lead to false alarms. The measurement of blackbody emission noise in the bands of 23.8 GHz and 31.4 GHz, using a quadratic regression retrieval algorithm is converted to atmospheric parameters like integrated water vapour and liquid water content. It has been found in our study that the liquid water shows significant activity prior to precipitation events even for mild and stratiform rainfall. The alarm can be generated well 20 mins before the commencement of actual rain events even in the upper atmosphere of 6 Kms, measured by a rain radar also operating in 24 Ghz microwave band. Although few rain events were found and reported which do not respond in the microwave liquid water channel. Efforts to identify such rain events and their possible explanation is going on and shall be reported in near future. Such studies are important to predict flash flooding in the Himalayas. Darjeeling owing to its geographical conditions experiences mild to very heavy rain. Such studies help improve aspects of Himalayas as

  5. MICROWAVE MEASUREMENT OF REFRACTORY MATERIALS AT HIGH-TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Smith, J.; Davis, B.; Limmer, R.

    2009-03-03

    Knowledge of the electrical behavior of refractory materials may enable the development and optimization of microwave nondestructive techniques to detect and evaluate changes in their physical properties while the materials are in service. This paper presents the results of a limited and preliminary investigation in which two refractory materials (dense chrome and dense zircon) were subjected to increasing temperature in a furnace and in which a frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar operating in the frequency range of 8-18 GHz radar was used to evaluate their attenuation properties.

  6. On the microwave measurement of precipitation in tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weng, Fuzhong; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    The difference between the brightness temperature structure over a typical tropical rain system and that of the midlatitude thunderstorms is examined. It is also determined how the brightness temperature and the rain rate relationship at the microwave frequencies deviates from that in the thunderstorms. It is shown, in particular, that the theoretical brightness temperature and rain rate relationship at 19.35 GHz provides good estimates of the surface rain rates for either convective or stratiform precipitation, but the relationship at 37 and 85.5 GHz may result in a significant overestimation of surface rain rate, especially for stratiform precipitation.

  7. Measurement of dielectric properties and determination of microwave emissivity of polluted waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, H.-J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The dielectric properties of polluted waters are measured with a reflection-type resonant cavity at 1.43 GHz. Very small water samples in quartz tubes of known volume are placed in the center of the maximum electric field. Measurement of the resonance-frequency variation and a change of the cavity's quality factor are used to determine the dielectric properties. The microwave emissivity of the polluted water is then calculated via the Fresnel equation and applied to data reductions of microwave radiometer measurements.

  8. Interpretation of ground-based microwave measurements of the moon using a detailed regolith properties model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L.; Keihm, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed model for the regolith's thermophysical and microwave properties has been used for the interpretation of ground-based measurements of the moon's microwave brightness temperature variation with lunar phase and changes during eclipses. The ground-based measurements include some crucial new lunation variation observations at 2.8, 6.0 and 13.1 cm. The many parameters in the regolith properties model were assigned values based on a careful review of Apollo in situ and lab sample measurements of thermophysical and electrical properties. The first identification of a wavelength-dependent component of scattering is reported.

  9. Reflection measurement of waveguide-injected high-power microwave antennas.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chengwei; Peng, Shengren; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Xuelong

    2015-12-01

    A method for reflection measurements of High-power Microwave (HPM) antennas excited with overmoded waveguides is proposed and studied systemically. In theory, principle of the method is proposed and the data processing formulas are developed. In simulations, a horn antenna excited by a TE11 mode exciter is examined and its reflection is calculated by CST Microwave Studio and by the method proposed in this article, respectively. In experiments, reflection measurements of two HPM antennas are conducted, and the measured results are well consistent with the theoretical expectations.

  10. Acute low-level microwave exposure and central cholinergic activity: studies on irradiation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake was measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus of rats after acute exposure (45 min) to pulsed (2 microseconds, 500 pps) or continuous-wave 2,450-MHz microwaves in cylindrical waveguides or miniature anechoic chambers. In all exposure conditions, the average whole-body specific absorption rate was at 0.6 W/kg. Decrease in choline uptake was observed in the frontal cortex after microwave exposure in all of the above irradiation conditions. Regardless of the exposure system used, hippocampal choline uptake was decreased after exposure to pulsed but not continuous-wave microwaves. Striatal choline uptake was decreased after exposure to either pulsed or continuous-wave microwaves in the miniature anechoic chamber. No significant change in hypothalamic choline uptake was observed under any of the exposure conditions studied. We conclude that depending on the parameters of the radiation, microwaves can elicit specific and generalized biological effects.

  11. Microwave and Beam Activation of Nanostructured Catalysts for Environmentally Friendly, Energy Efficient Heavy Crude Oil Processing

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose goal is initial evaluation and development of energy efficient processes which take advantage of the benefits offered by nanostructured catalysts which can be activated by microwave, RF, or radiation beams.

  12. Imaging of Active Microwave Devices at Cryogenic Temperatures using Scanning Near-Field Microwave Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanawalla, Ashfaq S.; Dutta, S. K.; Vlahacos, C. P.; Steinhauer, D. E.; Feenstra, B. J.; Anlage, Steven M.; Wellstood, F. C.

    1998-03-01

    The ability to image electric fields in operating microwave devices is interesting both from the fundamental point of view and for diagnostic purposes. To that end we have constructed a scanning near-field microwave microscope which uses an open-ended coaxial probe and operates at cryogenic temperatures.(For related publications see: C. P. Vlahacos, R. C. Black, S. M. Anlage, A. Amar and F. C. Wellstood, Appl. Phys. Lett. 69), 3274 (1996) and S. M. Anlage, C. P. Vlahacos, Sudeep Dutta and F. C. Wellstood, IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 7, 3686 (1997). Using this system we have imaged electric fields generated by both normal metal and superconducting microstrip resonators at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 300 K. We will present images and discuss our results including observations of clear standing wave patterns at the fundamental resonant frequency and an increased quality factor of the resonators at low temperatures.

  13. Microwave radiometry in living tissue: what does it measure?

    PubMed

    Cheever, E A; Foster, K R

    1992-06-01

    The sensitivity of microwave radiometry for detecting subcutaneous targets was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The radiometer used a dielectric loaded rectangular waveguide antenna in contact with a lossy dielectric medium. A cylindrical target with dielectric properties and/or temperature different from that of the surrounding medium was located beneath this surface. For most of the studies, the target and the surrounding medium were maintained at constant, but unequal, temperatures (i.e., heat conduction effects were insignificant). The received radiometric signal was calculated as the location and dielectric properties of the target were varied. Finally, the radiometer signal was calculated for the situation with the target maintained at constant temperature but with the surrounding medium modeled by the bioheat equation. Experimental studies were performed using a radiometer operating at 4.7 GHz. The target was a thin walled tube through which a temperature controlled liquid was circulated, located in a temperature controlled fluid tank. The results indicate that microwave radiometry (as used in this study) responds to the temperature averaged over the field pattern of the antenna with very strong weighting of regions near the surface. A simple quasi-static analysis provides a good indication of the sensitivity of the technique for detecting cylindrical targets whose dielectric properties are different from those of the surrounding medium. A simple estimate of thermal conduction around the target suggest that thermal effects greatly increase the apparent size of the target.

  14. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT.

  15. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT. PMID:24645431

  16. Forward and Backscattering Measurements of Rainfall using the NASA Microwave Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Lang, Roger; Meneghini, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper will present results from a study on the feasibility of making backscatter measurements from rainfall with the NASA/Microwave Link system at Wallops Island, VA. The study entails the implementation of an FMCW radar at the Link frequencies to enable simultaneous forward and backscatter measurements from rain. The Microwave Link system has been successfully employed in the development and testing of rainfall retrieval techniques. As presently configured, the Microwave Link measures attenuation and phase-shift due to rain over a 2.3 km path between the transmitting and receiving antennas. By their very nature, these measured quantities are averaged over the propagation path. As a result, the rainfall estimates obtained from the Link data are also averaged over the propagation path. However, rainfall is a highly variable process in space (as well as time). In order to gain a more detailed knowledge of its microphysics finer spatial resolutions are required. The backscatter measurements would enable range profiling over the Link path permitting a detailed study of the rainfall process. The backscatter measurements will be used in conjunction with the forward measurements and the measurements from a ground-based network of disdrometers and rain gauges located under the propagation path to develop new microwave retrieval techniques, and to test established single-frequency and dual-frequency radar retrieval algorithms relevant to the ongoing TRMM and up coming GPM missions.

  17. Fiber moisture content measurements of lint and seed cotton by a small microwave instrument

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The timely and accurate measurement of cotton fiber moisture content is important, as deviations in moisture fiber content can impact the fiber quality and processing of cotton fiber. The Mesdan Aqualab is a small, modular, microwave-based fiber moisture measurement instrument for samples with mode...

  18. Effect of Microwave Heating Conditions on the Preparation of High Surface Area Activated Carbon from Waste Bamboo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Hongying Xia; Zhang, Libo; Xia, Yi; Peng, Jinhui; Wang, Shixing; Zheng, Zhaoqiang; Zhang, Shengzhou

    2015-11-01

    The present study reports the effect of microwave power and microwave heating time on activated carbon adsorption ability. The waste bamboo was used to preparing high surface area activated carbon via microwave heating. The bamboo was carbonized for 2 h at 600°C to be used as the raw material. According to the results, microwave power and microwave heating time had a significant impact on the activating effect. The optimal KOH/C ratio of 4 was identified when microwave power and microwave heating time were 700 W and 15 min, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, surface area was estimated to be 3441 m2/g with pore volume of 2.093 ml/g and the significant proportion of activated carbon was microporous (62.3%). The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were illustrated that activated carbon surface had abundant functional groups. Additionally the pore structure is characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

  19. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Simon, F.; Murányi, F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  20. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators.

    PubMed

    Gyüre, B; Márkus, B G; Bernáth, B; Murányi, F; Simon, F

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation. PMID:26429462

  1. 110 GHz measurement of large-area graphene integrated in low-loss microwave structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulason, H. S.; Nguyen, H. V.; Guermoune, A.; Sridharan, V.; Siaj, M.; Caloz, C.; Szkopek, T.

    2011-10-01

    We report high-frequency scattering parameter measurement of large-area monolayer graphene integrated on low-loss quartz substrates. High-quality graphene was grown by chemical vapour deposition on copper, chemically hole doped, and transferred to quartz. Microwave measurements were performed from 0.01 to 110 GHz. Simple microwave models were used to extract graphene impedance parameters. We find that contact resistance is effectively shunted above 3 GHz. Atomically thin large area graphene behaves as a wideband resistor with negligible kinetic inductance and negligible skin effect.

  2. Visual observation and quantitative measurement of the microwave absorbing effect at X band.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L; Chen, X; Ong, C K

    2008-12-01

    We have set up a two-dimensional spatial field mapping system to measure graphically the quasi-free-space electromagnetic wave in a parallel plate waveguide. Our apparatus illustrates a potential application in characterizing the microwave absorbing materials. From the measured mappings of the microwave field, the visualization of spatial physical process and quantitative characterization of reflectivity coefficients can be achieved. This simple apparatus has a remarkable advantage over with conventional testing methods which usually involve huge, expensive anechoic chambers and demand samples of large size. PMID:19123583

  3. Dynamic measurement of bulk modulus of dielectric materials using a microwave phase shift technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, B. J.; Strand, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    A microwave Doppler shift technique was developed for measuring the dynamic bulk modulus of dielectric materials such as solid propellants. The system has a demonstrated time resolution on the order of milliseconds and a theoretical spatial resolution of a few microns. Accuracy of the technique is dependent on an accurate knowledge of the wavelength of the microwave in the sample being tested. Such measurement techniques are discussed. Preliminary tests with two solid propellants, one non-aluminized and one containing 16% aluminum, yielded reasonable, reproducible results. It was concluded that with refinements the technique holds promise as a practical means for obtaining accurate dynamic bulk modulus data over a variety of transient conditions.

  4. The pushbroom microwave radiometer and aircraft measurement of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, R. F.; Lawrence, R. W.; Levine, J. S.; Delnore, V. E.

    1985-01-01

    Soil moisture has been identified as a controlling parameter in the occurrence of atmospheric variations and crop vigor. Evapotranspiration rates impact local temperature, precipitation and motion fields of the atmosphere. The multiple beam pushbroom microwave radiometer (MBPMR) is a candidate for moisture monitoring on the Earth Observation System. A prototype MBPMR has been devised for airborne technology evaluations of pushbroom scanning capabilities. The instrument scans at 1.4 GHz with a Diche radiometer. Test flights on a NASA aircraft with the antenna mounted on the bottom of the fuselage have generated soil moisture data over crop areas for which ground truth data were gathered. Large antennas deployed from the Orbiter could collect sufficient data for mapping the global soil moisture in 6 days.

  5. Microwave radiometry in living tissue: What does it measure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheever, E.A. ); Foster, K.R. )

    1992-06-01

    The sensitivity of microwave radiometry for detecting subcutaneous targets was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The radiometer used a dielectric loaded rectangular waveguide antenna in contact with lossy dielectric medium. A cylindrical target with dielectric properties and/or temperature different from that of the surrounding medium were maintained at constant, but unequal, temperatures. The received radiometric signal was calculated as the location and dielectric properties of the target were varied. Finally, the radiometer signal was calculated for the situation with the target maintained at constant temperature but with the surrounding medium modeled by the bioheat equation. Experimental studies were performed using a radiometer operating at 4.7 GHz. The target was a thin walled tube through which a temperature controlled liquid was circulated, located in a temperature controlled fluid tank.

  6. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:27689798

  7. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.; Janney, Mark A.; Ferber, Mattison K.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy.

  8. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Janney, M.A.; Ferber, M.K.

    1992-03-24

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy. 2 figs.

  9. Microwaving Blood as a Non-Destructive Technique for Haemoglobin Measurements on Microlitre Samples

    PubMed Central

    Basey-Fisher, Toby H.; Guerra, Nadia; Triulzi, Chiara; Gregory, Andrew; Hanham, Stephen M.; Stevens, Molly M.; Maier, Stefan A.; Klein, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The non-destructive ex vivo determination of haemoglobin (Hgb) concentration offers the capability to conduct multiple red blood cell haematological measurements on a single sample, an advantage that current optical techniques are unable to offer. Here, a microwave method and device for the accurate and non-destructive determination of Hgb concentration in microlitre blood samples are described. Using broadband microwave spectroscopy, a relationship is established between the dielectric properties of murine blood and Hgb concentration that is utilized to create a technique for the determination of Hgb concentration. Subsequently, a microwave dielectric resonator-microfluidic system is implemented in the analysis of 52 murine samples with microlitre volumes and Hgb concentrations ranging from 0 to 17 g dL−1. Using the characterized relationship, independent and minimally invasive Hgb measurements are made on nine healthy mice as well as seven with mutations in the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene that leads to colorectal cancer and consequently anaemia. PMID:24002989

  10. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-15

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  11. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeff Sweterlitsch

    2003-01-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photoacoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photoacoustic signals in an off-line configuration. A second off-line instrument was constructed based in part on lessons learned with the first instrument, but which also expands the capabilities of the first instrument. Improvements include a control loop to allow more constant microwave power output and an ability to operate over a range of microwave frequencies. The third instrument, the on-line version of the fly ash monitor, has been designed, constructed, and initial efficiency tests have been conducted on the monitor's electrical components. Design and construction of the on-line fly ash monitor has been completed, as well as supporting apparatus that includes the independent support stands for the fly ash feeders and customized bottom hopper and feeder system. Modifications were made to the original design of the on-line monitor to improve the flow of fly ash through the monitor, and improvements were made to the diaphragm assembly where the accelerometer is to be mounted. The electrical components that provide and regulate the microwave source has been completed. Microwave leakage tests have also been completed to determine the robustness of the on-line monitor.

  12. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeff Sweterlitsch

    2004-07-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photoacoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photoacoustic signals in an off-line configuration. A second off-line instrument was constructed based in part on lessons learned with the first instrument, but which also expands the capabilities of the first instrument. Improvements include a control loop to allow more constant microwave power output and an ability to operate over a range of microwave frequencies. The third instrument, the on-line version of the fly ash monitor, has been designed, constructed, and initial efficiency tests have been conducted on the monitor's electrical components. This quarter focused on improving the signal strength of the accelerometer by increasing the power level of the microwaves that induced the thermo-elastic effect, and also to conduct repeatability experiments. Efforts this quarter were spent improving the coupling of the accelerometer with the diaphragm, detecting and eliminating microwave leakage, isolating stray electrical current within the laboratory, specifically within the ground, and replacing a faulty lock-in amplifier.

  13. Low-level microwave irradiation and central cholinergic activity: a dose-response study

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Rats were irradiated with circularly polarized, 2,450-MHz pulsed microwaves (2-microseconds pulses, 500 pulses per second (pps)) for 45 min in the cylindrical waveguide system of Guy et al. Immediately after exposure, sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake, an indicator of cholinergic activity in neural tissue, was measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. The power density was set to give average whole-body specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0.3, 0.45, 0.6, 0.75, 0.9, or 1.2 W/kg to study the dose-response relationship between the rate of microwave energy absorption and cholinergic activity in the different areas of the brain. Decrease in choline uptake was observed in the striatum at a SAR of 0.75 W/kg and above, whereas for the frontal cortex and hippocampus, decreases in choline uptake were observed at a SAR of 0.45 W/kg and above. No significant effect was observed in the hypothalamus at the irradiation power densities studied. The probit analysis was used to determine the SAR50 in each brain area, i.e., the SAR at which 50% of maximum response was elicited. SAR50 values for the striatum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus were 0.65, 0.38, and 0.44 W/kg, respectively.

  14. Advances on simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification using activated carbon irradiated by microwaves.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuang-Chen; Gao, Li; Ma, Jing-Xiang; Jin, Xin; Yao, Juan-Juan; Zhao, Yi

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the research background and chemistry of desulfurization and denitrification technology using microwave irradiation. Microwave-induced catalysis combined with activated carbon adsorption and reduction can reduce nitric oxide to nitrogen and sulfur dioxide to sulfur from flue gas effectively. This paper also highlights the main drawbacks of this technology and discusses future development trends. It is reported that the removal of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide using microwave irradiation has broad prospects for development in the field of air pollution control.

  15. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  16. Microwave Radiometer Networks for Measurement of the Spatio-Temporal Variability of Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, S. C.; Iturbide-Sanchez, F.; Padmanabhan, S.

    2006-12-01

    Tropospheric water vapor plays a key role in the prediction of convective storm initiation, precipitation and extreme weather events. Conventionally, water vapor profiles are derived from dewpoint and temperature measurements using instrumented weather balloons, including radiosondes. These balloons take approximately one hour to measure from surface to tropopause, and transmitter-sensor packages cannot be reused. Such in-situ measurements provide profiles with very high vertical resolution but with severe limitations in temporal and spatial coverage. Raman lidars use active optical techniques to provide comparable vertical resolution and measurement accuracy to radiosondes. However, these lidars are bulky and expensive, and their operation is limited to clear-sky conditions due to the high optical opacity of clouds. Microwave radiometers provide path-integrated water vapor and liquid water with high temporal resolution during nearly all weather conditions. If multiple frequencies are measured near the water vapor resonance, coarse vertical profiles can be obtained using statistical inversion. Motivated by the need for improved temporal and spatial resolutions, a network of elevation and azimuth scanning radiometers is being developed to provide coordinated volumetric measurements of tropospheric water vapor. To realize this network, two Miniaturized Water Vapor profiling Radiometers (MVWR) have been designed and fabricated at Colorado State University. MWVR is small, light-weight, consumes little power and is highly stable. To reduce the mass, volume, cost and power consumption as compared to traditional waveguide techniques, MWVR was designed based on monolithic microwave integrated-circuit technology developed for the wireless communication and defense industries. It was designed for network operation, in which each radiometer will perform a complete volumetric scan within a few minutes, and overlapping scans from multiple sensors will be combined

  17. ESA activities in the use of microwaves for the remote sensing of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccoll, D.

    1984-01-01

    The program of activities under way in the European Space Agency (ESA) directed towards Remote Sensing of the oceans and troposphere is discussed. The initial project is the launch of a satellite named ERS-1 with a primary payload of microwave values in theee C- and Ku-bands. This payload is discussed in depth. The secondary payload includes precision location experiments and an instrument to measure sea surface temperature, which are described. The important topic of calibration is extensively discussed, and a review of activities directed towards improvements to the instruments for future satellites is presented. Some discussion of the impact of the instrument payload on the spacecraft design follows and the commitment of ESA to the provision of a service of value to the ultimate user is emphasized.

  18. A multifrequency evaluation of active and passive microwave sensors for oil spill detection and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenner, R. G.; Reid, S. C.; Solie, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation is given of how active and passive microwave sensors can best be used in oil spill detection and assessment. Radar backscatter curves taken over oil spills are presented and their effect on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are discussed. Plots of microwave radiometric brightness variations over oil spills are presented and discussed. Recommendations as to how to select the best combination of frequency, viewing angle, and sensor type for evaluation of various aspects of oil spills are also discussed.

  19. High-Q active ring microwave resonators based on ferrite-ferroelectric layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, Alexey B.; Srinivasan, G.; Kalinikos, Boris A.

    2008-05-01

    An electric and magnetic field tunable (dual-tunable) microwave active ring resonator is designed and characterized. The device structure is implemented with a microwave amplifier and a ferrite-ferroelectric delay line in the feedback loop. At 8GHz, an effective Q factor of 50 000 and tuning by 5MHz with an electric field are achieved. The performance characteristics of the resonator are presented and discussed.

  20. [Microwave thermal remediation of soil contaminated with crude oil enhanced by granular activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Wei; Zhang, Yao-Bin; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Ya-Zhi

    2009-02-15

    The advantage of rapid, selective and simultaneous heating of microwave heating technology was taken to remediate the crude oil-contaminated soil rapidly and to recover the oil contaminant efficiently. The contaminated soil was processed in the microwave field with addition of granular activated carbon (GAC), which was used as strong microwave absorber to enhance microwave heating of the soil mixture to remove the oil contaminant and recover it by a condensation system. The influences of some process parameters on the removal of the oil contaminant and the oil recovery in the remediation process were investigated. The results revealed that, under the condition of 10.0% GAC, 800 W microwave power, 0.08 MPa absolute pressure and 150 mL x min(-1) carrier gas (N2) flow-rate, more than 99% oil removal could be obtained within 15 min using this microwave thermal remediation enhanced by GAC; at the same time, about 91% of the oil contaminant could be recovered without significant changes in chemical composition. In addition, the experiment results showed that GAC can be reused in enhancing microwave heating of soil without changing its enhancement efficiency obviously.

  1. Systematic errors in cosmic microwave background polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, Daniel; Challinor, Anthony; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the impact of instrumental systematic errors on the potential of cosmic microwave background polarization experiments targeting primordial B-modes. To do so, we introduce spin-weighted Müller matrix-valued fields describing the linear response of the imperfect optical system and receiver, and give a careful discussion of the behaviour of the induced systematic effects under rotation of the instrument. We give the correspondence between the matrix components and known optical and receiver imperfections, and compare the likely performance of pseudo-correlation receivers and those that modulate the polarization with a half-wave plate. The latter is shown to have the significant advantage of not coupling the total intensity into polarization for perfect optics, but potential effects like optical distortions that may be introduced by the quasi-optical wave plate warrant further investigation. A fast method for tolerancing time-invariant systematic effects is presented, which propagates errors through to power spectra and cosmological parameters. The method extends previous studies to an arbitrary scan strategy, and eliminates the need for time-consuming Monte Carlo simulations in the early phases of instrument and survey design. We illustrate the method with both simple parametrized forms for the systematics and with beams based on physical-optics simulations. Example results are given in the context of next-generation experiments targeting tensor-to-scalar ratios r ~ 0.01.

  2. Photogrammetrically Measured Distortions of Composite Structure Microwave Reflectors at -90K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mule, Peter; Hill, Michael D.; Sampler, Henry P.

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory, scheduled for a late 2000 launch, is designed to measure temperature fluctuations (anisotropy) and produce a high sensitivity and high spatial resolution (better than 0.3 deg. at 90 GHz.) map of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation over the entire sky between 22 and 90 GHz. MAP utilizes back-to-back composite Gregorian telescopes supported on a composite truss structure to focus the microwave signals into 10 differential microwave receivers. Proper position and shape of the telescope reflectors at the operating temperature of -90 K is a critical element to ensure mission success. We describe the methods and analysis used to validate the in-flight position and shape predictions for the reflectors based on photogrammetric metrology data taken under vacuum with the reflectors at -90 K. Contour maps showing reflector distortion were generated. The resulting reflector distortion data are shown to be crucial to the analytical assessment of the MAP instrument's microwave system in-flight performance.

  3. Photogrammetrically Measured Distortions of Composite Structure Microwave Reflectors at Approximately 90 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mule, Peter; Hill, Michael D.; Sampler, Henry P.

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory, scheduled for a fall 2000 launch, is designed to measure temperature fluctuations (anisotropy) and produce a high sensitivity and high spatial resolution (better than 0.3 deg.) map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation over the entire sky between 22 and 90 GHz. MAP utilizes back-to-back composite Gregorian telescopes supported on a composite truss structure to focus the microwave signals into 10 differential microwave receivers. Proper position and shape of the telescope reflectors at the operating temperature of approximately 90 K is a critical element to ensuring mission success. We describe the methods and analysis used to validate the in-flight position and shape predictions for the reflectors based on photogrammetric (PG) metrology data taken under vacuum with the reflectors at approximately 90 K. Contour maps showing reflector distortion analytical extrapolations were generated. The resulting reflector distortion data are shown to be crucial to the analytical assessment of the MAP instrument's microwave system in-flight performance.

  4. Compact microwave imaging system to measure spatial distribution of plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Oba, R.; Yugami, N.; Nishida, Y.

    2004-10-01

    We have developed an advanced microwave interferometric system operating in the K band (18-27 GHz) with the use of a fan-shaped microwave based on a heterodyne detection system for measuring the spatial distribution of the plasma density. In order to make a simple, low-cost, and compact microwave interferometer with better spatial resolution, a microwave scattering technique by a microstrip antenna array is employed. Experimental results show that the imaging system with the microstrip antenna array can have finer spatial resolution than one with the diode antenna array and reconstruct a good spatially resolved image of the finite size dielectric phantoms placed between the horn antenna and the micro strip antenna array. The precise two-dimensional electron density distribution of the cylindrical plasma produced by an electron cyclotron resonance has been observed. As a result, the present imaging system is more suitable for a two- or three-dimensional display of the objects or stationary plasmas and it is possible to realize a compact microwave imaging system.

  5. The development of a model to infer precipitation from microwave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, M. G.; Hardy, K. R.; Sze, N. D.

    1976-01-01

    To permit the inference of precipitation amounts from radiometric measurements, a radiative interaction model was developed. This model uses a simple computational scheme to determine the effects of rain upon brightness temperatures and can be used with a statistical inversion procedure to invert for rain rate. Precipitating cloud models was also developed and used with the microwave model for frequencies of 19.35 and 37 GHz to determine the variability of the microwave-rain rate relationship on a global and seasonal basis.

  6. Measurements of energy distribution and wall temperature in flowing hydrogen microwave plasma systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into translational energy of the flowing gas is being investigated. A calorimetric experimental system has been designed and built enclosing the microwave plasma system to accurately determine the net energy transferred to the flowing gas. For a flow rate of 8900 micromoles/sec, a pressure of 7.4 torr, and an absorbed power level of 80 W, an energy transfer efficiency of 50 percent has been measured. A heat transfer model that characterizes the energy transfer processes in the plasma is developed. A wall temperature for the plasma system is calculated.

  7. Measurement of the electron density in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qing; Zhang Guixin; Wang Liming; Wang Xinxin; Wang Shumin; Chen Yan

    2009-11-16

    The electron density in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure was measured with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The electron density is on the order of 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3}, one order higher than that deduced from the Stark broadening of spectral lines, and increases with the increase in the microwave power. The spatial distribution of the electron density was obtained. The highest electron density locates at the symmetrical axis of the plasma torch and decreases radially. It was found that the electron density fluctuates within a range of 0.3 with the time under the same experimental conditions.

  8. Measurement of the Longitudinal Shift of Radiation at Total Internal Reflection by Microwave Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akylas, Victor; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes a method to experimentally determine the longitudinal shift of a microwave beam at total internal reflection. Suggests that the activity be incorporated into an undergraduate laboratory program due to its ease in set-up and clarity of results. (CP)

  9. Dielectric measurements of water in the radio microwave frequencies by time domain reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Merabet, M.; Bose, T.K.

    1988-10-20

    The time domain reflectometric method is used with success to measure the dielectric properties of water from 10 MHz to 8 GHz. It is shown that special precautions must be taken into account in order to determine the dielectric properties of a substance with high dielectric constant in the microwave region.

  10. Microwave Measurements of Maleimide and its Doubly Hydrogen Bonded Dimer with Formic ACID*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2016-06-01

    The microwave spectra were measured for the maleimide monomer and the maleimide-formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer using a pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Many previously studied doubly hydrogen bonded dimers are formed between oxygen containing species, so it is important to also characterize and study other dimers containing nitrogen, as hydrogen bonding interactions with nitrogen are found in biological systems such as in DNA. The transition state of the dimer does not exhibit C_2_V symmetry, so the tunneling motion was not expected to be observed based on the symmetry, but it would be very important to also observe the tunneling process for an asymmetric dimer. Single-line b-type transitions were observed, so the tunneling motion was not observed in our microwave spectra. The hydrogen bond lengths were determined using a nonlinear least squares fitting program. *Supported by the NSF CHE-1057796

  11. Measurements of beam current density and proton fraction of a permanent-magnet microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2011-11-15

    A permanent-magnet microwave ion source has been built for use in a high-yield, compact neutron generator. The source has been designed to produce up to 100 mA of deuterium and tritium ions. The electron-cyclotron resonance condition is met at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz and a magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT. The source operates at a low hydrogen gas pressure of about 0.15 Pa. Hydrogen beams with a current density of 40 mA/cm{sup 2} have been extracted at a microwave power of 450 W. The dependence of the extracted proton beam fraction on wall materials and operating parameters was measured and found to vary from 45% for steel to 95% for boron nitride as a wall liner material.

  12. Measurements of microwave transmission characteristics through various configurations of fluidized bed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    The feasibility of developing a microwave diagnostic system for measurement of bubbles in a fluidized bed combustion system was experimentally investigated. Experiments were performed in a simple waveguide geometry using microwave frequencies from 2.4 to 3.9 GHz. Styrofoam spacers were used to simulate bubbles in bed materials, such as Greer limestone. The results show that it is feasible to develop a diagnostic system based on microwave transmission through a system consisting of gaps in a limestone media, such as a fluidized bed. The gap is shown to perturb the transmitted power, and to be very sensitive to bubble and bed material dimensions. Resonance effects are shown to occur when dimensions are integer multiples of a quarter wavelength.

  13. Measurements of microwave transmission characteristics through various configurations of fluidized bed materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The feasibility of developing a microwave diagnostic system for measurement of bubbles in a fluidized bed combustion system has been experimentally investigated. Experiments were performed in a simple waveguide geometry, using microwave frequencies from 2.4 to 3.9 GHz. Styrofoam spacers were used to simulate bubbles in bed materials, such as Greer limestone. The results show that it is feasible to develop a diagnostic system based on microwave transmission through a system consisting of gaps in a limestone media, such as a fluidized bed. The gap has been shown to perturb the transmitted power, and to be very sensitive to bubble and bed material dimensions. Resonance effects are shown to occur when dimensions are integer multiples of a quarter wavelength.

  14. Estimation of the geophysical properties of the ocean surface using aircraft microwave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, M. G.; Willand, J. H.; Chang, D. T.; Isaacs, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    An improved model of the effects of sea state on microwave signature has been developed which incorporates the different effects of whitecaps and streaks to define the response of microwave channels to wind speed. This model has been demonstrated to agree with recent measurements. An approximation model has also been incorporated to describe the effects of precipitation on microwave radiation through a computationally rapid routine. The use of these models and a new technique to allow the selection of the most climatologically appropriate D-matrix is demonstrated in the inversion of data collected over the bering Sea. Surface wind speed agrees very well with observations while good results are obtained for integrated water vapor, and liquid water.

  15. Feasibility Study on a Microwave-Based Sensor for Measuring Hydration Level Using Human Skin Models.

    PubMed

    Brendtke, Rico; Wiehl, Michael; Groeber, Florian; Schwarz, Thomas; Walles, Heike; Hansmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tissue dehydration results in three major types of exsiccosis--hyper-, hypo-, or isonatraemia. All three types entail alterations of salt concentrations leading to impaired biochemical processes, and can finally cause severe morbidity. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a microwave-based sensor technology for the non-invasive measurement of the hydration status. Electromagnetic waves at high frequencies interact with molecules, especially water. Hence, if a sample contains free water molecules, this can be detected in a reflected microwave signal. To develop the sensor system, human three-dimensional skin equivalents were instituted as a standardized test platform mimicking reproducible exsiccosis scenarios. Therefore, skin equivalents with a specific hydration and density of matrix components were generated and microwave measurements were performed. Hydration-specific spectra allowed deriving the hydration state of the skin models. A further advantage of the skin equivalents was the characterization of the impact of distinct skin components on the measured signals to investigate mechanisms of signal generation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a non-invasive microwave-based hydration sensor technology. The sensor bears potential to be integrated in a wearable medical device for personal health monitoring. PMID:27046226

  16. Feasibility Study on a Microwave-Based Sensor for Measuring Hydration Level Using Human Skin Models

    PubMed Central

    Brendtke, Rico; Wiehl, Michael; Groeber, Florian; Schwarz, Thomas; Walles, Heike; Hansmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tissue dehydration results in three major types of exsiccosis—hyper-, hypo-, or isonatraemia. All three types entail alterations of salt concentrations leading to impaired biochemical processes, and can finally cause severe morbidity. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a microwave-based sensor technology for the non-invasive measurement of the hydration status. Electromagnetic waves at high frequencies interact with molecules, especially water. Hence, if a sample contains free water molecules, this can be detected in a reflected microwave signal. To develop the sensor system, human three-dimensional skin equivalents were instituted as a standardized test platform mimicking reproducible exsiccosis scenarios. Therefore, skin equivalents with a specific hydration and density of matrix components were generated and microwave measurements were performed. Hydration-specific spectra allowed deriving the hydration state of the skin models. A further advantage of the skin equivalents was the characterization of the impact of distinct skin components on the measured signals to investigate mechanisms of signal generation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a non-invasive microwave-based hydration sensor technology. The sensor bears potential to be integrated in a wearable medical device for personal health monitoring. PMID:27046226

  17. The measurement of bound and free moisture in organic materials by microwave methods. [Explosives TATB and LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Pyper, J.W.; Buettner, H.M.; Cerjan, C.J.; Hallam, J.S.; King, R.J.

    1984-11-01

    Bound and free moisture can be classified by energetic, structural, or operational schemes. We discuss these schemes and consider four methods (dynamic dielectric thermal analysis, microwave attenuation analysis, near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy) that have been suggested for distinguishing between bound and free moisture in organic materials. This report describes the microwave attenuation method. The theoretical basis for using microwaves for this purpose is developed. We show that microwave measurements can be used to measure the moisture in triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) using a microwave network analyzer down to 0.04% H/sub 2/O. The design of the apparatus necessary to extend these measurements to lower moisture content limits is mentioned. As part of this study, we measured the dielectric properties of TATB for the first time. We found that the dielectric constant epsilon' for TATB was 4.00 +- 0.01.

  18. Zeeman effect in atmospheric O2 measured by ground-based microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas-Guzmán, F.; Kämpfer, N.; Murk, A.; Larsson, R.; Buehler, S. A.; Eriksson, P.

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the Zeeman effect on stratospheric O2 using ground-based microwave radiometer measurements. The interaction of the Earth magnetic field with the oxygen dipole leads to a splitting of O2 energy states, which polarizes the emission spectra. A special campaign was carried out in order to measure this effect in the oxygen emission line centered at 53.07 GHz. Both a fixed and a rotating mirror were incorporated into the TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) in order to be able to measure under different observational angles. This new configuration allowed us to change the angle between the observational path and the Earth magnetic field direction. Moreover, a high-resolution spectrometer (1 kHz) was used in order to measure for the first time the polarization state of the radiation due to the Zeeman effect in the main isotopologue of oxygen from ground-based microwave measurements. The measured spectra showed a clear polarized signature when the observational angles were changed, evidencing the Zeeman effect in the oxygen molecule. In addition, simulations carried out with the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) allowed us to verify the microwave measurements showing a very good agreement between model and measurements. The results suggest some interesting new aspects for research of the upper atmosphere.

  19. Electron density measurements in a pulse-repetitive microwave discharge in air

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, M.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.; Herring, G. C.; Exton, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a technique for absolute measurements of electron density in pulse-repetitive microwave discharges in air. The technique is based on the time-resolved absolute intensity of a nitrogen spectral band belonging to the Second Positive System, the kinetic model and the detailed particle balance of the N{sub 2}C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu} = 0) state. This new approach bridges the gap between two existing electron density measurement methods (Langmuir probe and Stark broadening). The electron density is obtained from the time-dependent rate equation for the population of N{sub 2}C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu} = 0) using recorded waveforms of the absolute C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{yields}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} (0-0) band intensity, the forward and reflected microwave power density. Measured electron density waveforms using numerical and approximated analytical methods are presented for the case of pulse repetitive planar surface microwave discharge at the aperture of a horn antenna covered with alumina ceramic plate. The discharge was generated in air at 11.8 Torr with a X-band microwave generator using 3.5 {mu}s microwave pulses at peak power of 210 kW. In this case, we were able to time resolve the electron density within a single 3.5 {mu}s pulse. We obtained (9.0 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} for the peak and (5.0 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} for the pulse-average electron density. The technique presents a convenient, non-intrusive diagnostic method for local, time-defined measurements of electron density in short duration discharges near atmospheric pressures.

  20. Preparation of activated carbon by microwave heating of langsat (Lansium domesticum) empty fruit bunch waste.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of langsat empty fruit bunch waste for preparation of activated carbon (EFBLAC) by microwave-induced activation was explored. Activation with NaOH at the IR ratio of 1.25, microwave power of 600 W for 6 min produced EFBLAC with a carbon yield of 81.31% and adsorption uptake for MB of 302.48 mg/g. Pore structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the physical and chemical characteristics of EFBLAC. Equilibrium data were best described by the Langmuir isotherm, with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 402.06 mg/g, and the adsorption kinetics was well fitted to the pseudo-second-order equation. The findings revealed the potential to prepare high quality activated carbon from langsat empty fruit bunch waste by microwave irradiation.

  1. Microwave acid digestion and preconcentration neutron activation analysis of biological and diet samples for iodine.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Chatt, A

    1991-07-01

    A simple preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) method has been developed for the determination of low levels of iodine in biological and nutritional materials. The method involves dissolution of the samples by microwave digestion in the presence of acids in closed Teflon bombs and preconcentration of total iodine, after reduction to iodide with hydrazine sulfate, by coprecipitation with bismuth sulfide. The effects of different factors such as acidity, time for complete precipitation, and concentrations of bismuth, sulfide, and diverse ions on the quantitative recovery of iodide have been studied. The absolute detection limit of the PNAA method is 5 ng of iodine. Precision of measurement, expressed in terms of relative standard deviation, is about 5% at 100 ppb and 10% at 20 ppb levels of iodine. The PNAA method has been applied to several biological reference materials and total diet samples. PMID:1897721

  2. Microwave assisted extraction of sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidan) from Ascophyllum nodosum and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Macquarrie, Duncan

    2015-09-20

    Sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidan) from brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum were extracted by microwave assisted extraction (MAE) technology. Different conditions of temperature (90-150°C), extraction time (5-30 min) were evaluated and optimal fucoidan yield was 16.08%, obtained from 120°C for 15 min's extraction. Compositional analysis, GPC, HPAEC and IR analysis were employed for characterization of extracted sulfated polysaccharides. Fucose was the main monosaccharide of fucoidan extracted at 90°C while glucuronic acid was the main monosaccharide of fucoidan extracted at 150°C. Both the molecular weight and sulfate content of extracted fucoidan increased with decreasing extraction temperature. All fucoidans exhibited antioxidant activities as measured by DPPH scavenging and reducing power, among which fucoidan extracted at 90°C was highest. This study shows that MAE is an efficient technology to extract sulfated polysaccharides from seaweed and Ascophyllum nodosum could potentially be a resource for natural antioxidants. PMID:26050894

  3. Microwave assisted extraction of sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidan) from Ascophyllum nodosum and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Macquarrie, Duncan

    2015-09-20

    Sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidan) from brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum were extracted by microwave assisted extraction (MAE) technology. Different conditions of temperature (90-150°C), extraction time (5-30 min) were evaluated and optimal fucoidan yield was 16.08%, obtained from 120°C for 15 min's extraction. Compositional analysis, GPC, HPAEC and IR analysis were employed for characterization of extracted sulfated polysaccharides. Fucose was the main monosaccharide of fucoidan extracted at 90°C while glucuronic acid was the main monosaccharide of fucoidan extracted at 150°C. Both the molecular weight and sulfate content of extracted fucoidan increased with decreasing extraction temperature. All fucoidans exhibited antioxidant activities as measured by DPPH scavenging and reducing power, among which fucoidan extracted at 90°C was highest. This study shows that MAE is an efficient technology to extract sulfated polysaccharides from seaweed and Ascophyllum nodosum could potentially be a resource for natural antioxidants.

  4. Microwave acid digestion and preconcentration neutron activation analysis of biological and diet samples for iodine.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Chatt, A

    1991-07-01

    A simple preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) method has been developed for the determination of low levels of iodine in biological and nutritional materials. The method involves dissolution of the samples by microwave digestion in the presence of acids in closed Teflon bombs and preconcentration of total iodine, after reduction to iodide with hydrazine sulfate, by coprecipitation with bismuth sulfide. The effects of different factors such as acidity, time for complete precipitation, and concentrations of bismuth, sulfide, and diverse ions on the quantitative recovery of iodide have been studied. The absolute detection limit of the PNAA method is 5 ng of iodine. Precision of measurement, expressed in terms of relative standard deviation, is about 5% at 100 ppb and 10% at 20 ppb levels of iodine. The PNAA method has been applied to several biological reference materials and total diet samples.

  5. Measurement of the Microwave Lensing shift in NIST-F1 and NIST-F2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferts, S. R.; Heavner, T. P.; Barlow, S. E.; Ashby, N.

    2016-06-01

    With several Primary Frequency Standards (PFS) across the world demonstrating systematic fractional frequency uncertainties on order of 1 x 10-16, it is crucial to accurately measure or model even small frequency shifts that could affect the ultimate PFS uncertainty, and thus ultimately impact the rate of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) which relies on precision PFS measurements. Recently there has been controversy about the physical causes and size of PFS frequency shifts due to microwave lensing effects. We present here the first measurements of microwave lensing frequency shifts in the PFS NIST-F1 and NIST-F2. The measured frequency shifts agree well with the recent theory of Ashby et al [1].

  6. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    Controlled ground-based passive microwave radiometric measurements on soil moisture were conducted to determine the effects of terrain surface roughness and vegetation on microwave emission. Theoretical predictions were compared with the experimental results and with some recent airborne radiometric measurements. The relationship of soil moisture to the permittivity for the soil was obtained in the laboratory. A dual frequency radiometer, 1.41356 GHz and 10.69 GHz, took measurements at angles between 0 and 50 degrees from an altitude of about fifty feet. Distinct surface roughnesses were studied. With the roughness undisturbed, oats were later planted and vegetated and bare field measurements were compared. The 1.4 GHz radiometer was less affected than the 10.6 GHz radiometer, which under vegetated conditions was incapable of detecting soil moisture. The bare surface theoretical model was inadequate, although the vegetation model appeared to be valid. Moisture parameters to correlate apparent temperature with soil moisture were compared.

  7. Signal phase estimation for measurement of respiration waveform using a microwave Doppler sensor.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kubo, Hajime; Mori, Taketoshi; Sato, Tomomasa; Sanada, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes and compares five methods for phase estimation to measure slight change of chest movement with respiration using a dual type microwave Doppler sensor. A body direction to the sensor affects the performance of the respiration measurement, because microwave reflection is sensitive to the surface direction. The phase estimation from two sensor signals is the most important part to measure respiration. Thus, we developed new five methods for phase estimation. These methods were evaluated by calculating correlation coefficients between estimated waveforms and reference ones. The results demonstrated that the phase estimation based on least square method is the best for respiration measurement with respect to both waveform estimation accuracy and calculation time.

  8. Signal phase estimation for measurement of respiration waveform using a microwave Doppler sensor.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kubo, Hajime; Mori, Taketoshi; Sato, Tomomasa; Sanada, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes and compares five methods for phase estimation to measure slight change of chest movement with respiration using a dual type microwave Doppler sensor. A body direction to the sensor affects the performance of the respiration measurement, because microwave reflection is sensitive to the surface direction. The phase estimation from two sensor signals is the most important part to measure respiration. Thus, we developed new five methods for phase estimation. These methods were evaluated by calculating correlation coefficients between estimated waveforms and reference ones. The results demonstrated that the phase estimation based on least square method is the best for respiration measurement with respect to both waveform estimation accuracy and calculation time. PMID:24111290

  9. Classification methods for monitoring Arctic sea ice using OKEAN passive/active two-channel microwave data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, Gennady I.; Douglas, David C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents methods for classifying Arctic sea ice using both passive and active (2-channel) microwave imagery acquired by the Russian OKEAN 01 polar-orbiting satellite series. Methods and results are compared to sea ice classifications derived from nearly coincident Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) image data of the Barents, Kara, and Laptev Seas. The Russian OKEAN 01 satellite data were collected over weekly intervals during October 1995 through December 1997. Methods are presented for calibrating, georeferencing and classifying the raw active radar and passive microwave OKEAN 01 data, and for correcting the OKEAN 01 microwave radiometer calibration wedge based on concurrent 37 GHz horizontal polarization SSM/I brightness temperature data. Sea ice type and ice concentration algorithms utilized OKEAN's two-channel radar and passive microwave data in a linear mixture model based on the measured values of brightness temperature and radar backscatter, together with a priori knowledge about the scattering parameters and natural emissivities of basic sea ice types. OKEAN 01 data and algorithms tended to classify lower concentrations of young or first-year sea ice when concentrations were less than 60%, and to produce higher concentrations of multi-year sea ice when concentrations were greater than 40%, when compared to estimates produced from SSM/I data. Overall, total sea ice concentration maps derived independently from OKEAN 01, SSM/I, and AVHRR satellite imagery were all highly correlated, with uniform biases, and mean differences in total ice concentration of less than four percent (sd<15%).

  10. Technology advances in active and passive microwave sensing through 1985. [microwave technology for the Seasat-A and Nimbus-G satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    The capabilities of passive and active microwave sensors are discussed. The Nimbus-G and Seasat-A scanning multichannel microwave spectrometer, the Seasat-A radar altimeter, scatterometer and synthetic aperture radar represent the first systematic attempt at exploring a wide variety of applications utilizing microwave sensing techniques and are indicators of the directions in which the pertinent technology is likely to evolve. The trend is toward high resolution multi-frequency imagers spanning wide frequency ranges and wide swaths requiring sophisticated receivers, real-time data processors and most importantly, complex antennas.

  11. Classification of Tropical Oceanic Precipitation Using High Altitude Aircraft Microwave and Electric Field Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Hood, Robbie E.; Blakeslee, Richard; Mach, Douglas; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    A physically intuitive and computationally simple precipitation mapping algorithm has been developed for use with the airborne Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR). The algorithm is based on microwave emission and scattering properties of precipitation. Specifically, emission by liquid water allows increasing brightness temperatures at low frequencies to be interpreted as increasing rain rates. Scattering by large hydrometeors (particularly graupel and hail) causes relative minima in the brightness temperatures, with progressively larger hydrometeors scattering progressively longer wavelengths. The vigor of convection is therefore ascertained according to which wavelengths are being significantly scattered. The combination of emission and scattering information from four microwave channels is used to assign a precipitation category, which is related to the liquid rain rate, the vertical extent of precipitation, and the vigor of convection. The qualitative precipitation categories output by the passive microwave algorithm have been verified using coincident radar (ER-2 Doppler Radar - EDOP) and electric field measurements (Lightning Instrument Package - LIP). These coincident measurements can subsequently be used to quantify rain rates, hydrometeor contents, and vertical profiles that are typical for each precipitation category. This algorithm has been developed using an airborne platform. Comparisons are being made with other airborne, satellite, and ground-based radar and radiometer data. This technique shows promise both as a research tool and potentially as a real-time analysis tool, which could be applied to either traditional or uninhabited aerial vehicles.

  12. Measurements of doping-dependent microwave nonlinearities in high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sheng-Chiang

    I first present the design and use of a near-field permeability imaging microwave microscope to measure local permeability and ferromagnetic resonant fields. This microscope is then modified as a near-field nonlinear microwave microscope to quantitatively measure the local nonlinearities in high-Tc superconductor thin films of YBa 2Cu3O7-delta (YBCO). The system consists of a coaxial loop probe magnetically coupling to the sample, a microwave source, some low- and high-pass filters for selecting signals at desired frequencies, two microwave amplifiers for amplification of desired signals, and a spectrum analyzer for detection of the signals. When microwave signals are locally applied to the superconducting thin film through the loop probe, nonlinear electromagnetic response appearing as higher harmonic generation is created due to the presence of nonlinear mechanisms in the sample. It is expected that the time-reversal symmetric (TRS) nonlinearities contribute only to even order harmonics, while the time-reversal symmetry breaking (TRSB) nonlinearities contribute to all harmonics. The response is sensed by the loop probe, and measured by the spectrum analyzer. No resonant technique is used in this system so that we can measure the second and third harmonic generation simultaneously. The spatial resolution of the microscope is limited by the size of the loop probe, which is about 500 mum diameter. The probe size can be reduced to ˜15 mum diameter, to improve the spatial resolution. To quantitatively address the nonlinearities, I introduce scaling current densities JNL(T) and JNL'(T), which measure the suppression of the super-fluid density as ns( T, J)/ns(T, 0) = 1 - (J/JNL'( T)) - (J/JNL(T)) 2, where J is the applied current density. I extract JNL(T) and JNL '(T) from my measurements of harmonic generation on YBCO bi-crystal grain boundaries, and a set of variously under-doped YBCO thin films. The former is a well-known nonlinear source which is expected to

  13. Atmospheric moisture measurements - A microwave radiometer-radiosonde comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Martin N.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Johansson, Jan M.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal emission of the sky at three frequencies (20.7, 22.2, and 31.4 GHz) with the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Crustal Dynamics Project MW Water Vapor Radiometer are reported. These measurements are compared with brightness temperatures inferred from measurements from VAISALA radiosonde packages launched every 3 hr during the experiment period. An error analysis for the radiosonde-inferred brightness temperatures is performed under the assumption of reasonable random uncertainties for the pressure, temperature, and humidity measurements and propagation of these uncertainties through the analysis algorithm. For the assumed uncertainties, the dominant contribution to the total uncertainty comes from the temperature measurement (66-88 percent), whereas the relative humidity measurement contributes only 2-8 percent, except in the vicinity of the water vapor line, where the contribution is 10-20 percent.

  14. New method for moisture content measurement using phase shifts at two microwave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Okamura, S; Zhang, Y

    2000-01-01

    A new method to measure moisture content of material is described in this paper. The method is based on two phase shifts of transmitted microwave signal at two different frequencies. The result using this method for moisture measurement of timber indicates this method being effective. The maximum error and mean value of error in moisture range from 2 to 30% on dry basis are 4.1% and 1.9%, respectively. PMID:11098442

  15. D-term inflation, cosmic strings, and consistency with cosmic microwave background measurements.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Jonathan; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2005-01-14

    Standard D-term inflation is studied in the framework of supergravity. D-term inflation produces cosmic strings; however, it can still be compatible with cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements without invoking any new physics. The cosmic strings contribution to the CMB data is not constant, nor dominant, contrary to some previous results. Using current CMB measurements, the free parameters (gauge and superpotential couplings, as well as the Fayet-Iliopoulos term) of D-term inflation are constrained. PMID:15698061

  16. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Andrew A. Suby

    2003-01-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photoacoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photo-acoustic signals in an off-line configuration. This system was assembled and used to test parameters thought important to photo-acoustic signal output. A standard modulation frequency was chosen based upon signal to noise data gained from experimentation. Sample heterogeneity was tested and found not to be influential. Further testing showed that sample compression and photo-acoustic volume do affect photo-acoustic signal with photoacoustic volume being the most influential. Testing in the fifth quarter focused on microwave power stability. Simultaneously, a second instrument is being constructed based in part on lessons learned with the first instrument, but also expands the capabilities of the first instrument by allowing a spectrum of microwave frequencies to be tested up to 10 GHz. The power amplifiers for this second instrument were completed and tested. Improvements were made to the current leveling loop, which will stabilize the microwave power. This loop is currently in operation with the single frequency cell. Discriminatory measurements are continuing in an attempt to differentiate between magnetic contaminants such as iron and non-magnetic contaminants such as carbon. A short coaxial test fixture was fabricated and tested showing the promise of another microwave based test method for determining carbon content in fly ash. Preliminary design iterations for the third on-line instrument (based on the experiences of the first two instruments) have begun.

  17. The microwave spectrum of o-benzyne measured in a novel Stark modulated spectrometer for transient molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Evan G.; Godfrey, Peter D.; McNaughton, Don

    2003-01-01

    A set of 36 new microwave transitions have been measured for o-benzyne, generated by pyrolysis of phthalic anhydride. All 50 known rotational transitions have been fitted to give an improved set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. A short waveguide based microwave spectrometer designed specifically for short lived species is described.

  18. Comparison of Profiling Microwave Radiometer, Aircraft, and Radiosonde Measurements From the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.

    2001-01-01

    Measurements from a profiling microwave radiometer are compared to measurements from a research aircraft and radiosondes. Data compared is temperature, water vapor, and liquid water profiles. Data was gathered at the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS) at Mirabel Airport outside Montreal, Canada during December 1999 and January 2000. All radiometer measurements were found to lose accuracy when the radome was wet. When the radome was not wetted, the radiometer was seen to indicate an inverted distribution of liquid water within a cloud. When the radiometer measurements were made at 15 deg. instead of the standard zenith, the measurements were less accurate.

  19. Soil moisture estimation by airborne active and passive microwave remote sensing: A test-bed for SMAP fusion algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, Carsten; Bogena, Heye; Jagdhuber, Thomas; Hajnsek, Irena; Horn, Ralf; Reigber, Andreas; Hasan, Sayeh; Rüdiger, Christoph; Jaeger, Marc; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state. The SMAP launch is currently planned for 2014-2015. The SMAP measurement approach is to integrate L-band radar and L-band radiometer as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. The radar and radiometer measurements can be effectively combined to derive soil moisture maps that approach the accuracy of radiometer-only retrievals, but with a higher resolution (being able to approach the radar resolution under some conditions). Aircraft and tower-based instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment in Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system DLR F-SAR were flown on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites. These data are used as a test-bed for the analysis of existing and development of new active-passive fusion techniques. A synergistic use of the two signals can help to decouple soil moisture effects from the effects of vegetation (or roughness) in a better way than in the case of a single instrument. In this study, we present and evaluate three approaches for the fusion of active and passive microwave records for an enhanced representation of the soil moisture status: i) estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter data, ii) disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, and iii) fusion of two single-source soil moisture products from radar and radiometer.

  20. New approach for measuring the microwave Hall mobility of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, D. V. B.; Subramanian, V.; Murthy, V. R. K.

    2006-06-15

    Measurement of Hall mobility in semiconductor samples using bimodal cavity method gives distinct advantages due to noncontact nature as well as the provision to measure anisotropic mobility. But the measurement approaches followed till now have a disadvantage of having high error values primarily due to the problem in evaluating the calibration constant of the whole experimental arrangement. This article brings out a new approach that removes such disadvantage and presents the calibration constant with 1% accuracy. The overall error in the carrier mobility values is within 5%.

  1. Measuring the large-scale anisotropy in the microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of large-scale anisotropy in the 2.7 K microwave background radiation are reaching a sensitivity of Delta T/T = 0.0001 in the amplitudes of low-order spherical harmonics. At this level, interesting conditions and processes in the early universe can be studied. However, the measurements are difficult and very susceptible to systematic errors. The microwave instruments and techniques are discussed with the emphasis on the reduction and evaluation of spurious effects. The subtraction of foreground radiation, mainly from diffuse Galactic sources, is a major problem that already limits the accuracy of measurements near 1 cm wavelength. Current results for the dipole and quadrupole moments are compared and discussed.

  2. Trace gas evolution in the lowermost stratosphere from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; Schwartz, M. J.; Read, W. G.

    2011-09-01

    Daily global measurements from NASA's Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) allow comprehensive investigation of interhemispheric and interannual variations in chemical and transport processes throughout the lowermost stratosphere (LMS). We analyze nearly seven years of MLS O3, HNO3, HCl and ClO measurements along with meteorological analyses to place chemical processing in and dispersal of processed air from the winter polar lowermost vortex and subvortex in a global context. The MLS data, the first simultaneous observations of HCl and ClO covering much of the LMS, reveal that chlorine activation is widespread in the Antarctic subvortex and can occur to a significant degree in the Arctic subvortex. Unusually low temperatures and strong, prolonged chlorine activation in the lowermost vortex and subvortex promoted large ozone losses there in the 2006 (and 2008) Antarctic and 2004/2005 Arctic winters, consistent with reported record low column ozone. Processed air dispersing from the decaying vortex in spring induces rapid changes in extravortex trace gas abundances. After vortex breakdown, the subtropical jet/tropopause becomes the major transport barrier in the LMS. Quasi-isentropic transport of tropical tropospheric air into the LMS, associated with the summer monsoon circulations, leads to decreases in extratropical O3, HNO3, and HCl in both hemispheres. Strong mixing in the summertime LMS homogenizes extratropical trace gas fields. MLS measurements in the tropics show signatures of monsoon-related cross-equatorial stratosphere-to-troposphere transport. Observed seasonal and interannual variations in trace gas abundances in the LMS are consistent with variations in the strength of transport barriers diagnosed from meteorological analyses.

  3. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  4. A new method for the precise multiband microwave dielectric measurement using stepped impedance stub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, M. Y.; Ali, A.; Hunter, I. C.; Roberts, N. S.

    2016-11-01

    This article presents a new method of wideband dielectric measurement at microwave frequencies. This method can be used to determine the complex dielectric properties of solid and semisolid materials from 0.9 GHz to 4.5 GHz, including the ISM bands of 915 MHz and 2450 MHz. The new method is based on the scattering parameter measurement of a stepped impedance open circuited micro-strip stub, partly loaded with dielectric test material. Current microwave wideband spectroscopy techniques generally measure dielectric materials over a wide range of frequencies but their accuracy is limited. In contrast, narrowband techniques generally measure dielectric properties to a high accuracy but only at a single frequency. This new technique is capable of measuring dielectric properties over a wide range of frequencies to a high accuracy. The technique has been verified by the empirical characterisation of the dielectric properties of Teflon and Duroid 5880 materials. Empirical results were in good agreement with values in the manufacturer’s Data Sheets. The complex permittivity data will be useful for further microwave processing of the materials.

  5. Accurate Permittivity Measurements for Microwave Imaging via Ultra-Wideband Removal of Spurious Reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Mathew G.; Viera, Joseph A.; Wanjura, John; Holt, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The use of microwave imaging is becoming more prevalent for detection of interior hidden defects in manufactured and packaged materials. In applications for detection of hidden moisture, microwave tomography can be used to image the material and then perform an inverse calculation to derive an estimate of the variability of the hidden material, such internal moisture, thereby alerting personnel to damaging levels of the hidden moisture before material degradation occurs. One impediment to this type of imaging occurs with nearby objects create strong reflections that create destructive and constructive interference, at the receiver, as the material is conveyed past the imaging antenna array. In an effort to remove the influence of the reflectors, such as metal bale ties, research was conducted to develop an algorithm for removal of the influence of the local proximity reflectors from the microwave images. This research effort produced a technique, based upon the use of ultra-wideband signals, for the removal of spurious reflections created by local proximity reflectors. This improvement enables accurate microwave measurements of moisture in such products as cotton bales, as well as other physical properties such as density or material composition. The proposed algorithm was shown to reduce errors by a 4:1 ratio and is an enabling technology for imaging applications in the presence of metal bale ties. PMID:22163668

  6. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  7. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  8. Measurement of electron clouds in large accelerators by microwave dispersion.

    PubMed

    De Santis, S; Byrd, J M; Caspers, F; Krasnykh, A; Kroyer, T; Pivi, M T F; Sonnad, K G

    2008-03-01

    Clouds of low energy electrons in the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation at high currents. Furthermore, it is difficult to probe their density over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave transmitted over a section of the accelerator and used it to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  9. Global Precipitation Measurement: GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) Algorithm Development Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the approach to the development of the Global Precipitation Measurement algorithm. This presentation includes information about the responsibilities for the development of the algorithm, and the calibration. Also included is information about the orbit, and the sun angle. The test of the algorithm code will be done with synthetic data generated from the Precipitation Processing System (PPS).

  10. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations and it is based on models that simulate high-resolution brightness temperatures as functions of observed reflectivity profiles and a parameter related to the rain drop-size-distribution. The modeled high-resolution brightness temperatures are used to determine normalized brightness temperature polarizations at the microwave radiometer resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is employed to minimize the differences between the simulated and observed normalized polarizations by adjusting the drop-size-distribution parameter. The impact of other unknowns that are not independent variables in the optimal estimation but affect the retrievals is minimized through statistical parameterizations derived from cloud model simulations. The retrieval technique is investigated using TRMM observations collected during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). These observations cover an area extending from 5 deg to deg N latitude and 166 deg to 172 deg E longitude from July to September 1999, and are coincident with various ground-based observations, facilitating a detailed analysis of the retrieved precipitation. Using the method developed in this study, precipitation estimates consistent with both the passive and active TRMM observations are obtained. Various parameters characterizing these estimates, i.e. the rain rate, the precipitation water content, the drop-size-distribution intercept, and the mass weighted mean drop diameter, are in good qualitative agreement with independent experimental and theoretical estimates. Combined rain estimates are in general higher than the official TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) only estimates for the area and the period considered in the study. Ground-based precipitation estimates

  11. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency Active and Passive Microwave Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.

    2004-04-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations, and it is based on models that simulate high-resolution brightness temperatures as functions of observed reflectivity profiles and a parameter related to the raindrop size distribution. The modeled high-resolution brightness temperatures are used to determine normalized brightness temperature polarizations at the microwave radiometer resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is employed to minimize the differences between the simulated and observed normalized polarizations by adjusting the drop size distribution parameter. The impact of other unknowns that are not independent variables in the optimal estimation, but affect the retrievals, is minimized through statistical parameterizations derived from cloud model simulations. The retrieval technique is investigated using TRMM observations collected during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). These observations cover an area extending from 5° to 12°N latitude and from 166° to 172°E longitude from July to September 1999 and are coincident with various ground-based observations, facilitating a detailed analysis of the retrieved precipitation. Using the method developed in this study, precipitation estimates consistent with both the passive and active TRMM observations are obtained. Various parameters characterizing these estimates, that is, the rain rate, precipitation water content, drop size distribution intercept, and the mass- weighted mean drop diameter, are in good qualitative agreement with independent experimental and theoretical estimates. Combined rain estimates are, in general, higher than the official TRMM precipitation radar (PR)-only estimates for the area and the period considered in the study. Ground-based precipitation estimates, derived

  12. Measurements of microwave spectra and structural parameters for methylferrocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolis, David S.; Tanjaroon, Chakree; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2002-08-01

    Rotational transitions for methylferrocene were measured, in the 4-12 GHz range, using a Flygare-Balle type, pulsed-beam Fourier transform spectrometer. Mono-substituted ferrocenes are nearprolate asymmetric tops with a and b dipole moment components, providing numerous possible transitions in this frequency range. Eighteen rotational constants were calculated from the data for six isotopomers. 59 transitions were measured for the normal isotopomer, and much smaller data sets were obtained for the 54Fe, and four 13C isotopomers. Despite the small data sets for 13C and 54Fe transitions, good fits were obtained with small standard deviations ranging from 2 to 5 kHz. The eighteen A, B, and C rotational constants were used to determine the structural parameters for methylferrocene. Measured rotational constants for the normal isotopomer are: A=1592.6050(6), B=957.2565(4), and C=825.9892(4) MHz. The values for the averaged structural parameters are: r1)(Fe-C)=2.050(7 A, r2)(C-C(cyclopentadienyl ligands)=1.433(7) A and r3(C-CH3))=1.52(2 A (for the methyl cyclopentadienyl ligand). Small splittings (20-30 kHz) were observed for some transitions, and these could be due to proton hyperfine structure or small internal rotation splittings. The structural parameters for this complex were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) methods, and the results are in very good agreement with the measured values. Results are compared with earlier measurements on substituted ferrocenes. Distortions of the substituted cyclopentadienyl ligand are significantly smaller than those observed for chloroferrocene.

  13. Preliminary studies: far-field microwave dosimetric measurements of a full-scale model of man.

    PubMed

    Olsen, R G

    1979-12-01

    Measurements of microwave heating were made in a full-size, upright human model. The 75-Kg model, composed of electrically simulated muscle, was placed in the far-zone of a standard-gain horn inside an absorber-lined chamber. Pulsed energy at 1.29 GHz was obtained from a military radar transmitter (AN/TPS-1G) and produced radiation at 6-14 mW/cm2 average power density at the location of the model. Microwave heating at the front surface was measured at nine locations on the phantom. Measurements at several depths within the phantom were also made at a central location to gain information on the depth-of-penetration of the microwave energy. Results of the frontal surface measurements and of the penetration study permitted a calculation of the approximate whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) when the model's long axis was parallel to the E-field vector. For a normalized power density of 1 mW/cm2 at a frequency of 1.29 GHz, the whole-body average SAR approximated 0.03 W/Kg. This result agrees well with theoretical predictions based on absorption in prolate spheroidal models of man.

  14. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system.

    PubMed

    Rydfjord, Jonas; Svensson, Fredrik; Fagrell, Magnus; Sävmarker, Jonas; Thulin, Måns; Larhed, Mats

    2013-01-01

    In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe), thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications.

  15. Microwave measurements of the spectra and molecular structure for phthalic anhydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Sun, Ming; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2014-05-01

    The microwave rotational spectrum for phthalic anhydride (PhA) has been measured in the 4-14 GHz microwave region using a pulsed-beam Fourier transform (PBFT) Flygare-Balle type microwave spectrometer. Initially, the molecular structure was calculated using Gaussian 09 suite with mp2/6-311++G** basis and the calculations were used in predicting spectra for the measured isotopologues. The experimental rotational transition frequencies were measured and used to calculate the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. The rotational constants for the normal isotopologue, four unique 13C substituted isotopologues and two 18O isotologues, were used in a least squares fit to determine nearly all structural parameters for this molecule. Since no substitutions were made at hydrogen sites, the calculated positions of the hydrogen atoms relative to the bonded carbon atoms were used in the structure determination. The rotational constants for the parent isotopologue were determined to be A = 1801.7622(9) MHz, B = 1191.71816(26) MHz, C = 717.44614(28) MHz. Small values for the centrifugal distortion constants were obtained; DJ = 0.0127 kHz, DJK = 0.0652 kHz, and DK = -0.099 kHz, indicating a fairly rigid structure. The structure of PhA is planar with a negative inertial defect of Δ = -0.154 amu Å2. Structural parameters from the mp2 and DFT calculations are in quite good agreement with measured parameters.

  16. A modified field model of waveguide reflection dielectric resonator for microwave measurements of dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Jyh

    2008-02-01

    A modified electromagnetic field model of a waveguide reflection dielectric resonator is suggested for measurements of dielectric properties of the homogeneous and isotropic medium in the microwave frequencies. Reflection signal is measured for the calculations of dielectric properties. A dielectric rod sample is put inside of a rectangular cavity made by a microwave waveguide. The sample's dielectric constant and loss tangent are computed from the unloaded quality factor and the resonant frequency of the TE01δ mode as well as the structure dimensions. For first time, this waveguide reflection dielectric resonator is applied on dielectric constant measurement. A modified field model of the waveguide reflection resonator is developed from the Itoh-Rudokas model [IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. MTT-25, 52 (1977)] of the parallel-plate dielectric resonator. This modification is justified by the dramatic improvement in the accuracy of dielectric constant measurements. The main merit of this field model is that it provides very simple electromagnetic field expressions of this TE01δ field mode. In addition, accuracies of various methods for calculating the power factor and conducting loss, which have never been given before, will be investigated in this article.

  17. Determination of the uncertainties of reflection coefficient measurements of a microwave network analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Duda, L.E.; Moyer, R.D.

    1998-04-01

    A method that calculates the residual uncertainties of a microwave network analyzer for the frequency range of 300 kHz to 50 GHz is described. The method utilizes measurements on NIST-certified standards (such as an airline or load) plus additional measurements to estimate the combined standard uncertainties for measurements using the network analyzer. The uncertainties of the standards are incorporated by means of a Monte Carlo technique. The uncertainties assigned to a network analyzer then provide the basis for estimating the uncertainties assigned to devices measured using a network analyzer. The results of this method for characterizing network analyzer uncertainties are presented for several connector types.

  18. High-Fidelity Qubit Measurement using a Superconducting Low-Inductance Undulatory Galvanometer Microwave Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorbeck, Ted; Hover, David; Zhu, Shaojiang; Ribeill, Guilhem; Sank, Daniel; Barends, Rami; Martinis, John; McDermott, Robert

    2014-03-01

    We describe a high-fidelity dispersive measurement of a superconducting Xmon qubit using a microwave amplifier based on the Superconducting Low-inductance Undulatory Galvanometer (SLUG). We will show a qubit measurement fidelity of 99% in 700 ns with the SLUG, compared to 60% without the SLUG. The SLUG amplifier has a gain of 19 dB at 6.6 GHZ. It also improves the signal-to-noise ratio by 9 dB, compared the same circuit without the SLUG. Also, the SLUG amplifier has a large dynamic range, with an input saturation power corresponding to around 600 photons in the readout cavity. All of these properties make the SLUG a promising microwave amplifier for more complex quantum circuits.

  19. Microwave frequency sweep interferometer for plasma density measurements in ECR ion sources: Design and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, Giuseppe; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Ornella; Sorbello, Gino; Celona, Luigi; Castro, Giuseppe; Agnello, Riccardo; Caruso, Antonio; Passarello, Santi; Longhitano, Alberto; Isernia, Tommaso; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) development is strictly related to the availability of new diagnostic tools, as the existing ones are not adequate to such compact machines and to their plasma characteristics. Microwave interferometry is a non-invasive method for plasma diagnostics and represents the best candidate for plasma density measurement in hostile environment. Interferometry in ECRISs is a challenging task mainly due to their compact size. The typical density of ECR plasmas is in the range 1011-1013 cm-3 and it needs a probing beam wavelength of the order of few centimetres, comparable to the chamber radius. The paper describes the design of a microwave interferometer developed at the LNS-INFN laboratories based on the so-called "frequency sweep" method to filter out the multipath contribution in the detected signals. The measurement technique and the preliminary results (calibration) obtained during the experimental tests will be presented.

  20. Microwave frequency sweep interferometer for plasma density measurements in ECR ion sources: Design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, Giuseppe; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Ornella; Sorbello, Gino; Celona, Luigi; Castro, Giuseppe; Agnello, Riccardo; Caruso, Antonio; Passarello, Santi; Longhitano, Alberto; Isernia, Tommaso; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) development is strictly related to the availability of new diagnostic tools, as the existing ones are not adequate to such compact machines and to their plasma characteristics. Microwave interferometry is a non-invasive method for plasma diagnostics and represents the best candidate for plasma density measurement in hostile environment. Interferometry in ECRISs is a challenging task mainly due to their compact size. The typical density of ECR plasmas is in the range 10(11)-10(13) cm(-3) and it needs a probing beam wavelength of the order of few centimetres, comparable to the chamber radius. The paper describes the design of a microwave interferometer developed at the LNS-INFN laboratories based on the so-called "frequency sweep" method to filter out the multipath contribution in the detected signals. The measurement technique and the preliminary results (calibration) obtained during the experimental tests will be presented.

  1. Microstrip ring resonator technique for measuring microwave attenuation in high-Tc superconducting thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, June H.; Oshita, Floyd K.; Fetterman, Harold R.; Kobrin, Paul; Sovero, Emilio

    1989-10-01

    Microwave attenuation of high-Tc superconducting (HTS) films sputtered on MgO and ZrO2 were measured using a microstrip ring resonator circuit. The results for Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O resonators were compared to those for gold-plated resonators of identical design. The losses of superconducting and gold-plated films were determined from unloaded Q-factor measurements. The attenuation of Y-Ba-Cu-O film on an MgO substrate is approximately 31 percent lower than that of gold films at 6.6 GHz and 33 percent lower at 19.2 GHz for temperatures below 50 K. The approach of using microstrips to characterize microwave losses shows the usefulness of HTS films in integrated circuit technology.

  2. Global brightness temperature spectra at high wavenumbers utilizing satellite microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanford, J. L.

    1980-05-01

    Satellite microwave brightness temperature (radiance) measurements represent weighted mean temperatures in a certain atmospheric layer. The high density of measurements along a polar-orbiting satellite track allows estimates of the brightness temperature variance spectrum at high meridional wavenumbers. Global data from the Nimbus 6 SCAMS microwave instrument sensitive to the 100-300 mb layer have been analyzed for 30 days in August 1975. The results reveal that the brightness temperature variance spectrum can be fit to the form k to the m power over the range k = 22 to 59 (horizontal wavelengths 1800 to 700 km). Using 95% confidence intervals, the fit yields m = minus 3.1 plus or minus 0.3. These results appear to have significance for estimates of energy cascade between different motion scales in the very high wavenumber regime.

  3. Microwave radiation measurements near the electron plasma frequency of the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallavarpu, R.; Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave emission near the electron plasma frequency was observed, and its relation to the average electron density and the dc toroidal magnetic field was examined. The emission was detected using a spectrum analyzer and a 50 omega miniature coaxial probe. The radiation appeared as a broad amplitude peak that shifted in frequency as the plasma parameters were varied. The observed radiation scanned an average plasma density ranging from 10 million/cu cm to 8 hundred million/cu cm. A linear relation was observed betweeen the density calculated from the emission frequency and the average plasma density measured with a microwave interferometer. With the aid of a relative density profile measurement of the plasma, it was determined that the emissions occurred from the outer periphery of the plasma.

  4. Microwave radiation measurements near the electron plasma frequency of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallavarpu, R.; Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave emission near the electron plasma frequency of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma has been observed, and its relation to the average electron density and the dc toroidal magnetic field was examined. The emission was detected using a spectrum analyzer and a 50-ohm miniature coaxial probe. The radiation appeared as a broad amplitude peak that shifted in frequency as the plasma parameters were varied. The observed radiation scanned an average plasma density ranging from 20 billion to 800 billion per cu cm. A linear relation was observed between the density calculated from the emission frequency and the average plasma density measured with a microwave interferometer. With the aid of a relative density profile measurement of the plasma, it was determined that the emissions occurred from the outer periphery of the plasma.

  5. Homodyne Microwave Electric Field Measurements Using Cesium Rydberg Atoms in Vapor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haoquan; Kumar, Santosh; Shaffer, James

    2015-05-01

    Probe laser noise is one of the main factors limiting the sensitivity of microwave electric field measurements that use Rydberg atoms in vapor cells. We apply a homodyne detection technique using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer to achieve a new sensitivity limit for the measurement of microwave electric fields, 3 - 5 μV cm-1√{ Hz }-1 . The new sensitivity is almost one order of magnitude better than the previous results presented in Ref. [Nat. Phys. 8, 819 (2012)]. We also report on the homogeneous dephasing effects caused by transit time broadening, collision broadening, and the lifetime of Rydberg atoms which we can now directly observe. We show that these dephasing effects are the fundamental limiting factors that determine the shot noise limit.

  6. Assimilation of Precipitation Measurement Missions Microwave Radiance Observations With GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jianjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; McCarty, Will; Akella, Santha; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) Core Observatory satellite was launched in February, 2014. The GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) is a conically scanning radiometer measuring 13 channels ranging from 10 to 183 GHz and sampling between 65 S 65 N. This instrument is a successor to the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI), which has observed 9 channels at frequencies ranging 10 to 85 GHz between 40 S 40 N since 1997. This presentation outlines the base procedures developed to assimilate GMI and TMI radiances in clear-sky conditions, including quality control methods, thinning decisions, and the estimation of, observation errors. This presentation also shows the impact of these observations when they are incorporated into the GEOS-5 atmospheric data assimilation system.

  7. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeff Sweterlitsch

    2003-07-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photoacoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photo-acoustic signals in an off-line configuration. This system was assembled and used to test parameters thought important to photo-acoustic signal output. A standard modulation frequency was chosen based upon signal to noise data gained from experimentation. Experiments were conducted during the seventh quarter to locate and eliminate microwave leakage from the off-line fly ash monitor. A preliminary cold-flow on-line fly ash monitor has been designed to evaluate the flow characteristics of the fly ash. Upon successful demonstration of repeatable, regular flow of the fly ash, design and construction of the hot-flow on-line fly ash monitor will commence.

  8. Microwave Scattering System Design for {rho}{sub i}e-Scale Turbulence Measurements on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D.R. Smith; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; H. Park; D. Johnson; L. Lin; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.

    2004-05-19

    Despite suppression of {rho}{sub i}-scale turbulent fluctuations, electron thermal transport remains anomalous in NSTX. For this reason, a microwave scattering system will be deployed to directly observe the w and k spectra of {rho}{sub e}-scale turbulent fluctuations and characterize the effect on electron thermal transport. The scattering system will employ a Gaussian probe beam produced by a high power 280 GHz microwave source. A five-channel heterodyne detection system will measure radial turbulent spectra in the range |k{sub r}| = 0-20 cm{sup -1}. Inboard and outboard launch configurations cover most of the normalized minor radius. Improved spatial localization of measurements is achieved with low aspect ratio and high magnetic shear configurations. This paper will address the global design of the scattering system, such as choice of frequency, size, launching system, and detection system.

  9. Influence of Polarity and Activation Energy in Microwave-Assisted Organic Synthesis (MAOS).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Antonio M; Prieto, Pilar; de la Hoz, Antonio; Díaz-Ortiz, Ángel; Martín, D Raúl; García, José I

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the parameters that have decisive roles in microwave-assisted reactions and to develop a model, using computational chemistry, to predict a priori the type of reactions that can be improved under microwaves. For this purpose, a computational study was carried out on a variety of reactions, which have been reported to be improved under microwave irradiation. This comprises six types of reactions. The outcomes obtained in this study indicate that the most influential parameters are activation energy, enthalpy, and the polarity of all the species that participate. In addition to this, in most cases, slower reacting systems observe a much greater improvement under microwave irradiation. Furthermore, for these reactions, the presence of a polar component in the reaction (solvent, reagent, susceptor, etc.) is necessary for strong coupling with the electromagnetic radiation. We also quantified that an activation energy of 20-30 kcal mol(-1) and a polarity (μ) between 7-20 D of the species involved in the process is required to obtain significant improvements under microwave irradiation.

  10. Influence of microwave irradiation on boron concentrate activation with an emphasis on surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Qiaoyi; Liu, Yajing; Xue, Xiangxin; Duan, Peining

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we employed microwave irradiation for activating boron concentrate, an abundant but low-grade boron mineral resource in China. The boron concentrate was pretreated by microwave irradiation based on TG-DTG-DSC analysis, and the influence of each parameter on processing efficiency was characterized using chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, FTIR and particle distribution analysis. Subsequently, the surface properties of boron concentrate and the mechanism of microwave irradiation was analyzed. Our results indicate that microwave irradiation decreased the processing temperature and shortened the roasting time by accelerating dehydroxylation and oxidation reactions in the boron concentrate, reducing the particle diameter and damaging the microstructure of the minerals, and it increased the B2O3 activity of boron from 64.68% to 86.73%, greater than the optimal conventional treatment. Compared with the simple thermal field, microwave roasting obviously increased ability of the boron concentrate to absorb OH- in the leachant and promoted boron leaching by expanding the contact area of the mineral exposed to leachant, boosting the amount of Mg2+ and Fe3+ on mineral surfaces, and increasing the hydrophilicity of the boron concentrate respectively. It enhanced the γSVLW and γSV- of boron concentrate from 29.15 mJ/m2 and 5.07 mJ/m2 to 37.07 mJ/m2 and 12.41 mJ/m2.

  11. Venus: new microwave measurements show no atmospheric water vapor.

    PubMed

    Janssen, M A; Hills, R E; Thornton, D D; Welch, W J

    1973-03-01

    Two sets of passive radio observations of Venus-measurements of the spectrum of the disk temperature near the 1-centimeter wavelength, and interferometric measurements of the planetary limb darkening at the 1.35-centimeter water vapor resonance-show no evidence of water vapor in the lower atmosphere of Venus. The upper limit of 2 x 10(-3) for the mixing ratio of water vapor is substantially less than the amounts derived from the Venera space probes (0.5 x 10(-2) to 2.5 x 10(-2)). This amount of water vapor cannot produce dense clouds, and it is doubtful that it may contribute significantly to a greenhouse effect.

  12. A facile synthesis of arylazonicotinates for dyeing polyester fabrics under microwave irradiation and their biological activity profiles.

    PubMed

    Al-Mousawi, Saleh M; El-Apasery, Morsy A; Mahmoud, Huda M

    2012-09-27

    A as textile dyes and the fastness properties of the dyed samples were measured. Most of the dyed fabrics tested displayed very good washing and perspiration fastness and series of 2-hydroxy- and 2-amino-6-substituted-5-arylazonicotinate monoazo compounds 7a-e and 9a-c were prepared via condensation of 3-oxo-3-substituted-2-arylhydrazonals 2a-e with active methylene nitriles 3a-d using microwave irradiation as an energy source. These substances were then tested moderate light fastness. Finally, the biological activity of the synthesized compounds against gram positive bacteria, gram negative bacteria and yeast were evaluated.

  13. Fluid and microfluidic dielectric measurement using a cavity perturbation method at microwave C-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghari, Aref

    The utilization of cavity perturbation technique in dielectric property measurement of fluid and micro-fluid is investigated in this thesis to better assist the ever-growing needs of science and technology for analysis and characterization of such materials in various applications from genetics, MEMS devices, to consumer product industry. Development of different techniques for measuring complex dielectric properties of fluid and micro-fluids at Giga (10 9)-Hz frequencies is of significant importance as their usage is increasingly coupled with infrared and microwave electromagnetic wavelengths. Conventional cavity perturbation method could provide a sensitive and convenient system for measuring fluids of low (e.g., epsilonr <10) permittivity that meets the assumptions of negligible perturbation to the electromagnetic field distribution in the cavity. Developing a methodology that uses conventional cavity perturbation method that is however suitable for a sensitive, accurate, and reliable measurement of high permittivity polar liquids at microwave C-band is the goal in the current work. Systematic studies are carried out, using de-ionic (DI) water as test specimens, to evaluate the influence of sample's container, volume, dimension, and temperature on the sensitivity and reliability of microwave dielectric measurement. The cavity perturbation measurement of DI water in a 1 mm diameter capillary tube showed well-defined temperature dependence of dielectric permittivity and loss coefficients of water. Observation of a permittivity peak in temperature range tested at 4GHz around -10 °C implies an important relaxation in low temperatures at microwave C-band, which corresponds to a critical slowing down of polarization reorientation in crystallized (icy) H2O. Numerical simulations using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) COMSOL suites were conducted to established the optimum amount of liquid water for cavity perturbation testing at microwave C-band (in perfectly conducting

  14. Active microwave remote sensing of an anisotropic random medium layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A two-layer anisotropic random medium model has been developed to study the active remote sensing of the earth. The dyadic Green's function for a two-layer anisotropic medium is developed and used in conjunction with the first-order Born approximation to calculate the backscattering coefficients. It is shown that strong cross-polarization occurs in the single scattering process and is indispensable in the interpretation of radar measurements of sea ice at different frequencies, polarizations, and viewing angles. The effects of anisotropy on the angular responses of backscattering coefficients are also illustrated.

  15. The recovery of microwave scattering parameters from scatterometric measurements with special application to the sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claassen, J. P.; Fung, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    As part of an effort to demonstrate the value of the microwave scatterometer as a remote sea wind sensor, the interaction between an arbitrarily polarized scatterometer antenna and a noncoherent distributive target was derived and applied to develop a measuring technique to recover all the scattering parameters. The results are helpful for specifying antenna polarization properties for accurate retrieval of the parameters not only for the sea but also for other distributive scenes.

  16. The fabrication and surface tolerance measurements of the JPL clear aperture microwave antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J.; Rocci, S.; Chian, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    Present ground station microwave antennas of the Deep Space Network are of the symmetric dual reflector (cassegrainian) type. An investigation is being made of alternative high-performance offset antenna designs which have a clear aperture (no reflector or structural blockage) with shaped reflector surfaces. A 1.5-m, 32-GHz clear aperture model was built for experimental studies. The unique processes of fabrication, surface measurement, and alignment are described.

  17. Aircraft and satellite measurement of ocean wave directional spectra using scanning-beam microwave radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Baker, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave radar technique for remotely measuring the vector wave number spectrum of the ocean surface is described. The technique, which employs short-pulse, noncoherent radars in a conical scan mode near vertical incidence, is shown to be suitable for both aircraft and satellite application, the technique was validated at 10 km aircraft altitude, where we have found excellent agreement between buoy and radar-inferred absolute wave height spectra.

  18. Technique for Performing Dielectric Property Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method, system, apparatus, and computer readable medium has been provided with the ability to obtain a complex permittivity dielectric or a complex permeability micron of a sample in a cavity. One or more complex-valued resonance frequencies f(sub m) of the cavity, wherein each f(sub m) is a measurement, are obtained. Maxwell's equations are solved exactly for dielectric, and/or micron, using the f(sub m) as known quantities, thereby obtaining the dielectric and/or micron of the sample.

  19. A Microwave FMCW Reflectometer for Electron Density Measurements on LTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, W. A.; Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2013-10-01

    An FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer is being installed on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) for electron density profile and fluctuation measurements. The system has two channels covering 13.5-33 GHz for (O-mode) electron density measurements in the range of 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3 . The diagnostic can operate at ultrafast full-band sweep intervals (Δt >= 4 μ s), which allows the system to function as both a profile and fluctuation monitor. The reflectometer utilizes a mid-plane port on LTX and views the plasma through a 4.8 '' gap between the upper and lower in-vessel shells. A pair of bi-static conical horns are attached to the ends of 18 '' long circular waveguide sections and mounted on a rotatable flange. This sub-assembly is attached to a jacking stage such that the horns can be positioned arbitrarily close to the plasma edge, or retracted outside the main chamber. A rotary joint allows the polarization of the launch and receive waves to be independently selected. Further details of the design and capabilities of the diagnostic, along with preliminary data, will be presented at the meeting. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Measuring the Dielectric Parameters of Frozen Sand in Microwave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordonsky, G. S.; Orlov, A. O.; Filippova, T. G.

    2004-04-01

    We measure the dielectric parameters of frozen sand by using a rectangular cavity resonator at frequencies 5.3-8.4 GHz. The transmission spectrum of the resonator completely filled with frozen sand shows supplementary resonances absent in the case where the resonator is filled with dry homogeneous sand. The difference of the resonance curves was observed for the cases of wetting the sand by ordinary (H2O) and heavy (D2O) water. It is supposed that the observed effects are related to percolation due to the existence and specific properties of the conducting liquid films of water on the surfaces of mineral particles. To verify this assumption, we performed measurements for the special medium consisting of a mixture of dry sand and small metal particles. This experiment showed that supplementary resonant peaks in the transmission spectrum of the resonator arise for a certain concentration of metal particles. The same effect is also observed in the case of incomplete filling of the resonator with dry sand. These anomalies can be explained by the appearance of negative dispersion of waves in the waveguide.

  1. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  2. Development and test of a Microwave Ice Accretion Measurement Instrument (MIAMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magenheim, B.; Rocks, J. K.

    1982-01-01

    The development of an ice accretion measurement instrument that is a highly sensitive, accurate, rugged and reliable microprocessor controlled device using low level microwave energy for non-instrusive real time measurement and recording of ice growth history, including ice thickness and accretion rate is discussed. Data is displayed and recorded digitally. New experimental data is presented, obtained with the instrument, which demonstrates its ability to measure ice growth on a two-dimensional airfoil. The device is suitable for aircraft icing protection. It may be mounted flush, non-intrusively, on any part of an aircraft skin including rotor blades and engine inlets.

  3. Measurements of complex impedance in microwave high power systems with a new bluetooth integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Roussy, Georges; Dichtel, Bernard; Chaabane, Haykel

    2003-01-01

    By using a new integrated circuit, which is marketed for bluetooth applications, it is possible to simplify the method of measuring the complex impedance, complex reflection coefficient and complex transmission coefficient in an industrial microwave setup. The Analog Devices circuit AD 8302, which measures gain and phase up to 2.7 GHz, operates with variable level input signals and is less sensitive to both amplitude and frequency fluctuations of the industrial magnetrons than are mixers and AM crystal detectors. Therefore, accurate gain and phase measurements can be performed with low stability generators. A mechanical setup with an AD 8302 is described; the calibration procedure and its performance are presented.

  4. High resolution Microwave Spectrometer Sounder (HIMSS) instrument program. Appendix: TRMM study (an instrument for NASA's tropical rainfall measuring mission)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobl, E. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The TRMM (Tropical Rain Measuring Mission) Study shows the feasibility of a conically scanned, total power radiometer. The heritage of the TRMM radiometer is the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) flying for the Air Force DMSP.

  5. A planar transmission-line sensor for measuring the microwave permittivity of liquid and semisolid biological materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A planar transmission-line configuration for rapid, nondestructive, wideband permittivity measurements of liquid and semisolid materials at microwave frequencies is described. The transmission-line propagation constant of the proposed configuration is determined with the multiline technique from sca...

  6. Miniaturized nondestructive microwave sensor for chickpea moisture measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abegaonkar, Mahesh P.; Karekar, R. N.; Aiyer, R. C.

    1999-07-01

    A miniaturized microstrip ring resonator (MRR) 1 in.×1 in. resonating at fro=10.27 GHz was used as a nondestructive moisture sensor for chickpea kernels (Cicer arietinum L.) for ease in loading and unloading. The change in the resonant frequency (Δfr) of the MRR is a measure of the amount of moisture in the overlaid kernel. The percentage of moisture (M) was varied from 0% (dry) to ˜50% (fully soaked) calculated on a wet weight basis. Δfr increased with M, although not linearly. Three regions were observed in the sensitivity curve. The first region extended from 0%-12%, the central region from 12%-43%, and the saturation region from 43%-50% in moisture content. In the central region the observed Δfr was 574 MHz, whereas in the first and third regions it was 44 and 55 MHz, respectively. The regions in the sensitivity curves indicate different dominant phenomena. A small scatter was observed in the first region, which increased with the increasing percent of moisture content.

  7. Microwave limb sounder. [measuring trace gases in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustincic, J. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Trace gases in the upper atmosphere can be measured by comparing spectral noise content of limb soundings with the spectral noise content of cold space. An offset Cassegrain antenna system and tiltable input mirror alternately look out at the limb and up at cold space at an elevation angle of about 22. The mirror can also be tilted to look at a black body calibration target. Reflection from the mirror is directed into a radiometer whose head functions as a diplexer to combine the input radiation and a local ocillator (klystron) beam. The radiometer head is comprised of a Fabry-Perot resonator consisting of two Fabry-Perot cavities spaced a number of half wavelengths apart. Incoming radiation received on one side is reflected and rotated 90 deg in polarization by the resonator so that it will be reflected by an input grid into a mixer, while the klystron beam received on the other side is also reflected and rotated 90 deg, but not without passing some energy to be reflected by the input grid into the mixer.

  8. Intercomparisons between passive and active microwave remote sensing, and hydrological modeling for soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, E. F.; Lin, D.-S.; Mancini, M.; Thongs, D.; Troch, P. A.; Jackson, T. J.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Engman, E. T.

    1993-01-01

    Soil moisture estimations from a distributed hydrological model and two microwave sensors were compared with ground measurements collected during the MAC-HYDRO'90 experiment. The comparison was done with the purpose of evaluating the performance of the hydrological model and examining the limitations of remote sensing techniques used in soil moisture estimation. An image integration technique was used to integrate and analyze rainfall, soil properties, land cover, topography, and remote sensing imagery. Results indicate that the hydrological model and microwave sensors successfully picked up temporal variations of soil moisture and that the spatial soil moisture pattern may be remotely sensed with reasonable accuracy using existing algorithms.

  9. [The activity of prooxidant-antioxidant system in loach embryos under the action of microwave radiation].

    PubMed

    Iaremchuk, M M; Dyka, M V; Sanahurs'kyĭ, D I

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) affects biological organisms, primarily on the cellular level. However, the effects of EMR at low-intensity exposure on animals and state of metabolic systems are not fully defined yet. Thus, research of microwave radiation influence on the processes of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection system is important for understanding the mechanisms of EMR action on the cell, in particular, and organism development on the whole. The content of lipid peroxidation products--lipid hydroperoxides, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the activity of antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase in loach embryos under the action of microwave radiation (GSM-900 MHz, SAR = 1.1 Vt/kg) lasting 1; 5; 10 and 20 min during early embryogenesis were studied. It has been found that content of lipid peroxidation products in germ cells undergoes significant changes under the action of low-intensity EMR. The effect of microwave radiation (1, 5, 10 min) leads to the increase of superoxide dismutase activity, nevertheless, 20 min exposure decreased this index to the level of control values as it is shown. It has been established that EMR at frequencies used for mobile communications reduce the activity of antioxidant protection system components, especially catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The growth of catalase activity at the 10-cell stage of blastomere division (P < 0.05) is an exception. The results of two-way analysis of variance attest that microwave radiation factor causes the large part of all observable modifications. PMID:25816598

  10. [The activity of prooxidant-antioxidant system in loach embryos under the action of microwave radiation].

    PubMed

    Iaremchuk, M M; Dyka, M V; Sanahurs'kyĭ, D I

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) affects biological organisms, primarily on the cellular level. However, the effects of EMR at low-intensity exposure on animals and state of metabolic systems are not fully defined yet. Thus, research of microwave radiation influence on the processes of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection system is important for understanding the mechanisms of EMR action on the cell, in particular, and organism development on the whole. The content of lipid peroxidation products--lipid hydroperoxides, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the activity of antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase in loach embryos under the action of microwave radiation (GSM-900 MHz, SAR = 1.1 Vt/kg) lasting 1; 5; 10 and 20 min during early embryogenesis were studied. It has been found that content of lipid peroxidation products in germ cells undergoes significant changes under the action of low-intensity EMR. The effect of microwave radiation (1, 5, 10 min) leads to the increase of superoxide dismutase activity, nevertheless, 20 min exposure decreased this index to the level of control values as it is shown. It has been established that EMR at frequencies used for mobile communications reduce the activity of antioxidant protection system components, especially catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The growth of catalase activity at the 10-cell stage of blastomere division (P < 0.05) is an exception. The results of two-way analysis of variance attest that microwave radiation factor causes the large part of all observable modifications.

  11. Assimilation of active and passive microwave observations for improved estimates of soil moisture and crop growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Ensemble Kalman Filter-based data assimilation framework that links a crop growth model with active and passive (AP) microwave models was developed to improve estimates of soil moisture (SM) and vegetation biomass over a growing season of soybean. Complementarities in AP observations were incorpo...

  12. Inhibitory effect of microwaved thinned nectarine extracts on polyphenol oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Diego; Venturini, María E; Oria, Rosa; Arias, Esther

    2016-04-15

    By-products from agricultural practices or from the fruit processing industry are a source of bioactive compounds that could be used in the food industry. Such by-products include thinned fruits, which are expected to contain high quantities of interesting compounds. One possible application of this fruits is the prevention of the enzymatic browning suffered by fruits and vegetables after minimal processing. The aim of this study is to determine the in vitro and in vivo activity of microwaved extracts obtained from thinned nectarines. It has been observed that in vitro the extracts obtained after the application of high microwave power levels (500, 1000 and 1500 W) are mixed type inhibitors of polyphenoloxidase enzyme, showing an irreversible inactivation. This inhibition could be attributed to the Maillard reaction products formed during the microwave treatment. In vivo, a solution of 2% of the extract obtained at 1500 W inhibited the enzymatic browning in minimally processed peaches for 8 days of storage.

  13. Inhibitory effect of microwaved thinned nectarine extracts on polyphenol oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Diego; Venturini, María E; Oria, Rosa; Arias, Esther

    2016-04-15

    By-products from agricultural practices or from the fruit processing industry are a source of bioactive compounds that could be used in the food industry. Such by-products include thinned fruits, which are expected to contain high quantities of interesting compounds. One possible application of this fruits is the prevention of the enzymatic browning suffered by fruits and vegetables after minimal processing. The aim of this study is to determine the in vitro and in vivo activity of microwaved extracts obtained from thinned nectarines. It has been observed that in vitro the extracts obtained after the application of high microwave power levels (500, 1000 and 1500 W) are mixed type inhibitors of polyphenoloxidase enzyme, showing an irreversible inactivation. This inhibition could be attributed to the Maillard reaction products formed during the microwave treatment. In vivo, a solution of 2% of the extract obtained at 1500 W inhibited the enzymatic browning in minimally processed peaches for 8 days of storage. PMID:26616994

  14. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Andrew A. Suby

    2002-01-01

    Three test instruments are to be used to determine the abilities of photo-acoustic technology for the ultimate purpose of measuring unburned carbon in fly ash in an on-line configuration. The first test instrument is in a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photo-acoustic signals in an off-line configuration. This system was assembled and used to begin testing parameters thought to be influential in the resulting photo-acoustic signal output. A standard modulation frequency was chosen based upon signal to noise data gained from experimentation and sample heterogeneity was tested and found not to be influential. Simultaneously, a second instrument is to be constructed based in part on lessons learned with the first instrument, and to expand the capabilities of the first instrument. Improvements include a control loop to allow more constant microwave power output and an ability to operate over a range of microwave frequencies. To date, the design of the second instrument has been completed and components ordered. The third instrument will be designed based on the experiences of the first two instruments and will operate in an on-line carbon-in-ash monitoring system for coal-fired power plants.

  15. Extraction of Water from Polar Lunar Permafrost with Microwaves - Dielectric Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing indicates the presence of hydrogen rich regions associated with the lunar poles. The logical hypothesis is that there is cryogenically trapped water ice located in craters at the lunar poles. Some of the craters have been in permanent darkness for a billion years. The presence of water at the poles as well as other scientific advantages of a polar base, have influenced NASA plans for the lunar outpost. The lunar outpost has water and oxygen requirements on the order of 1 ton per year scaling up to as much as 10 tons per year. Microwave heating of the frozen permafrost has unique advantages for water extraction. Proof of principle experiments have successfully demonstrated that microwaves will couple to the cryogenic soil in a vacuum and the sublimed water vapor can be successfully captured on a cold trap. The dielectric properties of lunar soil will determine the hardware requirements for extraction processes. Microwave frequency dielectric property measurements of lunar soil simulant have been measured.

  16. A high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet and its beam emittance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Zeen; Tan Xinjian; Du Hongxin; Luo Ben; Liu Zhanwen

    2008-07-15

    The progress of a 2.45 GHz high-current microwave ion source with permanent magnet for T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction neutron generator is reported in this paper. At 600 W microwave power and 22 kV extraction voltage, 90 mA peak hydrogen ion beam is extracted from a single aperture of 6 mm diameter. The beam emittance is measured using a simplified pepper-pot method. The (x,x{sup '}) emittance and the (y,y{sup '}) emittance for 14 keV hydrogen ion beam are 55.3{pi} and 58.2{pi} mm mrad, respectively. The normalized emittances are 0.302{pi} and 0.317{pi} mm mrad, respectively.

  17. Microwave measurement of the solid propellant pressure-coupled response function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Mcnamara, R. P.; Magiawala, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an investigation are presented on the applicability of a microwave Doppler shift technique for directly determining propellant response functions over the desired frequency range. The investigation consisted of three phases. In Phase 1 the validity of the technique was established by comparing measured pressure-coupled response function data to existing data from T-burners and rotating valve tests. In Phase 2 a new microwave burner-pressure modulation system capable of achieving frequencies and mean chamber pressures of at least 1500 Hz and 10.5 MPa (1500 psia), respectively, was developed. During Phase 3 test firings are being carried out to define the frequency limit, response function resolution, and precision of the new design.

  18. Measurement of Local Reactive and Resistive Photoresponse of a Superconducting Microwave Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlage, Steven M.; Zhuravel, Alexander P.; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    2006-03-01

    Despite the voluminous work on the nature of nonlinear effects in high-temperature superconductors (HTS), the causes are not completely clear and remain under debate. The Laser Scanning Microscope (LSM) is a spatially-resolved method that can simultaneously measure optical and high frequency properties of HTS devices. Earlier results showed high resolution images of non-uniform microwave current distributions near the edge of a patterned transmission line structure [A. P. Zhuravel, A. V. Ustinov, K. S. Harshavardhan, and S. M. Anlage, Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 4979 (2002)]. We have developed a new operational mode in which the microscope separately images the resistive and inductive components of the bolometric photoresponse. The two images show interesting and dramatic differences, leading to new insights about linear and nonlinear properties of HTS microwave devices.

  19. Investigating Baseline, Alternative and Copula-based Algorithm for combining Airborne Active and Passive Microwave Observations in the SMAP Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, C.; Lorenz, C.; Jagdhuber, T.; Laux, P.; Hajnsek, I.; Kunstmann, H.; Entekhabi, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states. SMAP integrates L-band radar and radiometer instruments as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. Airborne instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment, Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system F-SAR of DLR were flown simultaneously on the same platform on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites with in situ sensors. Here, we used the obtained data sets as a test-bed for the analysis of three active-passive fusion techniques: A) The SMAP baseline algorithm: Disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, B), the SMAP alternative algorithm: Estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter and C) Copula-based combination of active and passive microwave data. For method C empirical Copulas were generated and theoretical Copulas fitted both on the level of the raw products brightness temperature and backscatter as well as two soil moisture products. Results indicate that the regression parameters for method A and B are dependent on the radar vegetation index (RVI). Similarly, for method C the best performance was gained by generating separate Copulas for individual land use classes. For more in-depth analyses longer time series are necessary as can obtained by airborne campaigns, therefore, the methods will be applied to SMAP data.

  20. Characterization of geolocation accuracy of Suomi NPP Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yang; Weng, Fuzhong; Zou, Xiaolei; Yang, Hu; Scott, Deron

    2016-05-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite has 22 channels at frequencies ranging from 23 to 183 GHz for probing the atmospheric temperature and moisture under all weather conditions. As part of the ATMS calibration and validation activities, the geolocation accuracy of ATMS data must be well characterized and documented. In this study, the coastline crossing method (CCM) and the land-sea fraction method (LFM) are utilized to characterize and quantify the ATMS geolocation accuracy. The CCM is based on the inflection points of the ATMS window channel measurements across the coastlines, whereas the LFM collocates the ATMS window channel data with high-resolution land-sea mask data sets. Since the ATMS measurements provide five pairs of latitude and longitude data for K, Ka, V, W, and G bands, respectively, the window channels 1, 2, 3, 16, and 17 from each of these five bands are chosen for assessing the overall geolocation accuracy. ATMS geolocation errors estimated from both methods are generally consistent from 40 cases in June 2014. The ATMS along-track (cross-track) errors at nadir are within ±4.2 km (±1.2 km) for K/Ka, ±2.6 km (±2.7 km) for V bands, and ±1.2 km (±0.6 km) at W and G bands, respectively. At the W band, the geolocation errors derived from both algorithms are probably less reliable due to a reduced contrast of brightness temperatures in coastal areas. These estimated ATMS along-track and cross-track geolocation errors are well within the uncertainty requirements for all bands.

  1. High dopant activation of phosphorus in Ge crystal with high-temperature implantation and two-step microwave annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Tzu-Lang; Su, Yin-Hsien; Lee, Wen-Hsi

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, high-temperature ion implantation and low-temperature microwave annealing were employed to achieve high n-type active concentrations, approaching the solid solubility limit, in germanium. To use the characteristics of microwave annealing more effectively, a two-step microwave annealing process was employed. In the first annealing step, a high-power (1200 W; 425 °C) microwave was used to achieve solid-state epitaxial regrowth and to enhance microwave absorption. In the second annealing step, contrary to the usual process of thermal annealing with higher temperature, a lower-power (900 W; 375 °C) microwave process was used to achieve a low sheet resistance, 78Ω/◻, and a high carrier concentration, 1.025 × 1020 P/cm3, which is close to the solid solubility limit of 2 × 1020 P/cm3.

  2. Microwave sensing from orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritikos, H. N.; Shiue, J.

    1979-01-01

    Microwave sensors, used in conjunction with the traditional sensors of visible and infrared light to extend present capabilities of global weather forecasts and local storm watches, are discussed. The great advantage of these sensors is that they can penetrate or 'see' through cloud formations to monitor temperature, humidity and wind fields below the clouds. Other uses are that they can penetrate the earth deeper than optical and IR systems; they can control their own angle of incidence; they can detect oil spills; and they can enhance the studies of the upper atmosphere through measurement of temperature, water vapor and other gaseous species. Two types of microwave sensors, active and passive, are examined. Special attention is given to the study of the microwave radiometer and the corresponding temperature resolution as detected by the antenna. It is determined that not only will the microwave remote sensors save lives by allowing close monitoring of developing storms, but also save approximately $172 million/year.

  3. Microwave interferometry technique for obtaining gas interface velocity measurements in an expansion tube facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laney, C. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A microwave interferometer technique to determine the front interface velocity of a high enthalpy gas flow, is described. The system is designed to excite a standing wave in an expansion tube, and to measure the shift in this standing wave as it is moved by the test gas front. Data, in the form of a varying sinusoidal signal, is recorded on a high-speed drum camera-oscilloscope combination. Measurements of average and incremental velocities in excess of 6,000 meters per second were made.

  4. Surface recombination velocity and lifetime in InP measured by transient microwave reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothra, S.; Tyagi, S. D.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity are determined in organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)-grown InP by a contactless microwave technique. For lightly doped n-type InP, a surface recombination velocity of 5000 cm/s is measured. However, in solar cells with a heavily doped n-type emitter a surface recombination velocity of 1 x 10 to the 6th cm/s is observed. Possible reasons for this due to surface pinning are discussed. The effects of various chemical treatments and SiO on the surface recombination velocity are measured.

  5. Microwave limb sounder measurement of stratospheric SO[sub 2] from the Mt. Pinatubo Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Read, W.G.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W. )

    1993-06-18

    This paper presents measurements of sulfur dioxide densities in the stratosphere made by the microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the upper atmosphere research satellite. The SO[sub 2] came from the eruption of the Mt Pinatubo volcano which injected a massive quantity of gas into the stratosphere. The MLS is able to measure the decay rate of the gas densities based on its extended time and spatial coverage, and from this decay rate infer the OH densities in the stratosphere, since OH is the major reactive species which converts the SO[sub 2] into sulfuric acid.

  6. Quantitative measurement of piezoelectric coefficient of thin film using a scanning evanescent microwave microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhenli; Luo, Zhenlin; Liu, Chihui; Wu, Wenbin; Gao, Chen; Lu, Yalin

    2008-06-01

    This article describes a new approach to quantitatively measure the piezoelectric coefficients of thin films at the microscopic level using a scanning evanescent microwave microscope. This technique can resolve 10pm deformation caused by the piezoelectric effect and has the advantages of high scanning speed, large scanning area, submicron spatial resolution, and a simultaneous accessibility to many other related properties. Results from the test measurements on the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient of PZT thin film agree well with those from other techniques listed in literatures.

  7. Measurement of proton transfer reaction rates in a microwave cavity discharge flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, George M., IV

    The reaction rate coefficients between the hydronium ion and the molecules ethene (C2H4), propene (C 3H6), 1-butene (C4H8) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were measured at 296 K. The measured reaction rates were compared to collision rates calculated using average dipole orientation (ADO) theory. Reaction efficiency depends primarily upon the proton affinity of the molecules. All the measurements were obtained using the newly developed microwave cavity discharge flowing afterglow (MCD-FA) apparatus. This device uses an Asmussen-type microwave cavity discharge ion source that is spatially separated from the flow tube, eliminating many of the problems inherent with the original FA devices. In addition to measuring reaction rate coefficients, the MCD-FA was shown to be an effective tool for measuring trace compounds in atmospheric air. This method has many advantages over current detection techniques since compounds can be detected in almost real time, large mass ranges can be scanned quickly, and repeated calibration is not required. Preliminary measurements were made of car exhaust and exhaled alveolar air. Car exhaust showed the presence of numerous hydrocarbons, such as butene, benzene and toluene while the exhaled alveolar air showed the presence of various volatile organic compounds such as methanol and acetone.

  8. Passive and Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Haddad, Ziad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Braun, Scott A.; Chiu, Christine; Wang, Jian-Jian

    2002-01-01

    Passive and active microwave remote sensing data are analyzed to identify signatures of precipitation and vertical motion in tropical convection. A database of cloud/radiative model simulations is used to quantify surface rain rates and latent heating profiles that are consistent with these signatures. At satellite footprint-scale (approximately 10 km), rain rate and latent heating estimates are subject to significant random errors, but by averaging the estimates in space and time, random errors are substantially reduced, Bias errors have been minimized by improving the microphysics in the supporting cloud/radiative model simulations, and by imposing a consistent definition of remotely-sensed and model-simulated convective/stratiform rain coverage. Remotely-sensed precipitation and latent heating distributions in the tropics are derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/ I) sensor data. The prototype Version 6 TRMM passive microwave algorithm typically yields average heating profiles with maxima between 6 and 7 km altitude for organized mesoscale convective systems. Retrieved heating profiles for individual convective systems are compared to coincident estimates based upon a combination of dual-Doppler radar and rawinsonde data. Also, large-scale latent heating distributions are compared to estimates derived from a simpler technique that utilizes observations of surface rain rate and stratiform rain proportion to infer vertical heating structure. Results of these tests will be presented at the conference.

  9. Microwave plasma doping: Arsenic activation and transport in germanium and silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Hidenori; Oka, Masahiro; Ueda, Hirokazu; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Yuuki; Nakamura, Genji; Hirota, Yoshihiro; Kaitsuka, Takanobu; Kawakami, Satoru

    2016-04-01

    Microwave RLSA™ plasma doping technology has enabled conformal doping of non-planar semiconductor device structures. An important attribute of RLSA™ plasma doping is that it does not impart physical damage during processing. In this work, carrier activation measurements for AsH3 based plasma doping into silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) using rapid thermal annealing are presented. The highest carrier concentrations are 3.6 × 1020 and 4.3 × 1018 cm-3 for Si and Ge, respectively. Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiles of arsenic in Ge show that intrinsic dopant diffusion for plasma doping followed by post activation anneal is much slower than for conventional ion implantation. This is indicative of an absence of defects. The comparison is based on a comparison of diffusion times at identical annealing temperatures. The absence of defects, like those generated in conventional ion implantation, in RLSA™ based doping processes makes RLSA™ doping technology useful for damage free conformal doping of topographic structures.

  10. Soil Moisture Retrieval Through Changing Corn Using Active/Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. E.; Joseph, A.; DeLannoy, G.; Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Kim, E.; Houser, P.; Gish, T.

    2003-01-01

    An extensive field experiment was conducted from May-early October, 2002 at the heavily instrumented USDA-ARS (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service) OPE3 (Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement) test site in Beltsville, MD to acquire data needed to address active/passive microwave algorithm, modeling, and ground validation issues for accurate soil moisture retrieval. During the experiment, a tower-mounted 1.4 GHz radiometer (Lrad) and a truck-mounted dual-frequency (1.6 and 4.75 GHz) radar system were deployed on the northern edge of the site. The soil in this portion of the field is a sandy loam (silt 23.5%, sand 60.3%, clay 16.1%) with a measured bulk density of 1.253 g/cu cm. Vegetation cover in the experiment consisted of a corn crop which was measured from just after planting on April 17, 2002 through senescence and harvesting on October 2. Although drought conditions prevailed during the summer, the corn yield was near average, with peak biomass reached in late July.

  11. Alignment Measurements of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Instrument in a Thermal/Vacuum Chamber Using Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Michael D.; Herrera, Acey A.; Crane, J. Allen; Packard, Edward A.; Aviado, Carlos; Sampler, Henry P.; Obenschain, Arthur (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory, scheduled for a late 2000 launch, is designed to measure temperature fluctuations (anisotropy) and produce a high sensitivity and high spatial resolution (< 0.3 deg at 90 GHz.) map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation over the entire sky between 22 and 90 GHz. MAP utilizes back-to-back Gregorian telescopes to focus the microwave signals into 10 differential microwave receivers, via 20 feed horns. Proper alignment of the telescope reflectors and the feed horns at the operating temperature of 90 K is a critical element to ensure mission success. We describe the hardware and methods used to validate the displacement/deformation predictions of the reflectors and the microwave feed horns during thermal/vacuum testing of the reflectors and the microwave instrument. The smallest deformations to be resolved by the measurement system were on the order of +/- 0.030 inches (0.762 mm). Performance of these alignment measurements inside a thermal/vacuum chamber with conventional alignment equipment posed several limitations. A photogrammetry (PG) system was chosen to perform the measurements since it is a non-contact measurement system, the measurements can be made relatively quickly and accurately, and the photogrammetric camera can be operated remotely. The hardware and methods developed to perform the MAP alignment measurements using PG proved to be highly successful. The PG measurements met the desired requirements, enabling the desired deformations to be measured and even resolved to an order of magnitude smaller than the imposed requirements. Viable data were provided to the MAP Project for a full analysis of the on-orbit performance of the Instrument's microwave system.

  12. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project. VI - Spacecraft, scientific instruments, and launching rocket. Part 3 - The electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, Thomas T.; Yamasaki, Hiromichi

    1990-01-01

    The two microwave radiometers for TRMM are designed to measure thermal microwave radiation upwelling from the earth. The Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) scans from 50 deg to the left through nadir to 50 deg to the right in 78 steps with no moving mechanical parts in a band centered at 19.35 GHz. The TRMM concept uses the radar to develop a climatology of rain-layer thickness which can be used for the interpretation of the radiometer data over a swath wider than the radar. The ESMR data are useful for estimating rain intensity only over an ocean background. The Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), which scans conically with three dual polarized channels at 19, 37, and 85 GHz and a single polarized channel at 22 GHz, provides a wider range of rainfall intensities. The SSM/I spins about an axis parallel to the local spacecraft vector and 128 uniformly spaced samples of the 85 GHz data are taken on each scan over a 112-deg scan region simultaneously with 64 samples of the other frequencies.

  13. A measurement of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 7.5 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, S.; Bensadoun, M.; Bersanelli, M.; De Amici, G.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G.

    1992-01-01

    The temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation at a frequency of 7.5 GHz (4 cm wavelength) is measured, obtaining a brightness temperature of T(CMB) = 2.70 +/- 0.08 K (68 percent confidence level). The measurement was made from a site near the geographical South Pole during the austral spring of 1989 and was part of an international collaboration to measure the CMB spectrum at low frequencies with a variety of radiometers from several different sites. This recent result is in agreement with the 1988 measurement at the same frequency, which was made from a different site with significantly different systematic errors. The combined result of the 1988 and 1989 measurements is 2.64 +/- 0.06 K.

  14. Error Characterisation and Merging of Active and Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Gruber, Alexander; de Jeu, Richard; Parinussa, Robert; Chung, Daniel; Dorigo, Wouter; Reimer, Christoph; Kidd, Richard

    2015-04-01

    As part of the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA) a data fusion system has been developed which is capable of ingesting surface soil moisture data derived from active and passive microwave sensors (ASCAT, AMSR-E, etc.) flown on different satellite platforms and merging them to create long and consistent time series of soil moisture suitable for use in climate change studies. The so-created soil moisture data records (latest version: ESA CCI SM v02.1 released on 5/12/2014) are freely available and can be obtained from http://www.esa-soilmoisture-cci.org/. As described by Wagner et al. (2012) the principle steps of the data fusion process are: 1) error characterisation, 2) matching to account for data set specific biases, and 3) merging. In this presentation we present the current data fusion process and discuss how new error characterisation methods, such as the increasingly popular triple collocation method as discussed for example by Zwieback et al. (2012) may be used to improve it. The main benefit of an improved error characterisation would be a more reliable identification of the best performing microwave soil moisture retrieval(s) for each grid point and each point in time. In case that two or more satellite data sets provides useful information, the estimated errors can be used to define the weights with which each satellite data set are merged, i.e. the lower its error the higher its weight. This is expected to bring a significant improvement over the current data fusion scheme which is not yet based on quantitative estimates of the retrieval errors but on a proxy measure, namely the vegetation optical depth (Dorigo et al., 2015): over areas with low vegetation passive soil moisture retrievals are used, while over areas with moderate vegetation density active retrievals are used. In transition areas, where both products correlate well, both products are being used in a synergistic way: on time steps where only one of

  15. Average Dielectric Property Analysis of Complex Breast Tissue with Microwave Transmission Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, John D.; Fear, Elise C.

    2015-01-01

    Prior information about the average dielectric properties of breast tissue can be implemented in microwave breast imaging techniques to improve the results. Rapidly providing this information relies on acquiring a limited number of measurements and processing these measurement with efficient algorithms. Previously, systems were developed to measure the transmission of microwave signals through breast tissue, and simplifications were applied to estimate the average properties. These methods provided reasonable estimates, but they were sensitive to multipath. In this paper, a new technique to analyze the average properties of breast tissues while addressing multipath is presented. Three steps are used to process transmission measurements. First, the effects of multipath were removed. In cases where multipath is present, multiple peaks were observed in the time domain. A Tukey window was used to time-gate a single peak and, therefore, select a single path through the breast. Second, the antenna response was deconvolved from the transmission coefficient to isolate the response from the tissue in the breast interior. The antenna response was determined through simulations. Finally, the complex permittivity was estimated using an iterative approach. This technique was validated using simulated and physical homogeneous breast models and tested with results taken from a recent patient study. PMID:25585106

  16. Average dielectric property analysis of complex breast tissue with microwave transmission measurements.

    PubMed

    Garrett, John D; Fear, Elise C

    2015-01-01

    Prior information about the average dielectric properties of breast tissue can be implemented in microwave breast imaging techniques to improve the results. Rapidly providing this information relies on acquiring a limited number of measurements and processing these measurement with efficient algorithms. Previously, systems were developed to measure the transmission of microwave signals through breast tissue, and simplifications were applied to estimate the average properties. These methods provided reasonable estimates, but they were sensitive to multipath. In this paper, a new technique to analyze the average properties of breast tissues while addressing multipath is presented. Three steps are used to process transmission measurements. First, the effects of multipath were removed. In cases where multipath is present, multiple peaks were observed in the time domain. A Tukey window was used to time-gate a single peak and, therefore, select a single path through the breast. Second, the antenna response was deconvolved from the transmission coefficient to isolate the response from the tissue in the breast interior. The antenna response was determined through simulations. Finally, the complex permittivity was estimated using an iterative approach. This technique was validated using simulated and physical homogeneous breast models and tested with results taken from a recent patient study.

  17. Comparisons of Arctic In-Situ Snow and Ice Data with Airborne Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, T.; Cavalien, D. J.; Gasiewski, A.; Sturm, M.; Klein, M.; Maslanik, J.; Stroeve, J.; Heinrichs, J.; Holmgren, J.; Irisov, V.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the AMSR-E sea ice validation campaign in March 2003, aircraft flights over the Arctic sea ice were coordinated with ground measurements of snow and sea ice properties. The surface-based measurements were in the vicinity of Barrow, AK, and at a Navy ice camp located in the Beaufort Sea. The NASA P-3 aircraft was equipped with the NOAA ETL PSR microwave radiometer that has the same frequencies as the AMSR-E sensor. The goal was to validate the standard AMSR-E products ice temperature and snow depth on sea ice. Ground measurements are the only way to validate these parameters. The higher spatial resolution of the PSR instrument (between 30 and 500 m, depending on altitude) enables a better comparison between ground measurements and microwave data because of the expected smaller spatial variability. Maps of PSR data can then be used for further down-scaling to AMSR-E pixel areas. Initial results show a good qualitative agreement between the in-situ snow depths and the PSR data. Detailed studies are underway and latest results will be presented.

  18. Measurement at microwave frequencies of the magnetic properties of small quantities of powdered or diluted samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pura, Jose Luis; Muñoz, José María; Alejos, Óscar; Hernández-Gómez, Pablo; Torres, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Transmission line techniques are a convenient way to determine the electromagnetic properties of a variety of materials in the ranges of radio and microwave frequencies. Traditional methods based on the measurement of the four scattering parameters can be successfully replaced for the method presented here, in which no change in the geometry is needed, since two independent measurements are carried out, with and without an applied magnetic field. In addition, given the small size of the sample holder, the required amount of material can be drastically reduced, and allow the use of a lumped circuit model, then reducing the inherent difficulties associated with the use of distributed parameters. Even though this kind of model requires the involved wavelengths to be much larger than the size of the system, this requirement can be overcome as long as the tested materials have relative ɛ or μ lower than 100. Furthermore, the use of short-circuited transmission lines simplifies sample holding and systematizes the measurement process, which is an important target when dealing with measurements within the radio and microwave frequency ranges.

  19. Dimensional characterization of a quasispherical resonator by microwave and coordinate measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, R.; Flack, D.; Morantz, P.; Sutton, G.; Shore, P.; de Podesta, M.

    2011-02-01

    We describe the dimensional characterization of copper quasisphere NPL-Cranfield 2. The quasisphere is assembled from two hemispheres such that the internal shape is a triaxial ellipsoid, the major axes of which have nominal radii 62.000 mm, 62.031 mm and 62.062 mm. The artefact has been manufactured using diamond-turning technology and shows a deviation from design form of less than ±1 µm over most of its surface. Our characterization involves both coordinate measuring machine (CMM) experiments and microwave resonance spectroscopy. We have sought to reduce the dimensional uncertainty below the maximum permissible error of the CMM by comparative measurements with silicon and Zerodur spheres of known volume. Using this technique we determined the equivalent radius with an uncertainty of u(k = 1) = 114 nm, a fractional uncertainty of 1.8 parts in 106. Due to anisotropy of the probe response, we could only determine the eccentricities of the quasihemispheres with a fractional uncertainty of approximately 2%. Our microwave characterization uses the TM11 to TM18 resonances. We find the equivalent radius inferred from analysis of these modes to be consistent within ±4 nm with an overall uncertainty u(k = 1) = 11 nm. We discuss corrections for surface conductivity, waveguide perturbations and dielectric surface layers. We find that the CMM radius estimates derived from each hemisphere cannot be used to accurately predict the equivalent radius of the assembled resonator for two reasons. Firstly, the equatorial flanges are flat only to within ±1 µm, leading to an equatorial 'gap' whose dimension cannot be reliably estimated. Secondly, the resonator undergoes significant elastic distortion when the bolts connecting the hemispheres are tightened. We provide CMM and microwave measurements to support these conclusions in addition to finite-element modelling. Finally, we consider the implications of this work on a forthcoming experiment to determine the Boltzmann constant

  20. GROMOS-C, a novel ground-based microwave radiometer for ozone measurement campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, S.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-07-01

    Stratospheric ozone is of major interest as it absorbs most harmful UV radiation from the sun, allowing life on Earth. Ground-based microwave remote sensing is the only method that allows for the measurement of ozone profiles up to the mesopause, over 24 hours and under different weather conditions with high time resolution. In this paper a novel ground-based microwave radiometer is presented. It is called GROMOS-C (GRound based Ozone MOnitoring System for Campaigns), and it has been designed to measure the vertical profile of ozone distribution in the middle atmosphere by observing ozone emission spectra at a frequency of 110.836 GHz. The instrument is designed in a compact way which makes it transportable and suitable for outdoor use in campaigns, an advantageous feature that is lacking in present day ozone radiometers. It is operated through remote control. GROMOS-C is a total power radiometer which uses a pre-amplified heterodyne receiver, and a digital fast Fourier transform spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Among its main new features, the incorporation of different calibration loads stands out; this includes a noise diode and a new type of blackbody target specifically designed for this instrument, based on Peltier elements. The calibration scheme does not depend on the use of liquid nitrogen; therefore GROMOS-C can be operated at remote places with no maintenance requirements. In addition, the instrument can be switched in frequency to observe the CO line at 115 GHz. A description of the main characteristics of GROMOS-C is included in this paper, as well as the results of a first campaign at the High Altitude Research Station at Jungfraujoch (HFSJ), Switzerland. The validation is performed by comparison of the retrieved profiles against equivalent profiles from MLS (Microwave Limb Sounding) satellite data, ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast) model data, as well as our nearby NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric

  1. Subsurface Emission Effects in AMSR-E Measurements: Implications for Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galantowicz, John F.; Moncet, Jean-Luc; Liang, Pan; Lipton, Alan E.; Uymin, Gennady; Prigent, Catherine; Grassotti, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of land surface microwave emission time series shows that the characteristic diurnal signature associated with subsurface emission in sandy deserts carry over to arid and semi-arid region worldwide. Prior work found that diurnal variation of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) brightness temperatures in deserts was small relative to International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project land surface temperature (LST) variation and that the difference varied with surface type and was largest in sand sea regions. Here we find more widespread subsurface emission effects in Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) measurements. The AMSR-E orbit has equator crossing times near 01:30 and 13 :30 local time, resulting in sampling when near-surface temperature gradients are likely to be large and amplifying the influence of emission depth on effective emitting temperature relative to other factors. AMSR-E measurements are also temporally coincident with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST measurements, eliminating time lag as a source of LST uncertainty and reducing LST errors due to undetected clouds. This paper presents monthly global emissivity and emission depth index retrievals for 2003 at 11, 19, 37, and 89 GHz from AMSR-E, MODIS, and SSM/I time series data. Retrieval model fit error, stability, self-consistency, and land surface modeling results provide evidence for the validity of the subsurface emission hypothesis and the retrieval approach. An analysis of emission depth index, emissivity, precipitation, and vegetation index seasonal trends in northern and southern Africa suggests that changes in the emission depth index may be tied to changes in land surface moisture and vegetation conditions

  2. Rain detection and measurement from Megha-Tropiques microwave sounder—SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Atul Kumar; Piyush, D. N.; Gohil, B. S.; Pal, P. K.; Srinivasan, J.

    2016-08-01

    The Megha-Tropiques, an Indo-French satellite, carries on board a microwave sounder, Sondeur Atmosphérique du Profil d'Humidité Intertropical par Radiométrie (SAPHIR), and a microwave radiometer, Microwave Analysis and Detection of Rain and Atmospheric Structures (MADRAS), along with two other instruments. Being a Global Precipitation Measurement constellation satellite MT-MADRAS was an important sensor to study the convective clouds and rainfall. Due to the nonfunctioning of MADRAS, the possibility of detection and estimation of rain from SAPHIR is explored. Using near-concurrent SAPHIR and precipitation radar (PR) onboard Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observations, the rain effect on SAPHIR channels is examined. All the six channels of the SAPHIR are used to calculate the average rain probability (PR) for each SAPHIR pixel. Further, an exponential rain retrieval algorithm is developed. This algorithm explains a correlation of 0.72, RMS error of 0.75 mm/h, and bias of 0.04 mm/h. When rain identification and retrieval algorithms are applied together, it explains a correlation of 0.69 with an RMS error of 0.47 mm/h and bias of 0.01 mm/h. On applying the algorithm to the independent SAPHIR data set and compared with TRMM-3B42 rain on monthly scale, it explains a correlation of 0.85 and RMS error of 0.09 mm/h. Further distribution of rain difference of SAPHIR with other rain products is presented on global scale as well as for the climatic zones. For examining the capability of SAPHIR to measure intense rain, instantaneous rain over Phailin cyclone from SAPHIR is compared with other standard satellite-based rain products such as 3B42, Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation, and Precipitation Estimation from Remote Sensing Information using Artificial Neural Network.

  3. Land Surface Microwave Emissivities Derived from AMSR-E and MODIS Measurements with Advanced Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moncet, Jean-Luc; Liang, Pan; Galantowicz, John F.; Lipton, Alan E.; Uymin, Gennady; Prigent, Catherine; Grassotti, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A microwave emissivity database has been developed with data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) and with ancillary land surface temperature (LST) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the same Aqua spacecraft. The primary intended application of the database is to provide surface emissivity constraints in atmospheric and surface property retrieval or assimilation. An additional application is to serve as a dynamic indicator of land surface properties relevant to climate change monitoring. The precision of the emissivity data is estimated to be significantly better than in prior databases from other sensors due to the precise collocation with high-quality MODIS LST data and due to the quality control features of our data analysis system. The accuracy of the emissivities in deserts and semi-arid regions is enhanced by applying, in those regions, a version of the emissivity retrieval algorithm that accounts for the penetration of microwave radiation through dry soil with diurnally varying vertical temperature gradients. These results suggest that this penetration effect is more widespread and more significant to interpretation of passive microwave measurements than had been previously established. Emissivity coverage in areas where persistent cloudiness interferes with the availability of MODIS LST data is achieved using a classification-based method to spread emissivity data from less-cloudy areas that have similar microwave surface properties. Evaluations and analyses of the emissivity products over homogeneous snow-free areas are presented, including application to retrieval of soil temperature profiles. Spatial inhomogeneities are the largest in the vicinity of large water bodies due to the large water/land emissivity contrast and give rise to large apparent temporal variability in the retrieved emissivities when satellite footprint locations vary over time. This issue will be dealt with in the future by

  4. A multidimensional signal processing approach for classification of microwave measurements with application to stroke type diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mesri, Hamed Yousefi; Najafabadi, Masoud Khazaeli; McKelvey, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    A multidimensional signal processing method is described for detection of bleeding stroke based on microwave measurements from an antenna array placed around the head of the patient. The method is data driven and the algorithm uses samples from a healthy control group to calculate the feature used for classification. The feature is derived using a tensor approach and the higher order singular value decomposition is a key component. A leave-one-out validation method is used to evaluate the properties of the method using clinical data.

  5. Precision Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization from the POLARBEAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Bryan

    2013-04-01

    We present status and results from the first season of observations of the POLARBEAR experiment. POLARBEAR is measuring the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization anisotropies to constrain neutrino mass, inflation, dark energy, and cosmic birefringence. Since early 2012 POLARBEAR has been performing a deep search in 30 square degrees of sky to find odd parity B modes in the CMB polarization anisotropies induced by gravitational lensing. POLARBEAR observes with 1000 single mode 150GHz detectors with 3.5' FWHM beams from an off axis Gregorian Dragone 3m telescope in the Atacama Desert in Chile.

  6. Interaction of microwaves and germinating seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    The preliminary investigation measured the internal metabolic process by ATP production. Leakage of ions and organic material from germinating seeds indicated that membranes are a target of microwaves and heat. Electron photo-micrographs showed an increase in damage to membranes as heat and microwave treatments were increased. The second phase of this investigation was concerned with determining some of the biological activity at the initiation of germination of wheat seed, Triticum aestivum L., using a resonating microwave cavity oscillating at 9.3 GHz as a probe. Direct current conductivity measurements were also made on the seeds as a means of confirming the observations made with the microwave cavity.

  7. Cloud Liquid Water Path Comparisons from Passive Microwave and Solar Reflectance Satellite Measurements: Assessment of Sub-Field-of-View Cloud Effects in Microwave Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, Thomas J.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Chou, Joyce

    1997-01-01

    Satellite observations of the cloud liquid water path (LWP) are compared from special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) measurements and GOES 8 imager solar reflectance (SR) measurements to ascertain the impact of sub-field-of-view (FOV) cloud effects on SSM/I 37 GHz retrievals. The SR retrievals also incorporate estimates of the cloud droplet effective radius derived from the GOES 8 3.9-micron channel. The comparisons consist of simultaneous collocated and full-resolution measurements and are limited to nonprecipitating marine stratocumulus in the eastern Pacific for two days in October 1995. The retrievals from these independent methods are consistent for overcast SSM/I FOVS, with RMS differences as low as 0.030 kg/sq m, although biases exist for clouds with more open spatial structure, where the RMS differences increase to 0.039 kg/sq m. For broken cloudiness within the SSM/I FOV the average beam-filling error (BFE) in the microwave retrievals is found to be about 22% (average cloud amount of 73%). This systematic error is comparable with the average random errors in the microwave retrievals. However, even larger BFEs can be expected for individual FOVs and for regions with less cloudiness. By scaling the microwave retrievals by the cloud amount within the FOV, the systematic BFE can be significantly reduced but with increased RMS differences of O.046-0.058 kg/sq m when compared to the SR retrievals. The beam-filling effects reported here are significant and are expected to impact directly upon studies that use instantaneous SSM/I measurements of cloud LWP, such as cloud classification studies and validation studies involving surface-based or in situ data.

  8. Studies of gas adsorption on ZnO using ESR, FTIR spectroscopy, and MHE (Microwave Hall Effect) measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Byungki Na; Vannice, M.A. ); Walters, A.B. )

    1993-04-01

    This paper describes the application of a new technique - Microwave Hall Effect (MHE) measurements - to measure electron mobilities and to determine the effect of adsorption on electron densities of powders. Conduction electron densities calculated from microwave measurements of both mobilities and conductivities, as well as ESR spectroscopy and chemisorption measurements, have been applied to characterize high-surface-area ZnO (up to 30 m[sup 2]/g) samples before and after exposure to O[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CO, and H[sub 2]. Evacuation at 673 K removed lattice oxygen to produce paramagnetic lattice vacancies, (V[sub 0][sup +])[sup [minus

  9. Measurements of ICRF wave-induced density fluctuations in LHD by a microwave reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, A.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsujii, N.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Kasahara, H.; Kamio, S.; Seki, R.; Mutoh, T.; Yamada, I.; Takase, Y.

    2015-12-01

    An O-mode microwave reflectometer has been developed to measure ICRF wave induced electron density fluctuations in LHD plasmas. The system has two probing frequencies (28.8 and 30.1 GHz) to measure two spatial points simultaneously. The rms density fluctuation levels are typically 0.01%. The linearity between the measured density fluctuation amplitude and the square root of the RF power is discussed. The decay length of the RF field was estimated to be 1 to 7 m under the operational condition investigated. A typical spatial distance between the two measurement points corresponding to the two probing frequencies is a few centimeters, and the fluctuation amplitudes at the two points are similar in amplitude. The phase difference between the two fluctuations show in-phase relationship on average. Out-of phase relationships, which implies a standing wave structure, are often observed when the wave absorption is expected to be poor.

  10. Microwave detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1986-12-02

    A detector is described for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations, the detector comprising: a B-dot loop linking the magnetic field of the microwave pulse; a biased ferrite, that produces a magnetization field flux that links the B-dot loop. The ferrite is positioned within the B-dot loop so that the magnetic field of the microwave pulse interacts with the ferrite and thereby participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux; and high-frequency insensitive means for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop.

  11. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Andrew A. Suby

    2002-10-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photo-acoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photo-acoustic signals in an off-line configuration. This system was assembled and used to test parameters thought important to photo-acoustic signal output. A standard modulation frequency was chosen based upon signal to noise data gained from experimentation. Sample heterogeneity was tested and found not to be influential. Further testing showed that sample compression and photo-acoustic volume do affect photo-acoustic signal. Testing in the fourth quarter focused on signal repeatability, linearity, the effects of ultrasonic shaking, and sample cup variations. Simultaneously, a second instrument is being constructed based in part on lessons learned with the first instrument, but also expands the capabilities of the first instrument. The power amplifiers for this second instrument were recently completed and tested. Improvements were made to the current leveling loop, which will stabilize the microwave power. Other efforts were spent generating a magnetic field or electric field source for the photo-acoustic effect. The intent of this effort is to be able to discriminate between magnetic contaminants such as iron and non-magnetic contaminants such as carbon. A short coaxial test fixture was fabricated and tested showing the promise of another microwave based test method for determining carbon content in fly ash. The third instrument will be designed based on the experiences of the first two instruments and will operate in an on-line carbon-in-ash monitoring system for coal-fired power plants.

  12. Measurement of optical-beat frequency in a photoconductive terahertz-wave generator using microwave higher harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murasawa, Kengo; Sato, Koki; Hidaka, Takehiko

    2011-05-01

    A new method for measuring optical-beat frequencies in the terahertz (THz) region using microwave higher harmonics is presented. A microwave signal was applied to the antenna gap of a photoconductive (PC) device emitting a continuous electromagnetic wave at about 1 THz by the photomixing technique. The microwave higher harmonics with THz frequencies are generated in the PC device owing to the nonlinearity of the biased photoconductance, which is briefly described in this article. Thirteen nearly periodic peaks in the photocurrent were observed when the microwave was swept from 16 to 20 GHz at a power of -48 dBm. The nearly periodic peaks are generated by the homodyne detection of the optical beat with the microwave higher harmonics when the frequency of the harmonics coincides with the optical-beat frequency. Each peak frequency and its peak width were determined by fitting a Gaussian function, and the order of microwave harmonics was determined using a coarse (i.e., lower resolution) measurement of the optical-beat frequency. By applying the Kalman algorithm to the peak frequencies of the higher harmonics and their standard deviations, the optical-beat frequency near 1 THz was estimated to be 1029.81 GHz with the standard deviation of 0.82 GHz. The proposed method is applicable to a conventional THz-wave generator with a photomixer.

  13. Measurement of optical-beat frequency in a photoconductive terahertz-wave generator using microwave higher harmonics.

    PubMed

    Murasawa, Kengo; Sato, Koki; Hidaka, Takehiko

    2011-05-01

    A new method for measuring optical-beat frequencies in the terahertz (THz) region using microwave higher harmonics is presented. A microwave signal was applied to the antenna gap of a photoconductive (PC) device emitting a continuous electromagnetic wave at about 1 THz by the photomixing technique. The microwave higher harmonics with THz frequencies are generated in the PC device owing to the nonlinearity of the biased photoconductance, which is briefly described in this article. Thirteen nearly periodic peaks in the photocurrent were observed when the microwave was swept from 16 to 20 GHz at a power of -48 dBm. The nearly periodic peaks are generated by the homodyne detection of the optical beat with the microwave higher harmonics when the frequency of the harmonics coincides with the optical-beat frequency. Each peak frequency and its peak width were determined by fitting a Gaussian function, and the order of microwave harmonics was determined using a coarse (i.e., lower resolution) measurement of the optical-beat frequency. By applying the Kalman algorithm to the peak frequencies of the higher harmonics and their standard deviations, the optical-beat frequency near 1 THz was estimated to be 1029.81 GHz with the standard deviation of 0.82 GHz. The proposed method is applicable to a conventional THz-wave generator with a photomixer.

  14. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed. PMID:23765005

  15. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed.

  16. Microwave annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yao-Jen; Cho, T.-C.; Chuang, S.-S.; Hsueh, F.-K.; Lu, Y.-L.; Sung, P.-J.; Chen, S.-J.; Lo, C.-H.; Lai, C.-H.; Current, Michael I.; Tseng, T.-Y.; Chao, T.-S.; Yang, F.-L.

    2012-11-01

    Microwave annealing of dopants in Si has been reported to produce highly activated junctions at temperatures far below those needed for comparable results using conventional thermal processes. However the details of the kinetics and mechanisms for microwave annealing are far from well understood. Comparisons between MWA and RTA of dopants in implanted Si has been investigated to produce highly activated junctions. First, As, 31P, and BF 2 implants in Si substrate were annealed by MWA at temperatures below 550 °C.

  17. Deriving stratospheric trace gases from balloon-borne infrared/microwave limb sounding measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Schreier, Franz; Doicu, Adrian; Vogt, Peter; Trautmann, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Infrared (IR)/microwave limb sounding is a well-established technique for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere. The developments in IR/microwave limb sounding have triggered the demand for adequate and reliable analysis models and methods.

  18. Microwave-assisted preparation of azachalcones and their N-alkyl derivatives with antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Usta, Asu; Öztürk, Elif; Beriş, Fatih Ş

    2014-01-01

    Two new azachalcones were prepared by both Claisen-Schmidt condensation and a simple environmentally trendy microwave-assisted method. Ten new N-alkyl (C6,8,10,12,14)-substituted azachalconium bromides (3a-e, 4a-e) were prepared from compounds 1 and 2 with corresponding alkyl halides. The antimicrobial activities of all the compounds were tested against Enterococcus faecalis, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus micro-organisms. PMID:24571646

  19. Planar and cylindrical active microwave temperature imaging: numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Rius, J M; Pichot, C; Jofre, L; Bolomey, J C; Joachimowicz, N; Broquetas, A; Ferrando, M

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study at 2.45 GHz concerning both measurement and reconstruction parameters for planar and cylindrical configurations is presented. For the sake of comparison, a numerical model consisting of two nonconcentric cylinders is considered and reconstructed using both geometries from simulated experimental data. The scattered fields and reconstructed images permit extraction of very useful information about dynamic range, sensitivity, resolution, and quantitative image accuracy for the choice of the configuration in a particular application. Both geometries can measure forward and backward scattered fields. The backscattering measurement improves the image resolution and reconstruction in lossy mediums, but, on the other hand, has several dynamic range difficulties. This tradeoff between forward only and forward-backward field measurement is analyzed. As differential temperature imaging is a weakly scattering problem, Born approximation algorithms can be used. The simplicity of Born reconstruction algorithms and the use of FFT make them very attractive for real-time biomedical imaging systems. PMID:18222887

  20. Two-frequency /Delta k/ microwave scatterometer measurements of ocean wave spectra from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for remotely sensing the large-scale gravity wave spectrum on the ocean surface using a two frequency (Delta k) microwave scatterometer has been demonstrated from stationary platforms and proposed from moving platforms. This measurement takes advantage of Bragg type resonance matching between the electromagnetic wavelength at the difference frequency and the length of the large-scale surface waves. A prominent resonance appears in the cross product power spectral density (PSD) of the two backscattered signals. Ku-Band aircraft scatterometer measurements were conducted by NASA in the North Sea during the 1979 Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) experiment. Typical examples of cross product PSD's computed from the MARSEN data are presented. They demonstrate strong resonances whose frequency and bandwidth agree with the surface characteristics and the theory. Directional modulation spectra of the surface reflectivity are compared to the gravity wave spectrum derived from surface truth measurements.

  1. Mapping the spatial distribution and time evolution of snow water equivalent with passive microwave measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, J.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E.G.; Wood, A.W.; Hwang, J.-N.; Lettenmaier, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm that estimates the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of snow water equivalent and snow depth based on passive remote sensing measurements. It combines the inversion of passive microwave remote sensing measurements via dense media radiative transfer modeling results with snow accumulation and melt model predictions to yield improved estimates of snow depth and snow water equivalent, at a pixel resolution of 5 arc-min. In the inversion, snow grain size evolution is constrained based on pattern matching by using the local snow temperature history. This algorithm is applied to produce spatial snow maps of Upper Rio Grande River basin in Colorado. The simulation results are compared with that of the snow accumulation and melt model and a linear regression method. The quantitative comparison with the ground truth measurements from four Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) sites in the basin shows that this algorithm is able to improve the estimation of snow parameters.

  2. A novel phase noise measurement of phase modulation microwave photonic links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanyi; Gao, Yingjie; Yang, Chun

    2016-07-01

    Microwave photonic links can provide many advantages over traditional coaxial due to its low loss, small size, lightweight, large bandwidth and immunity to external interference. In this paper, a novel phase noise measurement system is built, since the input signal and the power supply noise can be effectively cancelled by a two-arm configuration without the phase locking. Using this approach, the phase noise performance of the 10-GHz phase modulation photonic link has been measured for the first time, evaluated the values of -124 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz offset and -132 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset is obtained. Theoretical analysis on the phase noise measurement system calibration is also discussed.

  3. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Olson, William S.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated using both simulated and airborne data. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite multi-frequency active and passive observations. These observations are characterized by various spatial and sampling resolutions. This makes the retrieval problem mathematically more difficult and ill-determined because the quality of information decreases with decreasing resolution. A model that, given reflectivity profiles and a small set of parameters (including the cloud water content, the intercept drop size distribution, and a variable describing the frozen hydrometeor properties), simulates high-resolution brightness temperatures is used. The high-resolution simulated brightness temperatures are convolved at the real sensor resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is used to minimize the differences between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. The retrieval technique is investigated using cloud model synthetic and airborne data from the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment. Simulated high-resolution brightness temperatures and reflectivities and airborne observation strong are convolved at the resolution of the TRMM instruments and retrievals are performed and analyzed relative to the reference data used in observations synthesis. An illustration of the possible use of the technique in satellite rainfall estimation is presented through an application to TRMM data. The study suggests improvements in combined active and passive retrievals even when the instruments resolutions are significantly different. Future work needs to better quantify the retrievals performance, especially in connection with satellite applications, and the uncertainty of the models used in retrieval.

  4. Microwave-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Yupingfeng powder and their antioxidant activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Bi-Bo; Qu, Xiao-Xia; Gao, Feng; Yuan, Min-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Microwave-assisted reflux extraction of polysaccharides YPF-P from the famous Chinese traditional drug, Yupingfeng powder, optimization of extracting conditions and evaluation of their antioxidant activity were conducted in this study. Results: Single factor effect trends were achieved through yields and contends of YPF-P obtained from different extracting conditions. Then through a three-level, four-variable Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology adopting yield as response, the optimal conditions were determined as follows: Material/solvent ratio 1:23.37, microwave power 560 W, Extraction temperature 64°C, and extraction time 9.62 min. Under the optimal conditions, the YPF-P extraction yield was 3.23%, and its content was detected as 38.52%. In antioxidant assays, the YPF-P was tested to possess 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities with an IC50 value of 0.262 mg/ml. In addition, YPF-P was also proved to have relatively low ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), compared to Vc, through FRAP assay. Conclusion: In the microwave assisted reflux extraction research, good YPF-P yield was achieved from materials with relatively low YPF-P content. And for the first time, both DPPH and FRAP assays were conducted on YPF-P, which proved that the antioxidant activity of YPF-P contributed to the functions of this medicine. PMID:26246730

  5. ON MEASURING THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND TEMPERATURE AT REDSHIFT 0.89

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, M.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Carilli, C. L.

    2013-02-20

    We report on a measurement of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation field, T {sub CMB}, at z = 0.88582 by imaging HC{sub 3}N(3 <- 2) and (5 <- 4) absorption in the foreground galaxy of the gravitationally lens magnified radio source PKS 1830-211 using the Very Long Baseline Array and the phased Very Large Array. Low-resolution imaging of the data yields a value of T {sub rot} = 5.6{sup +2.5} {sub -0.9} K for the rotational temperature, T {sub rot}, which is consistent with the temperature of the cosmic microwave background at the absorber's redshift of 2.73(1 + z) K. However, our high-resolution imaging reveals that the absorption peak position of the foreground gas is offset from the continuum peak position of the synchrotron radiation from PKS 1830-211SW, which indicates that the absorbing cloud is covering only part of the emission from PKS 1830-211, rather than the entire core-jet region. This changes the line-to-continuum ratios, and we find T {sub rot} between 1.1 and 2.5 K, which is lower than the expected value. This shows that previous T {sub rot} measurements could be biased due to unresolved structure.

  6. Microwave anomalous propagation (AP) measurement over Akure South-Western Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adediji, A. T.; Ajewole, M. O.

    2010-04-01

    Anomalous propagation (Anaprop) of microwave radiation is known to be caused by several meteorological conditions. In this study, radio refractive index and modified refractivity gradient were computed using the results of measurements of atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity made in Akure (7.15°N, 5.12°E), South Western Nigeria using Davis 6162 Wireless Vantage Pro2 weather stations (Integrated Sensor Suite, ISS) positioned at five different height levels beginning from the ground surface and at intervals of 50 m from the ground to a height of 200 m on a tower/mast owned by the Nigeria Television Authority (NTA) located at Iju in Akure north local government area of Ondo state but which is no longer being used. The study utilized one year of data measured between January and December 2008. From the results, the modified refractivity was calculated and found to increase with increasing altitude. The values were observed to be generally high during the rainy periods and generally low during the dry periods. The study also revealed that for microwave propagation in this geographic zone, the propagation condition is mostly super-refractive.

  7. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from sunflower seed oil residue via microwave assisted K2CO3 activation.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2011-10-01

    Sunflower seed oil residue, a by-product of sunflower seed oil refining, was utilized as a feedstock for preparation of activated carbon (SSHAC) via microwave induced K(2)CO(3) chemical activation. SSHAC was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption and elemental analysis. Surface acidity/basicity was examined with acid-base titration, while the adsorptive properties of SSHAC were quantified using methylene blue (MB) and acid blue 15 (AB). The monolayer adsorption capacities of MB and AB were 473.44 and 430.37 mg/g, while the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, Langmuir surface area and total pore volume were 1411.55 m(2)/g, 2137.72 m(2)/g and 0.836 cm(3)/g, respectively. The findings revealed the potential to prepare high surface area activated carbon from sunflower seed oil residue by microwave irradiation.

  8. Evidence for dark energy from the cosmic microwave background alone using the Atacama Cosmology Telescope lensing measurements.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Blake D; Dunkley, Joanna; Das, Sudeep; Appel, John W; Bond, J Richard; Carvalho, C Sofia; Devlin, Mark J; Dünner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fowler, Joseph W; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renée; Hughes, John P; Irwin, Kent D; Klein, Jeff; Kosowsky, Arthur; Marriage, Tobias A; Marsden, Danica; Moodley, Kavilan; Menanteau, Felipe; Niemack, Michael D; Nolta, Michael R; Page, Lyman A; Parker, Lucas; Reese, Erik D; Schmitt, Benjamin L; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; Swetz, Daniel S; Switzer, Eric R; Thornton, Robert; Visnjic, Katerina; Wollack, Ed

    2011-07-01

    For the first time, measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) alone favor cosmologies with w = -1 dark energy over models without dark energy at a 3.2-sigma level. We demonstrate this by combining the CMB lensing deflection power spectrum from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope with temperature and polarization power spectra from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The lensing data break the geometric degeneracy of different cosmological models with similar CMB temperature power spectra. Our CMB-only measurement of the dark energy density Ω(Λ) confirms other measurements from supernovae, galaxy clusters, and baryon acoustic oscillations, and demonstrates the power of CMB lensing as a new cosmological tool.

  9. Evidence for Dark Energy from the Cosmic Microwave Background Alone Using the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Lensing Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwin, Blake D.; Dunkley, Joanna; Das, Sudeep; Appel, John W.; Bond, J. Richard; Carvalho, C. Sofia; Devlin, Mark J.; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fowler, Joesph J.; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renee; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent D.; Klein, Jeff; Kosowsky, Arthur; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Moodley, Kavilan; Menanteau, Felipe; Niemack, Michael D.; Wollack, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    For the first time, measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) alone favor cosmologies with w = -1 dark energy over models without dark energy at a 3.2-sigma level. We demonstrate this by combining the CMB lensing deflection power spectrum from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope with temperature and polarization power spectra from the "Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The lensing data break the geometric degeneracy of different cosmological models with similar CMB temperature power spectra. Our CMB-only measurement of the dark energy density Omega(delta) confirms other measurements from supernovae, galaxy clusters and baryon acoustic oscillations, and demonstrates the power of CMB lensing as a new cosmological tool.

  10. Measurements of electron density and temperature in a miniature microwave discharge ion thruster using laser Thomson scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Tomita, K.; Yamasaki, N.; Tsuru, T.; Ezaki, T.; Kotani, Y.; Uchino, K.; Nakashima, H.

    2010-08-01

    In order to improve the thrust performance of a miniature microwave discharge ion thruster, the relationship between electron number density/temperature and operational conditions, mass flow rate, incident microwave power and magnetic field strength were measured by means of laser Thomson scattering. A photon counting method and a triple grating spectrometer were used against a small Thomson scattering signal and a strong stray laser light. Electron number density increased with incident microwave power and was saturated at critical incident microwave power; it was about 1.2 × 1018 m-3 at incident microwave power >8 W. In addition, electron number density increased with mass flow rate and became saturated; it was about 1.7 × 1018 m-3 at mass flow rate > 0.04 mg s-1. The electron number density gradually increased with an increase in the number of magnets, i.e. magnetic field strength. There was a sudden jump at thirteen magnets, although the thruster failed to ignite at fourteen magnets. This is because there is an optimum distance between the antenna and the electron cyclotron resonance layer. These results suggest that future improvement in thrust efficiency in miniature microwave discharge ion thrusters may come from the fine adjustment of the magnetic field configuration inside the discharge chamber.

  11. Blood-brain barrier alteration after microwave-induced hyperthermia is purely a thermal effect: I. Temperature and power measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, E.; Salcman, M.; Broadwell, R.D. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of microwave-induced hyperthermia on the blood-brain barrier was studied in 21 Sprague-Dawley rats. Under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, animals were place in a stereotactic frame, and an interstitial microwave antenna operating at 2450 MHz was inserted in a bony groove drilled parallel to the sagittal suture. Some antennae were equipped with an external cooling jacket. Temperature measurements were made lateral to the antenna by fluoroptical thermometry, and power was calculated from the time-temperature profile. Five minutes prior to termination of microwave irradiation, horseradish peroxidase (1 mg/20 g body weight) was injected intravenously. Extravasation of horseradish peroxidase was observed in brain tissue heated above 44.3 degrees C for 30 minutes and at 42.5 degrees C for 60 minutes. Microwave irradiation failed to open the blood-brain barrier when brain temperatures were sustained below 40.3 degrees C by the cooling system. Extravasation of blood-borne peroxidase occurred at sites of maximal temperature elevation, even when these did not coincide with the site of maximum power density. The data suggest that microwave-induced hyperthermia is an effective means for opening the blood-brain barrier and that the mechanism is not related to the nonthermal effect of microwaves.

  12. Machine learning aided diagnosis of hepatic malignancies through in vivo dielectric measurements with microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Tuba; Alp Kılıç, Mahmut; Erdoğan, Melike; Çayören, Mehmet; Tunaoğlu, Doruk; Kurtoğlu, İsmail; Yaslan, Yusuf; Çayören, Hüseyin; Enes Arıkan, Akif; Teksöz, Serkan; Cancan, Gülden; Kepil, Nuray; Erdamar, Sibel; Özcan, Murat; Akduman, İbrahim; Kalkan, Tunaya

    2016-07-01

    In the past decade, extensive research on dielectric properties of biological tissues led to characterization of dielectric property discrepancy between the malignant and healthy tissues. Such discrepancy enabled the development of microwave therapeutic and diagnostic technologies. Traditionally, dielectric property measurements of biological tissues is performed with the well-known contact probe (open-ended coaxial probe) technique. However, the technique suffers from limited accuracy and low loss resolution for permittivity and conductivity measurements, respectively. Therefore, despite the inherent dielectric property discrepancy, a rigorous measurement routine with open-ended coaxial probes is required for accurate differentiation of malignant and healthy tissues. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the need for multiple measurements with open-ended coaxial probe for malignant and healthy tissue differentiation by applying support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm to the dielectric measurement data. To do so, first, in vivo malignant and healthy rat liver tissue dielectric property measurements are collected with open-ended coaxial probe technique between 500 MHz to 6 GHz. Cole–Cole functions are fitted to the measured dielectric properties and measurement data is verified with the literature. Malign tissue classification is realized by applying SVM to the open-ended coaxial probe measurements where as high as 99.2% accuracy (F1 Score) is obtained.

  13. Machine learning aided diagnosis of hepatic malignancies through in vivo dielectric measurements with microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Tuba; Alp Kılıç, Mahmut; Erdoğan, Melike; Çayören, Mehmet; Tunaoğlu, Doruk; Kurtoğlu, İsmail; Yaslan, Yusuf; Çayören, Hüseyin; Enes Arıkan, Akif; Teksöz, Serkan; Cancan, Gülden; Kepil, Nuray; Erdamar, Sibel; Özcan, Murat; Akduman, İbrahim; Kalkan, Tunaya

    2016-07-01

    In the past decade, extensive research on dielectric properties of biological tissues led to characterization of dielectric property discrepancy between the malignant and healthy tissues. Such discrepancy enabled the development of microwave therapeutic and diagnostic technologies. Traditionally, dielectric property measurements of biological tissues is performed with the well-known contact probe (open-ended coaxial probe) technique. However, the technique suffers from limited accuracy and low loss resolution for permittivity and conductivity measurements, respectively. Therefore, despite the inherent dielectric property discrepancy, a rigorous measurement routine with open-ended coaxial probes is required for accurate differentiation of malignant and healthy tissues. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the need for multiple measurements with open-ended coaxial probe for malignant and healthy tissue differentiation by applying support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm to the dielectric measurement data. To do so, first, in vivo malignant and healthy rat liver tissue dielectric property measurements are collected with open-ended coaxial probe technique between 500 MHz to 6 GHz. Cole-Cole functions are fitted to the measured dielectric properties and measurement data is verified with the literature. Malign tissue classification is realized by applying SVM to the open-ended coaxial probe measurements where as high as 99.2% accuracy (F1 Score) is obtained.

  14. High accuracy plasma density measurement using hybrid Langmuir probe and microwave interferometer method

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; Gilchrist, B. E.; Dobson, C.; Jones, J. E.; Chavers, D. G.

    2007-11-15

    High spatial resolution plasma density measurements have been taken as part of an investigation into magnetic nozzle physics at the NASA/MSFC Propulsion Research Center. These measurements utilized a Langmuir triple probe scanned across the measurement chord of either of two stationary rf interferometers. By normalizing the scanned profile to the microwave interferometer line-integrated density measurement for each electrostatic probe measurement, the effect of shot-to-shot variation of the line-integrated density can be removed. In addition, by summing the voltage readings at each radial position in a transverse scan, the line density can be reconstituted, allowing the absolute density to be determined, assuming that the shape of the profile is constant from shot to shot. The spatial and temporal resolutions of this measurement technique depend on the resolutions of the scanned electrostatic probe and the interferometer. The measurement accuracy is 9%-15%, which is on the order of the accuracy of the rf interferometer. The measurement technique was compared directly with both scanning rf interferometer and standard Langmuir probe theory. The hybrid technique compares favorably with the scanning rf interferometer, and appears more accurate than probe theory alone. Additionally, our measurement technique is generally applicable even for nonaxisymmetric plasmas.

  15. High accuracy plasma density measurement using hybrid Langmuir probe and microwave interferometer method.

    PubMed

    Deline, C; Gilchrist, B E; Dobson, C; Jones, J E; Chavers, D G

    2007-11-01

    High spatial resolution plasma density measurements have been taken as part of an investigation into magnetic nozzle physics at the NASA/MSFC Propulsion Research Center. These measurements utilized a Langmuir triple probe scanned across the measurement chord of either of two stationary rf interferometers. By normalizing the scanned profile to the microwave interferometer line-integrated density measurement for each electrostatic probe measurement, the effect of shot-to-shot variation of the line-integrated density can be removed. In addition, by summing the voltage readings at each radial position in a transverse scan, the line density can be reconstituted, allowing the absolute density to be determined, assuming that the shape of the profile is constant from shot to shot. The spatial and temporal resolutions of this measurement technique depend on the resolutions of the scanned electrostatic probe and the interferometer. The measurement accuracy is 9%-15%, which is on the order of the accuracy of the rf interferometer. The measurement technique was compared directly with both scanning rf interferometer and standard Langmuir probe theory. The hybrid technique compares favorably with the scanning rf interferometer, and appears more accurate than probe theory alone. Additionally, our measurement technique is generally applicable even for nonaxisymmetric plasmas.

  16. Multichannel microwave interferometer with an antenna switching system for electron density measurement in a laboratory plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Mase, Atsushi; Nishida, Yasushi; Cheng, C. Z.

    2014-02-15

    This study presents a simple and powerful technique for multichannel measurements of the density profile in laboratory plasmas by microwave interferometry. This technique uses electromechanical microwave switches to temporally switch the connection between multiple receiver antennas and one phase-detection circuit. Using this method, the phase information detected at different positions is rearranged into a time series that can be acquired from a minimum number of data acquisition channels (e.g., two channels in the case of quadrature detection). Our successfully developed multichannel microwave interferometer that uses the antenna switching method was applied to measure the radial electron density profiles in a magnetized plasma experiment. The advantage of the proposed method is its compactness and scalability to multidimensional measurement systems at low cost.

  17. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  18. Microwave activation of electrochemical processes: enhanced electrodehalogenation in organic solvent media.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Chen; Coles, Barry A; Compton, Richard G; Marken, Frank

    2002-08-21

    The effect of high-intensity microwave radiation focused into a "hot spot" region in the vicinity of an electrode on electrochemical processes with and without coupled chemical reaction steps has been investigated in organic solvent media. First, the electrochemically reversible oxidation of ferrocene in acetonitrile and DMF is shown to be affected by microwave-induced thermal activation, resulting in increased currents and voltammetric wave shape effects. A FIDAP simulation investigation allows quantitative insight into the temperature distribution and concentration gradients at the electrode / solution interface. Next, the effect of intense microwave radiation on electroorganic reactions is considered for the case of ECE processes. Experimental data for the reduction of p-bromonitrobenzene, o-bromonitrobenzene, and m-iodonitrobenzene in DMF and acetonitrile are analyzed in terms of an electron transfer (E), followed by a chemical dehalogenation step (C), and finally followed by another electron-transfer step (E). The presence of the "hot spot" in the solution phase favors processes with high activation barriers.

  19. Comparison of active and passive microwave signatures of Arctic sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M. R.; Crawford, J. P.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Holt, B.; Carsey, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    In March 1988, overlapping active and passive microwave instrument data were acquired over Arctic sea ice using the NASA DC-8 aircraft equipped with multifrequency, variable polarization SAR and radiometer. Flights were conducted as a series of coordinated underflights of the DMSP SSM/I satellite radiometer in order to validate ice products derived from the SSM/I radiances. Subsequent flights by an NRL P-3 aircraft enabled overlapping high-resolution, single frequency image data to be acquired over the same regions using a Ka-band scanning microwave radiometer. In this paper, techniques are discussed for the accurate coregistration of the three aircraft datasets. Precise coregistration to an accuracy of 100 m plus or minus 25 m has, for the first time, enabled the detailed comparison of temporally and spatially coincident active and passive airborne microwave datasets. Preliminary results from the intercomparisons indicate that the SAR has highly frequency- and polarization-dependent signatures, which at 5.3 GHz (C-band) show an extremely high correlation with the 37 GHz radiometric temperatures.

  20. Influence of microwave parameters and water activity on radical generation in rice starch.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daming; Liu, Yixiao; Hu, Bo; Lin, Lufen; Huang, Luelue; Wang, Liyun; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Radical generation in rice starch under microwave treatment as well as the related chemical bond changes were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Raman spectroscopy. Samples with water activity of 0.4 and 0.7 have been treated and analyzed. It was found that microwave power level and water content could influence the amount of radicals along with the radical components and their contribution. Raman spectra showed corresponding changes in vibrational features of chemical bonds. During storage the signal intensity started to drop after a short period of increase. Rice starch radicals were relatively stable and could exist a long time in room temperature. Through signal simulation, 3 main components were separated from the original spectra and the evolving process was investigated. The main component was the radical located on C1 position in the glucose ring. PMID:26593462

  1. Antioxidant Activity and Phenolic Content of Microwave-Assisted Solanum melongena Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Maria N.; Pittalà, Valeria; Siracusa, Maria A.; Sorrenti, Valeria; Acquaviva, Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant fruit is a very rich source of polyphenol compounds endowed with antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to extract polyphenols from eggplant entire fruit, pulp, or skin, both fresh and dry, and compare results between conventional extraction and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The effects of time exposure (15, 30, 60, and 90 min) and solvent (water 100% or ethanol/water 50%) were also evaluated. The highest amount of polyphenols was found in the extract obtained from dry peeled skin treated with 50% aqueous ethanol, irradiated with microwave; this extract contained also high quantity of flavonoids and showed good antioxidant activity expressed by its capacity to scavenge superoxide anion and to inhibit lipid peroxidation. PMID:24683354

  2. NASA Activities as they Relate to Microwave Technology for Aerospace Communications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses current NASA activities and plans as they relate to microwave technology for aerospace communications. The presentations discusses some examples of the aforementioned technology within the context of the existing and future communications architectures and technology development roadmaps. Examples of the evolution of key technology from idea to deployment are provided as well as the challenges that lay ahead regarding advancing microwave technology to ensure that future NASA missions are not constrained by lack of communication or navigation capabilities. The presentation closes with some examples of emerging ongoing opportunities for establishing collaborative efforts between NASA, Industry, and Academia to encourage the development, demonstration and insertion of communications technology in pertinent aerospace systems.

  3. Slow potentials and spike unit activity of the cerebral cortex of rabbits exposed to microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Chizhenkova, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Unanesthetized rabbits exposed to 12.5-cm microwaves at a field intensity of 40 mW/cm/sup 2/ in the region of the head showed an increase in the number of slow waves and spindle-shaped firings in the EEG and a change in the discharge frequency of neurons in the visual cortex in 41-52% of the cases. An enhancement of the evoked response of visual cortex neurons to light was observed in 61% of the cases and a facilitation of the driving response in 80% of all cases. It is concluded that the evoked response is a more sensitive indicator of the microwave effect than background activity. The effects of the fields were most distinctly observed with the driving response.

  4. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of microwave-assisted Solanum melongena extracts.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Loredana; Modica, Maria N; Pittalà, Valeria; Romeo, Giuseppe; Siracusa, Maria A; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Sorrenti, Valeria; Acquaviva, Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant fruit is a very rich source of polyphenol compounds endowed with antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to extract polyphenols from eggplant entire fruit, pulp, or skin, both fresh and dry, and compare results between conventional extraction and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The effects of time exposure (15, 30, 60, and 90 min) and solvent (water 100% or ethanol/water 50%) were also evaluated. The highest amount of polyphenols was found in the extract obtained from dry peeled skin treated with 50% aqueous ethanol, irradiated with microwave; this extract contained also high quantity of flavonoids and showed good antioxidant activity expressed by its capacity to scavenge superoxide anion and to inhibit lipid peroxidation.

  5. Influence of microwave parameters and water activity on radical generation in rice starch.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daming; Liu, Yixiao; Hu, Bo; Lin, Lufen; Huang, Luelue; Wang, Liyun; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Radical generation in rice starch under microwave treatment as well as the related chemical bond changes were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Raman spectroscopy. Samples with water activity of 0.4 and 0.7 have been treated and analyzed. It was found that microwave power level and water content could influence the amount of radicals along with the radical components and their contribution. Raman spectra showed corresponding changes in vibrational features of chemical bonds. During storage the signal intensity started to drop after a short period of increase. Rice starch radicals were relatively stable and could exist a long time in room temperature. Through signal simulation, 3 main components were separated from the original spectra and the evolving process was investigated. The main component was the radical located on C1 position in the glucose ring.

  6. Passive/active microwave soil moisture retrieval disaggregation using SMAPVEX12 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Bin; Lakshmi, Venkat

    2014-11-01

    SMAPVEX12 is a pre-launch field campaign for evaluating and testing the soil moisture retrievals retrieved from the SMAP project. During this experiment, airborne microwave observations from PALS radiometer and radar: brightness temperature and radar backscatter, as well as ground measurements were acquired. In this study, the remote sensing soil moisture was retrieved from SMAPVEX12 PALS radiometer L-band (6GHz) brightness temperature at high altitude flight. The PALS soil moisture was then aggregated and compared with PALS radar backscatter coefficient to generate high spatial resolution microwave soil moisture in change. The R2 values of PALS soil moisture retrieval validation range from 0.407-0.881, indicating good accuracy of soil moisture retrieval. The R2 values of comparison between aggregated PALS Δ and PALS Δ range from 0.492-0.805, while the downscaled Δ validation range from 0.128- 0.383.

  7. Measurement of back-bombardment temperature rise in microwave thermionic electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Jeremy M. D.; Hadmack, Michael R.; Madey, John M. J.

    2013-08-01

    We describe a simple method to measure the back-bombardment heating temperature rise as a function of time in pulsed microwave thermionic guns using a fast rise-time InGaAs detector and optical pyrometer. Gaining knowledge of the nature of that temperature rise and the corresponding current out of the gun are the first steps in devising a scheme to counteract the back-bombardment heating which lengthens the micropulses, limits the macropulse length, and increases the energy spread of the emitted electron beam. We measured a temperature rise of 59 K in our LaB6 cathode which delivered a peak of 600 mA over a 5 μs RF pulse in our 0.33 MV/cm peak field, 2.856 GHz thermionic electron gun.

  8. A large-scale cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurement at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Lyman A.; Cheng, Edward S.; Meyer, Stephan S.

    1990-01-01

    A balloon-borne experiment to measure the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation at angular scales of 4 deg or greater is reported. The instrument simultaneously measures in four spectral bands centered on 5.6, 8.7, 15.8, and 22.5/cm. Three results are presented: (1) the 95-percent confidence limit for monochromatic anisotropies is 0.0001 or less on angular scales of 10 deg; (2) the Galactic plane dust emission at l = 42 deg is consistent with a nu-squared emissivity law at frequencies above 15/cm, with excess emission below 15/cm; and (3) atmospheric ozone at an altitude of 35 km may form clumps as large as Delta emissivity/emissivity = 0.002.

  9. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  10. A synthetic aperture microwave radiometer to measure soil moisture and ocean salinity from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Hilliard, L. M.; Swift, C. T.; Ruf, C. S.; Garrett, L. B.

    1991-01-01

    A concept is presented for a microwave radiometer in space to measure soil moisture and ocean salinity as part of an 'Earth Probe' mission. The measurements could be made using an array of stick antennas. The L-band channel (1.4 GHz) would be the primary channel for determining soil moisture, with the S-band (2.65-GHz) and C-band (5.0-GHz) channels providing ancillary information to help correct for the effects of the vegetation canopy and possibly to estimate a moisture profile. A preliminary study indicates that an orbit at 450 km would provide coverage of better than 95 percent of the earth every 3 days. A 10-km resolution cell (at nadir) requires stick antennas about 9.5-m long at L-band. The S-band and C-band sticks would be substantially shorter (5 m and 2.7 m, respectively).

  11. Measurement of back-bombardment temperature rise in microwave thermionic electron guns.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Jeremy M D; Hadmack, Michael R; Madey, John M J

    2013-08-01

    We describe a simple method to measure the back-bombardment heating temperature rise as a function of time in pulsed microwave thermionic guns using a fast rise-time InGaAs detector and optical pyrometer. Gaining knowledge of the nature of that temperature rise and the corresponding current out of the gun are the first steps in devising a scheme to counteract the back-bombardment heating which lengthens the micropulses, limits the macropulse length, and increases the energy spread of the emitted electron beam. We measured a temperature rise of 59 K in our LaB6 cathode which delivered a peak of 600 mA over a 5 μs RF pulse in our 0.33 MV/cm peak field, 2.856 GHz thermionic electron gun.

  12. Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-05-07

    Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

  13. Measurement of sodium-argon cluster ion recombination by coherent microwave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yue; Sawyer, Jordan; Zhang Zhili; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2012-03-12

    This present work demonstrates a non-intrusive measurement of the rate constant for sodium-argon cluster ions (Na{sup +}{center_dot}Ar) recombining with electrons. The measurements begin with resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization of the Na followed by coherent microwave scattering (radar) to monitor the plasma density. The Na{sup +}{center_dot}Ar adduct was formed in a three-body reaction. The plasma decay due to recombination reactions was monitored as a function of time and modeled to determine the rate constant. At 473 K, the rate constant is 1.8{sub -0.5}{sup +0.7}x10{sup -6}cm{sup 3}/s in an argon buffer at 100 Torr and initial Na number density of 5.5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}.

  14. Measurement of back-bombardment temperature rise in microwave thermionic electron guns.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Jeremy M D; Hadmack, Michael R; Madey, John M J

    2013-08-01

    We describe a simple method to measure the back-bombardment heating temperature rise as a function of time in pulsed microwave thermionic guns using a fast rise-time InGaAs detector and optical pyrometer. Gaining knowledge of the nature of that temperature rise and the corresponding current out of the gun are the first steps in devising a scheme to counteract the back-bombardment heating which lengthens the micropulses, limits the macropulse length, and increases the energy spread of the emitted electron beam. We measured a temperature rise of 59 K in our LaB6 cathode which delivered a peak of 600 mA over a 5 μs RF pulse in our 0.33 MV/cm peak field, 2.856 GHz thermionic electron gun. PMID:24007094

  15. ACTIVITIES: Centimeter and Millimeter Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolster, L. Carey

    1974-01-01

    An activity is suggested which will give junior high school students practice in estimating and measuring in centimeters and millimeters. Three worksheets are given, one of which is a model for making a metric caliper. (LS)

  16. Microwave measurements on a well-collimated dusty plasma sheet for communications blackout applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillman, Eric; Amatucci, Bill

    2013-10-01

    A linear hollow cathode produces an electron beam that is accelerated into a low pressure (50 to 150 mTorr) background of Argon, producing an electron beam discharge. A relatively constant 170 Gauss axial magnetic field is produced by two electromagnet coils arranged in a Helmholtz configuration. This results in a well-collimated electron beam, producing a 2-dimensional discharge sheet (40 cm high by 30 cm wide by 1 cm thick) with densities as high as 1012 cm-3. The plasma sheet is intended to replicate the parameters of the plasma layer produced around hypersonic and reentry vehicles. The electron beam is accelerated vertically towards a grounded beam dump electrode. This electrode is modified to include an array of six piezo buzzers modified and filled with alumina powder. When powered with a modest voltage, the piezoelectric shakers drop dust particles into the plasma sheet discharge directly below. A transmitting microwave horn is oriented normal to the dense plasma sheet while the receiving horn is mounted on a stage that can be rotated up to 180 degrees azimuthally. Microwave transmission and scattering measurements of the plasma sheet are made in the S-band and X-band for applications related to communications blackout. This research was performed while the primary author held a National Research Council Research Associateship Award at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  17. A FOREGROUND-CLEANED COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND MAP FROM NON-GAUSSIANITY MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Rajib

    2011-10-01

    In this Letter, we present a new method to estimate a foreground-cleaned cosmic microwave background (CMB) map at a resolution of 1{sup 0} by minimizing the non-Gaussian properties of the cleaned map which arise dominantly due to diffuse foreground emission components from the Milky Way. We employ simple kurtosis statistic as the measure of non-Gaussian properties and perform a linear combination of five frequency maps provided by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) in its seven-year data release in such a way that the cleaned map has a minimum kurtosis which leads to a non-Gaussianity-minimized, foreground-cleaned CMB map. We validate the method by performing Monte Carlo simulations. To minimize any residual foreground contamination from the cleaned map we flag out the region near the galactic plane based upon results from simulations. Outside the masked region our new estimate of the CMB map matches well with the WMAP's Internal Linear Combination (ILC) map. A simple pseudo-C{sub l} -based CMB TT power spectrum derived from the non-Gaussianity minimized map reproduces the earlier results of WMAP's power spectrum. An important advantage of the method is that it does not introduce any negative bias in angular power spectrum in the low multipole regime, unlike usual ILC method. Comparing our results with the previously published results we argue that CMB results are robust with respect to specific foreground removal algorithms employed.

  18. Remote sensing of precipitable water over the oceans from Nimbus-7 microwave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Change, H. D.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1981-01-01

    Global maps of precipitable water over derived from scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) data reveal salient features associated with ocean currents and the large scale general circulation in the atmosphere. Nimbus-7 SMMR brightness temperature measurements in the 21 and 18 GHz channels are used to sense the precipitable water in the atmospheric over oceans. The difference in the brightness temperature (T sub 21 -T sub 18), both in the horizontal and vertical polarization, is found to be essentially a function of the precipitable water in the atmosphere. An equation, based on the physical consideration of the radiative transfer in the microwave region, is developed to relate the precipitable water to (T sub 21 - T sub 18). It shows that the signal (T sub 21- T sub 18) does not suffer severely from the noise introduced by variations in the sea surface temperature, surface winds, and liquid water content in non rain clouds. The rms deviation between the estimated precipitable water from SMMR data and that given by the closely coincident ship radiosondes is about 0.25 g/ sq cm

  19. Photonic approach for microwave frequency measurement with adjustable measurement range and resolution using birefringence effect in highly non-linear fiber.

    PubMed

    Feng, Danqi; Xie, Heng; Qian, Lifen; Bai, Qinhong; Sun, Junqiang

    2015-06-29

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel approach for microwave frequency measurement utilizing birefringence effect in the highly non-linear fiber (HNLF). A detailed theoretical analysis is presented to implement the adjustable measurement range and resolution. By stimulating a complementary polarization-domain interferometer pair in the HNLF, a mathematical expression that relates the microwave frequency and amplitude comparison function is developed. We carry out a proof-to-concept experiment. A frequency measurement range of 2.5-30 GHz with a measurement error within 0.5 GHz is achieved except 16-17.5 GHz. This method is all-optical and requires no high-speed electronic components. PMID:26191769

  20. A 1 percent measurement of the temperature of the cosmic microwave radiation at lambda = 1.2 centimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David G.; Wilkinson, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Results are reported of a direct measurement of the cosmic microwave radiation temperature using a special Dicke radiometer (wavelength = 1.2 cm) designed to minimize the usual systematic errors. The experiment was performed at balloon altitudes to avoid atmospheric emission. The first flight gives a cosmic microwave radiation temperature of 2.783 + or - 0.025 K, where the error is due to several errors (mostly systematic) added by quadrature. This is the most accurate direct measurement (by a factor of 3) yet reported.

  1. Structure and polarization of active region microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Alissandrakis, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Active region radio emission observations made at 6.16 cm wavelength during May 20-27, 1980, are the bases of maps of total intensity and circular polarization presented for the three regions whose Hale numbers are 16850, 16863, and 16864. A detailed comparison is made between these maps and on- and off-band H-alpha pictures and magnetograms. The neutral lines with which the strongest sources were associated have their two opposite polarities close to each other, implying a high magnetic field gradient, and are also associated with arch filament systems. A detailed analysis is undertaken of observations of the circular polarization sense inversion in region 16863. The large scale structure of the magnetic field can be approximated by a dipole with its axis inclined by 11 deg with respect to the photosphere, and with a dipole moment of about 2 x 10 to the 31 power cgs units.

  2. Evaluation of “all weather” microwave-derived land surface temperatures with in situ CEOP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherinot, J.; Prigent, C.; Maurer, R.; Papa, F.; JiméNez, C.; Aires, F.; Rossow, W. B.

    2011-12-01

    Land surface skin temperature Ts plays a key role in meteorological and climatological processes but the availability and the accuracy of Ts measurements over land are still limited, especially under cloudy conditions. Ts estimates from infrared satellite observations can only be derived under clear sky. Passive microwave measurements are much less affected by clouds and can provide Ts regardless of the cloud conditions. A neural network inversion including first guess information has been previously developed to retrieve Ts, along with atmospheric water vapor, cloud liquid water, and surface emissivities over land from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager measurements, with a spatial resolution of 0.25° × 0.25°, at least twice daily. In this study, Ts estimates are evaluated through careful comparisons with in situ measurements in different environments over a full annual cycle. Under clear sky conditions, the quality of our microwave neural network retrieval is equivalent to the infrared International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project products, for most in situ stations, with errors ˜3 K as compared to in situ measurements. The performance of the microwave algorithm is similar under clear and cloudy conditions, confirming the potential of the microwaves under clouds. The Ts accuracy does not depend upon the surface emissivity, as the variability of this parameter is accounted for in the processing. Our microwave Ts have been calculated for more than 15 years (1993 to mid-2008). These "all weather" Ts are a very valuable complement to the IR-derived Ts, for use in atmospheric and surface models.

  3. Microwave-assisted synthesis, characterization and biological activities of organotin (IV) complexes with some thio Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ran Vir; Chaudhary, Pratibha; Chauhan, Shikha; Swami, Monika

    2009-03-01

    Microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of the organotin (IV) complexes are reported. Trigonal bipyramidal and octahedral complexes of tin (IV) have been synthesized by the reaction of dimethyltin (IV) dichloride with 4-nitrobenzanilide- S-benzyldithiocarbazate (L 1H), 4-chlorobenzanilide- S-benzyldithiocarbazate (L 2H), 4-nitrobenzanilidebenzothiazoline (L 3H) and 4-chlorobenzanilidebenzothiazoline (L 4H). The complexes so formed were characterized by elemental analysis, conductance measurements, molecular weight determinations and spectral data viz. IR, UV-Visible, 1H and 13C NMR. The anti-microbial activities of the ligands and their corresponding organotin (IV) complexes have been screened against various strains of bacteria and fungi. Antifertility activity against male albino rats has also been reported.

  4. GROMOS-C, a novel ground based microwave radiometer for ozone measurement campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, S.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-03-01

    Stratospheric ozone is of major interest as it absorbs most of harmful UV radiation from the sun, allowing life on Earth. Ground based microwave remote sensing is the only method that allows to measure ozone profiles up to the mesopause, 24 h and under different weather conditions with high time resolution. In this paper a novel ground based microwave radiometer is presented. It is called GROMOS-C (GRound based Ozone MOnitoring System for Campaigns), and it has been designed to measure the vertical profile of ozone distribution in the middle atmosphere, by observing ozone emission spectra at a frequency of 110.836 GHz. The instrument is designed in a compact way which makes it transportable and suitable for outdoor use in campaigns, an advantageous feature that is lacking in present day ozone radiometers. It is operated through remote control. GROMOS-C is a total power radiometer which uses a preamplified heterodyne receiver, and a digital Fast Fourier Transform spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Among its main new features stands out the incorporation of different calibration loads, including a noise diode and a new type of blackbody target specifically designed for this instrument, based on Peltier elements. The calibration scheme does not depend on the use of liquid nitrogen, therefore GROMOS-C can be operated at remote places with no maintenance requirements. In addition the instrument can be switched in frequency to observe the CO line at 115 GHz. A description of the main characteristics of GROMOS-C is included in this paper, as well as the results of a first campaign at the High Altitude Research Station in Jungfraujoch (HFSJ), Switzerland. The validation is performed by comparison of the retrieved profiles against equivalent profiles from MLS satellite data, ECMWF model data, as well as our nearby NDACC ozone radiometer measuring at Bern.

  5. Development of High Power Electron Beam Measuring and Analyzing System for Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, C. J.; Wu, X. L.; Li, Q. S.; Li, C. S.

    The measurement and analysis of high power electron beam during its formation and transmission are the basic scientific problems and key techniques for the development of high performance microwave vacuum electron devices, which are widely used in the fields of military weapon, microwave system and scientific instruments. In this paper, the dynamic parameters measurement and analysis system being built in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) recently are introduced. The instrument are designed to determine the cross-section, the current density, and the energy resolution of the high power electron beam during its formation and transmission process, which are available both for the electron gun and the electron optics system respectively. Then the three dimension trajectory images of the electron beam can be rebuilt and display with computer controlled data acquisition and processing system easily. Thus, much more complicated structures are considered and solved completely to achieve its detection and analysis, such as big chamber with 10-6 Pa high vacuum system, the controlled detector movement system in axis direction with distance of 600 mm inside the vacuum chamber, the electron beam energy analysis system with high resolution of 0.5%, and the electron beam cross-section and density detector using the YAG: Ce crystal and CCD imaging system et al. At present, the key parts of the instrument have been finished, the cross-section experiment of the electron beam have been performed successfully. Hereafter, the instrument will be used to measure and analyze the electron beam with the electron gun and electron optics system for the single beam and multiple beam klystron, gyrotron, sheet beam device, and traveling wave tube etc. thoroughly.

  6. Laboratory measurements of microwave and millimeter-wave properties of planetary constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate data on microwave and millimeter-wave properties of potential planetary atmospheric constituents is critical for the proper interpretation of radio occultation measurements, and of radio astronomical observations of both continuum and spectral line emissions. Such data is also needed to correct for atmospheric effects on radar studies of surface reflectivity. Since the refractive and absorptive properties of atmospheric constituents often vary drastically from theoretically predicted profiles, especially under the extreme conditions characteristic of the planetary atmosphere, laboratory measurements under simulated planetary conditions are required. The instrumentation and techniques used for laboratory measurement of the refractivity and absorptivity of atmospheric constituents at wavelengths longward of 1 mm, under simulated planetary conditions (temperature, pressure, and broadening gases) are reviewed. Techniques for measuring both gases and condensates are considered. Also reviewed are the relative accuracies of the various techniques. Laboratory measurements are reviewed which have already been made, and additional measurements which are needed for interpretation of data from Venus and the outer planets, are highlighted.

  7. Laboratory measurements of microwave and millimeter-wave properties of planetary atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate data on microwave and millimeter-wave properties of potential planetary atmospheric constituents is critical for the proper interpretation of radio occultation measurements, and of radio astronomical observations of both continuum and spectral line emissions. Such data is also needed to correct for atmospheric effects on radar studies of surface reflectivity. Since the refractive and absorptive properties of atmospheric constituents often vary drastically from theoretically-predicted profiles, especially under the extreme conditions characteristic of the planetary atmosphere, laboratory measurements under simulated planetary conditions are required. This paper reviews the instrumentation and techniques used for laboratory measurement of the refractivity and absorptivity of atmospheric constituents at wavelengths longward of 1 mm, under simulated planetary conditions (temperature, pressure, and broadening gases). Techniques for measuring both gases and condensates are considered. Also reviewed are the relative accuracies of the various techniques. Laboratory measurements are reviewed which have already been made, and additional measurements which are needed for interpretation of data from Venus and the outer planets, are highlighted.

  8. Discrepancies Between MODIS and ISCCP Land Surface Temperature Products Analyzed with Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moncet, Jean-Luc; Liang, Pan; Lipton, Alan E.; Galantowicz, John F.; Prigent, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares land surface temperature (LST) products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). With both sources, the LST data are derived from infrared measurements. For ISCCP, LST is a secondary product in support of the primary cloud analyses, but the LST data have been used for several other purposes. The MODIS measurements from the Aqua spacecraft are taken at about 01:30 and 13:30 local time, and the ISCCP three-hourly data, based on several geostationary and polar orbiting satellites. were interpolated to the MODIS measurement times. For July 2003 monthly averages over all clear-sky locations, the ISCCP-MODIS differences were +5.0 K and +2.5 K for day and night, respectively, and there were areas with differences as large as 25 K. The day-night differences were as much as approximately 10 K higher for ISCCP than for MODIS. The MODIS measurements were more consistent with independent microwave measurements from AMSR-E, by several measures, with respect to day-night differences and day-to-day variations.

  9. Mechanism of Enhanced Electrochemical Oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid with in situ Microwave Activated Boron-doped Diamond and Platinum Anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junxia; Zhao, Guohua; Liu, Meichuan; Li, Dongming

    2009-09-01

    Remarkable enhancement in degradation effect is achieved at in situ activated boron-doped diamond (BDD) and Pt anodes with different extent through electrochemical oxidation (EC) of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with microwave (MW) radiation in a flow system. Results show that when EC is activated with MW radiation, the complete mineralization time of 2,4-D at the BDD is reduced quickly from 10 to 4 h while Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal at Pt is increased from 37.7 to 58.3% at 10 h; the initial current efficiency is both improved about 1.5 times while the pseudo-first-order rate constant is increased by 153 and 119% at the BDD and Pt, respectively. To gain insight into the higher efficiency in microwave activated EC, the mechanism has therefore been systematically evaluated from the essence of electrochemical reaction and the accumulated hydroxyl radical concentration. 2,4-Dichlorophenol, catechol, benquinone, and maleic and oxalic acids are the main intermediates on the Pt anode measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while the intermediates on the BDD electrode include 2,4-dichlorophenol, hydroquinone, and maleic and oxalic acids. The reaction pathway with microwave radiation is the same as that in a conventional electrochemical oxidation on both electrodes. While less and lower aromatic intermediates produce at the BDD with MW, which suggests the higher ring-open ratio and the faster oxidation of carboxylic acids. With microwave radiation, the ring-open ratio at the BDD is increased to 98.8% from 85.6%; the value at Pt is increased to 67.3% from 35.9%. So microwave radiation can activate the electrochemical oxidation, which leads to the higher efficiency. This promotion is mainly due to the higher accumulated hydroxyl radical concentration and the effects by microwave radiation. All the results prove that the BDD electrode presents much better mineralization performance with MW. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first

  10. Multichannel Microwave Interferometer for Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Density and its Fluctuation on HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peiwan; Shi, Zhongbing; Chen, Wei; Zhong, Wulyu; Yang, Zengchen; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Boyu; Li, Yonggao; Yu, Liming; Liu, Zetian; Ding, Xuantong

    2016-07-01

    A multichannel microwave interferometer system has been developed on the HL-2A tokomak. Its working frequency is well designed to avoid the fringe jump effect. Taking the structure of HL-2A into account, its antennas are installed in the horizontal direction, i.e. one launcher in high field side (HFS) and four receivers in low field side (LFS). The fan-shaped measurement area covers those regions where the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities are active. The heterodyne technique contributes to its high temporal resolution (1 μs). It is possible for the multichannel system to realize simultaneous measurements of density and its fluctuation. The quadrature phase detection based on the zero-crossing method is introduced to density measurement. With this system, reliable line-averaged densities and density profiles are obtained. The location of the saturated internal kink mode can be figured out from the mode showing different intensities on four channels, and the result agrees well with that measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI). supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB104002, 2013GB107002, 2014GB107001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475058, 11475057, 11261140326, 11405049)

  11. On the sensitivity of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager channels to overland rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yalei; Liu, Guosheng; Wang, Yu; Cao, Jie

    2011-06-01

    The response of brightness temperatures at different microwave frequencies to overland precipitation is investigated by using the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and Microwave Imager (TMI) data. The Spearman correlation coefficients between observations at TMI channels or channel combinations and PR-measured near-surface rain are computed using 3 years of TRMM data. The results showed that the brightness temperature combinations from 19 and 37 GHz, that is, V19-V37 (the letter V denotes vertical polarization, and the numbers denote frequency in GHz) or V21-V37, can explain ˜10% more variance of near-surface rainfall rate than can the V85 brightness temperature. Also, the global distribution of the above correlation revealed that over almost all of the tropical land area covered by TRMM satellite, the V19-V37 channel has a closer response to the overland rainfall than does the V85 channel. This result is somewhat counterintuitive, because it has been long believed that the dominant signature of overland rainfall is the brightness temperature depression caused by ice scattering at high microwave frequencies (e.g., 85 GHz). To understand the underlying physics of this better low-frequency response, data analysis and radiative transfer modeling have been conducted to assess the influence on brightness temperatures from clouds with different ice and liquid water partitions. The results showed that under the condition of low frozen water and medium liquid water in the atmospheric column, the signal from the V19-V37 channel responded better to rainfall rate than did the one from the V85 channel. A plausible explanation to this result is that in addition to ice scattering signature, the V19-V37 channel contains liquid water information as well, which is more directly related to surface rain than to ice water aloft. At heavy rainfall conditions, the V19-V37, V37, and V85 channels all are correlated with near-surface rain reasonably well

  12. Modeling and measurement of microwave emission and backscattering from bare soil surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, S.; Wegmuller, U.

    1992-01-01

    A multifrequency ground-based radiometer-scatterometer system working at frequencies between 3.0 GHz and 11.0 GHz has been used to study the effect of soil moisture and roughness on microwave emission and backscattering. The freezing and thawing effect of the soil surface and the changes of the surface roughness due to rain and erosion are reported. To analyze the combined active and passive data, a scattering model based on physical optics approximation for the low frequency and geometrical optics approximation for high frequency has been developed. The model is used to calculate the bistatic scattering coefficients from the surface. By considering the conservation of energy, the result has been integrated over a hemisphere above the surface to calculate the emissivity. The backscattering and emission model has been coupled with the observed data in order to extract soil moisture and surface roughness.

  13. Microwave hydrothermal synthesis of AgInS{sub 2} with visible light photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Danzhen; Chen, Zhixin; Sun, Meng; Li, Wenjuan; Lin, Qiang; Fu, Xianzhi

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} AgInS{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized by a microwave hydrothermal method. {yields} This method involves no organic solvents, catalysts, or surfactants. {yields} AgInS{sub 2} showed higher activity for photocatalytic degradation MO than TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}. {yields} Holes, O{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} played an important role in the photocatalytic process. -- Abstract: AgInS{sub 2} nanoparticles with superior visible light photocatalytic activity were successfully synthesized by a microwave hydrothermal method. This method is a highly efficient and rapid route that involves no organic solvents, catalysts, or surfactants. The photocatalytic activity of AgInS{sub 2} nanoparticles was investigated through the degradation of dyes under visible light irradiation. Compared with TiO{sub 2-x}N{sub x}, AgInS{sub 2} has exhibited a superior activity for photocatalytic degradation MO under the same condition. The experiment results showed that superoxide radicals (O{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}), hydrogen peroxides (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and holes (h{sup +}) were the mainly active species for the degradation of organic pollutants over AgInS{sub 2}. Through the determination of flat band potential, the energy band structure of the sample was obtained. A possible mechanism for the degradation of organic pollutant over AgInS{sub 2} was proposed.

  14. Cosmic microwave background dipole spectrum measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Isaacman, R. B.; Mather, J. C.; Meyer, S. S.; Noerdlinger, P. D.; Shafer, R. A.; Weiss, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) has determined the dipole spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) from 2 to 20/cm. For each frequency the signal is decomposed by fitting to a monopole, a dipole, and a Galactic template for approximately 60% of the sky. The overall dipole spectrum fits the derivative of a Planck function with an amplitude of 3.343 +/- 0.016 mK (95% confidence level), a temperature of 2.714 +/- 0.022 K (95% confidence level), and an rms deviation of 6 x 10(exp -9) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm limited by a detector and cosmic-ray noise. The monopole temperature is consistent with that determined by direct measurement in the accompanying article by Mather et al.

  15. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background spectrum by the COBE FIRAS instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Fixsen, D. J.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Jensen, K. A.; Meyer, S. S.; Noerdlinger, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) has a blackbody spectrum within 3.4 x 10(exp -8) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm over the frequency range from 2 to 20/cm (5-0.5 mm). These measurements, derived from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotomer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, imply stringent limits on energy release in the early universe after t approximately 1 year and redshift z approximately 3 x 10(exp 6). The deviations are less than 0.30% of the peak brightness, with an rms value of 0.01%, and the dimensionless cosmological distortion parameters are limited to the absolute value of y is less than 2.5 x 10(exp -5) and the absolute value of mu is less than 3.3 x 10(exp -4) (95% confidence level). The temperature of the CMBR is 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (95% confidence level systematic).

  16. A Tutorial on Basic Principles of Microwave Reflectometry Applied to Fluctuation Measurements in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.; Kramer, G.J.; Valeo, E.

    2001-02-16

    Microwave reflectometry is now routinely used for probing the structure of magnetohydrodynamic and turbulent fluctuations in fusion plasmas. Conditions specific to the core of tokamak plasmas, such as small amplitude of density irregularities and the uniformity of the background plasma, have enabled progress in the quantitative interpretation of reflectometer signals. In particular, the extent of applicability of the 1-D [one-dimensional] geometric optics description of the reflected field is investigated by direct comparison to 1-D full wave analysis. Significant advances in laboratory experiments are discussed which are paving the way towards a thorough understanding of this important measurement technique. Data is presented from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [R. Hawryluk, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion 33 (1991) 1509] identifying the validity of the geometric optics description of the scattered field and demonstrating the feasibility of imaging turbulent fluctuations in fusion scale devices.

  17. Influence of the dielectric surrounding of plasma on the electron density measurement by microwave interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrasch, M.; Ehlbeck, J.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2014-07-01

    Using a vector network analyzer a frequency resolved microwave interferometer is built up in the range of 42.5-50 GHz. Due to the frequency resolved measurement technique it is possible to investigate the influence of the surrounding dielectric material on the transmission. The experiments are performed on a fluorescent lamp, which is enclosed by a glass tube. Furthermore, a dielectric resonator is built up by two plane silica windows, placed perpendicular to the beam. It was found that the influence can be described by a one-dimensional model using equivalent circuits, which is in very good agreement with experimental results. In addition, the common technique of rotating the windows to reduce their influence is investigated.

  18. Measurement of density fluctuations in the PDX tokamak using microwave scattering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.

    1984-01-01

    Density fluctuations in the PDX tokamak were analyzed with the scattering of 2 mm microwaves. The primary focus of the study was the low frequency (measured and their variation with toroidal field, neutral beam heating power, plasma current, position, and confinement regime in PDX was documented.

  19. The Split Window Microwave Radiometer (SWMR) for hurricane wind speed measurement from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Calvin T.; Black, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    The monitoring of hurricanes demands considerable resources each year by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Even with the extensive use of satellite and airborne probing of those storms, there is still much uncertainty involved in predicting landfall for timely evacuation of people subject to the threat. The concept of the Split Window Microwave Radiometer (SWMR) is to add an additional capability of remotely measuring surface winds to hopefully improve prediction capabilities or at least define the severity of the storm while it is far from land. Some of the present science and observational needs are addressed in this report as are remote sensing limitations which impact the design of a minimal system which can be launched into low earth orbit by a low cost launch system. This study has concluded that wind speed and rain rate maps of hurricanes can be generated with an X-Band radiometer system with an antenna whose aperture is 2 m on a side.

  20. Spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature of the atmospheric-pressure microwave induced nitrogen plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microwave induced N2 plasma is diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy with respect to the plasma gas temperature. The spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature is discussed with respect to the spectral line broadening of Ar I and the various emission rotational-vibrational band systems of N2(B-A), N2(C-B) and \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}). It is found that the Boltzmann plot of the selective spectral lines from \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}) at 391.4 nm is preferable to others with an accuracy better than 5% for an atmospheric-pressure plasma of high gas temperature. On the basis of the thermal balance equation, the dependences of the plasma gas temperature on the absorbed power, the gas flow rate, and the gas composition are investigated experimentally with photographs recording the plasma morphology.

  1. The Effect of Sea-Surface Sun Glitter on Microwave Radiometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A relatively simple model for the microwave brightness temperature of sea surface Sun glitter is presented. The model is an accurate closeform approximation for the fourfold Sun glitter integral. The model computations indicate that Sun glitter contamination of on orbit radiometer measurements is appreciable over a large swath area. For winds near 20 m/s, Sun glitter affects the retrieval of environmental parameters for Sun angles as large as 20 to 25 deg. The model predicted biases in retrieved wind speed and sea surface temperature due to neglecting Sun glitter are consistent with those experimentally observed in SEASAT SMMR retrievals. A least squares retrieval algorithm that uses a combined sea and Sun model function shows the potential of retrieving accurate environmental parameters in the presence of Sun glitter so long as the Sun angles and wind speed are above 5 deg and 2 m/s, respectively.

  2. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  3. A 145-GHz interferometer for measuring the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doriese, William Bertrand

    This thesis presents the design, construction, testing, and preliminary data analysis of MINT, the Millimeter INTerferometer. MINT is a 145-GHz, four-element interferometer designed to measure the anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at spherical harmonics of ℓ = 800 to 1900. In this region of ℓ-space, the CMB angular power spectrum should exhibit an exponential damping due to a pair of effects related to the finite thickness of the last-scattering surface: photon diffusion and line-of-sight projection. Measurements in this region have already been made at 31 GHz by the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI). MINT's goal is to complement CBI by extending these results to a higher frequency that is much less prone to extra-galactic point-source contamination. MINT's mission is also complementary to that of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) satellite. MINT observed the CMB in November and December, 2001, from an altitude of 17,000 feet in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. We describe the performance of the instrument during the observing campaign. Based on radiometric hot/cold-load tests, the SIS-mixer-based receivers are found to have an average receiver noise temperature (double sideband) of 39 K in a 2-GHz IF bandwidth. The typical atmosphere contribution is 5 K. We assess the phase stability, gain stability, pointing accuracy, and overall sensitivity of the interferometer via observations of Mars and Jupiter, and find that the instrument is sufficiently stable to allow an ultimate experimental sensitivity at the few-μK level needed for detection of the CMB anisotropy.

  4. Satellite passive microwave rain rate measurement over croplands during spring, summer and fall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Rain-rate algorithms for spring, summer and fall that have been developed from comparisons between the brightness temperatures measured by the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and rain rates derived from operational WSR-57 radars over land are described. Data were utilized from a total of 25 SMMR passes and 234 radars, resulting in about 12,000 observations of about 1600 sq/km areas. Multiple correlation coefficients of 0.63, 0.80 and 0.75 are achieved for the spring, summer and fall algorithms, respectively. Most of this information is in the form of multifrequency contrast in brightness temperature, which is interpreted as a measurement of the degree to which the land-emitted radiation is attenuated by the rain systems. The SMMR 37-GHz channel has more information on rain rate than any other channel. By combining the lower frequency channels with the 37-GHz observations, variations in land and precipitation thermometric temperatures can be removed, leaving rain attenuation as the major effect on brightness temperature. Polarization screening at 37 GHz is found to be sufficient to screen out cases of wet ground, which is only important when the ground is relatively vegetation free. Heavy rain cases are found to be significant part of the algorithms' success, because of the strong microwve signatures (low-brightness temperatures) that result from the presence of precipitation-sized ice in the upper portions of heavily precipitating storms. If IR data are combined with the summer microwave data, an improved (0.85) correlation with radar rain rates is achieved.

  5. Determination of the Structure of the Coronal Magnetic Field Using Microwave Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogod, V. M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the oscillatory motions and wave processes in active regions requires knowledge of the structure of the magnetic fields in the chromosphere and corona. We study the magnetic field structure of active regions at coronal heights, as they are determined by means of multiwave observations of polarized radio emission of active regions in the microwave range. Two methods, a stereoscopic method and the analysis of the radio spectrum are used. The method of stereoscopy rotation allows estimating the height of radio sources in a stable active region relative to the photosphere, based on its apparent motion in the image plane recorded over several days of observation. At various times one-dimensional scans at multiple frequencies spanning the 5.98 - 15.95 GHz frequency range from the RATAN-600 instrument are used. The gyroresonance emission mechanism, which is sensitive to the coronal magnetic field strength, is applied to convert the radio source estimated heights at various frequencies, h(f), to information as regards magnetic field vs. height, B(h). Diagrams of longitude - height of some polarized radio sources revealed multiple reversals, suggestive of a spiral magnetic structure. In all cases, the magnetic field strength maintains high values (800 - 1000 G) at the highest altitudes analysed, which reflects a relatively weak divergence in the field of magnetic flux tubes (in the height range 8 - 14 Mm) responsible for the main part of the radio emission of active regions.

  6. Laboratory measurements of microwave absorption from gaseous atmospheric constituents under conditions for the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1986-01-01

    Quite often the interpretive work on the microwave and millimeter-wave absorption profiles, which are inferred from radio occultation measurements or radio astronomical observations of the outer planets, employs theoretically-derived absorption coefficients to account for contributions to the observed opacity from gaseous constituents. Variations of the actual absorption coefficients from those which are theoretically derived, especially under the environmental conditions characteristic of the outer planets, can result in significant errors in the inferred abundances of the absorbing constituents. The recognition of the need to make laboratory measurements of the absorptivity of gases such as NH3, CH4, and H2O in a predominantly H2 atmosphere, under temperature and pressure conditions simulating the outer planets' atmospheres, and at wavelengths corresponding to both radio occultation and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility capable of making such measurements at Georgia Tech. The laboratory measurement system, the measurement techniques, and the proposed experimental regimen for Winter 1985 are described.

  7. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1.47 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus_minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus_minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus_minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus_minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  8. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1. 47 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  9. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Beam Measurements and the Microwave Brightness Temperatures of Uranus and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselfield, Matthew; Moodley, Kavilan; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gallardo, Patricio; Gralla, Megan B.; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hincks, Adam D.; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Niemack, Michael D.; Nolta, Michael R.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jon; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Switzer, Eric R.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the measurement of the beam profiles and window functions for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which operated from 2007 to 2010 with kilopixel bolometer arrays centered at 148, 218, and 277 GHz. Maps of Saturn are used to measure the beam shape in each array and for each season of observations. Radial profiles are transformed to Fourier space in a way that preserves the spatial correlations in the beam uncertainty to derive window functions relevant for angular power spectrum analysis. Several corrections are applied to the resulting beam transforms, including an empirical correction measured from the final cosmic microwave background (CMB) survey maps to account for the effects of mild pointing variation and alignment errors. Observations of Uranus made regularly throughout each observing season are used to measure the effects of atmospheric opacity and to monitor deviations in telescope focus over the season. Using the WMAP-based calibration of the ACT maps to the CMB blackbody, we obtain precise measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Uranus and Saturn disks at effective frequencies of 149 and 219 GHz. For Uranus we obtain thermodynamic brightness temperatures T(149/U) = 106.7 +/- 2.2 K and T(219/U) = 100.1 +/- 3.1 K. For Saturn, we model the effects of the ring opacity and emission using a simple model and obtain resulting (unobscured) disk temperatures of T(149/S) = 137.3 +/- 3.2 K and T(219/S) = 137.3 +/- 4.7 K.

  10. Measuring Substantial Reductions in Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Charles; Evans, Meredyth; Jason, Leonard A.; So, Suzanna; Brown, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The case definitions for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) each include a disability criterion requiring substantial reductions in activity in order to meet diagnostic criteria. Difficulties have been encountered in defining and operationalizing the substantial reduction disability criterion within these various illness definitions. The present study sought to relate measures of past and current activities in several domains including the SF-36, an objective measure of activity (e.g. actigraphy), a self-reported quality of life scale, and measures of symptom severity. Results of the study revealed that current work activities had the highest number of significant associations with domains such as the SF-36 subscales, actigraphy, and symptom scores. As an example, higher self-reported levels of current work activity were associated with better health. This suggests that current work related activities may provide a useful domain for helping operationalize the construct of substantial reductions in activity. PMID:25584524

  11. Microwave assisted synthesis, antifungal activity, and DFT study of some novel triazolinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na-Bo; Jin, Jian-Zhong; He, Fang-Yue

    2015-01-01

    A series of some novel 1,2,4-triazol-5(4H)-one derivatives were designed and synthesized under microwave irradiation via multistep reaction. The structures of 1,2,4-triazoles were confirmed by (1)H NMR, MS, FTIR, and elemental analysis. The antifungal activities of 1,2,4-triazoles were determined. The antifungal activity results indicated that the compounds 5c, 5f, and 5h exhibited good activity against Pythium ultimum, and the compounds 5b and 5c displayed good activity against Corynespora cassiicola. Theoretical calculation of the compound 5c was carried out with B3LYP/6-31G (d). The full geometry optimization was carried out using 6-31G(d) basis set, and the frontier orbital energy and electrostatic potential were discussed, and the structure-activity relationship was also studied. PMID:25861651

  12. Nanomechanical motion measured with an imprecision below the standard quantum limit using a nearly shot-noise limited microwave interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Jennifer; Teufel, John; Donner, Tobias; Castellanos-Beltran, Manuel; Lehnert, Konrad

    2010-03-01

    Observing quantum behavior of mechanical motion is challenging because it is difficult both to prepare pure quantum states of motion and to detect those states with sufficient precision. We present displacement measurements of a nanomechanical oscillator with an imprecision below that at the standard quantum limit [1]. We infer the motion from the phase modulation imprinted on a microwave signal by that motion. The modulation is enhanced by embedding the oscillator in a high-Q microwave cavity. We achieve the low imprecision by reading out the modulation with a Josephson Parametric Amplifier, realizing a microwave interferometer that operates near the shot-noise limit. The apparent motion of the mechanical oscillator due the interferometer's noise is now substantially less than its zero-point motion, making future detection of quantum states feasible. In addition, the phase sensitivity of the demonstrated interferometer is 30 times higher than previous microwave interferometers, providing a critical piece of technology for many experiments investigating quantum information encoded in microwave fields. [1] J. D. Teufel, T. Donner, M. A. Castellanos-Beltran, J. W. Harlow, K. W. Lehnert, Nature Nanotechnology, doi:10.1038/nnano.2009.343, (2009).

  13. Comparison of ClO measurements by airborne and spaceborne microwave radiometers in the Arctic winter stratosphere 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Crewell, S.; Fabian, R.; Kuenzi, K.

    1995-06-15

    In February 1993 measurements of chlorine monoxide ClO, one of the key substances in catalytic ozone destruction, were performed over Scandinavia by two microwave receivers, the Submillimeter Atmospheric Sounder (SUMAS) on board the German research aircraft FALCON and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS). High ClO concentrations (>1 ppb) inside the polar vortex at approximately 20km altitude were detected by both experiments. A comparison shows good agreement of both sensors in the location of enhanced ClO. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Patch Antenna for Measuring the Internal Temperature of Biological Objects Using the Near-Field Microwave Radiometric Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubaichin, A.; Bespalko, A.; Filatov, A.; Alexeev, E.; Zhuk, G.

    2016-01-01

    The near-field microwave antenna with central frequency of 2.23 GHz has been designed and manufactured to be used as a part of the medical microwave radiometric system. Experimental studies of the reflection coefficient in different parts of the human body were conducted using the developed antenna. The experimental studies were carried out in a group of volunteers with normal somatic growth. The results of the experiments were used to perform the analysis of the potential errors in the measurements obtained via the developed antenna.

  15. A measurement by BOOMERANG of multiple peaks in the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netterfield, C. B.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; Coble, K.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Bernardis, P. de; Farese, P.; Ganga, K.; Giacometti, M.; Hivon, E.; Hristov, V. V.; Iacoangeli, A.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Lange, A. E.; Martinis, L.; Masi, S.; Mason, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Montroy, T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background from l = 75 to l = 1025 (10' to 5 degrees) from a combined analysis of four 150 GHz channels in the BOOMERANG experiment. The spectrum contains multiple peaks and minima, as predicted by standard adiabatic-inflationary models in which the primordial plasma undergoes acoustic oscillations.

  16. Development, Test, and Evaluation of Microwave Radar Water Level (MWWL) Sensors' Wave Measurement Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, S. K.; Heitsenrether, R.

    2015-12-01

    Waves can have a significant impact on many coastal operations including navigational safety, recreation, and even the economy. Despite this, as of 2009, there were only 181 in situ real-time wave observation networks nationwide (IOOS 2009). There has recently been interest in adding real-time wave measurement systems to already existing NOAA Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) stations. Several steps have already been taken in order to achieve this, such as integrating information from existing wave measurement buoys and initial testing of multiple different wave measurement systems (Heitsenrether et al. 2012). Since wave observations can be derived from high frequency water level changes, we will investigate water level sensors' capability to measure waves. Recently, CO-OPS has been transitioning to new microwave radar water level (MWWL) sensors which have higher resolution and theoretically a greater potential wave measurement capability than the acoustic sensors in stilling wells. In this study, we analyze the wave measurement capability of MWWL sensors at two high energy wave environments, Duck, NC and La Jolla, CA, and compare results to two "reference" sensors (A Nortek acoustic waves and currents profiler (AWAC) at Duck and a single point pressure sensor at La Jolla). A summary of results from the two field test sites will be presented, including comparisons of wave energy spectra, significant wave height, and peak period measured by the test MWWL sensors and both reference AWAC and pressure sensors. In addition, relationships between MWWL versus reference wave sensor differences and specific wave conditions will be discussed. Initial results from spectral analysis and the calculation of bulk wave parameters indicate that MWWL sensors set to the "NoFilter" processing setting can produce wave measurements capability that compare well to the two reference sensors. These results support continued development to enable the

  17. Electron Density Measurements on LTX Using Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Peebles, W. A.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Schmitt, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic evolution of the electron density profile is tracked using microwave and millimeter-wave diagnostics on LTX. The 296 GHz (λ =1 mm) interferometer provides a radial line density measurement at the midplane, while an FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer (13.5 -33 GHz, or O-mode 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3) provides density profile measurements for the low-field side. Data taken during FY2015 will be compared with measurements from Thomson scattering and estimates of the plasma position from LRDFIT. Measurements of density fluctuations due to low-frequency (<100 kHz) MHD instabilities will also be shown. Future plans include the installation of a correlation reflectomter (Ka-band, 27-40 GHz) with dual tuneable sources and a frequency bandwidth of up to 5 MHz. This system will utilize the same antennas as the profile reflectometer to provide radial and/or toroidal/poloidal correlations. Further diagnostic details will be presented at the meeting. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Investigation of a microwave differential cavity resonator device for the measurement of humidity in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouleau, J. F.; Goyette, J.; Bose, T. K.; Fréchette, M. F.

    1999-09-01

    A resonant cavity based microwave differential device has been developed as a sensor for the measurement of small quantities of water vapor in gases. The presence of a contaminant is assessed by induced variations in the relative permittivity due to a shift in the resonant frequency of the measuring resonator. The measured output signal is related to the difference in the reflection coefficients of the measuring resonator and the reference one. A simple modeling approach of the system shows the proportionality between the difference of the reflection coefficients of the cavities and the variation in the dielectric constant. The evaluation of the minimum detectable change in the permittivity is possible using the Clausius-Mossotti equation for a binary gas mixture at a given concentration and pressure. The detection threshold is then determined by taking into account the signal-to-noise ratio of the differential setup. The estimation of the limit of detection for some practical moisture contaminated gases yields values in the low ppm level at T=293 K and atmospheric pressure. Experimental data suggest a detection threshold of 6 ppm for moisture.

  19. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

  20. Study of the magnetite to maghemite transition using microwave permittivity and permeability measurements.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Jerome Alexander; Bugler, Keith; Taylor, Stuart; Morgan, David; Williams, Paul; Bauer, Johann; Porch, Adrian

    2016-03-16

    The microwave cavity perturbation (MCP) technique is used to identify the transition from magnetite (Fe3O4) to the meta-stable form of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). In this study Fe3O4 was annealed at temperatures from 60 to 300 °C to vary the oxidation. Subsequent to annealing, the complex permittivity and magnetic permeability of the iron oxide powders were measured. The transition to γ-Fe2O3 was corroborated with x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). XRD, XPS and VSM implied that the starting powder was consistent with Fe3O4 and the powders annealed at more than 200 °C were transitioning to γ-Fe2O3. The MCP measurements gave large differences in both complex permittivity and magnetic permeability of the two phases in the frequency range of 2.5-10.2 GHz. Magnetic permeability decreased with annealing temperature, though magnetic losses showed frequency dependent behaviour. Complex permittivity measurements showed a large decrease in both dielectric constant and losses at all measurement frequencies, as well as a prominent loss peak centred around the phase transition temperatures. We interpret the loss peak as being a consequence of field effects due to an intermediate multi-phase mixture. Additionally, almost no frequency dependence was observed. The reduction in complex permittivity implies that the Feoct(2+) cations in the lattice provide a significant contribution to polarization at microwave frequencies and the effects of Feoct(3+) are nominal in comparison.. The change in loss can be explained as a combination of the differences in the effective conductivity of the two phases (i.e. Fe3O4 exhibits electron-hopping conduction whereas the presence of vacancies in γ-Fe2O3 nullifies this). This shows that the non-invasive MCP measurements serve as a highly sensitive and versatile method for looking at this phase transition in iron and potentially the effects of oxidation states on the polarization

  1. Passive Microwave Measurements Over Conifer Forests at L-Band and C-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Chauhan, N.; Kim, E.; Bidwell, S.; Goodberlet, M.; Haken, M.; deMatthaeis, P.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been made at L-band and C-band over conifer forests in Virginia to study the response of passive microwave instruments to biomass and soil moisture. A series of aircraft measurements were made in July, August and November, 1999 over relatively homogenous conifer forests of varying biomass. Three radiometers participated in these measurements. These were: 1) the L-band radiometer ESTAR, a horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer which has been used extensively in past measurements of soil moisture; 2) the L-band radiometer SLFMR, a vertically polarized cross-track scanner which has been used successfully in the past for mapping sea surface salinity; and 3) The ACMR, a new C-band radiometer which operates at V- and H-polarization and in the configuration for these experiments did not scan. All three radiometers were flown on the NASA P-3 aircraft based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The ESTAR and SLFMR were mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and imaged across track whereas the ACMR was mounted to look aft at 54 degrees up from nadir. Data was collected at altitudes of 915 meters and 457 meters. The forests consisted of relatively homogeneous "managed" stands of conifer located near Waverly, Virginia. This is a relatively flat area about 30 miles southeast of Richmond, VA with numerous stands of trees being grown for the forestry industry. The stands selected for study consisted of areas of regrowth and mature stands of pine. In addition, a small stand of very large trees was observed. Soil moisture sampling was done in each stand during the aircraft over flights. Data was collected on July 7, August 27, November 15 and November 30, 1999. Measurements were made with ESTAR on all days. The ACMR flew on the summer missions and the SLFMR was present only on the August 27 flight. Soil moisture varied from quite dry on July 7 to quite moist on November 30 (which was shortly after a period of rain). The microwave

  2. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background using BEAST for the determination of cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, Jeffery Dale

    The Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) is a millimeter wavelength experiment designed to generate maps of fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The telescope is composed of an off-axis Gregorian optical system with a 2.2 meter primary that focuses the collected microwave radiation onto an array of cryogenically cooled high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) receivers. This array is composed of six corrugated scalar feed horns in the Q band (38 to 45 GHz) and two more in the Ka band (26 to 36 GHz) with one of the six Q-band horns connected to an ortho-mode transducer for extraction of both polarizations incident on the single feed. The system has a minimum beam size of 20' with an average sensitivity of 900 m K [Special characters omitted.] per receiver. A map of the CMB centered on the north celestial pole has been generated from the BEAST telescope in a 9 ° wide annulus at declination 37° with a typical pixel error of 57 ± 5 m K when smoothed to 30' resolution. Cosmological parameter estimation of the power spectrum resulting from the map provides a measure of O k == 1- O total = -0.0= 74 ± .070, which is consistent with a flat universe. This paper describes the design and performance of the BEAST instrument and provides the details of subsystems developed and used toward the goal of generating a map of CMB fluctuations on 20' scales with sensitivity in l space between l ~100 and l ~500. A summary of the map and results generated by an observing campaign at the University of California White Mountain Research Station are also included.

  3. Thrust Stand Measurements of the Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. This type of pulsed thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Dis- charge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA), shown in Fig. 1, is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil before the main current pulse via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and a static magnetic field from a set of permanent magnets arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the theta-pinch coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil also serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) [1, 2]. In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to characterize the performance (specific impulse, thrust efficiency) of the MAD-IPA thruster. Impulse data are obtained at various pulse energies, mass flow rates and inductive coil geometries. Dependencies on these experimental parameters are discussed in the context of the current sheet formation and electromagnetic plasma

  4. Microwave Limb Sounder Measurements Depicting the Relationship Between Nitrous Oxide Levels and

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder measures nitrous oxide, which is unaffected by stratospheric chemical processes. By studying changes in its levels, scientists can better understand how air is moving around and how ozone is affected by that air motion, allowing them to differentiate those changes from the ones caused by chemical ozone destruction. In these cross-sections of nitrous oxide (top) and ozone (bottom) data from Aura, changes in the levels of these two chemicals at various temperatures and latitudes are depicted over time. The white contour shows the approximate location of the polar vortex boundary.

    The left panel data were collected on January 23, 2005, near the beginning of chemical ozone destruction this winter. Virtually all chemical loss occurred before March 10 (center panel). Ozone destruction extended throughout the polar vortex from about 15-20 kilometers (9-13 miles), but occurred only in the outer part of the vortex from 20-25 kilometers (13-16 miles). The differences between the two days are depicted in the right panel. The largest observed difference is about a 1.2 parts per million by volume decrease in ozone. Plots of nitrous oxide show a decrease in the region in the outer part of the vortex where most ozone loss occurs, indicating that air from above (where nitrous oxide is lower) has moved into this region. This downward motion brings higher ozone into the region where chemical loss is occurring, thus partially masking the effects of chemical loss. Calculations using Microwave Limb Sounder data to separate dynamical and chemical effects indicate maximum chemical ozone loss of approximately 2 parts per million by volume (approximately 60 percent) in the outer part of the vortex near 18-21 kilometers (11-13 miles), and approximately 1.5 parts per million by volume when averaged throughout the whole vortex region.

  5. Development of long-wave microwave satellite systems for measuring soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engman, Edwin T.

    1998-12-01

    The science need for remotely sensed soil moisture has been well established in the hydrologic, climate change and weather forecasting communities. There also have been a number of programs that have demonstrated the feasibility of using long wave microwave sensors for estimating soil moisture. These have ranged from truck mounted sensors, to intensive airborne campaigns with science objectives. Based on this history of truck and aircraft experiments, the science community has settled on a soil moisture product that meets the following criteria: a two day global repeat, a measured layer of 5 cm of soil, a footprint of 20 to 30 km, and an absolute accuracy of plus or minus 4% volumetric soil moisture. The principal sensor to accomplish this is an L-band passive microwave radiometer. A soil moisture mission is being proposed for the NASA Earth Systems Science Pathfinder (ESSP) mission which has very real constraints of a limited budget which includes the launch vehicle, and a three year award to launch time schedule. Within the past few years there have been a number of mission concepts proposed that meet the challenge of getting a very large antenna in space in order to realize a spatial resolution on the ground that meets the science and applications needs. This paper describes some of the alternative concepts considered to meet these unusual requirements and the ways to solve the very large antenna challenge, and the criteria used to choose the final design for an ESSP proposal. The paper also discusses the alternatives considered to obtain the necessary ancillary data for characterizing the surface roughness, the surface temperature and the attenuation affects of vegetation.

  6. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors.

    PubMed

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-02-16

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented.

  7. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  8. Accurate permittivity measurements for microwave imaging via ultra-wideband removal of spurious reflectors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of microwave imaging is becoming more prevalent for detection of interior hidden defects in manufactured and packaged materials. In applications for detection of hidden moisture, microwave tomography can be used to image the material and then perform an inverse calculation to derive an estim...

  9. Microwave Resonator Measurements of Atmospheric Absorption Coefficients: A Preliminary Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.; Spilker, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary design study examined the feasibility of using microwave resonator measurements to improve the accuracy of atmospheric absorption coefficients and refractivity between 18 and 35 GHz. Increased accuracies would improve the capability of water vapor radiometers to correct for radio signal delays caused by Earth's atmosphere. Calibration of delays incurred by radio signals traversing the atmosphere has applications to both deep space tracking and planetary radio science experiments. Currently, the Cassini gravity wave search requires 0.8-1.0% absorption coefficient accuracy. This study examined current atmospheric absorption models and estimated that current model accuracy ranges from 5% to 7%. The refractivity of water vapor is known to 1% accuracy, while the refractivity of many dry gases (oxygen, nitrogen, etc.) are known to better than 0.1%. Improvements to the current generation of models will require that both the functional form and absolute absorption of the water vapor spectrum be calibrated and validated. Several laboratory techniques for measuring atmospheric absorption and refractivity were investigated, including absorption cells, single and multimode rectangular cavity resonators, and Fabry-Perot resonators. Semi-confocal Fabry-Perot resonators were shown to provide the most cost-effective and accurate method of measuring atmospheric gas refractivity. The need for accurate environmental measurement and control was also addressed. A preliminary design for the environmental control and measurement system was developed to aid in identifying significant design issues. The analysis indicated that overall measurement accuracy will be limited by measurement errors and imprecise control of the gas sample's thermodynamic state, thermal expansion and vibration- induced deformation of the resonator structure, and electronic measurement error. The central problem is to identify systematic errors because random errors can be reduced by averaging

  10. Statistical Analysis of the Correlation between Microwave Emission Anomalies and Seismic Activity Based on AMSR-E Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    qin, kai; Wu, Lixin; De Santis, Angelo; Zhang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Pre-seismic thermal IR anomalies and ionosphere disturbances have been widely reported by using the Earth observation system (EOS). To investigate the possible physical mechanisms, a series of detecting experiments on rock loaded to fracturing were conducted. Some experiments studies have demonstrated that microwave radiation energy will increase under the loaded rock in specific frequency and the feature of radiation property can reflect the deformation process of rock fracture. This experimental result indicates the possibility that microwaves are emitted before earthquakes. Such microwaves signals are recently found to be detectable before some earthquake cases from the brightness temperature data obtained by the microwave-radiometer Advanced Microwave-Scanning Radiometer for the EOS (AMSR-E) aboard the satellite Aqua. This suggested that AMSR-E with vertical- and horizontal-polarization capability for six frequency bands (6.925, 10.65, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz) would be feasible to detect an earthquake which is associated with rock crash or plate slip. However, the statistical analysis of the correlation between satellite-observed microwave emission anomalies and seismic activity are firstly required. Here, we focus on the Kamchatka peninsula to carry out a statistical study, considering its high seismicity activity and the dense orbits covering of AMSR-E in high latitudes. 8-years (2003-2010) AMSR-E microwave brightness temperature data were used to reveal the spatio-temporal association between microwave emission anomalies and 17 earthquake events (M>5). Firstly, obvious spatial difference of microwave brightness temperatures between the seismic zone at the eastern side and the non-seismic zone the western side within the Kamchatka peninsula are found. Secondly, using both vertical- and horizontal-polarization to extract the temporal association, it is found that abnormal changes of microwave brightness temperatures appear generally 2 months before the

  11. MEASUREMENT OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRA FROM TWO YEARS OF BICEP DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H. C.; Barkats, D.; Bock, J. J.; Hristov, V. V.; Jones, W. C.; Kovac, J. M.; Lange, A. E.; Mason, P. V.; Matsumura, T.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battle, J. O.; Dowell, C. D.; Nguyen, H. T.; Bierman, E. M.; Keating, B. G.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.

    2010-03-10

    Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP) is a bolometric polarimeter designed to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. During three seasons of observing at the South Pole (2006 through 2008), BICEP mapped {approx}2% of the sky chosen to be uniquely clean of polarized foreground emission. Here, we present initial results derived from a subset of the data acquired during the first two years. We present maps of temperature, Stokes Q and U, E and B modes, and associated angular power spectra. We demonstrate that the polarization data are self-consistent by performing a series of jackknife tests. We study potential systematic errors in detail and show that they are sub-dominant to the statistical errors. We measure the E-mode angular power spectrum with high precision at 21 <= l <= 335, detecting for the first time the peak expected at l {approx} 140. The measured E-mode spectrum is consistent with expectations from a LAMBDACDM model, and the B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero. The tensor-to-scalar ratio derived from the B-mode spectrum is r = 0.02{sup +0.31}{sub -0.26}, or r < 0.72 at 95% confidence, the first meaningful constraint on the inflationary gravitational wave background to come directly from CMB B-mode polarization.

  12. A medium-scale measurement of the cosmic microwave background at 3.3 millimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinhold, Peter; Lubin, Philip

    1991-01-01

    A system has been developed for making measurements of spatial fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation, on an angular scale of 5 arcmin to a few degrees. The system consists of an off-axis Gregorian telescope with a nearly Gaussian response with FWHM adjustable from 20 to 50 arcmin, an SIS coherent receiver operating at 3.3 mm, and a pointing system capable of better than 1 arcmin rms stabilization. This paper reports on results from the system's first balloon flight in August 1988, and ground-based measurements made from the South Pole in December 1988. A portion of the South Pole data is used to place a 95-percent confidence level upper limit of Delta T/T less than 0.000035 for Gaussian sky fluctuations in the background radiation at 20-arcmin angular scale and a limit of Delta T/T less than 0.000033 on overall excess intrinsic sky noise. In addition, dust contamination in cosmic background radiation data is estimated using measurements of the Galaxy from this flight and a previous one, along with the IRAS 100-micron map. These anisotropy results give the most stringent limits on cold dark matter theories to date.

  13. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization lensing power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Linder, E; Leitch, E M; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-07-11

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ∼30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat+sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves. PMID:25062161

  14. Contact-free Measurement of Heart Rate Variability via a Microwave Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guohua; Yang, Fang; Tian, Yue; Jing, Xijing; Wang, Jianqi

    2009-01-01

    Measures of heart rate variability (HRV) are widely used to assess autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. HRV can be recorded via electrocardiography (ECG), which is both non-invasive and widely available. However, ECG needs three electrodes touching the body of the subjects, which makes them feel nervous and uncomfortable, thus potentially affecting the recording. Contact-free detection of the heartbeat via a microwave sensor constitutes another means of determining the timing of cardiac cycles by continuous monitoring of mechanical contraction of the heart. This technique can measure the heartbeat without any electrodes touching human body and penetrate the clothes at some distances, which in some instances may prove a practical basis for HRV analysis. Comparison of 5-minute recordings demonstrated that there were no significant differences in the temporal, frequency domains and in non-linear dynamic analysis of HRV measures derived from heartbeat and ECG, which suggested this technique may prove a practical alternative to ECG for HRV analysis. PMID:22303140

  15. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Srivastava, S.; Pandit, V. S. E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results.

  16. Calibration of a helical resonator for microwave dielectric and conductivity measurements of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K. J.; Castner, T. G.

    2001-03-01

    The helical resonator (HR) is a useful resonant structure for the measurement of the microwave conductivity and dielectric response, but must be calibrated to obtain absolute values of these quantities. This has been accomplished by the measurement of frequency shifts and Q changes of thin disk samples of the metals Cu, Al, and Au and high purity Si and the use of the formula for (f-f0)/f due to Bethe and Schwinger. The measurements were made at 293, 77, and 50 K for the HR modes n=1-7(124 MHz-1.44 GHz). The results demonstrate the largest uncertain in the calculated values of Δf/f result from the z-axis variation of the E and H fields because of the helix short leading to large uncertainties in the stored energy U. The large dielectric response of the metals with their large values of dielectric "constant" -(ωpτeff)2 larger than 104 allows neglect of the Ez component contribution to Δf/f. However, uncertainties in the value of the T-independent τeff in the skin depth regime require the absolute calibration with high purity Si with ɛ˜11.7 at T=77 K. The calibration is accurate to ±15%.

  17. Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing Power Spectrum with the POLARBEAR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A. E.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Linder, E.; Leitch, E. M.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Schanning, I.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Takakura, S.; Tomaru, T.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.; Polarbear Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ˜30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat +sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.

  18. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization lensing power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Linder, E; Leitch, E M; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-07-11

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ∼30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat+sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.

  19. Studies on space charge neutralization and emittance measurement of beam from microwave ion source.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anuraag; Goswami, A; Sing Babu, P; Srivastava, S; Pandit, V S

    2015-11-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source together with a beam transport system has been developed at VECC to study the problems related with the injection of high current beam into a compact cyclotron. This paper presents the results of beam profile measurement of high current proton beam at different degrees of space charge neutralisation with the introduction of neon gas in the beam line using a fine leak valve. The beam profiles have been measured at different pressures in the beam line by capturing the residual gas fluorescence using a CCD camera. It has been found that with space charge compensation at the present current level (∼5 mA at 75 keV), it is possible to reduce the beam spot size by ∼34%. We have measured the variation of beam profile as a function of the current in the solenoid magnet under the neutralised condition and used these data to estimate the rms emittance of the beam. Simulations performed using equivalent Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky beam envelope equations with space charge neutralization factor are also presented to interpret the experimental results. PMID:26628123

  20. Rough surface wavelength measurement through self mixing of Doppler microwave backscatter. [from ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A microwave backscatter technique is presented that has the ability to sense the dominant surface wavelength of a random rough surface. The purpose of this technique is to perform this measurement from an aircraft or spacecraft, wherein the horizontal velocity of the radar is an important parameter of the measurement system. Attention will be directed at water surface conditions for which a dominant wavelength can be defined, then the spatial variations of reflectivity will have a two dimensional spectrum that is sufficiently close to that of waves to be useful. The measurement concept is based on the relative motion between the water waves and a nadir looking radar, and the fact that while the instantaneous Doppler frequency at the receiver returned by any elementary group of scatterers on a water wave is monotonically changing, the difference in the Doppler frequency between any two scattering 'patches' stays approximately constant as these waves travel parallel to the major axis of an elliptical antenna footprint. The results of a theoretical analysis and a laboratory experiment with a continuous wave (CW) radar that encompasses several of the largest waves in the illuminated area show how the structure in the Doppler spectrum of the backscattered signal is related to the surface spectrum and its parameters in an especially direct and simple way when an incoherent envelope detector is the receiver.

  1. Carrier and Envelope Frequency Measurements for Supply-Modulated Microwave Power Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Scott R.

    Transmitters for high peak-to-average power ratio communication are increasingly using supply modulation to improve efficiency. In addition to a dc component, the dynamic supply may contain ac components up to 500MHz. The signal envelope dynamic impedance of the supply terminal of a power amplifier (PA) is often unknown and available nonlinear transistor models are unable to predict dynamic low frequency effects required for design of wideband efficient supply modulators. This thesis investigates envelope frequency effects on nonlinear behavior of microwave transistors and PAs under supply-modulated conditions. A measurement setup is created to characterize multi-frequency large-signal excitation of GaN transistors and PAs at carrier frequencies in the 10GHz range with 1-500MHz low frequency excitation on the drain terminal. A novel method for multi-frequency analysis of nonlinear circuit components based on describing functions is developed. It is shown that the describing functions agree with simulation and measurements. In addition, the measurement setup is used to characterize the low frequency drain impedance of a MMIC PA when connected to a simple resonant supply modulator. The main motivation for this work is to obtain knowledge of the dynamic supply terminal in the low frequency regime (1-500MHz) that can enable power amplifier and supply modulator co-design for very broadband signals.

  2. A new algorithm to measure sea ice concentration from passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repina, Irina; Sharkov, Evgeniy; Komarova, Nataliya; Raev, Mikhail; Tikhonov, Vasilii; Boyarskiy, Dmitriy

    Studies of spatial and temporal properties of sea ice distribution in polar regions help to monitor global environmental changes and reveal their natural and anthropogenic factors, as well as make forecasts of weather, marine transportation and fishing conditions, assess perspectives of mineral mining on the continental shelf, etc. Contact methods of observation are often insufficient to meet the goals, very complicated technically and organizationally and not always safe for people involved. Remote sensing techniques are believed to be the best alternative. Its include monitoring of polar regions by means of passive microwave sensing with the aim to determine spatial distribution, types, thickness and snow cover of ice. However, the algorithms employed today to retrieve sea ice characteristics from passive microwave sensing data for different reasons give significant errors, especially in summer period and also near ice edges and in cases of open ice. One of the error sources is the current practice of using empirical dependencies and adjustment coefficients for the retrieval of ice characteristics and neglecting the physics of the process. We discuss an electrodynamic model of the sea surface - sea ice - snow cover - atmosphere system developed with account taken of physical and structural properties of the ambient. Model calculations of ice brightness temperature in different concentrations and snow covers are in good agreement with SSM/I measurement data. On the base of this model we develop a new algorithm for the retrieval of sea ice concentration from passive microwave sensing data - Variation Arctic Sea Ice Algorithm (VASIA). In contrast to the well-known techniques (NASA TEAM, Bootstrap, ASI, NORSEX et al), it takes into account the real physical parameters of ice, snow and open water rather than empirical and adjustment coefficients. Satellite data were provided by the POLE-RT-Fields SSM/I and SSMIS data collection for polar regions retrieved from the

  3. Effect of Combined Spaceborne Microwave and Continuous Lightning Measurements on Precipitation Forecasts of the 1998 Ground-Hog Day Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinman, James A.; Chang, Dong-Eon; Morales, Carlos A.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of several newly available sources of meteorological data on mesoscale model forecasts of precipitation produced by the extra-tropical cyclone that struck Florida on February 2, 1998. Precipitation distributions of convective rainfall events were derived from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Multi-Channel Passive Microwave Sensor (TMI) microwave radiometric data by means of the Goddard PROFiling (GPROF) algorithm. Continuous lightning distributions were obtained from sferics measurements obtained from a network of VLF radio receivers. Histograms of coincident sferics frequency distributions were matched to those of precipitation to derive bogus convective rainfall rates from the continuously available sferics measurements. SSM/I and TMI microwave data were used to derive Integrated Precipitable Water (IPW) distributions. The TMI also provided sea surface temperatures (SSTS) of the Loop Current and Gulf Stream with improved structural detail. A series of experiments assimilated IPW and latent heating from the bogus convective rainfall for six-hours in the MM5 mesoscale forecast model to produce nine-hour forecasts of all rainfall as well as other weather parameters. Although continuously assimilating latent heating only slightly improved the surface pressure distribution forecast, it significantly improved the precipitation forecasts. Correctly locating convective rainfall was found critical for assimilating latent heating in the forecast model, but measurement of the rainfall intensity proved to be less important. The improved SSTs also had a positive impact on rainfall forecasts for this case. Assimilating bogus rainfall in the model produced nine-hour forecasts of radar reflectivity distributions that agreed well with coincident observations from the TRMM spaceborne precipitation radar, ground based radar and spaceborne microwave measurements.

  4. A measurement of the low frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    As part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR) at low frequencies, the intensity of the CBR has been measured at a frequency of 1.410 GHz. The measurement was made by comparing the power received from the sky with the power received from a specially designed cooled calibration target with known properties. Sources of radiation other than the CBR were then identified and subtracted to calculate the antenna temperature of the CBR at 1.410 GHz. The instrument used to measure the CBR was a total-power microwave radiometer with a 25 MHz bandwidth centered at 1.410 GHz. The radiometer had a noise temperature of 80 K, and sufficient data were taken that radiometer noise did not contribute significantly to the total measurement error. The sources of error were predominantly systematic in nature, and the largest error was due to uncertainty in the reflection characteristics of the cold-load calibrator. Identification and subtraction of signals from the Galaxy (0.7 K) and the Earth's atmosphere (0.8 K) were also significant parts of the data reduction and error analysis. The brightness temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation at 1.410 GHz is 222. +- 0.55 Kelvin. The spectrum of the CBR, as determined by this measurement and other published results, is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of temperature 2.741 +- 0.016. Constraints on the amount by which the CBR spectrum deviates from Planck spectrum are used to place limits on energy releases early in the history of the universe. 55 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Spanish activities (research and industrial applications) in the field of microwave material treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Catala Civera, J.M.; Reyes Davo, E.R. de los

    1996-12-31

    The GCM (Microwave Heating Group) within the Communications Department at the Technical University of Valencia is dedicated to the study of microwaves and their use in the current industrial processes in the Valencian Community and in Spain. To this end, a microwave heating laboratory has been developed and the benefits of incorporating microwave technologies into current industrial processes have been demonstrated. In this paper some of the industrial applications which are being investigated are presented.

  6. Effective dopant activation by susceptor-assisted microwave annealing of low energy boron implanted and phosphorus implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhao; Vemuri, Rajitha N. P.; Alford, T. L.; David Theodore, N.; Lu, Wei; Lau, S. S.; Lanz, A.

    2013-12-28

    Rapid processing and reduced end-of-range diffusion result from susceptor-assisted microwave (MW) annealing, making this technique an efficient processing alternative for electrically activating dopants within ion-implanted semiconductors. Sheet resistance and Hall measurements provide evidence of electrical activation. Susceptor-assisted MW annealing, of ion-implanted Si, enables more effective dopant activation and at lower temperatures than required for rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Raman spectroscopy and ion channeling analyses are used to monitor the extent of ion implantation damage and recrystallization. The presence and behavior of extended defects are monitored by cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Phosphorus implanted Si samples experience effective electrical activation upon MW annealing. On the other hand, when boron implanted Si is MW annealed, the growth of extended defects results in reduced crystalline quality that hinders the electrical activation process. Further comparison of dopant diffusion resulting from MW annealing and rapid thermal annealing is performed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. MW annealed ion implanted samples show less end-of-range diffusion when compared to RTA samples. In particular, MW annealed P{sup +} implanted samples achieve no visible diffusion and equivalent electrical activation at a lower temperature and with a shorter time-duration of annealing compared to RTA. In this study, the peak temperature attained during annealing does not depend on the dopant species or dose, for susceptor-assisted MW annealing of ion-implanted Si.

  7. Effective dopant activation by susceptor-assisted microwave annealing of low energy boron implanted and phosphorus implanted silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao; David Theodore, N.; Vemuri, Rajitha N. P.; Lu, Wei; Lau, S. S.; Lanz, A.; Alford, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid processing and reduced end-of-range diffusion result from susceptor-assisted microwave (MW) annealing, making this technique an efficient processing alternative for electrically activating dopants within ion-implanted semiconductors. Sheet resistance and Hall measurements provide evidence of electrical activation. Susceptor-assisted MW annealing, of ion-implanted Si, enables more effective dopant activation and at lower temperatures than required for rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Raman spectroscopy and ion channeling analyses are used to monitor the extent of ion implantation damage and recrystallization. The presence and behavior of extended defects are monitored by cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Phosphorus implanted Si samples experience effective electrical activation upon MW annealing. On the other hand, when boron implanted Si is MW annealed, the growth of extended defects results in reduced crystalline quality that hinders the electrical activation process. Further comparison of dopant diffusion resulting from MW annealing and rapid thermal annealing is performed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. MW annealed ion implanted samples show less end-of-range diffusion when compared to RTA samples. In particular, MW annealed P+ implanted samples achieve no visible diffusion and equivalent electrical activation at a lower temperature and with a shorter time-duration of annealing compared to RTA. In this study, the peak temperature attained during annealing does not depend on the dopant species or dose, for susceptor-assisted MW annealing of ion-implanted Si.

  8. Measurement of the permittivity and loss of high-loss materials using a Near-Field Scanning Microwave Microscope.

    PubMed

    Gregory, A P; Blackburn, J F; Lees, K; Clarke, R N; Hodgetts, T E; Hanham, S M; Klein, N

    2016-02-01

    In this paper improvements to a Near-Field Scanning Microwave Microscope (NSMM) are presented that allow the loss of high loss dielectric materials to be measured accurately at microwave frequencies. This is demonstrated by measuring polar liquids (loss tangent tanδ≈1) for which traceable data is available. The instrument described uses a wire probe that is electromagnetically coupled to a resonant cavity. An optical beam deflection system is incorporated within the instrument to allow contact mode between samples and the probe tip to be obtained. Liquids are contained in a measurement cell with a window of ultrathin glass. The calibration process for the microscope, which is based on image-charge electrostatic models, has been adapted to use the Laplacian 'complex frequency'. Measurements of the loss tangent of polar liquids that are consistent with reference data were obtained following calibration against single-crystal specimens that have very low loss. PMID:26686660

  9. A method to characterize the dielectric and interfacial properties of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures by microwave measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Hang-Ting; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Huang, Guo-Wei

    2002-04-01

    We have developed a method to investigate the dielectric and interfacial properties of gate dielectric thin films by microwave measurement. Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 (BST) thin films were deposited on 10 Ω cm (normal) and 10 k Ω cm [high-resistivity, (HR)] silicon substrates at the same time by rf magnetron sputtering. For the BST/HR-silicon, coplanar waveguides (CPW) were fabricated and measured at microwave frequencies with thru-reflect-line calibration while capacitance (C-V) measurements were carried out for BST/normal silicon. From the phase change of CPW transmission line and the maximum capacitance in C-V measurement, the dielectric constants of both the BST thin film and interface layer can be determined. Furthermore, the behaviors of insertion loss versus bias voltage were investigated. The results indicate that our method can provide useful information to study the dielectric and interfacial properties of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures.

  10. Microwave backscattering theory and active remote sensing of the ocean surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. S.; Miller, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    The status is reviewed of electromagnetic scattering theory relative to the interpretation of microwave remote sensing data acquired from spaceborne platforms over the ocean surface. Particular emphasis is given to the assumptions which are either implicit or explicit in the theory. The multiple scale scattering theory developed during this investigation is extended to non-Gaussian surface statistics. It is shown that the important statistic for the case is the probability density function of the small scale heights conditioned on the large scale slopes; this dependence may explain the anisotropic scattering measurements recently obtained with the AAFE Radscat. It is noted that present surface measurements are inadequate to verify or reject the existing scattering theories. Surface measurements are recommended for qualifying sensor data from radar altimeters and scatterometers. Additional scattering investigations are suggested for imaging type radars employing synthetically generated apertures.

  11. Evaluation of non-thermal effects by microwave irradiation in hydrolysis of waste-activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Byun, I G; Lee, J H; Lee, J M; Lim, J S; Park, T J

    2014-01-01

    The activation energy (Ea) for waste-activated sludge (WAS) hydrolysis was compared between microwave irradiation (MW) and conventional heating (CH) methods to evaluate the non-thermal effect of MW. The microwave-assisted hydrolysis of WAS was assumed to follow the first-order kinetics on the basis of volatile suspended solids (VSS) conversion to soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) for different initial VSS concentrations. By comparing the VSS decrement and the SCOD increment between MW and CH at different absolute temperatures of 323, 348 and 373 K, the average ratio of VSS conversion to SCOD was determined to range from 1.42 to 1.64 g SCOD/g VSS. These results corresponded to the theoretical value of 1.69 g SCOD/g VSS based on the assumption that the molecular formula of sludge was C10H19O3N. Consequently, the Ea of the MW-assisted WAS hydrolysis was much lower than that of CH for the same temperature conditions. The non-thermal effect of MW in the hydrolysis of WAS could be identified with the lower Ea than that of CH. PMID:25116507

  12. Efficient Catalytic Activity BiFeO3 Nanoparticles Prepared by Novel Microwave-Assisted Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Gong, Wanyun; Ma, Jinai; Li, Lu; Jiang, Jizhou

    2015-02-01

    A novel microwave-assisted sol-gel method was applied to the synthesis of the single-phase perovskite bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (BFO NPs) with the mean diameter ca. 73.7 nm. The morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the rhombohedral phase with R3c space group. The weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature was affirmed by the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). According to the UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (UV-DSR), the band gap energy of BFO NPs was determined to be 2.18 eV. The electrochemical activity was evaluated by BFO NPs-chitosan-glassy carbon electrode (BFO-CS-GCE) sensor for detection of p-nitrophenol contaminants. The material showed an efficient oxidation catalytic activity by degrading methylene blue (MB). It was found that the degradation efficiency of 10 mg L-1 MB at pH 6.0 was above 90.9% after ultrasound- and microwave-combined-assisted (US-MW) irradiation for 15 min with BFO NPs as catalyst and H202 as oxidant. A possible reaction mechanism of degradation of MB was also proposed.

  13. Evaluation of non-thermal effects by microwave irradiation in hydrolysis of waste-activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Byun, I G; Lee, J H; Lee, J M; Lim, J S; Park, T J

    2014-01-01

    The activation energy (Ea) for waste-activated sludge (WAS) hydrolysis was compared between microwave irradiation (MW) and conventional heating (CH) methods to evaluate the non-thermal effect of MW. The microwave-assisted hydrolysis of WAS was assumed to follow the first-order kinetics on the basis of volatile suspended solids (VSS) conversion to soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) for different initial VSS concentrations. By comparing the VSS decrement and the SCOD increment between MW and CH at different absolute temperatures of 323, 348 and 373 K, the average ratio of VSS conversion to SCOD was determined to range from 1.42 to 1.64 g SCOD/g VSS. These results corresponded to the theoretical value of 1.69 g SCOD/g VSS based on the assumption that the molecular formula of sludge was C10H19O3N. Consequently, the Ea of the MW-assisted WAS hydrolysis was much lower than that of CH for the same temperature conditions. The non-thermal effect of MW in the hydrolysis of WAS could be identified with the lower Ea than that of CH.

  14. Efficient Catalytic Activity BiFeO3 Nanoparticles Prepared by Novel Microwave-Assisted Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Gong, Wanyun; Ma, Jinai; Li, Lu; Jiang, Jizhou

    2015-02-01

    A novel microwave-assisted sol-gel method was applied to the synthesis of the single-phase perovskite bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (BFO NPs) with the mean diameter ca. 73.7 nm. The morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the rhombohedral phase with R3c space group. The weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature was affirmed by the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). According to the UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (UV-DSR), the band gap energy of BFO NPs was determined to be 2.18 eV. The electrochemical activity was evaluated by BFO NPs-chitosan-glassy carbon electrode (BFO-CS-GCE) sensor for detection of p-nitrophenol contaminants. The material showed an efficient oxidation catalytic activity by degrading methylene blue (MB). It was found that the degradation efficiency of 10 mg L-1 MB at pH 6.0 was above 90.9% after ultrasound- and microwave-combined-assisted (US-MW) irradiation for 15 min with BFO NPs as catalyst and H202 as oxidant. A possible reaction mechanism of degradation of MB was also proposed. PMID:26353647

  15. Tomographic measurement of temperature change in phantoms of the human body by chirp radar-type microwave computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, M

    1993-07-01

    The chirp radar-type microwave computed tomograph (CT) measures the temperature change in a human body noninvasively. The paper examines its feasibility. A chirp pulse signal between 1 and 2 GHz is radiated from the transmitting antenna to the phantom. The transmitted waves are detected by the receiving antenna, which is placed on the opposite side of the object, and the beat signal between the incident wave and the transmitted wave is produced by the mixer. By spectral analysis of the beat signal, only those signals transmitted on the straight line between the transmitting antenna and the receiving antenna are discriminated from multipath signals. The microwave tomogram can therefore be reconstructed easily using the conventional algorithms for an X-ray CT image. The microwave CT can use the chirp signal to remove the influence of multipath signals caused by diffraction and reflection. The imaging of dielectric materials with complicated structures is thus possible. The experimental results using phantoms show that the spatial resolution of this microwave CT is about 10 mm and that a two-dimensional distribution of temperature change can be measured.

  16. Characterization of smart microwave window materials based on conducting polymer composites: coaxial line, waveguide, and cyclic voltammetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Alan; Wright, Peter V.; Despotakis, Anthony; Lees, K.; Chambers, Barry

    1998-07-01

    Discs of polyaniline-silver-polymer electrolyte composites exhibit rapid and reversible changes in their microwave impedance when small electric fields are applied across then in a resonant coaxial line test set. The experimental data show that the initial conductivity of the materials is dependent on the concentration of silver metal and suggests that changes in resistance due to chemical switching take plane, at least in part, in the manufacture of the composites. The experimental data show that changes in the gradient of the cyclic voltammograms coincide with large changes in microwave reflectivity consistent with increasing conductivity of the composite when fields are applied. The reverse change occurs when the fields are removed. Measurements of the switching speed have shown that the composites are able to switch between the different states at in times of less than a second for more than one million switching operations with no depreciation of the material. Large area films have also been studied in the front of waveguide devices and measured in a microwave transmission mode. The results show that large changes in microwave impedance occur with the application of small electric fields (~ 15 V cm-1).

  17. Ink jet printed graphene oxide (GO) coplanar waveguide (CPW) structures for measurement of microwave propagation in GO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Kate; Barry, Edwin; Griep, Mark; Daniel, Johhny; Morris, Derek; Karna, Shashi

    2011-03-01

    Chemically reduced graphene~(CGR) has been successfully inkjet printed using a commercially available printer. The CGR with sheet sizes below 200 nm were dispersed in a mixture of water and ethanol. Coplanar waveguide (CPW) structures were deposited on CGR and plastic substrates, scattering (S) parameters were measured in order to extract material parameter for incorporation into simulation tools. Measurements and modeling of microwave propagation in graphene shall be presented.

  18. Variations and climatology of CI0 in the polar lower stratosphere from UARS Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Water, J. W.; Livesey, N. J.

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measured the global distribution of stratospheric ClO over annual cycles for much of the 1990s, albeit with reduced sampling frequency in the latter half of the decade. Here we present an overview of the interannual and interhemispheric variations in the distribution of ClO derived from UARS MLS measurements, with a particular emphasis on enhancements in the winter polar lower stratosphere.

  19. Earth Observing System/Advanced Microwave SoundingUnit-A (EOS/AMSU-A): Acquisition activities plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwantje, Robert

    1994-01-01

    This is the acquisition activities plan for the software to be used in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) system. This document is submitted in response to Contract NAS5-323 14 as CDRL 508. The procurement activities required to acquire software for the EOS/AMSU-A program are defined.

  20. Switching atomic fountain clock microwave interrogation signal and high-resolution phase measurements.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, Giorgio; Governatori, Graziano; Chambon, Damien; Lours, Michel; Rosenbusch, Peter; Guéna, Jocelyne; Chapelet, Frédéric; Bize, Sébastien; Tobar, Michael E; Laurent, Philippe; Potier, Thierry; Clairon, Andre

    2009-07-01

    This paper focuses on the development of tools aiming to solve several problems related to the microwave interrogation signal in atomic fountains. We first consider the problem related to cycle synchronous phase transients caused by the sequential operation of the atomic fountain. To search for such systematic phase variations deeply buried in the microwave synthesizer phase noise, we have developed a novel triggered-phase transient analyzer capable of processing the microwave signal to extract the phase in a synchronous manner even in the presence of frequency modulation. With this device we check in vivo the LNE-SYRTE fountain's interrogation signals with a resolution approaching 1 microradian. In addition, using this device, we investigate an innovative approach to solve a second problem, namely, the shift caused by microwave leakage in the fountain. Our approach consists of switching off the fountain microwave interrogation signal when atoms are outside the microwave cavity. To do that, we have developed a switch that is almost free of phase transients and is thus able to eliminate the frequency shift caused by microwave leakage without inducing significant phase transients on the interrogation signal.

  1. NORSEX 1979 microwave remote sensing data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigar, H. F.; Schaffner, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    Airborne microwave remote sensing measurements obtained by NASA Langley Research Center in support of the 1979 Norwegian Remote Sensing Experiment (NORSEX) are summarized. The objectives of NORSEX were to investigate the capabilities of an active/passive microwave system to measure ice concentration and type in the vicinity of the marginal ice zone near Svalbard, Norway and to apply microwave techniques to the investigation of a thermal oceanic front near Bear Island, Norway. The instruments used during NORSEX include the stepped frequency microwave radiometer, airborne microwave scatterometer, precision radiation thermometer and metric aerial photography. The data are inventoried, summarized, and presented in a user-friendly format. Data summaries are presented as time-history plots which indicate when and where data were obtained as well as the sensor configuration. All data are available on nine-track computer tapes in card-image format upon request to the NASA Langley Technical Library.

  2. Use of superconducting bearings to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanany, S.; Matsumura, T.; Johnson, B.; Jones, T.; Hull, J. R.; Ma, K. B.

    2002-08-21

    Measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation are expected to significantly increase our understanding of the early universe. We present a design for a CMB polarimeter in which a cryogenically cooled half wave plate rotates by means of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing. The design is optimized for implementation in MAXIPOL, a balloon-borne CMB polarimeter. A prototype bearing, consisting of commercially available ring-shaped permanent magnet and an array of YBCO bulk HTS material, has been constructed. We report on measurements of the coefficient of friction as a function of temperature between 15 and 80 K, of rotation frequency between 0.3 and 3.5 Hz, of levitation distance between 6 and 10 mm, and of ambient pressure between 1 and 10{sup -7} torr. The low rotational drag of the HTS bearing allows rotations for long periods of time with minimal input power and negligible wear and tear thus making this technology suitable for a future satellite mission.

  3. In situ growth rate measurement and nucleation enhancement for microwave plasma CVD of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoner, B. R.; Williams, B. E.; Wolter, S. D.; Nishimura, K.; Glass, J. T.

    1992-02-01

    Laser reflection interferometry (LRI) has been shown to be a useful in situ technique for measuring growth rate of diamond during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). Current alternatives to LRI usually involve ex situ analysis such as cross-sectional SEM or profilometry. The ability to measure the growth rate in 'real-time' has allowed the variation of processing parameters during a single deposition and thus the extraction of much more information in a fraction of the time. In situ monitoring of growth processes also makes it possible to perform closed loop process control with better reproducibility and quality control. Unfortunately, LRI requires a relatively smooth surface to avoid surface scattering and the commensurate drop in reflected intensity. This problem was remedied by greatly enhancing the diamond particle nucleation via the deposition of an intermediate carbon layer using substrate biasing. When an unscratched silicon wafer is pretreated by biasing negatively relative to ground while in a methane-hydrogen plasma, nucleation densities much higher than those achieved on scratched silicon wafers are obtained. The enhanced nucleation allows a complete film composed of small grains to form in a relatively short time, resulting in a much smoother surface than is obtained from a film grown at lower nucleation densities.

  4. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber

    2003-04-01

    Three test instruments are being evaluated to determine the feasibility of using photoacoustic technology for measuring unburned carbon in fly ash. The first test instrument is a single microwave frequency system previously constructed to measure photo-acoustic signals in an off-line configuration. This system was assembled and used to test parameters thought important to photo-acoustic signal output. A standard modulation frequency was chosen based upon signal to noise data gained from experimentation. Testing in the sixth quarter focused on initial testing for a magnetic photo-acoustic effect, loss tests and photo-acoustic tests on coal samples, and extending the testing range for the photo-acoustic effect over the octave of 900 MHz to 1800 MHz. Previous testing on this project was done at 1 GHz. In parallel with the photo-acoustic testing, some preliminary design considerations were investigated for the on-line monitor to be fabricated and testing in phase three of this project.

  5. Measuring the cosmic microwave background gravitational lensing potential from 500 deg2 of SPTpol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocanu, Laura Monica; South Pole Telescope Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Weak gravitational lensing by large-scale structure in the universe causes deflections in the paths of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. This effect introduces non-Gaussian correlations in the observed CMB temperature and polarization fields. The signature of lensing can be used to reconstruct the projected gravitational lensing potential with a quadratic estimator technique; this provides a measure of the integrated mass distribution out to the surface of last scattering, sourced primarily from redshifts between 0.1 and 5. The power spectrum of the lensing potential encodes information about the geometry of the universe and the growth of structure and can be used to place constraints on the sum of neutrino masses and dark energy. High signal-to-noise mass maps from CMB lensing are also powerful for cross-correlating with other tracers of large-scale structure and for delensing the CMB in search for primordial gravitational waves. This poster will describe recent progress on measuring the CMB gravitational lensing potential and its power spectrum using data from 500 deg2 of sky observed with the polarization-sensitive receiver installed on the South Pole Telescope, SPTpol.

  6. Simplified photonic-assisted digitalized microwave frequency measurement with improved coding efficiency and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing; Pan, Wei; Zou, Xihua; Yan, Lianshan; Luo, Bin; Liu, Xinkai; Li, Peixuan; Yan, Xianglei

    2016-08-01

    A simplified photonic approach to implement digitalized microwave frequency measurement with improved coding efficiency and receiving sensitivity is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed approach, an optical phase-shifted filter array and multiple optical filters with multiplied FSRs are designed to obtain digitalized results in the form of binary encoding. Thanks to the complementary outputs, an adaptive threshold decision implemented using balanced receivers is employed to perform binary encoding, instead of a fixed power ratio threshold of 0.5, leading to an improvement in the receiving sensitivity. Besides, a high coding efficiency and a fine measurement resolution are achieved with relaxed accuracy requirement on phase shifts of the optical filters. In particular, compared with the previous approaches, larger tolerances on the phase shifts of the optical phase-shifted filters are provided in the proposed approach having the same coding efficiency and resolution. Therefore, the proposed system is easy to be implemented and robust to noise. A proof-of-concept experiment is then performed. 6-bit binary digital results with a 5-bit effective number are obtained in the range from 10 GHz to 40 GHz. In addition, an integrated version of such a filter array is designed and analyzed in simulation.

  7. Microwave Limb Sounder/El Nino Watch - Water Vapor Measurement, October, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows atmospheric water vapor in Earth's upper troposphere, about 10 kilometers (6 miles) above the surface, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument flying aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. These data collected in early October 1997 indicate the presence of El Nino by showing a shift of humidity from west to east (blue and red areas) along the equatorial Pacific Ocean. El Nino is the term used when the warmest equatorial Pacific Ocean water is displaced toward the east. The areas of high atmospheric moisture correspond to areas of very warm ocean water. Warmer water evaporates at a higher rate and the resulting warm moist air then rises, forming tall cloud towers. In the tropics, the warm water and the resulting tall cloud towers typically produce large amounts of rain. The MLS instrument, developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, measures humidity at the top of these clouds, which are very moist. This rain is now occurring in the eastern Pacific Ocean and has left Indonesia (deep blue region) unusually dry, resulting in the current drought in that region. This image also shows moisture moving north into Mexico, an effect of several hurricanes spawned by the warm waters of El Nino.

  8. Investigations of a voltage-biased microwave cavity for quantum measurements of nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxinol, Francisco; Hao, Hugo; Lahaye, Matt

    2015-03-01

    Quantum electromechanical systems incorporating superconducting qubits have received extensive interest in recent years due to their promising prospects for studying fundamental topics of quantum mechanics such as quantum measurement, entanglement and decoherence in new macroscopic limits, also for their potential as elements in technological applications in quantum information network and weak force detector, to name a few. In this presentation we will discuss ours efforts toward to devise an electromechanical circuit to strongly couple a nanomechanical resonator to a superconductor qubit, where a high voltage dc-bias is required, to study quantum behavior of a mechanical resonator. Preliminary results of our latest generation of devices integrating a superconductor qubit into a high-Q voltage biased microwave cavities are presented. Developments in the circuit design to couple a mechanical resonator to a qubit in the high-Q voltage bias CPW cavity is discussed as well prospects of achieving single-phonon measurement resolution. National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1056423 and Grant No. DMR-1312421.

  9. Microwave Surface Impedance Measurements of SrFe2(As,P)2 Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka; Kitagawa, Kentaro; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Takigawa, Masashi; Uwatoko, Yoshiya

    2012-02-01

    Various pairing symmetries have been proposed concerning Fe-based superconductors both theoretically and experimentally. It was reported that LaFePO[1] and BaFe2(As,P)2[2] have line nodes in their superconducting gap. It is in sharp contrast to other Fe-based compounds such as LiFeAs[3] and Fe(Se,Te)[4]. To confirm whether line nodes in gap function is a common feature among P doped systems, we measured the microwave surface impedances of SrFe2(As,P)2 single crystals (Tc˜30K). Single crystals were grown by self-flux method. The surface impedances were measured using a cavity perturbation technique. The imaginary part of surface impedance, which is proportional to London penetration depth in the superconducting state, shows a power law, λ(T)-λ(0)T^n. The power law indicates low-energy quasiparticle excitation, and an exponent slightly smaller than 2 does not exclude the possibility of the existence of line nodes. [ 1 ] J. D. Fletcher et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 (2009) 147001.[ 2 ] K. Hashimoto et al., Phys. Rev. B 81 (2010) 220501(R).[ 3 ] Y. Imai et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 80 (2011) 013704.[ 4 ] H. Takahashi et al., Phys. Rev. B 84. (2011) 132503.

  10. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND THE MICROWAVE BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURES OF URANUS AND SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselfield, Matthew; Moodley, Kavilan; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D.; Nolta, Michael R.; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Marsden, Danica; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dünner, Rolando; Gallardo, Patricio; Fowler, Joseph W.; Niemack, Michael D.; Gralla, Megan B.; Marriage, Tobias A.; Halpern, Mark; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; and others

    2013-11-01

    We describe the measurement of the beam profiles and window functions for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), which operated from 2007 to 2010 with kilopixel bolometer arrays centered at 148, 218, and 277 GHz. Maps of Saturn are used to measure the beam shape in each array and for each season of observations. Radial profiles are transformed to Fourier space in a way that preserves the spatial correlations in the beam uncertainty to derive window functions relevant for angular power spectrum analysis. Several corrections are applied to the resulting beam transforms, including an empirical correction measured from the final cosmic microwave background (CMB) survey maps to account for the effects of mild pointing variation and alignment errors. Observations of Uranus made regularly throughout each observing season are used to measure the effects of atmospheric opacity and to monitor deviations in telescope focus over the season. Using the WMAP-based calibration of the ACT maps to the CMB blackbody, we obtain precise measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Uranus and Saturn disks at effective frequencies of 149 and 219 GHz. For Uranus we obtain thermodynamic brightness temperatures T{sub U}{sup 149}= 106.7 ± 2.2 K and T{sub U}{sup 219}= 100.1 ± 3.1 K. For Saturn, we model the effects of the ring opacity and emission using a simple model and obtain resulting (unobscured) disk temperatures of T{sub S}{sup 149}= 137.3 ± 3.2 K and T{sub S}{sup 219}= 137.3 ± 4.7 K.

  11. Bolometric detection of magnetoplasma resonances in microwave absorption by two-dimensional electron systems based on doping layer conductivity measurements in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Dorozhkin, S. I. Sychev, D. V.; Kapustin, A. A.

    2014-11-28

    We have implemented a new bolometric method to detect resonances in magneto-absorption of microwave radiation by two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) in selectively doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. Radiation is absorbed by the 2DES and the thermally activated conductivity of the doping layer supplying electrons to the 2DES serves as a thermometer. The resonant absorption brought about by excitation of the confined magnetoplasma modes appears as peaks in the magnetic field dependence of the low-frequency impedance measured between the Schottky gate and 2DES.

  12. Island based radar and microwave radiometer measurements of stratus cloud parameters during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, A.S.; Fairall, C.W.; Snider, J.B.; Lenshow, D.H.; Mayer, S.D.

    1996-04-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, simultaneous measurements were made with a vertically pointing cloud sensing radar and a microwave radiometer. The radar measurements are used to estimate stratus cloud drizzle and turbulence parameters. In addition, with the microwave radiometer measurements of reflectivity, we estimated the profiles of cloud liquid water and effective radius. We used radar data for computation of vertical profiles of various drizzle parameters such as droplet concentration, modal radius, and spread. A sample of these results is shown in Figure 1. In addition, in non-drizzle clouds, with the radar and radiometer we can estimate the verticle profiles of stratus cloud parameters such as liquid water concentration and effective radius. This is accomplished by assuming a droplet distribution with droplet number concentration and width constant with height.

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of the microwave cut-off probe for electron density measurements in low-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bin; Li Hong; Wang Huihui; Xie Jinlin; Liu Wandong

    2011-10-01

    The microwave cut-off probe for the electron density measurement in low-temperature plasmas is described in this article. It is based on the wave cutoff in an unmagnetized plasma. The measurement principle is analyzed theoretically using a model of plasma slab. Because of the high-pass characteristic of plasma, the waves above the cut-off frequency can penetrate the plasma slab, whereas the lower frequency waves are reflected from the cut-off layer. Therefore, an obvious critical point can be observed in the wave transmission spectrum. The abscissa of the critical point indicates the cut-off frequency, which is directly related to the maximum electron density between transmitting/receiving antennas of the cut-off probe. The measured electron densities are in agreement with the data obtained by the Langmuir probe. Experimental results show that the microwave cut-off probe can be used to diagnose the plasmas with a wide range of parameters.

  14. Data fusion with artificial neural networks (ANN) for classification of earth surface from microwave satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lure, Y. M. Fleming; Grody, Norman C.; Chiou, Y. S. Peter; Yeh, H. Y. Michael

    1993-01-01

    A data fusion system with artificial neural networks (ANN) is used for fast and accurate classification of five earth surface conditions and surface changes, based on seven SSMI multichannel microwave satellite measurements. The measurements include brightness temperatures at 19, 22, 37, and 85 GHz at both H and V polarizations (only V at 22 GHz). The seven channel measurements are processed through a convolution computation such that all measurements are located at same grid. Five surface classes including non-scattering surface, precipitation over land, over ocean, snow, and desert are identified from ground-truth observations. The system processes sensory data in three consecutive phases: (1) pre-processing to extract feature vectors and enhance separability among detected classes; (2) preliminary classification of Earth surface patterns using two separate and parallely acting classifiers: back-propagation neural network and binary decision tree classifiers; and (3) data fusion of results from preliminary classifiers to obtain the optimal performance in overall classification. Both the binary decision tree classifier and the fusion processing centers are implemented by neural network architectures. The fusion system configuration is a hierarchical neural network architecture, in which each functional neural net will handle different processing phases in a pipelined fashion. There is a total of around 13,500 samples for this analysis, of which 4 percent are used as the training set and 96 percent as the testing set. After training, this classification system is able to bring up the detection accuracy to 94 percent compared with 88 percent for back-propagation artificial neural networks and 80 percent for binary decision tree classifiers. The neural network data fusion classification is currently under progress to be integrated in an image processing system at NOAA and to be implemented in a prototype of a massively parallel and dynamically reconfigurable Modular

  15. Analysis of microwave backscatter measured by radar altimeter on land to study surface aerodynamic roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Le; Liu, Qinhuo

    2012-10-01

    The aerodynamic surface roughness z0 is a key parameter for climate and land-surface models to study surfaceatmosphere exchanges of mass and energy. The roughness length is difficult to estimate without wind speed profile data, which is intractable at regional to global scale. Theoretical formulations of roughness have been developed in terms of canopy attributes such as frontal area, height, and drag coefficient. This paper discusses the potential of radar altimetry, which provides the backscatter coefficient of the land surface at nadir view, to characterise the surface roughness at km scale. The AIEM model and ProSARproSIM are employed to simulate the backscatter coefficient under different surface condition and different observation geometry at bare soil and at pine forest, respectively. The altimetry backscatter decreases with increase of geometric roughness. The microwave backscatter measured at the nadir view is more sensitive to the surface roughness than that at the oblique observation, especially for the smooth surface. The direct forest return is the dominated scattering mechanism for normal incidence at forest area. Since we failed to collect the z0 measurement at arid and semi-arid area with sparse vegetation, the backscatter measurements at Ku and C band of altimeter Jason1 were analyzed with the ground measured aerodynamic surface roughness at three vegetated sites (Da yekou, Yin ke, and Chang Baisan) of China. The relationships we found between Jason1 sigma0 and z0 is not significant, since Jason1 lost track seriously at the three sites. Further research using the altimeter data of Jason2 and Cryosat is possible to demonstrate the potential to map z0 from orbit using radar altimeters.

  16. Microwave resonant activation in hybrid single-gap/two-gap Josephson tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabello, Steven; Lambert, Joseph G.; Mlack, Jerome; Dai, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Chen, Ke; Cunnane, Daniel; Xi, X. X.; Ramos, Roberto C.

    2016-09-01

    Microwave resonant activation is a powerful, straightforward technique to study classical and quantum systems, experimentally realized in Josephson junction devices cooled to very low temperatures. These devices typically consist of two single-gap superconductors separated by a weak link. We report the results of the first resonant activation experiments on hybrid thin film Josephson junctions consisting of a multi-gap superconductor (MgB2) and a single-gap superconductor (Pb or Sn). We can interpret the plasma frequency in terms of theories both for conventional and hybrid junctions. Using these models, we determine the junction parameters including critical current, resistance, and capacitance and find moderately high quality factors of Q0˜ 100 for these junctions.

  17. MARG - A Low Cost Solid State Microwave Areal Precipitation Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulitsch, Helmut; Dombai, Ferenc; Cremonini, Roberto; Bechini, Renzo

    2014-05-01

    Water is an essential resource for us so the measurements of its movement throughout the whole cycle is very important. The rainfall is discontinuous in space and in time having large natural variability unlike many other meteorological parameters. The widely used method for getting relatively accurate precipitation data over land is the combination of radar rainfall estimations and rain gauge data. The typically used radar data is coming from long-range weather radars operating in C or S band, or from mini radars operating in X band which is attenuating heavily in strong precipitation. Using such radar data we are facing several constraints: operating costs and limitations of long range radars, X band radars can be blocked totally in heavy thunderstorms even in short range, dual polarization solutions are expensive, etc. Recognizing that an important gap exists in instrumental precipitation measurements over land a consortium has been organized and a project has been established to develop a new measurement device, the so called Microwave Areal Rain Gauge (MARG). MARG is based on FMCW radar principle using solid state transmitter and digital signal processing and operating in C band. The MARG project aims to provide an innovative, real-time, low-cost, user friendly and accurate sensor technology to monitor and to measure continuously the rainfall intensity distribution over an area around some thousand square km. The MARG project proposal has been granted by the EU in FP7-SME-2012 funding scheme. The developed instrument is able to monitor in real-time intensity and spatial distribution of rainfall in rural and urban environments and can be operated by commercial weather data and value-added forecast product suppliers. To achieve sufficient isolation between the transmitter and receiver modules, and to avoid using complex and expensive microwave components, two parabolic antennae are used to transmit and receive the FMCW signal. The radar frontend operates in the

  18. Biopolymers Regulate Silver Nanoparticle under Microwave Irradiation for Effective Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Palaniyandi; Su, Chia-Hung; Venkat Kumar, Govindarajan; Adhikary, Shritama; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Gopinath, Subash C B; Chen, Yeng; Anbu, Periasamy

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, facile synthesis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was examined using microwave radiation and aniline as a reducing agent. The biopolymer matrix embedded nanoparticles were synthesized under various experimental conditions using different concentrations of biopolymer (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%), volumes of reducing agent (50, 100, 150 μL), and duration of heat treatment (30 s to 240 s). The synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for identification of AgNPs synthesis, crystal nature, shape, size, and type of capping action. In addition, the significant antibacterial efficacy and antibiofilm activity of biopolymer capped AgNPs were demonstrated against different bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 740 and Escherichia coli MTCC 9492. These results confirmed the potential for production of biopolymer capped AgNPs grown under microwave irradiation, which can be used for industrial and biomedical applications. PMID:27304672

  19. Fe-, Co-, and Ni-Loaded Porous Activated Carbon Balls as Lightweight Microwave Absorbents.

    PubMed

    Li, Guomin; Wang, Liancheng; Li, Wanxi; Xu, Yao

    2015-11-16

    Porous activated carbon ball (PACB) composites impregnated with iron, cobalt, nickel and/or their oxides were synthesized through a wet chemistry method involving PACBs as the carrier to load Fe(3+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) ions and a subsequent carbothermal reduction at different annealing temperatures. The results show that the pyrolysis products of nitrates and/or the products from the carbothermal reduction are embedded in the pores of the PACBs, with different distributions, resulting in different crystalline phases. The as-prepared PACB composites possessed high specific surface areas of 791.2-901.5 m(2)  g(-1) and low densities of 1.1-1.3 g cm(-3). Minimum reflection loss (RL) values of -50.1, -20.6, and -20.4 dB were achieved for Fe-PACB (annealed at 500 °C), Co-PACB (annealed at 800 °C), and Ni-PACB (annealed at 800 °C) composites, respectively. Moreover, the influence of the amount of the magnetic components in the PACB composites on the microwave-absorbing performances was investigated, further confirming that the dielectric loss was the primary contributor to microwave absorption. PMID:26373310

  20. Cellulose/CaCO3 nanocomposites: microwave ionic liquid synthesis, characterization, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-Guo; Dong, Yan-Yan; Fu, Lian-Hua; Li, Shu-Ming; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-02-15

    The purposes of this article are to synthesize the biomass-based hybrid nanocomposites using green method in green solvent and evaluate its biological activity. In this paper, microwave-assisted ionic liquid method is applied to the preparation of cellulose/CaCO(3) hybrid nanocomposites in the alkali extraction cellulose using CaCl(2) and Na(2)CO(3) as starting reactants. The ionic liquid acts as the excellent solvent for absorbing microwave and the dissolution of cellulose, and the synthesis of cellulose/CaCO(3) nanocomposites. The influences of reaction parameters such as the cellulose concentration and the types of solvent on the products were investigated. The increasing cellulose concentration favored the growth of CaCO(3). The morphologies of CaCO(3) changed from polyhedral to cube to particle with increasing cellulose concentration. Moreover, the solvents had an effect on the shape and dispersion of CaCO(3). Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that the cellulose/CaCO(3) nanocomposites had good biocompatibility and could be a candidate for the biomedical applications. PMID:23399205