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Sample records for active microwave sensors

  1. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  2. Active microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1994-01-01

    Research on the use of active microwaves in remote sensing, presented during plenary and poster sessions, is summarized. The main highlights are: calibration techniques are well understood; innovative modeling approaches have been developed which increase active microwave applications (segmentation prior to model inversion, use of ERS-1 scatterometer, simulations); polarization angle and frequency diversity improves characterization of ice sheets, vegetation, and determination of soil moisture (X band sensor study); SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry potential is emerging; use of multiple sensors/extended spectral signatures is important (increase emphasis).

  3. A multifrequency evaluation of active and passive microwave sensors for oil spill detection and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenner, R. G.; Reid, S. C.; Solie, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation is given of how active and passive microwave sensors can best be used in oil spill detection and assessment. Radar backscatter curves taken over oil spills are presented and their effect on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are discussed. Plots of microwave radiometric brightness variations over oil spills are presented and discussed. Recommendations as to how to select the best combination of frequency, viewing angle, and sensor type for evaluation of various aspects of oil spills are also discussed.

  4. Estimation of oceanic rainfall using passive and active measurements from SeaWinds spaceborne microwave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Khalil Ali

    The Ku band microwave remote sensor, SeaWinds, was developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Two identical SeaWinds instruments were launched into space. The first was flown onboard NASA QuikSCAT satellite which has been orbiting the Earth since June 1999, and the second instrument flew onboard the Japanese Advanced Earth Observing Satellite II (ADEOS-II) from December 2002 till October 2003 when an irrecoverable solar panel failure caused a premature end to the ADEOS-II satellite mission. SeaWinds operates at a frequency of 13.4 GHz, and was originally designed to measure the speed and direction of the ocean surface wind vector by relating the normalized radar backscatter measurements to the near surface wind vector through a geophysical model function (GMF). In addition to the backscatter measurement capability, SeaWinds simultaneously measures the polarized radiometric emission from the surface and atmosphere, utilizing a ground signal processing algorithm known as the QuikSCAT/ SeaWinds Radiometer (QRad/SRad). This dissertation presents the development and validation of a mathematical inversion algorithm that combines the simultaneous active radar backscatter and the passive microwave brightness temperatures observed by the SeaWinds sensor to retrieve the oceanic rainfall. The retrieval algorithm is statistically based, and has been developed using collocated measurements from SeaWinds, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) rain rates, and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) wind fields from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The oceanic rain is retrieved on a spacecraft wind vector cell (WVC) measurement grid that has a spatial resolution of 25 km. To evaluate the accuracy of the retrievals, examples of the passive-only, as well as the combined active/passive rain estimates from SeaWinds are presented, and comparisons are made with the standard

  5. Microwave reflectometer ionization sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seals, Joseph; Fordham, Jeffrey A.; Pauley, Robert G.; Simonutti, Mario D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the Microwave Reflectometer Ionization Sensor (MRIS) Instrument for use on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) spacecraft is described. The instrument contract was terminated, due to cancellation of the AFE program, subsequent to testing of an engineering development model. The MRIS, a four-frequency reflectometer, was designed for the detection and location of critical electron density levels in spacecraft reentry plasmas. The instrument would sample the relative magnitude and phase of reflected signals at discrete frequency steps across 4 GHz bandwidths centered at four frequencies: 20, 44, 95, and 140 GHz. The sampled data would be stored for later processing to calculate the distance from the spacecraft surface to the critical electron densities versus time. Four stepped PM CW transmitter receivers were located behind the thermal protection system of the spacecraft with horn antennas radiating and receiving through an insulating tile. Techniques were developed to deal with interference, including multiple reflections and resonance effects, resulting from the antenna configuration and operating environment.

  6. Aircraft active and passive microwave validation of sea ice concentration from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Crawford, J. P.; Drinkwater, M. R.; Eppler, D. T.; Farmer, L. D.; Jentz, R. R.; Wackerman, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of coordinate special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) underflights that were carried out during March 1988 with NASA and Navy aircraft over portions of the Bering, Beaufort, and Chukchi seas. NASA DC-8 AMMR data from Bering Sea ice edge crossings were used to verify that the ice edge location, defined as the position of the initial ice bands encountered by the aircraft, corresponds to an SSM/I ice concentration of 15 percent. Direct comparison of SSM/I and aircraft ice concentrations for regions having at least 80 percent aircraft coverage reveals that the SSM/I total ice concentration is lower on average by 2.4 +/-2.4 percent. For multiyear ice, NASA and Navy flights across the Beaufort and Chukchi seas show that the SSM/I algorithm correctly maps the large-scale distribution of multiyear ice: the zone of first-year ice off the Alaskan coast, the large areas of mixed first-year and multiyear ice, and the region of predominantly multiyear ice north of the Canadian archipelago.

  7. Application of artificial neural networks for the soil moisture retrieval from active and passive microwave spaceborne sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santi, Emanuele; Paloscia, Simonetta; Pettinato, Simone; Fontanelli, Giacomo

    2016-06-01

    Among the algorithms used for the retrieval of SMC from microwave sensors (both active, such as Synthetic Aperture Radar-SAR, and passive, radiometers), the artificial neural networks (ANN) represent the best compromise between accuracy and computation speed. ANN based algorithms have been developed at IFAC, and adapted to several radar and radiometric satellite sensors, in order to generate SMC products at a resolution varying from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers according to the spatial scale of each sensor. These algorithms, which are based on the ANN techniques for inverting theoretical and semi-empirical models, have been adapted to the C- to Ka- band acquisitions from spaceborne radiometers (AMSR-E/AMSR2), SAR (Envisat/ASAR, Cosmo-SkyMed) and real aperture radar (MetOP ASCAT). Large datasets of co-located satellite acquisitions and direct SMC measurements on several test sites worldwide have been used along with simulations derived from forward electromagnetic models for setting up, training and validating these algorithms. An overall quality assessment of the obtained results in terms of accuracy and computational cost was carried out, and the main advantages and limitations for an operational use of these algorithms were evaluated. This technique allowed the retrieval of SMC from both active and passive satellite systems, with accuracy values of about 0.05 m3/m3 of SMC or better, thus making these applications compliant with the usual accuracy requirements for SMC products from space.

  8. The Correlation of Active and Passive Microwave Outputs for the Skylab S-193 Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, K.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the correlation analysis of the Skylab S-193 13.9 GHz Radiometer/Scatterometer data. Computer analysis of the S-193 data shows more than 50 percent of the radiometer and scatterometer data are uncorrelated. The correlation coefficients computed for the data gathered over various ground scenes indicates the desirability of using both active and passive sensors for the determination of various Earth phenomena.

  9. Microwave sensors for earth resource observations in the 1980's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, J. W., Jr.; Harnage, M. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Future trends in microwave sensing are identified with reference to the workshops organized by the Active Microwave Remote Sensing Research Program. The workshops demonstrated that (1) microwave techniques have great potential for earth observations of renewable and nonrenewable resources and (2) existing research does not adequately assess microwave sensor measurement capabilities. The need for synoptic information includes such areas as cloud-free, surface-roughness and electrical-properties data. Attention is given to applications including all-weather imaging, sensitivity to vegetation and soil-moisture conditions. Research tasks to be accomplished during the next five years are discussed.

  10. Active microwave water equivalence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyne, H. S.; Ellerbruch, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of water equivalence using an active FM-CW microwave system were conducted over the past three years at various sites in Colorado, Wyoming, and California. The measurement method is described. Measurements of water equivalence and stratigraphy are compared with ground truth. A comparison of microwave, federal sampler, and snow pillow measurements at three sites in Colorado is described.

  11. Inexpensive Microwave Moisture Sensor for Granular Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A prototype microwave moisture sensor is described that was assembled from relatively inexpensive microwave components and tested for sensing moisture content in corn and wheat. Components include off-the-shelf voltage-controlled oscillator, isolator, power splitter, two 19-dBi microstrip patch ant...

  12. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Smatlak, Donna L.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Wittle, J. Kenneth; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  13. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  14. Mapping Seasonal Inundation of Amazonian Wetlands with Active Microwave Sensors: Current Status and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, L. L.; Melack, J. M.; Novo, E. M.; Mertes, L. A.; Barbosa, C. C.; Costa, M. P.; Gastil, M. M.

    2001-12-01

    Japanese Earth Resources Satellite 1 (JERS-1) imagery acquired over the Amazon basin during low- and high-water periods makes it possible to map seasonal inundation and vegetation of wetlands for most of the basin. Dual-season mapping has now been completed for a central Amazon quadrat extending from 72\\deg W,0\\deg S to 54\\deg W,8\\deg S. Imagery was acquired by the JERS-1 L-band, HH-polarized SAR during Sept.-Oct. 1995 and May-June 1996, and mosaicked at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory into low- and high-water mosaics with pixel dimensions of approx. 100 m. Image segmentation software developed at INPE was used to carry out a polygon-based classification of the co-registered mosaics into wetland and non-wetland classes. Wetland areas were classified by inundation state (flooded vs. non-flooded) and vegetation type (non-vegetated, woody, or herbaceous), and classification accuracy was assessed using geo-coded digital videography acquired during aerial surveys of the Brazilian Amazon. Seventeen percent of the study quadrat is occupied by wetlands, which are 96% inundated at high water and 26% inundated at low water (including river and stream channels). Flooded forest constitutes nearly 70% of the wetland area at high water. This mapping methodology is being applied to the entire lowland portion of the basin. In order to map inundation extent at intermediate water stages, and to increase classification accuracy in savanna regions, we are using time series of high-resolution JERS-1 and Radarsat data, and will make extensive use of planned acquisitions from the ENVISAT ASAR and ALOS PALSAR sensors.

  15. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  16. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors.

    PubMed

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-02-16

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented.

  17. Microwave Atmospheric-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Bradford, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes tests of microwave pressure sounder (MPS) for use in satellite measurements of atmospheric pressure. MPS is multifrequency radar operating between 25 and 80 GHz. Determines signal absorption over vertical path through atmosphere by measuring strength of echoes from ocean surface. MPS operates with cloud cover, and suitable for use on current meteorological satellites.

  18. Microwave multiplex readout for superconducting sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, E.; Becker, D.; Bennett, D.; Faverzani, M.; Fowler, J.; Gard, J.; Giachero, A.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Hilton, G.; Maino, M.; Mates, J.; Puiu, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Reintsema, C.; Schmidt, D.; Swetz, D.; Ullom, J.; Vale, L.

    2016-07-01

    The absolute neutrino mass scale is still an outstanding challenge in both particle physics and cosmology. The calorimetric measurement of the energy released in a nuclear beta decay is a powerful tool to determine the effective electron-neutrino mass. In the last years, the progress on low temperature detector technologies has allowed to design large scale experiments aiming at pushing down the sensitivity on the neutrino mass below 1 eV. Even with outstanding performances in both energy ( eV on keV) and time resolution ( 1 μs) on the single channel, a large number of detectors working in parallel is required to reach a sub-eV sensitivity. Microwave frequency domain readout is the best available technique to readout large array of low temperature detectors, such as Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) or Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). In this way a multiplex factor of the order of thousands can be reached, limited only by the bandwidth of the available commercial fast digitizers. This microwave multiplexing system will be used to readout the HOLMES detectors, an array of 1000 microcalorimeters based on TES sensors in which the 163Ho will be implanted. HOLMES is a new experiment for measuring the electron neutrino mass by means of the electron capture (EC) decay of 163Ho. We present here the microwave frequency multiplex which will be used in the HOLMES experiment and the microwave frequency multiplex used to readout the MKID detectors developed in Milan as well.

  19. Microwave moisture sensor for rapid and nondestructive grading of peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low-cost microwave moisture sensor operating at a single frequency for instantaneous and nondestructive determination of moisture content in peanut kernels from microwave dielectric measurements on peanut pods was developed and tested. The sensor operates at a frequency of 5.8 GHz and uses the pr...

  20. Microwaves Sensor for Wind Turbine Blade Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Haigh, Arthur; Soutis, Constantinos; Gibson, Andrew; Sloan, Robin

    2017-04-01

    The structural integrity of wind turbine blades can be adversely affected by their structural dynamics, temperature extremes, lightning strikes, ultraviolet radiation from sunlight and airborne particulate matter such as hailstones and sand. If subsurface delamination occurs and is undetected then this can lead to fibre breakage and catastrophic failures in composite blades. In this paper we introduce a microwave scanning technique that detects such delamination in practical blade assemblies. Using an open-ended waveguide sensor, the electromagnetic signal reflected from the composite is found to have a phase profile that can detect changes in the composite cross section. Glass fibre T-joints are scanned and the results used to detect thickness variations (e.g., the presence of the web) and delamination. Results are compared across the 18-20 GHz frequency band. The dielectric permittivity of the composite system is measured and is used to estimate the stand-off distance and operating frequency of the sensor. This is critical to the system's ability to detect damage. When the sensor is close to the surface of the structure (standoff distance ≈ 5 mm), delamination down to 0.2 mm in width could be detected.

  1. Microwaves Sensor for Wind Turbine Blade Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Haigh, Arthur; Soutis, Constantinos; Gibson, Andrew; Sloan, Robin

    2016-11-01

    The structural integrity of wind turbine blades can be adversely affected by their structural dynamics, temperature extremes, lightning strikes, ultraviolet radiation from sunlight and airborne particulate matter such as hailstones and sand. If subsurface delamination occurs and is undetected then this can lead to fibre breakage and catastrophic failures in composite blades. In this paper we introduce a microwave scanning technique that detects such delamination in practical blade assemblies. Using an open-ended waveguide sensor, the electromagnetic signal reflected from the composite is found to have a phase profile that can detect changes in the composite cross section. Glass fibre T-joints are scanned and the results used to detect thickness variations (e.g., the presence of the web) and delamination. Results are compared across the 18-20 GHz frequency band. The dielectric permittivity of the composite system is measured and is used to estimate the stand-off distance and operating frequency of the sensor. This is critical to the system's ability to detect damage. When the sensor is close to the surface of the structure (standoff distance ≈ 5 mm), delamination down to 0.2 mm in width could be detected.

  2. Analysis of interference to remote passive microwave sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Douglas; Tillotson, Tom

    1986-01-01

    The final acts of the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) were analyzed to determine potential interference to remote passive microwave sensors. Using interferer populations determined from the U.S. Government and FCC Master File Lists and assuming uniform geographical distribution of interferers, the level of interference from shared services and active services in adjacent and subharmonic bands was calculated for each of the 22 passive sensing bands. In addition, due to the theoretically large antennas required for passive sensing, an analysis was performed to determine if smaller antennas, i.e., relaxed resolution requirements, would have an effect on interference and to what extent.

  3. Testing of a Microwave Blade Tip Clearance Sensor at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.; Roeder, James W.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new active tip clearance control and structural health monitoring schemes in turbine engines and other types of rotating machinery requires sensors that are highly accurate and can operate in a high temperature environment. The use of a microwave sensor to acquire blade tip clearance and tip timing measurements is being explored at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The microwave blade tip clearance sensor works on principles that are very similar to a short range radar system. The sensor sends a continuous microwave signal towards a target and measures the reflected signal. The phase difference of the reflected signal is directly proportional to the distance between the sensor and the target being measured. This type of sensor is beneficial in that it has the ability to operate at extremely high temperatures and is unaffected by contaminants that may be present in turbine engines. The use of microwave sensors for this application is a new concept. Techniques on calibrating the sensors along with installation effects are not well quantified as they are for other sensor technologies. Developing calibration techniques and evaluating installation effects are essential in using these sensors to make tip clearance and tip timing measurements. As a means of better understanding these issues, the microwave sensors were used on a bench top calibration rig, a large axial vane fan, and a turbofan. Background on the microwave tip clearance sensor, an overview of their calibration, and the results from their use on the axial vane fan and the turbofan will be presented in this paper.

  4. Testing of a Microwave Blade Tip Clearance Sensor at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.; Roeder, James W.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new active tip clearance control and structural health monitoring schemes in turbine engines and other types of rotating machinery requires sensors that are highly accurate and can operate in a high-temperature environment. The use of a microwave sensor to acquire blade tip clearance and tip timing measurements is being explored at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The microwave blade tip clearance sensor works on principles that are very similar to a short-range radar system. The sensor sends a continuous microwave signal towards a target and measures the reflected signal. The phase difference of the reflected signal is directly proportional to the distance between the sensor and the target being measured. This type of sensor is beneficial in that it has the ability to operate at extremely high temperatures and is unaffected by contaminants that may be present in turbine engines. The use of microwave sensors for this application is a new concept. Techniques on calibrating the sensors along with installation effects are not well quantified as they are for other sensor technologies. Developing calibration techniques and evaluating installation effects are essential in using these sensors to make tip clearance and tip timing measurements. As a means of better understanding these issues, the microwave sensors were used on a benchtop calibration rig, a large axial vane fan, and a turbofan. Background on the microwave tip clearance sensor, an overview of their calibration, and the results from their use on the axial vane fan and the turbofan will be presented in this paper.

  5. Applications of active microwave imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, F. P.; Childs, L. F.; Gilbert, R.; Harlan, J. C.; Hoffer, R. M.; Miller, J. M.; Parsons, J.; Polcyn, F.; Schardt, B. B.; Smith, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics were discussed in reference to active microwave applications: (1) Use of imaging radar to improve the data collection/analysis process; (2) Data collection tasks for radar that other systems will not perform; (3) Data reduction concepts; and (4) System and vehicle parameters: aircraft and spacecraft.

  6. Summary of the Active Microwave Workshop, chapter 1. [utilization in applications and aerospace programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of the utility, feasibility, and advantages of active microwave sensors for a broad range of applications, including aerospace. In many instances, the material provides an in-depth examination of the applicability and/or the technology of microwave remote sensing, and considerable documentation is presented in support of these techniques. An assessment of the relative strengths and weaknesses of active microwave sensor data indicates that satisfactory data are obtainable for several significant applications.

  7. Microwave Sensor for Blade Tip Clearance and Structural Health Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    The use of microwave based sensors for the health monitoring of rotating machinery is being explored at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The microwave sensor works on the principle of sending a continuous signal towards a rotating component and measuring the reflected signal. The phase shift of the reflected signal is proportional to the distance between the sensor and the component that is being measured. This type of sensor is beneficial in that it has the ability to operate at extremely high temperatures and is unaffected by contaminants that may be present in the rotating machinery. It is intended to use these probes in the hot sections of turbine engines for closed loop turbine clearance control and structural health measurements. Background on the sensors, an overview of their calibration and preliminary results from using them to make blade tip clearance and health measurements on a large axial vane fan will be presented.

  8. Microwave sensors for nondestructive testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasri, Tuami; Glay, David; Mamouni, Ahmed; Leroy, Yves

    1999-10-01

    Much of today's applications in nondestructive testing by microwaves use an automatic network analyzer. As a result, there is a need for systems to reduce the cost of this kind of techniques. Fortunately, now we can benefit from the cost reduction of the microwave components, induced by the considerable development of the communication market, around 2 and 10 GHz. So, it seems reasonable to think that microwaves will take advantage of this new situation to assert themselves in this application field. In this context we conceive and develop original equipment competitive in term of price and reliability.

  9. A microwave position sensor with submillimeter accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, A.; Diskus, C. G.; Lubke, K.; Thim, H. W.

    1999-12-01

    Design and characteristics of a prototype distance sensor are presented in this paper. The radar front-end operates at 35 GHz and applies six-port technology and direct frequency measurement. The sensor makes use of both frequency-modulated continuous wave and interferometer principles and is capable of measuring distance with a very high accuracy of ±0.1 mm.

  10. Guidelines for spaceborne microwave remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litman, V.; Nicholas, J.

    1982-01-01

    A handbook was developed to provide information and support to the spaceborne remote sensing and frequency management communities: to guide sensor developers in the choice of frequencies; to advise regulators on sensor technology needs and sharing potential; to present sharing analysis models and, through example, methods for determining sensor sharing feasibility; to introduce developers to the regulatory process; to create awareness of proper assignment procedures; to present sensor allocations; and to provide guidelines on the use and limitations of allocated bands. Controlling physical factors and user requirements and the regulatory environment are discussed. Sensor frequency allocation achievable performance and usefulness are reviewed. Procedures for national and international registration, the use of non-allocated bands and steps for obtaining new frequency allocations, and procedures for reporting interference are also discussed.

  11. A Microwave Blade Tip Clearance Sensor for Propulsion Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Microwave sensor technology is being investigated by the NASA Glenn Research Center as a means of making non-contact structural health measurements in the hot sections of gas turbine engines. This type of sensor technology is beneficial in that it is accurate, it has the ability to operate at extremely high temperatures, and is unaffected by contaminants that are present in turbine engines. It is specifically being targeted for use in the High Pressure Turbine (HPT) and High Pressure Compressor (HPC) sections to monitor the structural health of the rotating components. It is intended to use blade tip clearance to monitor blade growth and wear and blade tip timing to monitor blade vibration and deflection. The use of microwave sensors for this application is an emerging concept. Techniques on their use and calibration needed to be developed. As a means of better understanding the issues associated with the microwave sensors, a series of experiments have been conducted to evaluate their performance for aero engine applications. This paper presents the results of these experiments.

  12. Single-ion microwave near-field quantum sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahnschaffe, M.; Hahn, H.; Zarantonello, G.; Dubielzig, T.; Grondkowski, S.; Bautista-Salvador, A.; Kohnen, M.; Ospelkaus, C.

    2017-01-01

    We develop an intuitive model of 2D microwave near-fields in the unusual regime of centimeter waves localized to tens of microns. Close to an intensity minimum, a simple effective description emerges with five parameters that characterize the strength and spatial orientation of the zero and first order terms of the near-field, as well as the field polarization. Such a field configuration is realized in a microfabricated planar structure with an integrated microwave conductor operating near 1 GHz. We use a single 9 Be+ ion as a high-resolution quantum sensor to measure the field distribution through energy shifts in its hyperfine structure. We find agreement with simulations at the sub-micron and few-degree level. Our findings give a clear and general picture of the basic properties of oscillatory 2D near-fields with applications in quantum information processing, neutral atom trapping and manipulation, chip-scale atomic clocks, and integrated microwave circuits.

  13. Sensor Calibration and Ocean Products for TRMM Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Lawrence, Richard J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    During the three years of finding, we have carefully corrected for two sensor/platform problems, developed a physically based retrieval algorithm to calculate SST, wind speed, water vapor, cloud liquid water and rain rates, validated these variables, and demonstrated that satellite microwave radiometers can provide very accurate SST retrievals through clouds. Prior to this, there was doubt by some scientists that the technique of microwave SST retrieval from satellites is a viable option. We think we have put these concerns to rest, and look forward to making microwave SSTs a standard component of the Earth science data sets. Our TMI SSTs were featured on several network news broadcasts and were reported in Science magazine. Additionally, we have developed a SST algorithm for VIRS to facilitate IR/MW inter-comparisons and completed research into diurnal cycles and air-sea interactions.

  14. Sensor Calibration and Ocean Products for TRMM Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Richard J. (Technical Monitor); Wentz, Frank J.

    2003-01-01

    During the three years of fundin& we have carefully corrected for two sensor/platform problems, developed a physically based retrieval algorithm to calculate SST, wind speed, water vapor, cloud liquid water and rain rates, validated these variables, and demonstrated that satellite microwave radiometers can provide very accurate SST retrievals through clouds. Prior to this, there was doubt by some scientists that the technique of microwave SST retrieval from satellites is a viable option. We think we have put these concerns to rest, and look forward to making microwave SSTs a standard component of the Earth science data sets. Our TMI SSTs were featured on several network news broadcasts and were reported in Science magazine. Additionally, we have developed a SST algorithm for VIRS to facilitate IR/MW inter-comparisons and completed research into diurnal cycles and air-sea interactions.

  15. Wireless ultrasound pitch-catch sensor powered by microwave energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Farshad; Yao, Jun; Huang, Haiying

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a compact, batteryless wireless ultrasound pitch-catch system that wirelessly transmits the excitation signals to the actuator installed on the structure, and acquires the ultrasound sensing signal from the wireless sensor. The principle of frequency conversion is used to transform the ultrasound signals to microwave signals so that it can be wirelessly transmitted without digitization. As such, the power hungry digital-to-analog data conversion at the wireless actuator is eliminated. The wireless sensor node is equipped with a low power amplifier, which can be powered continuously by a microwave energy harvester. In addition, compact microstrip patch antennas are implemented for wireless transmissions, which help to achieve a compact interrogation unit.

  16. Correlation of microwave sensor returns with soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, D. W.; Theis, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    Microwave sensor soil data were collected by aircraft over agricultural croplands. Multiple incident angle scatterometer data (13.3, 4.75, 1.6 and 0.4 GHz), passive radiometer data (L and C-band), and soil moisture ground truth measurements were collected coincidentally. Each sensor and angle of incidence was linearly analyzed against the measured soil moisture. For bare agricultural soils, the optimal single sensor for soil moisture preduction is the L-band passive radiometer. The effects of vegetation and differing surface roughness prove significant. When both bare and vegetated surfaces were studied, the masking due to the vegetation renders the single sensor approach ineffective in soil moisture prediction. Multisensor techniques are necessary to remotely measure soil moisture when a priori knowledge of vegetation is not available.

  17. Using satellite microwave sensors to develop climate data records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Ralph; Meng, Huan; Luo, Zhengzhao

    2011-08-01

    NOAA Workshop on Climate Data Records From Satellite Passive Microwave Sounders: AMSU/MHS/SSMT2; College Park, Maryland, 2-3 March 2011 ; The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Climate Data Record (CDR) program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/index.html) is an effort to create long-term homogeneous records of satellite measurements and derived products. As part of this effort, scientists at two related projects that focus on passive microwave sensors with the goal of hydrological applications—one led by a National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) team and one led by the City College of New York (CCNY)—held a joint workshop with the following objectives: To allow the CDR teams to interact with satellite data and product users and other CDR developers on relevant aspects of sensor characteristics and intercalibration that will lead to mature CDRs; To provide a formal mechanism for input by subject matter experts, in particular, sensor scientists and engineers; and> To move toward a community consensus approach for NOAA microwave sounder CDRs.

  18. Evolution of snow sensors and the potential of microwave devices in operational telemetry networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    Both manually collected snow-course data and telemetered information from SNOTEL sites throughout the western United States are used to make forecasts of streamflow. Although these conventional methods have proven highly reliable over the years, they still exhibit some shortcomings. Active and passive microwave remote sensing systems recently developed and tests present the potential to eliminate some negative aspects associated with other types of sensors currently in use. Because of their ability to see through the snowpack they offer a unique opportunity to improve snowpack measurement techniques. As yet neither the active nor passive system is developed sufficiently to supplant existing methods in operational telemetry networks. Active microwave sensors are the most promising for the near future and are being used in research and development programs to study snow pillow performance in the SNOTEL system.

  19. The Moon as a photometric calibration standard for microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdorf, Martin; Buehler, Stefan A.; Lang, Theresa; Michel, Simon; Hans, Imke

    2016-08-01

    Instruments on satellites for Earth observation on polar orbits usually employ a two-point calibration technique, in which deep space and an onboard calibration target provide two reference flux levels. As the direction of the deep-space view is in general close to the celestial equator, the Moon sometimes moves through the field of view and introduces an unwelcome additional signal. One can take advantage of this intrusion, however, by using the Moon as a third flux standard, and this has actually been done for checking the lifetime stability of sensors operating at visible wavelengths. As the disk-integrated thermal emission of the Moon is less well known than its reflected sunlight, this concept can in the microwave range only be used for stability checks and intercalibration. An estimate of the frequency of appearances of the Moon in the deep-space view, a description of the limiting factors of the measurement accuracy and models of the Moon's brightness, and a discussion of the benefits from complementing the naturally occurring appearances of the Moon with dedicated spacecraft maneuvers show that it would be possible to detect photometric lifetime drifts of a few percent with just two measurements. The pointing accuracy is the most crucial factor for the value of this method. Planning such observations in advance would be particularly beneficial, because it allows observing the Moon at well-defined phase angles and putting it at the center of the field of view. A constant phase angle eliminates the need for a model of the Moon's brightness when checking the stability of an instrument. With increasing spatial resolution of future microwave sensors another question arises, viz. to what extent foreground emission from objects other than the Moon will contaminate the flux entering the deep-space view, which is supposed to originate exclusively in the cosmic microwave background. We conclude that even the brightest discreet sources have flux densities below the

  20. Progress report of FY 1998 activities: The application of Kalman filtering to derive water vapor profiles from combined ground-based sensors: Raman lidar, microwave radiometers, GPS, and radiosondes

    SciTech Connect

    Edgeworth R. Westwater; Yong Han

    1999-10-01

    Previously, the proposers have delivered to ARM a documented algorithm, that is now applied operationally, and which derives water vapor profiles from combined remote sensor measurements of water vapor radiometers, cloud-base ceilometers, and radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS). With the expanded deployment of a Raman lidar at the CART Central Facility, high quality, high vertical-resolution, water vapor profiles will be provided during nighttime clear conditions, and during clear daytime conditions, to somewhat lower altitudes. The object of this effort is to use Kalman Filtering, previously applied to the combination of nighttime Raman lidar and microwave radiometer data, to derive high-quality water vapor profiles, during non-precipitating conditions, from data routinely available at the CART site. Input data to the algorithm would include: Raman lidar data, highly quality-controlled data of integrated moisture from microwave radiometers and GPS, RASS, and radiosondes. The focus of this years activities has been on the intercomparison of data obtained during the Water Vapor Intensive Operating Period'97 at the SGP CART site in central Oklahoma.

  1. Progress report of FY 1997 activities: The application of Kalman filtering to derive water vapor profiles from combined ground-based sensors: Raman lidar, microwave radiometers, GPS, and radiosondes

    SciTech Connect

    Edgeworth R. Westwater; Yong Han

    1997-10-05

    Previously, the proposers have delivered to ARM a documented algorithm, that is now applied operationally, and which derives water vapor profiles from combined remote sensor measurements of water vapor radiometers, cloud-base ceilometers, and radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS). With the expanded deployment of a Raman lidar at the CART Central Facility, high quality, high vertical-resolution, water vapor profiles will be provided during nighttime clear conditions, and during clear daytime conditions, to somewhat lower altitudes. The object of this proposal was to use Kalman Filtering, previously applied to the combination of nighttime Raman lidar and microwave radiometer data, to derive high-quality water vapor profiles, during non-precipitating conditions, from data routinely available at the CART site. Input data to the algorithm would include: Raman lidar data, highly quality-controlled data of integrated moisture from microwave radiometers and GPS, RASS, and radiosondes. The algorithm will include recently-developed quality control procedures for radiometers. The focus of this years activities has been on the intercomparison of data obtained during an intensive operating period at the SGP CART site in central Oklahoma.

  2. Orbiting passive microwave sensor simulation applied to soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W. (Principal Investigator); Clark, B. V.; Pitchford, W. M.; Paris, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    A sensor/scene simulation program was developed and used to determine the effects of scene heterogeneity, resolution, frequency, look angle, and surface and temperature relations on the performance of a spaceborne passive microwave system designed to estimate soil water information. The ground scene is based on classified LANDSAT images which provide realistic ground classes, as well as geometries. It was determined that the average sensitivity of antenna temperature to soil moisture improves as the antenna footprint size increased. Also, the precision (or variability) of the sensitivity changes as a function of resolution.

  3. Freshwater ice thickness observations using passive microwave sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Foster, J. L.; Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.

    1981-01-01

    Walden Reservoir, a freshwater lake in north-central Colorado, was overflown six times by a NASA C-130 aircraft between January 1977 and April 1980. The aircraft was equipped with four microwave radiometers operating between 0.81 and 6.0 cm in wavelength (37.0 to 5.0 GHz). The 6.0-cm radiometer data showed a good relationship with ice thickness based on a sample of four ice thickness values. The 1.67- and 1.35-cm radiometer data showed weaker relationships with ice thickness. The 0.81-cm sensor data showed no positive relationship with ice thickness. None of the relationships was statistically significant because of the small sample size. The 6.0-cm sensor data in the nadir-viewing mode was found to have the most potential of all the wavelengths studied, for use in remotely determining ice thickness. The 6.0-cm radiometer probably sensed the entire thickness of the ice on the reservoir (ranging from 25.4 to 67.3 cm in thickness) and was apparently not significantly affected by the snow overlying the ice. The shorter wavelengths are scattered by the snow overlying the ice and are more suitable for snow studies than for ice thickness studies.

  4. AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Slob, Evert; Turk, Ahmet Serdar; Crocco, Lorenzo; Catapano, Ilaria; Di Matteo, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-IRSES project AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging is based on a well-combined network among research institutions of EU, Associate and Third Countries (National Research Council of Italy - Italy, Technische Universiteit Delft - The Netherlands, Yildiz Technical University - Turkey, Bauman Moscow State Technical University - Russia, Usikov Institute for Radio-physics and Electronics and State Research Centre of Superconductive Radioelectronics "Iceberg" - Ukraine and University of Sao Paulo - Brazil) with the aims of achieving scientific advances in the framework of microwave and millimeter imaging systems and techniques for security and safety social issues. In particular, the involved partners are leaders in the scientific areas of passive and active imaging and are sharing their complementary knowledge to address two main research lines. The first one regards the design, characterization and performance evaluation of new passive and active microwave devices, sensors and measurement set-ups able to mitigate clutter and increase information content. The second line faces the requirements to make State-of-the-Art processing tools compliant with the instrumentations developed in the first line, suitable to work in electromagnetically complex scenarios and able to exploit the unexplored possibilities offered by new instrumentations. The main goals of the project are: 1) Development/improvement and characterization of new sensors and systems for active and passive microwave imaging; 2) Set up, analysis and validation of state of art/novel data processing approach for GPR in critical infrastructure and subsurface imaging; 3) Integration of state of art and novel imaging hardware and characterization approaches to tackle realistic situations in security, safety and subsurface prospecting applications; 4) Development and feasibility study of bio-radar technology (system and data processing) for vital signs detection and

  5. Active microwave users working group program planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bare, J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Childs, L. F.; Dellwig, L. F.; Heighway, J. E.; Joosten, R.; Lewis, A. J.; Linlor, W.; Lundien, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed programmatic and technical development plan for active microwave technology was examined in each of four user activities: (1) vegetation; (2) water resources and geologic applications, and (4) oceanographic applications. Major application areas were identified, and the impact of each application area in terms of social and economic gains were evaluated. The present state of knowledge of the applicability of active microwave remote sensing to each application area was summarized and its role relative to other remote sensing devices was examined. The analysis and data acquisition techniques needed to resolve the effects of interference factors were reviewed to establish an operational capability in each application area. Flow charts of accomplished and required activities in each application area that lead to operational capability were structured.

  6. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): A New Operational Sensor Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Lyu, Cheng-H Joseph; Leslie, R. Vince; Baker, Neal; Mo, Tsan; Sun, Ninghai; Bi, Li; Anderson, Mike; Landrum, Mike; DeAmici, Giovanni; Gu, Degui; Foo, Alex; Ibrahim, Wael; Robinson, Kris; Chidester, Lynn; Shiue, James

    2012-01-01

    ATMS is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. ATMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models; and ATMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet NWP sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface

  7. Microwave corrosion detection using open ended rectangular waveguide sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Qaddoumi, N.; Handjojo, L.; Bigelow, T.; Easter, J.; Bray, A.; Zoughi, R.

    2000-02-01

    The use of microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive testing methods utilizing open ended rectangular waveguide sensors has shown great potential for detecting minute thickness variations in laminate structures, in particular those backed by a conducting plate. Slight variations in the dielectric properties of materials may also be detected using a set of optimal parameters which include the standoff distance and the frequency of operation. In a recent investigation, on detecting rust under paint, the dielectric properties of rust were assumed to be similar to those of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. These values were used in an electromagnetic model that simulates the interaction of fields radiated by a rectangular waveguide aperture with layered structures to obtain optimal parameters. The dielectric properties of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were measured to be very similar to the properties of paint. Nevertheless, the presence of a simulated Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer under a paint layer was detected. In this paper the dielectric properties of several different rust samples from different environments are measured. The measurements indicate that the nature of real rust is quite diverse and is different from Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and paint, indicating that the presence of rust under paint can be easily detected. The same electromagnetic model is also used (with the newly measured dielectric properties of real rust) to obtain an optimal standoff distance at a frequency of 24 GHz. The results indicate that variations in the magnitude as well as the phase of the reflection coefficient can be used to obtain information about the presence of rust. An experimental investigation on detecting the presence of very thin rust layers (2.5--5 x 10{sup {minus}2} mm [09--2.0 x 10{sup {minus}3} in.]) using an open ended rectangular waveguide probe is also conducted. Microwave images of rusted specimens, obtained at 24 GHz, are also presented.

  8. Structural Health Monitoring on Turbine Engines Using Microwave Blade Tip Clearance Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Clem, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The ability to monitor the structural health of the rotating components, especially in the hot sections of turbine engines, is of major interest to aero community in improving engine safety and reliability. The use of instrumentation for these applications remains very challenging. It requires sensors and techniques that are highly accurate, are able to operate in a high temperature environment, and can detect minute changes and hidden flaws before catastrophic events occur. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has taken a lead role in the investigation of new sensor technologies and techniques for the in situ structural health monitoring of gas turbine engines. As part of this effort, microwave sensor technology has been investigated as a means of making high temperature non-contact blade tip clearance, blade tip timing, and blade vibration measurements for use in gas turbine engines. This paper presents a summary of key results and findings obtained from the evaluation of two different types of microwave sensors that have been investigated for use possible in structural health monitoring applications. The first is a microwave blade tip clearance sensor that has been evaluated on a large scale Axial Vane Fan, a subscale Turbofan, and more recently on sub-scale turbine engine like disks. The second is a novel microwave based blade vibration sensor that was also used in parallel with the microwave blade tip clearance sensors on the experiments with the sub-scale turbine engine disks.

  9. Structural health monitoring on turbine engines using microwave blade tip clearance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woike, Mark; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Clem, Michelle

    2014-04-01

    The ability to monitor the structural health of the rotating components, especially in the hot sections of turbine engines, is of major interest to the aero community in improving engine safety and reliability. The use of instrumentation for these applications remains very challenging. It requires sensors and techniques that are highly accurate, are able to operate in a high temperature environment, and can detect minute changes and hidden flaws before catastrophic events occur. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has taken a lead role in the investigation of new sensor technologies and techniques for the in situ structural health monitoring of gas turbine engines. As part of this effort, microwave sensor technology has been investigated as a means of making high temperature non-contact blade tip clearance, blade tip timing, and blade vibration measurements for use in gas turbine engines. This paper presents a summary of key results and findings obtained from the evaluation of two different types of microwave sensors that have been investigated for possible use in structural health monitoring applications. The first is a microwave blade tip clearance sensor that has been evaluated on a large scale Axial Vane Fan, a subscale Turbofan, and more recently on sub-scale turbine engine like disks. The second is a novel microwave based blade vibration sensor that was also used in parallel with the microwave blade tip clearance sensors on the same experiments with the sub-scale turbine engine disks.

  10. Microwave Sensor for Simultaneous and Nondestructive Determination of Moisture Content and Bulk Density of Granular Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low-cost microwave sensor operating at a single frequency for instantaneous and nondestructive determination of moisture content and bulk density of granular and particulate materials was developed and tested. The sensor operates at a frequency of 5.8 GHz and uses the principle of free-space tran...

  11. Progress report of FY 1999 activities: The application of Kalman filtering to derive water vapor profiles from combined ground-based sensors: Raman lidar, microwave radiometers, GPS, and radiosondes

    SciTech Connect

    Edgeworth R. Westwater; Yong Han

    1999-09-10

    Previously, the proposers have delivered to ARM a documented algorithm, that is now applied operationally, and which derives water vapor profiles from combined remote sensor measurements of water vapor radiometers, cloud-base ceilometers, and radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS). With the expanded deployment of a Raman lidar at the CART Central Facility, high quality, high vertical-resolution, water vapor profiles will be provided during nighttime clear conditions, and during clear daytime conditions, to somewhat lower altitudes. The object of this effort is to use Kalman Filtering, previously applied to the combination of nighttime Raman lidar and microwave radiometer data, to derive high-quality water vapor profiles, during non-precipitating conditions, from data routinely available at the CART site. Input data to the algorithm would include: Raman lidar data, highly quality-controlled data of integrated moisture from microwave radiometers and GPS, RASS, and radiosondes. While analyzing data obtained during the Water Vapor Intensive Operating Period'97 at the SGP CART site in central Oklahoma, several questions arose about the calibration of the ARM microwave radiometers (MWR). A large portion of this years effort was a thorough analysis of the many factors that are important for the calibration of this instrument through the tip calibration method and the development of algorithms to correct this procedure. An open literature publication describing this analysis has been accepted.

  12. Particle fallout/activity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Ihlefeld M. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Rose, Kenneth A., III (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A particle fallout/activity sensor measures relative amounts of dust or other particles which collect on a mirror in an area to be monitored. The sensor includes a sensor module and a data acquisition module, both of which can be operated independently of one another or in combination with one another. The sensor module includes a housing containing the mirror, an LED assembly for illuminating the mirror and an optical detector assembly for detecting light scattered off of the mirror by dust or other particles collected thereon. A microprocessor controls operation of the sensor module's components and displays results of a measurement on an LCD display mounted on the housing. A push button switch is also mounted on the housing which permits manual initiation of a measurement. The housing is constructed of light absorbing material, such as black delrin, which minimizes detection of light by the optical detector assembly other than that scattered by dust or particles on the mirror. The data acquisition module can be connected to the sensor module and includes its own microprocessor, a timekeeper and other digital circuitry for causing the sensor module to make a measurement periodically and send the measurement data to the data acquisition module for display and storage in memory for later retrieval and transfer to a separate computer. The time tagged measurement data can also be used to determine the relative level of activity in the monitored area since this level is directly related to the amount of dust or particle fallout in the area.

  13. A novel microwave sensor to determine particulate blend composition on-line.

    PubMed

    Austin, John; Gupta, Anshu; McDonnell, Ryan; Reklaitis, Gintaras V; Harris, Michael T

    2014-03-28

    Due to the ease with which particulate blends tend to segregate, blend uniformity and chemical composition are two critical control parameters in nearly all solids manufacturing industries. The prevailing wisdom has been that microwave sensors are not capable of or sensitive enough to measure the relative concentrations of components in a blend. Consequently, it is common to turn to near infrared sensing to determine material composition on-line. In this study, a novel microwave sensor was designed and utilized to determine, separately, the concentrations of different components in a blend of microcrystalline cellulose, acetaminophen, and water. This custom microwave sensor was shown to have comparable accuracy to a commercial NIR probe for both chemical composition and moisture content determination.

  14. Ground penetrating detection using miniaturized radar system based on solid state microwave sensor.

    PubMed

    Yao, B M; Fu, L; Chen, X S; Lu, W; Guo, H; Gui, Y S; Hu, C-M

    2013-12-01

    We propose a solid-state-sensor-based miniaturized microwave radar technique, which allows a rapid microwave phase detection for continuous wave operation using a lock-in amplifier rather than using expensive and complicated instruments such as vector network analyzers. To demonstrate the capability of this sensor-based imaging technique, the miniaturized system has been used to detect embedded targets in sand by measuring the reflection for broadband microwaves. Using the reconstruction algorithm, the imaging of the embedded target with a diameter less than 5 cm buried in the sands with a depth of 5 cm or greater is clearly detected. Therefore, the sensor-based approach emerges as an innovative and cost-effective way for ground penetrating detection.

  15. The electromagnetic-trait imaging computation of traveling wave method in breast tumor microwave sensor system.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhi-Fu; Han, Zhong-Ling; Yao, Meng

    2011-01-01

    Using the difference of dielectric constant between malignant tumor tissue and normal breast tissue, breast tumor microwave sensor system (BRATUMASS) determines the detected target of imaging electromagnetic trait by analyzing the properties of target tissue back wave obtained after near-field microwave radicalization (conelrad). The key of obtained target properties relationship and reconstructed detected space is to analyze the characteristics of the whole process from microwave transmission to back wave reception. Using traveling wave method, we derive spatial transmission properties and the relationship of the relation detected points distances, and valuate the properties of each unit by statistical valuation theory. This chapter gives the experimental data analysis results.

  16. Transmission-Type 2-Bit Programmable Metasurface for Single-Sensor and Single-Frequency Microwave Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun Bo; Li, Lian Lin; Xu, Bai Bing; Wu, Wei; Wu, Rui Yuan; Wan, Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    The programmable and digital metamaterials or metasurfaces presented recently have huge potentials in designing real-time-controlled electromagnetic devices. Here, we propose the first transmission-type 2-bit programmable coding metasurface for single-sensor and single- frequency imaging in the microwave frequency. Compared with the existing single-sensor imagers composed of active spatial modulators with their units controlled independently, we introduce randomly programmable metasurface to transform the masks of modulators, in which their rows and columns are controlled simultaneously so that the complexity and cost of the imaging system can be reduced drastically. Different from the single-sensor approach using the frequency agility, the proposed imaging system makes use of variable modulators under single frequency, which can avoid the object dispersion. In order to realize the transmission-type 2-bit programmable metasurface, we propose a two-layer binary coding unit, which is convenient for changing the voltages in rows and columns to switch the diodes in the top and bottom layers, respectively. In our imaging measurements, we generate the random codes by computer to achieve different transmission patterns, which can support enough multiple modes to solve the inverse-scattering problem in the single-sensor imaging. Simple experimental results are presented in the microwave frequency, validating our new single-sensor and single-frequency imaging system. PMID:27025907

  17. Transmission-Type 2-Bit Programmable Metasurface for Single-Sensor and Single-Frequency Microwave Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun Bo; Li, Lian Lin; Xu, Bai Bing; Wu, Wei; Wu, Rui Yuan; Wan, Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-03-01

    The programmable and digital metamaterials or metasurfaces presented recently have huge potentials in designing real-time-controlled electromagnetic devices. Here, we propose the first transmission-type 2-bit programmable coding metasurface for single-sensor and single- frequency imaging in the microwave frequency. Compared with the existing single-sensor imagers composed of active spatial modulators with their units controlled independently, we introduce randomly programmable metasurface to transform the masks of modulators, in which their rows and columns are controlled simultaneously so that the complexity and cost of the imaging system can be reduced drastically. Different from the single-sensor approach using the frequency agility, the proposed imaging system makes use of variable modulators under single frequency, which can avoid the object dispersion. In order to realize the transmission-type 2-bit programmable metasurface, we propose a two-layer binary coding unit, which is convenient for changing the voltages in rows and columns to switch the diodes in the top and bottom layers, respectively. In our imaging measurements, we generate the random codes by computer to achieve different transmission patterns, which can support enough multiple modes to solve the inverse-scattering problem in the single-sensor imaging. Simple experimental results are presented in the microwave frequency, validating our new single-sensor and single-frequency imaging system.

  18. Transmission-Type 2-Bit Programmable Metasurface for Single-Sensor and Single-Frequency Microwave Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun Bo; Li, Lian Lin; Xu, Bai Bing; Wu, Wei; Wu, Rui Yuan; Wan, Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-03-30

    The programmable and digital metamaterials or metasurfaces presented recently have huge potentials in designing real-time-controlled electromagnetic devices. Here, we propose the first transmission-type 2-bit programmable coding metasurface for single-sensor and single- frequency imaging in the microwave frequency. Compared with the existing single-sensor imagers composed of active spatial modulators with their units controlled independently, we introduce randomly programmable metasurface to transform the masks of modulators, in which their rows and columns are controlled simultaneously so that the complexity and cost of the imaging system can be reduced drastically. Different from the single-sensor approach using the frequency agility, the proposed imaging system makes use of variable modulators under single frequency, which can avoid the object dispersion. In order to realize the transmission-type 2-bit programmable metasurface, we propose a two-layer binary coding unit, which is convenient for changing the voltages in rows and columns to switch the diodes in the top and bottom layers, respectively. In our imaging measurements, we generate the random codes by computer to achieve different transmission patterns, which can support enough multiple modes to solve the inverse-scattering problem in the single-sensor imaging. Simple experimental results are presented in the microwave frequency, validating our new single-sensor and single-frequency imaging system.

  19. Optical fiber sensor for germicidal microwave plasma UV lamps for water and wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Colin; Lewis, E.; Al-Shamma'a, A.; Lucas, J.

    2001-05-01

    Low-pressure mercury lamps are commonly used for germicidal applications such as water and wastewater sterilization. The germicidal effect is due to the emission of light at 254 nm, which leads to the destruction of most waterborne bacteria. The Microwave Plasma UV Lamp (MPUVL) is a new technology for generating a high intensity UV light. A Fluorescent Optical Fiber based sensor is presented which is used for monitoring the output of a high power microwave UV light source and its control. This sensor is a fiber which has had its cladding removed and been coated with a phosphor doped polymer.

  20. Fiber sensor systems based on fiber laser and microwave photonic technologies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongyan; Chen, Daru; Cai, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors, especially fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are very attractive due to their numerous advantages over traditional sensors, such as light weight, high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, ease of multiplexing and so on. Therefore, fiber-optic sensors have been intensively studied during the last several decades. Nowadays, with the development of novel fiber technology, more and more newly invented fiber technologies bring better and superior performance to fiber-optic sensing networks. In this paper, the applications of some advanced photonic technologies including fiber lasers and microwave photonic technologies for fiber sensing applications are reviewed. FBG interrogations based on several kinds of fiber lasers, especially the novel Fourier domain mode locking fiber laser, have been introduced; for the application of microwave photonic technology, examples of microwave photonic filtering utilized as a FBG sensing interrogator and microwave signal generation acting as a transversal loading sensor have been given. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstrations have been carried out. The comparison of these advanced photonic technologies for the applications of fiber sensing is carried out and important issues related to the applications have been addressed and the suitable and potential application examples have also been discussed in this paper.

  1. Active microwave responses - An aid in improved crop classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    A study determined the feasibility of using visible, infrared, and active microwave data to classify agricultural crops such as corn, sorghum, alfalfa, wheat stubble, millet, shortgrass pasture and bare soil. Visible through microwave data were collected by instruments on board the NASA C-130 aircraft over 40 agricultural fields near Guymon, OK in 1978 and Dalhart, TX in 1980. Results from stepwise and discriminant analysis techniques indicated 4.75 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 0.4 GHz cross-polarized microwave frequencies were the microwave frequencies most sensitive to crop type differences. Inclusion of microwave data in visible and infrared classification models improved classification accuracy from 73 percent to 92 percent. Despite the results, further studies are needed during different growth stages to validate the visible, infrared, and active microwave responses to vegetation.

  2. Rapid, facile microwave-assisted synthesis of xanthan gum grafted polyaniline for chemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sadanand; Ramontja, James

    2016-08-01

    Grafting method, through microwave radiation procedure is extremely productive in terms of time consumption, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness. In this study, conductive and thermally stable composite (mwXG-g-PANi) was synthesized by grafting of aniline (ANi) on to xanthan gum (XG) using catalytic weight of initiator, ammonium peroxydisulfate in the process of microwave irradiation in an aqueous medium. The synthesis of mwXG-g-PANi were confirm by FTIR, XRD, TGA, and SEM. The influence of altering the microwave power, exposure time of microwave, concentration of monomer and the amount of initiator of graft polymerization were studied over the grafting parameters, for example, grafting percentage (%G) and grafting efficiency (%E). The maximum %G and %E achieved was 172 and 74.13 respectively. The outcome demonstrates that the microwave irradiation strategy can increase the reaction rate by 72 times over the conventional method. Electrical conductivity of XG and mwXG-g-PANi composite film was performed. The fabricated grafted sample film were then examined for the chemical sensor. The mwXG-g-PANi, effectively integrated and handled, are NH3 sensitive and exhibit a rapid sensing in presence of NH3 vapor. Chemiresistive NH3 sensors with superior room temperature sensing performance were produced with sensor response of 905 at 1ppb and 90% recovery within few second.

  3. Hand tremor and activity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konigsberg, E.

    1975-01-01

    System detects hand tremor and activity and transmitting signals over distance of at least 3 meters to receiver system. Designed for use in studies of effect of fatigue on individual's judgement or reaction time, sensor is installed within mounting of finger-ring; no external wiring or power source is needed.

  4. Active spectral sensor evaluation under varying conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant stress has been estimated by spectral signature using both passive and active sensors. As optical sensors measure reflected light from a target, changes in illumination characteristics critically affect sensor response. Active sensors are of benefit in minimizing uncontrolled illumination effe...

  5. Evaluation of a Microwave Blade Tip Clearance Sensor for Propulsion Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woike, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has investigated a microwave blade tip clearance system for the structural health monitoring of gas turbine engines. This presentation describes the sensors and the experiments that have been conducted to evaluate their performance along with future plans for their use on an engine ground test.

  6. Feasibility Study on a Microwave-Based Sensor for Measuring Hydration Level Using Human Skin Models

    PubMed Central

    Brendtke, Rico; Wiehl, Michael; Groeber, Florian; Schwarz, Thomas; Walles, Heike; Hansmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tissue dehydration results in three major types of exsiccosis—hyper-, hypo-, or isonatraemia. All three types entail alterations of salt concentrations leading to impaired biochemical processes, and can finally cause severe morbidity. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a microwave-based sensor technology for the non-invasive measurement of the hydration status. Electromagnetic waves at high frequencies interact with molecules, especially water. Hence, if a sample contains free water molecules, this can be detected in a reflected microwave signal. To develop the sensor system, human three-dimensional skin equivalents were instituted as a standardized test platform mimicking reproducible exsiccosis scenarios. Therefore, skin equivalents with a specific hydration and density of matrix components were generated and microwave measurements were performed. Hydration-specific spectra allowed deriving the hydration state of the skin models. A further advantage of the skin equivalents was the characterization of the impact of distinct skin components on the measured signals to investigate mechanisms of signal generation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a non-invasive microwave-based hydration sensor technology. The sensor bears potential to be integrated in a wearable medical device for personal health monitoring. PMID:27046226

  7. Application of the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor in a power radiation monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Gao; Jing, Yang; Si, Jiang; Debo, Wang

    2016-08-01

    A power radiation monitoring system based on thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensors is studied. This monitoring system consists of three modules: a data acquisition module, a data processing and display module, and a data sharing module. It can detect the power radiation in the environment and the date information can be processed and shared. The measured results show that the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor and the power radiation monitoring system both have a relatively good linearity. The sensitivity of the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor is about 0.101 mV/mW, and the sensitivity of the monitoring system is about 0.038 V/mW. The voltage gain of the monitoring system is about 380 times, which is relatively consistent with the theoretical value. In addition, the low-frequency and low-power module in the monitoring system is adopted in order to reduce the electromagnetic pollution and the power consumption, and this work will extend the application of the thermoelectric MEMS microwave power sensor in more areas. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11304158), the Province Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu (No. BK20140890), the Open Research Fund of the Key Laboratory of MEMS of Ministry of Education, Southeast University (No. 3206005302), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications (Nos. NY213024, NY215139).

  8. Microwave sensor for tangerine classification based on coupled-patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leekul, Prapan; Chivapreecha, Sorawat; Krairiksh, Monai

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with a microwave sensor for classifying tangerines by flavour using coupled-patch antennas. The operating frequency of the antennas is 2.45 GHz. The sensor determines the flavour of each tangerine by measuring the magnitudes of coupled signals of the antennas with the tangerine fruit at the centre. The sorting is carried out using an artificial neural network implemented on a field programmable gate array. The classification performance of the sensor is 95% accurate, so it has potential for use in sorting tangerines by flavour. In addition, the system uncertainty is analysed to determine optimal operating conditions.

  9. Microwave spectroscopy of the active sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    In studies of solar active regions and bursts, the ability to obtain spatially resolved radio spectra (brightness temperature spectra) opens a whole new range of possibilities for study of the solar corona. For active regions, two-dimensional maps of brightness temperature over a wide range of frequencies allows one to determine temperature, column density, and magnetic field strength over the entire region in a straightforward, unambiguous way. For flares, the time-dependent electron energy distribution, number of accelerated electrons, and magnetic field strength and direction can be found. In practice, obtaining complete radio images at a large number of frequencies is a significant technical challenge, especially while keeping costs down. Our instrument at Owens Valley Radio Observatory provided the starting point for a modest attempt at meeting this goal. We proposed to build three additional, very low-cost 2-m antennas which, when combined with our existing two 27-m dishes, expands the array to 5 elements. This modest increase in number of solar dedicated antennas, from 2 to 5, increases our maximum number of physical baselines from 1 to 10 and allows the instrument to do true imaging of solar microwave sources, both bursts and active regions. Combined with the technique of frequency synthesis, the new array has up to 450 effective baselines, giving imaging capability that approaches that of a sub-arrayed VLA. The prototype antenna design was finalized and the antenna was put into operation in Nov. 1989.

  10. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system

    PubMed Central

    Rydfjord, Jonas; Svensson, Fredrik; Fagrell, Magnus; Sävmarker, Jonas; Thulin, Måns

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe), thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications. PMID:24204419

  11. Temperature measurements with two different IR sensors in a continuous-flow microwave heated system.

    PubMed

    Rydfjord, Jonas; Svensson, Fredrik; Fagrell, Magnus; Sävmarker, Jonas; Thulin, Måns; Larhed, Mats

    2013-01-01

    In a continuous-flow system equipped with a nonresonant microwave applicator we have investigated how to best assess the actual temperature of microwave heated organic solvents with different characteristics. This is non-trivial as the electromagnetic field will influence most traditional methods of temperature measurement. Thus, we used a microwave transparent fiber optic probe, capable of measuring the temperature inside the reactor, and investigated two different IR sensors as non-contact alternatives to the internal probe. IR sensor 1 measures the temperature on the outside of the reactor whilst IR sensor 2 is designed to measure the temperature of the fluid through the borosilicate glass that constitutes the reactor wall. We have also, in addition to the characterization of the before mentioned IR sensors, developed statistical models to correlate the IR sensor reading to a correct value of the inner temperature (as determined by the internal fiber optic probe), thereby providing a non-contact, indirect, temperature assessment of the heated solvent. The accuracy achieved with these models lie well within the range desired for most synthetic chemistry applications.

  12. Active and Passive Hybrid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, James R.

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid ocean wind sensor (HOWS) can map ocean vector wind in low to hurricane-level winds, and non-precipitating and precipitating conditions. It can acquire active and passive measurements through a single aperture at two wavelengths, two polarizations, and multiple incidence angles. Its low profile, compact geometry, and low power consumption permits installation on air craft platforms, including high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

  13. Analytical and electrical modeling of a MEMS thermoelectric microwave power sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Juzheng; Liao, Xiaoping

    2016-09-01

    A new analytical method which can support full computer-aided circuit design for a microelectromechanical (MEMS) thermoelectric microwave power sensor operable at X-band is presented in this paper. A reduced dimensional form of a heat transfer equation is built in the radial direction based on point heat source approximation and precise volume mesh of the sensor. Frequency dependent losses are discussed to explain the sensitivity degradation with frequency. Based on this analysis, an electrical model for the power sensor is established. This approach facilitates the modeling of the coupled energy domains in the power sensor straightforwardly by means of a computer-aided simulation. Better estimation property is obtained compared to our previous works. Verifications are both conducted through ANSYS simulation and measurements with close agreements are observed. Relative errors between them are smaller than 13%. The deviations are discussed in detail. Fabrication of the thermoelectric power sensor is based on MEMS technology and the GaAs MMIC process.

  14. Atmospheric attenuation relative to earth-viewing orbital sensors. [atmospheric moisture effects on microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Jayroe, R. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Earth viewing space missions offer exciting new possibilities in several earth resources disciplines - geography, hydrology, agriculture, geology, and oceanography, to name a few. A most useful tool in planning experiments and applying space technology to earth observation is a statistical description of atmospheric parameters. Four dimensional atmospheric models and a world wide cloud model are used to produce atmospheric attenuation models to predict degradation effects for all classes of sensors for application to earth sensing experiments from spaceborne platforms. To insure maximum utility and application of these products, the development of an interaction model of microwave energy and atmospheric variables provides a complete description of the effects of atmospheric moisture upon microwaves.

  15. Frequency requirements for active earth observation sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The foundation and rationale for the selection of microwave frequencies for active remote sensing usage and for subsequent use in determination of sharing criteria and allocation strategies for the WARC-79 are presented.

  16. A Novel Symmetrical Split Ring Resonator Based on Microstrip for Microwave Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alahnomi, Rammah A.; Zakaria, Z.; Ruslan, E.; Bahar, Amyrul Azuan Mohd

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, novel symmetrical split ring resonator (SSRR) is proposed as a suitable component for performance enhancement of microwave sensors. SSRR has been employed for enhancing the insertion loss of the microwave sensors. Using the same device area, we can achieve a high Q-factor of 141.54 from the periphery enhancement using Quasi-linear coupling SSRR, whereas loose coupling SSRR can achieve a Q-factor of 33.98 only. Using Quasi-linear coupling SSRR, the Q-factor is enhanced 4.16 times the loose coupling SSRR using the same device area. After the optimization was made, the SSRR sensor with loose coupling scheme has achieved a very high Qfactor value around 407.34 while quasi-linear scheme has achieved high Q-factor value of 278.78 at the same operating frequency with smaller insertion loss. Spurious passbands at 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th harmonics have been completely suppressed well above -20 dB rejection level without visible changes in the passband filter characteristics. The most significant of using SSRR is to be used for various industrial applications such as food industry, quality control, bio-sensing medicine and pharmacy. The simulation result that Quasi-linear coupling SSRR is a viable candidate for the performance enhancement of microwave sensors has been verified.

  17. Solar Activity Studies using Microwave Imaging Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the status of solar cycle 24 based on polar prominence eruptions (PEs) and microwave brightness enhancement (MBE) information obtained by the Nobeyama radioheliograph. The north polar region of the Sun had near-zero field strength for more than three years (2012-2015) and ended only in September 2015 as indicated by the presence of polar PEs and the lack of MBE. The zero-polar-field condition in the south started only around 2013, but it ended by June 2014. Thus the asymmetry in the times of polarity reversal switched between cycle 23 and 24. The polar MBE is a good proxy for the polar magnetic field strength as indicated by the high degree of correlation between the two. The cross-correlation between the high- and low-latitude MBEs is significant for a lag of approximately 5.5 to 7.3 years, suggesting that the polar field of one cycle indicates the sunspot number of the next cycle in agreement with the Babcock-Leighton mechanism of solar cycles. The extended period of near-zero field in the north-polar region should result in a weak and delayed sunspot activity in the northern hemisphere in cycle 25.

  18. Spatial Scaling of Snow Observations and Microwave Emission Modeling During CLPX and Appropriate Satellite Sensor Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.; Tedesco, M.

    2005-12-01

    Accurate estimates of snow water equivalent and other properties play an important role in weather, natural hazard, and hydrological forecasting and climate modeling over a range of scales in space and time. Remote sensing-derived estimates have traditionally been of the 'snapshot' type, but techniques involving models with assimilation are also being explored. In both cases, forward emission models are useful to understand the observed passive microwave signatures and developing retrieval algorithms. However, mismatches between passive microwave sensor resolutions and the scales of processes controlling subpixel heterogeneity can affect the accuracy of the estimates. Improving the spatial resolution of new passive microwave satellite sensors is a major desire in order to (literally) resolve such subpixel heterogeneity, but limited spacecraft and mission resources impose severe constraints and tradeoffs. In order to maximize science return while mitigating risk for a satellite concept, it is essential to understand the scaling behavior of snow in terms of what the sensor sees (brightness temperature) as well as in terms of the actual variability of snow. NASA's Cold Land Processes Experiment-1 (CLPX-1: Colorado, 2002 and 2003) was designed to provide data to measure these scaling behaviors for varying snow conditions in areas with forested, alpine, and meadow/pasture land cover. We will use observations from CLPX-1 ground, airborne, and satellite passive microwave sensors to examine and evaluate the scaling behavior of observed and modeled brightness temperatures and observed and retrieved snow parameters across scales from meters to 10's of kilometers. The conclusions will provide direct examples of the appropriate spatial sampling scales of new sensors for snow remote sensing. The analyses will also illustrate the effects and spatial scales of the underlying phenomena (e.g., land cover) that control subpixel heterogeneity.

  19. Spatial Scaling of Snow Observations and Microwave Emission Modeling During CLPX and Appropriate Satellite Sensor Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Accurate estimates of snow water equivalent and other properties play an important role in weather, natural hazard, and hydrological forecasting and climate modeling over a range of scales in space and time. Remote sensing-derived estimates have traditionally been of the "snapshot" type, but techniques involving models with assimilation are also being explored. In both cases, forward emission models are useful to understand the observed passive microwave signatures and developing retrieval algorithms. However, mismatches between passive microwave sensor resolutions and the scales of processes controlling subpixel heterogeneity can affect the accuracy of the estimates. Improving the spatial resolution of new passive microwave satellite sensors is a major desire in order to (literally) resolve such subpixel heterogeneity, but limited spacecraft and mission resources impose severe constraints and tradeoffs. In order to maximize science return while mitigating risk for a satellite concept, it is essential to understand the scaling behavior of snow in terms of what the sensor sees (brightness temperature) as well as in terms of the actual variability of snow. NASA's Cold Land Processes Experiment-1 (CLPX-1: Colorado, 2002 and 2003) was designed to provide data to measure these scaling behaviors for varying snow conditions in areas with forested, alpine, and meadow/pasture land cover. We will use observations from CLPX-1 ground, airborne, and satellite passive microwave sensors to examine and evaluate the scaling behavior of observed and modeled brightness temperatures and observed and retrieved snow parameters across scales from meters to 10's of kilometers. The conclusions will provide direct examples of the appropriate spatial sampling scales of new sensors for snow remote sensing. The analyses will also illustrate the effects and spatial scales of the underlying phenomena (e.g., land cover) that control subpixel heterogeneity.

  20. Sensor development in the Shuttle era. [infrared temperature sounders and microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerding, R. B.; Mantarakis, P. Z.; Webber, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    The use of the Space Shuttle in the development of earth observation sensors is examined. Two sensor classes are selected for case histories: infrared temperature sounders and microwave radiometers. The most significant finding in each of the developmental studies of these two sensor classes is considered to be the feasibility and value of using the Shuttle/Spacelab as a test vehicle for the operation in space of a versatile multimode experimental sensor. The Shuttle Electrically Scanned Microwave Radiometer and the Shuttle Infrared Interferometer are found to be the most effective instruments in this context. The Shuttle/Spacelab Sortie mission characteristics provide opportunities for new approaches to the development of sensors, using the Shuttle as a test vehicle to improve the efficiency of the process with respect to time, cost, and/or quality of the final product. As for crew functions, the short-term Spacelab mission requires some near real-time evaluation of data quality and sensor function in order to insure efficient data collection.

  1. Microwave-induced thermogenetic activation of single cells

    SciTech Connect

    Safronov, N. A.; Fedotov, I. V.; Ermakova, Yu. G.; Matlashov, M. E.; Belousov, V. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-04-20

    Exposure to a microwave field is shown to enable thermogenetic activation of individual cells in a culture of cell expressing thermosensitive ion channels. Integration of a microwave transmission line with an optical fiber and a diamond quantum thermometer has been shown to allow thermogenetic single-cell activation to be combined with accurate local online temperature measurements based on an optical detection of electron spin resonance in nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond.

  2. Active Targets For Capacitive Proximity Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenstrom, Del T.; Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power active targets devised for use with improved capacitive proximity sensors described in "Capacitive Proximity Sensor Has Longer Range" (GSC-13377), and "Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields" (GSC-13475). Active targets are short-distance electrostatic beacons; they generate known alternating electro-static fields used for alignment and/or to measure distances.

  3. An optically-interrogated microwave-Poynting-vector sensor using cadmium manganese telluride.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chu; Whitaker, John F

    2010-06-07

    A single <110> cadmium-manganese-telluride crystal that exhibits both the Pockels and Faraday effects is used to produce a Poynting-vector sensor for signals in the microwave regime. This multi-birefringent crystal can independently measure either electric or magnetic fields through control of the polarization of the optical probe beam. After obtaining all the relevant electric and magnetic field components, a map of the Poynting vector along a 50-Omega microstrip was experimentally determined without the need for any further transformational calculations. The results demonstrate that this sensor can be used for near-field mapping of the Poynting vector. Utilizing both amplitude and phase information from the fields in the microwave signal, it was confirmed for the case of an open-terminated microstrip that no energy flowed to the load, while for a microstrip with a matched termination, the energy flowed consistently along the transmission line.

  4. Microwave-Based Microfluidic Sensor for Non-Destructive and Quantitative Glucose Monitoring in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Chretiennot, Thomas; Dubuc, David; Grenier, Katia

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a reliable microwave and microfluidic miniature sensor dedicated to the measurement of glucose concentration in aqueous solution. The device; which is integrated with microtechnologies; is made of a bandstop filter implemented in a thin film microstrip technology combined with a fluidic microchannel. Glucose aqueous solutions have been characterized for concentration ranging from 80 g/L down to 0.3 g/L and are identified with the normalized insertion loss at optimal frequency. The sensitivity of the sensor has consequently been estimated at 7.6 × 10−3 dB/(g/L); together with the experimental uncertainty; the resolution of the sensor comes to 0.4 g/L. These results demonstrate the potentialities of such a sensor for the quantitative analysis of glucose in aqueous solution. PMID:27775555

  5. Probing a dielectric resonator acting as passive sensor through a wireless microwave link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedt, J.-M.; Boudot, R.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.

    2014-09-01

    Dielectric resonators, generally used for frequency filtering in oscillator loops, can be used as passive cooperative targets for wireless sensor applications. In the present work, we demonstrate such an approach by probing their spectral characteristics using a microwave RADAR system. The unique spectral response and energy storage capability of resonators provide unique responses allowing to separate the sensor response from clutter. Although the dielectric resonator is not designed for high temperature sensitivity, the accurate determination of the resonance frequency allows for a remote estimate of the temperature with Kelvin resolution.

  6. Planar Microwave Sensor for Theranostic Therapy of Organic Tissue Based on Oval Split Ring Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Carolin; Puentes, Margarita; Maasch, Matthias; Hübner, Frank; Bazrafshan, Babak; Vogl, Thomas J.; Damm, Christian; Jakoby, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Microwave sensors in medical environments play a significant role due to the contact-less and non-invasive sensing mechanism to determine dielectric properties of tissue. In this work, a theranostic sensor based on Split Ring Resonators (SRRs) is presented that provides two operation modes to detect and treat tumor cells, exemplary in the liver. For the detection mode, resonance frequency changes due to abnormalities are evaluated, and in the treatment mode, microwave ablation is performed. The planar sensor structure can be integrated into a needle like a surgery tool that evokes challenges concerning size limitations and biocompatibility. To meet the size requirements and provide a reasonable operating frequency, properties of oval shaped SRRs are investigated. By elongating the radius of the SRR in one direction, the resonance frequency can be decreased significantly compared to circular SRR by a factor of two below 12 GHz. In order to validate the detection and treatment characteristics of the sensor, full wave simulations and measurements are examined. Clear resonance shifts are detected for loading the sensor structures with phantoms mimicking healthy and malignant tissue. For treatment mode evaluation, ex vivo beef liver tissue was ablated leading to a lesion zone 1.2 cm × 1 cm × 0.3 cm with a three minute exposure of maximum 2.1 W. PMID:27618050

  7. Design, development and method validation of a novel multi-resonance microwave sensor for moisture measurement.

    PubMed

    Peters, Johanna; Taute, Wolfgang; Bartscher, Kathrin; Döscher, Claas; Höft, Michael; Knöchel, Reinhard; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2017-04-08

    Microwave sensor systems using resonance technology at a single resonance in the range of 2-3 GHz have been shown to be a rapid and reliable tool for moisture determination in solid materials including pharmaceutical granules. So far, their application is limited to lower moisture ranges or limitations above certain moisture contents had to be accepted. Aim of the present study was to develop a novel multi-resonance sensor system in order to expand the measurement range. Therefore, a novel sensor using additional resonances over a wide frequency band was designed and used to investigate inherent limitations of first generation sensor systems and material-related limits. Using granule samples with different moisture contents, an experimental protocol for calibration and validation of the method was established. Pursuant to this protocol, a multiple linear regression (MLR) prediction model built by correlating microwave moisture values to the moisture determined by Karl Fischer titration was chosen and rated using conventional criteria such as coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC). Using different operators, different analysis dates and different ambient conditions the method was fully validated following the guidance of ICH Q2(R1). The study clearly showed explanations for measurement uncertainties of first generation sensor systems which confirmed the approach to overcome these by using additional resonances. The established prediction model could be validated in the range of 7.6-19.6%, demonstrating its fit for its future purpose, the moisture content determination during wet granulations.

  8. Development, Test, and Evaluation of Microwave Radar Water Level (MWWL) Sensors' Wave Measurement Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, S. K.; Heitsenrether, R.

    2015-12-01

    Waves can have a significant impact on many coastal operations including navigational safety, recreation, and even the economy. Despite this, as of 2009, there were only 181 in situ real-time wave observation networks nationwide (IOOS 2009). There has recently been interest in adding real-time wave measurement systems to already existing NOAA Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) stations. Several steps have already been taken in order to achieve this, such as integrating information from existing wave measurement buoys and initial testing of multiple different wave measurement systems (Heitsenrether et al. 2012). Since wave observations can be derived from high frequency water level changes, we will investigate water level sensors' capability to measure waves. Recently, CO-OPS has been transitioning to new microwave radar water level (MWWL) sensors which have higher resolution and theoretically a greater potential wave measurement capability than the acoustic sensors in stilling wells. In this study, we analyze the wave measurement capability of MWWL sensors at two high energy wave environments, Duck, NC and La Jolla, CA, and compare results to two "reference" sensors (A Nortek acoustic waves and currents profiler (AWAC) at Duck and a single point pressure sensor at La Jolla). A summary of results from the two field test sites will be presented, including comparisons of wave energy spectra, significant wave height, and peak period measured by the test MWWL sensors and both reference AWAC and pressure sensors. In addition, relationships between MWWL versus reference wave sensor differences and specific wave conditions will be discussed. Initial results from spectral analysis and the calculation of bulk wave parameters indicate that MWWL sensors set to the "NoFilter" processing setting can produce wave measurements capability that compare well to the two reference sensors. These results support continued development to enable the

  9. Activities of the Division of Microwave Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewerentz, Birgitta

    1989-11-01

    Multistatic radar technology requirements are very high for antennas, where a maximum of flexibility is desired. Multilobes are often used, or groups of antennas which are electrically operated. Electronics and other electrical equipment were studied for supporting ionizing radiation and several forms of electromagnetic radiation. Ferrite components were studied. For microwave and optical technology, applications are reported. High effect Pulse Microwave radiation (HPM) emitting from an antenna and creating trouble in the electronic equipment, or destruction of this equipment is discussed. The defense against HPM is studied.

  10. Diurnal change in trees as observed by optical and microwave sensors - The EOS Synergism Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Jobea; Mcdonald, Kyle; Paris, Jack; Dobson, Myron C.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.; Weber, James A.; Ustin, Susan L.; Vanderbilt, Vern C.; Kasischke, Eric S.

    1991-01-01

    The EOS (Earth Observing System) Synergism Study examined the temporal variability of the optical and microwave backscatter due to diurnal change in canopy properties of interest to ecosystem modelers. The experiment was designed to address diurnal changes in canopy water status that relate to transpiration. Multispectral optical and multifrequency, multipolarization microwave measurements were acquired using boom-truck-based systems over a two-week period. Sensor and canopy properties were collected around the clock. The canopy studied was a walnut orchard in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The results demonstrate a large diurnal variation in the dielectric properties of the tree that in turn produces significant diurnal changes in the microwave backscatter. The results suggest that permanently orbiting spaceborne sensors such as those on EOS should be placed in orbits that are optimized for the individual sensor and need not be tied together by a tight simultaneity requirement on the order of minutes to hours for the purpose of monitoring ecosystem properties.

  11. Abnormal Winter Melting of the Arctic Sea Ice Cap Observed by the Spaceborne Passive Microwave Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seongsuk; Yi, Yu

    2016-12-01

    The spatial size and variation of Arctic sea ice play an important role in Earth’s climate system. These are affected by conditions in the polar atmosphere and Arctic sea temperatures. The Arctic sea ice concentration is calculated from brightness temperature data derived from the Defense Meteorological Satellite program (DMSP) F13 Special Sensor Microwave/Imagers (SSMI) and the DMSP F17 Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) sensors. Many previous studies point to significant reductions in sea ice and their causes. We investigated the variability of Arctic sea ice using the daily sea ice concentration data from passive microwave observations to identify the sea ice melting regions near the Arctic polar ice cap. We discovered the abnormal melting of the Arctic sea ice near the North Pole during the summer and the winter. This phenomenon is hard to explain only surface air temperature or solar heating as suggested by recent studies. We propose a hypothesis explaining this phenomenon. The heat from the deep sea in Arctic Ocean ridges and/ or the hydrothermal vents might be contributing to the melting of Arctic sea ice. This hypothesis could be verified by the observation of warm water column structure below the melting or thinning arctic sea ice through the project such as Coriolis dataset for reanalysis (CORA).

  12. Inter-Sensor Comparison of Microwave Land Surface Emissivity Products to Improve Precipitation Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Temimi, M.; Turk, J.; Prigent, C.; Furuzawa, F.; Tian, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Microwave land surface emissivity acts as the background signal to estimate rain rate, cloud liquid water, and total precipitable water. Therefore, its accuracy can directly affect the uncertainty of such measurements. Over land, unlike over oceans, the microwave emissivity is relatively high and and varies significantly as surface conditions and land cover change. Lack of ground truth measurement of microwave emissivity especially on global scale has made the uncertainty analysis of this parameter very challenging. The present study investigates the consistency among the existing global land emissivity estimates from different microwave sensors. The products are determined from various sensors and frequencies ranging from 7 to 90 GHz. The selected emissivity products in this study are from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) by NOAA - Cooperative remote Sensing and Science and Technology Center (CREST), the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) by The Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in France, TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) by Nagoya University, Japan, and WindSat by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The emissivity estimates are based on different algorithms and ancillary data sets. This work investigates the difference among these emissivity products from 2003 to 2008 dynamically and spectrally. The similarities and discrepancies of the retrievals are studied at different land cover types. The mean relative difference (MRD) and other statistical parameters are calculated temporally for all five years of the study. Some inherent discrepancies between the selected products can be attributed to the difference in geometry in terms of incident angle, spectral response, and the foot print size which can affect the estimations. The results reveal that in lower frequencies (=<19 GHz) ancillary data especially skin temperature data set is the major source of difference in emissivity retrievals, while in higher frequencies

  13. NASA Sea Ice Validation Program for the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Special Sensor Microwave Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J. (Editor); Crawford, John P.; Drinkwater, Mark R.; Emery, William J.; Eppler, Duane T.; Farmer, L. Dennis; Fowler, Charles W.; Goodberlet, Mark; Jentz, Robert R.; Milman, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    The history of the program is described along with the SSM/I sensor, including its calibration and geolocation correction procedures used by NASA, SSM/I data flow, and the NASA program to distribute polar gridded SSM/I radiances and sea ice concentrations (SIC) on CD-ROMs. Following a discussion of the NASA algorithm used to convert SSM/I radiances to SICs, results of 95 SSM/I-MSS Landsat IC comparisons for regions in both the Arctic and the Antarctic are presented. The Landsat comparisons show that the overall algorithm accuracy under winter conditions is 7 pct. on average with 4 pct. negative bias. Next, high resolution active and passive microwave image mosaics from coordinated NASA and Navy aircraft underflights over regions of the Beaufort and Chukchi seas in March 1988 were used to show that the algorithm multiyear IC accuracy is 11 pct. on average with a positive bias of 12 pct. Ice edge crossings of the Bering Sea by the NASA DC-8 aircraft were used to show that the SSM/I 15 pct. ice concentration contour corresponds best to the location of the initial bands at the ice edge. Finally, a summary of results and recommendations for improving the SIC retrievals from spaceborne radiometers are provided.

  14. Remote Respiration Monitoring Using Ultra-wideband Microwave Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashikatsuragi, Kenji; Nakahata, Youichiro; Matsunami, Isamu; Kajiwara, Akihiro

    Impulse based ultra-wideband radio has lately attracted considerable attention as medical monitoring sensor since it is expected to measure bio-signals of a patient on a bed such as respiration rate and heartbeat with a remote non-contact approach. It is also friendly to the environment including the human body due to the very low electromagnetic energy emission. Using conventional ranging scheme, however, high speed A/D device should be required in order to detect the small respiratory displacement. This paper suggests a respiratory monitoring scheme where the respiration rate is measured by observing the variation of the path strength from the patient. Therefore, it does not require high speed A/D. It also makes possible to design the simultaneous monitoring of multiple patients in hospital beds, for example. In this paper the measurements were conducted for various scenarios and the feasibility is discussed.

  15. A 3D Model of the Thermoelectric Microwave Power Sensor by MEMS Technology

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhenxiang; Liao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel 3D model is proposed to describe the temperature distribution of the thermoelectric microwave power sensor. In this 3D model, the heat flux density decreases from the upper surface to the lower surface of the GaAs substrate while it was supposed to be a constant in the 2D model. The power sensor is fabricated by a GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) process and micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology. The microwave performance experiment shows that the S11 is less than −26 dB over the frequency band of 1–10 GHz. The power response experiment demonstrates that the output voltage increases from 0 mV to 27 mV, while the incident power varies from 1 mW to 100 mW. The measured sensitivity is about 0.27 mV/mW, and the calculated result from the 3D model is 0.28 mV/mW. The relative error has been reduced from 7.5% of the 2D model to 3.7% of the 3D model. PMID:27338395

  16. Design and In Vitro Interference Test of Microwave Noninvasive Blood Glucose Monitoring Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Heungjae; Naylon, Jack; Luzio, Steve; Beutler, Jan; Birchall, James; Martin, Chris; Porch, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    A design of a microwave noninvasive continuous blood glucose monitoring sensor and its interference test results are presented. The novelty of the proposed sensor is that it comprises two spatially separated split-ring resonators, where one interacts with the change in glucose level of a sample under test while the other ring is used as a reference. The reference ring has a slightly different resonant frequency and is desensitized to the sample owing to its location, thus allowing changes in temperature to be calibrated out. From an oral glucose tolerance test with two additional commercially available sensors (blood strip and continuous glucose monitor) in parallel, we obtained encouraging performance for our sensor comparable with those of the commercial sensors. The effects of endogenous interferents common to all subjects, i.e., common sugars, vitamins (ascorbic acid), and metabolites (uric acid) have also been investigated by using a large Franz cell assembly. From the interference test, it is shown that the change in sensor response is dominated by changes in glucose level for concentrations relevant to blood, and the effects of interferents are negligible in comparison. PMID:26568639

  17. Miniaturized nondestructive microwave sensor for chickpea moisture measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abegaonkar, Mahesh P.; Karekar, R. N.; Aiyer, R. C.

    1999-07-01

    A miniaturized microstrip ring resonator (MRR) 1 in.×1 in. resonating at fro=10.27 GHz was used as a nondestructive moisture sensor for chickpea kernels (Cicer arietinum L.) for ease in loading and unloading. The change in the resonant frequency (Δfr) of the MRR is a measure of the amount of moisture in the overlaid kernel. The percentage of moisture (M) was varied from 0% (dry) to ˜50% (fully soaked) calculated on a wet weight basis. Δfr increased with M, although not linearly. Three regions were observed in the sensitivity curve. The first region extended from 0%-12%, the central region from 12%-43%, and the saturation region from 43%-50% in moisture content. In the central region the observed Δfr was 574 MHz, whereas in the first and third regions it was 44 and 55 MHz, respectively. The regions in the sensitivity curves indicate different dominant phenomena. A small scatter was observed in the first region, which increased with the increasing percent of moisture content.

  18. Microwave stethoscope: development and benchmarking of a vital signs sensor using computer-controlled phantoms and human studies.

    PubMed

    Celik, Nuri; Gagarin, Ruthsenne; Huang, Gui Chao; Iskander, Magdy F; Berg, Benjamin W

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes a new microwave-based method and associated measurement system for monitoring multiple vital signs (VS) as well as the changes in lung water content. The measurement procedure utilizes a single microwave sensor for reflection coefficient measurements, hence the name "microwave stethoscope (MiSt)," as opposed to the two-sensor transmission method previously proposed by the authors. To compensate for the reduced sensitivity due to reflection coefficient measurements, an improved microwave sensor design with enhanced matching to the skin and broadband operation, as well as an advanced digital signal processing algorithm are used in developing the MiSt. Results from phantom experiments and human clinical trials are described. The results clearly demonstrate that MiSt provides reliable monitoring of multiple VS such as the respiration rate, heart rate, and the changes in lung water content through a single microwave measurement. In addition, information such as heart waveforms that correlates well with electrocardiogram is observed from these microwave measurements. Details of the broadband sensor design, experimental procedure, DSP algorithms used for VS extraction, and obtained results are presented and discussed.

  19. Soil moisture sensing via swept frequency based microwave sensors.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Mathew G; Karthikeyan, Sundar; Green, Timothy R; Schwartz, Robert C; Wanjura, John D; Holt, Greg A

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for low-cost, high-accuracy measurement of water content in various materials. This study assesses the performance of a new microwave swept frequency domain instrument (SFI) that has promise to provide a low-cost, high-accuracy alternative to the traditional and more expensive time domain reflectometry (TDR). The technique obtains permittivity measurements of soils in the frequency domain utilizing a through transmission configuration, transmissometry, which provides a frequency domain transmissometry measurement (FDT). The measurement is comparable to time domain transmissometry (TDT) with the added advantage of also being able to separately quantify the real and imaginary portions of the complex permittivity so that the measured bulk permittivity is more accurate that the measurement TDR provides where the apparent permittivity is impacted by the signal loss, which can be significant in heavier soils. The experimental SFI was compared with a high-end 12 GHz TDR/TDT system across a range of soils at varying soil water contents and densities. As propagation delay is the fundamental measurement of interest to the well-established TDR or TDT technique; the first set of tests utilized precision propagation delay lines to test the accuracy of the SFI instrument's ability to resolve propagation delays across the expected range of delays that a soil probe would present when subjected to the expected range of soil types and soil moisture typical to an agronomic cropping system. The results of the precision-delay line testing suggests the instrument is capable of predicting propagation delays with a RMSE of +/-105 ps across the range of delays ranging from 0 to 12,000 ps with a coefficient of determination of r(2) = 0.998. The second phase of tests noted the rich history of TDR for prediction of soil moisture and leveraged this history by utilizing TDT measured with a high-end Hewlett Packard TDR/TDT instrument to directly benchmark the SFI instrument over

  20. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specified surface of the body. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes: (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature.

  1. Temporal observations of surface soil moisture using a passive microwave sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; O'Neill, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 10 aircraft flights was conducted over agricultural fields to evaluate relationships between observed surface soil moisture and soil moisture predicted using passive microwave sensor observations. An a priori approach was used to predict values of surface soil moisture for three types of fields: tilled corn, no-till corn with soybean stubble, and idle fields with corn stubble. Acceptable predictions were obtained for the tilled corn fields, while poor results were obtained for the others. The source of error is suspected to be the density and orientation of the surface stubble layer; however, further research is needed to verify this explanation. Temporal comparisons between observed, microwave predicted, and soil water-simulated moisture values showed similar patterns for tilled well-drained fields. Divergences between the observed and simulated measurements were apparent on poorly drained fields. This result may be of value in locating and mapping hydrologic contributing areas.

  2. Science requirements for passive microwave sensors on earth science geostationary platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Staelin, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    It is suggested that the science requirements for passive geostationary microwave observations be met by near- and far-term sensors for each of two overlapping bands, with each band covering no more than a decade in frequency. The low-frequency band includes channels near 6, 10, 18, 22, 31 to 37, and possibly 50 to 60 GHz. The high-frequency band includes channels near 220 to 230, 183, 166, 118, 90 to 110, and possibly 50 to 60 and 31 to 37 GHz. The precise channel specifications will have to comply with international frequency allocations. The near-term goal is a high-frequency sensor based on a filled-aperture solid reflector antenna, which should rely on currently existing technology. The most critical issues for the near-term sensor are momentum compensation and the design of the feed assembly; these issues are coupled through the desired scan rate. The successful demonstration of the near-term (high-frequency) sensor will be essential for the continued development of far-term sensors satisfying the ideal science requirements. The far-term goal includes both a high-frequency sensor which meets the ideal science requirements, and a low-frequency sensor whose design will depend on advances in large antenna technology. The low-frequency (far-term) sensor might be based on one of several concepts: a deployable mesh reflector antenna of diameter at least 20 m, which shows promise for use at frequencies up to 30-GHz, a synthetic aperture interferometer of maximum baseline from 100 to 300 m, or a deployable phased-array bootlace lens, of diameter from 100 to 300 m. The first of these, a deployable mesh reflector antenna, will satisfy only the adequate spatial resolution requirements. The last two concepts meet the ideal spatial resolution science requirements, although they present significant structural and meteorological challenges.

  3. Development of a validation model for the defense meteorological satellite program's special sensor microwave imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, C. T.; Goodberlet, M. A.; Wilkerson, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The Defence Meteorological Space Program's (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), an operational wind speed algorithm was developed. The algorithm is based on the D-matrix approach which seeks a linear relationship between measured SSM/I brightness temperatures and environmental parameters. D-matrix performance was validated by comparing algorithm derived wind speeds with near-simultaneous and co-located measurements made by off-shore ocean buoys. Other topics include error budget modeling, alternate wind speed algorithms, and D-matrix performance with one or more inoperative SSM/I channels.

  4. Optimization of transition edge sensor arrays for cosmic microwave background observations with the south pole telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Junjia; Ade, P. A. R.; Anderson, A. J.; Avva, J.; Ahmed, Z.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J. E.; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Byrum, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carter, F. W.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Cliche, J. F.; Cukierman, A.; Czaplewski, D.; Divan, R.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dutcher, D.; Everett, W.; Gilbert, A.; Gannon, R.; Guyser, R.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hattori, K.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hubmayr, J.; Huang, N.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeong, O.; Khaire, T.; Kubik, D.; Kuo, C. L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. S.; Montgomery, J.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nguyen, H.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pan, Z.; Pearson, J.; Posada, C. M.; Rahlin, A.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Shariff, J. A.; Shirley, I.; Shirokoff, E.; Smecher, G.; Sobrin, J.; Stan, L.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Suzuki, A.; Tang, Q. Y.; Thakur, R. B.; Thompson, K. L.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.

    2016-12-15

    In this study, we describe the optimization of transition-edge-sensor (TES) detector arrays for the thirdgeneration camera for the South PoleTelescope.The camera,which contains ~16 000 detectors, will make high-angular-resolution maps of the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background. Our key results are scatter in the transition temperature of Ti/Au TESs is reduced by fabricating the TESs on a thin Ti(5 nm)/Au(5 nm) buffer layer and the thermal conductivity of the legs that support our detector islands is dominated by the SiOx dielectric in the microstrip transmission lines that run along

  5. Magnetic Sensor for Detection of Ground Vehicles Based on Microwave Spin Wave Generation in Ferrite Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    kPMHHkHf 042, ππ γ += , 2 where γ/2π = 2.8 MHz/Oe is the gyromagnetic ratio, M0 is the saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic material, and...measured by the frequency meter. Using typical values for high-quality magnetic films of yttrium-iron garnet ( YIG ) 4πM0 = 1750 Oe, H0 = 100 Oe... MAGNETIC SENSOR FOR DETECTION OF GROUND VEHICLES BASED ON MICROWAVE SPIN WAVE GENERATION IN FERRITE FILMS A. Slavin*, and V. Tiberkevich

  6. Microwave-assisted synthesis of highly water-soluble graphene towards electrical DNA sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bong Gill; Park, Hoseok; Yang, Min Ho; Jung, Young Mee; Lee, Sang Yup; Hong, Won Hi; Park, Tae Jung

    2010-12-01

    Graphene sheets have the potential for practical applications in electrochemical devices, but their development has been impeded by critical problems with aggregation of graphene sheets. Here, we demonstrated a facile and bottom-up approach for fabrication of DNA sensor device using water-soluble sulfonated reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) sheets via microwave-assisted sulfonation (MAS), showing enhanced sensitivity, reliability, and low detection limit. Key to achieving these performances is the fabrication of the SRGOs, where the MAS method enabled SRGOs to be highly dispersed in water (10 mg mL-1) due to the acidic sulfonated groups generated within 3 min of the functionalization reaction. The water-soluble SRGO-DNA (SRGOD) hybrids prepared by electrostatic interactions between a flat single layer of graphene sheets and DNAs are suitable for fabrication of electrical DNA sensor devices because of the unique electrical characteristics of SRGODs. The high sensing performance of SRGOD sensors was demonstrated with detection ofDNA hybridization using complementary DNAs, single base mismatched DNAs, and noncomplementary DNAs, with results showing higher sensitivity and lower detection limit than those of reduced graphene oxide-based DNA sensors. Simple and easy fabrication of DNA sensor devices using SRGODs is expected to provide an effective way for electrical detection ofDNA hybridization using miniature sensors without the labor-intensive labeling of the sensor and complex measurement equipment.Graphene sheets have the potential for practical applications in electrochemical devices, but their development has been impeded by critical problems with aggregation of graphene sheets. Here, we demonstrated a facile and bottom-up approach for fabrication of DNA sensor device using water-soluble sulfonated reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) sheets via microwave-assisted sulfonation (MAS), showing enhanced sensitivity, reliability, and low detection limit. Key to achieving these

  7. Active microwave remote sensing of oceans, chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A rationale is developed for the use of active microwave sensing in future aerospace applications programs for the remote sensing of the world's oceans, lakes, and polar regions. Summaries pertaining to applications, local phenomena, and large-scale phenomena are given along with a discussion of orbital errors.

  8. Design Considerations for High-Q Bandpass Microwave Oscillator Sensors Based Upon Resonant Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Anthony M.; Kelly, James F.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; McCloy, John S.

    2014-06-23

    A series of microwave resonant oscillator sensors were designed and characterized using bandpass planar and volumetric electrical resonators having loaded quality factor (Q) values in the range of 2 to 20. The use of these resonators in positive feedback circuits yielded sensor Q-factors of up to 2 x 107, demonstrating Q-factor amplifications on the order of 106. It is shown that the Q-factor amplification can be increased in a positive feedback system through the selection of feedback loop group delay, allowing use of resonators with lower Qstat values. A low-frequency electromagnetic interference sensing application is demonstrated for two resonant oscillator configurations, showing considerable frequency sensitivity to 45 kHz emitters.

  9. An optical fiber sensor based on cladding photoluminescence for high power microwave plasma ultraviolet lamps used in water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, C.; Lewis, E.; Al-Shamma'A, A.; Pandithas, I.; Cullen, J.; Lucas, J.

    2001-11-01

    Low-pressure mercury lamps are commonly used for germicidal applications such as water and wastewater sterilisation. The germicidal effect is due to the emission of light at 254 nm, which leads to the destruction of most waterborne bacteria. The Microwave plasma ultraviolet lamp (MPUVL) is a new technology for generating a high intensity ultraviolet (UV) light. A Fluorescent optical fiber based sensor is presented which is used for monitoring the output of a high power microwave UV light source and its control. This sensor is a fiber which has had its cladding removed and been coated with a phosphor doped polymer.

  10. Assimilation of Passive and Active Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, C. S.; Reichle, R. H.; DeLannoy, G. J. M.; Liu, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Root-zone soil moisture is an important control over the partition of land surface energy and moisture, and the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture has been shown to improve model profile soil moisture [1]. To date, efforts to assimilate remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture at large scales have focused on soil moisture derived from the passive microwave Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the active Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT; together with its predecessor on the European Remote Sensing satellites (ERS. The assimilation of passive and active microwave soil moisture observations has not yet been directly compared, and so this study compares the impact of assimilating ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture data, both separately and together. Since the soil moisture retrieval skill from active and passive microwave data is thought to differ according to surface characteristics [2], the impact of each assimilation on the model soil moisture skill is assessed according to land cover type, by comparison to in situ soil moisture observations.

  11. Hybrid graphene-copper UWB array sensor for brain tumor detection via scattering parameters in microwave detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamlos, Mohd Aminudin; Ismail, Abdul Hafiizh; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Narbudowicz, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid graphene-copper ultra-wideband array sensor applied to microwave imaging technique is successfully used in detecting and visualizing tumor inside human brain. The sensor made of graphene coated film for the patch while copper for both the transmission line and parasitic element. The hybrid sensor performance is better than fully copper sensor. Hybrid sensor recorded wider bandwidth of 2.0-10.1 GHz compared with fully copper sensor operated from 2.5 to 10.1 GHz. Higher gain of 3.8-8.5 dB is presented by hybrid sensor, while fully copper sensor stated lower gain ranging from 2.6 to 6.7 dB. Both sensors recorded excellent total efficiency averaged at 97 and 94%, respectively. The sensor used for both transmits equivalent signal and receives backscattering signal from stratified human head model in detecting tumor. Difference in the data of the scattering parameters recorded from the head model with presence and absence of tumor is used as the main data to be further processed in confocal microwave imaging algorithm in generating image. MATLAB software is utilized to analyze S-parameter signals obtained from measurement. Tumor presence is indicated by lower S-parameter values compared to higher values recorded by tumor absence.

  12. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The detection of flow transition between laminar and turbulent flow and of shear stress or skin friction of airfoils is important in basic research for validation of airfoil theory and design. These values are conventionally measured using hot film nickel sensors deposited on a polyimide substrate. The substrate electrically insulates the sensor and underlying airfoil but is prevented from thermally isolating the sensor by thickness constraints necessary to avoid flow contamination. Proposed heating of the model surface is difficult to control, requires significant energy expenditures, and may alter the basic flow state of the airfoil. A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specific surface of the body. The total thickness of the isolator and sensor avoid any contamination of the flow. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor; and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to, or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature. The present invention accordingly thermally isolates a temperature responsive sensor in an energy efficient, controllable manner while avoiding any contamination of the flow.

  13. A novel microwave sensor for real-time online monitoring of roll compacts of pharmaceutical powders online--a comparative case study with NIR.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshu; Austin, John; Davis, Sierra; Harris, Michael; Reklaitis, Gintaras

    2015-05-01

    Control of particulate processes is hard to achieve because of the ease with which powders tend to segregate. Thus, proper sensing methods must be employed to ensure content uniformity during operation. The role of sensing schemes becomes even more critical while operating the process continuously as measurements are essential for implementation of feedback control (Austin et al. 2013. J Pharm Sci 102(6):1895-1904; Austin et al. 2014. Anal Chim Acta 819:82-93). A microwave sensor was developed and shown to be effective in online measurement of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) concentration in a powder blend. During powder transport and hopper storage before processing, powder blends may segregate and cause quality deviations in the subsequent tableting operation. Therefore, it is critical to know the API concentration in the ribbons as the content uniformity is fixed once the ribbon is processed. In this study, a novel microwave sensor was developed that could provide measurement of a roller compacted ribbon's API concentration online, along with its density and moisture content. The results indicate that this microwave sensor is capable of increased accuracy compared with a commercially available near-IR probe for the determination of content uniformity and density in roller compacted ribbons online.

  14. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  15. High speed and high resolution interrogation of a fiber Bragg grating sensor based on microwave photonic filtering and chirped microwave pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ou; Zhang, Jiejun; Yao, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    High speed and high resolution interrogation of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor based on microwave photonic filtering and chirped microwave pulse compression is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed sensor, a broadband linearly chirped microwave waveform (LCMW) is applied to a single-passband microwave photonic filter (MPF) which is implemented based on phase modulation and phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion using a phase modulator (PM) and a phase-shifted FBG (PS-FBG). Since the center frequency of the MPF is a function of the central wavelength of the PS-FBG, when the PS-FBG experiences a strain or temperature change, the wavelength is shifted, which leads to the change in the center frequency of the MPF. At the output of the MPF, a filtered chirped waveform with the center frequency corresponding to the applied strain or temperature is obtained. By compressing the filtered LCMW in a digital signal processor, the resolution is improved. The proposed interrogation technique is experimentally demonstrated. The experimental results show that interrogation sensitivity and resolution as high as 1.25 ns/με and 0.8 με are achieved.

  16. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca(2+) activated BK channels, a K(+) channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate.

  17. The NASA Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR): A New Sensor for Earth Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The Airborne Earth Science Microwave Imaging Radiometer (AESMIR) is a versatile new airborne imaging radiometer recently developed by NASA. The AESMIR design is unique in that it performs dual-polarized imaging at all standard passive microwave frequency bands (6-89 GHz) using only one sensor headscanner package, providing an efficient solution for Earth remote sensing applications (snow, soil moisture/land parameters, precipitation, ocean winds, sea surface temperature, water vapor, sea ice, etc.). The microwave radiometers themselves will incorporate state-of-the-art receivers, with particular attention given to instrument calibration for the best possible accuracy and sensitivity. The single-package design of AESMIR makes it compatible with high-altitude aircraft platforms such as the NASA ER-2s. The arbitrary 2-axis gimbal can perform conical and cross-track scanning, as well as fixed-beam staring. This compatibility with high-altitude platforms coupled with the flexible scanning configuration, opens up previously unavailable science opportunities for convection/precip/cloud science and co-flying with complementary instruments, as well as providing wider swath coverage for all science applications. By designing AESMIR to be compatible with these high-altitude platforms, we are also compatible with the NASA P-3, the NASA DC-8, C-130s and ground-based deployments. Thus AESMIR can provide low-, mid-, and high- altitude microwave imaging. Parallel filter banks allow AESMIR to simultaneously simulate the exact passbands of multiple satellite radiometers: SSM/I, TMI, AMSR, Windsat, SSMI/S, and the upcoming GPM/GMI and NPOESS/CMIS instruments --a unique capability among aircraft radiometers. An L-band option is also under development, again using the same scanner. With this option, simultaneous imaging from 1.4 to 89 GHz will be feasible. And, all receivers except the sounding channels will be configured for 4-Stokes polarimetric operation using high-speed digital

  18. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed transition-edge sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Noroozian, Omid; Mates, John A. B.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Brevik, Justus A.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gao, Jiansong; Hilton, Gene C.; Horansky, Robert D.; Irwin, Kent D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Vale, Leila R.; Ullom, Joel N.; Kang, Zhao

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrate very high resolution photon spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed two-pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array. We measured a {sup 153}Gd photon source and achieved an energy resolution of 63 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 97 keV and an equivalent readout system noise of 86 pA/√(Hz) at the TES. The readout circuit consists of superconducting microwave resonators coupled to radio-frequency superconducting-quantum-interference-devices and transduces changes in input current to changes in phase of a microwave signal. We use flux-ramp modulation to linearize the response and evade low-frequency noise. This demonstration establishes one path for the readout of cryogenic X-ray and gamma-ray sensor arrays with more than 10{sup 3} elements and spectral resolving powers R=λ/Δλ>10{sup 3}.

  19. Single-shot and single-sensor high/super-resolution microwave imaging based on metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Libo; Li, Lianlin; Li, Yunbo; Zhang, Hao Chi; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    Real-time high-resolution (including super-resolution) imaging with low-cost hardware is a long sought-after goal in various imaging applications. Here, we propose broadband single-shot and single-sensor high-/super-resolution imaging by using a spatio-temporal dispersive metasurface and an imaging reconstruction algorithm. The metasurface with spatio-temporal dispersive property ensures the feasibility of the single-shot and single-sensor imager for super- and high-resolution imaging, since it can convert efficiently the detailed spatial information of the probed object into one-dimensional time- or frequency-dependent signal acquired by a single sensor fixed in the far-field region. The imaging quality can be improved by applying a feature-enhanced reconstruction algorithm in post-processing, and the desired imaging resolution is related to the distance between the object and metasurface. When the object is placed in the vicinity of the metasurface, the super-resolution imaging can be realized. The proposed imaging methodology provides a unique means to perform real-time data acquisition, high-/super-resolution images without employing expensive hardware (e.g. mechanical scanner, antenna array, etc.). We expect that this methodology could make potential breakthroughs in the areas of microwave, terahertz, optical, and even ultrasound imaging. PMID:27246668

  20. Single-shot and single-sensor high/super-resolution microwave imaging based on metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Libo; Li, Lianlin; Li, Yunbo; Zhang, Hao Chi; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-06-01

    Real-time high-resolution (including super-resolution) imaging with low-cost hardware is a long sought-after goal in various imaging applications. Here, we propose broadband single-shot and single-sensor high-/super-resolution imaging by using a spatio-temporal dispersive metasurface and an imaging reconstruction algorithm. The metasurface with spatio-temporal dispersive property ensures the feasibility of the single-shot and single-sensor imager for super- and high-resolution imaging, since it can convert efficiently the detailed spatial information of the probed object into one-dimensional time- or frequency-dependent signal acquired by a single sensor fixed in the far-field region. The imaging quality can be improved by applying a feature-enhanced reconstruction algorithm in post-processing, and the desired imaging resolution is related to the distance between the object and metasurface. When the object is placed in the vicinity of the metasurface, the super-resolution imaging can be realized. The proposed imaging methodology provides a unique means to perform real-time data acquisition, high-/super-resolution images without employing expensive hardware (e.g. mechanical scanner, antenna array, etc.). We expect that this methodology could make potential breakthroughs in the areas of microwave, terahertz, optical, and even ultrasound imaging.

  1. Electromagnetic Design of Feedhorn-Coupled Transition-Edge Sensors for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a powerful tool for probing the evolution of the early universe. Specifically, precision measurement of the polarization of the CMB enables a direct test for cosmic inflation. A key technological element on the path to the measurement of this faint signal is the capability to produce large format arrays of background-limited detectors. We describe the electromagnetic design of feedhorn-coupled, TES-based sensors. Each linear orthogonal polarization from the feed horn is coupled to a superconducting microstrip line via a symmetric planar orthomode transducer (OMT). The symmetric OMT design allows for highly-symmetric beams with low cross-polarization over a wide bandwidth. In addition, this architecture enables a single microstrip filter to define the passband for each polarization. Care has been taken in the design to eliminate stray coupling paths to the absorbers. These detectors will be fielded in the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS).

  2. NASA sea ice validation program for the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to the prime objective of the NASA validation program, namely, to establish quantitative relationships between the sea ice parameters derived from the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) using an algorithm originally developed for the Nimbus 7 SMMR. The underlying philosophy of the validation program is that confidence in the SSM/I algorithm products is achieved not so much by detailed comparison with localized surface observations as by consistency with independent spatially and temporally coincident data sets. The results of the satellite and aircraft comparisons that serve as the basis for the validation of the NASA SSMI/I sea ice algorithm are presented. High-resolution radiometer and C-band SAR imagery from the March 1988 NASA and Navy SSM/I underflights are used to verify the location of the ice edge and to validate the sea ice concentrations as determined by the SSM/I algorithm. These studies are argued to provide the most comprehensive measure to date of the accuracy of sea ice products derived from a spaceborne multichannel microwave imager.

  3. Using modalmetric fiber optic sensors to monitor the activity of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Życzkowski, M.; Uzięblo-Zyczkowska, B.; Dziuda, L.; Różanowski, K.

    2011-03-01

    The paper presents the concept of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor system for human psychophysical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes intensity of propagated light to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an multimode fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled by the singlemode optical fiber to detector. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use. We present the laboratory test of comparing their results with the known methods like EKG. addition, the article describes the work on integrated system to human psychophysiology activity monitoring. That system including a EMFIT, microwave, fiber optic and capacitive sensors.

  4. Microwave detection of hairline surface-breaking cracks in metals using open-ended coaxial sensors: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoughi, Reza; Hayes, Kent; Ganchev, Stoyan I.

    1996-11-01

    Recent microwave methods have shown to be capable of detecting and sizing surface slots and cracks in metals. These methods have incorporated the use of an open-ended rectangular waveguide probe for such measurements. A new microwave method utilizing an open-ended coaxial line sensor has been under investigation for some time now. Coaxial line sensors have certain features that make them quite attractive for surface crack detection. These features include their high level of sensitivity to the presence of very narrow cracks as will as the fact that their geometry may include complicated bends allowing access to hard to reach places. This paper presents and comments on some preliminary experimental results of using this sensor for hairline surface crack detection.

  5. Sensitivity of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Soil Moisture during Growing Corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, J.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Liu, P.; De Roo, R. D.; England, A. W.; Nagarajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) in the root zone is a key factor governing water and energy fluxes at the land surface and its accurate knowledge is critical to predictions of weather and near-term climate, nutrient cycles, crop-yield, and ecosystem productivity. Microwave observations, such as those at L-band, are highly sensitive to soil moisture in the upper few centimeters (near-surface). The two satellite-based missions dedicated to soil moisture estimation include, the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) [4] mission. The SMAP mission will include active and passive sensors at L-band to provide global observations of SM, with a repeat coverage of every 2-3 days. These observations can significantly improve root zone soil moisture estimates through data assimilation into land surface models (LSMs). Both the active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave sensors measure radiation quantities that are functions of soil dielectric constant and exhibit similar sensitivities to SM. In addition to the SM sensitivity, radar backscatter is highly sensitive to roughness of soil surface and scattering within the vegetation. These effects may produce a much larger dynamic range in backscatter than that produced due to SM changes alone. In this study, we discuss the field observations of active and passive signatures of growing corn at L-band from several seasons during the tenth Microwave, Water and Energy Balance Experiment (MicroWEX-10) conducted in North Central Florida, and to understand the sensitivity of these signatures to soil moisture under dynamic vegetation conditions. The MicroWEXs are a series of season-long field experiments conducted during the growing seasons of sweet corn, cotton, and energy cane over the past six years (for example, [22]). The corn was planted on July 5 and harvested on September 23, 2011 during MicroWEX-10. The size of the field was 0.04 km2 and the soils

  6. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project. VI - Spacecraft, scientific instruments, and launching rocket. Part 3 - The electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, Thomas T.; Yamasaki, Hiromichi

    1990-01-01

    The two microwave radiometers for TRMM are designed to measure thermal microwave radiation upwelling from the earth. The Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) scans from 50 deg to the left through nadir to 50 deg to the right in 78 steps with no moving mechanical parts in a band centered at 19.35 GHz. The TRMM concept uses the radar to develop a climatology of rain-layer thickness which can be used for the interpretation of the radiometer data over a swath wider than the radar. The ESMR data are useful for estimating rain intensity only over an ocean background. The Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), which scans conically with three dual polarized channels at 19, 37, and 85 GHz and a single polarized channel at 22 GHz, provides a wider range of rainfall intensities. The SSM/I spins about an axis parallel to the local spacecraft vector and 128 uniformly spaced samples of the 85 GHz data are taken on each scan over a 112-deg scan region simultaneously with 64 samples of the other frequencies.

  7. Selective microwave sensors exploiting the interaction of analytes with trap states in TiO2 nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarifi, M. H.; Farsinezhad, S.; Abdolrazzaghi, M.; Daneshmand, M.; Shankar, K.

    2016-03-01

    Sensing of molecular analytes by probing the effects of their interaction with microwaves is emerging as a cheap, compact, label-free and highly sensitive detection and quantification technique. Microstrip ring-type resonators are particularly favored for this purpose due to their planar sensing geometry, electromagnetic field enhancements in the coupling gap and compatibility with established printed circuit board manufacturing. However, the lack of selectivity in what is essentially a permittivity-sensing method is an impediment to wider adoption and implementation of this sensing platform. By placing a polycrystalline anatase-phase TiO2 nanotube membrane in the coupling gap of a microwave resonator, we engineer selectivity for the detection and differentiation of methanol, ethanol and 2-propanol. The scavenging of reactive trapped holes by aliphatic alcohols adsorbed on TiO2 is responsible for the alcohol-specific detection while the different short chain alcohols are distinguished on the basis of differences in their microwave response. Electrodeless microwave sensors which allow spectral and time-dependent monitoring of the resonance frequency and quality factor provide a wealth of information in comparison with electrode-based resistive sensors for the detection of volatile organic compounds. A high dynamic range (400 ppm-10 000 ppm) is demonstrated for methanol detection.Sensing of molecular analytes by probing the effects of their interaction with microwaves is emerging as a cheap, compact, label-free and highly sensitive detection and quantification technique. Microstrip ring-type resonators are particularly favored for this purpose due to their planar sensing geometry, electromagnetic field enhancements in the coupling gap and compatibility with established printed circuit board manufacturing. However, the lack of selectivity in what is essentially a permittivity-sensing method is an impediment to wider adoption and implementation of this sensing platform

  8. NASA sea ice and snow validation plan for the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave/imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J. (Editor); Swift, Calvin T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This document addresses the task of developing and executing a plan for validating the algorithm used for initial processing of sea ice data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI). The document outlines a plan for monitoring the performance of the SSMI, for validating the derived sea ice parameters, and for providing quality data products before distribution to the research community. Because of recent advances in the application of passive microwave remote sensing to snow cover on land, the validation of snow algorithms is also addressed.

  9. Soil moisture from the recent AMSR2 and FY3B multi-frequency passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinussa, Robert; Wang, Guojie; de Jeu, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Over the years several different multi-frequency passive microwave sensors were used to estimate surface soil moisture. An historical multi-frequency passive microwave database from these satellite platforms was already used to generate a long term (32 years) surface soil moisture dataset. The Land Parameter Retrieval Algorithm (LPRM) was applied to this historical multi-frequency passive microwave database, including the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), that plays a dominant role in the 2002-2011 period. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) shares a similar design with its predecessor, it was improved based on general technical development as well as the valuable heritage that AMSR-E left behind. Most recently, the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) started offering brightness temperature observations from the AMSR2 radiometer. In the recent years, China's National Satellite Meteorological Center (NSMC) developed meteorological satellites. The NSMC has polar orbiting sun-synchronized meteorological satellites in operation since 1988 in the so-called FengYun (FY) satellite series. FY3 is China's 2nd generation polar orbiting satellite series, its design was based on the previous polar orbiting satellite series and FY3 will ultimately become series of four satellites (FY3A to FY3D). The FY3B satellite is the 2nd satellite of the FY3 series and it's the 1st in the series to carry a microwave imager (MWRI) onboard observing the Earth's surface in 10 microwave channels. Brightness temperature observations of these recently developed sensors were compared to the existing database. An inter-calibration step was performed in order to overcome small difference in brightness temperature observations as a result of the different sensor calibration procedures. The LPRM was applied to observations made by the FY3B and AMSR2 sensors resulting in global soil moisture products. After the implementation of the

  10. A Microwave Ring-Resonator Sensor for Non-Invasive Assessment of Meat Aging.

    PubMed

    Jilnai, Muhammad Taha; Wen, Wong Peng; Cheong, Lee Yen; ur Rehman, Muhammad Zaka

    2016-01-20

    The assessment of moisture loss from meat during the aging period is a critical issue for the meat industry. In this article, a non-invasive microwave ring-resonator sensor is presented to evaluate the moisture content, or more precisely water holding capacity (WHC) of broiler meat over a four-week period. The developed sensor has shown significant changes in its resonance frequency and return loss due to reduction in WHC in the studied duration. The obtained results are also confirmed by physical measurements. Further, these results are evaluated using the Fricke model, which provides a good fit for electric circuit components in biological tissue. Significant changes were observed in membrane integrity, where the corresponding capacitance decreases 30% in the early aging (0D-7D) period. Similarly, the losses associated with intracellular and extracellular fluids exhibit changed up to 42% and 53%, respectively. Ultimately, empirical polynomial models are developed to predict the electrical component values for a better understanding of aging effects. The measured and calculated values are found to be in good agreement.

  11. A Microwave Ring-Resonator Sensor for Non-Invasive Assessment of Meat Aging

    PubMed Central

    Jilani, Muhammad Taha; Wen, Wong Peng; Cheong, Lee Yen; ur Rehman, Muhammad Zaka

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of moisture loss from meat during the aging period is a critical issue for the meat industry. In this article, a non-invasive microwave ring-resonator sensor is presented to evaluate the moisture content, or more precisely water holding capacity (WHC) of broiler meat over a four-week period. The developed sensor has shown significant changes in its resonance frequency and return loss due to reduction in WHC in the studied duration. The obtained results are also confirmed by physical measurements. Further, these results are evaluated using the Fricke model, which provides a good fit for electric circuit components in biological tissue. Significant changes were observed in membrane integrity, where the corresponding capacitance decreases 30% in the early aging (0D-7D) period. Similarly, the losses associated with intracellular and extracellular fluids exhibit changed up to 42% and 53%, respectively. Ultimately, empirical polynomial models are developed to predict the electrical component values for a better understanding of aging effects. The measured and calculated values are found to be in good agreement. PMID:26805828

  12. High-impedance NbSi TES sensors for studying the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nones, C.; Marnieros, S.; Benoit, A.; Bergé, L.; Bideaud, A.; Camus, P.; Dumoulin, L.; Monfardini, A.; Rigaut, O.

    2012-12-01

    Precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are crucial in cosmology because any proposed model of the universe must account for the features of this radiation. The CMB has a thermal blackbody spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K, i.e. the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9-mm wavelength. Of all CMB measurements that the scientific community has not yet been able to perform, the CMB B-mode polarization is probably the most challenging from the instrumental point of view. The signature of primordial gravitational waves, which give rise to a B-type polarization, is one of the goals in cosmology today and amongst the first objectives in the field. For this purpose, high-performance low-temperature bolometric cameras, made of thousands of pixels, are currently being developed by many groups, which will improve the sensitivity to B-mode CMB polarization by one or two orders of magnitude compared to the Planck satellite HFI detectors. We present here a new bolometer structure that is able to increase the pixel sensitivities and to simplify the fabrication procedure. This innovative device replaces delicate membrane-based structures and eliminates the mediation of phonons: the incoming energy is directly captured and measured in the electron bath of an appropriate sensor and the thermal decoupling is achieved via the intrinsic electron-phonon decoupling of the sensor at very low temperature. Reported results come from a 204-pixel array of NbxSi1-x transition edge sensors with a meander structure fabricated on a 2-inch silicon wafer using electron-beam co-evaporation and a cleanroom lithography process. To validate the application of this device to CMB measurements, we have performed an optical calibration of our sample in the focal plane of a dilution cryostat test bench. We have demonstrated a light absorption close to 20% and an optical noise equivalent power of about 7×10-16 W/√Hz, which is highly

  13. Active microwave remote sensing of earth/land, chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Geoscience applications of active microwave remote sensing systems are examined. Major application areas for the system include: (1) exploration of petroleum, mineral, and ground water resources, (2) mapping surface and structural features, (3) terrain analysis, both morphometric and genetic, (4) application in civil works, and (5) application in the areas of earthquake prediction and crustal movements. Although the success of radar surveys has not been widely publicized, they have been used as a prime reconnaissance data base for mineral exploration and land-use evaluation in areas where photography cannot be obtained.

  14. Investigating Baseline, Alternative and Copula-based Algorithm for combining Airborne Active and Passive Microwave Observations in the SMAP Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, C.; Lorenz, C.; Jagdhuber, T.; Laux, P.; Hajnsek, I.; Kunstmann, H.; Entekhabi, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states. SMAP integrates L-band radar and radiometer instruments as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. Airborne instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment, Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system F-SAR of DLR were flown simultaneously on the same platform on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites with in situ sensors. Here, we used the obtained data sets as a test-bed for the analysis of three active-passive fusion techniques: A) The SMAP baseline algorithm: Disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, B), the SMAP alternative algorithm: Estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter and C) Copula-based combination of active and passive microwave data. For method C empirical Copulas were generated and theoretical Copulas fitted both on the level of the raw products brightness temperature and backscatter as well as two soil moisture products. Results indicate that the regression parameters for method A and B are dependent on the radar vegetation index (RVI). Similarly, for method C the best performance was gained by generating separate Copulas for individual land use classes. For more in-depth analyses longer time series are necessary as can obtained by airborne campaigns, therefore, the methods will be applied to SMAP data.

  15. Characteristics of active spectral sensor for plant sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant stress has been estimated by spectral signature using both passive and active sensors. As optical sensors measure reflected light from a target, changes in illumination conditions critically affect sensor response. Active spectral sensors minimize the illumination effects by producing their ...

  16. Active-edge planar radiation sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, C.J.; Segal, J.D.; Westbrook, E.; Parker, Sherwood; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Watts, S.; Morse, J.

    2007-01-01

    Many systems in medicine, biology, high-energy physics, and astrophysics require large area radiation sensors. In most of these applications, minimizing the amount of dead area or dead material is crucial. We have developed a new type of silicon radiation sensor in which the device is active to within a few microns of the mechanical edge. Their perimeter is made by a plasma etcher rather than a diamond saw. Their edges can be defined and also passivated by growing, in an intermediate step, a field oxide on the side surfaces. In this paper, the basic architecture and results from a synchrotron beam test are presented. PMID:18185839

  17. Low temperature regeneration of activated carbons using microwaves: revising conventional wisdom.

    PubMed

    Calışkan, E; Bermúdez, J M; Parra, J B; Menéndez, J A; Mahramanlıoğlu, M; Ania, C O

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to explore the application of microwaves for the low temperature regeneration of activated carbons saturated with a pharmaceutical compound (promethazine). Contrary to expectations, microwave-assisted regeneration did not lead to better results than those obtained under conventional electric heating. At low temperatures the regeneration was incomplete either under microwave and conventional heating, being this attributed to the insufficient input energy. At mild temperatures, a fall in the adsorption capacity upon cycling was obtained in both devices, although this was much more pronounced for the microwave. These results contrast with previous studies on the benefits of microwaves for the regeneration of carbon materials. The fall in the adsorption capacity after regeneration was due to the thermal cracking of the adsorbed molecules inside the carbon porous network, although this effect applies to both devices. When microwaves are used, along with the thermal heating of the carbon bed, a fraction of the microwave energy seemed to be directly used in the decomposition of promethazine through the excitation of the molecular bonds by microwaves (microwave-lysis). These results point out that the nature of the adsorbate and its ability to interact with microwave are key factors that control the application of microwaves for regeneration of exhausted activated carbons.

  18. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  19. Efficient Catalytic Activity BiFeO3 Nanoparticles Prepared by Novel Microwave-Assisted Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Gong, Wanyun; Ma, Jinai; Li, Lu; Jiang, Jizhou

    2015-02-01

    A novel microwave-assisted sol-gel method was applied to the synthesis of the single-phase perovskite bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (BFO NPs) with the mean diameter ca. 73.7 nm. The morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the rhombohedral phase with R3c space group. The weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature was affirmed by the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). According to the UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (UV-DSR), the band gap energy of BFO NPs was determined to be 2.18 eV. The electrochemical activity was evaluated by BFO NPs-chitosan-glassy carbon electrode (BFO-CS-GCE) sensor for detection of p-nitrophenol contaminants. The material showed an efficient oxidation catalytic activity by degrading methylene blue (MB). It was found that the degradation efficiency of 10 mg L-1 MB at pH 6.0 was above 90.9% after ultrasound- and microwave-combined-assisted (US-MW) irradiation for 15 min with BFO NPs as catalyst and H202 as oxidant. A possible reaction mechanism of degradation of MB was also proposed.

  20. Degradation and dechlorination of pentachlorophenol by microwave-activated persulfate.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chengdu; Liu, Xitao; Zhao, Wei; Lin, Chunye; Ma, Jun; Shi, Wenxiao; Sun, Qu; Xiao, Hao

    2015-03-01

    The degradation performance of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by the microwave-activated persulfate (MW/PS) process was investigated in this study. The results indicated that degradation efficiency of PCP in the MW/PS process followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and compared with conventional heating, microwave heating has a special effect of increasing the reaction rate and reducing the process time. A higher persulfate concentration and reaction temperature accelerated the PCP degradation rate. Meanwhile, increasing the pH value and ionic strength of the phosphate buffer slowed down the degradation rate. The addition of ethanol and tert-butyl alcohol as hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical scavengers proved that the sulfate radicals were the dominant active species in the MW/PS process. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was employed to identify the intermediate products, and then a plausible degradation pathway involving dechlorination, hydrolysis, and mineralization was proposed. The acute toxicity of PCP, as tested with Photobacterium phosphoreum, Vibrio fischeri, and Vibrio qinghaiensis, was negated quickly during the MW/PS process, which was in agreement with the nearly complete mineralization of PCP. These results showed that the MW/PS process could achieve a high mineralization level in a short time, which provided an efficient way for PCP elimination from wastewater.

  1. Physical retrieval of precipitation water contents from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. Part 1: A cloud ensemble/radiative parameterization for sensor response (report version)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Raymond, William H.

    1990-01-01

    The physical retrieval of geophysical parameters based upon remotely sensed data requires a sensor response model which relates the upwelling radiances that the sensor observes to the parameters to be retrieved. In the retrieval of precipitation water contents from satellite passive microwave observations, the sensor response model has two basic components. First, a description of the radiative transfer of microwaves through a precipitating atmosphere must be considered, because it is necessary to establish the physical relationship between precipitation water content and upwelling microwave brightness temperature. Also the spatial response of the satellite microwave sensor (or antenna pattern) must be included in the description of sensor response, since precipitation and the associated brightness temperature field can vary over a typical microwave sensor resolution footprint. A 'population' of convective cells, as well as stratiform clouds, are simulated using a computationally-efficient multi-cylinder cloud model. Ensembles of clouds selected at random from the population, distributed over a 25 km x 25 km model domain, serve as the basis for radiative transfer calculations of upwelling brightness temperatures at the SSM/I frequencies. Sensor spatial response is treated explicitly by convolving the upwelling brightness temperature by the domain-integrated SSM/I antenna patterns. The sensor response model is utilized in precipitation water content retrievals.

  2. An analysis of errors in special sensor microwave imager evaporation estimates over the global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esbensen, S. K.; Chelton, D. B.; Vickers, D.; Sun, J.

    1993-01-01

    The method proposed by Liu (1984) is used to estimate monthly averaged evaporation over the global oceans from 1 yr of special sensor microwave imager (SDSM/I) data. Intercomparisons involving SSM/I and in situ data are made over a wide range of oceanic conditions during August 1987 and February 1988 to determine the source of errors in the evaporation estimates. The most significant spatially coherent evaporation errors are found to come from estimates of near-surface specific humidity, q. Systematic discrepancies of over 2 g/kg are found in the tropics, as well as in the middle and high latitudes. The q errors are partitioned into contributions from the parameterization of q in terms of the columnar water vapor, i.e., the Liu q/W relationship, and from the retrieval algorithm for W. The effects of W retrieval errors are found to be smaller over most of the global oceans and due primarily to the implicitly assumed vertical structures of temperature and specific humidity on which the physically based SSM/I retrievals of W are based.

  3. Microwave pyrolysis of oily sludge with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Rong

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to explore catalytic microwave pyrolysis of crude oil storage tank sludge for fuels using granular activated carbon (GAC) as a catalyst. The effect of GAC loading on the yield of pyrolysis products was also investigated. Heating rate of oily sludge and yield of microwave pyrolysis products such as oil and fuel gas was found to depend on the ratio of GAC to oily sludge. The optimal GAC loading was found to be 10%, while much smaller and larger feed sizes adversely influenced production. During oily sludge pyrolysis, a maximum oil yield of 77.5% was achieved. Pyrolytic oils with high concentrations of diesel oil and gasoline (about 70 wt% in the pyrolytic oil) were obtained. The leaching of heavy metals, such as Cr, As and Pb, was also suppressed in the solid residue after pyrolysis. This technique provides advantages such as harmless treatment of oily sludge and substantial reduction in the consumption of energy, time and cost.

  4. Passive and Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions in the Tropics from TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Haddad, Ziad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Braun, Scott A.; Chiu, Christine; Wang, Jian-Jian

    2002-01-01

    Passive and active microwave remote sensing data are analyzed to identify signatures of precipitation and vertical motion in tropical convection. A database of cloud/radiative model simulations is used to quantify surface rain rates and latent heating profiles that are consistent with these signatures. At satellite footprint-scale (approximately 10 km), rain rate and latent heating estimates are subject to significant random errors, but by averaging the estimates in space and time, random errors are substantially reduced, Bias errors have been minimized by improving the microphysics in the supporting cloud/radiative model simulations, and by imposing a consistent definition of remotely-sensed and model-simulated convective/stratiform rain coverage. Remotely-sensed precipitation and latent heating distributions in the tropics are derived from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave/ Imager (SSM/ I) sensor data. The prototype Version 6 TRMM passive microwave algorithm typically yields average heating profiles with maxima between 6 and 7 km altitude for organized mesoscale convective systems. Retrieved heating profiles for individual convective systems are compared to coincident estimates based upon a combination of dual-Doppler radar and rawinsonde data. Also, large-scale latent heating distributions are compared to estimates derived from a simpler technique that utilizes observations of surface rain rate and stratiform rain proportion to infer vertical heating structure. Results of these tests will be presented at the conference.

  5. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Attal, Ferhat; Mohammed, Samer; Dedabrishvili, Mariam; Chamroukhi, Faicel; Oukhellou, Latifa; Amirat, Yacine

    2015-12-11

    This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle). Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors' placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), Support Vector Machines (SVM), Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), and Random Forest (RF) as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM), are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject.

  6. Regional rainfall climatologies derived from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, Andrew J.; Adler, Robert F.; Nelkin, Eric J.; Huffman, George J.

    1994-01-01

    Climatologies of convective precipitation were derived from passive microwave observations from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager using a scattering-based algorithm of Adler et al. Data were aggregated over periods of 3-5 months using data from 4 to 5 years. Data were also stratified by satellite overpass times (primarily 06 00 and 18 00 local time). Four regions (Mexico, Amazonia, western Africa, and the western equatorial Pacific Ocean (TOGA COARE area) were chosen for their meteorological interest and relative paucity of conventional observations. The strong diurnal variation over Mexico and the southern United States was the most striking aspect of the climatologies. Pronounced morning maxima occured offshore, often in concativities in the coastline, the result of the increased convergence caused by the coastline shape. The major feature of the evening rain field was a linear-shaped maximum along the western slope of the Sierra Madre Occidental. Topography exerted a strong control on the rainfall in other areas, particularly near the Nicaragua/Honduras border and in Guatemala, where maxima in excess of 700 mm/month were located adjacent to local maxima in terrain. The correlation between the estimates and monthly gage data over the southern United States was low (0.45), due mainly to poor temporal sampling in any month and an inadequate sampling of the diurnal cycle. Over the Amazon Basin the differences in morning versus evening rainfall were complex, with an alternating series of morning/evening maxima aligned southwest to northeast from the Andes to the northeast Brazilian coast. A real extent of rainfall in Amazonia was slightly higher in the evening, but a maximum in morning precipitation was found on the Amazon River just east of Manaus. Precipitation over the water in the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) north of Brazil was more pronounced in the morning, and a pronounced land-/sea-breeze circulation was found along the northeast coast of Brazil

  7. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit devices for active array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    Two different aspects of active antenna array design were investigated. The transition between monolithic microwave integrated circuits and rectangular waveguides was studied along with crosstalk in multiconductor transmission lines. The boundary value problem associated with a discontinuity in a microstrip line is formulated. This entailed, as a first step, the derivation of the propagating as well as evanescent modes of a microstrip line. The solution is derived to a simple discontinuity problem: change in width of the center strip. As for the multiconductor transmission line problem. A computer algorithm was developed for computing the crosstalk noise from the signal to the sense lines. The computation is based on the assumption that these lines are terminated in passive loads.

  8. Monitoring snowpack properties by passive microwave sensors on board of aircraft and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Rango, A.

    1980-01-01

    Snowpack properties such as water equivalent and snow wetness may be inferred from variations in measured microwave brightness temperatures. This is because the emerged microwave radiation interacts directly with snow crystals within the snowpack. Using vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures obtained from the multifrequency microwave radiometer (MFMR) on board a NASA research aircraft and the electrical scanning microwave radiometer (ESMR) and scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) on board the Nimbus 5, 6, and 7 satellites, linear relationships between snow depth or water equivalent and microwave brightness temperature were developed. The presence of melt water in the snowpack generally increases the brightness temperatures, which can be used to predict snowpack priming and timing of runoff.

  9. Femtosecond laser fabricated multimode fiber sensors interrogated by optical-carrier-based microwave interferometry technique for distributed strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Liwei; Song, Yang; Huang, Jie; Cheng, Baokai; Zhu, Wenge; Xiao, Hai

    2016-03-01

    A multimode fiber (MMF) based cascaded intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometers (IFPIs) system is presented and the distributed strain sensing has been experimentally demonstrated by using such system. The proposed 13 cascaded IFPIs have been formed by 14 cascaded reflectors that have been fabricated on a grade index MMF. Each reflector has been made by drawing a line on the center of the cross-section of the MMF through a femtosecond laser. The distance between any two adjacent reflectors is around 100 cm. The optical carrier based microwave interferometry (OCMI) technique has been used to interrogate the MMF based cascaded FPIs system by reading the optical interference information in the microwave domain. The location along with the shift of the interference fringe pattern for each FPI can be resolved though signal processing based on the microwave domain information. The multimode interference showed very little influence to the microwave domain signals. By using such system the strain of 10-4 for each FPI sensor and the spatial resolution of less than 5 cm for the system can be easily achieved.

  10. Active Microwave Remote Sensing Observations of Weddell Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.

    1997-01-01

    Since July 1991, the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites have acquired radar data of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. The Active Microwave Instrument on board ERS has two modes; SAR and Scatterometer. Two receiving stations enable direct downlink and recording of high bit-rate, high resolution SAR image data of this region. When not in an imaging mode, when direct SAR downlink is not possible, or when a receiving station is inoperable, the latter mode allows normalized radar cross-section data to be acquired. These low bit-rate ERS scatterometer data are tape recorded, downlinked and processed off-line. Recent advances in image generation from Scatterometer backscatter measurements enable complementary medium-scale resolution images to be made during periods when SAR images cannot be acquired. Together, these combined C-band microwave image data have for the first time enabled uninterrupted night and day coverage of the Weddell Sea region at both high (25 m) and medium-scale (-20 km) resolutions. C-band ERS-1 radar data are analyzed in conjunction with field data from two simultaneous field experiments in 1992. Satellite radar signature data are compared with shipborne radar data to extract a regional and seasonal signature database for recognition of ice types in the images. Performance of automated sea-ice tracking algorithms is tested on Antarctic data to evaluate their success. Examples demonstrate that both winter and summer ice can be effectively tracked. The kinematics of the main ice zones within the Weddell Sea are illustrated, together with the complementary time-dependencies in their radar signatures. Time-series of satellite images are used to illustrate the development of the Weddell Sea ice cover from its austral summer minimum (February) to its winter maximum (September). The combination of time-dependent microwave signatures and ice dynamics tracking enable various drift regimes to be defined which relate closely to the circulation of the

  11. Classification methods for monitoring Arctic sea ice using OKEAN passive/active two-channel microwave data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, Gennady I.; Douglas, David C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents methods for classifying Arctic sea ice using both passive and active (2-channel) microwave imagery acquired by the Russian OKEAN 01 polar-orbiting satellite series. Methods and results are compared to sea ice classifications derived from nearly coincident Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) image data of the Barents, Kara, and Laptev Seas. The Russian OKEAN 01 satellite data were collected over weekly intervals during October 1995 through December 1997. Methods are presented for calibrating, georeferencing and classifying the raw active radar and passive microwave OKEAN 01 data, and for correcting the OKEAN 01 microwave radiometer calibration wedge based on concurrent 37 GHz horizontal polarization SSM/I brightness temperature data. Sea ice type and ice concentration algorithms utilized OKEAN's two-channel radar and passive microwave data in a linear mixture model based on the measured values of brightness temperature and radar backscatter, together with a priori knowledge about the scattering parameters and natural emissivities of basic sea ice types. OKEAN 01 data and algorithms tended to classify lower concentrations of young or first-year sea ice when concentrations were less than 60%, and to produce higher concentrations of multi-year sea ice when concentrations were greater than 40%, when compared to estimates produced from SSM/I data. Overall, total sea ice concentration maps derived independently from OKEAN 01, SSM/I, and AVHRR satellite imagery were all highly correlated, with uniform biases, and mean differences in total ice concentration of less than four percent (sd<15%).

  12. Rainfall index over oceans derived from SSM/I data. [Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Wilheit, T. T.

    1988-01-01

    Ths Special Sensor Microwave/Imager radiometer on board the DMSP satellite measured microwave radiation at 19.35, 22.235, 37.0, and 85.5 GHz with a swath width of 1400 km, providing an opportunity to study global precipitation distributions. A monthly averaged rainfall index was derived using only the 19.35 GHz data. It covers the + or - 50 deg portion of the world with a 5 deg x 5 deg grid. The brightness temperature histogram is analyzed to derive the rainfall distribution. Estimates of the freezing level heights and the water vapor contents are utilized to understand the rainfall distribution better. Log normal and gamma distribution functions are fitted to the data and the derived monthly rainfall index compares favorably with historical precipitation patterns.

  13. Fusion of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Create AN Essential Climate Variable Data Record on Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, W.; Dorigo, W.; de Jeu, R.; Fernandez, D.; Benveniste, J.; Haas, E.; Ertl, M.

    2012-07-01

    Soil moisture was recently included in the list of Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) that are deemed essential for IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) and UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change) needs and considered feasible for global observation. ECVs data records should be as long, complete and consistent as possible, and in the case of soil moisture this means that the data record shall be based on multiple data sources, including but not limited to active (scatterometer) and passive (radiometer) microwave observations acquired preferably in the low-frequency microwave range. Among the list of sensors that can be used for this task are the C-band scatterometers on board of the ERS and METOP satellites and the multi-frequency radiometers SMMR, SSM/I, TMI, AMSR-E, and Windsat. Together, these sensors already cover a time period of more than 30 years and the question is how can observations acquired by these sensors be merged to create one consistent data record? This paper discusses on a high-level possible approaches for fusing the individual satellite data. It is argued that the best possible approach for the fusion of the different satellite data sets is to merge Level 2 soil moisture data derived from the individual satellite data records. This approach has already been demonstrated within the WACMOS project (http://wacmos.itc.nl/) funded by European Space Agency (ESA) and will be further improved within the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of ESA (http://www.esa-cci.org/).

  14. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Attal, Ferhat; Mohammed, Samer; Dedabrishvili, Mariam; Chamroukhi, Faicel; Oukhellou, Latifa; Amirat, Yacine

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle). Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors’ placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), Support Vector Machines (SVM), Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), and Random Forest (RF) as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM), are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject. PMID:26690450

  15. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  16. Comparison of wind speed measurements over the oceans with the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager and the Geosat altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mognard, Nelly M.; Katsaros, Kristina B.

    1992-01-01

    In order to compare wind speed estimates from the Geosat altimeter and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), 25 colocated passes, within 2 hours of each other, were selected and the SSM/I estimates of wind speed and atmospheric parameters extracted along the Geosat track. Both instruments and their algorithms are described. A statistical comparison of wind speed estimates is presented and the effects of the atmospheric parameters from Geosat are analyzed. Quasi-simultaneous measurements by Geosat and SSM/I, along a Geosat track in the North-East Pacific, are also presented.

  17. A new sensor-based self-configurable bandstop filter for reducing the energy leakage in industrial microwave ovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente-Fernández, F. J.; Monzó-Cabrera, J.; Pedreño-Molina, J. L.; Lozano-Guerrero, A. J.; Fayos-Fernández, J.; Díaz-Morcillo, A.

    2012-06-01

    In this work a new sensor-based self-configurable waveguide bandstop filter that uses a combination of metallic irises and reconfigurable posts for reducing the energy leakage in industrial microwave ovens is presented and validated through a procedure fully based on measurements. Several optimization and reconfiguration alternatives of the moving posts such as genetic algorithms and parametric sweeps are assessed. Results show that good attenuation values can be obtained for all the analyzed scenarios. In particular, genetic algorithms are shown as the best search strategy. Design and optimization times are also reduced when using the proposed filter compared to computer simulations.

  18. A Negative Index Metamaterial-Inspired UWB Antenna with an Integration of Complementary SRR and CLS Unit Cells for Microwave Imaging Sensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Islam, Md. Moinul; Samsuzzaman, Md.; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Misran, Norbahiah

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a negative index metamaterial incorporated UWB antenna with an integration of complementary SRR (split-ring resonator) and CLS (capacitive loaded strip) unit cells for microwave imaging sensor applications. This metamaterial UWB antenna sensor consists of four unit cells along one axis, where each unit cell incorporates a complementary SRR and CLS pair. This integration enables a design layout that allows both a negative value of permittivity and a negative value of permeability simultaneous, resulting in a durable negative index to enhance the antenna sensor performance for microwave imaging sensor applications. The proposed MTM antenna sensor was designed and fabricated on an FR4 substrate having a thickness of 1.6 mm and a dielectric constant of 4.6. The electrical dimensions of this antenna sensor are 0.20 λ × 0.29 λ at a lower frequency of 3.1 GHz. This antenna sensor achieves a 131.5% bandwidth (VSWR < 2) covering the frequency bands from 3.1 GHz to more than 15 GHz with a maximum gain of 6.57 dBi. High fidelity factor and gain, smooth surface-current distribution and nearly omni-directional radiation patterns with low cross-polarization confirm that the proposed negative index UWB antenna is a promising entrant in the field of microwave imaging sensors. PMID:26007721

  19. A Negative Index Metamaterial-Inspired UWB Antenna with an Integration of Complementary SRR and CLS Unit Cells for Microwave Imaging Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Islam, Md Moinul; Samsuzzaman, Md; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Misran, Norbahiah

    2015-05-20

    This paper presents a negative index metamaterial incorporated UWB antenna with an integration of complementary SRR (split-ring resonator) and CLS (capacitive loaded strip) unit cells for microwave imaging sensor applications. This metamaterial UWB antenna sensor consists of four unit cells along one axis, where each unit cell incorporates a complementary SRR and CLS pair. This integration enables a design layout that allows both a negative value of permittivity and a negative value of permeability simultaneous, resulting in a durable negative index to enhance the antenna sensor performance for microwave imaging sensor applications. The proposed MTM antenna sensor was designed and fabricated on an FR4 substrate having a thickness of 1.6 mm and a dielectric constant of 4.6. The electrical dimensions of this antenna sensor are 0.20 λ × 0.29 λ at a lower frequency of 3.1 GHz. This antenna sensor achieves a 131.5% bandwidth (VSWR < 2) covering the frequency bands from 3.1 GHz to more than 15 GHz with a maximum gain of 6.57 dBi. High fidelity factor and gain, smooth surface-current distribution and nearly omni-directional radiation patterns with low cross-polarization confirm that the proposed negative index UWB antenna is a promising entrant in the field of microwave imaging sensors.

  20. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-06-03

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.

  1. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  2. A Well-Calibrated Ocean Algorithm for Special Sensor Microwave/Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, Frank J.

    1997-01-01

    I describe an algorithm for retrieving geophysical parameters over the ocean from special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I) observations. This algorithm is based on a model for the brightness temperature T(sub B) of the ocean and intervening atmosphere. The retrieved parameters are the near-surface wind speed W, the columnar water vapor V, the columnar cloud liquid water L, and the line-of-sight wind W(sub LS). I restrict my analysis to ocean scenes free of rain, and when the algorithm detects rain, the retrievals are discarded. The model and algorithm are precisely calibrated using a very large in situ database containing 37,650 SSM/I overpasses of buoys and 35,108 overpasses of radiosonde sites. A detailed error analysis indicates that the T(sub B) model rms accuracy is between 0.5 and 1 K and that the rms retrieval accuracies for wind, vapor, and cloud are 0.9 m/s, 1.2 mm, and 0.025 mm, respectively. The error in specifying the cloud temperature will introduce an additional 10% error in the cloud water retrieval. The spatial resolution for these accuracies is 50 km. The systematic errors in the retrievals are smaller than the rms errors, being about 0.3 m/s, 0.6 mm, and 0.005 mm for W, V, and L, respectively. The one exception is the systematic error in wind speed of -1.0 m/s that occurs for observations within +/-20 deg of upwind. The inclusion of the line-of-sight wind W(sub LS) in the retrieval significantly reduces the error in wind speed due to wind direction variations. The wind error for upwind observations is reduced from -3.0 to -1.0 m/s. Finally, I find a small signal in the 19-GHz, horizontal polarization (h(sub pol) T(sub B) residual DeltaT(sub BH) that is related to the effective air pressure of the water vapor profile. This information may be of some use in specifying the vertical distribution of water vapor.

  3. An Empirical Study of Tropical Cloud cluters Using Special Sensor Microwave Imager Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    hail ) scatter microwave radiation much more effectively than do "soft" snowflakes of the same dimension, so that the algorithm shows a bias in...26 Chapter 4. ALGORITHMS FOR RETRIEVAL OF ATMOSPHERIC PARAMETERS ............................................................ 39 4.1 Column Integrated...processes at various levels within a cloud. Most of the copious research on microwave radiometry in recent years has been devoted to developing algorithms

  4. Implementation of Microwave Active Nulling and Interrogation of Boundary Impedance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Sep. 2004. Electromagnetic Interrogation over Electric Boundary -H. How and C. Vittoria, "Microwave Impedance Control Over a Ferrite Boundary Layer...Utilizing Nonreciprocal Wave Propagation," IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech., MTT-52(8), 2004. Electromagnetic Interrogation involving Hexagonal Ferrite ...H. How, X. Zuo, and C. Vittoria, "Wave Propagation in Ferrite Involving Planar Anisotropy - Theory and Experiment" IEEE Trans. Magnetics, Mag-41(8

  5. Microwave remote sensing of hydrologic parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1977-01-01

    A perspective on the implementation of microwave sensors in future airborne and spaceborne observations of hydrologic parameters is presented. The rationale is based on a review of the status and future trends of active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave research as applied to the remote sensing of soil moisture content, snowpack water equivalent, freeze/thaw boundaries, lake ice thickness, surface water area, and the specification of watershed runoff coefficients. Analyses and observations based on data acquired from ground based, airborne and spaceborne platforms, and an evaluation of advantages and limitations of microwave sensors are included.

  6. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Active and Passive Microwave Ocean Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    of both analytical and efficient numerical methods for electromagnetics and hydrodynamics. New insights regarding these phenomena can then be applied to improve microwave active and passive remote sensing of the ocean surface.

  7. Active-Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Martian Permafrost and Subsurface Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raizer, V.; Linkin, V. M.; Ozorovich, Y. R.; Smythe, W. D.; Zoubkov, B.; Babkin, F.

    2000-01-01

    The investigation of permafrost formation global distribution and their appearance in h less than or equal 1 m thick subsurface layer would be investigated successfully by employment of active-passive microwave remote sensing techniques.

  8. Microwave and Beam Activation of Nanostructured Catalysts for Environmentally Friendly, Energy Efficient Heavy Crude Oil Processing

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose goal is initial evaluation and development of energy efficient processes which take advantage of the benefits offered by nanostructured catalysts which can be activated by microwave, RF, or radiation beams.

  9. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT.

  10. Imaging of Active Microwave Devices at Cryogenic Temperatures using Scanning Near-Field Microwave Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanawalla, Ashfaq S.; Dutta, S. K.; Vlahacos, C. P.; Steinhauer, D. E.; Feenstra, B. J.; Anlage, Steven M.; Wellstood, F. C.

    1998-03-01

    The ability to image electric fields in operating microwave devices is interesting both from the fundamental point of view and for diagnostic purposes. To that end we have constructed a scanning near-field microwave microscope which uses an open-ended coaxial probe and operates at cryogenic temperatures.(For related publications see: C. P. Vlahacos, R. C. Black, S. M. Anlage, A. Amar and F. C. Wellstood, Appl. Phys. Lett. 69), 3274 (1996) and S. M. Anlage, C. P. Vlahacos, Sudeep Dutta and F. C. Wellstood, IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 7, 3686 (1997). Using this system we have imaged electric fields generated by both normal metal and superconducting microstrip resonators at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 300 K. We will present images and discuss our results including observations of clear standing wave patterns at the fundamental resonant frequency and an increased quality factor of the resonators at low temperatures.

  11. Microwave activated electrochemical degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid at boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junxia; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Wei; Li, Dongming

    2009-04-01

    A method for improving the oxidation ability of the electrode is proposed by using microwave activation in electrochemical oxidation. The electrochemical degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with microwave radiation (MW-EC) was carried out in a continuous flow system under atmospheric pressure. In 3 h the removal of COD, ACE (average current efficiency) and Cl(-) concentration was 1.63, 2.25 and 1.67 times as that without microwave radiation, respectively. The high degradation ability was resulted from the more active centers at the electrode surface due to the microwave radiation. The decay kinetics of 2,4-D followed a pseudo first-order reaction. The rate constant was increased to 2.16x10(-4) s(-1) with the microwave radiation, while it was 8.52x10(-5) s(-1) with electrochemical treatment only (EC). Under both conditions, the main intermediates were identified and quantified by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The formation rate of intermediate products and further degradation rate were increased by about 50-120% with the microwave radiation. The activation of electrochemical oxidation by microwave was discussed from the diffusion process, adsorption and the temperature at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode.

  12. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    During the four years of the AgRISTARS Program, significant progress was made in quantifying the capabilities of microwave sensors for the remote sensing of soil moisture. In this paper, a discussion is provided of the results of numerous field and aircraft experiments, analysis of spacecraft data, and modeling activities which examined the various noise factors such as roughness and vegetation that affect the interpretability of microwave emission measurements. While determining that a 21-cm wavelength radiometer was the best single sensor for soil moisture research, these studies demonstrated that a multisensor approach will provide more accurate soil moisture information for a wider range of naturally occurring conditions.

  13. Effect of Microwave Heating Conditions on the Preparation of High Surface Area Activated Carbon from Waste Bamboo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Hongying Xia; Zhang, Libo; Xia, Yi; Peng, Jinhui; Wang, Shixing; Zheng, Zhaoqiang; Zhang, Shengzhou

    2015-11-01

    The present study reports the effect of microwave power and microwave heating time on activated carbon adsorption ability. The waste bamboo was used to preparing high surface area activated carbon via microwave heating. The bamboo was carbonized for 2 h at 600°C to be used as the raw material. According to the results, microwave power and microwave heating time had a significant impact on the activating effect. The optimal KOH/C ratio of 4 was identified when microwave power and microwave heating time were 700 W and 15 min, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, surface area was estimated to be 3441 m2/g with pore volume of 2.093 ml/g and the significant proportion of activated carbon was microporous (62.3%). The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were illustrated that activated carbon surface had abundant functional groups. Additionally the pore structure is characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

  14. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  15. Error Characterisation and Merging of Active and Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Gruber, Alexander; de Jeu, Richard; Parinussa, Robert; Chung, Daniel; Dorigo, Wouter; Reimer, Christoph; Kidd, Richard

    2015-04-01

    As part of the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA) a data fusion system has been developed which is capable of ingesting surface soil moisture data derived from active and passive microwave sensors (ASCAT, AMSR-E, etc.) flown on different satellite platforms and merging them to create long and consistent time series of soil moisture suitable for use in climate change studies. The so-created soil moisture data records (latest version: ESA CCI SM v02.1 released on 5/12/2014) are freely available and can be obtained from http://www.esa-soilmoisture-cci.org/. As described by Wagner et al. (2012) the principle steps of the data fusion process are: 1) error characterisation, 2) matching to account for data set specific biases, and 3) merging. In this presentation we present the current data fusion process and discuss how new error characterisation methods, such as the increasingly popular triple collocation method as discussed for example by Zwieback et al. (2012) may be used to improve it. The main benefit of an improved error characterisation would be a more reliable identification of the best performing microwave soil moisture retrieval(s) for each grid point and each point in time. In case that two or more satellite data sets provides useful information, the estimated errors can be used to define the weights with which each satellite data set are merged, i.e. the lower its error the higher its weight. This is expected to bring a significant improvement over the current data fusion scheme which is not yet based on quantitative estimates of the retrieval errors but on a proxy measure, namely the vegetation optical depth (Dorigo et al., 2015): over areas with low vegetation passive soil moisture retrievals are used, while over areas with moderate vegetation density active retrievals are used. In transition areas, where both products correlate well, both products are being used in a synergistic way: on time steps where only one of

  16. Advances on simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification using activated carbon irradiated by microwaves.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuang-Chen; Gao, Li; Ma, Jing-Xiang; Jin, Xin; Yao, Juan-Juan; Zhao, Yi

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the research background and chemistry of desulfurization and denitrification technology using microwave irradiation. Microwave-induced catalysis combined with activated carbon adsorption and reduction can reduce nitric oxide to nitrogen and sulfur dioxide to sulfur from flue gas effectively. This paper also highlights the main drawbacks of this technology and discusses future development trends. It is reported that the removal of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide using microwave irradiation has broad prospects for development in the field of air pollution control.

  17. New algorithms for microwave measurements of ocean winds Applications to Seasat and the special sensor microwave imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.; Mattox, L. A.; Peteherych, S.

    1986-01-01

    Improved second generation wind algorithms are used to process the three month Seasat SMMR and SASS data sets. The new algorithms are derived without using in situ anemometer measurements. All known biases in the sensors prime measurements are removed, and the algorithms prime model functions are internally self-consistent. The computed SMMR and SASS winds are collocated and compared on a 10 km cell-by-cell basis, giving a total of 115444 wind comparisons. The comparisons are done using three different sets of SMMR channels. When the 6.6H SMMR channel is used for wind retrieval, the SMMR and SASS winds agree to within 1.3 m/s over the SASS primary swath. At nadir where the radar cross section is less sensitive to wind, the agreement degrades to 1.9 m/s. The agreement is very good for winds from 0 to 15 m/s. Above 15 m/s, the off-nadir SASS winds are consistently lower than the SMMR winds, while at nadir the high SASS winds are greater than SMMR's. When 10.7H is used for the SMMR wind channel, the SMMR/SASS wind comparisons are not quite as good. When the frequency of the wind channel is increased to 18 GHz, the SMMR/SASS agreement substantially degrades to about 5 m/S.

  18. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Simple Floating Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Nakamura, Junichi; Kemeny, Sabrina E.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental complementary metal-oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) active-pixel image sensor integrated circuit features simple floating-gate structure, with metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) as active circuit element in each pixel. Provides flexibility of readout modes, no kTC noise, and relatively simple structure suitable for high-density arrays. Features desirable for "smart sensor" applications.

  19. Novel sensors to enable closed-loop active clearance control in gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisheimer, Jonathan; Holst, Tom

    2014-06-01

    Active clearance control within the turbine section of gas turbine engines presents and opportunity within aerospace and industrial applications to improve operating efficiencies and the life of downstream components. Open loop clearance control is currently employed during the development of all new large core aerospace engines; however, the ability to measure the gap between the blades and the case and close down the clearance further presents as opportunity to gain even greater efficiencies. The turbine area is one of the harshest environments for long term placement of a sensor in addition to the extreme accuracy requirements required to enable closed loop clearance control. This paper gives an overview of the challenges of clearance measurements within the turbine as well as discusses the latest developments of a microwave sensor designed for this application.

  20. Recognition of human activities with wearable sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weihua; Guo, Yongcai; Gao, Chao; Li, Xinke

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach for recognizing human activities with wearable sensors is investigated in this article. The key techniques of this approach include the generalized discriminant analysis (GDA) and the relevance vector machines (RVM). The feature vectors extracted from the measured signal are processed by GDA, with its dimension remarkably reduced from 350 to 12 while fully maintaining the most discriminative information. The reduced feature vectors are then classified by the RVM technique according to an extended multiclass model, which shows good convergence characteristic. Experimental results on the Wearable Action Recognition Dataset demonstrate that our approach achieves an encouraging recognition rate of 99.2%, true positive rate of 99.18% and false positive rate of 0.07%. Although in most cases, the support vector machines model has more than 70 support vectors, the number of relevance vectors related to different activities is always not more than 4, which implies a great simplicity in the classifier structure. Our approach is expected to have potential in real-time applications or solving problems with large-scale datasets, due to its perfect recognition performance, strong ability in feature reduction, and simple classifier structure.

  1. Highly selective NH3 gas sensor based on Au loaded ZnO nanostructures prepared using microwave-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Shingange, K; Tshabalala, Z P; Ntwaeaborwa, O M; Motaung, D E; Mhlongo, G H

    2016-10-01

    ZnO nanorods synthesized using microwave-assisted approach were functionalized with gold (Au) nanoparticles. The Au coverage on the surface of the functionalized ZnO was controlled by adjusting the concentration of the Au precursor. According to X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results, it was confirmed that Au form nanoparticles loaded on the surface of ZnO. The small Au loading level of 0.5wt% showed the highest response of 1600-100ppm of NH3 gas at room temperature (RT) whereas further increase of Au loading level resulted in poor detection of NH3. All Au loaded ZnO (Au/ZnO) based sensors exhibited very short recovery and response times compared to unloaded ZnO sensing materials. The responses of ZnO and Au/ZnO based sensors (0.5-2.5wt%) to other flammable gases, including H2, CO and CH4, were considerably less, demonstrating that Au/ZnO based sensors were highly selective to NH3 gas at room temperature. Spill over mechanism which is the main reason for the observed enhanced NH3 response with 0.5 Au loading level is explained in detail.

  2. Highly Sensitive Ethanol Sensor Based on Au-Decorated SnO2 Nanoparticles Synthesized Through Precipitation and Microwave Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Fang-Xian; Lian, Xiao-Xue; Zou, Yun-Ling; Wang, Qiong; Zhou, Qing-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Gold (Au)-decorated SnO2 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized through a precipitation and microwave irradiation process. The as-prepared products were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the as-prepared products consisted of nanometer-scale tetragonal crystalline SnO2 and face-centered cubic gold metal NPs. The gas sensing measurements showed that the sensor based on Au-decorated SnO2 NPs exhibited an extremely high response (239.5) toward 500-ppm ethanol at a relatively low working temperature (220°C). In addition, the response and recovery times of this sensor to ethanol were 1 s and 31 s, respectively. The excellent gas sensing performance of the synthesized NPs in terms of high response, fast response-recovery, superior selectivity, and good stability was attributed to the small nanometer size of the particles, Schottky barrier, and Au NP catalysis. Finally, we demonstrated that our Au-decorated SnO2 NPs could be a potential candidate for use in highly sensitive and selective gas sensors for ethanol.

  3. Energy-aware activity classification using wearable sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bo; Montoye, Alexander; Moore, Rebecca; Pfeiffer, Karin; Biswas, Subir

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents implementation details, system characterization, and the performance of a wearable sensor network that was designed for human activity analysis. Specific machine learning mechanisms are implemented for recognizing a target set of activities with both out-of-body and on-body processing arrangements. Impacts of energy consumption by the on-body sensors are analyzed in terms of activity detection accuracy for out-of-body processing. Impacts of limited processing abilities for the on-body scenario are also characterized in terms of detection accuracy, by varying the background processing load in the sensor units. Impacts of varying number of sensors in terms of activity classification accuracy are also evaluated. Through a rigorous systems study, it is shown that an efficient human activity analytics system can be designed and operated even under energy and processing constraints of tiny on-body wearable sensors.

  4. Energy-aware Activity Classification using Wearable Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bo; Montoye, Alexander; Moore, Rebecca; Pfeiffer, Karin; Biswas, Subir

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents implementation details, system characterization, and the performance of a wearable sensor network that was designed for human activity analysis. Specific machine learning mechanisms are implemented for recognizing a target set of activities with both out-of-body and on-body processing arrangements. Impacts of energy consumption by the on-body sensors are analyzed in terms of activity detection accuracy for out-of-body processing. Impacts of limited processing abilities for the on-body scenario are also characterized in terms of detection accuracy, by varying the background processing load in the sensor units. Impacts of varying number of sensors in terms of activity classification accuracy are also evaluated. Through a rigorous systems study, it is shown that an efficient human activity analytics system can be designed and operated even under energy and processing constraints of tiny on-body wearable sensors. PMID:25075266

  5. Characterization of Aroma-Active Compounds in Microwave Blanced Peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave blanching of peanuts has been explored as an alternative to conventional oven methods based on its speed of operation, energy savings, and efficiency of process control. Although processing times can be greatly reduced,the occurrence of stale/floral and ashy off-flavors has been reported a...

  6. Active and passive microwave measurements in Hurricane Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, V. E.; Bahn, G. S.; Grantham, W. L.; Harrington, R. F.; Jones, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center analysis of the airborne microwave remote sensing measurements of Hurricane Allen obtained on August 5 and 8, 1980 is summarized. The instruments were the C-band stepped frequency microwave radiometer and the Ku-band airborne microwave scatterometer. They were carried aboard a NOAA aircraft making storm penetrations at an altitude of 3000 m and are sensitive to rain rate, surface wind speed, and surface wind vector. The wind speed is calculated from the increase in antenna brightness temperature above the estimated calm sea value. The rain rate is obtained from the difference between antenna temperature increases measured at two frequencies, and wind vector is determined from the sea surface normalized radar cross section measured at several azimuths. Comparison wind data were provided from the inertial navigation systems aboard both the C-130 aircraft at 3000 m and a second NOAA aircraft (a P-3) operating between 500 and 1500 m. Comparison rain rate data were obtained with a rain radar aboard the P-3. Evaluation of the surface winds obtained with the two microwave instruments was limited to comparisons with each other and with the flight level winds. Two important conclusions are drawn from these comparisons: (1) the radiometer is accurate when predicting flight level wind speeds and rain; and (2) the scatterometer produces well behaved and consistent wind vectors for the rain free periods.

  7. A triboelectric motion sensor in wearable body sensor network for human activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Hui Huang; Xian Li; Ye Sun

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study is to design a novel triboelectric motion sensor in wearable body sensor network for human activity recognition. Physical activity recognition is widely used in well-being management, medical diagnosis and rehabilitation. Other than traditional accelerometers, we design a novel wearable sensor system based on triboelectrification. The triboelectric motion sensor can be easily attached to human body and collect motion signals caused by physical activities. The experiments are conducted to collect five common activity data: sitting and standing, walking, climbing upstairs, downstairs, and running. The k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) clustering algorithm is adopted to recognize these activities and validate the feasibility of this new approach. The results show that our system can perform physical activity recognition with a successful rate over 80% for walking, sitting and standing. The triboelectric structure can also be used as an energy harvester for motion harvesting due to its high output voltage in random low-frequency motion.

  8. Actively controlled multiple-sensor system for feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, Michael J.; Silberberg, Teresa M.

    1991-08-01

    Typical vision systems which attempt to extract features from a visual image of the world for the purposes of object recognition and navigation are limited by the use of a single sensor and no active sensor control capability. To overcome limitations and deficiencies of rigid single sensor systems, more and more researchers are investigating actively controlled, multisensor systems. To address these problems, we have developed a self-calibrating system which uses active multiple sensor control to extract features of moving objects. A key problem in such systems is registering the images, that is, finding correspondences between images from cameras of differing focal lengths, lens characteristics, and positions and orientations. The authors first propose a technique which uses correlation of edge magnitudes for continuously calibrating pan and tilt angles of several different cameras relative to a single camera with a wide angle field of view, which encompasses the views of every other sensor. A simulation of a world of planar surfaces, visual sensors, and a robot platform used to test active control for feature extraction is then described. Motion in the field of view of at least one sensor is used to center the moving object for several sensors, which then extract object features such as color, boundary, and velocity from the appropriate sensors. Results are presented from real cameras and from the simulated world.

  9. Arctic sea ice concentrations from special sensor microwave imager and advanced very high resolution radiometer satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, W. J.; Fowler, C.; Maslanik, J.

    1994-01-01

    Nearly coincident data from the special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) and the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) are used to compute and compare Arctic sea ice concentrations for different regions and times of the year. To help determine overall accuracies and to highlight sources of differences between passive microwave, optical wavelength, and thermal wavelength data, ice concentrations are estimated using two operational SSM/I ice concentration algorithms and with visible- and thermal-infrared wavelength AVHRR data. All algorithms capture the seasonal patterns of ice growth and melt. The ranges of differences fall within the general levels of uncertainty expected for each method and are similar to previous accuracy estimates. The estimated ice concentrations are all highly correlated, with uniform biases, although differences between individual pairs of observations can be large. On average, the NASA Team algorithm yielded 5% higher ice concentrations than the Bootstrap algorithm, while during nonmelt periods the two SSM/I algorithms agree to within 0.5%. These seasonal differences are consistent with the ways that the 19-GHz and 37-GHz microwave channels are used in the algorithms. When compared to the AVHRR-derived ice concentrations, the Team-algorithm results are more similar on average in terms of correlation and mean differences. However, the Team algorithm underestimates concentrations relative to the AVHRR output by 6% during cold months and overestimates by 3% during summer. Little seasonal difference exists between the Bootstrap and AVHRR results, with a mean difference of about 5%. Although the mean differences are less between the SSM/I-derived concentrations and concentrations estimated using AVHRR channel 1, the correlations appear substantially better between the SSM/I data and concentrations derived from AVHRR channel 4, particularly for the Team algorithm output.

  10. Design rules for the optimization of the sensitivity of open-ended coaxial microwave sensors for monitoring changes in dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Baños, Beatriz; Catalá-Civera, José M.; Canós, Antoni J.; Peñaranda-Foix, Felipe

    2005-05-01

    Open-ended coaxial probes are widely used for non-destructive measurement of dielectric properties of materials, and also as microwave sensors for industrial processes and quality control applications. The main design parameters of these sensors are the coaxial radii and working frequency. In this paper, the influence of these variables on the final sensitivity of the coaxial sensor when monitoring dielectric materials is analysed, and a novel expression for this parameter selection is proposed. Moreover, a method to select the optimum parameters of experimental configurations is provided. Measurements demonstrate that high discrimination can be achieved with this method when monitoring changes in the dielectric properties of materials.

  11. ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite rods synthesized by microwave-assisted method for humidity sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, CH.; Venkateswara Rao, K.

    2014-12-01

    The nanocomposite rods shows well known properties compared with nano structured materials for various applications like light-emitting diodes, electron field emitters, solar cells, optoelectronics, sensors, transparent conductors and fabrication of nano devices. Present paper investigates the properties of ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite rods. The bi component of ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite rods was synthesized by microwave-assisted method which is very simple, rapid and uniform in heating. The frequency of microwaves 2.45 GHz was used and temperature maintained 180 °C. Zinc acetate and titanium isopropoxide precursors were used in the preparation. The obtained ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite rods were annealed at 500 °C and 600 °C. ZnO/TiO2 nanocomposite rods have been characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) for average crystallite size and phase of the composite material, Particle Size Analyser (PSA) for average particle size, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) for morphology study, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDX) for elemental analysis, and Thermal Gravimetric and Differential Thermal Analysis (TG-DTA) for thermal property.

  12. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 3 - From theory to applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of volume scattering and emission theory are discussed, taking into account a weakly scattering medium, the Born approximation, first-order renormalization, the radiative transfer method, and the matrix-doubling method. Other topics explored are related to scatterometers and probing systems, the passive microwave sensing of the atmosphere, the passive microwave sensing of the ocean, the passive microwave sensing of land, the active microwave sensing of land, and radar remote sensing applications. Attention is given to inversion techniques, atmospheric attenuation and emission, a temperature profile retrieval from ground-based observations, mapping rainfall rates, the apparent temperature of the sea, the emission behavior of bare soil surfaces, the emission behavior of vegetation canopies, the emission behavior of snow, wind-vector radar scatterometry, radar measurements of sea ice, and the back-scattering behavior of cultural vegetation canopies.

  13. Measuring physical activity with sensors: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Dias, André; Fisterer, Bernhard; Lamla, Gregor; Kuhn, Klaus; Hartvigsen, Gunnar; Horsch, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Long term wearing of motion and heart rate sensors are essential aspects for longitudinal studies on physical activity measurement studies. We conducted a qualitative study with seven subjects in a total of 13 test sessions to identify usability and handling problems associated with Stayhealth RT3, Actigraph GT1M and Polar RS800 sensors. We found that battery life limitation is the most recurrent technical problem and long term wear of heart rate sensors produces discomfort and skin irritation.

  14. All-Weather Sounding of Moisture and Temperature From Microwave Sensors Using a Coupled Surface/Atmosphere Inversion Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukabara, S. A.; Garrett, K.

    2014-12-01

    A one-dimensional variational retrieval system has been developed, capable of producing temperature and water vapor profiles in clear, cloudy and precipitating conditions. The algorithm, known as the Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS), is currently running operationally at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS), and is applied to a variety of data from the AMSU-A/MHS sensors on board the NOAA-18, NOAA-19, and MetOp-A/B polar satellite platforms, as well as SSMI/S on board both DMSP F-16 and F18, and from the NPP ATMS sensor. MiRS inverts microwave brightness temperatures into atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, along with hydrometeors and surface parameters, simultaneously. This atmosphere/surface coupled inversion allows for more accurate retrievals in the lower tropospheric layers by accounting for the surface emissivity impact on the measurements. It also allows the inversion of the soundings in all-weather conditions thanks to the incorporation of the hydrometeors parameters in the inverted state vector as well as to the inclusion of the emissivity in the same state vector, which is accounted for dynamically for the highly variable surface conditions found under precipitating atmospheres. The inversion is constrained in precipitating conditions by the inclusion of covariances for hydrometeors, to take advantage of the natural correlations that exist between temperature and water vapor with liquid and ice cloud along with rain water. In this study, we present a full assessment of temperature and water vapor retrieval performances in all-weather conditions and over all surface types (ocean, sea-ice, land, and snow) using matchups with radiosonde as well as Numerical Weather Prediction and other satellite retrieval algorithms as references. An emphasis is placed on retrievals in cloudy and precipitating atmospheres, including extreme weather events

  15. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  16. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  17. Preparation of high surface area activated carbon from coconut shells using microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kunbin; Peng, Jinhui; Srinivasakannan, C; Zhang, Libo; Xia, Hongying; Duan, Xinhui

    2010-08-01

    The present study attempts to utilize coconut shell to prepare activated carbon using agents such as steam, CO(2) and a mixture of steam-CO(2) with microwave heating. Experimental results show that the BET surface area of activated carbons irrespective of the activation agent resulted in surface area in excess of 2000 m(2)/g. The activation time using microwave heating is very much shorter, while the yield of the activated carbon compares well with the conventional heating methods. The activated carbon prepared using CO(2) activation has the largest BET surface area, however the activation time is approximately 2.5 times higher than the activation using steam or mixture of steam-CO(2). The chemical structure of activated carbons examined using Fourier transformed infra-red spectra (FTIR) did not show any variation in the surface functional groups of the activated carbon prepared using different activation agents.

  18. Microwave frequency sensor for detection of biological cells in microfluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic-Jaric, M.; Romanuik, S. F.; Ferrier, G. A.; Bridges, G. E.; Butler, M.; Sunley, K.; Thomson, D. J.; Freeman, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    We present details of an apparatus for capacitive detection of biomaterials in microfluidic channels operating at microwave frequencies where dielectric effects due to interfacial polarization are minimal. A circuit model is presented, which can be used to adapt this detection system for use in other microfluidic applications and to identify ones where it would not be suitable. The detection system is based on a microwave coupled transmission line resonator integrated into an interferometer. At 1.5 GHz the system is capable of detecting changes in capacitance of 650 zF with a 50 Hz bandwidth. This system is well suited to the detection of biomaterials in a variety of suspending fluids, including phosphate-buffered saline. Applications involving both model particles (polystyrene microspheres) and living cells—baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and Chinese hamster ovary cells—are presented. PMID:20216959

  19. Preparation of activated carbon by microwave heating of langsat (Lansium domesticum) empty fruit bunch waste.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of langsat empty fruit bunch waste for preparation of activated carbon (EFBLAC) by microwave-induced activation was explored. Activation with NaOH at the IR ratio of 1.25, microwave power of 600 W for 6 min produced EFBLAC with a carbon yield of 81.31% and adsorption uptake for MB of 302.48 mg/g. Pore structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the physical and chemical characteristics of EFBLAC. Equilibrium data were best described by the Langmuir isotherm, with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 402.06 mg/g, and the adsorption kinetics was well fitted to the pseudo-second-order equation. The findings revealed the potential to prepare high quality activated carbon from langsat empty fruit bunch waste by microwave irradiation.

  20. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Olson, William S.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated using both simulated and airborne data. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite multi-frequency active and passive observations. These observations are characterized by various spatial and sampling resolutions. This makes the retrieval problem mathematically more difficult and ill-determined because the quality of information decreases with decreasing resolution. A model that, given reflectivity profiles and a small set of parameters (including the cloud water content, the intercept drop size distribution, and a variable describing the frozen hydrometeor properties), simulates high-resolution brightness temperatures is used. The high-resolution simulated brightness temperatures are convolved at the real sensor resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is used to minimize the differences between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. The retrieval technique is investigated using cloud model synthetic and airborne data from the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment. Simulated high-resolution brightness temperatures and reflectivities and airborne observation strong are convolved at the resolution of the TRMM instruments and retrievals are performed and analyzed relative to the reference data used in observations synthesis. An illustration of the possible use of the technique in satellite rainfall estimation is presented through an application to TRMM data. The study suggests improvements in combined active and passive retrievals even when the instruments resolutions are significantly different. Future work needs to better quantify the retrievals performance, especially in connection with satellite applications, and the uncertainty of the models used in retrieval.

  1. Active self-testing noise measurement sensors for large-scale environmental sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-12-13

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10.

  2. Active Self-Testing Noise Measurement Sensors for Large-Scale Environmental Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Federico; Cuong, Nguyen The; Reinoso, Felipe; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone's frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor's hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50) effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10. PMID:24351634

  3. Immunotropic influence of 900 MHz microwave GSM signal on human blood immune cells activated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Wanda; Dabrowski, Marek P; Kubacki, Roman; Sobiczewska, Elzbieta; Szmigielski, Stanisław

    2006-01-01

    In an earlier study we reported that G(o) phase peripheral blood mononulclear cells (PBMC) exposed to low-level (SAR = 0.18 W/kg) pulse-modulated 1300 MHz microwaves and subsequently cultured, demonstrate changed immune activity (Dabrowski et al., 2003). We investigated whether cultured immune cells induced into the active phases of cell cycle (G(1), S) and then exposed to microwaves will also be sensitive to electromagnetic field. An anechoic chamber of our design containing a microplate with cultured cells and an antenna emitting microwaves (900 MHz simulated GSM signal, 27 V/m, SAR 0.024 W/kg) was placed inside the ASSAB incubator. The microcultures of PBMC exposed to microwaves demonstrated significantly higher response to mitogens and higher immunogenic activity of monocytes (LM index) than control cultures. LM index, described in detail elsewhere (Dabrowski et al., 2001), represents the monokine influence on lymphocyte mitogenic response. The results suggest that immune activity of responding lymphocytes and monocytes can be additionally intensified by 900 MHz microwaves.

  4. Role of modulation on the effect of microwaves on ornithine decarboxylase activity in L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Penafiel, L M; Litovitz, T; Krause, D; Desta, A; Mullins, J M

    1997-01-01

    The effect of 835 MHz microwaves on the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in L929 murine cell was investigated at an SAR of approximately 2.5 W/kg. The results depended upon the type of modulation employed. AM frequencies of 16 Hz and 60 Hz produced a transient increase in ODC activity that reached a peak at 8 h of exposure and returned to control levels after 24 h of exposure. In this case, ODC was increased by a maximum of 90% relative to control levels. A 40% increase in ODC activity was also observed after 8 h of exposure with a typical signal from a TDMA digital cellular telephone operating in the middle of its transmission frequency range (approximately 840 MHz). This signal was burst modulated at 50 Hz, with approximately 30% duty cycle. By contrast, 8 h exposure with 835 MHz microwaves amplitude modulated with speech produced no significant change in ODC activity. Further investigations, with 8 h of exposure to AM microwaves, as a function of modulation frequency, revealed that the response is frequency dependent, decreasing sharply at 6 Hz an 600 Hz. Exposure with 835 MHz microwaves, frequency modulated with a 60 Hz sinusoid, yielded no significant enhancement in ODC activity for exposure times ranging between 2 and 24 h. Similarly, exposure with a typical signal from an AMPS analog cellular telephone, which uses a form of frequency modulation, produced no significant enhancement in ODC activity. Exposure with 835 MHz continuous wave microwaves produced no effects for exposure times between 2 and 24 h, except for a small but statistically significant enhancement in ODC activity after 6 h of exposure. Comparison of these results suggests that effects are much more robust when the modulation causes low-frequency periodic changes in the amplitude of the microwave carrier.

  5. Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at Microwave Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    This report summarizes research activities and results obtained under grant N000l4-99-1-0627 "Active/Passive Remote Sensing of the Ocean Surface at...Measurements were completed during April 1999 by the Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts.

  6. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-05

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  7. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0–60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems. PMID:26538293

  8. Daily precipitation estimation through different microwave sensors: Verification study over Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatta, Luca; Marra, Anna Cinzia; Panegrossi, Giulia; Casella, Daniele; Sanò, Paolo; Dietrich, Stefano; Massari, Christian; Brocca, Luca

    2017-02-01

    The accurate estimation of rainfall from remote sensing is of paramount importance for many applications as, for instance, the mitigation of natural hazards like floods, droughts, and landslides. Traditionally, microwave observations in the frequency between 10 and 183 GHz are used for estimating rainfall based on the direct interaction of radiation with the hydrometeors within precipitating clouds in a so-called top-down approach. Recently, a bottom-up approach was proposed that uses satellite soil moisture products derived from microwave observations (<10 GHz) for the estimation of accumulated rainfall amounts. The integration of the bottom-up and top-down approaches has large potential for providing high accurate rainfall estimates exploiting their different and complementary nature. In this study, we perform a long-term (3 years) assessment of different satellite rainfall products exploiting the full range of microwave frequencies over Italy. Specifically, the integration of two top-down algorithms (CDRD, Cloud Dynamics and Radiation Database, and PNPR, Passive microwave Neural network Precipitation Retrieval) for estimating rainfall from conically and cross-track scanning radiometers, and one bottom-up algorithm (SM2RAIN) applied to the Advanced SCATterometer soil moisture product is carried out. The performances of the products, individually and merged together, are assessed at daily time scale. The integration of top-down and bottom-up approaches provides the highest performance both in terms of continuous and categorical scores (i.e., median correlation coefficient and root mean square error values equal to 0.71 and 6.62 mm, respectively). In such a combination, the limitations of the two approaches are compensated allowing a better estimation of ground accumulated rainfall through SM2RAIN while, overcoming the limitations of rainfall estimation for intense events during wet conditions through CDRD-PNPR product. The accuracy and the reliability of the

  9. Soil moisture detection by Skylab's microwave sensors. [radiometer/scatterometer measurements of Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Barr, J. C.; Sobti, A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Terrain microwave backscatter and emission response to soil moisture variations were investigated using Skylab's 13.9 GHz RADSCAT (radiometer/scatterometer) system. Data acquired on June 5, 1973, over a test site in west-central Texas indicated a fair degree of correlation with composite rainfall. The scan made was cross-track contiguous (CTC) with a pitch of 29.4 deg and no roll effect. Vertical polarization was employed with both radiometer and scatterometer. The composite rainfall was computed according to the flood prediction technique using rainfall data supplied by weather reporting stations.

  10. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology and Reliability Characterization Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Pain, Bedabrata; Kayaii, Sammy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the technology, design features and reliability characterization methodology of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Both overall chip reliability and pixel reliability are projected for the imagers.

  11. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  12. Pulse-Driven Magnetoimpedance Sensor Detection of Cardiac Magnetic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology. PMID:22022453

  13. On the Response of the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager to the Marine Environment: Implications for Atmospheric Parameter Retrievals. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, Grant W.

    1990-01-01

    A reasonably rigorous basis for understanding and extracting the physical information content of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) satellite images of the marine environment is provided. To this end, a comprehensive algebraic parameterization is developed for the response of the SSM/I to a set of nine atmospheric and ocean surface parameters. The brightness temperature model includes a closed-form approximation to microwave radiative transfer in a non-scattering atmosphere and fitted models for surface emission and scattering based on geometric optics calculations for the roughened sea surface. The combined model is empirically tuned using suitable sets of SSM/I data and coincident surface observations. The brightness temperature model is then used to examine the sensitivity of the SSM/I to realistic variations in the scene being observed and to evaluate the theoretical maximum precision of global SSM/I retrievals of integrated water vapor, integrated cloud liquid water, and surface wind speed. A general minimum-variance method for optimally retrieving geophysical parameters from multichannel brightness temperature measurements is outlined, and several global statistical constraints of the type required by this method are computed. Finally, a unified set of efficient statistical and semi-physical algorithms is presented for obtaining fields of surface wind speed, integrated water vapor, cloud liquid water, and precipitation from SSM/I brightness temperature data. Features include: a semi-physical method for retrieving integrated cloud liquid water at 15 km resolution and with rms errors as small as approximately 0.02 kg/sq m; a 3-channel statistical algorithm for integrated water vapor which was constructed so as to have improved linear response to water vapor and reduced sensitivity to precipitation; and two complementary indices of precipitation activity (based on 37 GHz attenuation and 85 GHz scattering, respectively), each of which are relatively

  14. Software Defined Doppler Radar as a Contactless Multipurpose Microwave Sensor for Vibrations Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Antonio; Costanzo, Sandra; Di Massa, Giuseppe

    2017-01-08

    A vibration sensor based on the use of a Software-Defined Radio (SDR) platform is adopted in this work to provide a contactless and multipurpose solution for low-cost real-time vibrations monitoring. In order to test the vibration detection ability of the proposed non-contact method, a 1 GHz Doppler radar sensor is simulated and successfully assessed on targets at various distances, with various oscillation frequencies and amplitudes. Furthermore, an SDR Doppler platform is practically realized, and preliminary experimental validations on a device able to produce a harmonic motion are illustrated to prove the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  15. Software Defined Doppler Radar as a Contactless Multipurpose Microwave Sensor for Vibrations Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Raffo, Antonio; Costanzo, Sandra; Di Massa, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    A vibration sensor based on the use of a Software-Defined Radio (SDR) platform is adopted in this work to provide a contactless and multipurpose solution for low-cost real-time vibrations monitoring. In order to test the vibration detection ability of the proposed non-contact method, a 1 GHz Doppler radar sensor is simulated and successfully assessed on targets at various distances, with various oscillation frequencies and amplitudes. Furthermore, an SDR Doppler platform is practically realized, and preliminary experimental validations on a device able to produce a harmonic motion are illustrated to prove the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:28075345

  16. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY07 maturation activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, Jack E.; Blecke, Jill; Mitchell, John Anthony; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Crowson, Douglas A.; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Epp, David S.; Baker, Michael Sean

    2008-08-01

    This report describes activities conducted in FY07 to mature the MEMS passive shock sensor. The first chapter of the report provides motivation and background on activities that are described in detail in later chapters. The second chapter discusses concepts that are important for integrating the MEMS passive shock sensor into a system. Following these two introductory chapters, the report details modeling and design efforts, packaging, failure analysis and testing and validation. At the end of FY07, the MEMS passive shock sensor was at TRL 4.

  17. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  18. Investigation of the effects of summer melt on the calculation of sea ice concentration using active and passive microwave data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Burns, Barbara A.; Onstott, Robert G.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of ice surface melt on microwave signatures and errors in the calculation of sea ice concentration are examined, using active and passive microwave data sets from the Marginal Ice Zone Experiment aircraft flights in the Fram Strait region. Consideration is given to the possibility of using SAR to supplement passive microwave data to unambiguously discriminate between open water areas and ponded floes. Coincident active multichannel microwave radiometer and SAR measurements of individual floes are used to describe the effects of surface melt on sea ice concentration calculations.

  19. Influence of Polarity and Activation Energy in Microwave-Assisted Organic Synthesis (MAOS).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Antonio M; Prieto, Pilar; de la Hoz, Antonio; Díaz-Ortiz, Ángel; Martín, D Raúl; García, José I

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the parameters that have decisive roles in microwave-assisted reactions and to develop a model, using computational chemistry, to predict a priori the type of reactions that can be improved under microwaves. For this purpose, a computational study was carried out on a variety of reactions, which have been reported to be improved under microwave irradiation. This comprises six types of reactions. The outcomes obtained in this study indicate that the most influential parameters are activation energy, enthalpy, and the polarity of all the species that participate. In addition to this, in most cases, slower reacting systems observe a much greater improvement under microwave irradiation. Furthermore, for these reactions, the presence of a polar component in the reaction (solvent, reagent, susceptor, etc.) is necessary for strong coupling with the electromagnetic radiation. We also quantified that an activation energy of 20-30 kcal mol(-1) and a polarity (μ) between 7-20 D of the species involved in the process is required to obtain significant improvements under microwave irradiation.

  20. Influence of microwave irradiation on boron concentrate activation with an emphasis on surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Qiaoyi; Liu, Yajing; Xue, Xiangxin; Duan, Peining

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we employed microwave irradiation for activating boron concentrate, an abundant but low-grade boron mineral resource in China. The boron concentrate was pretreated by microwave irradiation based on TG-DTG-DSC analysis, and the influence of each parameter on processing efficiency was characterized using chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, FTIR and particle distribution analysis. Subsequently, the surface properties of boron concentrate and the mechanism of microwave irradiation was analyzed. Our results indicate that microwave irradiation decreased the processing temperature and shortened the roasting time by accelerating dehydroxylation and oxidation reactions in the boron concentrate, reducing the particle diameter and damaging the microstructure of the minerals, and it increased the B2O3 activity of boron from 64.68% to 86.73%, greater than the optimal conventional treatment. Compared with the simple thermal field, microwave roasting obviously increased ability of the boron concentrate to absorb OH- in the leachant and promoted boron leaching by expanding the contact area of the mineral exposed to leachant, boosting the amount of Mg2+ and Fe3+ on mineral surfaces, and increasing the hydrophilicity of the boron concentrate respectively. It enhanced the γSVLW and γSV- of boron concentrate from 29.15 mJ/m2 and 5.07 mJ/m2 to 37.07 mJ/m2 and 12.41 mJ/m2.

  1. Role of modulation on the effect of microwaves on ornithine decarboxylase activity in L929 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Penafiel, L.M.; Litovitz, T.; Krause, D.; Desta, A.; Mullins, J.M.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of 835 MHz microwaves on the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in L929 murine cells was investigated at an SAR of {approximately}2.5 W/kg. The results depended upon the type of modulation employed. AM frequencies of 16 Hz and 60 Hz produced a transient increase in ODC activity that reached a peak at 8 h of exposure and returned to control levels after 24 h of exposure. In this case, ODC was increased by a maximum of 90% relative to control levels. A 40% increase in ODC activity was also observed after 8 h of exposure with a typical signal from a TDMA digital cellular telephone operating in the middle of its transmission frequency range. This signal was burst modulated at 50 Hz, with approximately 30% duty cycle. By contrast, 8 h exposure with 835 MHz microwaves amplitude modulated with speech produced no significant change in ODC activity. Further investigations, with 8 h of exposure to AM microwaves, as a function of modulation frequency, revealed that the response is frequency dependent, decreasing sharply at 6 Hz and 600 Hz. Exposure with 835 MHz microwaves, frequency modulated with a 60 Hz sinusoid, yielded no significant enhancement in ODC activity for exposure times ranging between 2 and 24 h. Similarly, exposure with a typical signal from an AMPS analog cellular telephone, which uses a form of frequency modulation, produced no significant enhancement in ODC activity. Exposure with 835 MHz continuous wave microwaves produced no effects for exposure times between 2 and 24 h, except for a small but statistically significant enhancement in ODC activity after 6 h of exposure.

  2. Effects of microwave exposure on the hamster immune system. I. Natural killer cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.K.; Cain, C.A.; Lockwood, J.; Tompkins, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Hamsters were exposed to repeated or single doses of microwave energy and monitored for changes in core body temperature, circulating leukocyte profiles, serum corticosteroid levels, and natural killer (NK) cell activity in various tissues. NK cytotoxicity was measured in a /sup 51/Cr-release assay employing baby hamster kidney (BHK) targets or BHK infected with herpes simplex virus. Repeated exposure of hamsters at 15 mW/cm2 for 60 min/day had no significant effect on natural levels of spleen-cell NK activity against BHK targets. Similarly, repeated exposure at 15 mW/cm2 over a 5-day period had no demonstrable effect on the induction of spleen NK activity by vaccinia virus immunization, that is, comparable levels of NK were induced in untreated and microwave-treated animals. In contrast, treatment of hamsters with a single 60-min microwave exposure at 25 mW/cm2 caused a significant suppression in induced spleen NK activity. A similar but less marked decrease in spleen NK activity was observed in sham-exposed animals. Moreover, the sham effects on NK activity were not predictable and appeared to represent large individual animal variations in the response to stress factors. Depressed spleen NK activity was evident as early as 4 h postmicrowave treatment and returned to normal levels by 8 h. Hamsters exposed at 25 mW/cm2 showed an elevated temperature of 3.0-3.5 degrees C that returned to normal within 60 min after termination of microwave exposure. These animals also showed a marked lymphopenia and neutrophilia by 1 h posttreatment that returned to normal by 8-10 h. Serum glucocorticosteroids were elevated between 1 aNd 8 h after microwave treatment. Sham-exposed animals did not demonstrate significant changes in core body temperature, peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) profile, or glucocorticosteroid levels as compared to minimum-handling controls.

  3. Microwave Resonant Cavity and Loaded Carbon Nanotubes -- A Sensor to Detect Toxins like Methamphetamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Aman; Robert, James; Henley, Don; Dahiya, Jai

    2006-10-01

    A resonant cavity operating in TM010 mode was used to study the absorption response of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes and other Nanomaterials for different types of gas molecules. The range of the frequency signal as a probe was chosen arbitrarily between 9.1 -9.8 GHz. A highly specific range will be studied for further experiments. It was found that for different pressures of different gases and different types of Nanomaterials, there was a different response in the shifts of the probe signal for each cycle of gassing and degassing of the cavity. The preliminary work done so far suggests that Microwave spectroscopy of the complex medium of gases and Carbon Nanotubes can be used as a highly sensitive technique in studying the complex dielectric response of different polar as well as non-polar gases when subjected to intense electromagnetic fields within the Cavity.

  4. Chronic exposure to GSM 1800-MHz microwaves reduces excitatory synaptic activity in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shujun; Ning, Wei; Xu, Zhengping; Zhou, Suya; Chiang, Huai; Luo, Jianhong

    2006-05-08

    The world wide proliferation of mobile phones raises the concern about the health effects of 1800-MHz microwaves on the brain. The present study assesses the effects of microwave exposure on the function of cultured hippocampal neurons of rats using whole cell patch-clamp analysis combined with immunocytochemistry. We showed that chronic exposure (15 min per day for 8 days) to Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) 1800-MHz microwaves at specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.4 W/kg induced a selective decrease in the amplitude of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-soxazole propionic acid (AMPA) miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), whereas the frequency of AMPA mEPSCs and the amplitude of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) mEPSCs did not change. Furthermore, the GSM microwave treatment decreased the expression of postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95) in cultured neurons. Our results indicated that 2.4 W/kg GSM 1800-MHz microwaves may reduce excitatory synaptic activity and the number of excitatory synapses in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  5. Continuous microwave pasteurization of a vegetable smoothie improves its physical quality and hinders detrimental enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Arjmandi, Mitra; Otón, Mariano; Artés, Francisco; Artés-Hernández, Francisco; Gómez, Perla A; Aguayo, Encarna

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a pasteurization treatment at 90 ± 2 ℃ for 35 s provided by continuous microwave under different doses (low power/long time and high power/short time) or conventional pasteurization on the quality of orange-colored smoothies and their changes throughout 45 days of storage at 5 ℃ was investigated. A better color retention of the microwave pasteurization- treated smoothie using high power/short time than in conventionally processed sample was evidenced by the stability of the hue angle. The continuous microwave heating increased the viscosity of the smoothie more than the conventional pasteurization in comparison with non-treated samples. Lower residual enzyme activities from peroxidase, pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonase were obtained under microwave heating, specifically due to the use of higher power/shorter time. For this kind of smoothie, polygalacturonase was the more thermo-resistant enzyme and could be used as an indicator of pasteurization efficiency. The use of a continuous semi-industrial microwave using higher power and shorter time, such as 1600 W/206 s and 3600 W/93 s, resulted in better quality smoothies and greater enzyme reduction than conventional thermal treatment.

  6. Synergistic use of active and passive microwave in soil moisture estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, P.; Chauhan, N.; Jackson, T.; Saatchi, S.

    1992-01-01

    Data gathered during the MACHYDRO experiment in central Pennsylvania in July 1990 have been utilized to study the synergistic use of active and passive microwave systems for estimating soil moisture. These data sets were obtained during an eleven-day period with NASA's Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) and Push-Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) over an instrumented watershed which included agricultural fields with a number of different crop covers. Simultaneous ground truth measurements were also made in order to characterize the state of vegetation and soil moisture under a variety of meteorological conditions. A combination algorithm is presented as applied to a representative corn field in the MACHYDRO watershed.

  7. Assimilation of active and passive microwave observations for improved estimates of soil moisture and crop growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Ensemble Kalman Filter-based data assimilation framework that links a crop growth model with active and passive (AP) microwave models was developed to improve estimates of soil moisture (SM) and vegetation biomass over a growing season of soybean. Complementarities in AP observations were incorpo...

  8. Retrieving soil surface temperature under snowpack using special sensor microwave/imager brightness temperature in forested areas of Heilongjiang, China: an improved method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xingming; Li, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Tao; Ding, Yanling; Wu, Lili; Zhang, Shiyi; Zhao, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface temperature (Ts) is an important indicator of global temperature change and a key input parameter for retrieving land surface variables using remote sensing techniques. Due to the masking in the thermal infrared band and the scattering in the microwave band of snow, the temperature of soil surfaces covered by snow is difficult to infer from remote sensing data. We attempted to estimate Ts under snow cover using brightness temperature data from the special sensor microwave/imager. Ts under snow cover was underestimated due to the strong scattering effect of snow on upward soil microwave emissions at 37 GHz. The underestimated portion of Ts is related to snow properties, such as depth, grain size, and moisture. Based on the microwave emission model of layered snowpacks, the simulated results revealed a linear relationship between the underestimated Ts and the brightness temperature difference (TBD) at 19 and 37 GHz. When TBDs at 19 and 37 GHz were introduced to the Ts estimation method, accuracy improved, i.e., the root mean square error and bias of the estimated Ts decreased greatly, especially for dry snow. This improvement allows Ts estimation of snow-covered surfaces from 37 GHz microwave brightness temperature.

  9. Inhibitory effect of microwaved thinned nectarine extracts on polyphenol oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Diego; Venturini, María E; Oria, Rosa; Arias, Esther

    2016-04-15

    By-products from agricultural practices or from the fruit processing industry are a source of bioactive compounds that could be used in the food industry. Such by-products include thinned fruits, which are expected to contain high quantities of interesting compounds. One possible application of this fruits is the prevention of the enzymatic browning suffered by fruits and vegetables after minimal processing. The aim of this study is to determine the in vitro and in vivo activity of microwaved extracts obtained from thinned nectarines. It has been observed that in vitro the extracts obtained after the application of high microwave power levels (500, 1000 and 1500 W) are mixed type inhibitors of polyphenoloxidase enzyme, showing an irreversible inactivation. This inhibition could be attributed to the Maillard reaction products formed during the microwave treatment. In vivo, a solution of 2% of the extract obtained at 1500 W inhibited the enzymatic browning in minimally processed peaches for 8 days of storage.

  10. Microwave-induced formation of platinum nanostructured networks with superior electrochemical activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Jia, Falong; Wang, Fangfang; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Lizhi

    2011-12-16

    Platinum nanostructured networks (PNNs) can be synthesized through the chemical reduction of H(2)PtCl(6) by benzyl alcohol under microwave irradiation without the introduction of any surfactants, templates, or seeds. The synthesis route utilizes benzyl alcohol as both the reductant and the structure-directing agent, and thus, the process is particularly simple and highly repeatable. The formation of the PNN structure was ascribed to the collision-induced fusion of Pt nanocrystals owing to the cooperative functions of microwave irradiation and benzyl alcohol. Compared with a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the as-prepared PNNs possessed superior electrochemical activity and stability on the oxidation of methanol because of the unique 3D nanostructured networks and abundant defects formed during the assembly process. This study may provide a facile microwave-induced approach for the synthesis of other 3D nanostructured noble metals or their alloys.

  11. Developing sensor activity relationships for the JPL electronic nose sensors using molecular modeling and QSAR techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Jewell, A. D.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    We report a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) study using Genetic Function Approximations (GFA) to describe the polymer-carbon composite sensor activities in the JPL Electronic Nose, when exposed to chemical vapors at parts-per-million concentration levels.

  12. The Effects of Rainfall Inhomogeneity on Climate Variability of Rainfall Estimated from Passive Microwave Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Poyner, Philip; Berg, Wesley; Thomas-Stahle, Jody

    2007-01-01

    Passive microwave rainfall estimates that exploit the emission signal of raindrops in the atmosphere are sensitive to the inhomogeneity of rainfall within the satellite field of view (FOV). In particular, the concave nature of the brightness temperature (T(sub b)) versus rainfall relations at frequencies capable of detecting the blackbody emission of raindrops cause retrieval algorithms to systematically underestimate precipitation unless the rainfall is homogeneous within a radiometer FOV, or the inhomogeneity is accounted for explicitly. This problem has a long history in the passive microwave community and has been termed the beam-filling error. While not a true error, correcting for it requires a priori knowledge about the actual distribution of the rainfall within the satellite FOV, or at least a statistical representation of this inhomogeneity. This study first examines the magnitude of this beam-filling correction when slant-path radiative transfer calculations are used to account for the oblique incidence of current radiometers. Because of the horizontal averaging that occurs away from the nadir direction, the beam-filling error is found to be only a fraction of what has been reported previously in the literature based upon plane-parallel calculations. For a FOV representative of the 19-GHz radiometer channel (18 km X 28 km) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the mean beam-filling correction computed in this study for tropical atmospheres is 1.26 instead of 1.52 computed from plane-parallel techniques. The slant-path solution is also less sensitive to finescale rainfall inhomogeneity and is, thus, able to make use of 4-km radar data from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) in order to map regional and seasonal distributions of observed rainfall inhomogeneity in the Tropics. The data are examined to assess the expected errors introduced into climate rainfall records by unresolved changes in rainfall inhomogeneity. Results show that global

  13. Microwave and camera sensor fusion for the shape extraction of metallic 3D space objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Scott W.; Defigueiredo, Rui J. P.; Krishen, Kumar

    1989-01-01

    The vacuum of space presents special problems for optical image sensors. Metallic objects in this environment can produce intense specular reflections and deep shadows. By combining the polarized RCS with an incomplete camera image, it has become possible to better determine the shape of some simple three-dimensional objects. The radar data are used in an iterative procedure that generates successive approximations to the target shape by minimizing the error between computed scattering cross-sections and the observed radar returns. Favorable results have been obtained for simulations and experiments reconstructing plates, ellipsoids, and arbitrary surfaces.

  14. Annotating smart environment sensor data for activity learning.

    PubMed

    Szewcyzk, S; Dwan, K; Minor, B; Swedlove, B; Cook, D

    2009-01-01

    The pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. In order to monitor the functional health of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track the activities that people perform at home. Machine learning techniques can perform this task, but the software algorithms rely upon large amounts of sample data that is correctly labeled with the corresponding activity. Labeling, or annotating, sensor data with the corresponding activity can be time consuming, may require input from the smart home resident, and is often inaccurate. Therefore, in this paper we investigate four alternative mechanisms for annotating sensor data with a corresponding activity label. We evaluate the alternative methods along the dimensions of annotation time, resident burden, and accuracy using sensor data collected in a real smart apartment.

  15. Active microwave measurements of Arctic sea ice under summer conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, R. G.; Gogineni, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Radar provides a valuable tool in the study of sea-ice conditions and the solution of sea-ice operational problems. For this reason, the U.S. and Canada have conducted studies to define a bilateral synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite program. The present paper is concerned with work which has been performed to explore the needs associated with the study of sea-ice-covered waters. The design of a suitable research or operational spaceborne SAR or real aperture radar must be based on an adequate knowledge of the backscatter coefficients of the ice features which are of interest. In order to obtain the needed information, studies involving the use of a helicopter were conducted. In these studies L-C-X-Ku-band calibrated radar data were acquired over areas of Arctic first-year and multiyear ice during the first half of the summer of 1982. The results show that the microwave response in the case of sea ice is greatly influenced by summer melt, which produces significant changes in the properties of the snowpack and ice sheet.

  16. Rapid preparation of α-FeOOH and α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures by microwave heating and their application in electrochemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Marinho, J.Z.; Montes, R.H.O.; Moura, A.P. de; Longo, E.; Varela, J.A.; Munoz, R.A.A.; Lima, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Simple microwave method leads to the rapid formation of the goethite and hematite. • Homogenous nucleation and growth of particles are controlled by synthesis time. • Modified electrode with α-FeOOH nanoplates improved the electrochemical response. • The sample is directly heated by microwaves and its crystallization is accelerated. • Fe{sup 3+} nanostructures are promising for development of electrochemical sensors. - Abstract: α-FeOOH (goethite) and α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite) nanostructures have been successfully synthesized using the microwave-assisted hydrothermal (MAH) method and by the rapid burning in a microwave oven of the as-prepared goethite, respectively. The orthorhombic α-FeOOH to rhombohedralα-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} structural transformation was observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy results. Plates-like α-FeOOH prepared in 2 min and rounded and quasi-octahedral shaped α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles obtained in 10 min were observed using field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The use of microwave heating allowed iron oxides to be prepared with shorter reaction times when compared to other synthesis methods. α-FeOOH nanoplates were incorporated into graphite-composite electrodes, which presented electrocatalytic properties towards the electrochemical oxidation of ascorbic acid in comparison with unmodified electrodes. This result demonstrates that such α-FeOOH nanostructures are very promising chemical modifiers for the development of improved electrochemical sensors.

  17. Synthesis of novel quinoxalinone derivatives by conventional and microwave methods and assessing their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Waqar; Munawar, Munawar Ali; Ahmed, Ejaz; Sharif, Ahsan; Ahmed, Saeed; Ayub, Amjad; Khan, Misbahul Ain; Nasim, Faizul Hassan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, twenty-one arylaminoquinoxalinone derivatives were synthesized and their antibacterial activities against Staphylococci aureus, Pseudomonas aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella typhi, and Shigella pneumoniae were evaluated relative to known antibiotics; augmentin, ampicillin, and chloramphenicol. The insecticidal activities of the prepared compounds were also investigated against Tribolium castaneum using permethrin as a standard insecticide. The derivatives were synthesized using both conventional and microwave techniques. Their structures were confirmed using spectral techniques and elemental analysis.

  18. Satellite Remote Sensing of Global Vegetation Phenology: Comparison of Optical-Infrared and Microwave Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. O.; Kimball, J. S.; Jones, L. A.; McDonald, K. C.

    2009-12-01

    Satellite optical-infrared remote sensing has long been used to monitor vegetation phenology at continental to global scales. Models incorporating the optical-infrared vegetation indices (VI), EVI and NDVI, have been applied to measure phenological events including growing season start, peak, end and duration. These indices are sensitive to signal degradation from reduced solar illumination, clouds, smoke and other atmospheric effects reducing temporal fidelity and accuracy of observations. However, satellite microwave remote sensing at lower frequencies (≤ 10 GHz) is largely insensitive to solar illumination and atmospheric effects. The AMSR-E radiometer offers multifrequency microwave observations at moderate (~25-60 km) spatial scales with near-daily global sampling. We recently developed an algorithm for global retrieval of vegetation optical depth (VOD), which is sensitive to phenological changes in canopy biomass and water content. We examined phenology signals using three approaches. First, linear correlations between six years (2003-2008) of MODIS VI, AMSR-E VOD, and a bioclimatic phenology model were derived globally. Second, correlations were summarized by land cover type and spatially contiguous regions to assess regional patterns in the results. Finally, we compared MODIS VI and AMSR-E VOD series with the bioclimatic phenology model and tower eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements across a network of Ameriflux sites representing the major global biomes. Our results show reduced VI-VOD correspondence over cloudy regions, including tropical forests, due to VI related signal degradation. VOD phenology sensitivity coincided with seasonal changes in meteorological conditions, vegetation greenness, ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem CO2 exchange. Correlation means by land cover (pixels≥80% homogeneous) ranged from 0.66 (NDVI; Savannas; 97% of pixels p<0.01) to -0.07 (EVI; Evergreen Broadleaf; 70% of pixels p>0.10). The majority of insignificant

  19. Active Sensing System with In Situ Adjustable Sensor Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Nurzaman, Surya G.; Culha, Utku; Brodbeck, Luzius; Wang, Liyu; Iida, Fumiya

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread use of sensors in engineering systems like robots and automation systems, the common paradigm is to have fixed sensor morphology tailored to fulfill a specific application. On the other hand, robotic systems are expected to operate in ever more uncertain environments. In order to cope with the challenge, it is worthy of note that biological systems show the importance of suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability to handle different kinds of sensing tasks with particular requirements. Methodology This paper presents a robotics active sensing system which is able to adjust its sensor morphology in situ in order to sense different physical quantities with desirable sensing characteristics. The approach taken is to use thermoplastic adhesive material, i.e. Hot Melt Adhesive (HMA). It will be shown that the thermoplastic and thermoadhesive nature of HMA enables the system to repeatedly fabricate, attach and detach mechanical structures with a variety of shape and size to the robot end effector for sensing purposes. Via active sensing capability, the robotic system utilizes the structure to physically probe an unknown target object with suitable motion and transduce the arising physical stimuli into information usable by a camera as its only built-in sensor. Conclusions/Significance The efficacy of the proposed system is verified based on two results. Firstly, it is confirmed that suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability enables the system to sense different physical quantities, i.e. softness and temperature, with desirable sensing characteristics. Secondly, given tasks of discriminating two visually indistinguishable objects with respect to softness and temperature, it is confirmed that the proposed robotic system is able to autonomously accomplish them. The way the results motivate new research directions which focus on in situ adjustment of sensor morphology will also be discussed. PMID:24416094

  20. [Active crop canopy sensor-based nitrogen diagnosis for potato].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Li, Fei; Qin, Yong-Lin; Fan, Ming-Shou

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, two potato experiments involving different N rates in 2011 were conducted in Wuchuan County and Linxi County, Inner Mongolia. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was collected by an active GreenSeeker crop canopy sensor to estimate N status of potato. The results show that the NDVI readings were poorly correlated with N nutrient indicators of potato at vegetative Growth stage due to the influence of soil background. With the advance of growth stages, NDVI values were exponentially related to plant N uptake (R2 = 0.665) before tuber bulking stage and were linearly related to plant N concentration (R2 = 0.699) when plant fully covered soil. In conclusion, GreenSeeker active crop sensor is a promising tool to estimate N status for potato plants. The findings from this study may be useful for developing N recommendation method based on active crop canopy sensor.

  1. A Lightweight Hierarchical Activity Recognition Framework Using Smartphone Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Manhyung; Bang, Jae Hun; Nugent, Chris; McClean, Sally; Lee, Sungyoung

    2014-01-01

    Activity recognition for the purposes of recognizing a user's intentions using multimodal sensors is becoming a widely researched topic largely based on the prevalence of the smartphone. Previous studies have reported the difficulty in recognizing life-logs by only using a smartphone due to the challenges with activity modeling and real-time recognition. In addition, recognizing life-logs is difficult due to the absence of an established framework which enables the use of different sources of sensor data. In this paper, we propose a smartphone-based Hierarchical Activity Recognition Framework which extends the Naïve Bayes approach for the processing of activity modeling and real-time activity recognition. The proposed algorithm demonstrates higher accuracy than the Naïve Bayes approach and also enables the recognition of a user's activities within a mobile environment. The proposed algorithm has the ability to classify fifteen activities with an average classification accuracy of 92.96%. PMID:25184486

  2. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  3. Oxidative degradation of trichloroethylene adsorbed on active carbons: Use of microwave energy

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, R.; Nandi, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds (CHCl), such as chlorinated alkanes/alkenes, benzene and biphenyl etc, represent an important fraction of the industrial hazardous wastes produced. Trichloroethylene (TCE) can be removed from waste streams by adsorption on active carbons. The primary objective of the present work was to study the detoxification in air-stream of TCE adsorbed on different types of active carbons using in situ microwave heating. A secondary objective was to examine the regeneration of used carbons from the effects of repeated cyclic operations (adsorption- detoxification). The experimental study has shown that trichloroethylene adsorbed on active carbon can be oxidatively degradated in presence of microwave radiation. Energy can be transferred efficiently to the reaction sites without losing heat to the surrounding vessel. One of the decomposition product of trichloroethylene is free chlorine which is held very strongly on active carbon. Hydrochloric acid on the other hand seems to be less strongly held and appears in large concentration in the exit gas. Production of free chlorine can be avoided by using chlorohydrocarbon mixed with sufficient internal hydrogen. This is also expected to minimize the problem of carbon regeneration encountered in this study. The results obtained from studies on the oxidative degradation of TCE under microwave radiation are promising in a number of respects: (1) the detoxification of TCE adsorbed on active carbon can be conducted at moderate (<400{degree}C) temperatures, and (2) the used carbon bed can be regenerated. A patent on the process has been issued. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Rapid Synthesis and Antiviral Activity of (Quinazolin-4-Ylamino)Methyl-Phosphonates Through Microwave Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hui; Hu, Deyu; Wu, Jian; He, Ming; Jin, Linhong; Yang, Song; Song, Baoan

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the simple synthesis of new (quinazolin-4-ylamino) methylphosphonates via microwave irradiation. Substituted-2-aminobenzonitrile reacted with 1,1-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylmethanamine at a reflux condition to obtain N′-(substituted-2-cyanophenyl)-N,N-dimethylformamidine (1). The subsequent reaction of this intermediate product with α-aminophosphonate (2) in a solution containing glacial acetic acid in 2-propanol through microwave irradiation resulted in the formation of (quinazolin-4-ylamino)methyl-phosphonate derivatives 3a to 3x, which were unequivocally characterized by the spectral data and elemental analysis. The influence of the reaction conditions on the yield of 3a was investigated to optimize the synthetic conditions. The relative optimal conditions for the synthesis of 3a include a 1:1 molar ratio of N′-(2-cyanophenyl)-N,N-dimethylformamidine to diethyl amino(phenyl)methylphosphonate and a 4:1 volume ratio of isopropanol to HOAc in the solvent mixture, at a reaction temperature of 150 °C, with a microwave power of 100 W and a corresponding pressure of 150 psi for 20 min in the microwave synthesizer. The yield of 3a was approximately 79%, whereas those of 3b to 3x were approximately 77% to 86%. Some of the synthesized compounds displayed weak to good anti-Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activity. PMID:22837660

  5. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Fiber Paper by Active Screen Plasma Nitriding and Its Microwave Heating Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Naishu; Ma, Shining; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-12-28

    In this paper, active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) treatment was performed on polyacrylonitrile carbon fiber papers. Electric resistivity and microwave loss factor of carbon fiber were described to establish the relationship between processing parameters and fiber's ability to absorb microwaves. The surface processing effect of carbon fiber could be characterized by dynamic thermal mechanical analyzer testing on composites made of carbon fiber. When the process temperature was at 175 °C, it was conducive to obtaining good performance of dynamical mechanical properties. The treatment provided a way to change microwave heating properties of carbon fiber paper by performing different treatment conditions, such as temperature and time parameters. Atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that, during the course of ASPN treatment on carbon fiber paper, nitrogen group was introduced and silicon group was removed. The treatment of nitrogen-doped carbon fiber paper represented an alternative promising candidate for microwave curing materials used in repairing and heating technology, furthermore, an efficient dielectric layer material for radar-absorbing structure composite in metamaterial technology.

  6. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  7. Potential of jackfruit peel as precursor for activated carbon prepared by microwave induced NaOH activation.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-05-01

    The feasibility of preparing activated carbon (JPAC) from jackfruit peel, an industrial residue abundantly available from food manufacturing plants via microwave-assisted NaOH activation was explored. The influences of chemical impregnation ratio, microwave power and radiation time on the properties of activated carbon were investigated. JPAC was examined by pore structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherm, elemental analysis, surface acidity/basicity and zeta potential measurements. The adsorptive behavior of JPAC was quantified using methylene blue as model dye compound. The best conditions resulted in JPAC with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 400.06 mg/g and carbon yield of 80.82%. The adsorption data was best fitted to the pseudo-second-order equation, while the adsorption mechanism was well described by the intraparticle diffusion model. The findings revealed the versatility of jackfruit peels as good precursor for preparation of high quality activated carbon.

  8. Preliminary microwave irradiation of water solutions changes their channel-modifying activity.

    PubMed

    Fesenko, E E; Geletyuk, V I; Kazachenko, V N; Chemeris, N K

    1995-06-05

    Earlier we have shown that millimetre microwaves (42.25 GHz) of non-thermal power, upon direct admittance into an experiment bath, greatly influence activation characteristics of single Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels (in particular, the channel open state probability, Po). Here we present new data showing that similar changes in Po arise due to the substitution of a control bath solution for a preliminary microwave irradiated one of the same composition (100 mmol/l KCl with Ca2+ added), with irradiation time being 20-30 min. Therefore, due to the exposure to the field the solution acquires some new properties that are important for the channel activity. The irradiation terminated, the solution retains a new state for at least 10-20 min (solution memory). The data suggest that the effects of the field on the channels are mediated, at least partially, by changes in the solution properties.

  9. Renewable phenols production by catalytic microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets with activated carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Liu, Yupeng; Liang, Jing; Tang, Juming

    2013-08-01

    The effects of different activated carbon (AC) catalysts based on various carbon sources on products yield and chemical compositions of upgraded pyrolysis oils were investigated using microwave pyrolysis of Douglas fir sawdust pellets. Results showed that high amounts of phenols were obtained (74.61% and 74.77% in the upgraded bio-oils by DARCO MRX (wood based) and DARCO 830 (lignite coal based) activated carbons, respectively). The catalysts recycling test of the selected catalysts indicated that the carbon catalysts can be reused for at least 3-4 times and produced high concentrations of phenol and phenolic compounds. The chemical reaction mechanism for phenolics production during microwave pyrolysis of biomass was analyzed.

  10. Snowmelt estimation in the Antarctic Peninsula by subpixel analysis of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, C. W.; Costi, J.; Neto, J. A.; Simoes, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we used co-registered SSM/I F13 (Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer - DMSP) and classified ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture RADAR) images (ENVISAT), covering the Antarctic Peninsula continental area, and applied these data in a Spectral Linear Mixing Model (SLMM) for a subpixel analysis of the snowmelt in SSM/I images. We used SSM/I F13 data processed into Equal Area Scalable Earth (EASE)-Grid brightness temperature (NSIDC), from 19 GHz and 37 GHz channels (horizontal e vertically polarized), acquired during ascending orbits. We calibrated the SSM/I F13 data and compared them to co-registered images of components' proportion (fraction images) of study area endmembers, namely Wet Snow Zone (WSZ), Dry Snow Zone (DSZ) and rock outcrops. The fraction images were derived from classified images of these endmembers, resulted from the classification of ASAR images on wideswath mode (150 m of spatial resolution). For the WSZ subpixel analysis in SSM/I F13 images, we used 16 mosaics of ASAR classified images, from November and December 2006, January to April 2007, December 2007 and January 2008. In the SLMM of this study, the brightness temperature of each pixel (Rk) in a given channel k (frequency and polarization) was assumed as a result of a linear combination of the spectral signature of each endmember (rk) in the channel k, weighted by the percentual coverage area (or fraction area F) of this component at each pixel of SSM/I images. The 16 ASAR fraction images of endmembers and 16 co-registered SSM/I F13 images with same acquisition date were used in the SLMM to estimate the unknown spectral signatures rk, based on the least squares solution determined by Haertel and Shimabukuro (2005). The spectral signature rk of each endmember were then used with SSM/I images of the same date (i.e., calibrated brightness temperatures Rk) to estimate the WSZ fraction images F. Each estimated WSZ fraction image were compared with the original WSZ fraction image

  11. Decadal Trends and Variability in Special Sensor Microwave / Imager (SSM/I) Brightness Temperatures and Earth Incidence Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilburn, K. A.; Shie, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF) dataset is a valuable tool for monitoring air-sea fluxes over the global ocean. The most recently released version of GSSTF, Version 2b, uses Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) Version-6 Special Sensor Microwave / Imager (SSM/I) brightness temperature (TB) dataset in its production. Analysis of long-term trends from 1987 to 2008 in GSSTF showed a surprising result: while column-integrated water vapor has a small positive trend (less than 1%/decade), the lowest 500-m water vapor (WB) has a large negative trend (-3.4%/decade). Through collaboration between our two groups, we determined that the trends in WB are due to trends in the earth incidence angle (EIA) of SSM/I TB measurements. The effect of these EIA trends must be removed from TB to get accurate trends in WB. This presentation characterizes EIA trends and variability in the SSM/I dataset, and explains their effect on TB. The entire dataset is analyzed, including all six sensors operating from 1987-2009. The methodology used to calculate EIA is explained, which provides insight into the sources of EIA variability. The main source of variability is the change in altitude over an orbit, however this is modulated by the precession of perigee that varies with a four month period. The physical relationship between EIA and TB is explained with RSS radiative transfer model. The relationship is not constant, but depends on the meteorological conditions in the satellite footprint, which is the key difficulty in removing EIA effects. Since the SSM/I satellites are gradually falling over time, EIA has a trend of -0.14°/decade. This produces a -0.3 K/decade trend in vertical polarization TB. RSS has always handled EIA variations using its retrieval algorithms that are parameterized in terms of EIA. In order to use legacy algorithms that do not include EIA dependence (e.g., Schulz WB retrieval algorithm), an algorithm to normalize TB to a nominal EIA is derived and

  12. Fabrication of Feedhorn-Coupled Transition Edge Sensor Arrays for Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denis, K. L.; Ali, A.; Appel, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Chang, M. P.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Costen, N.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Hu, R.; Marriage, T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.; Wollack, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the minute cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization signature requires multi-frequency high-throughput precision instrument systems. We have previously described the detector fabrication of a 40 gigahertz focal plane and now describe the fabrication of a 37-element dual-polarization detector module for measurement of the CMB at 90 gigahertz. The 72-TES (Transition Edge Sensor)-based bolometers in each module are coupled to a niobium-based planar orthomode transducer with integrated band defining filters implemented in microstrip transmission line. A single crystal silicon dielectric substrate serves as microstrip dielectric and as a thermal link between the membrane isolated MoAu TES operating at 150 millikelvins and the heat bath. A short silicon leg between the heat bath and the TES bolometer is designed for ballistic phonon transport and provides improved process control and uniformity of thermal conductance in the presence of phonon scattering on roughened surfaces. Micro-machined structures are used to realize the orthomode transducer backshort, provide out of band signal rejection, and a silicon photonic choke for feedhorn coupling are described. The backshort, choke wafer, and detector wafer are indium bump-bonded to create a single 37-element dual-polarization detector module. Fourteen such hexagonally shaped modules each 80 millimeters in size comprise two focal planes. These, along with the recently delivered 40 gigahertz focal plane, will survey a large fraction of the sky as part of the Johns Hopkins University-led ground-based CLASS (Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor) telescope.

  13. The Special Sensor Microwave Imager Wind Dataset: A Source of Quantitative Information for the Ocean-to-Land Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.; Ardizzone, J.; Atlas, R.; Demaree, G.; Huth, R.; Jaagus, J.; Koslowsky, D.; Przybylak, R.; Wos, A.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    It is well recognized that advection from the North Atlantic has a profound effect on the climatic conditions in central Europe. A new dataset of the ocean-surface winds, derived from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager, SSM/1, is now available. This satellite instrument measures the wind speed, but not the direction. However, variational analysis developed at the Data Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, by combining the SSM/I measurements with wind vectors measured from ships, etc., produced global maps of the ocean surface winds suitable for climate analysis. From this SSM/I dataset, a specific index I(sub na) of the North Atlantic surface winds has been developed, which pertinently quantifies the low-level advection into central Europe. For a selected time-period, the index I(sub na) reports the average of the amplitude of the wind, averaging only the speed when the direction is from the southwest (when the wind is from another direction, the contribution counts to the average as zero speed). Strong correlations were found between February I(sub na) and the surface air temperatures in Europe 50-60 deg N. In the present study, we present the correlations between I(sub na) and temperature I(sub s), and also the sensitivity of T(sub s), to an increase in I(sub na), in various seasons and various regions. We specifically analyze the flow of maritime-air from the North Atlantic that produced two extraordinary warm periods: February 1990, and early-winter 2000/2001. The very cold December 2001 was clearly due to a northerly flow. Our conclusion is that the SSM/I dataset is very useful for providing insight to the forcing of climatic fluctuations in Europe.

  14. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, Jose C.; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael; Capella, Juan V.; Serrano, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART), serial peripheral interface (SPI), and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference), about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature. PMID:26393604

  15. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, Jose C; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael; Capella, Juan V; Serrano, Juan J

    2015-09-18

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART), serial peripheral interface (SPI), and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference), about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature.

  16. Investigation of frequency response of microwave active ring resonator based on ferrite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, M. I.; Nikitin, A. A.; Ustinov, A. B.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2016-11-01

    The complex transmission coefficient of active ring resonators based on ferrite-film delay lines was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Influence of the parameters of the delay line on the transmission coefficients was investigated. It was shown that the resonant frequencies of the ring depend on the ferrite film thickness and the distance between spin-wave antennae. These dependences give possibility to control the shape of the transmission coefficient that in combination with magnetic tuning provide flexibility for microwave applications.

  17. Active microwave investigation of snowpacks: Experimental documentation, Colorado 1979-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiles, W. H.; Ulaby, F. T.; Aslam, A.; Abdelrazik, M.

    1981-01-01

    During the winter of 1979-1980, the University of Kansas Microwave Active Spectrometer systems measured the backscattering properties of snowpacks under varying conditions at four test sites in Colorado. In addition to the radar data over 1-35 GHz, ground-truth measurements of the atmospheric, snow, and soil characteristics were obtained for each radar data set. The test sites, data acquisition procedures, and data that were acquired in this experiment are presented and described.

  18. Fusion of smartphone motion sensors for physical activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2014-06-10

    For physical activity recognition, smartphone sensors, such as an accelerometer and a gyroscope, are being utilized in many research studies. So far, particularly, the accelerometer has been extensively studied. In a few recent studies, a combination of a gyroscope, a magnetometer (in a supporting role) and an accelerometer (in a lead role) has been used with the aim to improve the recognition performance. How and when are various motion sensors, which are available on a smartphone, best used for better recognition performance, either individually or in combination? This is yet to be explored. In order to investigate this question, in this paper, we explore how these various motion sensors behave in different situations in the activity recognition process. For this purpose, we designed a data collection experiment where ten participants performed seven different activities carrying smart phones at different positions. Based on the analysis of this data set, we show that these sensors, except the magnetometer, are each capable of taking the lead roles individually, depending on the type of activity being recognized, the body position, the used data features and the classification method employed (personalized or generalized). We also show that their combination only improves the overall recognition performance when their individual performances are not very high, so that there is room for performance improvement. We have made our data set and our data collection application publicly available, thereby making our experiments reproducible.

  19. Fusion of Smartphone Motion Sensors for Physical Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2014-01-01

    For physical activity recognition, smartphone sensors, such as an accelerometer and a gyroscope, are being utilized in many research studies. So far, particularly, the accelerometer has been extensively studied. In a few recent studies, a combination of a gyroscope, a magnetometer (in a supporting role) and an accelerometer (in a lead role) has been used with the aim to improve the recognition performance. How and when are various motion sensors, which are available on a smartphone, best used for better recognition performance, either individually or in combination? This is yet to be explored. In order to investigate this question, in this paper, we explore how these various motion sensors behave in different situations in the activity recognition process. For this purpose, we designed a data collection experiment where ten participants performed seven different activities carrying smart phones at different positions. Based on the analysis of this data set, we show that these sensors, except the magnetometer, are each capable of taking the lead roles individually, depending on the type of activity being recognized, the body position, the used data features and the classification method employed (personalized or generalized). We also show that their combination only improves the overall recognition performance when their individual performances are not very high, so that there is room for performance improvement. We have made our data set and our data collection application publicly available, thereby making our experiments reproducible. PMID:24919015

  20. Microwave-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Yupingfeng powder and their antioxidant activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Bi-Bo; Qu, Xiao-Xia; Gao, Feng; Yuan, Min-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Microwave-assisted reflux extraction of polysaccharides YPF-P from the famous Chinese traditional drug, Yupingfeng powder, optimization of extracting conditions and evaluation of their antioxidant activity were conducted in this study. Results: Single factor effect trends were achieved through yields and contends of YPF-P obtained from different extracting conditions. Then through a three-level, four-variable Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology adopting yield as response, the optimal conditions were determined as follows: Material/solvent ratio 1:23.37, microwave power 560 W, Extraction temperature 64°C, and extraction time 9.62 min. Under the optimal conditions, the YPF-P extraction yield was 3.23%, and its content was detected as 38.52%. In antioxidant assays, the YPF-P was tested to possess 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities with an IC50 value of 0.262 mg/ml. In addition, YPF-P was also proved to have relatively low ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), compared to Vc, through FRAP assay. Conclusion: In the microwave assisted reflux extraction research, good YPF-P yield was achieved from materials with relatively low YPF-P content. And for the first time, both DPPH and FRAP assays were conducted on YPF-P, which proved that the antioxidant activity of YPF-P contributed to the functions of this medicine. PMID:26246730

  1. Assessment of Cryospheric Products Derived from Microwave Sensors Using the MiRS Algorithm with Applications to GCOM-W/AMSR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassotti, C.; Boukabara, S. A.; Garrett, K.; Islam, T.; Zubko, V.; Zhan, X.; Mims, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS) has been the NOAA official operational microwave retrieval algorithm since 2007 and is currently run operationally on microwave data from NOAA, Metop, DMSP and Suomi-NPP polar orbiting satellites. Work is underway to extend MiRS to Megha-Tropics/SAPHIR data by 2014. It has also been run experimentally on data from TRMM/TMI, Aqua/AMSR-E. The inversion within MiRS follows a 1D-variational methodology, in which the fundamental physical attributes affecting the microwave observations are retrieved physically, including the profile of atmospheric temperature, water vapor, hydrometeors, as well as surface emissivity and temperature. The community radiative transfer model (CRTM) is used as the forward and Jacobian operator to simulate the radiances at each iteration prior to fitting the measurements to within the noise level. The retrieved surface properties are then used to determine surface physical characteristics, including, when appropriate, cryospheric parameters such as sea ice concentration, ice age, and snow water amount, using pre-determined relationships that link emissivity and effective skin temperature to these parameters. These links are based, in part, on physical modeling of snow and ice radiative properties. The determination of the cryospheric properties from the core retrieved products uses a constrained search within a sensor-specific pre-computed catalog which relates the emissivities at surface-sensitive channels to the cryospheric parameters of interest. In this study, we will present an overview of results to date in applying MiRS to a number of sensors, including AMSR2, and, where possible, evaluate performances with collocated independent observations.

  2. Backscattering characteristics Analyses of winter wheat covered area and Drought Monitoring Based on active microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C., Sr.; Li, L.

    2015-12-01

    The advantage of active microwave remote sensing on the sensitivity of polarization characteristic, backscatter intensity and phase characteristics to soil moisture demonstrates its potential to map and monitor relative soil moisture changes and drought information with high spatial resolution. However, the existence of soil surface condition and vegetation effects confounds the retrieval of soil moisture from active microwave, and therefore limits its applications on soil moisture retrieval and drought monitoring. To research how to reduce the effect of soil roughness and wheat cover with multi- incident angles and multi polarization active microwave remote sensing data, MIMICS and AIEM models were used to simulate the backscattering coefficient of winter wheat covered field. The interaction between winter wheat at main growth stages and microwave was analyzed. The effects of surface roughness and physical parameters of wheat on the backscattering characteristics and the variation of different incident angles and different polarization conditions are simulated and analyzed emphatically. Then scattering coefficient information of winter wheat covered area at different wheat growth stage was measured with a C band ground-based scattering meter. At the same time, biomass, leaf area index and soil rough degree, soil water content and other related parameters are collected. After comparing and analyzing the measured data and the simulated data at different incident angles and different polarization modes, we propose an approach of using multi polarization and multi angle data to eliminate the soil roughness and wheat vegetation effects and performing the inversion of soil moisture. Using the Radarsat2 satellite SAR data and ground-based scatter data gotten at the same period in 2012, soil moisture information of greater area is obtained, and then the drought information is obtained, which is consistent with the measured results.

  3. Microwave backscattering theory and active remote sensing of the ocean surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. S.; Miller, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    The status is reviewed of electromagnetic scattering theory relative to the interpretation of microwave remote sensing data acquired from spaceborne platforms over the ocean surface. Particular emphasis is given to the assumptions which are either implicit or explicit in the theory. The multiple scale scattering theory developed during this investigation is extended to non-Gaussian surface statistics. It is shown that the important statistic for the case is the probability density function of the small scale heights conditioned on the large scale slopes; this dependence may explain the anisotropic scattering measurements recently obtained with the AAFE Radscat. It is noted that present surface measurements are inadequate to verify or reject the existing scattering theories. Surface measurements are recommended for qualifying sensor data from radar altimeters and scatterometers. Additional scattering investigations are suggested for imaging type radars employing synthetically generated apertures.

  4. Active and Passive Microwave Determination of the Circulation and Characteristics of Weddell and Ross Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Liu, Xiang

    2000-01-01

    A combination of satellite microwave data sets are used in conjunction with ECMWF (Medium Range Weather Forecasts) and NCEP (National Center for Environment Prediction) meteorological analysis fields to investigate seasonal variability in the circulation and sea-ice dynamics of the Weddell and Ross Seas. Results of sea-ice tracking using SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager), Scatterometer and SAR images are combined with in-situ data derived from Argos buoys and GPS drifters to validate observed drift patterns. Seasonal 3-month climatologies of ice motion and drift speed variance illustrate the response of the sea-ice system to seasonal forcing. A melt-detection algorithm is used to track the onset of seasonal melt, and to determine the extent and duration of atmospherically-led surface melting during austral summer. Results show that wind-driven drift regulates the seasonal distribution and characteristics of sea-ice and the intensity of the cyclonic Gyre circulation in these two regions.

  5. Active Microwave Delay Line Based on Dipole-Exchange Spin Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, Andrei; Kobljanskyj, Yuri; Melkov, Gennadiy; Tyberkevych, Vasil; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy

    2003-03-01

    An active microwave signal processor based on the interaction of relatively long (k 100 1/cm ) dipolar spin waves (or magnetostatic waves (MSW)) with localized electromagnetic pumping in an yttrium-iron garnet (YIG) film has been developed in [1]. The processor performs operations of controlled time delay, amplification, phase conjugation, compression, and convolution of pulsed microwave signals, but due to a relatively large group velocity of MSW pulses has a maximum delay time not exceeding 300 ns . In the current paper we develop theoretically and realize experimentally an active microwave delay line based on the excitation of relatively short-wavelength ( k 10000 1/cm ) dipole-exchange spin waves (DESW) that have considerably smaller dissipation parameter and much smaller group velocity than the MSW. The new DESW delay line has a single wire antenna (width of the order of several micrometers to allow the excitation of short-wavelength DESW) and a pumping dielectric resonator situated nearby. The input (signal) pulse excites in the YIG film both DESW and MSW. The pumping pulse, supplied to the resonator after a time interval t , performs a front reversal of all the excited waves and after a time interval T 2t a delayed output signal produced by both DESW and MSW is received at the antenna. With the increase of t due to the substantially smaller dissipation of DESW the larger and larger portion of the output signal is created by the DESW. As a result, a controlled time delay of an input microwave pulse of more than 1200 ns with insertion loss of 0.04 dB/ns was achieved . The developed microwave delay line is also capable of performing other signal processing operations like convolution and compression of delayed input pulses and might find applications in the modern radar technology [1]. G.A. Melkov, Yu.V. Kobljanskyj, A.A. Serga, V.S. Tiberkevich, and A.N. Slavin, Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Microwave and Optical Technology (ISMOT'01), p

  6. Integration of active and passive sensors for obstacle avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Victor H. L.; Sridhar, Banavar

    1989-01-01

    The automatic obstacle-avoidance guidance problem is studied under the operational constraints imposed by the rotorcraft nap-of-the-earth (NOE) environment. The problem is discussed for two different circumstances. The first assumes that a full range map is available, irrespective of the type of sensor being used. Two approaches are proposed to extend a two-dimensional obstacle-avoidance concept presented by Cheng (1988). The situation where only a sparse range map is available from a passive sensor is also treated. An integrated approach that augments the passive sensor with an active one is discussed, along with the problem of data fusion and how it is affected by the characteristics of NOE flight.

  7. Trichomes as sensors: detecting activity on the leaf surface.

    PubMed

    Tooker, John F; Peiffer, Michelle; Luthe, Dawn S; Felton, Gary W

    2010-01-01

    The dramatic movements of some carnivorous plants species are triggered by sensory structures derived from trichomes. While unusual plant species such as the Venus fly trap and sundews may be expected to have elaborate sensors to capture their insect prey, more modest plant species might not be expected to have similar sensory capabilities. Our recent work, however, has revealed that glandular trichomes on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) appear to have a function similar to trigger hairs of carnivorous species, acting as "early warning" sensors. Using a combination of behavioral, molecular, and biochemical techniques, we determined that caterpillars, moths and mechanical disruption upregulate signaling molecules and defensive genes found in glandular trichomes. Importantly, we discovered that plants whose trichomes have been broken respond more vigorously when their defenses were induced. Taken together, our results suggest that glandular trichomes can act as sensors that detect activity on the leaf surface, and ready plants for herbivore attack.

  8. Monitoring Brain Activity with Protein Voltage and Calcium Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Storace, Douglas A.; Braubach, Oliver R.; Jin, Lei; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Sung, Uhna

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the roles of different cell types in the behaviors generated by neural circuits requires protein indicators that report neural activity with high spatio-temporal resolution. Genetically encoded fluorescent protein (FP) voltage sensors, which optically report the electrical activity in distinct cell populations, are, in principle, ideal candidates. Here we demonstrate that the FP voltage sensor ArcLight reports odor-evoked electrical activity in the in vivo mammalian olfactory bulb in single trials using both wide-field and 2-photon imaging. ArcLight resolved fast odorant-responses in individual glomeruli, and distributed odorant responses across a population of glomeruli. Comparisons between ArcLight and the protein calcium sensors GCaMP3 and GCaMP6f revealed that ArcLight had faster temporal kinetics that more clearly distinguished activity elicited by individual odorant inspirations. In contrast, the signals from both GCaMPs were a saturating integral of activity that returned relatively slowly to the baseline. ArcLight enables optical electrophysiology of mammalian neuronal population activity in vivo. PMID:25970202

  9. Comparison of active and passive microwave signatures of Arctic sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M. R.; Crawford, J. P.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Holt, B.; Carsey, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    In March 1988, overlapping active and passive microwave instrument data were acquired over Arctic sea ice using the NASA DC-8 aircraft equipped with multifrequency, variable polarization SAR and radiometer. Flights were conducted as a series of coordinated underflights of the DMSP SSM/I satellite radiometer in order to validate ice products derived from the SSM/I radiances. Subsequent flights by an NRL P-3 aircraft enabled overlapping high-resolution, single frequency image data to be acquired over the same regions using a Ka-band scanning microwave radiometer. In this paper, techniques are discussed for the accurate coregistration of the three aircraft datasets. Precise coregistration to an accuracy of 100 m plus or minus 25 m has, for the first time, enabled the detailed comparison of temporally and spatially coincident active and passive airborne microwave datasets. Preliminary results from the intercomparisons indicate that the SAR has highly frequency- and polarization-dependent signatures, which at 5.3 GHz (C-band) show an extremely high correlation with the 37 GHz radiometric temperatures.

  10. NASA Activities as they Relate to Microwave Technology for Aerospace Communications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses current NASA activities and plans as they relate to microwave technology for aerospace communications. The presentations discusses some examples of the aforementioned technology within the context of the existing and future communications architectures and technology development roadmaps. Examples of the evolution of key technology from idea to deployment are provided as well as the challenges that lay ahead regarding advancing microwave technology to ensure that future NASA missions are not constrained by lack of communication or navigation capabilities. The presentation closes with some examples of emerging ongoing opportunities for establishing collaborative efforts between NASA, Industry, and Academia to encourage the development, demonstration and insertion of communications technology in pertinent aerospace systems.

  11. Antioxidant Activity and Phenolic Content of Microwave-Assisted Solanum melongena Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Modica, Maria N.; Pittalà, Valeria; Siracusa, Maria A.; Sorrenti, Valeria; Acquaviva, Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant fruit is a very rich source of polyphenol compounds endowed with antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to extract polyphenols from eggplant entire fruit, pulp, or skin, both fresh and dry, and compare results between conventional extraction and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The effects of time exposure (15, 30, 60, and 90 min) and solvent (water 100% or ethanol/water 50%) were also evaluated. The highest amount of polyphenols was found in the extract obtained from dry peeled skin treated with 50% aqueous ethanol, irradiated with microwave; this extract contained also high quantity of flavonoids and showed good antioxidant activity expressed by its capacity to scavenge superoxide anion and to inhibit lipid peroxidation. PMID:24683354

  12. Slow potentials and spike unit activity of the cerebral cortex of rabbits exposed to microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Chizhenkova, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Unanesthetized rabbits exposed to 12.5-cm microwaves at a field intensity of 40 mW/cm/sup 2/ in the region of the head showed an increase in the number of slow waves and spindle-shaped firings in the EEG and a change in the discharge frequency of neurons in the visual cortex in 41-52% of the cases. An enhancement of the evoked response of visual cortex neurons to light was observed in 61% of the cases and a facilitation of the driving response in 80% of all cases. It is concluded that the evoked response is a more sensitive indicator of the microwave effect than background activity. The effects of the fields were most distinctly observed with the driving response.

  13. Antioxidant activity and phenolic content of microwave-assisted Solanum melongena extracts.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Loredana; Modica, Maria N; Pittalà, Valeria; Romeo, Giuseppe; Siracusa, Maria A; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Sorrenti, Valeria; Acquaviva, Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant fruit is a very rich source of polyphenol compounds endowed with antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to extract polyphenols from eggplant entire fruit, pulp, or skin, both fresh and dry, and compare results between conventional extraction and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE). The effects of time exposure (15, 30, 60, and 90 min) and solvent (water 100% or ethanol/water 50%) were also evaluated. The highest amount of polyphenols was found in the extract obtained from dry peeled skin treated with 50% aqueous ethanol, irradiated with microwave; this extract contained also high quantity of flavonoids and showed good antioxidant activity expressed by its capacity to scavenge superoxide anion and to inhibit lipid peroxidation.

  14. Active pixel sensor array with electronic shuttering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An active pixel cell includes electronic shuttering capability. The cell can be shuttered to prevent additional charge accumulation. One mode transfers the current charge to a storage node that is blocked against accumulation of optical radiation. The charge is sampled from a floating node. Since the charge is stored, the node can be sampled at the beginning and the end of every cycle. Another aspect allows charge to spill out of the well whenever the charge amount gets higher than some amount, thereby providing anti blooming.

  15. Sensor web enables rapid response to volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Ashley G.; Chien, Steve; Wright, Robert; Miklius, Asta; Kyle, Philip R.; Welsh, Matt; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Tran, Daniel; Schaffer, Steven R.; Sherwood, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Rapid response to the onset of volcanic activity allows for the early assessment of hazard and risk [Tilling, 1989]. Data from remote volcanoes and volcanoes in countries with poor communication infrastructure can only be obtained via remote sensing [Harris et al., 2000]. By linking notifications of activity from ground-based and spacebased systems, these volcanoes can be monitored when they erupt.Over the last 18 months, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has implemented a Volcano Sensor Web (VSW) in which data from ground-based and space-based sensors that detect current volcanic activity are used to automatically trigger the NASA Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) spacecraft to make highspatial-resolution observations of these volcanoes.

  16. Steel bridge fatigue crack detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Ziehl, Paul; Ozevin, Didem; Pollock, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are well known for its dual capabilities in structural health monitoring, acting as either actuators or sensors. Due to the variety of deterioration sources and locations of bridge defects, there is currently no single method that can detect and address the potential sources globally. In our research, our use of the PWAS based sensing has the novelty of implementing both passive (as acoustic emission) and active (as ultrasonic transducers) sensing with a single PWAS network. The combined schematic is using acoustic emission to detect the presence of fatigue cracks in steel bridges in their early stage since methods such as ultrasonics are unable to quantify the initial condition of crack growth since most of the fatigue life for these details is consumed while the fatigue crack is too small to be detected. Hence, combing acoustic emission with ultrasonic active sensing will strengthen the damage detection process. The integration of passive acoustic emission detection with active sensing will be a technological leap forward from the current practice of periodic and subjective visual inspection, and bridge management based primarily on history of past performance. In this study, extensive laboratory investigation is performed supported by theoretical modeling analysis. A demonstration system will be presented to show how piezoelectric wafer active sensor is used for acoustic emission. Specimens representing complex structures are tested. The results will also be compared with traditional acoustic emission transducers to identify the application barriers.

  17. Active Control of Noise Using Actuator/Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Winder, Patrice; Kirby, George

    1996-01-01

    Current research in smart structures is directed toward the integration of many actuators and sensors into a material. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using this instrumentation for active noise control from a vibrating structures. Current technology for reducing radiated sound is limited by the instrumentation for the control system. These control systems employ relatively small numbers of sensors and actuators. Hence, these control systems must rely on a model of the structure to estimate and control the global vibrations that contribute to the far field pressure. For complex, realistic structures the development of such a model is a formidable task. The model is a limiting factor in the continuing development of structural acoustics. In this paper we propose to increase the number of actuators and sensors of a smart material to offset the complexity of the model used for control design. The sensor arrays will be used to directly sense the shape of the structure rather than using a model of the structures to indirectly sense the shape of the structure. The actuator array is used to apply distributed forces to the structure, rather than using the structure itself as a load path. A control system for the active cancellation of sound is derived from standard control system methodologies.

  18. Dual effects of microwaves on single Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in cultured kidney cells Vero.

    PubMed

    Geletyuk, V I; Kazachenko, V N; Chemeris, N K; Fesenko, E E

    1995-02-06

    Using the patch voltage-clamp method, possible effects of millimetre microwaves (42.25 GHz) on single Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in cultured kidney cells (Vero) were investigated. It was found that exposure to the field of non-thermal power (about 100 microW/cm2) for 20-30 min greatly modifies both the Hill coefficient and an apparent affinity of the channels for Ca2+(i). The data suggest that the field alters both cooperativity and binding characteristics of the channel activation by internal Ca2+. The effects depend on initial sensitivity of the channels to Ca2+ and the Ca2+ concentration applied.

  19. Microwave synthesis and photocatalytic activities of ZnO bipods with different aspect ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Fazhe; Zhao, Zengdian; Qiao, Xueliang; Tan, Fatang; Wang, Wei

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We synthesized linked ZnO nanorods by a facile microwave method. • The effect of reaction parameters on ZnO was investigated. • ZnO bipods with different aspect ratios were prepared. • The photocatalytic performance of ZnO bipods was evaluated. - Abstract: Linked ZnO nanorods have been successfully prepared via a facile microwave method without any post-synthesis treatment. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated the precursor had completely transformed into the pure ZnO crystal. The images of field emitting scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed that linked ZnO nanorods consisted predominantly of ZnO bipods. The formation process of the ZnO bipods was clearly discussed. ZnO bipods with different aspect ratios have been obtained by tuning the concentrations of reagents and microwave power. Moreover, the photocatalytic performance of ZnO bipods with different aspect ratios for degradation of methylene blue was systematically evaluated. The results of photocatalytic experiments showed that the photocatalytic activity increased with the aspect ratios of ZnO bipods increased. The reason is that ZnO bipods with larger aspect ratio have higher surface area, which can absorb more MB molecules to react with ·OH radicals.

  20. A planar transmission-line sensor for measuring the microwave permittivity of liquid and semisolid biological materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A planar transmission-line configuration for rapid, nondestructive, wideband permittivity measurements of liquid and semisolid materials at microwave frequencies is described. The transmission-line propagation constant of the proposed configuration is determined with the multiline technique from sca...

  1. Microwave-assisted preparation and adsorption performance of activated carbon from biodiesel industry solid reside: influence of operational parameters.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-01-01

    Preparation of activated carbon has been attempted using KOH as activating agent by microwave heating from biodiesel industry solid residue, oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFBAC). The significance of chemical impregnation ratio (IR), microwave power and activation time on the properties of activated carbon were investigated. The optimum condition has been identified at the IR of 1.0, microwave power of 600 W and activation time of 7 min. EFBAC was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement, determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue as dye model compound. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 395.30 mg/g and carbon yield of 73.78%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume were corresponding to 1372 m2/g and 0.76 cm3/g, respectively.

  2. Fluorescence-Based Sensor for Monitoring Activation of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.

    2012-01-01

    This sensor unit is designed to determine the level of activation of lunar dust or simulant particles using a fluorescent technique. Activation of the surface of a lunar soil sample (for instance, through grinding) should produce a freshly fractured surface. When these reactive surfaces interact with oxygen and water, they produce hydroxyl radicals. These radicals will react with a terephthalate diluted in the aqueous medium to form 2-hydroxyterephthalate. The fluorescence produced by 2-hydroxyterephthalate provides qualitative proof of the activation of the sample. Using a calibration curve produced by synthesized 2-hydroxyterephthalate, the amount of hydroxyl radicals produced as a function of sample concentration can also be determined.

  3. The promise of wearable activity sensors to define patient recovery.

    PubMed

    Appelboom, Geoff; Yang, Annie H; Christophe, Brandon R; Bruce, Eliza M; Slomian, Justine; Bruyère, Olivier; Bruce, Samuel S; Zacharia, Brad E; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Connolly, E Sander

    2014-07-01

    The recent emergence of mobile health--the use of mobile telecommunication and wireless devices to improve health outcomes, services, and research--has inspired a patient-centric approach to monitor health metrics. Sensors embedded in wearable devices are utilized to acquire greater self-knowledge by tracking basic parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature as well as data related to exercise, diet, and psychological state. To that end, recent studies on utilizing wireless fitness activity trackers to monitor and promote functional recovery in patients suggest that collecting up-to-date performance data could help patients regain functional independence and help hospitals determine the appropriate length of stay for a patient. This manuscript examines existing functional assessment scales, discusses the use of activity tracking sensors in evaluating functional independence, and explores the growing application of wireless technology in measuring and promoting functional recovery.

  4. Complex dielectric properties of microcrystalline cellulose, anhydrous lactose, and α-lactose monohydrate powders using a microwave-based open-reflection resonator sensor.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pei-Fang; Hsieh, Yi-Ling; Angonese, Kristen; Dunn, Don; King, Ray J; Machbitz, Rachel; Christianson, Andrew; Chappell, William J; Taylor, Lynne S; Harris, Michael T

    2011-07-01

    The real (ε') and imaginary (ε″) components of the complex permittivity of anhydrous lactose and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) under different bulk densities, moisture contents (MCs), and times of hydration (for anhydrous lactose) were measured nondestructively using a microwave resonator sensor operating in the range of 700-800 MHz. Measurements of sensor resonant frequency and conductance allow, through calibration, determination of the complex dielectric properties ε' (relative permittivity) and ε″ (relative dielectric loss) of the test material. Characteristic graphs of ε″ versus ε' - 1 curve for each powder were generated as a function of bulk density and MC. Such data can be used to develop empirical models for the simultaneous in situ measurement of the bulk density and MC of the powders. Unlike MCC, anhydrous lactose is converted to its hydrate form in the presence of moisture, which causes a reduction in the amount of physisorbed and "free" water and a subsequent change in the dielectric properties. For powders such as anhydrous lactose that can form a crystal hydrate in the presence of moisture, a combination of techniques such as vibrational spectroscopy together with microwave resonator measurements are appropriate to characterize, in situ, the physical and chemical properties of the powder.

  5. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-03-08

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (NM) impedance technique are sighted and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency EIM impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acoustic-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  6. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-02-29

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  7. Active microwave remote sensing research program plan. Recommendations of the Earth Resources Synthetic Aperture Radar Task Force. [application areas: vegetation canopies, surface water, surface morphology, rocks and soils, and man-made structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A research program plan developed by the Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications to provide guidelines for a concentrated effort to improve the understanding of the measurement capabilities of active microwave imaging sensors, and to define the role of such sensors in future Earth observations programs is outlined. The focus of the planned activities is on renewable and non-renewable resources. Five general application areas are addressed: (1) vegetation canopies, (2) surface water, (3) surface morphology, (4) rocks and soils, and (5) man-made structures. Research tasks are described which, when accomplished, will clearly establish the measurement capabilities in each area, and provide the theoretical and empirical results needed to specify and justify satellite systems using imaging radar sensors for global observations.

  8. All-sky radiance simulation of Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR microwave sensor using multiple scattering radiative transfer model for data assimilation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhulatha, A.; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2017-03-01

    Incorporation of cloud- and precipitation-affected radiances from microwave satellite sensors in data assimilation system has a great potential in improving the accuracy of numerical model forecasts over the regions of high impact weather. By employing the multiple scattering radiative transfer model RTTOV-SCATT, all-sky radiance (clear sky and cloudy sky) simulation has been performed for six channel microwave SAPHIR (Sounder for Atmospheric Profiling of Humidity in the Inter-tropics by Radiometry) sensors of Megha-Tropiques (MT) satellite. To investigate the importance of cloud-affected radiance data in severe weather conditions, all-sky radiance simulation is carried out for the severe cyclonic storm `Hudhud' formed over Bay of Bengal. Hydrometeors from NCMRWF unified model (NCUM) forecasts are used as input to the RTTOV model to simulate cloud-affected SAPHIR radiances. Horizontal and vertical distribution of all-sky simulated radiances agrees reasonably well with the SAPHIR observed radiances over cloudy regions during different stages of cyclone development. Simulated brightness temperatures of six SAPHIR channels indicate that the three dimensional humidity structure of tropical cyclone is well represented in all-sky computations. Improved correlation and reduced bias and root mean square error against SAPHIR observations are apparent. Probability distribution functions reveal that all-sky simulations are able to produce the cloud-affected lower brightness temperatures associated with cloudy regions. The density scatter plots infer that all-sky radiances are more consistent with observed radiances. Correlation between different types of hydrometeors and simulated brightness temperatures at respective atmospheric levels highlights the significance of inclusion of scattering effects from different hydrometeors in simulating the cloud-affected radiances in all-sky simulations. The results are promising and suggest that the inclusion of multiple scattering

  9. A Moderate-resolution Geosynchronous Microwave Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, James

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of microwave radiometers for remote sensing of atmospheric temperature and humidity began in early 1970s, when NASA's Nimbus series experimental satellites tested a number of microwave payloads which are the precursors of today's operational microwave temperature and humidity sounders such as the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A and AMSU-B), now flying on several Lower Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites, notably the National Oceanic and Atmospheric (NOAA)-series weather satellites. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) will be the next generation microwave sounder, now being developed by NASA for the future U.S. National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites System (NPOESS), slated for operation late this decade. The unique feature of a microwave sensor is its cloud-penetrating capability. And the visible and IR sensors are usually greatly degraded by cloud covers. But under the cloud cover is where the weather can be most "active," and atmospheric measurements are most urgently needed. This unique capability has been well proven by AMSU-A, and AMSU-B on LEO satellites. The same capability is also true for a microwave sounder on a GEO satellite. The key advantage of a sensor on a GEO-platform is its "high temporal resolution." A sensor on a GEO-platform can almost "continuous" monitor a given scene on Earth. On the other hand, the major drawback the GEO-platform is its poor spatial resolution. This is probably the main reason why a geosynchronous microwave sounder has yet to be realized. Take the ATMS as an example. It has a 20 cm diameter antenna (temperature channels), producing a 2.2 degree beam, resulting in a footprint of 32 km (from the NPOESS 833 km orbit). From a GEO-orbit the same 32 km footprint would need an antenna 43 times larger, or 860 cm diameter. We will discuss the needs and advantages of such a GEO-microwave sounder with a straw-man design, and show the expected performance characteristics, such as

  10. Motion Sensor Use for Physical Activity Data: Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Margaret; Grey, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity continues to be a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and only one half of adults in the United States meet physical activity (PA) goals. PA data are often collected for surveillance or for measuring change after an intervention. One of the challenges in PA research is quantifying exactly how much and what type of PA is taking place—especially because self-report instruments have inconsistent validity. Objective The purpose is to review the elements to consider when collecting PA data via motion sensors, including the difference between PA and exercise; type of data to collect; choosing the device; length of time to monitor PA; instructions to the participants; and interpretation of the data. Methods The current literature on motion sensor research was reviewed and synthesized to summarize relevant considerations when using a motion sensor to collect PA data. Results Exercise is a division of PA that is structured, planned, and repetitive. Pedometer data includes steps taken, and calculated distance and energy expenditure. Accelerometer data includes activity counts and intensity. The device chosen depends on desired data, cost, validity, and ease of use. Reactivity to the device may influence the duration of data collection. Instructions to participants may vary depending on purpose of the study. Experts suggest pedometer data be reported as steps—since that is the direct output—and distance traveled and energy expenditure are estimated values. Accelerometer count data may be analyzed to provide information on time spent in moderate or vigorous activity. Discussion Thoughtful decision making about PA data collection using motion sensor devices is needed to advance nursing science. PMID:26126065

  11. Microwave Deflection Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, Paul; Kobayashi, Herb; Ngo, Phong; Lichtenberg, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    Doppler-radar instrument measures small deflections or vibrations of reflecting surface. Acting as interferometric micrometer, instrument includes combination of analog and digital circuits measuring change in phase of radar return due to movement of reflecting surface along signal-propagation path. Includes homodyne Doppler-radar transceiver and digital signal-processing circuitry to measure change in phase shift as target deflects.

  12. Implementation study of wearable sensors for activity recognition systems

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemian, Mona

    2015-01-01

    This Letter investigates and reports on a number of activity recognition methods for a wearable sensor system. The authors apply three methods for data transmission, namely ‘stream-based’, ‘feature-based’ and ‘threshold-based’ scenarios to study the accuracy against energy efficiency of transmission and processing power that affects the mote's battery lifetime. They also report on the impact of variation of sampling frequency and data transmission rate on energy consumption of motes for each method. This study leads us to propose a cross-layer optimisation of an activity recognition system for provisioning acceptable levels of accuracy and energy efficiency. PMID:26609413

  13. Microwave-assisted synthesis and antifungal activity of novel fused Osthole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Rong-Rong; Wang, Jia-Qun; Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Ya-Ling; Wang, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Hua

    2016-11-29

    Based on the microwave-assisted synthetic protocol developed in our previous work, we have synthesized a series of novel furo[3,2-c]coumarins as fused Osthole derivatives, via the reaction of 4-hydroxycoumarins and β-ketoesters catalyzed by DMAP. All the target compounds were evaluated in vitro for their antifungal activity against six phytopathogenic fungi, some compounds exhibited potential activity in the primary assays. Especially compounds 6c, 7b, 8b and 8c (shown in Fig. 1) were the most active ones, EC50 values of these four compounds against Colletotrichum capsica, Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani were further investigated. 6c was identified as the most promising candidate with the EC50 value at 0.110 μM against Botrytis cinerea and 0.040 μM against Colletotrichum capsica, respectively, representing better antifungal activity than that of the commonly used fungicide Azoxystrobin.

  14. Recognition of Human Activities Using Continuous Autoencoders with Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lukun

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an approach for recognizing human activities with wearable sensors. The continuous autoencoder (CAE) as a novel stochastic neural network model is proposed which improves the ability of model continuous data. CAE adds Gaussian random units into the improved sigmoid activation function to extract the features of nonlinear data. In order to shorten the training time, we propose a new fast stochastic gradient descent (FSGD) algorithm to update the gradients of CAE. The reconstruction of a swiss-roll dataset experiment demonstrates that the CAE can fit continuous data better than the basic autoencoder, and the training time can be reduced by an FSGD algorithm. In the experiment of human activities’ recognition, time and frequency domain feature extract (TFFE) method is raised to extract features from the original sensors’ data. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA) method is applied to feature reduction. It can be noticed that the dimension of each data segment is reduced from 5625 to 42. The feature vectors extracted from original signals are used for the input of deep belief network (DBN), which is composed of multiple CAEs. The training results show that the correct differentiation rate of 99.3% has been achieved. Some contrast experiments like different sensors combinations, sensor units at different positions, and training time with different epochs are designed to validate our approach. PMID:26861319

  15. Using an Active Pixel Sensor In A Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, HansGeorg; Wieman, Howard H.; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2004-04-22

    Research has shown that Active Pixel CMOS sensors can detect charged particles. We have been studying whether this process can be used in a collider environment. In particular, we studied the effect of radiation with 55 MeV protons. These results show that a fluence of about 2 x 10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2} reduces the signal by a factor of two while the noise increases by 25%. A measurement 6 months after exposure shows that the silicon lattice naturally repairs itself. Heating the silicon to 100 C reduced the shot noise and increased the collected charge. CMOS sensors have a reduced signal to noise ratio per pixel because charge diffuses to neighboring pixels. We have constructed a photogate to see if this structure can collect more charge per pixel. Results show that a photogate does collect charge in fewer pixels, but it takes about 15 ms to collect all of the electrons produced by a pulse of light.

  16. Migration testing of plastics and microwave-active materials for high-temperature food-use applications.

    PubMed

    Castle, L; Jickells, S M; Gilbert, J; Harrison, N

    1990-01-01

    Temperatures have been measured using a fluoro-optic probe at the food/container or food/packaging interfaces as appropriate, for a range of foods heated in either a microwave or a conventional oven. Reheating ready-prepared foods packaged in plastics pouches, trays or dishes in the microwave oven, according to the manufacturers' instructions, resulted in temperatures in the range 61-121 degrees C. Microwave-active materials (susceptors) in contact with ready-prepared foods frequently reached local spot temperatures above 200 degrees C. For foods cooked in a microwave oven according to published recipes, temperatures from 91 degrees C to 200 degrees C were recorded, whilst similar temperatures (92-194 degrees C) were attained in a conventional oven, but over longer periods of time. These measurements form the basis for examining compliance with specific and overall migration limits for plastics materials. The testing conditions proposed depend on the intended use of the plastic - for microwave oven use for aqueous foods, for all lidding materials, and for reheating of foods, testing would only be required with aqueous simulants for 1 h at 100 degrees C; for unspecified microwave oven use, testing with olive oil would be required for 30 min at 150 degrees C; and for unspecified use in a conventional oven testing with olive oil would be required for 2 h at 175 degrees C. For microwave-active materials, it is proposed that testing is carried out in the microwave oven using a novel semi-solid simulant comprising olive oil and water absorbed onto an inert support of diatomaceous earth. The testing in this instance is carried out with the simulant instead of food in a package and heating in the microwave oven at 600 W for 4 min for every 100 g of simulant employed. There is an option in every case to test for migration using real foods rather than simulants if it can be demonstrated that results using simulants are unrepresentative of those for foods. The proposed

  17. Statistical Analysis of the Correlation between Microwave Emission Anomalies and Seismic Activity Based on AMSR-E Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    qin, kai; Wu, Lixin; De Santis, Angelo; Zhang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Pre-seismic thermal IR anomalies and ionosphere disturbances have been widely reported by using the Earth observation system (EOS). To investigate the possible physical mechanisms, a series of detecting experiments on rock loaded to fracturing were conducted. Some experiments studies have demonstrated that microwave radiation energy will increase under the loaded rock in specific frequency and the feature of radiation property can reflect the deformation process of rock fracture. This experimental result indicates the possibility that microwaves are emitted before earthquakes. Such microwaves signals are recently found to be detectable before some earthquake cases from the brightness temperature data obtained by the microwave-radiometer Advanced Microwave-Scanning Radiometer for the EOS (AMSR-E) aboard the satellite Aqua. This suggested that AMSR-E with vertical- and horizontal-polarization capability for six frequency bands (6.925, 10.65, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz) would be feasible to detect an earthquake which is associated with rock crash or plate slip. However, the statistical analysis of the correlation between satellite-observed microwave emission anomalies and seismic activity are firstly required. Here, we focus on the Kamchatka peninsula to carry out a statistical study, considering its high seismicity activity and the dense orbits covering of AMSR-E in high latitudes. 8-years (2003-2010) AMSR-E microwave brightness temperature data were used to reveal the spatio-temporal association between microwave emission anomalies and 17 earthquake events (M>5). Firstly, obvious spatial difference of microwave brightness temperatures between the seismic zone at the eastern side and the non-seismic zone the western side within the Kamchatka peninsula are found. Secondly, using both vertical- and horizontal-polarization to extract the temporal association, it is found that abnormal changes of microwave brightness temperatures appear generally 2 months before the

  18. Microwave remote sensing from space for earth resource surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The concepts of radar remote sensing and microwave radiometry are discussed and their utility in earth resource sensing is examined. The direct relationship between the character of the remotely sensed data and the level of decision making for which the data are appropriate is considered. Applications of active and a passive microwave sensing covered include hydrology, land use, mapping, vegetation classification, environmental monitoring, coastal features and processes, geology, and ice and snow. Approved and proposed microwave sensors are described and the use of space shuttle as a development platform is evaluated.

  19. Activation of VEGF/Flk-1-ERK Pathway Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Injury After Microwave Exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Feng; Li, Xiang; Gao, Ya-Bing; Wang, Shui-Ming; Zhao, Li; Dong, Ji; Yao, Bin-Wei; Xu, Xin-Ping; Chang, Gong-Min; Zhou, Hong-Mei; Hu, Xiang-Jun; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2015-08-01

    Microwaves have been suggested to induce neuronal injury and increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but the mechanism remains unknown. The role of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/Flk-1-Raf/MAPK kinase (MEK)/extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway in structural and functional injury of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following microwave exposure was examined. An in vitro BBB model composed of the ECV304 cell line and primary rat cerebral astrocytes was exposed to microwave radiation (50 mW/cm(2), 5 min). The structure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the permeability was assessed by measuring transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transmission. Activity and expression of VEGF/Flk-1-ERK pathway components and occludin also were examined. Our results showed that microwave radiation caused intercellular tight junctions to broaden and fracture with decreased TEER values and increased HRP permeability. After microwave exposure, activation of the VEGF/Flk-1-ERK pathway and Tyr phosphorylation of occludin were observed, along with down-regulated expression and interaction of occludin with zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). After Flk-1 (SU5416) and MEK1/2 (U0126) inhibitors were used, the structure and function of the BBB were recovered. The increase in expression of ERK signal transduction molecules was muted, while the expression and the activity of occludin were accelerated, as well as the interactions of occludin with p-ERK and ZO-1 following microwave radiation. Thus, microwave radiation may induce BBB damage by activating the VEGF/Flk-1-ERK pathway, enhancing Tyr phosphorylation of occludin, while partially inhibiting expression and interaction of occludin with ZO-1.

  20. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force activated door sensor of a door system installed according to the installation instructions shall...

  1. Spanish activities (research and industrial applications) in the field of microwave material treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Catala Civera, J.M.; Reyes Davo, E.R. de los

    1996-12-31

    The GCM (Microwave Heating Group) within the Communications Department at the Technical University of Valencia is dedicated to the study of microwaves and their use in the current industrial processes in the Valencian Community and in Spain. To this end, a microwave heating laboratory has been developed and the benefits of incorporating microwave technologies into current industrial processes have been demonstrated. In this paper some of the industrial applications which are being investigated are presented.

  2. Polymer optical fiber grating as water activity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Webb, David J.

    2014-05-01

    Controlling the water content within a product has long been required in the chemical processing, agriculture, food storage, paper manufacturing, semiconductor, pharmaceutical and fuel industries. The limitations of water content measurement as an indicator of safety and quality are attributed to differences in the strength with which water associates with other components in the product. Water activity indicates how tightly water is "bound," structurally or chemically, in products. Water absorption introduces changes in the volume and refractive index of poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA. Therefore for a grating made in PMMA based optical fiber, its wavelength is an indicator of water absorption and PMMA thus can be used as a water activity sensor. In this work we have investigated the performance of a PMMA based optical fiber grating as a water activity sensor in sugar solution, saline solution and Jet A-1 aviation fuel. Samples of sugar solution with sugar concentration from 0 to 8%, saline solution with concentration from 0 to 22%, and dried (10ppm), ambient (39ppm) and wet (68ppm) aviation fuels were used in experiments. The corresponding water activities are measured as 1.0 to 0.99 for sugar solution, 1.0 to 0.86 for saline solution, and 0.15, 0.57 and 1.0 for the aviation fuel samples. The water content in the measured samples ranges from 100% (pure water) to 10 ppm (dried aviation fuel). The PMMA based optical fiber grating exhibits good sensitivity and consistent response, and Bragg wavelength shifts as large as 3.4 nm when the sensor is transferred from dry fuel to wet fuel.

  3. Microwave-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Cyphomandra betacea and its biological activities.

    PubMed

    C, Senthil Kumar; M, Sivakumar; K, Ruckmani

    2016-11-01

    Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the parameters for microwave-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from Cyphomandra betacea. The results showed a good fit with a second-order polynomial equation that was statistically acceptable at P<0.05. Optimal conditions for the extraction of polysaccharides were: extraction time, 2h; microwave power, 400W; extraction temperature, 60°C; and ratio of raw material to water 1:40 (g/mL). Under the optimized conditions, the yield of polysaccharides was found to be relatively high (about 36.52%). The in vitro biological activities of antioxidant and antitumor were evaluated. The IC50 value of polysaccharides was found to be 3mg/mL. The percentage of Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Our results showed that polysaccharides inhibited proliferation of MCF-7 (Breast carcinoma), A549 (Human lung carcinoma) and HepG2 (Liver carcinoma) with an IC50 of 0.23mg/mL, 0.17mg/mL and 0.62mg/mL respectively after 48h incubation. Polysaccharides were shown to promote apoptosis as seen in the nuclear morphological examination study using acridine orange (AO) and ethidium bromide (EB) staining. This is the first report on the effects of polysaccharides extracted from Cyphomandra betacea which exhibited stronger antioxidant and antitumor activities.

  4. Degradation of Active Brilliant Red X-3B by a microwave discharge electrodeless lamp in the presence of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jie; Wen, Teng; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Xue-Wei; Zeng, Qing-Fu; An, Shu-Qing; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2010-06-01

    Degradation of Active Brilliant Red X-3B (X-3B) in aqueous solution by a microwave discharge electrodeless lamp (MDEL) in the presence of activated carbon was investigated. The preliminary results proved this method could effectively degrade X-3B in aqueous solution. The removal percentages of colour and chemical oxygen demand were up to approximately 99% and 66%, respectively, at the conditions of 0.8 g/L dye concentration, 20 g/L activated carbon, pH 7.0 and 8 min microwave irradiation time. The degradation basically belonged to first-order reaction kinetics and its rate constant was 0.42 min(-1). No aromatic organics were detected in the final treated solution, indicating that the mineralization was relatively complete. By studying the change in solution properties, it could be concluded that MDEL-assisted oxidation was the dominant reaction mechanism. In addition, the influence of operational parameters and reuse of activated carbon were also discussed.

  5. A CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans George; Singh, Kunal; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Wieman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-12-02

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 {micro}m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe{sup 55} exposure are reported. The sensors have also been irradiated by 55 MeV protons to test for radiation damage. The radiation increased the noise and reduced the signal. The noise can be explained by shot noise from the increased leakage current and the reduction in signal is due to charge being trapped in the epi layer. Nevertheless, the radiation effect is small for the expected exposures at RHIC and RHIC II. Finally, we describe our concept for mechanically supporting a thin silicon wafer in an actual detector.

  6. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.; McMillin, Summer

    2013-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation portable life support system (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Space Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode-based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array/microcontroller architecture. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU.

  7. Development of Active Catheter,Active Guide Wire and Micro Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Y.; Mineta, T.; Totsu, K.; Makishi, W.; Esashi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Summary Active catheters and active guide wires which move like a snake have been developed for catheter-based minimally invasive diagnosis and therapy. Communication and control IC chips in the active catheter reduce the number of lead wires for control. The active catheter can be not only bent but also torsioned and extended. An ultra minature fiber-optic pressure sensor; a forward-looking ultrasonic probe and a magnetic position and orientation sensor have been developed for catheters and guide wires. These moving mechanisms and several sensors which are fitted near the tip of the catheter and the guide wire will provide detailed information near the tip and enable delicate and effective catheter intervention. PMID:20663389

  8. A New Quantum Sensor for Measuring Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.; Thomas, T.; Heinicke, D.; Peterson, R.; Morgan, P.; McDermitt, D. K.; Burba, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    A quantum sensor measures photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, in μmol of photons m-2 s-1) in the 400 nm to 700 nm waveband. Plants utilize this radiation to drive photosynthesis, though individual plant responses to incident radiation may vary within this range. The new quantum sensor (model LI-190R, LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE), with an optical filter and silicon photodiode detector housed in a cosine-corrected head, is designed to provide a better response to incident radiation across the 400-700 nm range. The new design is expected to significantly improve spectral response due to uniformity across the PAR waveband, but particularly in the wavebands from 520 nm to 600 nm and 665 nm to 680 nm, and sharp cutoffs in the regions below and above the PAR waveband. Special care was taken to make sure that PAR sensor would not substantially respond to incident radiation above the 700 nm threshold because this can lead to errors when performing measurements in environments with a large proportion of near-infrared radiation, such as canopy understory. The physical housing of the sensor is designed to be weather-resistant, to effectively shed precipitation, provide protection at high temperature and high humidity conditions, and has a cosine-corrected response to 82° zenith angle. The latter is particularly important when measuring incident radiation at low elevation angles, diffuse light, or low light conditions. This presentation describes the principles of the new design, and shows the performance results from field experiments and laboratory tests.

  9. Validation of a microwave radar system for the monitoring of locomotor activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Vittorio; Scannapieco, Eugenio; Renzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Background The general or spontaneous motor activity of animals is a useful parameter in chronobiology. Modified motion detectors can be used to monitor locomotor activity rhythms. We modified a commercial microwave-based detection device and validated the device by recording circadian and ultradian rhythms. Methods Movements were detected by microwave radar based on the Doppler effect. The equipment was designed to detect and record simultaneously 12 animals in separate cages. Radars were positioned at the bottom of aluminium bulkheads. Animal cages were positioned above the bulkheads. The radars were connected to a computer through a digital I/O board. Results The apparatus was evaluated by several tests. The first test showed the ability of the apparatus to detect the exact frequency of the standard moving object. The second test demonstrated the stability over time of the sensitivity of the radars. The third was performed by simultaneous observations of video-recording of a mouse and radar signals. We found that the radars are particularly sensitive to activities that involve a displacement of the whole body, as compared to movement of only a part of the body. In the fourth test, we recorded the locomotor activity of Balb/c mice. The results were in agreement with published studies. Conclusion Radar detectors can provide automatic monitoring of an animal's locomotor activity in its home cage without perturbing the pattern of its normal behaviour or initiating the spurt of exploration occasioned by transfer to a novel environment. Recording inside breeding cages enables long-term studies with uninterrupted monitoring. The use of electromagnetic waves allows contactless detection and freedom from interference of external stimuli. PMID:16674816

  10. Detection Thresholds of Falling Snow from Satellite-Borne Active and Passive Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Johnson, Benjamin T.; Munchak, S. Joseph

    2012-01-01

    surface of 0.25 g / cubic m and dendrite snowflakes be detected? If this information is known, we can focus retrieval efforts on detectable storms and concentrate advances on achievable results. Here, the focus is to determine thresholds of detection for falling snow for various snow conditions over land and lake surfaces. The results rely on simulated Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) simulations of falling snow cases since simulations provide all the information to determine the measurements from space and the ground truth. Sensitivity analyses were performed to better ascertain the relationships between multifrequency microwave and millimeter-wave sensor observations and the falling snow/underlying field of view. In addition, thresholds of detection for various sensor channel configurations, snow event system characteristics, snowflake particle assumptions, and surface types were studied. Results will be presented for active radar at Ku, Ka, and W-band and for passive radiometer channels from 10 to 183 GHz.

  11. [Analysis of pulsed bioelectric activity of rabbit cerebral cortex in response to low-intensity microwave radiation].

    PubMed

    Luk'ianova, S N; Monseeva, N V

    1998-01-01

    In experiments on 22 rabbits the influence of a pulse microwave irradiation on extracellular activity of separate nervous cells of sensorimotori and occipital areas of a cortex brain is shown. The reaction could consist in activation or in braking frequency of the discharges, that was connected to frequency impulsation in an initial background. The researched mode of a microwave irradiation (1.5 GHz, duration of a pulsed-0.4 microsecond, frequency of their recurrence 1000 Hz, DFEpulsed-300 microW/sm2) had a corrigizing action.

  12. ESA activities in the use of microwaves for the remote sensing of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccoll, D.

    1984-01-01

    The program of activities under way in the European Space Agency (ESA) directed towards Remote Sensing of the oceans and troposphere is discussed. The initial project is the launch of a satellite named ERS-1 with a primary payload of microwave values in theee C- and Ku-bands. This payload is discussed in depth. The secondary payload includes precision location experiments and an instrument to measure sea surface temperature, which are described. The important topic of calibration is extensively discussed, and a review of activities directed towards improvements to the instruments for future satellites is presented. Some discussion of the impact of the instrument payload on the spacecraft design follows and the commitment of ESA to the provision of a service of value to the ultimate user is emphasized.

  13. Optimal Sensor Placement in Active Multistatic Sonar Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    monitored in order to protect them from hostile underwater assets. We consider discrete “ cookie cutter” sensors as well as various diffuse sensor models. By... cookie cutter sensor model, we are able to exclude even more suboptimal solutions by determining range-of-the-day, source and receiver circles. To...protect them from hostile underwater assets. We consider discrete “ cookie cutter” sensors as well as various diffuse sensor models. By showing that the

  14. Characterisation of Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSM/T-2) radiances using radiative transfer simulations from global atmospheric reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Poli, Paul; John, Viju O.

    2017-02-01

    The near-global and all-sky coverage of satellite observations from microwave humidity sounders operating in the 183 GHz band complement radiosonde and aircraft observations and satellite infrared clear-sky observations. The Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSM/T-2) of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program began operations late 1991. It has been followed by several other microwave humidity sounders, continuing today. However, expertise and accrued knowledge regarding the SSM/T-2 data record is limited because it has remained underused for climate applications and reanalyses. In this study, SSM/T-2 radiances are characterised using several global atmospheric reanalyses. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim), the first ECMWF reanalysis of the 20th-century (ERA-20C), and the Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) are projected into SSM/T-2 radiance space using a fast radiative transfer model. The present study confirms earlier indications that the polarisation state of SSM/T-2 antenna is horizontal (not vertical) in the limit of nadir viewing. The study also formulates several recommendations to improve use of the SSM/T-2 measurement data in future fundamental climate data records or reanalyses. Recommendations are (1) to correct geolocation errors, especially for DMSP 14; (2) to blacklist poor quality data identified in the paper; (3) to correct for inter-satellite biases, estimated here on the order of 1 K, by applying an inter-satellite recalibration or, for reanalysis, an automated (e.g., variational) bias correction; and (4) to improve precipitating cloud filtering or, for reanalysis, consider an all-sky assimilation scheme where radiative transfer simulations account for the scattering effect of hydrometeors.

  15. Biopolymers Regulate Silver Nanoparticle under Microwave Irradiation for Effective Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities

    PubMed Central

    Velusamy, Palaniyandi; Su, Chia-Hung; Venkat Kumar, Govindarajan; Adhikary, Shritama; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chen, Yeng; Anbu, Periasamy

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, facile synthesis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was examined using microwave radiation and aniline as a reducing agent. The biopolymer matrix embedded nanoparticles were synthesized under various experimental conditions using different concentrations of biopolymer (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%), volumes of reducing agent (50, 100, 150 μL), and duration of heat treatment (30 s to 240 s). The synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for identification of AgNPs synthesis, crystal nature, shape, size, and type of capping action. In addition, the significant antibacterial efficacy and antibiofilm activity of biopolymer capped AgNPs were demonstrated against different bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 740 and Escherichia coli MTCC 9492. These results confirmed the potential for production of biopolymer capped AgNPs grown under microwave irradiation, which can be used for industrial and biomedical applications. PMID:27304672

  16. Microwave-assisted extraction of active pharmaceutical ingredient from solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Hoang, T H; Sharma, R; Susanto, D; Di Maso, M; Kwong, E

    2007-07-13

    The microwave assisted extraction (MAE) technique has been evaluated for the extraction of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) from various solid dosage forms. Using immediate release tablets of Compound A as a model, optimization of the extraction method with regards to extraction solvent composition, extraction time and temperature was briefly discussed. Complete recovery of Compound A was achieved when samples were extracted using acetonitrile as the extraction solvent under microwave heating at a constant cell temperature of 50 degrees C for 5 min. The optimized MAE method was applied for content uniformity (single tablet extraction) and potency (multiple tablets extraction) assays of release and stability samples of two products of Compound A (5 and 25mg dose strength) stored at various conditions. To further demonstrate the applicability of MAE, the instrumental extraction conditions (50 degrees C for 5 min) were adopted for the extraction of montelukast sodium (Singulair) from various solid dosage forms using methanol-water (75:25, v/v) as the extraction solvent. The MAE procedure demonstrated an extraction efficiency of 97.4-101.9% label claim with the greatest RSD at 1.4%. The results compare favorably with 97.6-102.3% label claim with the greatest RSD at 2.9% obtained with validated mechanical extraction procedures. The system is affordable, user-friendly and simple to operate and troubleshoot. Rapid extraction process (7 min/run) along with high throughput capacity (up to 23 samples simultaneously) would lead to reduced cycle time and thus increased productivity.

  17. Biopolymers Regulate Silver Nanoparticle under Microwave Irradiation for Effective Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Palaniyandi; Su, Chia-Hung; Venkat Kumar, Govindarajan; Adhikary, Shritama; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Gopinath, Subash C B; Chen, Yeng; Anbu, Periasamy

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, facile synthesis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was examined using microwave radiation and aniline as a reducing agent. The biopolymer matrix embedded nanoparticles were synthesized under various experimental conditions using different concentrations of biopolymer (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%), volumes of reducing agent (50, 100, 150 μL), and duration of heat treatment (30 s to 240 s). The synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for identification of AgNPs synthesis, crystal nature, shape, size, and type of capping action. In addition, the significant antibacterial efficacy and antibiofilm activity of biopolymer capped AgNPs were demonstrated against different bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 740 and Escherichia coli MTCC 9492. These results confirmed the potential for production of biopolymer capped AgNPs grown under microwave irradiation, which can be used for industrial and biomedical applications.

  18. Multi-sensor control for 6-axis active vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Douglas Gary

    The goal of this research is to look at the two different parts of the challenge of active vibration isolation. First is the hardware that will be used to accomplish the task and improve performance. The cubic hexapod, or Stewart platform, has become a popular solution to the problem because of its ability to provide 6-axis vibration isolation with a relatively simple configuration. A number of these hexapods have been constructed at different research facilities around the country to address different missions, each with their own approach. Hood Technology Corporation and the University of Washington took the lessons learned from these designs and developed a new hexapod that addresses the requirements of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's planned space borne interferometry missions. This system has unique mechanical design details and is built with 4 sensors in each strut. This, along with a real time computer to implement controllers, allows for a great deal of flexibility in controller design and research into sensor selection. Other unique design features include a very soft axial stiffness, a custom designed voice coil actuator with a large displacement capability and elastomeric flexures both for guiding the actuator and providing pivot points on each strut. The second part, and the primary area of this research, is to examine multi-sensor control strategies in an effort to improve the performance of the controllers, their stability and/or how implementable they are. Up to this point, the primary method of control for systems of this type has been classical, designing single-input, single output controller loops to be closed around each strut. But because of the geometry of the hexapod and the different problems that can occur with some sensors, the classical approach is limited in what it can accomplish. This research shows the benefits to be gained by going to a multiple sensor controller and implementing controllers that are designed using a frequency

  19. NASA team algorithm for sea ice concentration retrieval from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave imager - Comparison with Landsat satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Schweiger, Axel

    1991-01-01

    The present study describes the validation of the the NASA team algorithm for the determination of sea ice concentrations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I). A total of 28 cloud-free Landsat scenes were selected to permit validation of the passive microwave ice concentration algorithm for a range of ice concentrations and ice types. The sensitivity of the NASA team algorithm to the selection of locally and seasonally adjusted algorithm parameters is discussed. Mean absolute differences between SSM/I and Landsat ice concentrations are within 1 percent during fall using local and global tie points (standard deviations of the difference are +/-3.1 and +/-6.2 percent, respectively). In areas with greater amounts of nilas and young ice, the NASA team algorithm was found to underestimate ice concentrations by as much as 9 percent. It is inferred that the standard deviation between SSM/I and Landsat ice concentrations decreases from +/-7 to +/-5 percent with local tie points compared to the global ones for spring and fall.

  20. Development of visible/infrared/microwave agriculture classification and biomass estimation algorithms. [Guyton, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Theis, S. W.; Jones, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Agricultural crop classification models using two or more spectral regions (visible through microwave) are considered in an effort to estimate biomass at Guymon, Oklahoma Dalhart, Texas. Both grounds truth and aerial data were used. Results indicate that inclusion of C, L, and P band active microwave data, from look angles greater than 35 deg from nadir, with visible and infrared data improve crop discrimination and biomass estimates compared to results using only visible and infrared data. The microwave frequencies were sensitive to different biomass levels. The K and C band were sensitive to differences at low biomass levels, while P band was sensitive to differences at high biomass levels. Two indices, one using only active microwave data and the other using data from the middle and near infrared bands, were well correlated to total biomass. It is implied that inclusion of active microwave sensors with visible and infrared sensors on future satellites could aid in crop discrimination and biomass estimation.

  1. Better physical activity classification using smartphone acceleration sensor.

    PubMed

    Arif, Muhammad; Bilal, Mohsin; Kattan, Ahmed; Ahamed, S Iqbal

    2014-09-01

    Obesity is becoming one of the serious problems for the health of worldwide population. Social interactions on mobile phones and computers via internet through social e-networks are one of the major causes of lack of physical activities. For the health specialist, it is important to track the record of physical activities of the obese or overweight patients to supervise weight loss control. In this study, acceleration sensor present in the smartphone is used to monitor the physical activity of the user. Physical activities including Walking, Jogging, Sitting, Standing, Walking upstairs and Walking downstairs are classified. Time domain features are extracted from the acceleration data recorded by smartphone during different physical activities. Time and space complexity of the whole framework is done by optimal feature subset selection and pruning of instances. Classification results of six physical activities are reported in this paper. Using simple time domain features, 99 % classification accuracy is achieved. Furthermore, attributes subset selection is used to remove the redundant features and to minimize the time complexity of the algorithm. A subset of 30 features produced more than 98 % classification accuracy for the six physical activities.

  2. Active structural acoustic control using the remote sensor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, Jordan; Daley, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Active structural acoustic control (ASAC) is an effective method of reducing the sound radiation from vibrating structures. In order to implement ASAC systems using only structural actuators and sensors, it is necessary to employ a model of the sound radiation from the structure. Such models have been presented in the literature for simple structures, such as baffled rectangular plates, and methods of determining the radiation modes of more complex practical structures using experimental data have also been explored. A similar problem arises in the context of active noise control, where cancellation of a disturbance is required at positions in space where it is not possible to locate a physical error microphone. In this case the signals at the cancellation points can be estimated from the outputs of remotely located measurement sensors using the “remote microphone method”. This remote microphone method is extended here to the ASAC problem, in which the pressures at a number of microphone locations must be estimated from measurements on the structure of the radiating system. The control and estimation strategies are described and the performance is assessed for a typical structural radiation problem.

  3. Active hydrothermal and non-active massive sulfide mound investigation using a new multiparameter chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Wu, G.; Qin, H.; Wang, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Investigation of active hydrothermal mound as well as non-active massive sulfide mound are studied recently. However, there is still lack of in-situ detection method for the non-active massive sulfide mound. Even though Transient ElectroMagnetic (TEM) and Electric Self-potential (SP) methods are good, they both are labour, time and money cost work. We proposed a new multiparameter chemical sensor method to study the seafloor active hydrothermal mound as well as non-active massive sulfide mound. This sensor integrates Eh, S2- ions concentration and pH electrochemical electrodes together, and could found chemical change caused by the active hydrothermal vent, even weak chemical abnormalities by non-active massive sulfide hydrothermal mound which MARP and CTD sometimes cannot detect. In 2012, the 1st Leg of the Chinese 26th cruise, the multiparameter chemical sensor was carried out with the deepsea camera system over the Carlsberg Ridge in Indian Ocean by R/V DAYANGYIHAO. It was shown small Eh and S2- ions concentration abnormal around a site at Northwest Indian ridge. This site was also evidenced by the TV grab. In the 2nd Leg of the same cruise in June, this chemical sensor was carried out with TEM and SP survey system. The chemical abnormalities are matched very well with both TEM and SP survey results. The results show that the multiparameter chemical sensor method not only can detect active hydrothermal mound, but also can find the non-active massive sulfide hydrothermal mound.

  4. Effects of low power microwave radiation on biological activity of Collagenase enzyme and growth rate of S. Cerevisiae yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsuhaim, Hamad S.; Vojisavljevic, Vuk; Pirogova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, microwave radiation, a type/subset of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) has been widely used in industry, medicine, as well as food technology and mobile communication. Use of mobile phones is rapidly growing. Four years from now, 5.1 billion people will be mobile phone users around the globe - almost 1 billion more mobile users than the 4.3 billion people worldwide using them now. Consequently, exposure to weak radiofrequency/microwave radiation generated by these devices is markedly increasing. Accordingly, public concern about potential hazards on human health is mounting [1]. Thermal effects of radiofrequency/microwave radiation are very well-known and extensively studied. Of particular interest are non-thermal effects of microwave exposures on biological systems. Nonthermal effects are described as changes in cellular metabolism caused by both resonance absorption and induced EMR and are often accompanied by a specific biological response. Non-thermal biological effects are measurable changes in biological systems that may or may not be associated with adverse health effects. In this study we studied non-thermal effects of low power microwave exposures on kinetics of L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and growth rate of yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strains type II. The selected model systems were continuously exposed to microwave radiation at the frequency of 968MHz and power of 10dBm using the designed and constructed (custom made) Transverse Electro-Magnetic (TEM) cell [2]. The findings reveal that microwave radiation at 968MHz and power of 10dBm inhibits L-lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity by 26% and increases significantly (15%) the proliferation rate of yeast cells.

  5. Dealing with the Effects of Sensor Displacement in Wearable Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Banos, Oresti; Toth, Mate Attila; Damas, Miguel; Pomares, Hector; Rojas, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Most wearable activity recognition systems assume a predefined sensor deployment that remains unchanged during runtime. However, this assumption does not reflect real-life conditions. During the normal use of such systems, users may place the sensors in a position different from the predefined sensor placement. Also, sensors may move from their original location to a different one, due to a loose attachment. Activity recognition systems trained on activity patterns characteristic of a given sensor deployment may likely fail due to sensor displacements. In this work, we innovatively explore the effects of sensor displacement induced by both the intentional misplacement of sensors and self-placement by the user. The effects of sensor displacement are analyzed for standard activity recognition techniques, as well as for an alternate robust sensor fusion method proposed in a previous work. While classical recognition models show little tolerance to sensor displacement, the proposed method is proven to have notable capabilities to assimilate the changes introduced in the sensor position due to self-placement and provides considerable improvements for large misplacements. PMID:24915181

  6. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from cotton stalk by microwave assisted chemical activation--application in methylene blue adsorption from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hui; Yang, Le; Tao, Guanghui; Dai, Jiulei

    2009-07-30

    The activated carbon prepared from cotton stalk with ZnCl(2) as activation was investigated under microwave radiation. Effects on the yield and adsorption capacities of activated carbon were evaluated then, such as, microwave power, microwave radiation time and the impregnation ratio of ZnCl(2). It indicated that the optimum conditions were as follows: microwave power of 560 W, microwave radiation time of 9 min and the impregnation ratio of ZnCl(2) was 1.6g/g. Iodine number, amount of methylene blue adsorption and the yield of activated carbon prepared under optimum conditions were 972.92 mg/g, 193.50mg/g and 37.92%, respectively. Laboratory prepared activated carbons were characterized by pH(ZPC), SEM, FT-IR, S(BET) and pore structural parameters. Then they were used as adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue from aqueous solutions under varying conditions of initial concentration, carbon dosage and pH. It indicated that Langmuir isotherm was fitter than Freundlich isotherm and Temkin isotherm.

  7. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S> ; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity (EVA) in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation Portable Life Support System (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode (LD) spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen (O2) channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)/microcontroller architecture. Based on the results of the initial instrument development, further prototype development and testing of instruments leveraging the lessons learned were desired. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU. .

  8. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-14

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 10{sup 4} ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 10{sup 4} and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √S{sub I} = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S{sub 21} enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers P{sub MR} make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √S{sub I} is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of P{sub MR}) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of P{sub MR}). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the

  9. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-01

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 104 ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 104 and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √SI = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S21 enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers PMR make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √SI is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of PMR) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of PMR). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the microwave RF-SQUID multiplexer can exhibit √SI ≤ 5 pA/√Hz, i.e., close to √SI of

  10. Microwave permittivity and dielectric relaxation of a high surface area activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, J. E.; Wheeler, R. R., Jr.

    Carbonaceous materials are amenable to microwave heating to varying degrees. The primary indicator of susceptibility is the complex permittivity (ɛ*), of which, the real component correlates with polarization, and the imaginary term represents dielectric loss. For a given material, the complex permittivity is dependent upon both frequency and temperature. Here we report the complex permittivity of a high surface area coconut shell activated carbon which is commonly used in analytical chemistry and a wide variety of industrial separations. Associated polarization-relaxation phenomena are also characterized. Broadband measurements were made using a high temperature compatible open-ended coaxial dielectric probe at frequencies between 0.2 and 26 GHz, and across the temperature region between 24 °C and 191 °C.

  11. NASA's Potential Contributions to Avalanche Forecasting Using Active and Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blonski, Slawomir

    2007-01-01

    This Candidate Solution is based on using active and passive microwave measurements acquired from NASA satellites to improve USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) Forest Service forecasting of avalanche danger. Regional Avalanche Centers prepare avalanche forecasts using ground measurements of snowpack and mountain weather conditions. In this Solution, range of the in situ observations is extended by adding remote sensing measurements of snow depth, snow water equivalent, and snowfall rate acquired by satellite missions that include Aqua, CloudSat, future GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement), and the proposed SCLP (Snow and Cold Land Processes). Measurements of snowpack conditions and time evolution are improved by combining the in situ and satellite observations with a snow model. Recurring snow observations from NASA satellites increase accuracy of avalanche forecasting, which helps the public and the managers of public facilities make better avalanche safety decisions.

  12. Bio-based phenols and fuel production from catalytic microwave pyrolysis of lignin by activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Wang, Lu; Wei, Yi; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Xuesong; Liu, Yupeng; Yadavalli, Gayatri; Tang, Juming

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to explore catalytic microwave pyrolysis of lignin for renewable phenols and fuels using activated carbon (AC) as a catalyst. A central composite experimental design (CCD) was used to optimize the reaction condition. The effects of reaction temperature and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV, h(-1)) on product yields were investigated. GC/MS analysis showed that the main chemical compounds of bio-oils were phenols, guaiacols, hydrocarbons and esters, most of which were ranged from 71% to 87% of the bio-oils depending on different reaction conditions. Bio-oils with high concentrations of phenol (45% in the bio-oil) were obtained. The calorific value analysis revealed that the high heating values (HHV) of the lignin-derived biochars were from 20.4 to 24.5 MJ/kg in comparison with raw lignin (19 MJ/kg). The reaction mechanism of this process was analyzed.

  13. Microwave assisted extraction of sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidan) from Ascophyllum nodosum and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Macquarrie, Duncan

    2015-09-20

    Sulfated polysaccharides (fucoidan) from brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum were extracted by microwave assisted extraction (MAE) technology. Different conditions of temperature (90-150°C), extraction time (5-30 min) were evaluated and optimal fucoidan yield was 16.08%, obtained from 120°C for 15 min's extraction. Compositional analysis, GPC, HPAEC and IR analysis were employed for characterization of extracted sulfated polysaccharides. Fucose was the main monosaccharide of fucoidan extracted at 90°C while glucuronic acid was the main monosaccharide of fucoidan extracted at 150°C. Both the molecular weight and sulfate content of extracted fucoidan increased with decreasing extraction temperature. All fucoidans exhibited antioxidant activities as measured by DPPH scavenging and reducing power, among which fucoidan extracted at 90°C was highest. This study shows that MAE is an efficient technology to extract sulfated polysaccharides from seaweed and Ascophyllum nodosum could potentially be a resource for natural antioxidants.

  14. Activation of Al2O3 passivation layers on silicon by microwave annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Johannes; Otto, Martin; Sprafke, Alexander N.; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2013-11-01

    Thin aluminum oxide layers deposited on silicon by thermal atomic layer deposition can be used to reduce the electronic recombination losses by passivating the silicon surfaces. To activate the full passivation ability of such layers, a post-deposition annealing step at moderate temperatures (≈400 ∘C, duration≈30 min) is required. Such an annealing step is commonly done in an oven in air, nitrogen, or forming gas atmosphere. In this work, we investigate the ability to reduce the duration of the annealing step by heating the silicon wafer with a microwave source. The annealing time is significantly reduced to durations below 1 min while achieving effective minority carrier lifetimes similar or higher to that of conventionally oven-annealed samples.

  15. Microwave acid digestion and preconcentration neutron activation analysis of biological and diet samples for iodine.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Chatt, A

    1991-07-01

    A simple preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) method has been developed for the determination of low levels of iodine in biological and nutritional materials. The method involves dissolution of the samples by microwave digestion in the presence of acids in closed Teflon bombs and preconcentration of total iodine, after reduction to iodide with hydrazine sulfate, by coprecipitation with bismuth sulfide. The effects of different factors such as acidity, time for complete precipitation, and concentrations of bismuth, sulfide, and diverse ions on the quantitative recovery of iodide have been studied. The absolute detection limit of the PNAA method is 5 ng of iodine. Precision of measurement, expressed in terms of relative standard deviation, is about 5% at 100 ppb and 10% at 20 ppb levels of iodine. The PNAA method has been applied to several biological reference materials and total diet samples.

  16. Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Extracts from Whole Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) With or Without Microwave Irradiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of extracting phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity from buckwheat with water, 50% aqueous ethanol, or 100% ethanol using microwave irradiation or a water bath for 15 min at various temperatures (23 – 150 °C). The phenolic content of...

  17. Synthetic aperture microwave imaging with active probing for fusion plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Vladimir F.; Freethy, Simon J.; Huang, Billy K.

    2014-08-21

    A Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system has been designed and built to obtain 2-D images at several frequencies from fusion plasmas. SAMI uses a phased array of linearly polarised antennas. The array configuration has been optimised to achieve maximum synthetic aperture beam efficiency. The signals received by antennas are down-converted to the intermediate frequency range and then recorded in a full vector form. Full vector signals allow beam focusing and image reconstruction in both real time and a post-processing mode. SAMI can scan over 16 pre-programmed frequencies in the range of 10-35GHz with a switching time of 300ns. The system operates in 2 different modes simultaneously: both a 'passive' imaging of plasma emission and also an 'active' imaging of the back-scattered signal of the radiation launched by one of the antennas from the same array. This second mode is similar to so-called Doppler backscattering (DBS) reflectometry with 2-D resolution of the propagation velocity of turbulent structures. Both modes of operation show good performance in fusion plasma experiments on Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). We have obtained the first ever 2-D images of BXO mode conversion windows. With active probing, first ever turbulence velocity maps have been obtained. We present an overview of the diagnostic and discuss recent results. In contrast to quasi-optical microwave imaging systems SAMI requires neither big aperture viewing ports nor large 2-D detector arrays to achieve the desired imaging resolution. The number of effective 'pixels' of the synthesized image is proportional to the number of receiving antennas squared. Thus only a small number of optimised antennas is sufficient for the majority of applications. Possible implementation of SAMI on ITERand DEMO is discussed.

  18. Preparation of activated carbon from sugarcane bagasse by microwave assisted activation for the remediation of semi-aerobic landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Lee, L K; Hameed, B H

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluates the sugarcane bagasse derived activated carbon (SBAC) prepared by microwave heating for the adsorptive removal of ammonical nitrogen and orthophosphate from the semi-aerobic landfill leachate. The physical and chemical properties of SBAC were examined by pore structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The effects of adsorbent dosage, contact time and solution pH on the adsorption performance were investigated in a batch mode study at 30°C. Equilibrium data were favorably described by the Langmuir isotherm model, with a maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for ammonical nitrogen and orthophosphate of 138.46 and 12.81 mg/g, respectively, while the adsorption kinetic was best fitted to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results illustrated the potential of sugarcane bagasse derived activated carbon for the adsorptive treatment of semi-aerobic landfill leachate.

  19. Adhesive disbond detection using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, William; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace industry continues to increase the use of adhesives for structural bonding due to the increased joint efficiency (reduced weight), even distribution of the load path and decreases in stress concentrations. However, the limited techniques for verifying the strength of adhesive bonds has reduced its use on primary structures and requires an intensive inspection schedule. This paper discusses a potential structural health monitoring (SHM) technique for the detection of disbonds through the in situ inspection of adhesive joints. This is achieved through the use of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), thin unobtrusive sensors which are permanently bonded to the aircraft structure. The detection method discussed in this study is electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS), a local vibration method. This method detects disbonds from the change in the mechanical impedance of the structure surrounding the disbond. This paper will discuss how predictive modeling can provide valuable insight into the inspection method, and provide better results than empirical methods alone. The inspection scheme was evaluated using the finite element method, and the results were verified experimentally using a large aluminum test article, and included both pristine and disbond coupons.

  20. Microwave emissions from snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation emitted from dry and wet snowpack in the microwave region (1 to 100 GHz) is discussed and related to ground observations. Results from theoretical model calculations match the brightness temperatures obtained by truck mounted, airborne and spaceborne microwave sensor systems. Snow wetness and internal layer structure complicate the snow parameter retrieval algorithm. Further understanding of electromagnetic interaction with snowpack may eventually provide a technique to probe the internal snow properties

  1. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:27689798

  2. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis.

  3. Preparation of activated carbon from coconut shell chars in pilot-scale microwave heating equipment at 60 kW.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Peng, Jinhui; Zhang, Libo; Yang, Kunbin; Xia, Hongying; Zhang, Shimin; Guo, Sheng-hui

    2009-02-01

    Experiments to prepare activated carbon by microwave heating indicated that microwave energy can decrease reaction temperature, save the energy and shorten processing time remarkably compared to conventional heating, owing to its internal and volumetric heating effects. The above results were based on the laboratory-scale experiments. It is desirable to develop a pilot-scale microwave heating equipment and investigate the parameters with the aim of technological industrialization. In the present study, the components and features of the self-invented equipment were introduced. The temperature rise curves of the chars were obtained. Iodine numbers of the activated carbons all exceed the state standard of China under the following conditions: 25 kg/h charging rate, 0.42 rev/min turning rate of ceramic tube, flow rate of steam at pressure of 0.01 MPa and 40 kW microwave heating power after 60 kW pre-activation for 30 min. Pore structure of the sample obtained at a time point of 46 h, which contained BET surface area, and pore size distributions of micropores and total pores, was tested by nitrogen adsorption at 77K.

  4. Using microwave heating to improve the desorption efficiency of high molecular weight VOC from beaded activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Shariaty, Pooya; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2015-04-07

    Incomplete regeneration of activated carbon loaded with organic compounds results in heel build-up that reduces the useful life of the adsorbent. In this study, microwave heating was tested as a regeneration method for beaded activated carbon (BAC) loaded with n-dodecane, a high molecular weight volatile organic compound. Energy consumption and desorption efficiency for microwave-heating regeneration were compared with conductive-heating regeneration. The minimum energy needed to completely regenerate the adsorbent (100% desorption efficiency) using microwave regeneration was 6% of that needed with conductive heating regeneration, owing to more rapid heating rates and lower heat loss. Analyses of adsorbent pore size distribution and surface chemistry confirmed that neither heating method altered the physical/chemical properties of the BAC. Additionally, gas chromatography (with flame ionization detector) confirmed that neither regeneration method detectably altered the adsorbate composition during desorption. By demonstrating improvements in energy consumption and desorption efficiency and showing stable adsorbate and adsorbent properties, this paper suggests that microwave heating is an attractive method for activated carbon regeneration particularly when high-affinity VOC adsorbates are present.

  5. Preparation of activated carbon from coconut shell chars in pilot-scale microwave heating equipment at 60 kW

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wei; Peng Jinhui Zhang Libo; Yang Kunbin; Xia Hongying; Zhang Shimin; Guo Shenghui

    2009-02-15

    Experiments to prepare activated carbon by microwave heating indicated that microwave energy can decrease reaction temperature, save the energy and shorten processing time remarkably compared to conventional heating, owing to its internal and volumetric heating effects. The above results were based on the laboratory-scale experiments. It is desirable to develop a pilot-scale microwave heating equipment and investigate the parameters with the aim of technological industrialization. In the present study, the components and features of the self-invented equipment were introduced. The temperature rise curves of the chars were obtained. Iodine numbers of the activated carbons all exceed the state standard of China under the following conditions: 25 kg/h charging rate, 0.42 rev/min turning rate of ceramic tube, flow rate of steam at pressure of 0.01 MPa and 40 kW microwave heating power after 60 kW pre-activation for 30 min. Pore structure of the sample obtained at a time point of 46 h, which contained BET surface area, and pore size distributions of micropores and total pores, was tested by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K.

  6. Effect of Activating Agent on the Preparation of Bamboo-Based High Surface Area Activated Carbon by Microwave Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hongying; Wu, Jian; Srinivasakannan, Chandrasekar; Peng, Jinhui; Zhang, Libo

    2016-06-01

    The present work attempts to convert bamboo into a high surface area activated carbon via microwave heating. Different chemical activating agents such as KOH, NaOH, K2CO3 and Na2CO3 were utilized to identify a most suitable activating agent. Among the activating agents tested KOH was found to generate carbon with the highest porosity and surface area. The effect of KOH/C ratio on the porous nature of the activated carbon has been assessed. An optimal KOH/C ratio of 4 was identified, beyond which the surface area as well as the pore volume were found to decrease. At the optimized KOH/C ratio the surface area and the pore volume were estimated to be 3,441 m2/g and 2.093 ml/g, respectively, with the significant proportion of which being microporous (62.3%). Activated carbon prepared under the optimum conditions was further characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Activated carbons with so high surface area and pore volume are very rarely reported, which could be owed to the nature of the precursor and the optimal conditions of mixture ratio adopted in the present work.

  7. SHM of wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active-sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Gyuhae; Taylor, Stuart G; Farinholt, Kevin M; Farrar, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a variety of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques, based on the use of piezoelectric active-sensors, used to determine the structural integrity of wind turbine blades. Specifically, Lamb wave propagations, frequency response functions, and time series based methods are utilized to estimate the condition of wind turbine blades. For experiments, a 1m section of a 9m CX100 blade is used. Overall, these three methods yielded a sufficient damage detection capability to warrant further investigation into field deployment. A full-scale fatigue test of a CX-100 wind turbine blade is also conducted. This paper summarizes considerations needed to design such SHM systems, experimental procedures and results, and practical implementation issues that can be used as guidelines for future investigations.

  8. Background Subtraction Based on Color and Depth Using Active Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sanchez, Enrique J.; Diaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Depth information has been used in computer vision for a wide variety of tasks. Since active range sensors are currently available at low cost, high-quality depth maps can be used as relevant input for many applications. Background subtraction and video segmentation algorithms can be improved by fusing depth and color inputs, which are complementary and allow one to solve many classic color segmentation issues. In this paper, we describe one fusion method to combine color and depth based on an advanced color-based algorithm. This technique has been evaluated by means of a complete dataset recorded with Microsoft Kinect, which enables comparison with the original method. The proposed method outperforms the others in almost every test, showing more robustness to illumination changes, shadows, reflections and camouflage. PMID:23857259

  9. Antioxidant activity in barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.) grains roasted in a microwave oven under conditions optimized using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Omwamba, Mary; Hu, Qiuhui

    2010-01-01

    Microwave processing and cooking of foods is a recent development that is gaining momentum in household as well as large-scale food applications. Barley contains phenol compounds which possess antioxidant activity. In this study the microwave oven roasting condition was optimized to obtain grains with high antioxidant activity measured as the ability to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical. Antioxidant activity of grains roasted under optimum conditions was assessed based on DPPH radical scavenging activity, reducing power and inhibition of oxidation in linoleic acid system. The optimum condition for obtaining roasted barley with high antioxidant activity (90.5% DPPH inhibition) was found to be at 600 W microwave power, 8.5 min roasting time, and 61.5 g or 2 layers of grains. The roasting condition influenced antioxidant activity both individually and interactively. Statistical analysis showed that the model was significant (P < 0.0001). The acetone extract had significantly high inhibition of lipid peroxidation and DPPH radical scavenging activity compared to the aqueous extract and alpha-tocopherol. The reducing power of acetone extracts was not significantly different from alpha-tocopherol. The acetone extract had twice the amount of phenol content compared to the aqueous extract indicating its high extraction efficiency. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of phenol acids, amino phenols, and quinones. The aqueous extract did not contain 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid which are phenol compounds reported to contribute to antioxidant activity in barley grain.

  10. Quaternized Carboxymethyl Chitosan-Based Silver Nanoparticles Hybrid: Microwave-Assisted Synthesis, Characterization and Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Siqi; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Zhiming; Qi, Chusheng

    2016-01-01

    A facile, efficient, and eco-friendly approach for the preparation of uniform silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) was developed. The synthesis was conducted in an aqueous medium exposed to microwave irradiation for 8 min, using laboratory-prepared, water-soluble quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan (QCMC) as a chemical reducer and stabilizer and silver nitrate as the silver source. The structure of the prepared QCMC was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The formation, size distribution, and dispersion of the Ag NPs in the QCMC matrix were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) analysis, and the thermal stability and antibacterial properties of the synthesized QCMC-based Ag NPs composite (QCMC-Ag) were also explored. The results revealed that (1) QCMC was successfully prepared by grafting quaternary ammonium groups onto carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) chains under microwave irradiation in water for 90 min and this substitution appeared to have occurred at -NH2 sites on C2 position of the pyranoid ring; (2) uniform and stable spherical Ag NPs could be synthesized when QCMC was used as the reducing and stabilizing agent; (3) Ag NPs were well dispersed in the QCMC matrix with a narrow size distribiution in the range of 17–31 nm without aggregation; and (4) due to the presence of Ag NPs, the thermal stability and antibacterial activity of QCMC-Ag were dramatically improved relative to QCMC. PMID:28335246

  11. Wave Correlation Effects in Active Microwave Remote Sensing of the Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadr, Nagi Mahmoud

    This study examines the wave correlation effects that arise in active microwave remote sensing of the environment. These correlation effects, or coherent interference effects, are not accounted for by the regular phenomenological transport and radar equations, in which intensities, as a rule, are added incoherently. In particular, two types of correlation effects are examined: those associated with the medium and those associated with the source. The study method is the analytical wave approach to propagation and scattering from random media. This entails using Maxwell's equations to arrive at expressions for the first and second moments of the field. Unlike previous studies, however, in which plane wave incidence is assumed, here the radar is directly incorporated into the analytical wave formulation, and the antenna fields replaced via their plane wave representations. In this way, analysis of both the medium and source correlation effects on a per plane wave basis becomes a straightforward matter. The medium correlation effects are responsible for backscatter enhancement. Although the enhancement effect has been studied before on numerous occasions, careful characterization of the enhancement for microwave scattering from environmental scenes, such as vegetation canopies, has been lacking. The study at hand therefore fills this void and, in addition, quantifies the influence of this enhancement on phase difference statistics, a new and potentially important environmental remote sensing tool. The source correlation effects arise as a result of both the nature of the source and the geometry of the particular problem. By including these effects, a more general expression than the radar equation is obtained analytically. Quantitative examples show that, under certain circumstances, the results of this general expression deviate substantially from the results provided by the radar equation. This finding verifies the importance of considering source correlation

  12. Urban rainfall estimation employing commercial microwave links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko; ten Veldhuis, Marie-claire

    2015-04-01

    Urban areas often lack rainfall information. To increase the number of rainfall observations in cities, microwave links from operational cellular telecommunication networks may be employed. Although this new potential source of rainfall information has been shown to be promising, its quality needs to be demonstrated more extensively. In the Rain Sense kickstart project of the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS), sensors and citizens are preparing Amsterdam for future weather. Part of this project is rainfall estimation using new measurement techniques. Innovative sensing techniques will be utilized such as rainfall estimation from microwave links, umbrellas for weather sensing, low-cost sensors at lamp posts and in drainage pipes for water level observation. These will be combined with information provided by citizens in an active way through smartphone apps and in a passive way through social media posts (Twitter, Flickr etc.). Sensor information will be integrated, visualized and made accessible to citizens to help raise citizen awareness of urban water management challenges and promote resilience by providing information on how citizens can contribute in addressing these. Moreover, citizens and businesses can benefit from reliable weather information in planning their social and commercial activities. In the end city-wide high-resolution rainfall maps will be derived, blending rainfall information from microwave links and weather radars. This information will be used for urban water management. This presentation focuses on rainfall estimation from commercial microwave links. Received signal levels from tens of microwave links within the Amsterdam region (roughly 1 million inhabitants) in the Netherlands are utilized to estimate rainfall with high spatial and temporal resolution. Rainfall maps will be presented and compared to a gauge-adjusted radar rainfall data set. Rainfall time series from gauge(s), radars and links will be compared.

  13. Effects of Activation Energy to Transient Response of Semiconductor Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Akira; Ohtani, Tatsuki

    The smell classifiable gas sensor will be desired for many applications such as gas detection alarms, process controls for food production and so on. We have tried to realize the sensor using transient responses of semiconductor gas sensor consisting of tin dioxide and pointed out that the sensor gave us different transient responses for kinds of gas. Results of model calculation showed the activation energy of chemical reaction on the sensor surface strongly depended on the transient response. We tried to estimate the activation energies by molecular orbital calculation with SnO2 Cluster. The results show that there is a liner relationship between the gradient of the transient responses and activation energies for carboxylic and alcoholic gases. Transient response will be predicted from activation energy in the same kind of gas and the smell discrimination by single semiconductor gas sensor will be realized by this relationship.

  14. A Microwave Pressure Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    An instrument to measure atmospheric pressure at the earth's surface from an orbiting satellite would be a valuable addition to the expanding inventory of remote sensors. The subject of this report is such an instrument - the Microwave Pressure Sounder (MPS). It is shown that global-ocean coverage is attainable with sufficient accuracy, resolution and observational frequency for meteorological, oceanographic and climate research applications. Surface pressure can be deduced from a measurement of the absorption by an atmospheric column at a frequency in the wing of the oxygen band centered on 60 GHz. An active multifrequency instrument is needed to make this measurement with sufficient accuracy. The selection of optimum operating frequencies is based upon accepted models of surface reflection, oxygen, water vapor and cloud absorption. Numerical simulation using a range of real atmospheres defined by radiosonde observations were used to validate the frequency selection procedure. Analyses are presented of alternative system configurations that define the balance between accuracy and achievable resolution.

  15. Improving the biogas production performance of municipal waste activated sludge via disperser induced microwave disintegration.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; Rajesh Banu, J; Vinoth Kumar, J; Rajkumar, M

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the influence of disperser induced microwave pretreatment was investigated to analyze the proficiency of floc disruption on subsequent disintegration and biodegradability process. Initially, the flocs in the sludge was disrupted through disperser at a specific energy input of 25.3kJ/kgTS. The upshot of the microwave disintegration presents that the solids reduction and solubilization of floc disrupted (disperser induced microwave pretreated) sludge was found to be 17.33% and 22% relatively greater than that achieved in microwave pretreated (9.3% and 16%) sludge alone. The biodegradability analysis, affords an evaluation of parameter confidence and correlation determination. The eventual biodegradability of microwave pretreated, and floc disrupted sludges were computed to be 0.15(gCOD/gCOD) and 0.28(gCOD/gCOD), respectively. An economic assessment of this study offers a positive net profit of about 104.8USD/ton of sludge in floc disrupted sample.

  16. Vector disparity sensor with vergence control for active vision systems.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Francisco; Diaz, Javier; Gibaldi, Agostino; Sabatini, Silvio P; Ros, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for computing vector disparity for active vision systems as used on robotics applications. The control of the vergence angle of a binocular system allows us to efficiently explore dynamic environments, but requires a generalization of the disparity computation with respect to a static camera setup, where the disparity is strictly 1-D after the image rectification. The interaction between vision and motor control allows us to develop an active sensor that achieves high accuracy of the disparity computation around the fixation point, and fast reaction time for the vergence control. In this contribution, we address the development of a real-time architecture for vector disparity computation using an FPGA device. We implement the disparity unit and the control module for vergence, version, and tilt to determine the fixation point. In addition, two on-chip different alternatives for the vector disparity engines are discussed based on the luminance (gradient-based) and phase information of the binocular images. The multiscale versions of these engines are able to estimate the vector disparity up to 32 fps on VGA resolution images with very good accuracy as shown using benchmark sequences with known ground-truth. The performances in terms of frame-rate, resource utilization, and accuracy of the presented approaches are discussed. On the basis of these results, our study indicates that the gradient-based approach leads to the best trade-off choice for the integration with the active vision system.

  17. Proton currents constrain structural models of voltage sensor activation

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Aaron L; Mokrab, Younes; Bennett, Ashley L; Sansom, Mark SP; Ramsey, Ian Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is evidently unique among voltage sensor domain proteins in mediating an intrinsic ‘aqueous’ H+ conductance (GAQ). Mutation of a highly conserved ‘gating charge’ residue in the S4 helix (R1H) confers a resting-state H+ ‘shuttle’ conductance (GSH) in VGCs and Ci VSP, and we now report that R1H is sufficient to reconstitute GSH in Hv1 without abrogating GAQ. Second-site mutations in S3 (D185A/H) and S4 (N4R) experimentally separate GSH and GAQ gating, which report thermodynamically distinct initial and final steps, respectively, in the Hv1 activation pathway. The effects of Hv1 mutations on GSH and GAQ are used to constrain the positions of key side chains in resting- and activated-state VS model structures, providing new insights into the structural basis of VS activation and H+ transfer mechanisms in Hv1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18017.001 PMID:27572256

  18. A sensor and video based ontology for activity recognition in smart environments.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D; Morrow, Philip J; Nugent, Chris D

    2014-01-01

    Activity recognition is used in a wide range of applications including healthcare and security. In a smart environment activity recognition can be used to monitor and support the activities of a user. There have been a range of methods used in activity recognition including sensor-based approaches, vision-based approaches and ontological approaches. This paper presents a novel approach to activity recognition in a smart home environment which combines sensor and video data through an ontological framework. The ontology describes the relationships and interactions between activities, the user, objects, sensors and video data.

  19. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzo, S.; Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R.; Paschen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 μm, produced at CiS, and 100-200 μm thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowing for a reduced overlap of the modules in the pixel layer close to the beam pipe. The CiS production includes also four chip sensors according to the module geometry planned for the outer layers of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector to be operated at the HL-LHC. The modules have been characterized using radioactive sources in the laboratory and with high precision measurements at beam tests to investigate the hit efficiency and charge collection properties at different bias voltages and particle incidence angles. The performance of the different sensor thicknesses and edge designs are compared before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1.4 × 1016 neq/cm2.

  20. Remediation of anionic dye from aqueous system using bio-adsorbent prepared by microwave activation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arush; Sharma, Gaurav; Naushad, Mu; Ghfar, Ayman A; Pathania, Deepak

    2017-04-07

    The present study was attempted to ascertain the possible application of activated carbon as cost effective and eco-friendly adsorbent prepared via microwave (MW) assisted chemical activation. The activated carbon was characterized using different techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The various adsorption parameters have been optimized to examine the viability of activated carbon as a plausible sorbent for the remediation of Congo red (CR) dye from aquatic system. The adsorption equilibrium was interpreted using Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin isotherms. The equilibrium data adequately fitted to Langmuir isotherm with stronger R(2) (0.994). The maximum adsorption capacity (qm) of activated carbon was recorded to be 68.96 mg/g. Additionally, sorptional kinetic data were examined by reaction based and diffusion based models such as pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich model and intra-particle diffusion, Dumwald-Wagner models, respectively. The experimental results indicated that pseudo-second-order equation and Elovich model better discuss the adsorption kinetics. The computed values of thermodynamic parameters such as free energy change (ΔG(0)), enthalpy change (ΔH(0)) and entropy change (ΔS(0)) were recorded as -3.63 kJ/mol, 42.47 kJ/mol, 152.07 J/mol K, respectively at 30°C, which accounted for favorable, spontaneous and endothermic process. The regeneration study emphasized that percentage uptake declined from 90.35 to 83.45% after 6cycles of testing. So, our findings implied that activated carbon produced from biomass must be cost-effectively used as an adsorbent for detoxifying the CR dye from industrial effluents.

  1. Shape effect on the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized via a microwave-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xuesen; Wen, Junjie; Xiong, Xuhua; Hu, Yongyou

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used as sustained-release bactericidal agents for water treatment. Among the physicochemical characteristics of AgNPs, shape is an important parameter relevant to the antibacterial activity. Three typically shaped AgNPs, nanocubes, nanospheres, and nanowires, were prepared via a microwave-assisted method and characterized by TEM, UV-vis, and XRD. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was determined by OD growth curves tests, MIC tests, and cell viability assay against Escherichia coli. The interaction between AgNPs and bacterial cells was observed by TEM. The results showed that the three differently shaped AgNPs were nanoscale, 55 ± 10 nm in edge length for nanocubes, 60 ± 15 nm in diameter for nanospheres, 60 ± 10 nm in diameter and 2-4 μm in length for nanowires. At the bacterial concentration of 10(4) CFU/mL, the MIC of nanocubes, nanospheres, and nanowires were 37.5, 75, and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Due to the worst contact with bacteria, silver nanowires exhibited the weakest antibacterial activity compared with silver nanocubes and silver nanospheres. Besides, silver nanocubes mainly covered by {100} facets showed stronger antibacterial activity than silver nanospheres covered by {111} facets. It suggests that the shape effect on the antibacterial activity of AgNPs is attributed to the specific surface areas and facets reactivity; AgNPs with larger effective contact areas and higher reactive facets exhibit stronger antibacterial activity.

  2. Monitoring of acoustic emission activity using thin wafer piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei; Meisner, Daniel; Momeni, Sepand

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a well-known technique for monitoring onset and propagation of material damage. The technique has demonstrated utility in assessment of metallic and composite materials in applications ranging from civil structures to aerospace vehicles. While over the course of few decades AE hardware has changed dramatically with the sensors experiencing little changes. A traditional acoustic emission sensor solution utilizes a thickness resonance of the internal piezoelectric element which, coupled with internal amplification circuit, results in relatively large sensor footprint. Thin wafer piezoelectric sensors are small and unobtrusive, but they have seen limited AE applications due to low signal-to-noise ratio and other operation difficulties. In this contribution, issues and possible solutions pertaining to the utility of thin wafer piezoelectrics as AE sensors are discussed. Results of AE monitoring of fatigue damage using thin wafer piezoelectric and conventional AE sensors are presented.

  3. Using an Active Sensor to Estimate Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Dry Matter Yield and Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing in the form of active sensors could be used to estimate forage biomass on spatial and temporal scales. The objective of this study is to use canopy reflectance measurements from an active remote sensor to compare different vegetation indices as a means of estimating final dry matter y...

  4. Active Sensor Reflectance Measurements of Corn Nitrogen Status and Yield Potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of active crop canopy sensor reflectance measurements of in-season corn (Zea mays L.) nitrogen (N) status for directing spatially-variable N applications has been advocated to improve N use efficiency. However, first it is necessary to confirm that active sensors can reliably assess N status. Ou...

  5. 77 FR 52317 - Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active Sonar

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Navy Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active... Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) sonar systems with certain...

  6. Toward real time detection of the basic living activity in home using a wearable sensor and smart home sensors.

    PubMed

    Bang, Sunlee; Kim, Minho; Song, Sa-Kwang; Park, Soo-Jun

    2008-01-01

    As the elderly people living alone are enormously increasing recently, we need the system inferring activities of daily living (ADL) for maintaining healthy life and recognizing emergency. The system should be constructed with sensors, which are used to associate with people's living while remaining as non intrusive views as possible. To do this, the proposed system use a triaxial accelerometer sensor and environment sensors indicating contact with subject in home. Particularly, in order to robustly infer ADLs, we present component ADL, which is decided with conjunction of human motion together, not just only contacted object identification. It is an important component in inferring ADL. In special, component ADL decision firstly refines misclassified initial activities, which improves the accuracy of recognizing ADL. Preliminary experiments results for proposed system provides overall recognition rate of over 97% over 8 component ADLs, which can be effectively applicable to recognize the final ADLs.

  7. Solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from Dryopteris fragrans and evaluation of antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Li, Chun-Ying; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Mu, Pan-Song; Fu, Yu-Jie

    2012-07-15

    Solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) of the essential oil from Dryopteris fragrans and its antioxidant activity were investigated. A central composite design combined with response surface methodology was applied to study the influences of extraction time, irradiation power and humidity (proportion of water pretreatment). A maximal extraction yield of 0.33% was achieved under optimal conditions of extraction time 34 min, irradiation power 520 W and humidity 51%. Sixteen compounds, representing 89.65% of the oil, were identified, of which the major ones, (1R,4S,11R)-4,6,6,11-tetramethyltricyclo[5.4.0.0(4,8)]undecan-1-ol (30.49%), 1R,4S,7S,11R-2,2,4,8-tetramethyltricyclo[5.3.1.0(4,11)]undec-8-ene (22.91%) and, 1,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-2,5,5,8a-tetramethyl-1-naphthalenemethanol (15.11%), accounted for 68.51% of the oil. The antioxidant activity of the essential oil was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), β-carotene/linoleic acid, and reducing power assay, the IC50 values were 0.19, 0.09 and 0.18 mg/mL, respectively. All these results suggest that SFME represents an excellent alternative protocol for production of essential oils from plant materials.

  8. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of ZnO-graphene nanocomposites prepared by microwave synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, Natalie P.; Almahoudi, Serial H.; Olson, Chelsea R.; El-Shall, M. Samy

    2012-12-01

    This work reports a simple one-step synthesis of ZnO nanopyramids supported on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets using microwave irradiation (MWI) of zinc acetate and GO in the presence of a mixture of oleic acid and oleylamine. The rapid decomposition of zinc acetate by MWI in the presence of the mixture of oleic acid and oleylamine results in the formation of hexagonal ZnO nanopyramids. GO has a high affinity for absorbing MWI, which results in a high local heating effect around the GO nanosheets and facilitates the reduction of GO by the oleylamine. The RGO nanosheets act as heterogeneous surface sites for the nucleation and growth of the ZnO nanopyramids. Using ligand exchange, the ZnO-RGO nanocomposites can be dispersed in an aqueous medium, thus allowing their use as photocatalysts for the degradation of the malachite green dye in water. The ZnO-RGO nanocomposites show enhanced photocatalytic activity for the degradation of the dye over the unsupported ZnO nanopyramids. The enhanced activity is attributed to efficient charge transfer of the photogenerated electrons in the conduction band of ZnO to graphene. This enhances the oxidative pathway of the holes generated in the valence band of ZnO which can effectively lead to the degradation and mineralization of the malachite green. The ZnO nanopyramids supported on RGO could have improved performance in other photocatalytic reactions and also in solar energy conversion.

  9. Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Detector with High Efficiency, Broad Bandwidth, and Highly Symmetric Coupling to Transition Edge Sensor Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E.; Cao, N.; Chuss, D.; Denis, K.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Schneider, G.; Stevenson, T.; Travers, D.; U-yen, K.

    2008-01-01

    Four probe antennas transfer signals from waveguide to microstrip lines. The probes not only provide broadband impedance matching, but also thermally isolate waveguide and detector. In addition, we developed a new photonic waveguide choke joint design, with four-fold symmetry, to suppress power leakage at the interface. We have developed facilities to test superconducting circuit elements using a cryogenic microwave probe station, and more complete systems in waveguide. We used the ring resonator shown below to measure a dielectric loss tangent < 7x10(exp -4) over 10 - 45 GHz. We have combined component simulations to predict the overall coupling from waveguide modes to bolometers. The result below shows the planar circuit and waveguide interface can utilize the high beam symmetry of HE11 circular feedhorns with > 99% coupling efficiency over 30% fractional bandwidth.

  10. Electro-active sensor, method for constructing the same; apparatus and circuitry for detection of electro-active species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electro-active sensor includes a nonconductive platform with a first electrode set attached with a first side of a nonconductive platform. The first electrode set serves as an electrochemical cell that may be utilized to detect electro-active species in solution. A plurality of electrode sets and a variety of additional electrochemical cells and sensors may be attached with the nonconductive platform. The present invention also includes a method for constructing the aforementioned electro-active sensor. Additionally, an apparatus for detection and observation is disclosed, where the apparatus includes a sealable chamber for insertion of a portion of an electro-active sensor. The apparatus allows for monitoring and detection activities. Allowing for control of attached cells and sensors, a dual-mode circuitry is also disclosed. The dual-mode circuitry includes a switch, allowing the circuitry to be switched from a potentiostat to a galvanostat mode.

  11. Flexible and Stretchable Physical Sensor Integrated Platforms for Wearable Human-Activity Monitoringand Personal Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Trung, Tran Quang; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable physical sensors that can measure and quantify electrical signals generated by human activities are attracting a great deal of attention as they have unique characteristics, such as ultrathinness, low modulus, light weight, high flexibility, and stretchability. These flexible and stretchable physical sensors conformally attached on the surface of organs or skin can provide a new opportunity for human-activity monitoring and personal healthcare. Consequently, in recent years there has been considerable research effort devoted to the development of flexible and stretchable physical sensors to fulfill the requirements of future technology, and much progress has been achieved. Here, the most recent developments of flexible and stretchable physical sensors are described, including temperature, pressure, and strain sensors, and flexible and stretchable sensor-integrated platforms. The latest successful examples of flexible and stretchable physical sensors for the detection of temperature, pressure, and strain, as well as their novel structures, technological innovations, and challenges, are reviewed first. In the next section, recent progress regarding sensor-integrated wearable platforms is overviewed in detail. Some of the latest achievements regarding self-powered sensor-integrated wearable platform technologies are also reviewed. Further research direction and challenges are also proposed to develop a fully sensor-integrated wearable platform for monitoring human activity and personal healthcare in the near future.

  12. Impact of Sensor Misplacement on Dynamic Time Warping Based Human Activity Recognition using Wearable Computers

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Nimish; Lee, Jaeseong; Lotfian, Reza; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2017-01-01

    Daily living activity monitoring is important for early detection of the onset of many diseases and for improving quality of life especially in elderly. A wireless wearable network of inertial sensor nodes can be used to observe daily motions. Continuous stream of data generated by these sensor networks can be used to recognize the movements of interest. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) is a widely used signal processing method for time-series pattern matching because of its robustness to variations in time and speed as opposed to other template matching methods. Despite this flexibility, for the application of activity recognition, DTW can only find the similarity between the template of a movement and the incoming samples, when the location and orientation of the sensor remains unchanged. Due to this restriction, small sensor misplacements can lead to a decrease in the classification accuracy. In this work, we adopt DTW distance as a feature for real-time detection of human daily activities like sit to stand in the presence of sensor misplacement. To measure this performance of DTW, we need to create a large number of sensor configurations while the sensors are rotated or misplaced. Creating a large number of closely spaced sensors is impractical. To address this problem, we use the marker based optical motion capture system and generate simulated inertial sensor data for different locations and orientations on the body. We study the performance of the DTW under these conditions to determine the worst-case sensor location variations that the algorithm can accommodate.

  13. Wireless structural health monitoring for critical members of civil infrastructures using piezoelectric active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghee; Yun, Chung-Bang; Inman, Daniel J.; Park, Gyuhae

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents several challenging issues on wireless structural health monitoring techniques for critical members of civil infrastructures using piezoelectric active sensors. The basic concept of the techniques is to monitor remotely the structural integrity by observing the impedance variations at the piezoelectric active sensors distributed to critical members of a host structure. An active sensing node incorporating on-board microprocessor and radio frequency telemetry is introduced in a sense of tailoring wireless sensing technology to the impedance method. A data compression algorithm using principal component analysis is embedded into the on-board chip of the active sensing node. The data compression algorithm would promote efficiency in terms of both power management and noise elimination of the active sensor node. Finally, a piezoelectric sensor self-diagnosis issue is touched introducing a new impedance model equation that incorporates the effects of sensor and bonding defects.

  14. Effect of ultrasonic and microwave disintegration on physico-chemical and biodegradation characteristics of waste-activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Doğruel, Serdar; Özgen, Aslı Sedem

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrasonic and microwave disintegration on physico-chemical and biodegradability properties of waste-activated sludge (WAS) from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Another aim was to carry out particle size distribution (PSD) analysis as an integral component of sludge characterization to highlight the transformation mechanisms involved in pretreatment processes and better understand the biodegradation patterns of sonicated and irradiated WAS liquids examined by means of respirometric measurements. Various combinations of sonication and microwave irradiation parameters were applied to optimize operating conditions. The optimum ultrasonic density was determined as 1.5 W/mL, and energy dosages lower than 30,000 kJ/kg TS resulted in a fairly linear increase in the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) release. An irradiation time of 10 min and a temperature of 175°C were selected as the optimum microwave pretreatment conditions for sludge liquefaction. The most apparent impact of ultrasonication on the PSD of COD was the shifting of the peak at the particulate fraction (>1600 nm) toward the lowest size range (<2 nm). Microwave heating at the selected experimental conditions and ultrasonic pretreatment at 30,000 kJ/kg TS exhibited comparable size distribution and biodegradation characteristics to those of domestic sewage.

  15. Microwave-swing adsorption to capture and recover vapors from air streams with activated carbon fiber cloth.

    PubMed

    Hashisho, Zaher; Rood, Mark; Botich, Leon

    2005-09-01

    Adsorption with regeneration is a desirable means to control the emissions of organic vapors such as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air streams as it allows for capture, recovery, and reuse of those VOCs/HAPS. Integration of activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorbent with microwave regeneration provides promise as a new adsorption/ regeneration technology. This research investigates the feasibility of using microwaves to regenerate ACFC as part of a process for capture and recovery of organic vapors from gas streams. A bench-scale fixed-bed microwave-swing adsorption (MSA) system was built and tested for adsorption of water vapor, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) from an airstream and then recovery of those vapors with microwave regeneration. The electromagnetic heating behavior of dry and vapor-saturated ACFC was also characterized. The MSA system successfully adsorbed organic vapors from the airstreams, allowed for rapid regeneration of the ACFC cartridge, and recovered the water and organic vapors as liquids.

  16. Human movement activity classification approaches that use wearable sensors and mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaghyan, Sahak; Sarukhanyan, Hakob; Akopian, David

    2013-03-01

    Cell phones and other mobile devices become part of human culture and change activity and lifestyle patterns. Mobile phone technology continuously evolves and incorporates more and more sensors for enabling advanced applications. Latest generations of smart phones incorporate GPS and WLAN location finding modules, vision cameras, microphones, accelerometers, temperature sensors etc. The availability of these sensors in mass-market communication devices creates exciting new opportunities for data mining applications. Particularly healthcare applications exploiting build-in sensors are very promising. This paper reviews different approaches of human activity recognition.

  17. Microwave Ovens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emitting Products Radiation-Emitting Products and Procedures Home, Business, and Entertainment Products Microwave ... for Consumers Laws, Regulations & Standards Industry Guidance Other Resources Description Microwave ...

  18. Self-Activated Transparent All-Graphene Gas Sensor with Endurance to Humidity and Mechanical Bending.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Hoo; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Yong-Jin; Shim, Yeong-Seok; Kim, Soo Young; Hong, Byung Hee; Jang, Ho Won

    2015-10-27

    Graphene is considered as one of leading candidates for gas sensor applications in the Internet of Things owing to its unique properties such as high sensitivity to gas adsorption, transparency, and flexibility. We present self-activated operation of all graphene gas sensors with high transparency and flexibility. The all-graphene gas sensors which consist of graphene for both sensor electrodes and active sensing area exhibit highly sensitive, selective, and reversible responses to NO2 without external heating. The sensors show reliable operation under high humidity conditions and bending strain. In addition to these remarkable device performances, the significantly facile fabrication process enlarges the potential of the all-graphene gas sensors for use in the Internet of Things and wearable electronics.

  19. Microwave-assisted digestion using nitric acid for heavy metals and sulfated ash testing in active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    PubMed

    Pluhácek, T; Hanzal, J; Hendrych, J; Milde, D

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring of inorganic impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients plays a crucial role in the quality control of the pharmaceutical production. The heavy metals and residue on ignition/sulfated ash methods employing microwave-assisted digestion with concentrated nitric acid have been demonstrated as alternatives to inappropriate compendial methods recommended in United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.). The recoveries using the heavy metals method ranged between 89% and 122% for nearly all USP and Ph. Eur. restricted elements as well as the recoveries of sodium sulfate spikes were around 100% in all tested matrices. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion method allowed simultaneous decomposition of 15 different active pharmaceutical ingredients with sample weigh up to 1 g. The heavy metals and sulfated ash procedures were successfully applied to the determination of heavy metals and residue on ignition/sulfated ash content in mycophenolate mofetil, nicergoline and silymarin.

  20. Microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of optically active poly (ester-imide)s incorporating L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Zahmatkesh, Saeed; Hajipour, Abdol R

    2010-04-01

    Pyromellitic dianhydride (1) was reacted with L-alanine (2) to result [N,N'-(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L-alanine diacid] (3). This compound (3) was converted to N,N'-(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L-alanine diacyl chloride (4) by reaction with thionyl chloride. The microwave-assisted polycondensation of this diacyl chloride (4) with polyethyleneglycol-diol (PEG-200) and/or three synthetic aromatic diols furnish a series of new PEIs and Co-PEIs in a laboratory microwave oven (Milestone). The resulting polymers and copolymers have inherent viscosities in the range of 0.31-0.53 dl g(-1). These polymers are optically active, thermally stable and soluble in polar aprotic solvents such as DMF, DMSO, NMP, DMAc, and sulfuric acid. All of the above polymers were fully characterized by IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, elemental analyses, specific rotation and thermal analyses. Some structural characterizations and physical properties of these optically active PEIs and Co-PEIs have been reported.

  1. P-doped TiO2 with superior visible-light activity prepared by rapid microwave hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jinfen; Lu, Pan; Kang, Mei; Deng, Kunfa; Yao, Binghua; Yu, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Qian

    2014-11-01

    Phosphorous-doped anatase TiO2 powders (P-TiO2) were prepared by rapid microwave hydrothermal method. The resulting materials were characterized by XRD, SEM, XPS, DRS and N2 adsorption. P-doping decreased the band gap and enlarged the surface area of P-doped samples than that of undoped TiO2 samples. Therefore, the photocatalytic degradation of methyl blue (MB) and tetracycline hydrochloride (Tc) experiments showed that the P-TiO2 catalysts, especially the two-steps-controlling products P-TiO2-2, exhibited higher degradation efficiency than the undoped TiO2 and commercial P25 under visible-light irradiation. Hydroxyl radicals (rad OH) have been confirmed to be the active species during the photocatalytic oxidation reaction. The microwave hydrothermal method confirms to be very suitable for the synthesis of superior visible-light activity P-doped samples.

  2. Active microwave measurements of sea ice under fall conditions: The RADARSAT/FIREX fall experiment. [in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, R. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Moore, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    A series of measurements of the active microwave properties of sea ice under fall growing conditions was conducted. Ice in the inland waters of Mould Bay, Crozier Channel, and intrepid inlet and ice in the Arctic Ocean near Hardinge Bay was investigated. Active microwave data were acquired using a helicopter borne scatterometer. Results show that multiyear ice frozen in grey or first year ice is easily detected under cold fall conditions. Multiyear ice returns were dynamic due to response to two of its scene constituents. Floe boundaries between thick and thin ice are well defined. Multiyear pressure ridge returns are similar in level to background ice returns. Backscatter from homogeneous first year ice is seen to be primarily due to surface scattering. Operation at 9.6 GHz is more sensitive to the detailed changes in scene roughness, while operation at 5.6 GHz seems to track roughness changes less ably.

  3. Analysis of soil moisture retrieval from airborne passive/active L-band sensor measurements in SMAPVEX 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Song, Hongting; Tan, Lei; Li, Yinan; Li, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Soil moisture is a key component in the hydrologic cycle and climate system. It is an important input parameter for many hydrologic and meteorological models. NASA'S upcoming Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, to be launched in October 2014, will address this need by utilizing passive and active microwave measurements at L-band, which will penetrate moderately dense canopies. In preparation for the SMAP mission, the Soil Moisture Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) was conducted from 6 June to 17 July 2012 in the Carment-Elm Creek area in Manitoba, Canada. Over a period of six weeks diverse land cover types ranging from agriculture over pasture and grassland to forested sites were re-visited several times a week. The Passive/Active L-band Sensor (PALS) provides radiometer products, vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures, and radar products. Over the past two decades, successful estimation of soil moisture has been accomplished using passive and active L-band data. However, remaining uncertainties related to surface roughness and the absorption, scattering, and emission by vegetation must be resolved before soil moisture retrieval algorithms can be applied with known and acceptable accuracy using satellite observations. This work focuses on analyzing the Passive/Active L-band Sensor observations of sites covered during SMAPVEX12, investigating the observed data, parameterizing vegetation covered surface model, modeling inversion algorithm and analyzing observed soil moisture changes over the time period of six weeks. The data and analysis results from this study are aimed at increasing the accuracy and range of validity of SMAP soil moisture retrievals via enhancing the accuracy for soil moisture retrieval.

  4. Pulse activity of populations of cortical neurons under microwave exposures of different intensity.

    PubMed

    Chizhenkova, R A

    2004-06-01

    In rabbit pulse flows of populations of cortical neurons were investigated prior to, during, and after 1-min microwave irradiation (wavelength 37.5 cm, power density 0.2-40 mW/cm2). It was found that the microwave irradiation produced shifts in mean values of interspike intervals and in the number of spike bursts. Peculiarities of rearrangements of pulse flows of cortical neurons were conditioned by an intensity of exposures.

  5. Fault tolerant photodiode and photogate active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Cory; Chapman, Glenn H.; La Haye, Michelle L.; Djaja, Sunjaya; Cheung, Desmond Y. H.; Lin, Henry; Loo, Edward; Audet, Yves R.

    2005-03-01

    As the pixel counts of digital imagers increase, the challenge of maintaining high yields and ensuring reliability over an imager"s lifetime increases. A fault tolerant active pixel sensor (APS) has been designed to meet this need by splitting an APS in half and operating both halves in parallel. The fault tolerant APS will perform normally in the no defect case and will produce approximately half the output for single defects. Thus, the entire signal can be recovered by multiplying the output by two. Since pixels containing multiple defects are rare, this design can correct for most defects allowing for higher production yields. Fault tolerant photodiode and photogate APS" were fabricated in 0.18-micron technology. Testing showed that the photodiode APS could correct for optically induced and electrically induced faults, within experimental error. The photogate APS was only tested for optically induced defects and also corrects for defects within experimental error. Further testing showed that the sensitivity of fault tolerant pixels was approximately 2-3 times more sensitive than the normal pixels. HSpice simulations of the fault tolerant APS circuit did not show increased sensitivity, however an equivalent normal APS circuit with twice width readout and row transistors was 1.90 times more sensitive than a normal pixel.

  6. Confronting Passive and Active Sensors with Non-Gaussian Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo.; Garcia-Gago, Jesús.; Gomez-Lahoz, Javier.; González-Aguilera, Diego.

    2014-01-01

    This paper has two motivations: firstly, to compare the Digital Surface Models (DSM) derived by passive (digital camera) and by active (terrestrial laser scanner) remote sensing systems when applied to specific architectural objects, and secondly, to test how well the Gaussian classic statistics, with its Least Squares principle, adapts to data sets where asymmetrical gross errors may appear and whether this approach should be changed for a non-parametric one. The field of geomatic technology automation is immersed in a high demanding competition in which any innovation by one of the contenders immediately challenges the opponents to propose a better improvement. Nowadays, we seem to be witnessing an improvement of terrestrial photogrammetry and its integration with computer vision to overcome the performance limitations of laser scanning methods. Through this contribution some of the issues of this “technological race” are examined from the point of view of photogrammetry. A new software is introduced and an experimental test is designed, performed and assessed to try to cast some light on this thrilling match. For the case considered in this study, the results show good agreement between both sensors, despite considerable asymmetry. This asymmetry suggests that the standard Normal parameters are not adequate to assess this type of data, especially when accuracy is of importance. In this case, standard deviation fails to provide a good estimation of the results, whereas the results obtained for the Median Absolute Deviation and for the Biweight Midvariance are more appropriate measures. PMID:25196104

  7. Soil Moisture Retrieval Through Changing Corn Using Active/Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. E.; Joseph, A.; DeLannoy, G.; Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Kim, E.; Houser, P.; Gish, T.

    2003-01-01

    An extensive field experiment was conducted from May-early October, 2002 at the heavily instrumented USDA-ARS (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service) OPE3 (Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement) test site in Beltsville, MD to acquire data needed to address active/passive microwave algorithm, modeling, and ground validation issues for accurate soil moisture retrieval. During the experiment, a tower-mounted 1.4 GHz radiometer (Lrad) and a truck-mounted dual-frequency (1.6 and 4.75 GHz) radar system were deployed on the northern edge of the site. The soil in this portion of the field is a sandy loam (silt 23.5%, sand 60.3%, clay 16.1%) with a measured bulk density of 1.253 g/cu cm. Vegetation cover in the experiment consisted of a corn crop which was measured from just after planting on April 17, 2002 through senescence and harvesting on October 2. Although drought conditions prevailed during the summer, the corn yield was near average, with peak biomass reached in late July.

  8. Monitoring of Surface Wetness from active microwave satellite data in permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, A.; Boike, J.; Sabel, D.; Wagner, W.

    2008-12-01

    Soil moisture content impacts land surface energy dynamics, regional runoff dynamics and vegetation productivity. Coarse to medium resolution data from active microwave instruments onboard satellites which are currently in space are able to provide such valuable information for operational use. Scatterometer (ERS, Metop ASCAT) can be applied on regional to global scale. ScanSAR systems are suitable for regional to continental monitoring and for the investigation of scaling issues. The original approach which was developed for scatterometer data (Wagner et al. 1999) has been transferred to ScanSAR data within the framework of the ESA Tiger innovator project SHARE (www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/radar/share). Data from the ENVISAT ASAR instrument operating in Global Mode (1km resolution) have not only been used over the southern African subcontinent, but also over entire Australia and within other regional studies. Current research focuses on the validation and investigation of scaling issues of satellite derived surface wetness in permafrost environment. A comparison to soil moisture measurements has been carried out over the Lena- Delta, Russia. Measurements are from a site on Samoylov Island, which is characterized by polygonal tundra. Best aggreement of the 1km resolution satellit data was found for polygon centres, with a Pearson correlation of 0.72. Timeseries analyses from this and other sites in Siberia will be presented.

  9. Impact of active ingredients on the swelling properties of orally disintegrating tablets prepared by microwave treatment.

    PubMed

    Sano, Syusuke; Iwao, Yasunori; Kimura, Susumu; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2014-07-01

    The impact of different active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) loading on the properties of orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) prepared according to our previously reported microwave (MW) treatment process was evaluated using famotidine (FAM), acetaminophen (AAP), and ibuprofen (IBU). None of the APIs interrupted the tablet swelling during the MW treatment and the tablet hardness were improved by more than 20 N. MW treatment, however, led to a significant increase in the disintegration time of the ODTs containing IBU, but it had no impact on that of the ODTs containing FAM or AAP. This increased disintegration time of the ODTs containing IBU was attributed to the relatively low melting point of IBU (Tm=76 °C), with the IBU particles melting during the MW treatment to form agglomerates, which interrupted the penetration of water into the tablets and delayed their disintegration. The effects of the MW treatment on the chemical stability and dissolution properties of ODTs were also evaluated. The results revealed that MW treatment did not promote the degradations of FAM and AAP or delay their release from the ODTs, while dissolution of the ODTs containing IBU delayed by MW treatment. Based on these results, the MW method would be applicable to the preparation of ODTs containing APIs with melting points higher than 110 °C.

  10. Preparation of Granular Red Mud Adsorbent using Different Binders by Microwave Pore - Making and Activation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thiquynhxuan; Wang, Hanrui; Ju, Shaohua; Peng, Jinhui; Zhou, Liexing; Wang, Shixing; Yin, Shaohua; Liu, Chao

    2016-04-01

    In this work, microwave energy is used for preparing a granular red mud (GRM) adsorbent made of red mud with different binders, such as starch, sodium silicate and cement. The effects of the preparation parameters, such as binder type, binder addition ratio, microwave heating temperature, microwave power and holding time, on the absorption property of GRM are investigated. The BET surface area, strength, pore structure, XRD and SEM of the GRM absorbent are analyzed. The results show that the microwave roasting has a good effect on pore-making of GRM, especially when using organic binder. Both the BET surface area and the strength of GRM obtained by microwave heating are significantly higher than that by conventional heating. The optimum conditions are obtained as follows: 6:100 (w/w) of starch to red mud ratio, microwave roasting with a power of 2.6 kW at 500℃ for holding time of 30 min. The BET surface area, pore volume and average pore diameter of GRM prepared at the optimum conditions are 15.58 m2/g, 0.0337 cm3/g and 3.1693 A0, respectively.

  11. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  12. ALTERNATIVE ROUTES FOR CATALYST PREPARATION: USE OF ULTRASOUND AND MICROWAVE IRRADIATION FOR THE PREPARATION OF VANADIUM PHOSPHORUS OXIDE CATALYST AND THEIR ACTIVITY FOR HYDROCARBON OXIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vanadium phosphorus oxide (VPO) has been prepared using ultrasound and microwave irradiation methods and compared with the catalyst prepared by conventional method for both the phase composition and activity for hydrocarbon oxidation. It is found that ultrasound irradiation metho...

  13. Microwave radiation absorption: behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, J A

    1991-07-01

    The literature contains much evidence that absorption of microwave energy will lead to behavioral changes in man and laboratory animals. The changes include simple perturbations or outright stoppage of ongoing behavior. On one extreme, intense microwave absorption can result in seizures followed by death. On the other extreme, man and animals can hear microwave pulses at very low rates of absorption. Under certain conditions of exposure, animals will avoid microwaves, while under other conditions, they will actively work to obtain warmth produced by microwaves. Some research has shown behavioral effects during chronic exposure to low-level microwaves. The specific absorption rates that produce behavioral effects seem to depend on microwave frequency, but controversy exists over thresholds and mechanism of action. In all cases, however, the behavioral disruptions cease when chronic microwave exposure is terminated. Thermal changes in man and animals during microwave exposure appear to account for all reported behavioral effects.

  14. A model of the 1.6 GHz scatterometer. [performance of airborne scatterometer used as microwave remote sensor of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The performance was studied of the 1.6 GHz airborne scatterometer system which is used as one of several Johnson Space Center (JSC) microwave remote sensors to detect moisture content of soil. The system is analyzed with respect to its antenna pattern and coupling, the signal flow in the receiver data channels, and the errors in the signal outputs. The operational principle and the sensitivity of the system, as well as data handling are also described. The finite cross-polarized gains of all four 1.6 GHz scatterometer antennae are found to have profound influence on the cross-polarized backscattered signal returns. If these signals are not analyzed properly, large errors could result in the estimate of the cross-polarized coefficient. It is also found necessary to make corrections to the variations of the aircraft parameters during data reduction in order to minimize the error in the coefficient estimate. Finally, a few recommendations are made to improve the overall performance of the scatterometer system.

  15. Satellite observations of a polar low over the Norwegian Sea by Special Sensor Microwave Imager, Geosat, and TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claud, Chantal; Mognard, Nelly M.; Katsaros, Kristina B.; Chedin, Alain; Scott, Noelle A.

    1993-01-01

    Many polar lows are generated at the boundary between sea ice and the ocean, in regions of large temperature gradients, where in situ observations are rare or nonexistent. Since satellite observations are frequent in high-latitude regions, they can be used to detect polar lows and track their propagation and evolution. The Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) providing estimates of surface wind speed, integrated cloud liquid water content, water vapor content, and precipitation size ice-scattering signal over the ocean; the Geosat radar altimeter measuring surface wind speed and significant wave height; and the TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) allowing the determination of temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere have been used in synergy for a specific case which occurred in the Norwegian Sea on January, 23-24 1988. All three instruments show sharp atmospheric gradients associated with the propagation of this low across the ocean, which permit the detection of the polar low at a very early stage and tracking it during its development, propagation, and decay. The wind speed gradients are measured with good qualitative agreement between the altimeter and SSM/I. TOVS retrieved fields prior to the formation of the low confirm the presence of an upper level trough, while during the mature phase baroclinicity can be observed in the 1000-500 hPa geopotential thicknesses.

  16. Characterization of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors for particle detection: Beam test of the four-sensors RAPS03 stacked system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passeri, Daniele; Servoli, Leonello; Biagetti, Daniele; Meroli, Stefano

    2010-05-01

    In this work, in order to check the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) detectors for vertexing/tracking applications, four stacked CMOS APS sensors featuring 256×256 pixels with 10×10 μm 2 size have been tested at the INFN Beam Test Facility (BFT), Frascati (Rome). For this purpose, a dedicated mechanical and electrical set-up has been devised and implemented, allowing for the simultaneous read-out of four sensors arranged in a stacked structure. A compact and fast system (up to 64 MHz read-out clock) based on external ADCs and FPGA allows for the PC communication through USB2.0. Preliminary results in terms of track reconstructions of electrons of different energies (up to 496 MeV) are presented. This work has been carried out within the framework of the SHARPS project, supported by INFN.

  17. Microwave systems analysis, solar power satellite. [alignment of the antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Various alternative active approaches to achieving aand maintaining flatness for the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) were studied. A baseline active alignment scheme was developed which includes subarray attachment mechanisms, height and tilting adjustments, service corridors, a rotating laser beam reference system, monopulse pointing techniques, and the design of a beam-centering photoconductive sensor.

  18. Microwave accelerated synthesis of zinc oxide nanoplates and their enhanced photocatalytic activity under UV and solar illuminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anas, S.; Rahul, S.; Babitha, K. B.; Mangalaraja, R. V.; Ananthakumar, S.

    2015-11-01

    Photoactive zinc based nanoplates were developed through a rapid microwave synthesis. A low temperature thermolysis reaction in a surfactant medium was initially performed for producing microwave active zinc based polar precursors. Using these precursors, the zinc oxide nanopowder having platelet morphologies were prepared. The nanoplatelets exhibited random growth with non-polar (1 0 1) surface as the major growth plane. The structural and functional features of the resultant zinc oxide samples were monitored using XRD, FTIR, TEM and PL. The photocatalytic activities of the samples were investigated through the standard photoreduction kinetics using the methylene blue dye. The catalytic efficiencies of the samples were checked both under UV and sunlight. A comparative study was also performed with the standard TiO2 sample. The analyses revealed that the microwave derived zinc oxide have higher catalytic efficiency, than the standard titania samples, both under UV and sunlight illuminations. The unique nature of the zinc oxide non-polar surfaces can be attributed due to the presence of more active two dimensional open surfaces and the higher content of oxygen defect concentrations.

  19. Fabrication of Feedhorn-Coupled Transition Edge Sensor Arrays for Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, K. L.; Ali, A.; Appel, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Chang, M. P.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Costen, N.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Hu, R.; Marriage, T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Characterization of the minute cosmic microwave background polarization signature requires multi-frequency, high-throughput precision instrument systems. We have previously described the detector fabrication of a 40 GHz focal plane and now describe the fabrication of detector modules for measurement of the CMB at 90 GHz. The 90 GHz detectors are a scaled version of the 40 GHz architecture where, due to smaller size detectors, we have implemented a modular (wafer level) rather than the chip-level architecture. The new fabrication process utilizes the same design rules with the added challenge of increased wiring density to the 74 TES's as well as a new wafer level hybridization procedure. The hexagonally shaped modules are tile-able, and as such can be used to form the large focal planes required for a space-based CMB polarimeter. The detectors described here will be deployed in two focal planes with seven modules each in the Johns Hopkins University led ground-based Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) telescope.

  20. Fabrication of Feedhorn-Coupled Transition Edge Sensor Arrays for Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denis, Kevin L.; Aamir, A.; Bennett, C. L.; Chang, M. P.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Costen, N.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Hu, R.; Marriage, T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.; Wollack, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the minute cosmic microwave background polarization signature requires multi-frequency high-throughput precision instrument systems. We have previously described the detector fabrication of a 40 GHz focal plane and now describe the fabrication of the detector modules for measurement of the CMB at 90GHz. The 74-TES based bolometers in each module are coupled to a niobium based planar orthomode transducer with integrated band defining filters implemented in microstrip transmission line. A single crystal silicon dielectric substrate serves as microstrip dielectric and as a thermal link between the membrane isolated MoAu TES operating at 150mK and the heat bath. A short silicon leg between the heat bath and the TES bolometer is designed for ballistic phonon transport and provides improved process control and uniformity of thermal conductance in the presence of phonon scattering on roughened surfaces. Micro-machined structures are used to realize the orthomode transducer backshort, provide out of band signal rejection, and a silicon photonic choke for feedhorn coupling are described. The backshort, choke wafer, and detector wafer are indium bump bonded to create a single 37-element dual-polarization detector module. Fourteen such hexagonally shaped modules each 90 mm in size comprise two focal planes. These, along with the recently delivered 40GHz focal plane, will survey a large fraction of the sky as part of the Johns Hopkins University led ground based CLASS (Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor) telescope.

  1. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The AgRISTARS Soil Moisture Project has made significant progress in the quantification of microwave sensor capabilities for soil moisture remote sensing. The 21-cm wavelength has been verified to be the best single channel for radiometric observations of soil moisture. It has also been found that other remote sensing approaches used in conjunction with L-band passive data are more successful than multiple wavelength microwave radiometry in this application. AgRISTARS studies have also improved current understanding of noise factors affecting the interpretability of microwave emission data. The absorption of soil emission by vegetation has been quantified, although this effect is less important than absorption effects for microwave radiometry.

  2. Upregulation of HIF-1α via activation of ERK and PI3K pathway mediated protective response to microwave-induced mitochondrial injury in neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Yang, Yue-Feng; Gao, Ya-Bing; Wang, Shui-Ming; Wang, Li-Feng; Zuo, Hong-Yan; Dong, Ji; Xu, Xin-Ping; Su, Zhen-Tao; Zhou, Hong-Mei; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-12-01

    Microwave-induced learning and memory deficits in animal models have been gaining attention in recent years, largely because of increasing public concerns on growing environmental influences. The data from our group and others have showed that the injury of mitochondria, the major source of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in primary neurons, could be detected in the neuron cells of microwave-exposed rats. In this study, we provided some insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind mitochondrial injury in PC12 cell-derived neuron-like cells. PC12 cell-derived neuron-like cells were exposed to 30 mW/cm(2) microwave for 5 min, and damages of mitochondrial ultrastructure could be observed by using transmission electron microscopy. Impairments of mitochondrial function, indicated by decrease of ATP content, reduction of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activities, decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, could be detected. We also found that hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α), a key regulator responsible for hypoxic response of the mammalian cells, was upregulated in microwave-exposed neuron-like cells. Furthermore, HIF-1α overexpression protected mitochondria from injury by increasing the ATP contents and MMP, while HIF-1α silence promoted microwave-induced mitochondrial damage. Finally, we demonstrated that both ERK and PI3K signaling activation are required in microwave-induced HIF-1α activation and protective response. In conclusion, we elucidated a regulatory connection between impairments of mitochondrial function and HIF-1α activation in microwave-exposed neuron-like cells. By modulating mitochondrial function and protecting neuron-like cells against microwave-induced mitochondrial injury, HIF-1α represents a promising therapeutic target for microwave radiation injury.

  3. Ice Thickness Estimation of Thin Sea Ice Using Active Microwave Sensor Data Obtained at Different Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brath, M.; Kern, S.; Stammer, D.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new approach to estimate thin sea ice thickness based on multi-frequency and multi-angle RADAR backscatter measurements. The method is based on the inversion of a first order backscattering model using Monte Carlo methods without any need for additional measured data than the measured radar cross section (RCS) except an optional guess of the surface temperature. The method is applied to RCS data obtained with the Multi3Scat during August and September 2007 over the Arctic Ocean. The Multi3Scat is a helicopter-borne scatterometer of the University of Hamburg, which simultaneously measures the like-polarization RCS at five different frequencies between 1 GHz and 15 GHz (in frequency bands L, S, C, X, and Ku) at incidence angles of 20° to 65°. A video and an infrared camera simultaneously sense the surface in the scatterometer's footprint for additional, independent information. The uncertainty of the thin sea ice thickness estimates obtained with our method is about 5 cm when combining two or more frequencies but only about 10 cm when using just one frequency. Thin sea ice thickness values obtained with our method are of the same order of independent in-situ observations.

  4. AQUARIUS: A Passive/Active Microwave Sensor to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity Globally from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David; Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Colomb, F. Raul; Chao, Yi

    2004-01-01

    Salinity is important for understanding ocean dynamics, energy exchange with the atmosphere and the global water cycle. Existing data is limited and much of the ocean has never even been sampled. Sea surface salinity can be measured remotely by satellite and a three year mission for this purpose called AquariudSAC-D has recently been selected by NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program. The objective is to map the salinity field globally with a spatial resolution of 100 km and a monthly average accuracy of 0.2 psu. The mission, scheduled for launch in 2008, is a partnership of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) and the Argentine Comision National de Actividades Epaciales (CONAE).

  5. Fitness activity classification by using multiclass support vector machines on head-worn sensors.

    PubMed

    Loh, Darrell; Lee, Tien J; Zihajehzadeh, Shaghayegh; Hoskinson, Reynald; Park, Edward J

    2015-08-01

    Fitness activity classification on wearable devices can provide activity-specific information and generate more accurate performance metrics. Recently, optical head-mounted displays (OHMD) like Google Glass, Sony SmartEyeglass and Recon Jet have emerged. This paper presents a novel method to classify fitness activities using head-worn accelerometer, barometric pressure sensor and GPS, with comparisons to other common mounting locations on the body. Using multiclass SVM on head-worn sensors, we obtained an average F-score of 96.66% for classifying standing, walking, running, ascending/descending stairs and cycling. The best sensor location combinations were found to be on the ankle plus another upper body location. Using three or more sensors did not show a notable improvement over the best two-sensor combinations.

  6. Microwave and millimeter-wave systems for wall penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, David D., Jr.; Currie, Nicholas C.

    1998-07-01

    The need for through-the-wall surveillance sensors has existed for many years. Recent advances in microwave and millimeter-wave (MMW) technologies provide new applications for law enforcement use. These applications include the potential to conduct surveillance through walls and the ability to detect the presence of living persons behind doors or other barriers. Covert surveillance and personnel detection are of high interest to both the Department of Defense in support of Small Unit Operations and the Justice Department for civilian law enforcement applications. Microwave sensors are under development that can detect the presence of persons (and even weapons) behind walls and track moving persons behind walls. MMW sensors are under development which can provide pseudo-images of persons behind the walls including radiometric sensors at 95 GHz, active 95 GHz real aperture radars, and heartbeat detection radars. Radiometric sensors include 2D FPA systems, 1D FPA, scanned systems, and single element scanned sensors. Active FPA radars include illuminated radiometric systems and coherent radar systems. Real aperture MMW radar systems include raster scanned and non-scanned (hand-held) sensors.

  7. Radiation tolerance of CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors with self-biased pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveaux, M.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Besson, A.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Dorokhov, M.; Dritsa, C.; Dulinski, W.; Fröhlich, I.; Goffe, M.; Grandjean, D.; Heini, S.; Himmi, A.; Hu, C.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Müntz, C.; Shabetai, A.; Stroth, J.; Szelezniak, M.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.

    2010-12-01

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) are proposed as a technology for various vertex detectors in nuclear and particle physics. We discuss the mechanisms of ionizing radiation damage on MAPS hosting the dead time free, so-called self bias pixel. Moreover, we introduce radiation hardened sensor designs which allow operating detectors after exposing them to irradiation doses above 1 Mrad.

  8. Source analysis of spaceborne microwave radiometer interference over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Li; Zhang, Sibo

    2016-03-01

    Satellite microwave thermal emissions mixed with signals from active sensors are referred to as radiofrequency interference (RFI). Based on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) observations from June 1 to 16, 2011, RFI over Europe was identified and analyzed using the modified principal component analysis algorithm in this paper. The X band AMSR-E measurements in England and Italy are mostly affected by the stable, persistent, active microwave transmitters on the surface, while the RFI source of other European countries is the interference of the reflected geostationary TV satellite downlink signals to the measurements of spaceborne microwave radiometers. The locations and intensities of the RFI induced by the geostationary TV and communication satellites changed with time within the observed period. The observations of spaceborne microwave radiometers in ascending portions of orbits are usually interfered with over European land, while no RFI was detected in descending passes. The RFI locations and intensities from the reflection of downlink radiation are highly dependent upon the relative geometry between the geostationary satellite and the measuring passive sensor. Only these fields of view of a spaceborne instrument whose scan azimuths are close to the azimuth relative to the geostationary satellite are likely to be affected by RFI.

  9. The heat-shock factor is not activated in mammalian cells exposed to cellular phone frequency microwaves.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Andrei; Moros, Eduardo G; Davidson, Teri; Bradbury, Matt; Straube, William; Roti Roti, Joseph

    2005-08-01

    There has been considerable interest in the biological effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation, given the explosive growth of cellular telephone use, with the possible induction of malignancy being a significant concern. Thus the determination of whether nonthermal effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation contribute to the process leading to malignancy is an important task. One proposed pathway to malignancy involves the induction of the stress response by exposures to cell phone frequency microwaves. The first step in the induction of the stress response is the activation of the DNA-binding activity of the specific transcription factor involved in this response, the heat-shock factor (HSF). The DNA-binding activity of HSF in hamster, mouse and human cells was determined after acute and continuous exposures to frequency domain multiple access (FDMA)- or code domain multiple access (CDMA)-modulated microwaves at low (0.6 W/kg) or high (approximately 5 W/kg) SARs at frequencies used for mobile communication. The DNA-binding activity of HSF was monitored using a gel shift assay; the calibration of this assay indicated that an increase of approximately 10% in the activation of the DNA-binding activity of HSF after a 1 degrees C increase in temperature could be detected. We failed to detect any increase in the DNA-binding ability of HSF in cultured mammalian cells as a consequence of any exposure tested, within the sensitivity of our assay. Our results do not support the notion that the stress response is activated as a consequence of exposure to microwaves of frequencies associated with mobile communication devices.

  10. Surface effects on the microwave backscatter and emission of snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Stiles, W. H.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements were performed with active and passive microwave sensors for both dry and wet snow conditions. A layer of Rayleigh scatterers with irregular surface boundaries is found to be a reasonable model for interpreting passive and active measurements in X- and Ku-bands. It was found that roughness had a significant effect on both backscatter and emission from wet snow; however, only a small effect was noted for dry snow.

  11. An intercomparison of available soil moisture estimates from thermal-infrared and passive microwave remote sensing and land-surface modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remotely-sensed soil moisture studies have mainly focused on retrievals using active and passive microwave (MW) sensors whose measurements provided a direct relationship to soil moisture (SM). MW sensors present obvious advantages such as the ability to retrieve through non-precipitating cloud cover...

  12. A Novel Wearable Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition Approach Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Hiram; Martínez-Villaseñor, María de Lourdes; Miralles-Pechuán, Luis

    2016-07-05

    Human activity recognition has gained more interest in several research communities given that understanding user activities and behavior helps to deliver proactive and personalized services. There are many examples of health systems improved by human activity recognition. Nevertheless, the human activity recognition classification process is not an easy task. Different types of noise in wearable sensors data frequently hamper the human activity recognition classification process. In order to develop a successful activity recognition system, it is necessary to use stable and robust machine learning techniques capable of dealing with noisy data. In this paper, we presented the artificial hydrocarbon networks (AHN) technique to the human activity recognition community. Our artificial hydrocarbon networks novel approach is suitable for physical activity recognition, noise tolerance of corrupted data sensors and robust in terms of different issues on data sensors. We proved that the AHN classifier is very competitive for physical activity recognition and is very robust in comparison with other well-known machine learning methods.

  13. Optimization of preparation of activated carbon from cotton stalk by microwave assisted phosphoric acid-chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hui; Zhang, Genlin; Xu, Xiaolin; Tao, Guanghui; Dai, Jiulei

    2010-10-15

    The preparation of activated carbon (AC) from cotton stalk was investigated in this paper. Orthogonal array experimental design method was used to optimize the preparation of AC using microwave assisted phosphoric acid. Optimized parameters were radiation power of 400 W, radiation time of 8 min, concentration of phosphoric acid of 50% by volume and impregnation time of 20 h, respectively. The surface characteristics of the AC prepared under optimized condition were examined by pore structure analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Pore structure analysis shows that mecropores constitute more of the porosity of the prepared AC. Compared to cotton stalk, different functionalities and morphology on the carbon surfaces were formed in the prepared process. The adsorption capacity of the AC was also investigated by removing methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution. The equilibrium data of the adsorption was well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity of MB on the prepared AC is 245.70 mg/g. The adsorption process follows the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  14. ESAM: Endocrine inspired Sensor Activation Mechanism for multi-target tracking in WSNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adil Mahdi, Omar; Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Abdul; Idris, Mohd Yamani Idna; Znaid, Ammar Abu; Khan, Suleman; Al-Mayouf, Yusor Rafid Bahar

    2016-10-01

    Target tracking is a significant application of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in which deployment of self-organizing and energy efficient algorithms is required. The tracking accuracy increases as more sensor nodes are activated around the target but more energy is consumed. Thus, in this study, we focus on limiting the number of sensors by forming an ad-hoc network that operates autonomously. This will reduce the energy consumption and prolong the sensor network lifetime. In this paper, we propose a fully distributed algorithm, an Endocrine inspired Sensor Activation Mechanism for multi target-tracking (ESAM) which reflecting the properties of real life sensor activation system based on the information circulating principle in the endocrine system of the human body. Sensor nodes in our network are secreting different hormones according to certain rules. The hormone level enables the nodes to regulate an efficient sleep and wake up cycle of nodes to reduce the energy consumption. It is evident from the simulation results that the proposed ESAM in autonomous sensor network exhibits a stable performance without the need of commands from a central controller. Moreover, the proposed ESAM generates more efficient and persistent results as compared to other algorithms for tracking an invading object.

  15. Inductive displacement sensors with a notch filter for an active magnetic bearing system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Seng-Chi; Le, Dinh-Kha; Nguyen, Van-Sum

    2014-07-15

    Active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems support rotating shafts without any physical contact, using electromagnetic forces. Each radial AMB uses two pairs of electromagnets at opposite sides of the rotor. This allows the rotor to float in the air gap, and the machine to operate without frictional losses. In active magnetic suspension, displacement sensors are necessary to detect the radial and axial movement of the suspended object. In a high-speed rotating machine equipped with an AMB, the rotor bending modes may be limited to the operating range. The natural frequencies of the rotor can cause instability. Thus, notch filters are a useful circuit for stabilizing the system. In addition, commercial displacement sensors are sometimes not suitable for AMB design, and cannot filter the noise caused by the natural frequencies of rotor. Hence, implementing displacement sensors based on the AMB structure is necessary to eliminate noises caused by natural frequency disturbances. The displacement sensor must be highly sensitive in the desired working range, and also exhibit a low interference noise, high stability, and low cost. In this study, we used the differential inductive sensor head and lock-in amplifier for synchronous demodulation. In addition, an active low-pass filter and a notch filter were used to eliminate disturbances, which caused by natural frequencies. As a consequence, the inductive displacement sensor achieved satisfactory linearity, high sensitivity, and disturbance elimination. This sensor can be easily produced for AMB applications. A prototype of these displacement sensors was built and tested.

  16. Inductive Displacement Sensors with a Notch Filter for an Active Magnetic Bearing System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Seng-Chi; Le, Dinh-Kha; Nguyen, Van-Sum

    2014-01-01

    Active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems support rotating shafts without any physical contact, using electromagnetic forces. Each radial AMB uses two pairs of electromagnets at opposite sides of the rotor. This allows the rotor to float in the air gap, and the machine to operate without frictional losses. In active magnetic suspension, displacement sensors are necessary to detect the radial and axial movement of the suspended object. In a high-speed rotating machine equipped with an AMB, the rotor bending modes may be limited to the operating range. The natural frequencies of the rotor can cause instability. Thus, notch filters are a useful circuit for stabilizing the system. In addition, commercial displacement sensors are sometimes not suitable for AMB design, and cannot filter the noise caused by the natural frequencies of rotor. Hence, implementing displacement sensors based on the AMB structure is necessary to eliminate noises caused by natural frequency disturbances. The displacement sensor must be highly sensitive in the desired working range, and also exhibit a low interference noise, high stability, and low cost. In this study, we used the differential inductive sensor head and lock-in amplifier for synchronous demodulation. In addition, an active low-pass filter and a notch filter were used to eliminate disturbances, which caused by natural frequencies. As a consequence, the inductive displacement sensor achieved satisfactory linearity, high sensitivity, and disturbance elimination. This sensor can be easily produced for AMB applications. A prototype of these displacement sensors was built and tested. PMID:25029281

  17. Microwave ECR Ion Thruster Development Activities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Outer solar system missions will have propulsion system lifetime requirements well in excess of that which can be satisfied by ion thrusters utilizing conventional hollow cathode technology. To satisfy such mission requirements, other technologies must be investigated. One possible approach is to utilize electrodeless plasma production schemes. Such an approach has seen low power application less than 1 kW on earth-space spacecraft such as ARTEMIS which uses the rf thruster the RIT 10 and deep space missions such as MUSES-C which will use a microwave ion thruster. Microwave and rf thruster technologies are compared. A microwave-based ion thruster is investigated for potential high power ion thruster systems requiring very long lifetimes.

  18. Microwave-Hydrothermal Synthesis of SnO2-CNTs Hybrid Nanocomposites with Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuisheng; Dai, Weili

    2017-01-01

    SnO2 nanoparticles coated on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared via a simple microwave-hydrothermal route. The as-obtained SnO2-CNTs composites were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared SnO2-CNTs for degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation was investigated. The results show that SnO2-CNTs nanocomposites have a higher photocatalytic activity than pure SnO2 due to the rapid transferring of electrons and the effective separation of holes and electrons on SnO2-CNTs. PMID:28336888

  19. Microwave-Hydrothermal Synthesis of SnO2-CNTs Hybrid Nanocomposites with Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuisheng; Dai, Weili

    2017-03-03

    SnO2 nanoparticles coated on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared via a simple microwave-hydrothermal route. The as-obtained SnO2-CNTs composites were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared SnO2-CNTs for degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation was investigated. The results show that SnO2-CNTs nanocomposites have a higher photocatalytic activity than pure SnO2 due to the rapid transferring of electrons and the effective separation of holes and electrons on SnO2-CNTs.

  20. An adaptive Hidden Markov model for activity recognition based on a wearable multi-sensor device.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Wei, Zhiqiang; Yue, Yaofeng; Wang, Hao; Jia, Wenyan; Burke, Lora E; Baranowski, Thomas; Sun, Mingui

    2015-05-01

    Human activity recognition is important in the study of personal health, wellness and lifestyle. In order to acquire human activity information from the personal space, many wearable multi-sensor devices have been developed. In this paper, a novel technique for automatic activity recognition based on multi-sensor data is presented. In order to utilize these data efficiently and overcome the big data problem, an offline adaptive-Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is proposed. A sensor selection scheme is implemented based on an improved Viterbi algorithm. A new method is proposed that incorporates personal experience into the HMM model as a priori information. Experiments are conducted using a personal wearable computer eButton consisting of multiple sensors. Our comparative study with the standard HMM and other alternative methods in processing the eButton data have shown that our method is more robust and efficient, providing a useful tool to evaluate human activity and lifestyle.

  1. A single-nanoparticle NO2 gas sensor constructed using active molecular plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lichan; Wu, Bo; Guo, Longhua; Tey, Ruiwen; Huang, Youju; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2015-01-25

    A single-nanoparticle plasmonic sensor for the sensitive detection of gas molecules (NO2) has been constructed. Taking advantage of active molecular plasmonics, the analyte selectively triggers a measurable spectral shift of ferrocene-modified single gold nanorods.

  2. UHF wearable battery free sensor module for activity and falling detection.

    PubMed

    Nam Trung Dang; Thang Viet Tran; Wan-Young Chung

    2016-08-01

    Falling is one of the most serious medical and social problems in aging population. Therefore taking care of the elderly by detecting activity and falling for preventing and mitigating the injuries caused by falls needs to be concerned. This study proposes a wearable, wireless, battery free ultra-high frequency (UHF) smart sensor tag module for falling and activity detection. The proposed tag is powered by UHF RF wave from reader and read by a standard UHF Electronic Product Code (EPC) Class-1 Generation-2 reader. The battery free sensor module could improve the wearability of the wireless device. The combination of accelerometer signal and received signal strength indication (RSSI) from a reader in the passive smart sensor tag detect the activity and falling of the elderly very successfully. The fabricated smart sensor tag module has an operating range of up to 2.5m and conducting in real-time activity and falling detection.

  3. Microwave-Assisted Simultaneous Extraction of Luteolin and Apigenin from Tree Peony Pod and Evaluation of Its Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongzheng; Yang, Lei; Zu, Yuangang; Zhao, Xiuhua

    2014-01-01

    An efficient microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) technique was employed in simultaneous extraction of luteolin and apigenin from tree peony pod. The MAE procedure was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and compared with other conventional extraction techniques of macerate extraction (ME) and heat reflux extraction (HRE). The optimal conditions of MAE were as follows: employing 70% ethanol volume fraction as solvent, soaking time of 4 h, liquid-solid ratio of 10 (mL/g), microwave irradiation power of 265 W, microwave irradiation time of 9.6 min, and 3 extraction cycles. Under the optimal conditions, 151 μg/g luteolin and 104 μg/g apigenin were extracted from the tree peony pod. Compared with ME and HRE, MAE gave the highest extraction efficiency. The antioxidant activities of the extracts obtained by MAE, ME, and HRE were evaluated using a 2,2-di(4-tert-octylphenyl)-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging assay, a ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP), and a reducing power assay. Meanwhile, the structural changes of the unprocessed and processed tree peony pod samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25405227

  4. Validation of mercury tip-switch and accelerometer activity sensors for identifying resting and active behavior in bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasmine Ware,; Rode, Karyn D.; Pagano, Anthony M.; Bromaghin, Jeffrey; Charles T Robbins,; Joy Erlenbach,; Shannon Jensen,; Amy Cutting,; Nicole Nicassio-Hiskey,; Amy Hash,; Owen, Megan A.; Heiko Jansen,

    2015-01-01

    Activity sensors are often included in wildlife transmitters and can provide information on the behavior and activity patterns of animals remotely. However, interpreting activity-sensor data relative to animal behavior can be difficult if animals cannot be continuously observed. In this study, we examined the performance of a mercury tip-switch and a tri-axial accelerometer housed in collars to determine whether sensor data can be accurately classified as resting and active behaviors and whether data are comparable for the 2 sensor types. Five captive bears (3 polar [Ursus maritimus] and 2 brown [U. arctos horribilis]) were fitted with a collar specially designed to internally house the sensors. The bears’ behaviors were recorded, classified, and then compared with sensor readings. A separate tri-axial accelerometer that sampled continuously at a higher frequency and provided raw acceleration values from 3 axes was also mounted on the collar to compare with the lower resolution sensors. Both accelerometers more accurately identified resting and active behaviors at time intervals ranging from 1 minute to 1 hour (≥91.1% accuracy) compared with the mercury tip-switch (range = 75.5–86.3%). However, mercury tip-switch accuracy improved when sampled at longer intervals (e.g., 30–60 min). Data from the lower resolution accelerometer, but not the mercury tip-switch, accurately predicted the percentage of time spent resting during an hour. Although the number of bears available for this study was small, our results suggest that these activity sensors can remotely identify resting versus active behaviors across most time intervals. We recommend that investigators consider both study objectives and the variation in accuracy of classifying resting and active behaviors reported here when determining sampling interval.

  5. Simulation of Melting Ice-Phase Precipitation Hydrometeors for Use in Passive and Active Microwave Remote-Sensing Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, with active and passive microwave remote-sensing instruments, was designed to be sensitive to precipitation-sized particles. The shape of these particles naturally influences the distribution of scattered microwaves. Therefore, we seek to simulate ice-phase precipitation using accurate models of the physical properties of individual snowflakes and aggregate ice crystals, similar to those observed in precipitating clouds. A number of researchers have examined the single-scattering properties of individual ice crystals and aggregates, but only a few have started to look at the properties of melting these particles. One of the key difficulties, from a simulation perspective, is characterizing the distribution of melt-water on a melting particle. Previous studies by the author and others have shown that even for spherical particles, the relative distribution of liquid water on an ice-particle can have significant effects on the computed scattering and absorption properties in the microwave regime. This, in turn, strongly influences forward model simulations of passive microwave TBs, radar reflectivities, and path-integrated attenuation. The present study examines the sensitivity of the single scattering properties of melting ice-crystals and aggregates to variations in the volume fraction of melt water, and the distribution of meltwater. We make some simple simulations 1-D vertical profiles having melting layers, and compute the radar reflectivities consistent with the GPM DPR at Ku- and Ka-band. We also compute the top-of-the-atmosphere brightness temperatures at GPM GMI channels for the same vertical profiles, and discuss the sensitivities to variances in the aforementioned physical properties.

  6. Submersible microbial fuel cell sensor for monitoring microbial activity and BOD in groundwater: focusing on impact of anodic biofilm on sensor applicability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-10-01

    A sensor, based on a submersible microbial fuel cell (SUMFC), was developed for in situ monitoring of microbial activity and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in groundwater. Presence or absence of a biofilm on the anode was a decisive factor for the applicability of the sensor. Fresh anode was required for application of the sensor for microbial activity measurement, while biofilm-colonized anode was needed for utilizing the sensor for BOD content measurement. The current density of SUMFC sensor equipped with a biofilm-colonized anode showed linear relationship with BOD content, to up to 250 mg/L (∼233 ± 1 mA/m(2)), with a response time of <0.67 h. This sensor could, however, not measure microbial activity, as indicated by the indifferent current produced at varying active microorganisms concentration, which was expressed as microbial adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) concentration. On the contrary, the current density (0.6 ± 0.1 to 12.4 ± 0.1 mA/m(2)) of the SUMFC sensor equipped with a fresh anode showed linear relationship, with active microorganism concentrations from 0 to 6.52 nmol-ATP/L, while no correlation between the current and BOD was observed. It was found that temperature, pH, conductivity, and inorganic solid content were significantly affecting the sensitivity of the sensor. Lastly, the sensor was tested with real contaminated groundwater, where the microbial activity and BOD content could be detected in <3.1 h. The microbial activity and BOD concentration measured by SUMFC sensor fitted well with the one measured by the standard methods, with deviations ranging from 15% to 22% and 6% to 16%, respectively. The SUMFC sensor provides a new way for in situ and quantitative monitoring contaminants content and biological activity during bioremediation process in variety of anoxic aquifers.

  7. Behavior of piezoelectric wafer active sensor in various media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamas, Tuncay

    The dissertation addresses structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using ultrasonic waves generated by piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) with an emphasis on the development of theoretical models of standing harmonic waves and guided waves. The focal objective of the research is to extend the theoretical study of electro-mechanical coupled PWAS as a resonator/transducer that interacts with standing and traveling waves in various media through electro-mechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) method and guided wave propagation. The analytical models are developed and the coupled field finite element analysis (CF-FEA) models are simulated and verified with experiments. The dissertation is divided into two parts with respect to the developments in EMIS methods and GWP methods. In the first part, analytical and finite element models have been developed for the simulation of PWAS-EMIS in in-plane (longitudinal) and out-of-plane (thickness) mode. Temperature effects on free PWAS-EMIS are also discussed with respect to the in-plane mode. Piezoelectric material degradation on certain electrical and mechanical properties as the temperature increases is simulated by our analytical model for in-plane circular PWAS-EMIS that agrees well with the sets of experiments. Then the thickness mode PWAS-EMIS model was further developed for a PWAS resonator bonded on a plate-like structure. The latter analytical model was to determine the resonance frequencies for the normal mode expansion method through the global matrix method by considering PWAS-substrate and proof mass-PWAS-substrate models. The proof mass concept was adapted to shift the systems resonance frequencies in thickness mode. PWAS in contact with liquid medium on one of its surface has been analytically modeled and simulated the electro-mechanical response of PWAS with various liquids with different material properties such as the density and the viscosity. The second part discusses the guided wave propagation

  8. Radiation, temperature, and vacuum effects on piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Postolache, Cristian; Tudose, Mihai

    2016-03-01

    The effect of radiation, temperature, and vacuum (RTV) on piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWASs) is discussed. This study is relevant for extending structural health monitoring (SHM) methods to space vehicle applications that are likely to be subjected to harsh environmental conditions such as extreme temperatures (hot and cold), cosmic radiation, and interplanetary vacuums. This study contains both theoretical and experimental investigations with the use of electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS). In the theoretical part, analytical models of circular PWAS resonators were used to derive analytical expressions for the temperature sensitivities of EMIS resonance and antiresonance behavior. Closed-form expressions for frequency and peak values at resonance and antiresonance were derived as functions of the coefficients of thermal expansion, {α }1, {α }2, {α }3; the Poisson ratio, ν and its sensitivity, \\partial ν /\\partial T; the relative compliance gradient (\\partial {s}11E/\\partial T)/{s}11E; and the Bessel function root, z and its sensitivity, \\partial z/\\partial T. In the experimental part, tests were conducted to subject the PWAS transducers to RTV conditions. In one set of experiments, several RTV exposure, cycles were applied with EMIS signatures recorded at the beginning and after each of the repeated cycles. In another set of experiments, PWAS transducers were subjected to various temperatures and the EMIS signatures were recorded at each temperature after stabilization. The processing of measured EMIS data from the first set of experiments revealed that the resonance and antiresonance frequencies changed by less than 1% due to RTV exposure, whereas the resonance and antiresonance amplitudes changed by around 15%. After processing an individual set of EMIS data from the second set of experiments, it was determined that the relative temperature sensitivity of the antiresonance frequency ({f}{{AR}}/{f}{{AR}}) is approximately 63.1× {10

  9. Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Michael; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    A passive plasmonics based chemical sensing system to be used in harsh operating environments was investigated and developed within this program. The initial proposed technology was based on combining technologies developed at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and at the University of Minnesota (UM). Specifically, a passive wireless technique developed at UM was to utilize a heat-activated plasmonic design to passively harvest the thermal energy from within a combustion emission stream and convert this into a narrowly focused light source. This plasmonic device was based on a bullseye design patterned into a gold film using focused ion beam methods (FIB). Critical to the design was the use of thermal stabilizing under and overlayers surrounding the gold film. These stabilizing layers were based on both atomic layer deposited films as well as metal laminate layers developed by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS). While the bullseye design was never able to be thermally stabilized for operating temperatures of 500oC or higher, an alternative energy harvesting design was developed by CNSE within this program. With this new development, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The method was further improved by patterning rods which harvested energy in the near infrared, which led to a factor of 10 decrease in data acquisition times as well as demonstrated selectivity with a reduced wavelength data set. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting

  10. CMOS VLSI Active-Pixel Sensor for Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Sun, Chao; Yang, Guang; Heynssens, Julie

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for a proposed active-pixel sensor (APS) and a design to implement the architecture in a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit provide for some advanced features that are expected to be especially desirable for tracking pointlike features of stars. The architecture would also make this APS suitable for robotic- vision and general pointing and tracking applications. CMOS imagers in general are well suited for pointing and tracking because they can be configured for random access to selected pixels and to provide readout from windows of interest within their fields of view. However, until now, the architectures of CMOS imagers have not supported multiwindow operation or low-noise data collection. Moreover, smearing and motion artifacts in collected images have made prior CMOS imagers unsuitable for tracking applications. The proposed CMOS imager (see figure) would include an array of 1,024 by 1,024 pixels containing high-performance photodiode-based APS circuitry. The pixel pitch would be 9 m. The operations of the pixel circuits would be sequenced and otherwise controlled by an on-chip timing and control block, which would enable the collection of image data, during a single frame period, from either the full frame (that is, all 1,024 1,024 pixels) or from within as many as 8 different arbitrarily placed windows as large as 8 by 8 pixels each. A typical prior CMOS APS operates in a row-at-a-time ( grolling-shutter h) readout mode, which gives rise to exposure skew. In contrast, the proposed APS would operate in a sample-first/readlater mode, suppressing rolling-shutter effects. In this mode, the analog readout signals from the pixels corresponding to the windows of the interest (which windows, in the star-tracking application, would presumably contain guide stars) would be sampled rapidly by routing them through a programmable diagonal switch array to an on-chip parallel analog memory array. The

  11. Structural Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2011-07-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for a large class of damage detection and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. This paper starts with a brief review of PWAS physical principles and basic modelling and continues by considering the various ways in which PWAS can be used for damage detection: (a) embedded guided-wave ultrasonics, i.e., pitch-catch, pulse-echo, phased arrays, thickness mode; (b) high-frequency modal sensing, i.e., the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance method; (c) passive detection, i.e., acoustic emission and impact detection. An example of crack-like damage detection and localization with PWAS phased arrays on a small metallic plate is given. The modelling of PWAS detection of disbond damage in adhesive joints is achieved with the analytical transfer matrix method (TMM). The analytical methods offer the advantage of fast computation which enables parameter studies and carpet plots. A parametric study of the effect of crack size and PWAS location on disbond detection is presented. The power and energy transduction between PWAS and structure is studied analytically with a wave propagation method. Special attention is given to the mechatronics modeling of the complete transduction cycle from electrical excitation into ultrasonic acoustic waves by the piezoelectric effect, the transfer through the structure, and finally reverse piezoelectric transduction to generate the received electric signal. It is found that the combination of PWAS size and wave frequency/wavelength play an important role in identifying transduction maxima and minima that could be exploited to achieve an optimum power-efficient design. The multi-physics finite element method (MP-FEM), which permits fine discretization of damaged regions and complicated structural geometries, is used to study the generation of guided waves in a plate from an electrically excited transmitter PWAS and the capture of these waves as electric

  12. Design, synthesis, and activity of nanocellulosic protease sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we contrast the molecular assembly, and biochemical utility of nanocellulosic materials prepared from cotton and wood as protease sensors. The cotton-based nanocellulosic substrates were prepared in a variety of ways to produce nanocrystals, films and aerogels, which were derivatized with eithe...

  13. A Secure Behavior Modification Sensor System for Physical Activity Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Today, advances in wireless sensor networks are making it possible to capture large amounts of information about a person and their interaction within their home environment. However, what is missing is how to ensure the security of the collected data and its use to alter human behavior for positive benefit. In this research, exploration was…

  14. Interference Mitigation Technique Using Active Spaceborne Sensor Antenna in EESS (Active) and Space Research Service (Active) for Use in 500 MHz Bandwidth Near 9.6 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneycutt, Bryan L.

    2005-01-01

    This document presents an interference mitigation technique using the active spaceborne sensor SAR3 antenna in the Earth Exploration-Satellite Service (active) and Space Research Service (active) for use in a 500 MHz bandwidth near 9.6 GHz. The purpose of the document is present antenna designs which offer lower sidelobes and faster rolloff in the sidelobes which in turn mitigates the interference to other services from the EESS (active) and SRS (active) sensors.

  15. Rainfall and River Currents Retrieved from Microwave Backscatter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, W.J.; Keller, W.C.; Hayes, K.; Nystuen, J.; Spicer, K.

    2003-01-01

    The use of CW microwave sensors in yielding information on both river surface velocities and rain rates was discussed. Eight CW microwave sensors were installed at Cowlitz river in Western Washington State in the US. The sensors measured the river surface velocity via Doppler shifts at eight locations across the river. Comparison of the surface velocities derived from the sensors mounted on the bridge with those measured by current meters and acoustic sensors demonstrated good agreement.

  16. A Robust, Microwave Rain Gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansheim, T. J.; Niemeier, J. J.; Kruger, A.

    2008-12-01

    Researchers at The University of Iowa have developed an all-electronic rain gauge that uses microwave sensors operating at either 10 GHz or 23 GHz, and measures the Doppler shift caused by falling raindrops. It is straightforward to interface these sensors with conventional data loggers, or integrate them into a wireless sensor network. A disadvantage of these microwave rain gauges is that they consume significant power when they are operating. However, this may be partially negated by using data loggers' or sensors networks' sleep-wake-sleep mechanism. Advantages of the microwave rain gauges are that one can make them very robust, they cannot clog, they don't have mechanical parts that wear out, and they don't have to be perfectly level. Prototype microwave rain gauges were collocated with tipping-bucket rain gauges, and data were collected for two seasons. At higher rain rates, microwave rain gauge measurements compare well with tipping-bucket measurements. At lower rain rates, the microwave rain gauges provide more detailed information than tipping buckets, which quantize measurement typically in 1 tip per 0.01 inch, or 1 tip per mm of rainfall.

  17. Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Analog-To-Digital Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed single-chip integrated-circuit image sensor contains 128 x 128 array of active pixel sensors at 50-micrometer pitch. Output terminals of all pixels in each given column connected to analog-to-digital (A/D) converter located at bottom of column. Pixels scanned in semiparallel fashion, one row at time; during time allocated to scanning row, outputs of all active pixel sensors in row fed to respective A/D converters. Design of chip based on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, and individual circuit elements fabricated according to 2-micrometer CMOS design rules. Active pixel sensors designed to operate at video rate of 30 frames/second, even at low light levels. A/D scheme based on first-order Sigma-Delta modulation.

  18. X-ray imaging characterization of active edge silicon pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponchut, C.; Ruat, M.; Kalliopuska, J.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was the experimental characterization of edge effects in active-edge silicon pixel sensors, in the frame of X-ray pixel detectors developments for synchrotron experiments. We produced a set of active edge pixel sensors with 300 to 500 μm thickness, edge widths ranging from 100 μm to 150 μm, and n or p pixel contact types. The sensors with 256 × 256 pixels and 55 × 55 μm2 pixel pitch were then bump-bonded to Timepix readout chips for X-ray imaging measurements. The reduced edge widths makes the edge pixels more sensitive to the electrical field distribution at the sensor boundaries. We characterized this effect by mapping the spatial response of the sensor edges with a finely focused X-ray synchrotron beam. One of the samples showed a distortion-free response on all four edges, whereas others showed variable degrees of distortions extending at maximum to 300 micron from the sensor edge. An application of active edge pixel sensors to coherent diffraction imaging with synchrotron beams is described.

  19. Self-activated ultrahigh chemosensitivity of oxide thin film nanostructures for transparent sensors

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hi Gyu; Shim, Young-Soek; Kim, Do Hong; Jeong, Hu Young; Jeong, Myoungho; Jung, Joo Young; Han, Seung Min; Kim, Jong Kyu; Kim, Jin-Sang; Park, Hyung-Ho; Lee, Jong-Heun; Tuller, Harry L.; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Jang, Ho Won

    2012-01-01

    One of the top design priorities for semiconductor chemical sensors is developing simple, low-cost, sensitive and reliable sensors to be built in handheld devices. However, the need to implement heating elements in sensor devices, and the resulting high power consumption, remains a major obstacle for the realization of miniaturized and integrated chemoresistive thin film sensors based on metal oxides. Here we demonstrate structurally simple but extremely efficient all oxide chemoresistive sensors with ~90% transmittance at visible wavelengths. Highly effective self-activation in anisotropically self-assembled nanocolumnar tungsten oxide thin films on glass substrate with indium-tin oxide electrodes enables ultrahigh response to nitrogen dioxide and volatile organic compounds with detection limits down to parts per trillion levels and power consumption less than 0.2 microwatts. Beyond the sensing performance, high transparency at visible wavelengths creates opportunities for their use in transparent electronic circuitry and optoelectronic devices with avenues for further functional convergence. PMID:22905319

  20. Probing active-edge silicon sensors using a high precision telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiba, K.; Artuso, M.; van Beveren, V.; van Beuzekom, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Buytaert, J.; Collins, P.; Dumps, R.; van der Heijden, B.; Hombach, C.; Hynds, D.; Hsu, D.; John, M.; Koffeman, E.; Leflat, A.; Li, Y.; Longstaff, I.; Morton, A.; Pérez Trigo, E.; Plackett, R.; Reid, M. M.; Rodríguez Perez, P.; Schindler, H.; Tsopelas, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Wysokiński, M.

    2015-03-01

    The performance of prototype active-edge VTT sensors bump-bonded to the Timepix ASIC is presented. Non-irradiated sensors of thicknesses 100-200 μm and pixel-to-edge distances of 50 μm and 100 μm were probed with a beam of charged hadrons with sub-pixel precision using the Timepix telescope assembled at the SPS at CERN. The sensors are shown to be highly efficient up to a few micrometers from the physical edge of the sensor. The distortion of the electric field lines at the edge of the sensors is studied by reconstructing the streamlines of the electric field using two-pixel clusters. These results are supported by TCAD simulations. The reconstructed streamlines are used to study the field distortion as a function of the bias voltage and to apply corrections to the cluster positions at the edge.

  1. First experimental results on active and slim-edge silicon sensors for XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancheri, L.; Benkechcache, M. E. A.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Xu, H.; Verzellesi, G.; Ronchin, S.; Boscardin, M.; Ratti, L.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Vacchi, C.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Giorgi, M.; Forti, F.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Morsani, F.; Fabris, L.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents the first characterization results obtained on a pilot fabrication run of planar sensors, tailored for X-ray imaging applications at FELs, developed in the framework of INFN project PixFEL. Active and slim-edge p-on-n sensors are fabricated on n-type high-resistivity silicon with 450 μm thickness, bonded to a support wafer. Both diodes and pixelated sensors with a pitch of 110 μm are included in the design. Edge structures with different number of guard rings are designed to comply with the large bias voltage required by the application after accumulating an ionizing radiation dose as large as 1GGy. Preliminary results from the electrical characterization of the produced sensors, providing a first assessment of the proposed approach, are discussed. A functional characterization of the sensors with a pulsed infrared laser is also presented, demonstrating the validity of slim-edge configurations.

  2. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-03-24

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available.

  3. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2–30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  4. Toward transparent and self-activated graphene harmonic transponder sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiyu Harry; Sakhdari, Maryam; Hajizadegan, Mehdi; Shahini, Ali; Akinwande, Deji; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2016-04-01

    We propose the concept and design of a transparent, flexible, and self-powered wireless sensor comprising a graphene-based sensor/frequency-modulator circuitry and a graphene antenna. In this all-graphene device, the multilayered-graphene antenna receives the fundamental tone at C band and retransmits the frequency-modulated sensed signal (harmonic tone) at X band. The frequency orthogonality between the received/re-transmitted signals may enable high-performance sensing in severe interference/clutter background. Here, a fully passive, quad-ring frequency multiplier is proposed using graphene field-effect transistors, of which the unique ambipolar charge transports render a frequency doubling effect with conversion gain being chemically sensitive to exposed gas/molecular/chemical/infectious agents. This transparent, light-weight, and self-powered system may potentially benefit a number of wireless sensing and diagnosis applications, particularly for smart contact lenses/glasses and microscope slides that require high optical transparency.

  5. An adaptive Hidden Markov Model for activity recognition based on a wearable multi-sensor device

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human activity recognition is important in the study of personal health, wellness and lifestyle. In order to acquire human activity information from the personal space, many wearable multi-sensor devices have been developed. In this paper, a novel technique for automatic activity recognition based o...

  6. Molten salt-supported polycondensation of optically active diacid monomers with an aromatic thiazole-bearing diamine using microwave irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Zadehnazari, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Microwave heating was used to prepare optically active thiazole-bearing poly(amide-imide)s. Polymerization reactions were carried out in the molten tetrabutylammonium bromide as a green molten salt medium and triphenyl phosphite as the homogenizer. Structural elucidation of the compounds was performed by Fourier transform infrared and NMR spectroscopic data and elemental analysis results. The polymeric samples were readily soluble in various organic solvents, forming low-colored and flexible thin films via solution casting. They showed high thermal stability with decomposition temperature being above 360 °C. They were assembled randomly in a nanoscale size. PMID:25685498

  7. Microwave Oven Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.; Richardson, Denise; Yan, Yuan

    1998-01-01

    Explains a series of laboratory activities which employ a microwave oven to help students understand word problems that relate to states of matter, collect data, and calculate and compare electrical costs to heat energy costs. (DDR)

  8. 2D-Visualization of metabolic activity with planar optical chemical sensors (optodes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R. J.; Liebsch, G.

    2015-12-01

    Microbia plays an outstandingly important role in many hydrologic compartments, such as e.g. the benthic community in sediments, or biologically active microorganisms in the capillary fringe, in ground water, or soil. Oxygen, pH, and CO2 are key factors and indicators for microbial activity. They can be measured using optical chemical sensors. These sensors record changing fluorescence properties of specific indicator dyes. The signals can be measured in a non-contact mode, even through transparent walls, which is important for many lab-experiments. They can measure in closed (transparent) systems, without sampling or intruding into the sample. They do not consume the analytes while measuring, are fully reversible and able to measure in non-stirred solutions. These sensors can be applied as high precision fiberoptic sensors (for profiling), robust sensor spots, or as planar sensors for 2D visualization (imaging). Imaging enables to detect thousands of measurement spots at the same time and generate 2D analyte maps over a region of interest. It allows for comparing different regions within one recorded image, visualizing spatial analyte gradients, or more important to identify hot spots of metabolic activity. We present ready-to-use portable imaging systems for the analytes oxygen, pH, and CO2. They consist of a detector unit, planar sensor foils and a software for easy data recording and evaluation. Sensors foils for various analytes and measurement ranges enable visualizing metabolic activity or analyte changes in the desired range. Dynamics of metabolic activity can be detected in one shot or over long time periods. We demonstrate the potential of this analytical technique by presenting experiments on benthic disturbance-recovery dynamics in sediments and microbial degradation of organic material in the capillary fringe. We think this technique is a new tool to further understand how microbial and geochemical processes are linked in (not solely) hydrologic

  9. An active tactile sensor for detecting mechanical characteristics of contacted objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Shikida, M.; Sasaki, H.; Itoigawa, K.; Sato, K.

    2006-08-01

    We propose an active tactile sensor actuated by magnetic force. The tactile sensor has the advantage of being able to detect mechanical characteristics related to a tactile impression of contacted objects using a single sensor structure, much as human skin functions. It consists of a displacement-sensing element of piezoresistors formed on a silicon diaphragm, and a magnetic actuating element (a permanent magnet and a flat coil). The sensor has two modes of operation, quasi-static and vibration, and it can detect contact force, elasticity and damping of contacted objects by choosing between operation modes. We fabricated the piezoresistor sensing and magnetic actuating elements by applying the microelectromechanical systems technologies, and assembled them in a hybrid manner. The size of the sensor was 6.0 mm × 6.0 mm × 10 µm. As contact samples we used three different rubber materials with hardness values ranging from A20 to A60 in Shore A. We experimentally confirmed that both the resonance frequency and the Q-factor of the sensing element in the vibration mode changed with different samples. We were able to calculate the elastic and damping coefficients of the contacted rubber objects by analyzing the vibrational response of the diaphragm. From the results, we concluded that the active sensor can detect mechanical characteristics of contacted objects using a single sensor structure.

  10. Active and passvie microwave remote sensing of springtime near-surface soil that at mid-latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Tsunekawa, A.; Tsubo, M.

    2010-12-01

    Springtime near-surface soil thaw event is important for understanding the near-surface earth system. Previous researches based on both active and passive microwave remote sensing technologies have paid scant attention, especially at mid-latitudes where the near-surface earth system has been changed substantially by climate change and human activities, and are characterized by more complex climate and land surface conditions than the permafrost areas. SSM/I brightness temperature and QuikSCAT Ku-band backscatter were applied in this study at a case study area of northern China and Mongolia in springtime. The soil freeze-thaw algorithm was employed for SSM/I data, and a random sampling technique was applied to determine the brightness temperature threshold for 37 GHz vertically polarized radiation: 258.2 and 260.1 K for the morning and evening satellite passes, respectively. A multi-step method was proposed for QuikSCAT Ku-band backscatter based on both field observed soil thaw events and the typical signature of radar backscatter time series when soil thaw event occurred. The method is mainly focuses on the estimated boundary of thaw events and detection of primary thaw date. Finally, based on those results, a theoretical method by applying both active and passive microwave remote sensing was proposed for understanding different types of frozen grounds and their specific characters (e.g. initial and end date of springtime soil freeze-thaw transition period) in mid-latitudes.

  11. Key role of temperature monitoring in interpretation of microwave effect on transesterification and esterification reactions for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Mazubert, Alex; Taylor, Cameron; Aubin, Joelle; Poux, Martine

    2014-06-01

    Microwave effects have been quantified, comparing activation energies and pre-exponential factors to those obtained in a conventionally-heated reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oils via transesterification and esterification reactions. Several publications report an enhancement of biodiesel production using microwaves, however recent reviews highlight poor temperature measurements in microwave reactors give misleading reaction performances. Operating conditions have therefore been carefully chosen to investigate non-thermal microwave effects alone. Temperature is monitored by an optical fiber sensor, which is more accurate than infrared sensors. For the transesterification reaction, the activation energy is 37.1kJ/mol (20.1-54.2kJ/mol) in the microwave-heated reactor compared with 31.6kJ/mol (14.6-48.7kJ/mol) in the conventionally-heated reactor. For the esterification reaction, the activation energy is 45.4kJ/mol (31.8-58.9kJ/mol) for the microwave-heated reactor compared with 56.1kJ/mol (55.7-56.4kJ/mol) for conventionally-heated reactor. The results confirm the absence of non-thermal microwave effects for homogenous-catalyzed reactions.

  12. Development and Integration of Hardware and Software for Active-Sensors in Structural Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Overly, Timothy G.S.

    2007-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) promises to deliver great benefits to many industries. Primarily among them is a potential for large cost savings in maintenance of complex structures such as aircraft and civil infrastructure. However, several large obstacles remain before widespread use on structures can be accomplished. The development of three components would address many of these obstacles: a robust sensor validation procedure, a low-cost active-sensing hardware and an integrated software package for transition to field deployment. The research performed in this thesis directly addresses these three needs and facilitates the adoption of SHM on a larger scale, particularly in the realm of SHM based on piezoelectric (PZT) materials. The first obstacle addressed in this thesis is the validation of the SHM sensor network. PZT materials are used for sensor/actuators because of their unique properties, but their functionality also needs to be validated for meaningful measurements to be recorded. To allow for a robust sensor validation algorithm, the effect of temperature change on sensor diagnostics and the effect of sensor failure on SHM measurements were classified. This classification allowed for the development of a sensor diagnostic algorithm that is temperature invariant and can indicate the amount and type of sensor failure. Secondly, the absence of a suitable commercially-available active-sensing measurement node is addressed in this thesis. A node is a small compact measurement device used in a complete system. Many measurement nodes exist for conventional passive sensing, which does not actively excite the structure, but there are no measurement nodes available that both meet the active-sensing requirements and are useable outside the laboratory. This thesis develops hardware that is low-power, active-sensing and field-deployable. This node uses the impedance method for SHM measurements, and can run the sensor diagnostic algorithm also developed here

  13. Discrete piezoelectric sensors and actuators for active control of two-dimensional spacecraft components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayer, Janice I.; Varadan, V. V.; Varadan, V. K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes research into the use of discrete piezoelectric sensors and actuators for active modal control of flexible two-dimensional structures such as might be used as components for spacecraft. A dynamic coupling term is defined between the sensor/actuator and the structure in terms of structural model shapes, location and piezoelectric behavior. The relative size of the coupling term determines sensor/actuator placement. Results are shown for a clamped square plate and for a large antenna. An experiment was performed on a thin foot-square plate clamped on all sides. Sizable vibration control was achieved for first, second/third (degenerate) and fourth modes.

  14. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E.; Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Zhou, Z.; Ackland, B.; Dickinson, A.; Eid, E.; Inglis, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing research and development of CMOS active pixel image sensors for low cost commercial applications. A number of sensor designs have been fabricated and tested in both p-well and n-well technologies. Major elements in the development of the sensor include on-chip analog signal processing circuits for the reduction of fixed pattern noise, on-chip timing and control circuits and on-chip analog-to-digital conversion (ADC). Recent results and continuing efforts in these areas will be presented.

  15. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Staller, C.; Zhou, Z; Fossum, E.

    1994-01-01

    JPL, under sponsorship from the NASA Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology, has been developing a second-generation solid-state image sensor technology. Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are a well-established first generation image sensor technology. For both commercial and NASA applications, CCDs have numerous shortcomings. In response, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology has been under research. The major advantages of APS technology are the ability to integrate on-chip timing, control, signal-processing and analog-to-digital converter functions, reduced sensitivity to radiation effects, low power operation, and random access readout.

  16. Impacts of microwave pretreatments on the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy waste activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Uma Rani, R.; Adish Kumar, S.; Kaliappan, S.; Yeom, IckTae; Rajesh Banu, J.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Microwave pretreatment of dairy WAS was studied. ► MW pretreatment at 70% intensity for 12 min, COD solubilization was 18.6%. ► Biogas production and SS reduction was 35% and 14% higher than control. ► In digester at 15 days SRT with medium OLR, SS and VS reduction was 67% and 64%. ► Biogas and methane production was 57% and 49% higher than control, in digesters. - Abstract: Microwave (MW) irradiation is one of the new and possible methods used for pretreating the sludge. Following its use in different fields, this MW irradiation method has proved to be more appropriate in the field of environmental research. In this paper, we focused on the effects of MW irradiation at different intensities on solubilization, biodegradation and anaerobic digestion of sludge from the dairy sludge. The changes in the soluble fractions of the organic matter, the biogas yield, the methane content in the biogas were used as control parameters for evaluating the efficiency of the MW pretreatment. Additionally, the energetic efficiency was also examined. In terms of an energetic aspect, the most economical pretreatment of sludge was at 70% intensity for 12 min irradiation time. At this, COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production were found to be 18.6%, 14% and 35% higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein and carbohydrate hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this microwave pretreatment even at low irradiation energy input. Also, experiments were carried out in semi continuous anaerobic digesters, with 3.5 L working volume. Combining microwave pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 67%, 64% and 57% of SS reduction, VS reduction and biogas production higher than the control, respectively.

  17. Impacts of microwave pretreatments on the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Uma Rani, R; Adish Kumar, S; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Icktae; Rajesh Banu, J

    2013-05-01

    Microwave (MW) irradiation is one of the new and possible methods used for pretreating the sludge. Following its use in different fields, this MW irradiation method has proved to be more appropriate in the field of environmental research. In this paper, we focused on the effects of MW irradiation at different intensities on solubilization, biodegradation and anaerobic digestion of sludge from the dairy sludge. The changes in the soluble fractions of the organic matter, the biogas yield, the methane content in the biogas were used as control parameters for evaluating the efficiency of the MW pretreatment. Additionally, the energetic efficiency was also examined. In terms of an energetic aspect, the most economical pretreatment of sludge was at 70% intensity for 12 min irradiation time. At this, COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production were found to be 18.6%, 14% and 35% higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein and carbohydrate hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this microwave pretreatment even at low irradiation energy input. Also, experiments were carried out in semi continuous anaerobic digesters, with 3.5L working volume. Combining microwave pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 67%, 64% and 57% of SS reduction, VS reduction and biogas production higher than the control, respectively.

  18. The analysis of animal bioelectric brain activity influenced by microwaves or by the introduction of strychnine.

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, A V

    1999-02-01

    The widespread impact made by technology has raised concerns about the safety of human exposure to electromagnetic radiation in the environment. The brain is especially sensitive to the influence of microwaves. The most effective method for estimation of the organism's functional states is an analysis of electroencephalograms. The statistical and spectral methods are usually used for analysis of animal electrocorticograms. The information obtained in such way is the integrated character and it is sometimes insufficient for identification of the brain state charging caused by various factors, especially microwaves altering the ecological situation. The nonlinear dynamics method is used in our work concurrent with the spectral correlation method for animal electrocorticogram processing. The correlation dimensionality represents a numerical criterion allowing for comparative investigation of various dynamic states of the system. In the process of investigation, it has been found that the nonlinear dynamics method may be used to analyze the electrocorticograms of experimental animal in different functional states being confirmed by increasing parameter of the correlation dimensionality in electrocorticograms of animal irradiated by microwaves or subjected to the introduction of strychnine.

  19. Microbial short-chain fatty acid production and extracellular enzymes activities during in vitro fermentation of polysaccharides from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. treated with microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie-Lun; Nie, Shao-Ping; Li, Chang; Fu, Zhi-Hong; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2013-06-26

    Effects of microwave irradiation on microbial short-chain fatty acid production and the activites of extracellular enzymes during in vitro fermentation of the polysaccharide from Plantago asiatica L. were investigated in this study. It was found that the apparent viscosity, average molecular weight, and particle size of the polysaccharide decreased after microwave irradiation. Reducing sugar amount increased with molecular weight decrease, suggesting the degradation may derive from glycosidic bond rupture. The polysaccharide surface topography was changed from large flakelike structure to smaller chips. FT-IR showed that microwave irradiation did not alter the primary functional groups in the polysaccharide. However, short-chain fatty acid productions of the polysaccharide during in vitro fermentation significantly increased after microwave irradiation. Activities of microbial extracellular enzymes xylanase, arabinofuranosidase, xylosidase, and glucuronidase in fermentation cultures supplemented with microwave irradiation treated polysaccharide were also generally higher than those of untreated polysaccharide. This showed that microwave irradiation could be a promising degradation method for the production of value-added polysaccharides.

  20. Microwave-assisted activated carbon from cocoa shell as adsorbent for removal of sodium diclofenac and nimesulide from aqueous effluents.

    PubMed

    Saucier, Caroline; Adebayo, Matthew A; Lima, Eder C; Cataluña, Renato; Thue, Pascal S; Prola, Lizie D T; Puchana-Rosero, M J; Machado, Fernando M; Pavan, Flavio A; Dotto, G L

    2015-05-30

    Microwave-induced chemical activation process was used to prepare an activated carbon from cocoa shell for efficient removal of two anti-inflammatories, sodium diclofenac (DFC) and nimesulide (NM), from aqueous solutions. A paste was obtained from a mixture of cocoa shell and inorganic components; with a ratio of inorganic: organic of 1 (CSC-1.0). The mixture was pyrolyzed in a microwave oven in less than 10 min. The CSC-1.0 was acidified with a 6 mol L(-1) HCl under reflux to produce MWCS-1.0. The CSC-1.0 and MWCS-1.0 were characterized using FTIR, SEM, N2 adsorption/desorption curves, X-ray diffraction, and point of zero charge (pHpzc). Experimental variables such as initial pH of the adsorbate solutions and contact time were optimized for adsorptive characteristics of MWCS-1.0. The optimum pH for removal of anti-inflammatories ranged between 7.0 and 8.0. The kinetic of adsorption was investigated using general order, pseudo first-order and pseu do-second order kinetic models. The maximum amounts of DCF and NM adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0 at 25 °C are 63.47 and 74.81 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorbent was tested on two simulated hospital effluents. MWCS-1.0 is capable of efficient removal of DCF and NM from a medium that contains high sugar and salt concentrations.

  1. Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Rubel, Glenn O.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Ball, Thomas M.

    2011-04-01

    The impregnated active carbon used in air purification systems degrades over time due to exposure to contamination and mechanical effects (packing, settling, flow channeling, etc.). A novel approach is proposed to detect contamination in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). ECIS is currently being used to evaluate active carbon filtration material; however, it cannot differentiate the impedance changes due to chemical contamination from those due to mechanical changes. EMIS can detect impedance changes due to mechanical changes. For the research work presented in this paper, Piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) was used for the EMIS method. Some remarkable new phenomena were unveiled in the detection of carbon filter status. 1. PWAS EMIS can detect the presence of contaminants, such as water and kerosene in the carbon bed 2. PWAS EMIS can monitor changes in mechanical pressure that may be associated with carbon bed packing, settling and flow channeling 3. EMIS and ECIS measurements are consistent with each other and complimentary A tentative simplified impedance model was created to simulate the PWAS-carbon bed system under increasing pressure. Similar impedance change pattern was observed when comparing the simulation results with experimental data.

  2. A Low Power, Parallel Wearable Multi-Sensor System for Human Activity Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuecheng; Jia, Wenyan; Yu, Tianjian; Luan, Bo; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the design of a low power heterogeneous wearable multi-sensor system, built with Zynq System-on-Chip (SoC), for human activity evaluation is presented. The powerful data processing capability and flexibility of this SoC represent significant improvements over our previous ARM based system designs. The new system captures and compresses multiple color images and sensor data simultaneously. Several strategies are adopted to minimize power consumption. Our wearable system provides a new tool for the evaluation of human activity, including diet, physical activity and lifestyle.

  3. A Low Power, Parallel Wearable Multi-Sensor System for Human Activity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuecheng; Jia, Wenyan; Yu, Tianjian; Luan, Bo; Mao, Zhi-hong; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a low power heterogeneous wearable multi-sensor system, built with Zynq System-on-Chip (SoC), for human activity evaluation is presented. The powerful data processing capability and flexibility of this SoC represent significant improvements over our previous ARM based system designs. The new system captures and compresses multiple color images and sensor data simultaneously. Several strategies are adopted to minimize power consumption. Our wearable system provides a new tool for the evaluation of human activity, including diet, physical activity and lifestyle. PMID:26185409

  4. Passive radiation detection using optically active CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosiek, Luke; Schalk, Patrick D.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there have been a number of small-scale and hobbyist successes in employing commodity CMOS-based camera sensors for radiation detection. For example, several smartphone applications initially developed for use in areas near the Fukushima nuclear disaster are capable of detecting radiation using a cell phone camera, provided opaque tape is placed over the lens. In all current useful implementations, it is required that the sensor not be exposed to visible light. We seek to build a system that does not have this restriction. While building such a system would require sophisticated signal processing, it would nevertheless provide great benefits. In addition to fulfilling their primary function of image capture, cameras would also be able to detect unknown radiation sources even when the danger is considered to be low or non-existent. By experimentally profiling the image artifacts generated by gamma ray and β particle impacts, algorithms are developed to identify the unique features of radiation exposure, while discarding optical interaction and thermal noise effects. Preliminary results focus on achieving this goal in a laboratory setting, without regard to integration time or computational complexity. However, future work will seek to address these additional issues.

  5. High temperature sensor/microphone development for active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, Thomas R.

    1993-01-01

    The industrial and scientific communities have shown genuine interest in electronic systems which can operate at high temperatures, among which are sensors to monitor noise, vibration, and acoustic emissions. Acoustic sensing can be accomplished by a wide variety of commercially available devices, including: simple piezoelectric sensors, accelerometers, strain gauges, proximity sensors, and fiber optics. Of the several sensing mechanisms investigated, piezoelectrics were found to be the most prevalent, because of their simplicity of design and application and, because of their high sensitivity over broad ranges of frequencies and temperature. Numerous piezoelectric materials are used in acoustic sensors today; but maximum use temperatures are imposed by their transition temperatures (T(sub c)) and by their resistivity. Lithium niobate, in single crystal form, has the highest operating temperature of any commercially available material, 650 C; but that is not high enough for future requirements. Only two piezoelectric materials show potential for use at 1000 C; AlN thin film reported to be piezoactive at 1150 C, and perovskite layer structure (PLS) materials, which possess among the highest T(sub c) (greater than 1500 C) reported for ferroelectrics. A ceramic PLS composition was chosen. The solid solution composition, 80% strontium niobate (SN) and 20% strontium tantalate (STa), with a T(sub c) approximately 1160 C, was hot forged, a process which concurrently sinters and renders the plate-like grains into a highly oriented configuration to enhance piezo properties. Poled samples of this composition showed coupling (k33) approximately 6 and piezoelectric strain constant (d33) approximately 3. Piezoactivity was seen at 1125 C, the highest temperature measurement reported for a ferroelectric ceramic. The high temperature piezoelectric responses of this, and similar PLS materials, opens the possibility of their use in electronic devices operating at temperatures up to

  6. Phosphatase activity of the voltage-sensing phosphatase, VSP, shows graded dependence on the extent of activation of the voltage sensor.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Souhei; Okamura, Yasushi

    2014-03-01

    The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) consists of a voltage sensor and a cytoplasmic phosphatase region, and the movement of the voltage sensor is coupled to the phosphatase activity. However, its coupling mechanisms still remain unclear. One possible scenario is that the phosphatase is activated only when the voltage sensor is in a fully activated state. Alternatively, the enzymatic activity of single VSP proteins could be graded in distinct activated states of the voltage sensor, and partial activation of the voltage sensor could lead to partial activation of the phosphatase. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we studied a voltage sensor mutant of zebrafish VSP, where the voltage sensor moves in two steps as evidenced by analyses of charge movements of the voltage sensor and voltage clamp fluorometry. Measurements of the phosphatase activity toward phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate revealed that both steps of voltage sensor activation are coupled to the tuning of phosphatase activities, consistent with the idea that the phosphatase activity is graded by the magnitude of the movement of the voltage sensor.

  7. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inherent force activated secondary door... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force... when the door applies a 15 pound (66.7 N) or less force in the down or closing direction and when...

  8. Oligomeric state affects oxygen dissociation and diguanylate cyclase activity of globin coupled sensors.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Deer, D Douglas; Weinert, Emily E

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation is regulated by enzymes, such as diguanylate cyclases, that respond to environmental signals and alter c-di-GMP levels. Diguanylate cyclase activity of two globin coupled sensors is shown to be regulated by gaseous ligands, with cyclase activity and O2 dissociation affected by protein oligomeric state.

  9. Evaluation of three different data fusion approaches that uses satellite soil moisture from different passive microwave sensors to construct one consistent climate record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schalie, Robin; de Jeu, Richard; Kerr, Yann; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Rodríguez-Fernández, Nemesio; Al-Yaari, Amen; Drusch, Matthias; Mecklenburg, Susanne; Dolman, Han

    2016-04-01

    Datasets that are derived from satellite observations are becoming increasingly important for measuring key parameters of the Earth's climate and are therefore crucial in research on climate change, giving the opportunity to researchers to detect anomalies and long-term trends globally. One of these key parameters is soil moisture (SM), which has a large impact on water, energy and biogeochemical cycles worldwide. A long-term SM data record from active and passive microwave satellite observations was developed as part of ESA's Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI-SM, http://www.esa-soilmoisture-cci.org/). Currently the dataset covers a period from 1978 to 2014 and is updated regularly, observations from a several microwave satellites including: ERS-1, ERS-2, METOP-A, Nimbus 7 SMMR, DMSP SSM/I, TRMM TMI, Aqua AMSRE, Coriolis WindSat, and GCOM-W1 AMSR2. In 2009, ESA launched the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, Kerr et al., 2010) mission, carrying onboard a unique L-band radiometer, but its SM retrievals are not yet part of this dataset. Due to the different radiometric characteristics of SMOS, integrating SMOS into the ESA-CCI-SM dataset is not straight forward. Therefore several approaches have been tested to fuse soil moisture retrievals from SMOS and AMSRE, which currently forms the basis of the passive microwave part within ESA-CCI-SM project. These approaches are: 1. A Neural Network Fusion approach (Rodríguez-Fernández et al., 2015), 2. A regression approach (Wigneron et al., 2004; Al-Yaari et al., 2015) and 3. A radiative transfer based approach, using the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (Van der Schalie et al., 2016). This study evaluates the three different approaches and tests their skills against multiple datasets, including MERRA-Land, ERA-Interim/Land, the current ESA-CCI-SM v2.2 and in situ measurements from the International Soil Moisture Network and present a recommendation for the potential integration of SMOS soil moisture into the ESA

  10. Piezoelectric Active Humidity Sensors Based on Lead-Free NaNbO3 Piezoelectric Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Li; Zhou, Di; Cao, Jun Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The development of micro-/nano-scaled energy harvesters and the self-powered sensor system has attracted great attention due to the miniaturization and integration of the micro-device. In this work, lead-free NaNbO3 piezoelectric nanofibers with a monoclinic perovskite structure were synthesized by the far-field electrospinning method. The flexible active humidity sensors were fabricated by transferring the nanofibers from silicon to a soft polymer substrate. The sensors exhibited outstanding piezoelectric energy-harvesting performance with output voltage up to 2 V during the vibration process. The output voltage generated by the NaNbO3 sensors exhibited a negative correlation with the environmental humidity varying from 5% to 80%, where the peak-to-peak value of the output voltage generated by the sensors decreased from 0.40 to 0.07 V. The sensor also exhibited a short response time, good selectively against ethanol steam, and great temperature stability. The piezoelectric active humidity sensing property could be attributed to the increased leakage current in the NaNbO3 nanofibers, which was generated due to proton hopping among the H3O+ groups in the absorbed H2O layers under the driving force of the piezoelectric potential. PMID:27338376

  11. Piezoelectric Active Humidity Sensors Based on Lead-Free NaNbO₃ Piezoelectric Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Li; Zhou, Di; Cao, Jun Cheng

    2016-06-07

    The development of micro-/nano-scaled energy harvesters and the self-powered sensor system has attracted great attention due to the miniaturization and integration of the micro-device. In this work, lead-free NaNbO₃ piezoelectric nanofibers with a monoclinic perovskite structure were synthesized by the far-field electrospinning method. The flexible active humidity sensors were fabricated by transferring the nanofibers from silicon to a soft polymer substrate. The sensors exhibited outstanding piezoelectric energy-harvesting performance with output voltage up to 2 V during the vibration process. The output voltage generated by the NaNbO₃ sensors exhibited a negative correlation with the environmental humidity varying from 5% to 80%, where the peak-to-peak value of the output voltage generated by the sensors decreased from 0.40 to 0.07 V. The sensor also exhibited a short response time, good selectively against ethanol steam, and great temperature stability. The piezoelectric active humidity sensing property could be attributed to the increased leakage current in the NaNbO₃ nanofibers, which was generated due to proton hopping among the H₃O⁺ groups in the absorbed H₂O layers under the driving force of the piezoelectric potential.

  12. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) L-Band Microwave Radiometer Post-Launch Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Misra, Sidharth; Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Hudson, Derek; Le Vine, David M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Yueh, Simon H.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer is a fully-polarimetric L-band radiometer flown on the SMAP satellite in a 6 AM/ 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685 km altitude. Since April, 2015, the radiometer is under calibration and validation to assess the quality of the radiometer L1B data product. Calibration methods including the SMAP L1B TA2TB (from Antenna Temperature (TA) to the Earth's surface Brightness Temperature (TB)) algorithm and TA forward models are outlined, and validation approaches to calibration stability/quality are described in this paper including future work. Results show that the current radiometer L1B data satisfies its requirements.

  13. Monitoring of posture allocations and activities by a shoe-based wearable sensor.

    PubMed

    Sazonov, Edward S; Fulk, George; Hill, James; Schutz, Yves; Browning, Raymond

    2011-04-01

    Monitoring of posture allocations and activities enables accurate estimation of energy expenditure and may aid in obesity prevention and treatment. At present, accurate devices rely on multiple sensors distributed on the body and thus may be too obtrusive for everyday use. This paper presents a novel wearable sensor, which is capable of very accurate recognition of common postures and activities. The patterns of heel acceleration and plantar pressure uniquely characterize postures and typical activities while requiring minimal preprocessing and no feature extraction. The shoe sensor was tested in nine adults performing sitting and standing postures and while walking, running, stair ascent/descent and cycling. Support vector machines (SVMs) were used for classification. A fourfold validation of a six-class subject-independent group model showed 95.2% average accuracy of posture/activity classification on full sensor set and over 98% on optimized sensor set. Using a combination of acceleration/pressure also enabled a pronounced reduction of the sampling frequency (25 to 1 Hz) without significant loss of accuracy (98% versus 93%). Subjects had shoe sizes (US) M9.5-11 and W7-9 and body mass index from 18.1 to 39.4 kg/m2 and thus suggesting that the device can be used by individuals with varying anthropometric characteristics.

  14. Laser-Machined Shape Memory Alloy Sensors for Position Feedback in Active Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Alexander T.; Park, Byong-Ho; Liang, David H.; Niemeyer, Günter

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-based interventions are a form of minimally invasive surgery that can decrease hospitalization time and greatly lower patient morbidity compared to traditional methods. However, percutaneous catheter procedures are hindered by a lack of precise tip manipulation when actuation forces are transmitted over the length of the catheter. Active catheters with local shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuation can potentially provide the desired manipulation of a catheter tip, but hysteresis makes it difficult to control the actuators. A method to integrate small-volume, compliant sensors on an active catheter to provide position feedback for control would greatly improve the viability of SMA-based active catheters. In this work, we describe the design, fabrication, and performance of resistance-based position sensors that are laser-machined from superelastic SMA tubing. Combining simple material models and rapid prototyping, we can develop sensors of appropriate stiffness and sensitivity with simple modifications in sensor geometry. The sensors exhibit excellent linearity over the operating range and are designed to be easily integrated onto an active catheter substrate. PMID:19759806

  15. Using luminescent materials as the active element for radiation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerman, William A.; Fontenot, Ross S.; Williams, Stephen; Miller, John

    2016-05-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge for Earth-based defense applications as well as human and/or robotic space missions. Practical sensors based on luminescence will depend heavily upon research investigating the resistance of these materials to ionizing radiation and the ability to anneal or self-heal from damage caused by such radiation. In 1951, Birks and Black showed experimentally that the luminescent efficiency of anthracene bombarded by alphas varies with total fluence (N) as (I/I0) = 1/(1 + AN), where I is the luminescence yield, I0 is the initial yield, and A is a constant. The half brightness (N1/2) is defined as the fluence that reduce the emission light yield to half and is equal to is the inverse of A. Broser and Kallmann developed a similar relationship to the Birks and Black equation for inorganic phosphors irradiated using alpha particles. From 1990 to the present, we found that the Birks and Black relation describes the reduction in light emission yield for every tested luminescent material except lead phosphate glass due to proton irradiation. These results indicate that radiation produced quenching centers compete with emission for absorbed energy. The purpose of this paper is to present results from research completed in this area over the last few years. Particular emphasis will be placed on recent measurements made on new materials such as europium tetrakis dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (EuD4TEA). Results have shown that EuD4TEA with its relatively small N1/2 might be a good candidate for use as a personal proton fluence sensor.

  16. iCalm: wearable sensor and network architecture for wirelessly communicating and logging autonomic activity.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Richard Ribon; Dobson, Kelly; Goodwin, Matthew S; Eydgahi, Hoda; Wilder-Smith, Oliver; Fernholz, David; Kuboyama, Yuta; Hedman, Elliott Bruce; Poh, Ming-Zher; Picard, Rosalind W

    2010-03-01

    Widespread use of affective sensing in healthcare applications has been limited due to several practical factors, such as lack of comfortable wearable sensors, lack of wireless standards, and lack of low-power affordable hardware. In this paper, we present a new low-cost, low-power wireless sensor platform implemented using the IEEE 802.15.4 wireless standard, and describe the design of compact wearable sensors for long-term measurement of electrodermal activity, temperature, motor activity, and photoplethysmography. We also illustrate the use of this new technology for continuous long-term monitoring of autonomic nervous system and motion data from active infants, children, and adults. We describe several new applications enabled by this system, discuss two specific wearable designs for the wrist and foot, and present sample data.

  17. Physical Activities Monitoring Using Wearable Acceleration Sensors Attached to the Body.

    PubMed

    Arif, Muhammad; Kattan, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring physical activities by using wireless sensors is helpful for identifying postural orientation and movements in the real-life environment. A simple and robust method based on time domain features to identify the physical activities is proposed in this paper; it uses sensors placed on the subjects' wrist, chest and ankle. A feature set based on time domain characteristics of the acceleration signal recorded by acceleration sensors is proposed for the classification of twelve physical activities. Nine subjects performed twelve different types of physical activities, including sitting, standing, walking, running, cycling, Nordic walking, ascending stairs, descending stairs, vacuum cleaning, ironing clothes and jumping rope, and lying down (resting state). Their ages were 27.2 ± 3.3 years and their body mass index (BMI) is 25.11 ± 2.6 Kg/m2. Classification results demonstrated a high validity showing precision (a positive predictive value) and recall (sensitivity) of more than 95% for all physical activities. The overall classification accuracy for a combined feature set of three sensors is 98%. The proposed framework can be used to monitor the physical activities of a subject that can be very useful for the health professional to assess the physical activity of healthy individuals as well as patients.

  18. Physical Activities Monitoring Using Wearable Acceleration Sensors Attached to the Body

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring physical activities by using wireless sensors is helpful for identifying postural orientation and movements in the real-life environment. A simple and robust method based on time domain features to identify the physical activities is proposed in this paper; it uses sensors placed on the subjects’ wrist, chest and ankle. A feature set based on time domain characteristics of the acceleration signal recorded by acceleration sensors is proposed for the classification of twelve physical activities. Nine subjects performed twelve different types of physical activities, including sitting, standing, walking, running, cycling, Nordic walking, ascending stairs, descending stairs, vacuum cleaning, ironing clothes and jumping rope, and lying down (resting state). Their ages were 27.2 ± 3.3 years and their body mass index (BMI) is 25.11 ± 2.6 Kg/m2. Classification results demonstrated a high validity showing precision (a positive predictive value) and recall (sensitivity) of more than 95% for all physical activities. The overall classification accuracy for a combined feature set of three sensors is 98%. The proposed framework can be used to monitor the physical activities of a subject that can be very useful for the health professional to assess the physical activity of healthy individuals as well as patients. PMID:26203909

  19. Microwave-assisted synthesis of CdO-ZnO nanocomposite and its antibacterial activity against human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, K.; Dhanuskodi, S.; Gobinath, C.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.

    2015-03-01

    CdO-ZnO nanocomposite was prepared by microwave-assisted method and characterized by X-ray crystallography (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). It exhibits hexagonal cubic structure with an average crystallite size of 27 nm. From the UV-Vis spectra, the bandgap is estimated as 2.92 eV. The fluorescence spectrum shows a near band edge emission at 422 nm. In addition the antibacterial activity of CdO-ZnO nanocomposite was carried out in-vitro against two kinds of bacteria: gram negative bacteria (G -ve) i.e. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and gram positive bacteria (G +ve): Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Bacillus spp. This study indicates the zone of inhibition of 40 mm has high antibacterial activity towards the gram positive bacterium S. aureus.

  20. Microwave-assisted synthesis of CdO-ZnO nanocomposite and its antibacterial activity against human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Karthik, K; Dhanuskodi, S; Gobinath, C; Sivaramakrishnan, S

    2015-03-15

    CdO-ZnO nanocomposite was prepared by microwave-assisted method and characterized by X-ray crystallography (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). It exhibits hexagonal cubic structure with an average crystallite size of 27 nm. From the UV-Vis spectra, the bandgap is estimated as 2.92 eV. The fluorescence spectrum shows a near band edge emission at 422 nm. In addition the antibacterial activity of CdO-ZnO nanocomposite was carried out in-vitro against two kinds of bacteria: gram negative bacteria (G -ve) i.e. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and gram positive bacteria (G +ve): Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Bacillus spp. This study indicates the zone of inhibition of 40 mm has high antibacterial activity towards the gram positive bacterium S. aureus.

  1. Microwave-assisted synthesis, characterization and biological activities of organotin (IV) complexes with some thio Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ran Vir; Chaudhary, Pratibha; Chauhan, Shikha; Swami, Monika

    2009-03-01

    Microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of the organotin (IV) complexes are reported. Trigonal bipyramidal and octahedral complexes of tin (IV) have been synthesized by the reaction of dimethyltin (IV) dichloride with 4-nitrobenzanilide- S-benzyldithiocarbazate (L 1H), 4-chlorobenzanilide- S-benzyldithiocarbazate (L 2H), 4-nitrobenzanilidebenzothiazoline (L 3H) and 4-chlorobenzanilidebenzothiazoline (L 4H). The complexes so formed were characterized by elemental analysis, conductance measurements, molecular weight determinations and spectral data viz. IR, UV-Visible, 1H and 13C NMR. The anti-microbial activities of the ligands and their corresponding organotin (IV) complexes have been screened against various strains of bacteria and fungi. Antifertility activity against male albino rats has also been reported.

  2. Removal of Pb(II) from water by the activated carbon modified by nitric acid under microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shuheng; Zhang, Jiajun; Shen, Dekui; Xiao, Rui; Gu, Sai; Zhao, Ming; Liang, Junyu

    2016-02-01

    The rice husk based activated carbon (RH-AC) was treated by nitric acid under microwave heating, in order to improve its capability for the removal of heavy metal ions from water. The optimal conditions for the modification of RH-AC (M-RH-AC) were determined by means of orthogonal array experimental design, giving those as the concentration of nitric acid of 8mol/L, modification time of 15min, modification temperature of 130°C and microwave power of 800W. The characteristics of the M-RH-AC and RH-AC were examined by BET, XRD, Raman spectrum, pH titration, zeta potential, Boehm titration and FTIR analysis. The M-RH-AC has lower pore surface area, smaller crystallite, lower pHIEP and more oxygen-containing functional groups than the RH-AC. Removal capacity of Pb(II) ions by the M-RH-AC and RH-AC from water solution was estimated concerning the influence of contact time, pH value, and initial concentration. The equilibrium time of Pb(II) removal was found to be around 90min after modification process. Two kinetic models are adopted to describe the possible Pb(II) adsorption mechanism, finding that the adsorption rate of Pb(II) ions by the M-RH-AC is larger than that of RH-AC.

  3. Microwave assisted synthesis of sheet-like Cu/BiVO{sub 4} and its activities of various photocatalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Li, Li; Yi, Tingting; Zhang, WenZhi; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Lili

    2015-09-15

    The Cu/BiVO{sub 4} photocatalyst with visible-light responsivity was prepared by the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The phase structures, chemical composition and surface physicochemical properties were well-characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis diffuse reflectance absorption (UV–vis/DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption tests. Results indicate that the crystal structure of synthetic composite materials is mainly monoclinic scheelite BiVO{sub 4}, which is not changed with the increasing doping amount of Cu. In addition, the presence of Cu not only enlarges the range of the composite materials under the visible-light response, but also increases the BET value significantly. Compared to pure BiVO{sub 4}, 1% Cu/BiVO{sub 4}-160 performs the highest photocatalytic activity to degrade methylene blue under the irradiation of ultraviolet, visible and simulated sunlight. In addition, the capture experiments prove that the main active species was superoxide radicals during photocatalytic reaction. Moreover, the 1% Cu/BiVO{sub 4}-160 composite shows good photocatalytic stability after three times of recycling. - Graphical abstract: A series of BiVO{sub 4} with different amounts of Cu doping were prepared by the microwave-assisted method, moreover, which performed the high photocatalytic activities to degrade methylene blue under multi-mode. - Highlights: • A series of Cu/BiVO{sub 4} with different amounts of Cu doping were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • The morphologies of as-samples were different with the amount of Cu doping increased. • Compared with pure BiVO{sub 4}, as-Cu/BiVO{sub 4} showed stronger absorption in the visible light region obviously. • 1% Cu/BiVO{sub 4}-160 performed the high photocatalytic activities to degrade methylene blue under multi-mode. • OH{sup •} and h{sup +} both play important roles in the photocatalytic reaction.

  4. Comparison of essential oil composition and antimicrobial activity of Coriandrum sativum L. extracted by hydrodistillation and microwave-assisted hydrodistillation.

    PubMed

    Sourmaghi, Mohammad Hossein Salehi; Kiaee, Gita; Golfakhrabadi, Fereshteh; Jamalifar, Hossein; Khanavi, Mahnaz

    2015-04-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), is an annual herb in the Apiaceae family which disperses in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern regions. The Coriander essential oil has been used in food products, perfumes, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries for its flavor and odor. In Iran, fruits of Coriander used in pickle, curry powders, sausages, cakes, pastries, biscuits and buns. The aim of this study was to investigate microwave radiation effects on quality, quantity and antimicrobial activity of essential oil of Coriander fruits. The essential oils were obtained from the Coriander fruits by hydrodistillation (HD) and Microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MAHD) then, the oils were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. Antimicrobial activities of essential oils were evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans by microdilution method. The results indicated that the HD and MAHD essential oils (EO) were dominated by monoterpenoids such as linalool, geranyl acetate and γ-terpinene. The major compound in both EO was linalool which its amount in HD and MAHD was 63 % and 66 %, respectively. The total amount of monoterpenes hydrocarbons in HD EO differ significantly with the amount in MAHD EO (12.56 % compare to 1.82 %). HD EO showed greater activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans than MAHD EO. Moreover, their activities against Ecoli and P. aeruginosa were the same with Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) 0.781 and 6.25 μL mL(-1), respectively. By using MAHD method, it was superior in terms of saving energy and extraction time, although the oil yield and total composition decrease by using this method.

  5. A comparative study on the effect of conventional thermal pasteurisation, microwave and ultrasound treatments on the antioxidant activity of five fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Sangeeta; Mahnot, Nikhil Kumar; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2016-06-01

    A comparative study on the effect of conventional thermal pasteurisation, microwave and ultrasound treatments on the phytochemical and antioxidant activities of juices from carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.), black jamun (Syzygium cumuni L.Skeels.), watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var lanatus), pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr) and litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) was carried out. Depending on the type of fruit sample and treatment, increase or decrease in phytochemical values was observed. Overall, sonication had a positive effect on the total flavonoid content in all the juice samples followed by microwave treatment with exceptions in some cases. High-performance liquid chromatography study showed the presence of different phenolic acids depending on the sample type. The phenolic acids in some processed carambola juice samples showed decrease or complete destruction, while in some cases, an increase or appearance of newer phenolic acid originally not detected in the fresh juice was observed as seen in conventional thermal pasteurisation, microwaved at 600 W and sonicated juices. Both microwaved and sonicated samples were found to have positive effect on the phenolic content and antioxidant activity with exceptions in some cases. Therefore, microwave and sonication treatment could be used in place of thermal pasteurisation depending on the sample requirements.

  6. Monitoring activities of daily living based on wearable wireless body sensor network.

    PubMed

    Kańtoch, E; Augustyniak, P; Markiewicz, M; Prusak, D

    2014-01-01

    With recent advances in microprocessor chip technology, wireless communication, and biomedical engineering it is possible to develop miniaturized ubiquitous health monitoring devices that are capable of recording physiological and movement signals during daily life activities. The aim of the research is to implement and test the prototype of health monitoring system. The system consists of the body central unit with Bluetooth module and wearable sensors: the custom-designed ECG sensor, the temperature sensor, the skin humidity sensor and accelerometers placed on the human body or integrated with clothes and a network gateway to forward data to a remote medical server. The system includes custom-designed transmission protocol and remote web-based graphical user interface for remote real time data analysis. Experimental results for a group of humans who performed various activities (eg. working, running, etc.) showed maximum 5% absolute error compared to certified medical devices. The results are promising and indicate that developed wireless wearable monitoring system faces challenges of multi-sensor human health monitoring during performing daily activities and opens new opportunities in developing novel healthcare services.

  7. Chemical sensor platform for non-invasive monitoring of activity and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Solovei, Dmitry; Žák, Jaromír; Majzlíková, Petra; Sedláček, Jiří; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2015-01-14

    A non-invasive solution for monitoring of the activity and dehydration of organisms is proposed in the work. For this purpose, a wireless standalone chemical sensor platform using two separate measurement techniques has been developed. The first approach for activity monitoring is based on humidity measurement. Our solution uses new humidity sensor based on a nanostructured TiO2 surface for sweat rate monitoring. The second technique is based on monitoring of potassium concentration in urine. High level of potassium concentration denotes clear occurrence of dehydration. Furthermore, a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) was developed for this sensor platform to manage data transfer among devices and the internet. The WBAN coordinator controls the sensor devices and collects and stores the measured data. The collected data is particular to individuals and can be shared with physicians, emergency systems or athletes' coaches. Long-time monitoring of activity and potassium concentration in urine can help maintain the appropriate water intake of elderly people or athletes and to send warning signals in the case of near dehydration. The created sensor system was calibrated and tested in laboratory and real conditions as well. The measurement results are discussed.

  8. A Comprehensive Analysis on Wearable Acceleration Sensors in Human Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Janidarmian, Majid; Roshan Fekr, Atena; Radecka, Katarzyna; Zilic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    Sensor-based motion recognition integrates the emerging area of wearable sensors with novel machine learning techniques to make sense of low-level sensor data and provide rich contextual information in a real-life application. Although Human Activity Recognition (HAR) problem has been drawing the attention of researchers, it is still a subject of much debate due to the diverse nature of human activities and their tracking methods. Finding the best predictive model in this problem while considering different sources of heterogeneities can be very difficult to analyze theoretically, which stresses the need of an experimental study. Therefore, in this paper, we first create the most complete dataset, focusing on accelerometer sensors, with various sources of heterogeneities. We then conduct an extensive analysis on feature representations and classification techniques (the most comprehensive comparison yet with 293 classifiers) for activity recognition. Principal component analysis is applied to reduce the feature vector dimension while keeping essential information. The average classification accuracy of eight sensor positions is reported to be 96.44% ± 1.62% with 10-fold evaluation, whereas accuracy of 79.92% ± 9.68% is reached in the subject-independent evaluation. This study presents significant evidence that we can build predictive models for HAR problem under more realistic conditions, and still achieve highly accurate results. PMID:28272362

  9. Distributed Amplifier Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Distributed Amplifier Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Design by John E. Penn ARL-TR-6237 October 2012...Distributed Amplifier Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Design John E. Penn Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Distributed Amplifier Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Design 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  10. NprR, a moonlighting quorum sensor shifting from a phosphatase activity to a transcriptional activator

    PubMed Central

    Perchat, Stéphane; Talagas, Antoine; Zouhir, Samira; Poncet, Sandrine; Bouillaut, Laurent; Nessler, Sylvie; Lereclus, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of biological functions requires factors (proteins, peptides or chemicals) able to sense and translate environmental conditions or any circumstances in order to modulate the transcription of a gene, the stability of a transcript or the activity of a protein. Quorum sensing is a regulation mechanism connecting cell density to the physiological state of a single cell. In bacteria, quorum sensing coordinates virulence, cell fate and commitment to sporulation and other adaptation properties. The critical role of such regulatory systems was demonstrated in pathogenicity and adaptation of bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group (i.e. B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis). Furthermore, using insects as a model of infection, it was shown that sequential activation of several quorum sensing systems allowed bacteria to switch from a virulence state to a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing their survival in the host cadaver, and ultimately to the commitment into sporulation. The chronological development of these physiological states is directed by quorum sensors forming the RNPP family. Among them, NprR combines two distinct functions connecting sporulation to necrotrophism in B. thuringiensis. In the absence of its cognate signaling peptide (NprX), NprR negatively controls sporulation by acting as a phosphatase. In the presence of NprX, it acts as a transcription factor regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of the bacteria in the insect cadaver. PMID:28357327

  11. Fault Diagnosis Based on Chemical Sensor Data with an Active Deep Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Hu, Zhixin; Liu, Jun; Yu, Shanen; Wu, Feng

    2016-10-13

    Big sensor data provide significant potential for chemical fault diagnosis, which involves the baseline values of security, stability and reliability in chemical processes. A deep neural network (DNN) with novel active learning for inducing chemical fault diagnosis is presented in this study. It is a method using large amount of chemical sensor data, which is a combination of deep learning and active learning criterion to target the difficulty of consecutive fault diagnosis. DNN with deep architectures, instead of shallow ones, could be developed through deep learning to learn a suitable feature representation from raw sensor data in an unsupervised manner using stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) and work through a layer-by-layer successive learning process. The features are added to the top Softmax regression layer to construct the discriminative fault characteristics for diagnosis in a supervised manner. Considering the expensive and time consuming labeling of sensor data in chemical applications, in contrast to the available methods, we employ a novel active learning criterion for the particularity of chemical processes, which is a combination of Best vs. Second Best criterion (BvSB) and a Lowest False Positive criterion (LFP), for further fine-tuning of diagnosis model in an active manner rather than passive manner. That is, we allow models to rank the most informative sensor data to be labeled for updating the DNN parameters during the interaction phase. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated in two well-known industrial datasets. Results indicate that the proposed method can obtain superior diagnosis accuracy and provide significant performance improvement in accuracy and false positive rate with less labeled chemical sensor data by further active learning compared with existing methods.

  12. Fault Diagnosis Based on Chemical Sensor Data with an Active Deep Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng; Hu, Zhixin; Liu, Jun; Yu, Shanen; Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Big sensor data provide significant potential for chemical fault diagnosis, which involves the baseline values of security, stability and reliability in chemical processes. A deep neural network (DNN) with novel active learning for inducing chemical fault diagnosis is presented in this study. It is a method using large amount of chemical sensor data, which is a combination of deep learning and active learning criterion to target the difficulty of consecutive fault diagnosis. DNN with deep architectures, instead of shallow ones, could be developed through deep learning to learn a suitable feature representation from raw sensor data in an unsupervised manner using stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) and work through a layer-by-layer successive learning process. The features are added to the top Softmax regression layer to construct the discriminative fault characteristics for diagnosis in a supervised manner. Considering the expensive and time consuming labeling of sensor data in chemical applications, in contrast to the available methods, we employ a novel active learning criterion for the particularity of chemical processes, which is a combination of Best vs. Second Best criterion (BvSB) and a Lowest False Positive criterion (LFP), for further fine-tuning of diagnosis model in an active manner rather than passive manner. That is, we allow models to rank the most informative sensor data to be labeled for updating the DNN parameters during the interaction phase. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated in two well-known industrial datasets. Results indicate that the proposed method can obtain superior diagnosis accuracy and provide significant performance improvement in accuracy and false positive rate with less labeled chemical sensor data by further active learning compared with existing methods. PMID:27754386

  13. Bioinspired active whisker sensor for robotic vibrissal tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2014-12-01

    A whisker transducer (WT) inspired by rat’s vibrissal tactile perception is proposed based on a transduction matrix model characterizing the electro-mechanical transduction process in both forward and backward directions. It is capable of acting as an actuator to sweep the whisker and simultaneously as a sensor to sense the force, motion, and mechanical impedance at whisker tip. Its validity is confirmed by numerical simulation using a finite element model. A prototype is then fabricated and its transduction matrix is determined by parameter identification. The calibrated WT can accurately sense mechanical impedance which is directly related to stiffness, mass and damping. Subsequent vibrissal tactile sensing of sandpaper texture reveals that the real part of mechanical impedance sensed by WT is correlated with sandpaper roughness. Texture discrimination is successfully achieved by inputting the real part to a k-means clustering algorithm. The mechanical impedance sensing ability as well as other features of the WT such as simultaneous-actuation-and-sensing makes it a good solution to robotic tactile sensing.

  14. An active alignment scheme for the MPTS array. [contour sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R.

    1980-01-01

    In order to achieve and maintain required flatness of the antenna array, a rotating laser beam used for leveling applications on earth was utilized as a reference system. A photoconductive sensor with a reflective collecting surface determines the displacement and polarity of any misalignment and automatically engages a stepping motor to drive a variable-length mechanism to make the necessary corrections. Once aligned, little power is dissipated since a nulling bridge circuit that centers on the beam is used. A three-point subarray alignment arrangement is described which independently adjusts, in the three orthogonal directions, the height and tilt of subarrays within the MPTS array and readily adapts to any physical distortions of the secondary structure (such as that resulting from severe temperature extremes caused by an eclipse of the Sun). It is shown that only one rotating laser system is required since optical blockage is minimal on the array surface and that it is possible to incorporate a number of redundant laser systems for reliability without affecting the overall performance.

  15. Active Optical Sensors for Tree Stem Detection and Classification in Nurseries

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Miguel; Perez-Ruiz, Manuel; Valero, Constantino; Gliever, Chris J.; Hanson, Bradley D.; Slaughter, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Active optical sensing (LIDAR and light curtain transmission) devices mounted on a mobile platform can correctly detect, localize, and classify trees. To conduct an evaluation and comparison of the different sensors, an optical encoder wheel was used for vehicle odometry and provided a measurement of the linear displacement of the prototype vehicle along a row of tree seedlings as a reference for each recorded sensor measurement. The field trials were conducted in a juvenile tree nursery with one-year-old grafted almond trees at Sierra Gold Nurseries, Yuba City, CA, United States. Through these tests and subsequent data processing, each sensor was individually evaluated to characterize their reliability, as well as their advantages and disadvantages for the proposed task. Test results indicated that 95.7% and 99.48% of the trees were successfully detected with the LIDAR and light curtain sensors, respectively. LIDAR correctly classified, between alive or dead tree states at a 93.75% success rate compared to 94.16% for the light curtain sensor. These results can help system designers select the most reliable sensor for the accurate detection and localization of each tree in a nursery, which might allow labor-intensive tasks, such as weeding, to be automated without damaging crops. PMID:24949638

  16. Active optical sensors for tree stem detection and classification in nurseries.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Miguel; Perez-Ruiz, Manuel; Valero, Constantino; Gliever, Chris J; Hanson, Bradley D; Slaughter, David C

    2014-06-19

    Active optical sensing (LIDAR and light curtain transmission) devices mounted on a mobile platform can correctly detect, localize, and classify trees. To conduct an evaluation and comparison of the different sensors, an optical encoder wheel was used for vehicle odometry and provided a measurement of the linear displacement of the prototype vehicle along a row of tree seedlings as a reference for each recorded sensor measurement. The field trials were conducted in a juvenile tree nursery with one-year-old grafted almond trees at Sierra Gold Nurseries, Yuba City, CA, United States. Through these tests and subsequent data processing, each sensor was individually evaluated to characterize their reliability, as well as their advantages and disadvantages for the proposed task. Test results indicated that 95.7% and 99.48% of the trees were successfully detected with the LIDAR and light curtain sensors, respectively. LIDAR correctly classified, between alive or dead tree states at a 93.75% success rate compared to 94.16% for the light curtain sensor. These results can help system designers select the most reliable sensor for the accurate detection and localization of each tree in a nursery, which might allow labor-intensive tasks, such as weeding, to be automated without damaging crops.

  17. Transparent Stretchable Self-Powered Patchable Sensor Platform with Ultrasensitive Recognition of Human Activities.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byeong-Ung; Lee, Ju-Hyuck; Trung, Tran Quang; Roh, Eun; Kim, Do-Il; Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2015-09-22

    Monitoring of human activities can provide clinically relevant information pertaining to disease diagnostics, preventive medicine, care for patients with chronic diseases, rehabilitation, and prosthetics. The recognition of strains on human skin, induced by subtle movements of muscles in the internal organs, such as the esophagus and trachea, and the motion of joints, was demonstrated using a self-powered patchable strain sensor platform, composed on multifunctional nanocomposites of low-density silver nanowires with a conductive elastomer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate/polyurethane, with high sensitivity, stretchability, and optical transparency. The ultra-low-power consumption of the sensor, integrated with both a supercapacitor and a triboelectric nanogenerator into a single transparent stretchable platform based on the same nanocomposites, results in a self-powered monitoring system for skin strain. The capability of the sensor to recognize a wide range of strain on skin has the potential for use in new areas of invisible stretchable electronics for human monitoring. A new type of transparent, stretchable, and ultrasensitive strain sensor based on a AgNW/PEDOT:PSS/PU nanocomposite was developed. The concept of a self-powered patchable sensor system integrated with a supercapacitor and a triboelectric nanogenerator that can be used universally as an autonomous invisible sensor system was used to detect the wide range of strain on human skin.

  18. Bend, stretch, and touch: Locating a finger on an actively deformed transparent sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Mirza Saquib; Dobashi, Yuta; Preston, Claire; Wyss, Justin K. M.; Mirabbasi, Shahriar; Madden, John David Wyndham

    2017-01-01

    The development of bendable, stretchable, and transparent touch sensors is an emerging technological goal in a variety of fields, including electronic skin, wearables, and flexible handheld devices. Although transparent tactile sensors based on metal mesh, carbon nanotubes, and silver n