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Sample records for active military duty

  1. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... include participation in a military reserve or the National Guard unless the borrower is called to active... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military...

  2. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military...

  3. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military...

  4. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military...

  5. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military...

  6. Health promotion in active-duty military women with children.

    PubMed

    Agazio, Janice G; Ephraim, Paula M; Flaherty, Norma B; Gurney, Cynthia A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which selected demographic characteristics, definition of health, perceived health status, perceived self-efficacy, and resources are related to the health promoting behaviors of active-duty women with children and to describe qualitatively the experience of being an active-duty mother. Grounded in Pender's (1996) Health Promotion Model, this study used methodological triangulation to test a hypothesized model. A sample of 141 active-duty women with children using military health services participated. Resource availability and commitment were key components of being successful at balancing home and work demands.

  7. Intimate partner violence among military veterans and active duty servicemen.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Amy D; Panuzio, Jillian; Taft, Casey T

    2005-11-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious public health problem that has received increased attention in the military. We review existing literature regarding prevalence, consequences, correlates, and treatment of IPV perpetration among military veterans and active duty servicemen. Rates of IPV across these military populations range from 13.5% to 58%, with considerably lower rates obtained among samples not selected on the basis of psychopathology. For both military veterans and active duty servicemen, IPV results in significant victim injury and negative child outcomes, and problematic substance use, depression, and antisocial characteristics represent psychiatric correlates of IPV perpetration. For veterans, posttraumatic stress disorder also is an important correlate that largely accounts for the relationship between combat exposure and IPV perpetration. Additional correlates include military service factors, relationship adjustment, childhood trauma, and demographic factors. The only experimentally controlled IPV treatment study indicates that standard treatments are ineffective for active duty servicemen. Further research is needed to advance the development of etiological models of IPV among military populations, to determine whether such models necessarily differ from those developed among civilians, and to rigorously test IPV interventions tailored to the specific characteristics of these individuals.

  8. Perceived deprivation in active duty military nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Julie A; Fallacaro, Michael D; Pellegrini, Joseph E

    2009-02-01

    There is a shortage of military Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs). Relative deprivation is a perception of unfairness due to discrepancies between what one has and what one could or should have that is dependent on feelings (subjective data) and facts (objective data). Feelings of relative deprivation could contribute to the military CRNA shortage. The purposes of this study were to measure relative deprivation in active-duty military CRNAs and explore variables that correlate with relative deprivation. The descriptive, correlational study was conducted using a self-administered survey sent to 435 active-duty Army, Navy, and Air Force CRNAs. Surveys were distributed to subjects by mail and could be answered by mail or by secured website. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Analysis of the data revealed a calculated response rate of 57.7%. There was no significant correlation (P < .05) between years as a CRNA, military pay, promotion opportunity, or scope of practice/autonomy and relative deprivation. Correlations of the psychological factors "wanting" and "deserving" with relative deprivation were significant (P < .001). Further research is indicated to identify definitive factors that can be modified to improve feelings of deprivation as they relate to retention and recruitment of military CRNAs.

  9. Chronic pain management in the active-duty military

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David; Cohen, Steven P.

    2012-06-01

    As in the general population, chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome affliction in active-duty military personnel. Painful conditions in military members can be categorized broadly in terms of whether they arise directly from combat injuries (gunshot, fragmentation wound, blast impact) or whether they result from non-combat injuries (sprains, herniated discs, motor vehicle accidents). Both combat-related and non-combat-related causes of pain can further be classified as either acute or chronic. Here we discuss the state of pain management as it relates to the military population in both deployed and non-deployed settings. The term non-battle injury (NBI) is commonly used to refer to those conditions not directly associated with the combat actions of war. In the history of warfare, NBI have far outstripped battle-related injuries in terms not only of morbidity, but also mortality. It was not until improvements in health care and field medicine were applied in World War I that battle-related deaths finally outnumbered those attributed to disease and pestilence. However, NBI have been the leading cause of morbidity and hospital admission in every major conflict since the Korean War. Pain remains a leading cause of presentation to military medical facilities, both in and out of theater. The absence of pain services is associated with a low return-to-duty rate among the deployed population. The most common pain complaints involve the low-back and neck, and studies have suggested that earlier treatment is associated with more significant improvement and a higher return to duty rate. It is recognized that military medicine is often at the forefront of medical innovation, and that many fields of medicine have reaped benefit from the conduct of war.

  10. 2011 Health Related Behaviors Survey of Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    with about 1.4% reporting illicit drug, synthetic cannabis , or inhalant use in the past 12 months.1  About one-quarter (24.9%) of active duty personnel...drug use began by asking about the use of a variety of illicit drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Two substances, synthetic cannabis and...of any “illicit” drug use. Since survey administration in 2011, many of the compounds found in synthetic cannabis have been classified by the military

  11. Barriers and Facilitators of Breastfeeding for Primiparous Active Duty Military Mothers: A Qualitative Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-11

    allowing more rapid involution of the uterus and decreased postpartum bleeding. Amenorrhea caused by breastfeeding results in less menstrual blood loss in...BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS OF BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY Kristine Markley Bristow APPROVED... BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY” beyond brief excerpts is with the permission of the copyright owner, and

  12. Barriers and Facilitators of Breasteeding for Primiparous Active Duty Military Mothers: A Qualitative Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    Breastfeeding increases oxytocin levels, allowing more rapid involution of the uterus and decreased postpartum bleeding. Amenorrhea caused by breastfeeding ...BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS OF BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY Kristine Markley Bristow APPROVED...FACILITATORS OF BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  13. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Top-Line Estimates for Active-Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    SEXUAL ASSAULT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE U.S. MILITARY Top-Line Estimates for Active -Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace...SUBTITLE Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Top-Line Estimates for Active -Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace...and Tables Figures 1. Estimated Percentage of Active -Duty Service Men and Women Who Experienced Unwanted Sexual Contact in the Past Year, as

  14. Prospective post-traumatic stress disorder symptom trajectories in active duty and separated military personnel.

    PubMed

    Porter, Ben; Bonanno, George A; Frasco, Melissa A; Dursa, Erin K; Boyko, Edward J

    2017-06-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious mental illness that affects current and former military service members at a disproportionately higher rate than the civilian population. Prior studies have shown that PTSD symptoms follow multiple trajectories in civilians and military personnel. The current study examines whether the trajectories of PTSD symptoms of veterans separated from the military are similar to continuously serving military personnel. The Millennium Cohort Study is a population-based study of military service members that commenced in 2001 with follow-up assessments occurring approximately every 3 years thereafter. PTSD symptoms were assessed at each time point using the PTSD Checklist. Latent growth mixture modeling was used to compare PTSD symptom trajectories between personnel who separated (veterans; n = 5292) and personnel who remained in military service (active duty; n = 16,788). Four distinct classes (resilient, delayed-onset, improving, and elevated-recovering) described PTSD symptoms trajectories in both veterans and active duty personnel. Trajectory shapes were qualitatively similar between active duty and veterans. However, within the resilient, improving, and elevated recovering classes, the shapes were statistically different. Although the low-symptom class was the most common in both groups (veterans: 82%; active duty: 87%), veterans were more likely to be classified in the other three classes (in all cases, p < 0.01). The shape of each trajectory was highly similar between the two groups despite differences in military and civilian life.

  15. Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Assessment Program (DLAP), which incorporates the active duty health behaviors study and expands the scope to include the National Guard and Reserves, as...well as other special studies . Findings from the program provide information on the fitness of the force, including estimates of alcohol, drug, and...first to include Coast Guard personnel. The study has three broad aims for active duty military personnel: continue to assess the nature, extent, and

  16. They Self-Ignited: Adult Student Journeys to an Associate's Degree While Active Duty Military or Military Spouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibus, Lindsay Pohl

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study was undertaken in order to gain an understanding of the lived experiences of adult students and how they made meaning of their journey. To that end, through in-depth interviews with twenty participants, the study inquired into the journeys to an associate's degree of adult students who were also active duty military service…

  17. Spice: A New Legal Herbal Mixture Abused by Young Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Spice: A New “Legal” Herbal Mixture Abused by Young Active Duty Military Personnel Vikhyat S. Bebarta, MD Sasha Ramirez, DO Shawn M. Varney, MD...ABSTRACT. Spice is an herbal mixture smoked for euphoria and mixed with synthetic cannabinoids that are undetected on urine drug screens. Spice use has...drug paraphernalia. Spice is a new herbal mixture that is increasingly used in the military. Expected effects are similar to cannabis, but may include

  18. Active Duty Female Military’s Experience of Fear, Embarrassment, and Distress During Pelvic Examinations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    1 1. Sexual Violence While on Active Duty...............................................2 2. Sexual Violence Prior to Military...Service .........................................3 3. History of Sexual Violence Associated With Physical and Mental Health Issues...experience of one or more of the following: (1) verbal and/or physical sexual harassment; (2) attempted sexual assault, or the attempt to force sexual

  19. Military Deployments and Mental Health Utilization Among Spouses of Active Duty Service Members.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Todd C; Kum, Hye-Chung; Dabney, Alan; Wells, Rebecca

    2016-10-01

    Since the onset of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan attention has increased on the importance of mental health with military service members. An integral component, although far less studied, are the ties between mental health and military spouses. Military deployments place considerable stress on military families. This study analyzed the mental health utilization of military spouses of active duty service members assigned to an aircraft carrier between 2011 and 2014. A negative binomial generalized estimating equation was used to examine the rate of change in mental health utilization over time against various deployment phases. Associations emerged between select deployment phases (i.e., deployment 1, between deployments, deployment 2) with increases in mental health utilization ranging between 12% and 20% for military spouses. This study demonstrated, for military spouses, the in between deployment phase has associations with mental health utilization rates similar to actual deployed periods. As a result, military leaders should continue to monitor the well-being of their service members' families throughout all deployment phases.

  20. Dental utilization by spouses of active duty U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Chisick, M C; Poindexter, F R; York, A K

    1998-03-01

    This study explores dental utilization and access barriers to dental care for spouses of active duty U.S. military personnel as reported by their military sponsor. It also compares dental utilization of spouses and civilians. The data, collected using self-administered questionnaires between April 1994 and January 1995, are from 5,732 Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marine personnel with nonmilitary spouses. Comparative civilian data are from the most recent (1985-1986) U.S. oral health survey of working adults. Results show that dental utilization of military spouses parallels that of civilians. Cost was the most commonly cited barrier to dental care for spouses. Logistic regression results show that the likelihood of a spouse having seen a dentist within the past year is influenced by insurance status, sex, branch of service of sponsor, and rank of sponsor. Insurance status is the strongest predictor of dental utilization for spouses.

  1. Efficacy of a Tobacco Quitline in Active Duty Military and TRICARE Beneficiaries: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Klesges, Robert C; Ebbert, Jon O; Talcott, G Wayne; Thomas, Fridtjof; Richey, Phyllis A; Womack, Catherine; Hryshko-Mullen, Ann; Oh, John

    2015-08-01

    A higher proportion of military personnel than civilians smoke cigarettes. Few randomized trials of tobacco use interventions have been conducted in the U.S. military. We evaluated the efficacy of a tobacco quitline (QL) in 1298 active duty military personnel, their dependents, reservists, and retirees who smoke cigarettes. Participants were randomized to either a proactive (counselor-initiated) or reactive (participant-initiated) QL intervention for 8 weeks. The proactive condition included up to an 8-week supply of free nicotine replacement therapy, and the reactive condition included a 2-week supply. The primary outcome was 12-month smoking abstinence. The enrolled population was predominantly affiliated with the Air Force and Army. At the end of treatment, proactive treatment was associated with a greater odds of both prolonged (44.22% vs. 24.96%; odds ratio [OR] = 2.4, P < 0.0001) and 7-day point prevalence (49.92% vs. 28.20%; OR = 2.5, P < 0.0001) smoking abstinence, a difference that was maintained for prolonged smoking abstinence at 12 months (22.03% vs. 13.41%; OR = 1.8, P < 0.0001). Our findings provide evidence that a proactive QL with nicotine replacement therapy is highly efficacious among Air Force and Army active duty and TRICARE beneficiaries and would provide an effective telephonic treatment option for this population of smokers.

  2. Gender differences in the expression of PTSD symptoms among active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Laurel; Williams, Jason; Bray, Robert; Kandel, Denise

    2015-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and symptom factors in the total U.S. active duty force. Data were drawn from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel including 17,939 men and 6751 women from all services. The results indicated that women expressed more distress than men across almost all the symptoms on the PTSD Checklist except for hypervigilance. Women also scored significantly higher on all four factors examined: Re-experiencing, Avoidance, Emotionally Numb, Hyperarousal. More women than men were distressed by combat experiences that involved some type of violence, such as being wounded, witnessing or engaging in acts of cruelty, engaging in hand-to-hand combat, and, to a lesser extent, handling dead bodies. Men who had been sexually abused had a greater number of symptoms and were consistently more distressed than women on individual symptoms and symptom factors.

  3. Validity of the Virtual Reality Stroop Task (VRST) in active duty military.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Christina M; Reger, Greg M; Edwards, Joseph; Rizzo, Albert A; Courtney, Christopher G; Parsons, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    Virtual environments provide the ability to systematically deliver test stimuli in simulated contexts relevant to real world behavior. The current study evaluated the validity of the Virtual Reality Stroop Task (VRST), which presents test stimuli during a virtual reality military convoy with simulated combat threats. Active duty Army personnel (N = 49) took the VRST, a customized version of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM)-Fourth Edition TBI Battery (2007) that included the addition of the ANAM Stroop and Tower tests, and traditional neuropsychological measures, including the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System version of the Color-Word Interference Test. Preliminary convergent and discriminant validity was established, and performance on the VRST was significantly associated with computerized and traditional tests of attention and executive functioning. Valid virtual reality cognitive assessments open new lines of inquiry into the impact of environmental stimuli on performance and offer promise for the future of neuropsychological assessments used with military personnel.

  4. Test-retest reliability of four computerized neurocognitive assessment tools in an active duty military population.

    PubMed

    Cole, Wesley R; Arrieux, Jacques P; Schwab, Karen; Ivins, Brian J; Qashu, Felicia M; Lewis, Steven C

    2013-11-01

    Computerized neurocognitive assessment tools (NCATs) are increasingly used for baseline and post-concussion assessments. To date, NCATs have not demonstrated strong test-retest reliabilities. Most studies have used non-military populations and different methodologies, complicating the determination of the utility of NCATs in military populations. The test-retest reliability of four NCATs (Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics 4 [ANAM4], CNS-Vital Signs, CogState, and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test [ImPACT]) was investigated in a healthy active duty military sample. Four hundred and nineteen Service Members were randomly assigned to take one NCAT and 215 returned after approximately 30 days for retest. Participants deemed to have inadequate effort during one or both testing sessions, according to the NCATs scoring algorithms, were removed from analyses. Each NCAT had at least one reliability score (intraclass correlation) in the "adequate" range (.70-.79), only ImPACT had one score considered "high" (.80-.89), and no scores met "very high" criteria (.90-.99). However, overall test-retest reliabilities in four NCATs in a military sample are consistent with reliabilities reported in the literature and are lower than desired for clinical decision-making.

  5. Effects of combat deployment on risky and self-destructive behavior among active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Cynthia J; Stander, Valerie A; McWhorter, Stephanie K; Rabenhorst, Mandy M; Milner, Joel S

    2011-10-01

    Although research has documented negative effects of combat deployment on mental health, few studies have examined whether deployment increases risky or self-destructive behavior. The present study addressed this issue. In addition, we examined whether deployment effects on risky behavior varied depending on history of pre-deployment risky behavior, and assessed whether psychiatric conditions mediated effects of deployment on risky behavior. In an anonymous survey, active duty members of the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Navy (N = 2116) described their deployment experiences and their participation in risky recreational activities, unprotected sex, illegal drug use, self-injurious behavior, and suicide attempts during three time frames (civilian, military pre-deployment, and military post-deployment). Respondents also reported whether they had problems with depression, anxiety, or PTSD during the same three time frames. Results revealed that risky behavior was much more common in civilian than in military life, with personnel who had not deployed, compared to those who had deployed, reporting more risky behavior and more psychiatric problems as civilians. For the current time period, in contrast, personnel who had deployed (versus never deployed) were significantly more likely to report both risky behavior and psychiatric problems. Importantly, deployment was associated with increases in risky behavior only for personnel with a pre-deployment history of engaging in risky behavior. Although psychiatric conditions were associated with higher levels of risky behavior, psychiatric problems did not mediate associations between deployment and risky behavior. Implications for understanding effects of combat deployment on active duty personnel and directions for future research are discussed.

  6. Reference values for performance on the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics V3.0 in an active duty military sample.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Dennis L; Bleiberg, Joseph; Roebuck-Spencer, Tresa; Cernich, Alison N; Schwab, Karen; Ivins, Brian; Salazar, Andres M; Harvey, Sally C; Brown, Fred H; Warden, Deborah

    2006-10-01

    The Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) is a computerized measure of processing speed, cognitive efficiency, and memory. This study describes performance and psychometric properties of ANAM in an active duty, healthy military sample (N = 2,371) composed primarily of young (18-46 years) adult males. Rarely have neuropsychological reference values for use with individuals in the military been derived from a large, active duty military population, and this is the first computerized neuropsychological test battery with military-specific reference values. Although these results do not provide demographically corrected, formal normative data, they provide reference points for neuropsychologists and other health care providers who are using ANAM data in research or clinical settings, with patients of comparable demographics to the present sample.

  7. Prevalence of Perceived Stress and Mental Health Indicators Among Reserve-Component and Active-Duty Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Marian E.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Bray, Robert M.; Williams, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined stress levels and other indicators of mental health in reservists and active-duty military personnel by deployment status. Methods. We used data from the Department of Defense Health-Related Behaviors surveys, which collect comprehensive, population-based data for reserve and active-duty forces. Data were collected from 18 342 reservists and 16 146 active-duty personnel. Results. Overall, with adjustment for sociodemographic and service differences, reservists reported similar or less work and family stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms than did active-duty personnel. However, reservists who had been deployed reported higher rates of suicidal ideation and attempts than did active-duty personnel who had been deployed and higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology than did any active-duty personnel and reservists who had not been deployed. The highest rates of suicidal ideation and attempts were among reservists who had served in theaters other than Iraq and Afghanistan. Conclusions. Our results suggest that deployment has a greater impact on reservists than on active-duty members, thus highlighting the urgent need for services addressing reservists’ unique postdeployment mental health issues. Also, deployment to any theater, not only Iraq or Afghanistan, represents unique threats to all service members’ mental well-being. PMID:22571709

  8. Occupational Impact of Multilevel Cervical Disease Treated With Hybrid Cervical Disc Arthroplasty in Active Duty Military Population.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Andrew; Herzog, Josh; Caram, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the techniques, results, and complications of hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty in a high-demand military population. Emphasis is on the occupational impact and return to duty outcomes. This article is a case series with prospective follow-up of 30 hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty patients from the authors' institution. Average follow-up was 16.1 months. Average patient age was 39.7 years. Noncommissioned officer was the most common military rank. Cervical disc arthroplasty at C5/6 with fusion at C6/7 was the most common procedure (21/30). All classifications of military occupational specialty were represented. A total of 24/30 (80%) patients returned to duty (RTD) and 24/24 (100%) of RTD patients reported relief (postoperative improvement) compared with 4/6 (66.7%) medical evaluation board patients. Average RTD time was 15.6 weeks. All RTD patients maintained their preoperative military occupational specialty. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty has the potential to provide relief and return military patients to preoperative active duty status.

  9. Incidence of Norovirus-Associated Medical Encounters among Active Duty United States Military Personnel and Their Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Rha, Brian; Lopman, Benjamin A.; Alcala, Ashley N.; Riddle, Mark S.; Porter, Chad K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Norovirus is a leading cause of gastroenteritis episodes and outbreaks in US military deployments, but estimates of endemic disease burden among military personnel in garrison are lacking. Methods Diagnostic codes from gastroenteritis-associated medical encounters of active duty military personnel and their beneficiaries from July 1998–June 2011 were obtained from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. Using time-series regression models, cause-unspecified encounters were modeled as a function of encounters for specific enteropathogens. Model residuals (representing unexplained encounters) were used to estimate norovirus-attributable medical encounters. Incidence rates were calculated using population data for both active duty and beneficiary populations. Results The estimated annual mean rate of norovirus-associated medically-attended visits among active duty personnel and their beneficiaries was 292 (95% CI: 258 to 326) and 93 (95% CI: 80 to 105) encounters per 10,000 persons, respectively. Rates were highest among beneficiaries <5 years of age with a median annual rate of 435 (range: 318 to 646) encounters per 10,000 children. Norovirus was estimated to cause 31% and 27% of all-cause gastroenteritis encounters in the active duty and beneficiary populations, respectively, with over 60% occurring between November and April. There was no evidence of any lag effect where norovirus disease occurred in one population before the other, or in one beneficiary age group before the others. Conclusions Norovirus is a major cause of medically-attended gastroenteritis among non-deployed US military active duty members as well as in their beneficiaries. PMID:27115602

  10. Dental utilization of active duty/previous active duty US military: a cross-sectional analysis of the 2010 Behavior and Risk Surveillance Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sambamoorthi, Usha; Jurevic, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to understand dental utilization of 1) individuals serving/having served in active duty in the U.S. military as compared with the general public and 2) individuals who are currently serving as compared with individuals who are no longer active duty, but have been in active duty within the previous year. Methods The Behavior and Risk Surveillance Survey, 2010, was used in cross-sectional analyses to determine the comparisons. Chi square and multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied. Results 70.7% of participants who had served/currently serving had a dental visit within the previous 12 months; 69.9% of the general public reported a dental visit (p = 0.0265). 69.8% of participants who had served/currently serving had a dental hygiene visit within the previous 12 months and 68.1% of the general public reported a dental hygiene visit (p <0.0001). The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for participants who had served/currently serving vs. the general public was 1.10 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.05, 1.16; p<0.0001) for dental visits and 1.11 (95%CI 1.05, 1.17; p<0.0001) for dental hygiene visits. Conclusion Participants who are serving or have served were more likely to have any dental visit and dental hygiene visit than the general public; but the results were not substantively important. PMID:26086028

  11. Active-duty military service members’ visual representations of PTSD and TBI in masks

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Melissa S.; Kaimal, Girija; Gonzaga, Adele M. L.; Myers-Coffman, Katherine A.; DeGraba, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Active-duty military service members have a significant risk of sustaining physical and psychological trauma resulting in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Within an interdisciplinary treatment approach at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence, service members participated in mask making during art therapy sessions. This study presents an analysis of the mask-making experiences of service members (n = 370) with persistent symptoms from combat- and mission-related TBI, PTSD, and other concurrent mood issues. Data sources included mask images and therapist notes collected over a five-year period. The data were coded and analyzed using grounded theory methods. Findings indicated that mask making offered visual representations of the self related to individual personhood, relationships, community, and society. Imagery themes referenced the injury, relational supports/losses, identity transitions/questions, cultural metaphors, existential reflections, and conflicted sense of self. These visual insights provided an increased understanding of the experiences of service members, facilitating their recovery.

  12. Development of a multilevel prevention program for improved relationship functioning in active duty military members.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Richard E; Smith Slep, Amy M; Sabathne, C; Eckardt Erlanger, Ann C; Hsu, Teresa T; Snyder, Douglas K; Balderrama-Durbin, Christina; Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Talcott, Gerald W; Tatum, JoLyn; Baker, Monty T; Cassidy, Daniel; Sonnek, Scott M

    2015-06-01

    The relationships and families of active duty (AD) service members have been tremendously strained by deployments and high operations' tempo. This study involves the first steps in developing a multilevel approach to preventing relationship problems that integrates universal, selective, and indicated prevention/intervention. Such an approach has tremendous empirical support for parenting problems, but no similar program exists for couple problems. We conducted two studies with U.S. Air Force Security Forces members. Study 1 elicited the target population's topics of highest interest. For almost all topics, 70% to 95% of participants who desired information reported being underserved by current prevention offerings (i.e., not receiving needed information). Using the top topics generated in Study 1, we developed prevention information/action planning sheets on 18 relationship issues. In Study 2, we had AD members who gave feedback on the form and content of the sheets. Overall, AD members believed that the sheets were moderately to very useful and were presented well, had pithy but comprehensive information and conveyed the content well. Results imply that a multilevel approach may be a useful complement to formal services in meeting underserved military members' needs and that further research and development of this dissemination vector for evidence-based information is warranted.

  13. Association among functional-movement ability, fatigue, sedentary time, and fitness in 40 years and older active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Armbruster, Carol; Evans, Ellen M; Sexauer, Lisa; Peterson, James; Wyatt, William

    2013-12-01

    Identifying potential modifiable determinants of functional movement ability and fatigue may inform efforts to maintain constant physical readiness, especially in active duty military over 40 years of age, who are largely sedentary throughout their work day. The primary aim of this study was to determine the associations among conventional fitness measures (body composition, flexibility, and strength), sedentary behavior (sitting time), functional movement ability, and fatigue in military personnel. Volunteer active duty personnel 40 years of age and older (n = 569 males; n = 121 females; mean ± SD for total sample = 44.5 ± 4.1 years) were assessed for adiposity (%Fat), strength, flexibility, self-reported sitting time, perceived fatigue using the fatigue severity scale, and functional movement ability using the functional movement screening criteria. Greater flexibility was associated with better functional movement screening scores (r = 0.34, p < 0.05), and waist circumference and %Fat were inversely related to function (r = -0.26 and -0.21, p < 0.05). Furthermore, less sitting time (p < 0.001) was associated with less fatigue. Our data suggest that exercise training, reductions in daily sitting time, and weight management may be viable intervention targets to enhance functional movement ability and reduce fatigue in 40+ year old active duty military personnel.

  14. Pathways of Risk and Resilience: Impact of a Family Resilience Program on Active-Duty Military Parents.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, William R; Lester, Patricia; Milburn, Norweeta; Woodward, Kirsten; Stein, Judith

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, studies into the impact of wartime deployment and related adversities on service members and their families have offered empirical support for systemic models of family functioning and a more nuanced understanding of the mechanisms by which stress and trauma reverberate across family and partner relationships. They have also advanced our understanding of the ways in which families may contribute to the resilience of children and parents contending with the stressors of serial deployments and parental physical and psychological injuries. This study is the latest in a series designed to further clarify the systemic functioning of military families and to explicate the role of resilient family processes in reducing symptoms of distress and poor adaptation among family members. Drawing upon the implementation of the Families Overcoming Under Stress (FOCUS) Family Resilience Program at 14 active-duty military installations across the United States, structural equation modeling was conducted with data from 434 marine and navy active-duty families who participated in the FOCUS program. The goal was to better understand the ways in which parental distress reverberates across military family systems and, through longitudinal path analytic modeling, determine the pathways of program impact on parental distress. The findings indicated significant cross-influence of distress between the military and civilian parents within families, families with more distressed military parents were more likely to sustain participation in the program, and reductions in distress among both military and civilian parents were significantly mediated by improvements in resilient family processes. These results are consistent with family systemic and resilient models that support preventive interventions designed to enhance family resilient processes as an important part of comprehensive services for distressed military families.

  15. Pilot Study to determine interest of adult civilian dependants of active duty military personnel in participation in a weight control program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult civilian dependents of active duty military personnel (ADMP) may play a central role in influencing the home food environment and the risk of overweight and obesity in American Warfighters and military families. However, there is no information on whether this group would be receptive to weigh...

  16. Military unit support, postdeployment social support, and PTSD symptoms among active duty and National Guard soldiers deployed to Iraq.

    PubMed

    Han, Sohyun C; Castro, Frank; Lee, Lewina O; Charney, Meredith E; Marx, Brian P; Brailey, Kevin; Proctor, Susan P; Vasterling, Jennifer J

    2014-06-01

    Research suggests that military unit support and community postdeployment social support are associated with fewer PTSD symptoms following military deployment. This study extended prior research by examining the associations among predeployment unit support and PTSD symptoms before Iraq deployment as well as unit support, PTSD symptoms, and postdeployment social support after deployment among 835 U.S. Army and 173 National Guard soldiers. Multiple regression analyses indicated that predeployment unit support was not significantly associated with postdeployment PTSD severity in either group of soldiers, whereas higher unit support during deployment was significantly associated with lower postdeployment PTSD severity among active duty soldiers only. Among both groups, higher levels of postdeployment social support were associated with lower levels of postdeployment PTSD symptom severity. These findings suggest that postdeployment social support is a particularly strong buffer against postdeployment PTSD symptoms among both groups of soldiers whereas the effects of unit support may be limited.

  17. Stress, mental health, and job performance among active duty military personnel: findings from the 2002 Department of Defense Health-Related Behaviors Survey.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Laurel L; Williams, Thomas V; Kress, Amii M

    2006-09-01

    This study examined the extent to which high levels of occupational and family stress were associated with mental health problems and productivity loss among active duty military personnel. We analyzed data from the 2002 Department of Defense Survey of Health-Related Behaviors among Military Personnel, which provided extensive population-based information on 12,756 active duty personnel in all branches of the military worldwide. Military personnel reported higher levels of stress at work than in their family life. The personnel reporting the highest levels of occupational stress were those 25 or younger, those who were married with spouses not present, and women. Personnel with high levels of stress had significantly higher rates of mental health problems and productivity loss than those with less stress. We recommend that prevention and intervention efforts geared toward personnel reporting the highest levels of stress be given priority for resources in this population.

  18. Suicide Deaths of Active-Duty U.S. Military and Omega-3 Fatty-Acid Status: A Case-Control Comparison

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Deaths e1J Clin Psychiatry Suicide Deaths of Active-Duty US Military and Omega -3 Fatty - Acid Status: A Case-Control Comparison Michael D. Lewis, MD...factors. Objective: To determine whether deficiencies of neuroactive, highly unsaturated omega -3 essential fatty acids (n-3 HUFAs), in particular...U.S. Military And Omega -3 Fatty - Acid Status: A Case-Control Comparison 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  19. 41 CFR 302-2.9 - If I am furloughed to perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the relocation within the time limitation? 302-2.9 Section 302-2.9 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits §...

  20. 41 CFR 302-2.9 - If I am furloughed to perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the relocation within the time limitation? 302-2.9 Section 302-2.9 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits §...

  1. 41 CFR 302-2.9 - If I am furloughed to perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the relocation within the time limitation? 302-2.9 Section 302-2.9 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits §...

  2. 41 CFR 302-2.9 - If I am furloughed to perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the relocation within the time limitation? 302-2.9 Section 302-2.9 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits §...

  3. 41 CFR 302-2.9 - If I am furloughed to perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... perform active military duty, will I have to complete all aspects of the relocation within the time limitation? 302-2.9 Section 302-2.9 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS General Rules Time Limits §...

  4. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    protocol changes. The amendments were routed through all 5 IRBs (RAND, Palmer, NHP, NMCSD, and WRNMMC) prior to site implementation. Samueli ...Chiropractic care on reaction and response times. CONTACT INFORMATION: Ian Coulter, PhD ACT Principal Investigator RAND Corp Samueli Chair in...Chiropractic Research Ph: (563)885-5150 Email: christine.goertz@palmer.edu Joan Walter, JD, PA ACT Co-Investigator Samueli Institute/VP, Military

  5. Spice: a new "legal" herbal mixture abused by young active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Ramirez, Sasha; Varney, Shawn M

    2012-01-01

    Spice is an herbal mixture smoked for euphoria and mixed with synthetic cannabinoids that are undetected on urine drug screens. Spice use has increased in the military because it is considered legal and is not detected on urine drug screen. The authors describe 3 cases of Spice use in military members. Case 1: 19-year-old male presented with paranoia, agitation, and visual hallucinations after smoking the "Space" brand of Spice. Urine thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were negative. Case 2: 19-year-old female presented with sedation, amnesia, and agitation. She smoked the "Space" brand. She was alert within 3 hours of arrival. Urine GC-MS detected levorphanol. Case 3: 23-year-old male presented with delusions and paranoia. He complained of "monsters on his back." His symptoms improved in the emergency department (ED). His urine TLC and GC-MS were negative. All cases were admitted and evaluated by a toxicologist; all 3 had their history corroborated by family or friends, or with drug paraphernalia. Spice is a new herbal mixture that is increasingly used in the military. Expected effects are similar to cannabis, but may include more paranoia and hallucinations, and may differ for each brand.

  6. Rationale for Spiritually Oriented Cognitive Processing Therapy for Moral Injury in Active Duty Military and Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Harold G; Boucher, Nathan A; Oliver, Rev John P; Youssef, Nagy; Mooney, Scott R; Currier, Joseph M; Pearce, Michelle

    2017-02-01

    Wartime experiences have long been known to cause ethical conflict, guilt, self-condemnation, difficulty forgiving, loss of trust, lack of meaning and purpose, and spiritual struggles. "Moral injury" (MI) (also sometimes called "inner conflict") is the term used to capture this emotional, cognitive, and behavioral state. In this article, we provide rationale for developing and testing Spiritually Oriented Cognitive Processing Therapy, a version of standard cognitive processing therapy for the treatment of MI in active duty and veteran service members (SMs) with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms who are spiritual or religious (S/R). Many SMs have S/R beliefs that could increase vulnerability to MI. Because the injury is to deeply held moral standards and ethical values and often adversely affects spiritual beliefs and worldview, we believe that those who are S/R will respond more favorably to a therapy that directly targets this injury from a spiritually oriented perspective. An evidence-based treatment for MI in posttraumatic stress disorder that not only respects but also utilizes SMs' spiritual beliefs/behaviors may open the door to treatment for many S/R military personnel.

  7. Past Childhood Abuse and Present Alcohol Use as Risk Factors for Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempt in United States Military Active Duty Personnel, 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Abuse and Alcoholism, Research Findings on Underage Drinking and the Minimum Legal Drinking Age, 28 Aug 2008, URL: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/AboutNIAAA...a notable rate of current heavy drinking among members. Prior studies in the general population demonstrated associations between childhood abuse...of active duty military revealed a high prevalence of members with past childhood abuse and a notable rate of current heavy drinking among members

  8. New Sources of Active Duty Military Personnel: The Prior Service Accessions Pool.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    reverse aide it necessry a"d identify by block nmrber) See Reverse Side DO I J’AN75, 1473 EDITION OF INOV 48 1SOSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY...nurse 926 91E 91 Dental Dental hygienist 081 Specialist 94B 94 Food Service Cook, cafeteria 912 Specialist Food service worker 916 95B 95 Military police...houising, subs idized food prices, etc. ). It t heit ad ’justs the new f igure for di fferences in the tax treatment o~f m ili tary an~d cmvilIian

  9. Factors influencing a health promoting lifestyle in spouses of active duty military.

    PubMed

    Padden, Diane L; Connors, Rebecca A; Posey, Sheena M; Ricciardi, Richard; Agazio, Janice G

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the factors influencing the health promoting behaviors (HPBs) of military spouses. Pender's Health Promotion Model provided the theoretical framework guiding this study. One hundred twelve female spouses were surveyed regarding their perceived health status, perceived stress, self-efficacy, social support, and participation in HPBs. Perceived health status, self-efficacy, social support, and HPBs were positively related, whereas perceived stress was negatively related. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed perceived stress and social support to be predictive of an overall health promoting lifestyle (HPLPII), with the full model explaining 49.7% of the variance.

  10. The psychometric properties of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) in a clinical sample of active duty military service members.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Damon; Francis, Joseph P; Tafrate, Raymond Chip

    2005-11-01

    The increasing prominence of the construct of readiness to change in the field of substance abuse treatment has led to the development of instruments designed to assess the construct. We examined the psychometric properties of one such instrument, the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), in a sample of treatment-seeking, active duty, U.S. military service members diagnosed with alcohol and/or drug dependence. A principal components analysis of the items was consistent with the tridimensional structure of the SOCRATES found among treatment-seeking civilians but resulted in a 14-item scale, as opposed to the 19-item version found for civilians. Normative data, in the form of means and decile rankings for the SOCRATES subscales, for substance-dependent military patients are provided to complement those available for civilian patients. Future research should examine the concurrent and predictive validity of the scale.

  11. Supporting School Success for Homeless Children of Veterans and Active Duty Military Members. Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This brief is designed for local staff of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), state McKinney-Vento coordinators and school district McKinney-Vento liaisons, educators, and other providers of services to active members of the military and veterans, and their children. It provides basic information to assist homeless children of veterans or…

  12. Pilot study to determine interest of adult civilian dependents of active duty military personnel in participation in a weight control program.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Asma; Roberts, Susan B; Young, Andrew J; McGraw, Susan; Dallal, Gerard E; Das, Sai Krupa

    2014-03-01

    Adult civilian dependents of active duty military personnel (ADMP) may play a central role in influencing the home food environment and the risk of overweight and obesity in American Warfighters and military families. However, there is no information on whether this group would be receptive to weight control programs. We conducted a survey to determine the level of interest of adult civilian dependents of ADMP in participating in a group weight control program. Subjects were a convenience sample of 191 adult civilian dependents of ADMP (94% women, 6% men) based in Massachusetts and aged 33.8 ± 8.4 years, body mass index 25.5 ± 5.5 kg/m(2). Overall, there was a significant effect of body mass index on interest in program participation (p = 0.004). Eighty five percent of overweight participants and 100% of obese participants reported being Moderately Likely or Very Likely to participate in a provided weight control program. In overweight and obese survey respondents there was no significant effect of ADMP rank on interest in program participation (p = 0.34). These findings suggest that overweight and obese adult civilian dependents of ADMP may be very receptive targets for programs to control overweight and obesity in military families.

  13. The relationship between heavy alcohol use and work productivity loss in active duty military personnel: a secondary analysis of the 1995 Department of Defense Worldwide Survey.

    PubMed

    Fisher, C A; Hoffman, K J; Austin-Lane, J; Kao, T C

    2000-05-01

    This cross-sectional study examines the association between heavy alcohol use among active duty military personnel and five work productivity loss events that may have an adverse effect on military performance and readiness. Data for light (N = 3,147) and heavy (N = 2,242) drinkers, categorized by gender and pay grade, were obtained from the 1995 Department of Defense Worldwide Survey. Drinking classification was predefined using a standard algorithm that factored quantity and frequency of wine, beer, and liquor consumed. The relative risks of experiencing a productivity loss event at a particular level and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by applying the Mantel-Haenszel method after adjusting for age. The relative risks for increased self-reported lateness, leaving early, low performance, and on-the-job injury were all higher for heavy drinkers than for light drinkers. This association between the heavy-drinking population and four of five work productivity loss events indicates that prevention programs should target all personnel.

  14. Military Personnel: DOD Needs More Complete Data on Active-Duty Servicemembers Use of Food Assistance Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    programs. GAO reviewed information on government and charitable food assistance programs and policies . GAO also interviewed DOD and service officials at...quality-of-life matters.7 USD (P&R) is the Secretary’s senior policy advisor on recruitment, career development, and pay and benefits for military...Manpower Data Center, Military Community and Family Policy , and others. USD (P&R) responsibilities include, but are not limited to, developing policies

  15. The Role of Natural Support Systems in the Post-deployment Adjustment of Active Duty Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Janet A; Olson, Jonathan; Perkins, Daniel F; Travis, Wendy J; Ormsby, LaJuana

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the relations among three different types of naturally occurring social support (from romantic partners, friends and neighbors, and unit leaders) and three indices of service member well-being (self reports of depressive symptoms, satisfaction with military life, and perceptions of unit readiness) for service members who did and did not report negative experiences associated with military deployment. Data were drawn from the 2011 Community Assessment completed anonymously by more than 63,000 USAF personnel. Regression analyses revealed that higher levels of social support was associated with better outcomes regardless of negative deployment experiences. Evidence of moderation was also noted, with all forms of social support moderating the impact of negative deployment experiences on depressive symptoms and support from unit leaders moderating the impact of negative deployment experience on satisfaction with military life. No moderation was found for perceptions of unit readiness. Subgroup analyses revealed slightly different patterns for male and female service members, with support providing fewer moderation effects for women. These findings may have value for military leaders and mental health professionals working to harness the power of naturally occurring relationships to maximize the positive adjustment of service members and their families. Implications for practices related to re-integration of post-deployment military personnel are discussed.

  16. Impact of Transcendental Meditation on Psychotropic Medication Use Among Active Duty Military Service Members With Anxiety and PTSD.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Vernon A; Monto, Andrea; Williams, Jennifer J; Rigg, John L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether the regular practice of Transcendental Meditation (TM) decreased the need for psychotropic medications required for anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) management and increased psychological wellbeing. The sample included 74 military Service Members with documented PTSD or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified (ADNOS), 37 that practiced TM and 37 that did not. At 1 month, 83.7% of the TM group stabilized, decreased, or ceased medications and 10.8% increased medication dosage; compared with 59.4% of controls that showed stabilizations, decreases, or cessations; and 40.5% that increased medications (p < 0.03). A similar pattern was observed after 2 (p < 0.27), 3 (p < 0.002), and 6 months (p < 0.34). Notably, there was a 20.5% difference between groups in severity of psychological symptoms after 6 months, that is, the control group experienced an increase in symptom severity compared with the group practicing TM. These findings provide insight into the benefits of TM as a viable treatment modality in military treatment facilities for reducing PTSD and ADNOS psychological symptoms and associated medication use.

  17. Meta-analysis of average symptom change in inpatient treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder in veteran and active duty U.S. military samples.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Justin S; Loeffler, George H; Pulos, Steven; Campbell, Annie W

    2016-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that inpatient/residential treatment for PTSD associated with military duty should result in significantly lower PTSD symptoms at patient discharge compared to patient intake. Meta-analysis of effects comparing intake and discharge PTSD symptoms from 26 samples, reported in 16 studies, supported this hypothesis (d = -.73; p < .00001). Moderator analysis indicated between-study variation in PTSD symptom changes was predominantly due to the type of measure used, with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale producing the largest effect (d = -1.60). Larger effects were also observed for more recently published studies and studies with larger percentages of females. These findings support the efficacy of inpatient treatment for military PTSD, although a causal factor for effectiveness could not be identified. Further, the results indicate between-program comparisons of symptom reduction require the same measure of PTSD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Trends in the incidence of physician-diagnosed mild traumatic brain injury among active duty U.S. military personnel between 1997 and 2007.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Kenneth L; Marshall, Stephen W; Sturdivant, Rodney X; Lincoln, Andrew E

    2012-05-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has been described as the most common form of traumatic brain injury within military populations; however, few epidemiologic studies have examined incidence rates for mTBI in this population. The objective of this study was to examine trends in the incidence of mTBI among active-duty U.S. service members between 1997 and 2007. Specifically, we were interested in evaluating trends in the incidence rates in relation to the initiation of combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. A retrospective cohort study was conducted utilizing data extracted from the Defense Medical Surveillance System to identify all incident cases of mTBI within the study population. The primary outcome of interest was the incidence rate of mTBI per 1000 person-years. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to analyze the data. There were 98,012 mTBI cases and 14,956,955 person-years of follow-up, for an overall incidence rate of 6.55 (95% CI 6.51,6.59) per 1000 person-years. There was a steady increase in the mTBI rate over time. The average change in the mTBI rate was 8.5% (95% CI 8.2%,8.8%) per year; however, the rate rose dramatically in the last 2 years of the study period. Overall, for 2006-2007 versus 1997-2005, the rate ratio was 1.61 (95% CI 1.58,1.65). The greatest increase in the rate of mTBI was observed among those serving in Iraq, who experienced a 38.4% (95% CI 35.4%,41.1%) annual increase in new cases. The observed increase in the incidence of mTBI in this population has significant policy implications in terms of allocating appropriate health care resources.

  19. Unintended Pregnancy and Contraception Among Active Duty Servicewomen and Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Vinita; Borrero, Sonya; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla

    2012-01-01

    The number of women of childbearing age who are active duty service members or veterans of the U.S. military is increasing. These women may seek reproductive health care at medical facilities operated by the military, in the civilian sector or through the Department of Veterans Affairs. This article reviews the current data on unintended pregnancy and prevalence of and barriers to contraceptive use among active duty and veteran women. Active duty servicewomen have high rates of unintended pregnancy and low contraceptive use which may be due to official prohibition of sexual activity in the military, logistic difficulties faced by deployed women and limited patient and provider knowledge of available contraceptives. In comparison, little is known about rates of unintended pregnancy and contraceptive use among women veterans. Based on this review, research recommendations to address these issues are provided. PMID:22200252

  20. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Nonresponse Bias Analysis Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    the extent of nonresponse bias for the estimated rate of unwanted sexual contact (USC rate) in the active duty military. The level of nonresponse...of this research was to assess the extent of nonresponse bias for the estimated rate of unwanted sexual contact (USC rate)1 in the active duty...DMDC estimated that overall 1.9% (±0.45) of active duty military members had experienced unwanted sexual contact (USC) in the last 12 months. DMDC

  1. 78 FR 22252 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; FFEL/Direct Loan/Perkins Military...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; FFEL/ Direct Loan/Perkins Military Service.../Perkins Military Service Deferment/Post-Active Duty Student Deferment Request & SCRA Request. OMB Control... Number of Annual Burden Hours: 9,177. Abstract: The Military Service/Post-Active Duty Student...

  2. Tibial stress fractures in an active duty population: long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Kelly G; Dickens, Jonathan F; Rue, John-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tibial stress fractures are a common overuse injury among military recruits. The purpose of this study was to determine what, if any, long-term effects that tibial stress fractures have on military personnel with respect to physical activity level, completion of military training, recurrence of symptoms, and active duty service. Twenty-six military recruits included in a previous tibial stress fracture study were contacted 10 years after initial injury and asked a series of questions related to any long-term consequences of their tibial stress fracture. Of the 13 patients available for contact, no patients reported any necessary limited duty while on active duty, and no patient reported being separated or discharged from the military as a result of stress fracture. Tibial stress fractures in military recruits are most often an isolated injury and do not affect ability to complete military training or reflect a long-term need for decreased physical activity.

  3. The Effect of Deployment on the Rate of Major Depression and Substance Abuse in Active Duty Military from 2001-2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Major Depression , Rates of Substance Abuse, Deployment Effects, OEF, OIF, Comorbidity, Mental Health Illness 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...health illness . This thesis evaluates the effects of deployment history on major depression and substance abuse in the active duty population from...trend in mental health illness , depression , and substance abuse being the top two diagnoses. Mental health illness affects readiness, and the cost of

  4. Relationships Between Physical Fitness, Demands of Flight Duty, and Musculoskeletal Symptoms Among Military Pilots.

    PubMed

    Rintala, Harri; Häkkinen, Arja; Siitonen, Simo; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2015-12-01

    Although the mechanisms of G-induced stresses on the spinal structure of military pilots are well understood, less is known about relationships between the intensity of physical activity, fitness, occupational musculoskeletal symptoms, and the degree of resulting disabilities. During an aeromedical examination, Finnish military pilots answered a questionnaire on their flying experience, the occurrence of flight duty-related pain, the degree of resulting disabilities, and the intensity of physical activity they conducted. 195 males were selected for further analysis. They were divided into three groups, designated high G, low G, and HQ, according to their current flight duty profile. 93% of pilots who had passed fighter lead-in training reported flight duty-induced musculoskeletal disorders. The high-G group exhibited the highest aerobic capacity (p < 0.001) and muscular fitness scores (p < 0.001). The fittest individuals suffered markedly fewer disabilities than their less fit counterparts (p = 0.005). Flight hour accumulation among the subjects in the high-G group was associated (p = 0.010) with the occurrence of flight duty-induced disabilities. The fittest pilots flew aircraft that induce the heaviest accelerations. They also reported more musculoskeletal pain than the other pilots. Yet they seemed to experience fewer disabilities, which highlights the importance of physical training in the maintenance of operational readiness.

  5. Impact of childhood maltreatment on physical health-related quality of life in U.S. active duty military personnel and combat veterans.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Laura H; Lemmer, Jennifer; Nunnink, Sarah; McLay, Robert N; Baker, Dewleen G

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have found an association between childhood maltreatment (CM) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and to a lesser extent have considered whether psychiatric symptoms may explain the relationship. This study aimed to further our understanding of the link between CM and HRQoL by testing whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and physical HRQoL. Mediation models were examined in a sample of male Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) active duty and combat veterans (n=249). PTSD and depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between CM and overall physical HRQoL, as well as participation in daily activities due to physical health, bodily pain, and social functioning. Mediation of the relationship between childhood maltreatment and physical and social functioning by depression and PTSD symptoms may lend support to neurobiological hypotheses that childhood maltreatment sensitizes the nervous system and after repeated trauma may lead to the development of psychiatric symptoms, which have a major impact on morbidity and mortality.

  6. Virtual reality exposure therapy for active duty soldiers.

    PubMed

    Reger, Greg M; Gahm, Gregory A

    2008-08-01

    Virtual reality exposure (VRE) therapy is a promising treatment for a variety of anxiety disorders and has recently been extended to the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, the authors briefly review the rationale for VRE and its key processes. They illustrate the treatment with an active-duty Army soldier diagnosed with combat-related PTSD. Six sessions of VRE were provided using an immersive simulation of a military convoy in Iraq. Self-reported PTSD symptoms and psychological distress were reduced at posttreatment relative to pretreatment reports, as assessed by the PTSD Checklist-Military Version and the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale-24. The case outcomes parallel those reported in the research with other disorders and suggest the applicability of VRE in treating active duty soldiers with combat-related PTSD.

  7. The Potential Effects of the Defense Business Board Military Compensation Task Group’s 2011 Recommendations on Active-Duty Service Member Retirement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Plan 5 The military did not begin participating in the TSP until 2001. Although this is the case , the TSP has been in existence since 1986 when...Human Resource Strategy did not recommend cuts in military compensation due to the unfairness of the MRRA. Taking the lead from the DSB, Congress...per year (Henning, 2011). The task group drew three main conclusions from their study. First, the system is unfair because, due to the 20-year

  8. MILITARY PAY: Processes for Retaining Injured Army National Guard and Reserve Soldiers on Active Duty Have Been Improved, but Some Challenges Remain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    average length of stay of soldiers treated by civilian providers through CBHCI with the average length of stay of soldiers treated at MTFs...these metrics may be misleading. According to the Army’s metrics, the average length of stay , before being returned to duty or medically separated...for soldiers treated by civilian providers through CBHCI is 288 days whereas the average length of stay for soldiers

  9. Associations between sleep difficulties and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in veterans and active duty military personnel of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Christi S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Germain, Anne; Lindquist, Jennifer; Olsen, Maren; Brancu, Mira; Beckham, Jean C

    2015-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that sleep disturbance may play an important role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Despite the prevalence of sleep complaints among service members of recent military conflicts, few studies have examined associations between sleep and risk factors for CVD in this population. Symptom checklist items regarding distress about "trouble falling asleep" and "restless/disturbed sleep" were used as proxies for sleep onset and maintenance difficulties to examine these associations in US military service members of recent conflicts. Veterans having both sleep onset and maintenance difficulties had greater odds of being a current smoker and having psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses. Increased odds of a self-reported hypertension diagnosis and elevated systolic blood pressure were also found in certain subsets of this sample. Findings highlight the need for greater recognition of sleep difficulties as a CVD risk factor in a population known to be at increased risk for this condition.

  10. Mental Health Concerns: Veterans & Active Duty

    MedlinePlus

    ... through My Health e Vet , the VA’s online personal health record. This site for veterans, active duty ... their families provides access to health records, a personal health journal, online VA prescription refill information and ...

  11. The Effects of Military Assignments and Duties on the Martial Status of Navy Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    are beyond the scope of the thesis. One of the important issues about marital status is the effect of time . It is very likely that, in the first...not. Logit multivariate regres sion models are used to estimate the effects of military assignments and duties on the marital status of Navy...important because of its emphasis, for the first time , on the effects of different duties and assignments on the marital status of Navy officers. On

  12. Impact of Military JP-8 Fuel on Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Performance and Emissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-07

    Filipi, Z., Assanis, D., Kuo, T.-W., Najt, P., Rask, R. “New Heat Transfer Correlation for the HCCI Engine Derived from Measurements of...Impact of Military JP-8 Fuel on Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Performance and Emissions Gerald Fernandes1, Jerry Fuschetto1, Zoran Filipi1 and Dennis...with the operation of a diesel engine with JP- 8 fuel due to its lower density and viscosity, but few experimental studies suggest that kerosene

  13. [Influence of chronic diseases of reserve military personnel of Ukraine army on their capability to do their duty according military speciality].

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, S N

    2008-01-01

    The author presents in the article the way of distribution of reserve military personnel of Ukraine army on special groups depending on presence of chronical diseases or pathological conditions. The author analyzed more than 800 personal files of military personnel and other materials related to assessment of functional state of this personnel and efficiency of performing their duty. Data received from Kiev commissariats and other Ukraine military Institutions have been analyzed. The proposed way of military personnel distribution allows optimizing their operating mode by creating a special mode where resource of military personnel's professional health is preserved.

  14. Brucella melitensis infection following military duty in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Bechtol, D; Carpenter, L R; Mosites, E; Smalley, D; Dunn, J R

    2011-11-01

    Brucellosis is a common zoonotic disease worldwide; however, few cases are reported in the US. Brucella melitensis infections are primarily acquired via consumption of high-risk foods or travel to endemic areas. We describe a case of B. melitensis infection in a Tennessee soldier following deployment in Iraq. Initial symptoms included knee and back pain. Culture of an aspirate of the left sacroiliac joint yielded B. melitensis. Genetic analysis indicated that this isolate came from the Middle East. Investigation of laboratory workers identified risky exposures and positive serology prompting post-exposure prophylaxis. Military personnel and other travellers should be advised to reduce risk regarding food consumption and animal contact in endemic areas. Additionally, medical providers should remain vigilant for non-endemic zoonoses among recent travellers.

  15. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) Duties of Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration....

  16. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) Duties of Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration....

  17. 12 CFR 1022.121 - Active duty alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Active duty alerts. 1022.121 Section 1022.121 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) Duties of Consumer Reporting Agencies Regarding Identity Theft § 1022.121 Active duty alerts. (a) Duration....

  18. Students Help a Teacher Called to Active Duty: What a Great Feeling to Have a Group of Students Who Are Excited and Want to Help a Teacher in Need so Many Miles from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuill, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The author shares how his technology education students at Tecumseh Middle School help his former student from a Purdue class, Ryan Smith, who was called to active military duty. Ryan was teaching technology education at Lafayette Jefferson High School when he was called by the military in the fall of 2004 to report to active duty. Before…

  19. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  20. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  1. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  2. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  3. 22 CFR 19.11-6 - Death during active duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death during active duty. 19.11-6 Section 19.11... PARTICIPANTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM § 19.11-6 Death during active duty. (a...-2 computed as if the participant had retired on the date of death unless a court order or...

  4. A Multisite, Randomized Clinical Trial of Virtual Reality and Prolonged Exposure Therapy for Active Duty Soldiers with PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Therapy (PE) Post - Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) BODY: Overview This study was a randomized, waitlist...therapy (PE) with a waitlist (WL) group in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in active duty (AD) Soldiers with combat-related...subjects randomized. 15. SUBJECT TERMS exposure therapy, posttraumatic stress disorder , virtual reality, military, prolonged exposure 16

  5. Deployment stressors and posttraumatic stress symptomatology: comparing active duty and National Guard/Reserve personnel from Gulf War I.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Dawne S; Samper, Rita E; King, Daniel W; King, Lynda A; Martin, James A

    2008-02-01

    The increased use of National Guard and Reserve (NG/R) military personnel in current conflicts raises the question of whether deployment experiences and their associations with posttraumatic stress symptomatology differ for active duty and NG/R military personnel. To date, very few studies are available on this topic. Moreover, it is unclear whether the impact of military status differs for women and men. We addressed these research issues in a sample of 311 female and male Gulf War I veterans. Several differences were observed in deployment stressor exposures and results based on differential associations generally suggested more negative impacts of deployment experiences for active duty women and NG/R men. The potential role of unit cohesion in explaining these findings is discussed.

  6. Understanding and Reducing Off-Duty Vehicle Crashes Among Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Ecola, Liisa; Collins, Rebecca L.; Eiseman, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The authors review traffic safety in the United States, with specific reference to military personnel, focusing on safety interventions and attempts to change driver behavior and decisions. Overall, driving has become safer over the last 20 years: A variety of factors seem to have contributed to this increased safety—better vehicle safety features, better road safety features, decreases in teenage drunk driving, more seat belt use, and at least recently, fewer vehicle miles traveled. In contrast, motorcycle riding, a topic of particular interest to the military, is becoming more dangerous. The main difference between the military and civilian population is the proportion of military crash fatalities on motorcycles—the U.S. rate is currently about 15 percent of fatalities, while in some military branches the rate is on average 35–40 percent. This review shows that the following safety interventions tend to help in the reduction of vehicle crashes and that some in particular may be useful in the military setting: (1) better enforcement of underage drinking laws and continuation of alcohol deglamorization campaigns (Department of Defense regulations exist, but underage drinking seems to be relatively common); (2) high-visibility enforcement techniques for sobriety checkpoints; (3) high-visibility enforcement techniques for seat belt use; (4) adoption of a lower blood alcohol concentration level (such as 0.05) for motorcyclists, since the evidence shows that motorcyclists' ability to drive safely begins declining at lower levels than those for car drivers; (5) screening—perhaps as part of military medical assessment—and brief intervention with a trained counselor for at-risk drinkers, since they are at higher risk for drinking and driving; (6) media campaigns that are paired with community activities that also emphasize driver safety, such as workshops or fairs and with enforcement of driving regulations, and targeted at the drivers at highest risk

  7. Mental Health and Substance Use Factors Associated with Unwanted Sexual Contact among U.S. Active Duty Service Women

    PubMed Central

    Stahlman, Shauna; Javanbakht, Marjan; Cochran, Susan; Hamilton, Alison B.; Shoptaw, Steven; Gorbach, Pamina M.

    2015-01-01

    Many U.S. military women are exposed to unwanted sexual contact during military service, which can have important implications for mental health. Using data from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors, we employed multiple logistic regression methods to examine whether unwanted sexual contact was associated with stress, screening positive for mental disorders, or substance use, among active duty service women. The sample included 7,415 female military personnel, of whom 13.4% reported unwanted sexual contact (including any touching of genitals) since entering the military. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, factors independently associated with unwanted sexual contact included military-related stress (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 2.44), family/personal life-related stress (AOR = 1.78), and gender-related stress (AOR = 1.98) in the past 12 months. In addition, screening positive for depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, psychological distress, and suicidal ideation or attempt were associated with unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.57–2.11). For drug/alcohol use, only misuse of tranquilizers/muscle relaxers (past 12 months) was associated with report of unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.35). Given the prevalence of unwanted sexual contact and corresponding adverse health outcomes in this sample of active duty women, strategies to create military structural/cultural changes and reduce gender-related stress and sexism are needed. PMID:25976935

  8. Determining optimal clothing ensembles based on weather forecasts, with particular reference to outdoor winter military activities.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Marco; Pavlinic, Daniela Z; Crisci, Alfonso; Capecchi, Valerio; Orlandini, Simone; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2011-07-01

    Military and civil defense personnel are often involved in complex activities in a variety of outdoor environments. The choice of appropriate clothing ensembles represents an important strategy to establish the success of a military mission. The main aim of this study was to compare the known clothing insulation of the garment ensembles worn by soldiers during two winter outdoor field trials (hike and guard duty) with the estimated optimal clothing thermal insulations recommended to maintain thermoneutrality, assessed by using two different biometeorological procedures. The overall aim was to assess the applicability of such biometeorological procedures to weather forecast systems, thereby developing a comprehensive biometeorological tool for military operational forecast purposes. Military trials were carried out during winter 2006 in Pokljuka (Slovenia) by Slovene Armed Forces personnel. Gastrointestinal temperature, heart rate and environmental parameters were measured with portable data acquisition systems. The thermal characteristics of the clothing ensembles worn by the soldiers, namely thermal resistance, were determined with a sweating thermal manikin. Results showed that the clothing ensemble worn by the military was appropriate during guard duty but generally inappropriate during the hike. A general under-estimation of the biometeorological forecast model in predicting the optimal clothing insulation value was observed and an additional post-processing calibration might further improve forecast accuracy. This study represents the first step in the development of a comprehensive personalized biometeorological forecast system aimed at improving recommendations regarding the optimal thermal insulation of military garment ensembles for winter activities.

  9. Determining optimal clothing ensembles based on weather forecasts, with particular reference to outdoor winter military activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, Marco; Pavlinic, Daniela Z.; Crisci, Alfonso; Capecchi, Valerio; Orlandini, Simone; Mekjavic, Igor B.

    2011-07-01

    Military and civil defense personnel are often involved in complex activities in a variety of outdoor environments. The choice of appropriate clothing ensembles represents an important strategy to establish the success of a military mission. The main aim of this study was to compare the known clothing insulation of the garment ensembles worn by soldiers during two winter outdoor field trials (hike and guard duty) with the estimated optimal clothing thermal insulations recommended to maintain thermoneutrality, assessed by using two different biometeorological procedures. The overall aim was to assess the applicability of such biometeorological procedures to weather forecast systems, thereby developing a comprehensive biometeorological tool for military operational forecast purposes. Military trials were carried out during winter 2006 in Pokljuka (Slovenia) by Slovene Armed Forces personnel. Gastrointestinal temperature, heart rate and environmental parameters were measured with portable data acquisition systems. The thermal characteristics of the clothing ensembles worn by the soldiers, namely thermal resistance, were determined with a sweating thermal manikin. Results showed that the clothing ensemble worn by the military was appropriate during guard duty but generally inappropriate during the hike. A general under-estimation of the biometeorological forecast model in predicting the optimal clothing insulation value was observed and an additional post-processing calibration might further improve forecast accuracy. This study represents the first step in the development of a comprehensive personalized biometeorological forecast system aimed at improving recommendations regarding the optimal thermal insulation of military garment ensembles for winter activities.

  10. Precipitating circumstances of suicide among active duty U.S. Army personnel versus U.S. civilians, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents' military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent.

  11. Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide among Active Duty U.S. Army Personnel Versus U.S. Civilians, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents’ military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  12. GIS interoperability: current activities and military implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Sylvia

    1997-07-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are gaining importance in military operations because of their capability to spatially and visually integrate various kinds of information. In an era of limited resources, geospatial data must be shared efficiently whenever possible. The military-initiated Global Geospatial Information and Services (GGI&S) Project aims at developing the infrastructure for GIS interoperability for the military. Current activities in standardization and new technology have strong implications on the design and development of GGI&S. To facilitate data interoperability at both the national and international levels, standards and specifications in geospatial data sharing are being studied, developed and promoted. Of particular interest to the military community are the activities related to the NATO DIGEST, ISO TC/211 Geomatics standardization and the industry-led Open Geodata Interoperability Specifications (OGIS). Together with new information technology, standardization provides the infrastructure for interoperable GIS for both civilian and military environments. The first part of this paper describes the major activities in standardization. The second part presents the technologies developed at DREV in support of the GGI&S. These include the Open Geospatial Datastore Interface (OGDI) and the geospatial data warehouse. DREV has been working closely with Defence Geomatics and private industry in the research and development of new technology for the GGI&S project.

  13. Genetics and Other Risk Factors for Past Concussions in Active-Duty Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Dretsch, Michael N; Silverberg, Noah; Gardner, Andrew J; Panenka, William J; Emmerich, Tanja; Crynen, Gogce; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Chaytow, Helena; Mathura, Venkat; Crawford, Fiona C; Iverson, Grant L

    2017-02-15

    Risk factors for concussion in active-duty military service members are poorly understood. The present study examined the association between self-reported concussion history and genetics (apolipoprotein E [APOE], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], and D2 dopamine receptor genes [DRD2]), trait personality measures (impulsive-sensation seeking and trait aggression-hostility), and current alcohol use. The sample included 458 soldiers who were preparing to deploy for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. For those with the BDNF Met/Met genotype, 57.9% (11/19) had a history of one or more prior concussions, compared with 35.6% (154/432) of those with other BDNF genotypes (p = 0.049, odds ratio [OR] = 2.48). APOE and DRD2 genotypes were not associated with risk for past concussions. Those with the BDNF Met/Met genotype also reported greater aggression and hostility personality characteristics. When combined in a predictive model, prior military deployments, being male, and having the BDNF Met/Met genotype were independently associated with increased lifetime history of concussions in active-duty soldiers. Replication in larger independent samples is necessary to have more confidence in both the positive and negative genetic associations reported in this study.

  14. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  15. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  16. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  17. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  18. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  19. 1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel: Statistical Methodology Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    6218 Ask for report by ADA 386 288 DMDC Report No. 2000-010 September 2000 1999 SURVEY OF ACTIVE DUTY PERSONNEL: STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY REPORT...STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY REPORT Executive Summary This report describes the sampling design, sample selection, estimation procedures, and the missing data

  20. Changes in Career Intent during Initial Tour of Active Duty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenk, Faye

    The study was designed to determine the predictability of an Air Force officer's career decision and to evaluate relationships between career decision and various demographic, environmental, and attitudinal factors. Information on this group was compiled for the period before commissioning and through five years of active duty. The report presents…

  1. The Effect of Career Assessments and Follow-Up Counseling on Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy (CDMSE) among Active-Duty Coast Guard Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    This study (a) examined career decision-making self-efficacy (CDMSE) differences across gender, age, military grade, level of education, previous career assessments, previous career counseling, and currently attending college, and (b) examined the effect of career assessments with follow-up counseling on CDMSE among active-duty Coast Guard…

  2. Military Personnel: DOD Needs to Take Further Actions to Prevent Sexual Assault During Initial Military Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    sexual assaults within the military still go unreported. Based on the results of a DOD 2012 survey of active duty servicemembers, DOD estimated that...about 26,000 active duty 2Department of Defense, Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military: Fiscal Year 2013 (Apr. 22...to estimate the past year prevalence of unwanted sexual contact among active duty servicemembers. Although the survey term “unwanted sexual contact

  3. House Divided: The Splitting of Active Duty Civil Affairs Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    training of Active Duty Civil Affairs. This will allow the reader to become familiar with the Active branch as a whole and show the different...readers are extremely familiar with the large-scale environment given the nightly news coverage, but the small-scale environment is decidedly different...apparatus and are familiar with operating in conjunction with embassies and country teams. While conventional forces also have their own intelligence

  4. Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Violence Among Active Duty Women and Wives of Active Duty Men - Comparisons with Women in the U.S. General Population, 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Violence Among Active Duty Women and Wives of Active Duty Men—Comparisons with Women...Technical Report Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence, Sexual Violence, and Stalking among Active Duty Women and Wives of Active Duty Men— Comparisons...the General U.S. Population, Active Duty Women, and Wives of Active Duty Men by Type of Perpetrator — NISVS 2010 Table 3 Prevalence of Contact Sexual

  5. Department of Defense Offshore Military Activities Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-16

    joint use of offshore areas for military and mineral exploration or developmental purposes. (See enclosure 2.) In carrying out negotiations with elements...that from time to time and from place to place the requirements for mineral exploration /development and defense related activities may conflict. In...area, certain defense- related activities on the OCS may be irreconcilable with mineral exploration / development and will, under the procedures

  6. Motor vehicle crashes among active duty U.S. Army personnel, 1999 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Lauren M; Pollack, Keshia M; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Canada, Sara; Baker, Susan P

    2011-09-01

    In the U.S. Army, motor vehicle crashes (MVCs), both privately owned and military, are a leading cause of injury and death. Few studies have described the distribution and trends of MVCs among Army personnel, which may have been impacted by current military missions. This descriptive study of risk factors and select outcomes is from safety report data maintained by the U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center on 11,469 active duty Army personnel involved in MVCs, 1999-2006. The majority (66%) of Soldiers in MVCs were in military vehicles within the continental United States (68%). The average age of individuals involved in MVCs was 27.7 years old. Males had a consistently higher MVC rate than females. The average cost per MVC related to property damage and injuries was $36,039 and $24,038, respectively. Results suggest a need for additional exploration of MVCs involving Army vehicles, which were the most common and among the most costly.

  7. 2010 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. Overview Report on Sexual Harassment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    2010 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members Overview Report on Sexual Harassment Additional copies of this report may...SURVEY OF ACTIVE DUTY MEMBERS: OVERVIEW REPORT ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT Lindsay M. Rock and Rachel N. Lipari Defense Manpower... ACTIVE DUTY MEMBERS: OVERVIEW REPORT ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT Executive Summary Background This report presents the results on issues related to

  8. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certain active duty members of the Uniformed Services assigned to remote locations in the United States... active duty service member; and (ii) Pursuant to the assignment of such duty, resides at a location that... uniformed service concerned, based on a determination that such waiver is necessary to assure...

  9. Military Service, Race, and the Transition to Marriage and Cohabitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth, the author investigates the relationship between military service and the transition to the first intimate union. The author argues that active-duty military service promotes marriage over cohabitation. The results are consistent with this argument, showing that active-duty members of…

  10. Incidence and Duration of Breastfeedings in Active Duty Military Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    mothers who breastfeed their babies to 75% in the early postpartum period and increase the number of mothers who nurse for up to six months to fifty...n=429,840) of the 720,000 women sampled were breastfeeding in the hospital (Ryan, 1997). At 6 months postpartum , 21.6% (n=155,520) of the women...responses to a postpartum questionnaire sent to mothers. Comparing rates of breastfeeding in 1989 to the rates in 1995, breast-feeding initiation increased

  11. Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in Active Duty Military (BALSAM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    testing and serial testing scenarios. If the biomarkers are viewed as indicators of disease process, a serial testing approach will improve our...disease, we would wish to minimize false negatives. A parallel testing approach to the biomarkers will allow us to maximize sensitivity and rule-out...Cincinnati, all remaining samples at the end of the study will we be decontaminated by bleaching followed by autoclave sterilization then discarded

  12. Satisfaction with Military Dental Care by Active Duty Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    problem and may contribute to reducing the morale similar score in Table II would indicate a satisfaction level be- of soldiers as well . As Marine Corps...ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) In fall 1992, a random, worldwide sample of 5,474 enlisted personnel and 4,036 officers was surveyed on satisfaction with twenty...composite overall satisfaction score using factor analysis. Composite scores were regressed on demographics, dental utilization, and access .barriers

  13. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  14. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  15. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  16. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  17. 7 CFR 1400.213 - Military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military personnel. 1400.213 Section 1400.213... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.213 Military personnel. If a person is called to active duty in the military before a determination is made that the person...

  18. Environmental factors, immune changes and respiratory diseases in troops during military activities.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Chciałowski, Andrzej; Korsak, Jolanta

    2013-06-01

    Combat operations in contemporary theaters of war, as well as combat training, are carried out in all parts of the world, typically in a harsh environment. Specific environmental conditions, such as heat, cold, high-altitudes, desert climates, as well as chemical and biological pollution of both the atmosphere and soil, together with over-exertion, food restrictions, sleep deprivation, and psychological stress can all result in changes in the immune system and the occurrence of associated diseases. Respiratory diseases are one of the most common health problems among military personnel participating in combat training or deployed to operations in areas characterized by difficult climatic and sanitary conditions. They are, therefore, one of the main reasons for military personnel requiring ambulant and hospital treatment. The aim of the study was to discuss the influence of environmental factors and the conditions in which active duty is performed on changes in the immune system and the occurrence of respiratory tract diseases in a military environment.

  19. Disaster Preparedness Among Active Duty Navy, Retirees, Veterans, and Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Annis, Heather; Jacoby, Irving; DeMers, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Background With the increase in natural and manmade disasters, preparedness remains a vital area of concern. Despite attempts by government and non-government agencies to stress the importance of preparedness, national levels of preparedness remain unacceptably low. A goal of commands and installations is to ensure that US Navy beneficiaries are well prepared for disasters. This is especially critical in active service members to meet mission readiness requirements in crisis settings. Objective To evaluate active duty personnel, dependents, veterans, and retirees regarding disaster preparedness status. Methods The authors conducted an anonymous 29-question survey for US Navy active duty, dependents, veterans and retirees of the Greater San Diego Region evaluating actual basic disaster readiness as determined by FEMA standards of 3-day minimum supply of emergency stores and equipment. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used to analyze data. Results 1150 surveys were returned and analyzed. 983 were sufficiently complete for logistic regression analysis with 394 responding “Yes” to having a 72-hour disaster kit (40.1%) while 589 had “No” as a response (59.9%). Conclusion The surveyed population is no more prepared than the general public though surveyed beneficiaries overall are at upper range of preparedness. Lower income and levels of education were associated with lack of preparedness, whereas training in disaster preparedness or having been affected by disasters increased the likelihood of being adequately prepared. Unlike results seen in the general public, those with chronic healthcare needs in our surveyed population were more, rather than less likely to be prepared and those with minor children were less likely, rather than more likely to be prepared. Duty status was assessed and only veterans were significantly more likely than most to be prepared. PMID:26903142

  20. Life as a military spouse.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Military spouses live a capricious life. They often move away from everything familiar to support their active duty spouse. Honor, courage, and commitment are values military spouses need to assist them in being strong and resilient. Effective coping skills aid in the various roles these spouses assume, which may cause personal sacrifices to be made in support of the service member.

  1. The Limits of Military Officers’ Duty to Obey Civilian Orders: A Neo-classical Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    and legally —to obey civilian orders, even as they agree that this rule of obedience has excep- tions. Commentators tend to differ, however, on the...disagreement about the breadth of the exceptions tends to assume that their bases—moral, professional, and legal —are incommensurable. This monograph...exercise of their own expertise as “statesmen.” Part III maps this latter exception onto the two general exceptions to military obedience, il- legal

  2. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. Survey Note and Briefing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-15

    Exercises /Alerts Percent of Active Duty Members Who Experienced Unwanted Sexual Contact, by Gender WGRA 2012 Q35 Margins of error range from ±4% to ±12...harassment in the active duty force. This survey note and accompanying briefing (Appendix) provide information on the prevalence rates of sexual ...ELATIONS SURVEYSH R 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members 2 Unwanted Sexual Contact 2006 2010 2012 Women: 6.8% Men

  3. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Administration, Datasets and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-04

    ABSTRACT This report documents the administration of the 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Sexual ... Active Duty Members Information Gathered on the Survey G-2 HOMESAFE To what extent do/would you feel safe from being sexually assaulted on your...of Active Duty Members Information Gathered on the Survey G-26 In an effort to prevent sexual assault, please indicate how well your unit

  4. Mood symptoms contribute to working memory decrement in active-duty soldiers being treated for posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dretsch, Michael N; Thiel, Kenneth J; Athy, Jeremy R; Irvin, Clinton R; Sirmon-Fjordbak, Bess; Salvatore, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A significant proportion of military veterans of operations in Afghanistan and Iraq have been diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Growing evidence suggests that neuropsychological deficits are a symptom of PTSD. The current study investigated neurocognitive functioning among soldiers diagnosed with PTSD. Specifically, active-duty soldiers with and without a diagnosis of PTSD were assessed for performance on tests of attention and working memory. In addition, factors such as combat experience, depression, anxiety, PTSD symptom severity, and alcohol consumption were explored as possible mediators of group differences in neurocognitive functioning. Twenty-three active-duty soldiers diagnosed with PTSD were matched with 23 healthy Soldier controls; all were administered the Attention Network Task (ANT), Backward Digit Span (BDS) task, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, PTSD Checklist—Military Version, Combat Exposure Scale, and Modified Drinking Behavior Questionnaire. Soldiers diagnosed with PTSD performed significantly worse on the working memory task (BDS) than healthy controls, and reported greater levels of PTSD symptoms, combat exposure, depression, and anxiety. However, after controlling for depression and anxiety symptoms, the relationship between PTSD and working memory was no longer present. The results indicate that PTSD is accompanied by deficits in working memory, which appear to be partially attributed to anxiety and depression symptoms. PMID:22950039

  5. Functional Improvement Following Diastasis Rectus Abdominus Repair in an Active Duty Navy Female.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Katerina M; Golberg, Kathy F; Field, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Return to physical activity following childbirth can be a difficult process complicated by structural changes during pregnancy. A common problem is the development of a diastasis of the rectus abdominus (DRA), defined as a horizontal separation of the abdominus muscles at the linea alba. Recent data indicate that the greater the distance of separation of the muscle, the worse the functional ability. We describe a 24-year-old active duty U.S. Navy female G1P2 with a diagnosis of DRA. At 2 months postpartum, she was referred to physical therapy because of back pain and inability to meet baseline activities of daily living. After 4 months of physical therapy, she was unable to complete curl ups as required by U.S. Navy physical fitness standards. Abdominoplasty with imbrication of the abdominal wall diastasis was performed followed by additional physical therapy, after which she returned to baseline functioning. The restoration of functional ability postoperatively suggests there is a therapeutic indication for surgical correction of DRA. In high-functioning military patients with DRA who fail to return to baseline level of activity following a trial of physical therapy, surgical intervention should be considered to obtain the optimal functional ability.

  6. Decision-Making Styles of Active-Duty Police Officers: A Multiple-Case Occupational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Patrick Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the decision-making styles of active-duty police officers or what the consequences of not understanding those decision-making styles may be. The purpose of the study was to describe the demographics and decision-making profiles of active-duty police officers, as well as any relationships that may exist among these variables,…

  7. American War and Military Operations Casualties: Lists and Statistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-26

    16 Table 14. Operation Iraqi Freedom: Military Deaths , March 19, 2003, Through...Freedom: Military Deaths , March 19, 2003, Through February 6, 2010 Casualty Type Totals Army Navya Marines Air Force Hostile 3,469 2,524 65 851 29...2 Table 2. Worldwide U.S. Active Duty Military Deaths

  8. 32 CFR 154.15 - Military appointment, enlistment, and induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... active duty of any officer or enlisted regular/reserve military retiree or Individual Ready Reserve who... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military appointment, enlistment, and induction... Requirements § 154.15 Military appointment, enlistment, and induction. (a) General. The appointment,...

  9. Military-Induced Family Separation: A Stress Reduction Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, William G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that Persian Gulf War focused public attention on the problems military families face in coping with military-induced family separation. Highlights some of the unique stressors faced by active-duty, national guard, and reserve military families. Presents practical guidelines to assist social workers in designing interventions to help these…

  10. Advanced Marketing 8130. Instructional Areas. Duties and Tasks. Learning Activities. Referenced Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond.

    This resource handbook, which is designed for use by instructors of courses in advanced marketing, consists of a duty/task list with referenced resources, a duty/task list with learning activities, and a list of resources. Included in each list are materials dealing with the following topics: communication in marketing, economics in marketing,…

  11. Political Activities by Members of the Armed Forces on Active Duty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-15

    an election day. 13. Solicit or otherwise engage in fundraising activities in Federal offices or facilities, including military reservations, for a...actively promote, political dinners and similar fundraising events. 18. Attend partisan political events as an official representative of the Armed Forces

  12. Idiopathic renal infarction in a previously healthy active duty soldier.

    PubMed

    Eickhoff, Christa; Mei, Jian M; Martinez, Jorge; Little, Dustin

    2014-02-01

    Renal infarction (RI) is rare, and usually occurs in patients with associated comorbidities. The majority of reported cases have presented with laboratory abnormalities, most notably leukocytosis and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A 50-year-old active duty white male nonsmoker without medical history presented with flank pain. Urinalysis, complete blood count, LDH, and serum creatinine were normal. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed a right-sided RI. The patient was admitted to the hospital and anticoagulated. Laboratory values remained normal, and a comprehensive workup failed to reveal an etiology for his RI. RI is rare, and affected patients often present with symptoms similar to more common conditions such as lumbago or nephrolithiasis. Elevated LDH may be a clue to the diagnosis, but unlike 92% of the reviewed cases, our patient presented with a normal value. This case suggests that clinicians should consider RI in patients with persistent symptoms for whom more common causes of flank pain have been excluded; including in nonsmoking patients without apparent risk factors for infarction who present with a normal LDH and no leukocytosis.

  13. The Long War and Parental Combat Deployment: Effects on Military Children and At-Home Spouses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Patricia; Peterson, Kris; Reeves, James; Knauss, Larry; Glover, Dorie; Mogil, Catherine; Duan, Naihua; Saltzman, William; Pynoos, Robert; Wilt, Katherine; Beardslee, William

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Given the growing number of military service members with families and the multiple combat deployments characterizing current war time duties, the impact of deployments on military children requires clarification. Behavioral and emotional adjustment problems were examined in children (aged 6 through 12) of an active duty Army or Marine…

  14. Lowering the Retirement Age for Military Reservists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-11

    not bring them to the same level, or equal pay , but it would provide a slightly more equitable treatment than the current age 60 rule. By drawing...receive retirement pay once they have reached the age of 60. For some military reservists this could mean waiting an additional 22 years before...receiving retirement pay after completing 20 years of active military service. By contrast, retired active duty military personnel can start receiving

  15. 78 FR 63459 - Notice of Active Duty Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Affairs. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Bruce T. Brown, Executive Secretary, DoD Civilian/Military Service Review Board, 1500 West Perimeter Road, Suite 3700, Joint Base Andrews, NAF Washington, MD...

  16. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  17. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  18. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  19. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  20. 42 CFR 31.14 - Application for treatment; active duty personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND FORMER LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE Provisions Applicable to Personnel of Former Lighthouse Service § 31.14 Application for treatment; active duty personnel. An applicant for medical...

  1. 2009 Workplace and Equal Opportunity Survey of Active Duty Members - Tabulation of Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-30

    Opportunity Survey of Active Duty Members DMDC 469 Percentages 60f . Continued Percent Responding 1 2 3 Max ME Percentage Reporting Yes Officers 51...LIDYDLODEOH0XVWFLWHDWOHDVWWKH\\HDU DQGEH<HDUFRPSOLDQWHJ [[[[[[ 5(32577ɛ(6WDWHWKHW\\ SH RI

  2. 2005 Workplace and Equal Opportunity Survey of Active-Duty Members: Tabulation of Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Not reportable 2005 Workplace and Equal Opportunity Survey of Active-Duty Members DMDC 505 Percentages 60f . Continued Percent Responding 1...5(32577ɛ(6WDWHWKHW\\ SH RIUHSRUWVXFKDV ILQDOWHFKQLFDOLQWHULPPHPRUDQGXPPDVWHU V WKHVLVSURJUHVV

  3. The Burden of Disability among Active Duty Air Force Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    al., 2000). Injury Limited duty (days/injury) Fractures 103.2 Sprains 16.7 Other traumatic injuries 7.6 Tendinitis 7.0 Strains 3.0...iliotibial band syndrome (4.0% of subjects), ankle sprain (2.8%), and Achilles tendinitis /bursitis (2.8%) were the most frequently reported injuries; shin

  4. A Case of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome in a Healthy Active Duty Marine.

    PubMed

    Thota, Darshan; Portouw, Steven J; Bruner, David I

    2015-10-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is an uncommon disorder that can lead to small bowel obstructions or perforations. Typical populations include young females with anorexia. However, there have been a few reports of healthy males with acute vomiting reported to have SMA syndrome. Our case report highlights an active duty Marine who developed SMA syndrome and the importance of recognizing this disease given the severity in delay of diagnosis in population of young healthy active duty members.

  5. Suicide Attempt Characteristics Among Veterans and Active-Duty Service Members Receiving Mental Health Services: A Pooled Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Villatte, Jennifer L.; O’Connor, Stephen S.; Leitner, Rebecca; Kerbrat, Amanda H.; Johnson, Lora L.; Gutierrez, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Past suicidal behaviors are among the strongest and most consistent predictors of eventual suicide and may be particularly salient in military suicide. The current study compared characteristics of suicide attempts in veterans (N = 746) and active-duty service members (N = 1,013) receiving treatment for acute suicide risk. Baseline data from six randomized controlled trials were pooled and analyzed using robust regression. Service members had greater odds of having attempted suicide relative to veterans, though there were no differences in number of attempts made. Service members also had higher rates of premilitary suicide attempts and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Veterans disproportionately attempted suicide by means of overdose. In veterans, combat deployment was associated with lower odds of lifetime suicide attempt, while history of NSSI was associated with greater attempt odds. Neither was significantly associated with lifetime suicide attempt in service members. Implications for suicide assessment and treatment are discussed. PMID:26740909

  6. Heavy-duty truck population, activity and usage patterns. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of the study was to update the heavy-duty truck (HDT) population, activity (e.g., vehicle miles traveled (VMT), numbers of starts and trips, trip duration, etc.), and usage patterns type of service/business (e.g., delivery, construction, etc.), area of operation (i.e., local, short-haul, long-haul) for HDT`s registered and/or operated in California. The population and activity estimates were done on a weight-class-specific basis light-heavy-duty, medium-heavy-duty and heavy-heavy-duty. Population, activity and usage estimates were based primarily on Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registration data and Truck Inventory and Usage Survey (TIUS) data. In addition to the analysis of existing data (i.e., DMV and TIUS), 42 HDTs were fitted with on-board data loggers that recorded numbers of trips and starts, daily VMT and travel by time-of-day.

  7. Robots for hazardous duties: Military, space, and nuclear facility applications. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design and application of robots used in place of humans where the environment could be hazardous. Military applications include autonomous land vehicles, robotic howitzers, and battlefield support operations. Space operations include docking, maintenance, mission support, and intra-vehicular and extra-vehicular activities. Nuclear applications include operations within the containment vessel, radioactive waste operations, fueling operations, and plant security. Many of the articles reference control techniques and the use of expert systems in robotic operations. Applications involving industrial manufacturing, walking robots, and robot welding are cited in other published searches in this series. (Contains a minimum of 183 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. 1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    with the survey’s lithocode to ensure quality . Any mismatched pairs initiated further investigation of the matching process. This procedure ensured...Introduction to variance estimation. New York: Springer-Verlag. Woodruff, R. (1952). Confidence intervals for medians and other positional measures ...characteristics of your current residence and community at your permanent duty station? a. Cost of residence b. Quality and condition of residence c. Amount of

  9. Active-Duty Physicians' Perceptions and Satisfaction with Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief Missions: Implications for the Field

    PubMed Central

    Oravec, Geoffrey J.; Artino, Anthony R.; Hickey, Patrick W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The United States Department of Defense participates in more than 500 missions every year, including humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, as part of medical stability operations. This study assessed perceptions of active-duty physicians regarding these activities and related these findings to the retention and overall satisfaction of healthcare professionals. Methods and Findings An Internet-based survey was developed and validated. Of the 667 physicians who responded to the survey, 47% had participated in at least one mission. On a 7-point, Likert-type response scale, physicians reported favorable overall satisfaction with their participation in these missions (mean  = 5.74). Perceived benefit was greatest for the United States (mean  = 5.56) and self (mean  = 5.39) compared to the target population (mean  = 4.82). These perceptions were related to participants' intentions to extend their military medical service (total model R2  = .37), with the strongest predictors being perceived benefit to self (β = .21, p<.01), the U.S. (β = .19, p<.01), and satisfaction (β = .18, p<.05). In addition, Air Force physicians reported higher levels of satisfaction (mean  = 6.10) than either Army (mean  = 5.27, Cohen's d = 0.75, p<.001) or Navy (mean  = 5.60, Cohen's d  = 0.46, p<.01) physicians. Conclusions Military physicians are largely satisfied with humanitarian missions, reporting the greatest benefit of such activities for themselves and the United States. Elucidation of factors that may increase the perceived benefit to the target populations is warranted. Satisfaction and perceived benefits of humanitarian missions were positively correlated with intentions to extend time in service. These findings could inform the larger humanitarian community as well as military medical practices for both recruiting and retaining medical professionals. PMID:23555564

  10. 78 FR 42057 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... and Approval; Comment Request; FFEL/Direct Loan/Perkins Military Service Deferment/Post- Active Duty... considered public records. Title of Collection: FFEL/Direct Loan/Perkins Military Service Deferment/Post.... Abstract: The Military Service/Post-Active Duty Student Deferment request form serves as the means by...

  11. A Call to Duty: Educational Policy and School Reform Addressing the Needs of Children from Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esqueda, Monica Christina; Astor, Ron Avi; De Pedro, Kris M. Tunac

    2012-01-01

    More than 90% of the nation's 1.2 million military children attend civilian-operated public schools. Education researchers, however, often overlook the educational experiences and needs of military children attending civilian-operated public schools (i.e., schools that are administered by and under the purview of local education agencies). This…

  12. 5 CFR 332.322 - Persons who lost eligibility because of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... military service. 332.322 Section 332.322 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Eligibility Restoration of Eligibility § 332.322 Persons who lost eligibility because of military service. (a... date of his entrance on active military duty, exclusive of any additional service imposed pursuant...

  13. State Policymakers: Supporting Military Families with Children. Policy Briefing Series. Issue 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Melissa; Lettieri, Chelsea

    2008-01-01

    Managing work and family responsibilities is particularly difficult for military families with children. While military life has always been demanding, in recent years an increasing number of military personnel in both the Active Duty Force and Selected Reserves have had to confront the additional demands of parenthood. Providing resources to…

  14. Deployment Effects on Children and Adolescents: Designing and Deploying a Developmentally Appropriate Education and Screening Video Program for Military Families

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-22

    therapy for our military children. Monitoring of active duty troops for mental health issues has been ongoing for deploying military service members...with the separation, may be called home (redeployed prematurely ), adversely impacting unit mission completion (Patrin, 2000). It is imperative...them make the decision to seek out a definitive evaluation or therapy (Hardaway, 2004). Active duty military programs expend significant resources to

  15. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. Tabulations of Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    sexual activities ? ............................................................................................ 300 f. Made gestures or used body...Relations Survey of Active Duty Members DMDC xi h. Made unwanted attempts to establish a romantic sexual relationship with you despite your efforts...experiences of Crude/ Offensive Behavior, Unwanted Sexual Attention, or Sexual Coercion ........... 340 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active

  16. Influence of military activities on raptor abundance and behavior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schueck, Linda S.; Marzluff, J.M.; Steenhof, Karen

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the influence of military training on the abundance and behavior of raptors at a military training area in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in Idaho during the breeding seasons of 1991a??1994. Raptor counts on military training ranges did not differ when we compared all training days to all non-training days. However, during one period of intensive military training in one breeding season, raptor counts were lower during training than on non-training days. During training, Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus) did not alter their behavior on training days. In years when prey numbers were low, falcons, hawks, and eagles perched and flew at low levels less often and flew at higher altitudes more often during training than they did when training did not occur. We observed fewer prey capture attempts on ranges on days with training than on days without training. Specific types of military training activity affected counts of raptors on ranges. The lowest raptor counts were associated with firing of artillery, small arms, and main turret guns or machine guns on tanks. Raptor counts associated with tank preparation (i.e., assembling and loading ammunition), driving, laser training, and convoy traffic were similar to non-training periods.

  17. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Joseph J.; Trone, Daniel W.; McGraw, Susan; Steelman, Ryan A.; Austin, Krista G.; Lieberman, Harris R.

    2016-01-01

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users) were coffee (65%), colas (54%), teas (40%), and energy drinks (28%). Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week) included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher. PMID:27735834

  18. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Trone, Daniel W; McGraw, Susan; Steelman, Ryan A; Austin, Krista G; Lieberman, Harris R

    2016-10-09

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users) were coffee (65%), colas (54%), teas (40%), and energy drinks (28%). Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week) included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher.

  19. Parenting Stress After Deployment in Navy Active Duty Fathers.

    PubMed

    Yablonsky, Abigail M; Yan, Guofen; Bullock, Linda

    2016-08-01

    Military fathers are being deployed, and leaving their families, for greater lengths of time and more frequently than ever before. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of recent deployment on parenting stress in U.S. Navy fathers with young children. Of the 111 participants who completed the one-time study questionnaire at a large military outpatient clinic on the Eastern seaboard, 67.6% had returned from a ship-based deployment. Regression analyses were performed, using the Parenting Stress Index as the outcome variable, deployment elements (such as time away from home in the past 5 years) as predictors, and adjusting for other factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Higher perceived threat and greater warfare exposure were both associated with increased parenting stress (p < 0.05) in the unadjusted model. These associations were greatly attenuated and no longer significant after adjustment for depression. In addition, rates of positive screens for PTSD and depression (17.1%) in this sample were higher than in other recent studies. In summary, these data indicate that various deployment factors are associated with increased parenting stress in Navy fathers back from deployment within the past year; these relationships are largely explained by depressive symptoms. Clinical implications are discussed.

  20. Called to Serve: The Military Mobilization of Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to answer the following research question: What is the process by which undergraduate students, recalled for military duty, prepare for mobilization, separate from their institution and then re-enroll upon their release from active duty, and how is this process affected by meaning? Using the grounded theory tradition,…

  1. 38 CFR 21.46 - Veteran ordered to active duty; extension of basic period of eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Periods of Eligibility § 21.46 Veteran ordered to active... active duty under 10 U.S.C. 688, 12301(a), 12301(d), 12301(g), 12302, or 12304, the veteran's basic... months. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3103(e); sec. 308(h), Pub. L. 107-330, 116 Stat. 2829)...

  2. MARO - Mass Atrocity Response Operations: A Military Planning Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    innovative dimension was the creation of a standing body of retired and active duty military planners to provide pro- fessional horsepower for thinking...The strategic guidance should provide clarity with respect to ac- tions taken against the host nation’s government or its military (if they are...services, develop infrastructure, and foster economic growth. Military plans usually are phased, based on anticipated activities or condi- tions. Although

  3. Sexual Harassment in the Active-Duty Navy: Findings from the 1991 Navy-Wide Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    NPRDC-TR-94-2) harassed. This direct query method has the advantage of recognizing the complexities involved in deciding whether sexually - oriented ...NPRDC-TR-94-2 December 13 Sexual Harassment in the Active-Duty Navy: Findings from the 1991 Navy-Wide Survey ɘ DTIC Authors ELECTE Amy L Culbertson...1991-1992 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Sexual Harassment in the Active-Duty Navy: N0002293WREE500 Findings from the 1991 Navy-Wide Survey 6

  4. 2006 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Tabulations of Responses. Volume 2: Coast Guard Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    remarks about your appearance, body, or sexual activities ?................................................................................. 182 f...and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members xviii DMDC d. Would people be able to get away with sexual harassment if it was reported...285 2006 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members DMDC xix SEXUAL ASSAULT TRAINING

  5. Proposal of a framework for evaluating military surveillance systems for early detection of outbreaks on duty areas

    PubMed Central

    Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Chaudet, Herve; Green, Andrew D; Jefferson, Henry L; Texier, Gaetan; Webber, Daniel; Dupuy, Bruce; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background In recent years a wide variety of epidemiological surveillance systems have been developed to provide early identification of outbreaks of infectious disease. Each system has had its own strengths and weaknesses. In 2002 a Working Group of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) produced a framework for evaluation, which proved suitable for many public health surveillance systems. However this did not easily adapt to the military setting, where by necessity a variety of different parameters are assessed, different constraints placed on the systems, and different objectives required. This paper describes a proposed framework for evaluation of military syndromic surveillance systems designed to detect outbreaks of disease on operational deployments. Methods The new framework described in this paper was developed from the cumulative experience of British and French military syndromic surveillance systems. The methods included a general assessment framework (CDC), followed by more specific methods of conducting evaluation. These included Knowledge/Attitude/Practice surveys (KAP surveys), technical audits, ergonomic studies, simulations and multi-national exercises. A variety of military constraints required integration into the evaluation. Examples of these include the variability of geographical conditions in the field, deployment to areas without prior knowledge of naturally-occurring disease patterns, the differences in field sanitation between locations and over the length of deployment, the mobility of military forces, turnover of personnel, continuity of surveillance across different locations, integration with surveillance systems from other nations working alongside each other, compatibility with non-medical information systems, and security. Results A framework for evaluation has been developed that can be used for military surveillance systems in a staged manner consisting of initial, intermediate and final evaluations. For each stage

  6. Military women as wives and mothers.

    PubMed

    Wahl, C K; Rundall, V F

    1996-01-01

    The increasing number of women in the military, especially married women and mothers, is forcing the military to accommodate populations it did not have to deal with in the past. The military community has responded by initiating programs that address the needs of active duty wives and mothers, especially with regard to family support, health care, and available child care facilities. However, many policy questions pertaining to military women remain, including nondeployment of breastfeeding women or mothers of small infants, treating the family as the unit of analysis and not just the service member, and providing programs such as WIC and Head Start to its members overseas.

  7. Real-world PM, NO x, CO, and ultrafine particle emission factors for military non-road heavy duty diesel vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dongzi; Nussbaum, Nicholas J.; Kuhns, Hampden D.; Chang, M.-C. Oliver; Sodeman, David; Moosmüller, Hans; Watson, John G.

    2011-05-01

    Training on US military bases involves nonroad diesel vehicles with emissions that can affect base personnel, nearby communities, and attainment of air quality standards. Nonroad diesel engines contribute 44% of diesel PM and 12% of total NO x emissions from mobile sources nationwide. Although military sector fuel use accounts for only ≈0.4% of distillate fuel use in US, emissions factors measured for these engines improve the representation of the relatively small (as compared to onroad sources) database of nonroad emission factors. Heavy-duty multi-axle, all-wheel drive military trucks are not compatible with regular single-axle dynamometers and their emissions cannot be measured under standard laboratory conditions. We have developed a novel in-plume technique to measure in-use emissions from vehicles with elevated stack. Real-world gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emission factors (EFs) from ten 7-ton 6-wheel drive trucks and two 8-wheel drive heavy tactical Logistics Vehicle System (LVS) vehicles were measured using in-plume sampling. The EFs of these trucks are comparable to those of onroad trucks while the PM EFs of 2-stroke LVS are ≈10 times higher than those of onroad vehicles. Lower EC/PM ratio was observed for LVS compared with MTVR. PM number emission factors were 5.9 × 10 14 particles km -1 for the trucks and 2.5 × 10 16 particles km -1 for the LVSs, three orders of magnitude higher than the proposed European Union standard of 6 × 10 11 particles km -1. The EFs sampled can be extended to engines used in the broader nonroad sector including agriculture and mining and used as inputs to the NONROAD model.

  8. All Military Adolescents Are Not the Same: Sexuality and Substance Use among Adolescents in the U.S. Military Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Klein, David A; Adelman, William P; Thompson, Amy M; Shoemaker, Richard G; Shen-Gunther, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Data examining sexuality and substance use among active duty and military-dependent youth is limited; however, these psychosocial factors have military implications. Adolescents and young adults aged 12-23 were recruited from an active-duty trainee clinic (n = 225) and a military pediatric clinic (n = 223). Active duty participants were more likely to be older, male, White, previous tobacco users, and report a history of sexual activity and less contraception use at their most recent intercourse, compared to the dependent group. Over 10% of all participants indicated attraction to members of the same gender or both genders. In logistic regression analysis, non-White participants were less likely to use contraception compared to White participants. Adolescents and young adults seen in military clinics frequently engage in high-risk behavior. Clinicians who care for military youth should assess their patient's psychosocial history. Further study of this population is warranted to identify factors that may influence risk and resilience.

  9. 8 CFR 329.5 - Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. 329.5 Section 329.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. (a) A person desiring to...

  10. 8 CFR 329.5 - Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. 329.5 Section 329.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. (a) A person desiring...

  11. Civilian Demonstrations Near the Military Installation: Restraints on Military Surveillance and Other Intelligence Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    may be used as a tool to deter lawful political activity, and courts may view overt military surveillance as evidence of a bad faith purpose instead of...a good faith physical security purpose.19 Evidence of bad faith makes it more likely that a court will find standing.󈨧 Surveillance can become...event of a delu~ohoal aflhto srenewved or the iiaUtKi’i is o)therisie nainr and assorted Srauik" fils may be McAWi~i * retnainabh!e munder this

  12. 75 FR 49913 - Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Department of the Air Force Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups SUMMARY: On July 30, 2010, the Secretary of the Air Force, acting as Executive Agent of the Secretary of Defense...'' for purposes of all laws administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). FOR...

  13. Risk Factors for Clinically Significant Intimate Partner Violence among Active-Duty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith Slep, Amy M.; Foran, Heather M.; Heyman, Richard E.; Snarr, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesized risk factors for men's and women's clinically significant intimate partner violence (CS-IPV) from four ecological levels (i.e., individual, family, workplace, community) were tested in a representative sample of active-duty U.S. Air Force members (N = 42,744). When considered together, we expected only individual and family factors to…

  14. 78 FR 7802 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Allowance in Duties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Allowance in Duties AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30.... SUMMARY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department of Homeland Security will...

  15. Optimizing fitness for duty and post-combat clinical services for military personnel and combat veterans with ADHD—a systematic review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Iliyan; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyper activity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder, most often diagnosed in childhood, and characterized by hyperactivity and inattention that negatively impacts one's ability to function and fulfill social and personal obligations. Individuals with past history of ADHD may enlist in the military under certain conditions, however the full impact of military training and deployment of later in life ADHD symptoms is unclear. It is of particular interest how military experience may affect ADHD in remission and if such individuals might be at elevated risk for relapse of ADHD symptoms. Method We performed a systematic review f the available literature including the Department of Defense (DOD) guidelines for both eligibility to enlist and fitness for deployment based on reported history and current symptomatology of ADHD. Results The after care for veterans with ADHD relapse is inconsistent and presents with number of challenges. We evaluate the DOD policies regarding the implications of ADHD for fitness for military service and post-combat mental health. Conclusion The full extend of the interaction between pre-existing ADHD and post-combat PTSD are not fully understood. The development of comprehensive and clear algorithms for diagnosing and treating ADHD in the military before and after deployment will have a strong positive impact on the quality of care delivered to soldiers and veterans. PMID:25206949

  16. Committee on Military Nutrition Research Activity Report 1986 - 1992.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-29

    Heart Study. ubrin the effects of dietary Intervention strategies en verious health status parametrs such as body weight . blood lipid. and blood...approach the upper limt of acceptable body weight as determined by military sanards. The question ares whether overweight wome would resort to holi In order...or 1.6 grams/kilogram of body weight for adults . 4. Balance food intake and physical activity to maintain appropriate body weight . 5. The Committee

  17. The impact of military activities on the concentration of mercury in soils of military training grounds and marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Gębka, Karolina; Bełdowski, Jacek; Bełdowska, Magdalena

    2016-11-01

    Military activities have been conducted on land and at sea. Both during conflicts and in peace time, some regions served as a military training ground which included firing positions and bunkers. Mercury fulminate has been used in ammunition primers and detonators. Certain amount of ammunition was dumped into the Baltic Sea after the Second World War. Because of corroded containers, mercury can be released into the marine environment. The soil and sediment samples were taken from military training grounds, southern Baltic in 2014 and 2015. The concentration of mercury was determined by AMA-254 analyzer. Hg concentration was higher in the places of military activities, as compared to other areas. Ten times increased concentration of Hg was determined in soil sample collected in area of active gun range compared to the reference station. The significant higher concentration of mercury was detected in stations where chemical warfare agents were found.

  18. The Associations of Physical and Sexual Assault with Suicide Risk in Nonclinical Military and Undergraduate Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Craig J.; McNaugton-Cassill, Mary; Osman, Augustine; Hernandez, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    The associations of various forms of sexual and physical assault with a history of suicide attempts and recent suicide ideation were studied in two distinct samples: active duty military and undergraduate students. A total of 273 active duty Air Force personnel and 309 undergraduate students anonymously completed self-report surveys of assault…

  19. Sonoran pronghorn habitat use on landscapes disturbed by military activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krausman, P.R.; Harris, L.K.; Haas, S.K.; Koenen, Kiana K. G.; Devers, P.; Bunting, D.; Barb, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Sonoran pronghorn (Antilocapra americana sonoriensis) population in the United States declined to ???33 animals in January 2003. Low population numbers and unstable recruitment are concerns for biologists managing this subspecies. We examined habitat use by pronghorn from 1999 to 2002 on a portion of the Barry M. Goldwater Range (BMGR) used for military exercises. We overlaid locations of pronghorn (n= 1,203) on 377 1-km2 blocks within the North (NTAC) and South Tactical Ranges (STAC), BMGR; we classified vegetation associations and disturbance status (e.g., airfields, targets, roads) for each block. Locations of pronghorn were distributed in proportion to vegetation associations on NTAC and STAC. Sightings of pronghorns were biased toward disturbed blocks, with 73% of locations of pronghorn occurring in proximity to mock airfields, high-explosive hills (e.g., targets for live high-explosive bombs and rockets), other targets, and roads. Disturbed landscapes on the BMGR may attract Sonoran pronghorn by creating favorable forage. Habitat manipulations simulating the effects of military disturbances on the landscape (e.g., improved forage) may improve remaining Sonoran pronghorn habitat. Antilocapra americana sonoriensis, Barry M. Goldwater Air Force Range, disturbed habitat, habitat availability, habitat use, military activity, Sonoran pronghorn.

  20. Understanding diet and modeling changes in the omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid composition of U.S. garrison foods for active duty personnel.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Bernadette P; Yu, Karina; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon; Johnson, Jeremiah; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that dietary omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are important in reducing the risk of mental illness. We used the DoD Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel (HRBS) to assess current military dietary patterns and meal locations. We used the Lands Equation to model PUFAs in a sample Garrison diet and the nutritional impact of substitution of foods higher in omega-3 PUFAs and lower in omega-6 PUFAs on tissue composition. The military diet was very poor quality compared to 2010 Healthy People Guidelines. A representative Garrison diet does not meet our estimated healthy n-3 HUFA intake at 3.5 g/d, corresponding with a tissue composition of 60% n-3 in HUFA (i.e., 40% n-6 in HUFA). Substitution of n-3 rich eggs, poultry, pork and other food commodities, combined with use on low linoleic acid oils, may contribute significantly to attaining healthier n-6/n-3 proportions in the tissue.

  1. Heart rate variability characteristics in a large group of active-duty Marines and relationship to posttraumatic stress

    PubMed Central

    Minassian, Arpi; Geyer, Mark A.; Baker, Dewleen G.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Risbrough, Victoria B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Heart rate variability (HRV), thought to reflect autonomic nervous system function, is lowered in conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The potential confounding effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and depression in the relationship between HRV and PTSD have not been elucidated in a large cohort of military service members. Here we describe HRV associations with stress disorder symptoms in a large study of Marines, while accounting for well-known covariates of HRV and PTSD including TBI and depression. Methods Four battalions of male active-duty Marines (N=2430) were assessed 1-2 months prior to a combat deployment. HRV was measured during 5 minutes of rest. Depression and PTSD were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory and Clinician Administered PTSD scale respectively. Results After accounting for covariates including TBI, a regression indicated that lower levels of high frequency (HF) HRV were associated with a diagnosis of PTSD (beta = -.20, p=.035). Depression and PTSD severity were correlated (r= .49, p <.001), however participants with PTSD but relatively low depression scores exhibited reduced HF compared to controls (p=.012). Marines with deployment experience (n=1254) had lower HRV than those with no experience (p = .033). Conclusions This cross-sectional analysis of a large cohort supports associations between PTSD and reduced HRV when accounting for TBI and depression symptoms. Future post-deployment assessments will be used to determine whether pre-deployment HRV can predict vulnerability and resilience to the serious psychological and physiological consequences of combat exposure. PMID:24804881

  2. Obesity and the US Military Family

    PubMed Central

    Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Sbrocco, Tracy; Theim, Kelly R.; Cohen, L. Adelyn; Mackey, Eleanor R.; Stice, Eric; Henderson, Jennifer L.; McCreight, Sarah J.; Bryant, Edny J.; Stephens, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review discusses the current knowledge and future directions regarding obesity within the US military family (i.e., active-duty servicemembers, as well as military spouses, children, retirees, and veterans). The increasing rates of overweight and obesity within the US military adversely impact military readiness, limit recruitment, and place a significant financial burden on the Department of Defense. Design and Methods The following topics are reviewed: 1) The prevalence of and the financial, physical, and psychological costs associated with overweight in military communities; 2) military weight regulations, and challenges faced by the military family related to overweight and disordered eating; 3) the continued need for rigorous program evaluations and new intervention development. Results Overweight and its associated sequelae impact the entire military family. Military families share many similarities with their civilian counterparts, but they face unique challenges (e.g., stress related to deployments and relocations). Although the military has weight management resources, there is an urgent need for rigorous program evaluation and the development of enhanced obesity prevention programs across the lifespan of the military family–several of which are proposed herein. Conclusions Interdisciplinary and collaborative research efforts and team-based interventions will continue to inform understanding of obesity treatment and prevention within military and civilian populations. PMID:23836452

  3. Report of the Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    that military separation physicals shall include an assessment of sexual trauma, previously disclosed or undisclosed, during active duty service...comply with these standards. Further, SAPRO must be actively engaged in prevention policy development and legislation. Defense Task Force on Sexual ...SAPRO develop training policies and exercise oversight over Military Service training programs. Sexual assault prevention and response training must

  4. Experience of Postpartum Active Duty Women in Training for the Fitness Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-10

    complications N=6 Breastfeeding Issues N=8 Sadness/lowered self- esteem N=4 Fear of failing fitness assessment N=11 *Known data from 3 pilot...to breastfeeding . Emotional changes included feelings of sadness, feeling emotionally drained, feeling overwhelmed, and lowered self-esteem... breastfeeding would be beneficial. These results strongly suggest that close follow-up of active duty women after delivery is essential in order to

  5. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members; Statistical Methodology Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Survey of Active Duty Members (2010 WGRA). The allocation was accomplished by means of the DMDC Sample Planning Tool, Version 2.1 ( Dever and Mason, 2003...This application is based on the method originally 10 developed by J. R. Chromy (1987), and is described in Mason, Wheeless, George, Dever ...Chair). Port Jefferson, NY: Author. Dever , J. A., and Mason, R. E. (2003). DMDC sample planning tool: Version 2.1. Arlington, VA: DMDC. Mason

  6. Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bedno, Sheryl; Hauret, Keith; Loringer, Kelly; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Mallon, Timothy; Jones, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to document risk factors for any injury and sports- and exercise-related injuries, including personal and occupational stress among active duty service members (SMs) in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. A total of 10,692 SMs completed the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members. The survey asked about demographics, personal stress and occupational stress, injuries from any cause, and participation in sports- and exercise- related activities in the past year. The survey used a complex sampling procedure to create a representative sample of SMs. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations of injury outcomes with potential risk factors. 49% of SMs sought medical care for an injury in the past year and 25% sustained a sports- and exercise-related activities injury. Odds of injury were higher for the Army and Marine Corps than for the Air Force or Navy. This survey showed that higher personal and occupational stress was associated with higher risks of injury. SMs who experienced higher levels of personal or occupational stress reported higher risks of injuries. The effects of stress reduction programs on injury risks should be evaluated in military and other young physically active populations.

  7. 2010 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    ThrtFrc: Use physical force-Uned 672 STALKSHAU [55a] DidOffend: Sexually harass be-Uned 673 2010 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty...body, or sexual activities ? .......................................... Made gestures or used body language of a sexual nature that embarrassed or...slighted, or ignored you)?      e. Made offensive remarks about your appearance, body, or sexual activities

  8. Active duty service members who sustain a traumatic brain injury have chronically elevated peripheral concentrations of Aβ40 and lower ratios of Aβ42/40

    PubMed Central

    Lejbman, Natasha; Olivera, Anlys; Heinzelmann, Morgan; Feng, Rebekah; Yun, Sijung; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Gill, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary objective: Excessive accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) and tau have been observed in older individuals with chronic neurological symptoms related to a traumatic brain injury (TBI), yet little is known about the possible role of Aβ in younger active duty service members following a TBI. The purpose of the study was to determine if Aβ 40 or 42 related to sustaining a TBI or to chronic neurological symptoms in a young cohort of military personnel. Research design: This was a cross-sectional study of active duty service members who reported sustaining a TBI and provided self-report of neurological and psychological symptoms and provided blood. Methods and procedures: An ultrasensitive single-molecule enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to compare concentrations of Aβ in active duty service members with (TBI+; n = 53) and without (TBI–; n = 18) a history of TBI. Self-report and medical history were used to measure TBI occurrence and approximate the number of total TBIs and the severity of TBIs sustained during deployment. Main outcomes and results: This study reports that TBI is associated with higher concentrations of Aβ40 (F 1,68 = 6.948, p = 0.009) and a lower ratio of Aβ42/Aβ40 (F 1,62 = 5.671, p = 0.020). These differences remained significant after controlling for co-morbid symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Conclusions: These findings suggest that alterations in Aβ relate to TBIs and may contribute to chronic neurological symptoms. PMID:27834544

  9. INDUSTRIAL/MILITARY ACTIVITY-INITIATED ACCIDENT SCREENING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Kalinich

    1999-09-27

    Impacts due to nearby installations and operations were determined in the Preliminary MGDS Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1996) to be potentially applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of the potential activities ongoing on or off the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is intended that the Industrial/Military Activity-Initiated Accident Screening Analysis provided herein will meet the requirements of the ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987) in establishing whether this external event can be screened from further consideration or must be included as a design basis event (DBE) in the development of accident scenarios for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis only considers issues related to preclosure radiological safety. Issues important to waste isolation as related to impact from nearby installations will be covered in the MGR performance assessment.

  10. TRICARE: changes included in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010; enhancement of transitional dental care for members of the Reserve Component on active duty for more than 30 days in support of a contingency operation. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-12-28

    The Department is publishing this final rule to implement section 703 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (NDAA for FY10). Specifically, that legislation amends the transitional health care dental benefits for Reserve Component members on active duty for more than 30 days in support of a contingency operation. The legislation entitles these Reserve Component members to dental care in the same manner as a member of the uniformed services on active duty for more than 30 days, thus providing care to the Reserve member in both military dental treatment facilities and authorized private sector dental care. This final rule does not eliminate any medical or dental care that is currently covered as transitional health care for the member.

  11. Supplemental genistein, quercetin, and resveratrol intake in active duty army soldiers.

    PubMed

    Sepowitz, John J; Fauser, Kristina R; Meyer, Stephanie A; Jackson, Steven J

    2015-05-01

    Previous reports indicate that the majority of U.S. Army soldiers consume dietary supplements (DSs) > 1 time/wk. However, these studies did not evaluate phytonutrient supplementation. A growing literature suggests inclusion of phytonutrients in DSs may pose a risk for toxicity, which could impact the performance of soldier duties, as well as long-term health and wellness. This study was conducted to assess and understand soldiers' motivations to consume phytonutrient-containing DSs, specifically genistein, quercetin, and resveratrol. The study was a cross-sectional, descriptive mixed-methods design using a survey and semistructured interviews. There were 436 soldiers stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington who completed the survey, from which 36 soldiers completed an interview. Overall, 34% of soldiers reported taking a single or multicomponent phytonutrient DS > 1 time/wk, from which 41 soldiers took >1 supplement/wk. Soldiers' reasons for use included unsure (54%), weight loss (12%), and other, unspecified (24%). The majority of interviewees did not consume DSs based on inclusion of genistein, quercetin, or resveratrol. The majority of soldiers, in our study, appear unable to rationalize their phytonutrient DS choices. Findings from this study illuminate the need for future research to further explore DS practices within military populations and encourage informed use of DSs.

  12. Military Social Workers at War: Their Experiences and the Educational Content that Helped Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Catherine A.; DeCoster, Vaughn

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-four active-duty military social workers, deployed during various stages of the war in Iraq, participated in an open-ended survey regarding their jobs and the social work training they found valuable. Using a mixed analytical approach, the researchers organized answers into a phenomenological arrangement describing the military social…

  13. How to Motivate Military Veterans to Participate in the GI Bill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, some military veterans have been influenced by barriers, preventing them from using their educational benefits. Any active duty member or military veteran could have been exposed to and influenced by these barriers and become unmotivated and not use or discontinue using these benefits. If veterans do not use their educational…

  14. National Healthcare Reform: Implications for the Military Healthcare System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-16

    healthcare for certain non-active duty reservists and extended chiropractic care to active duty members placing yet additional pressures on defense health...coalition of lobbyists and elected representatives to implement reforms. The recent passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA... Care Act (PPACA), Capitation, Health Savings Accounts (HAS), AHLTA, VistA, TRICARE, Military Healthcare System (MHS). 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  15. Economic Sanctions, Military Activity, and Road Traffic Crashes in Vojvodina, Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Ðurić, Predrag; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Political violence has not been examined as a risk factor for traumatic injuries from road traffic crashes. We identify trends in road traffic crashes related to war-related military activity and international economic sanctions in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina, Serbia. Methods Overall road traffic crashes and crashes leading to hospitalization and fatality in Vojvodina, Serbia were examined from 1996 through 2001. Rates were calculated per 100,000 population and per 10,000 registered vehicles. Three time periods were examined: years with international sanctions and military activity; years with international sanctions but no military activity; and, years with neither sanctions nor military activity. Results Compared to the period with neither sanctions nor military activity, severe injury crashes were 1.23 times more frequent (95% CI = 1.19 – 1.27) during the period with sanctions and military activity and 1.21 times more frequent (95% CI= 1.16 – 1.27) during the period with sanctions but no military activity. Conclusions Our data suggest that vehicle travel became safer following the end of military action and economic sanctions. Road traffic safety needs to be a priority both during periods of political unrest and its recovery phase. PMID:19074242

  16. Robots for hazardous duties: Military, space, and nuclear facility applications. January 1987-September 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 87-Sep 91

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design and application of robots used in place of humans where the environment could be hazardous. Military applications include autonomous land vehicles, robotic howitzers, and battlefield support operations. Space operations include docking, maintenance, and mission support, both intra-vehicular and extra-vehicular activities. Nuclear applications include operations within the containment vessel, radioactive waste operations, fueling operations, and plant security. Many of the articles reference control techniques and the use of expert systems in robotic operations. Applications involving industrial manufacturing, walking robots, and robot welding are cited in other published searches in the series. (Contains 172 citations with title list and subject index.)

  17. Multiple Past Concussions Are Associated with Ongoing Post-Concussive Symptoms but Not Cognitive Impairment in Active-Duty Army Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Dretsch, Michael N; Silverberg, Noah D; Iverson, Grant L

    2015-09-01

    The extent to which multiple past concussions are associated with lingering symptoms or mental health problems in military service members is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between lifetime concussion history, cognitive functioning, general health, and psychological health in a large sample of fit-for-duty U.S. Army soldiers preparing for deployment. Data on 458 active-duty soldiers were collected and analyzed. A computerized cognitive screening battery (CNS-Vital Signs(®)) was used to assess complex attention (CA), reaction time (RT), processing speed (PS), cognitive flexibility (CF), and memory. Health questionnaires included the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI), PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M), Zung Depression and Anxiety Scales (ZDS; ZAS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Alcohol Use and Dependency Identification Test (AUDIT). Soldiers with a history of multiple concussions (i.e., three or more concussions) had significantly greater post-concussive symptom scores compared with those with zero (d=1.83, large effect), one (d=0.64, medium effect), and two (d=0.64, medium effect) prior concussions. Although the group with three or more concussions also reported more traumatic stress symptoms, the results revealed that traumatic stress was a mediator between concussions and post-concussive symptom severity. There were no significant differences on neurocognitive testing between the number of concussions. These results add to the accumulating evidence suggesting that most individuals recover from one or two prior concussions, but there is a greater risk for ongoing symptoms if one exceeds this number of injuries.

  18. April 2006 Status of Forces Survey of Active-Duty Members: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    scale 998 CHLCOPEU* [60e] Import:fam mbrs deal w/deploy-Uned 777 CHLCOPF 60f . [ 60f ] Import:no relocations/school chang 84 CHLCOPFR* Briefing of...CHLCOPF:collapse scale 999 CHLCOPFU* [ 60f ] Import:no relocations/school-Uned 778 SOFA0604 Active Duty April 2006 Alphabetical Table of Contents...deployment 83 CHLCOPF 60f . [ 60f ] Import:no relocations/school chang 84 CHLCOPG 60g. [60g] Import:limit exposure of news cove 85 CHLCOPH 60h. [60h

  19. Immunomodulatory and antioxidative activity of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-yu; Feng, Cui-ping; Li, Xing; Chang, Ming-chang; Meng, Jun-long; Xu, Li-jing

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the immune activation and reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides (CMP) in vivo, 24 male and 24 female Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. The mice in the four experimental groups were administered 0 (normal control), 50, 100, or 200mg/kg/d body weight CMP via gavage. After 30 days, the viscera index, leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, immunoglobulin (IgG) levels, and biochemical parameters were measured. The effect of CMP on the expression of tumor necrosis (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, and interleukin (IL)-1β in the spleens of experimental mice was investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the administration of CMP improved the immune function in mice, significantly increased the spleen and thymus indices, the spleen lymphocyte activity, the total quantity of white blood cells, and IgG function in mice serum. CMP exhibited significant antioxidative activity in mice, and decreased malondialdehyde levels in vivo. CMP upregulated the expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β mRNA in high-dose groups compared to that observed for the control mice. We can thus conclude that CMP effectively improved the immune function through protection against oxidative stress. CMP thus shows potential for development as drugs and health supplements.

  20. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  1. Suicide Risk by Military Occupation in the DoD Active Component Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trofimovich, Lily; Reger, Mark A.; Luxton, David D.; Oetjen-Gerdes, Lynne A.

    2013-01-01

    Suicide risk based on occupational cohorts within the U.S. military was investigated. Rates of suicide based on military occupational categories were computed for the Department of Defense (DoD) active component population between 2001 and 2010. The combined infantry, gun crews, and seamanship specialist group was at increased risk of suicide…

  2. A Randomized Trial of Musculoskeletal Pain Treatment in a Military Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0055 TITLE: A Randomized Trial of Musculoskeletal Pain Treatment in a Military Population PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert...NUMBERS A Randomized Trial of Musculoskeletal Pain Treatment in a DAMD17-03-1-0055 Military Population 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert J. Gatchel, Ph.D. 7...restoration approach to the treatment of Active Duty military from all 4 branches suffering from chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP). The primary aims of this

  3. 78 FR 16654 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of... activated carbon from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') would likely lead to a continuation or... a sunset review of the antidumping duty order on certain activated carbon from the PRC, pursuant...

  4. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    System; Wayne B. Jonas, M.D. of Samueli Institute; Anthony J. Lisi, DC of Veterans Health Administration; Dennis Marchiori, DC, Ph.D. of Palmer...received official signatures from: WRNMMC, Samueli Institute, Palmer College of Chiropractic and RAND Corporation and San Diego Commanding Admiral, who...review. Once an IT Impact Statement is obtained from WRNMMC the amendment will be sent for legal review. Samueli Institute is in the process of

  5. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    IA ; † Physical Medicine and Integrative Care Services, Fort Bliss, TX ; ‡ Samueli Institute, Alexandria, VA ; § Palmer College of Chiropractic...drug(s). Samueli Institute grant funds were received to support this work. Some of this work was conducted in a facility constructed with support

  6. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Johnson, DC of VAGLA Healthcare System; Wayne B. Jonas, M.D. of Samueli Institute; Anthony J. Lisi, DC of Veterans Health Annual Report, W81XWH-11-2...concerns are minimal. After the first of the year, COL Helwig and Dr. Mona Bingham ( Samueli Institute) will begin working on the necessary documentation to...RAND’s marketing department, Samueli Institute’s marketing department, Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research employees and chiropractors working in

  7. 38 CFR 3.7 - Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. 3.7 Section 3.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Indemnity Compensation General § 3.7 Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military... military, naval, or air service: (a) Aerial transportation of mail (Pub. L. 140, 73d Congress). Persons...

  8. Selective Early Retirement of Officers on an Active Duty List and the Reserve Active Status List and Selective Early Removal of Officers from the Reserve Active Status List,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    States Code, to update policies for the selective early retirement of commissioned officers and warrant officers from the Active Duty List, selective...early removal of commissioned officers from the Reserve Active Status List, and selective early retirement of officers in the Naval Reserve, serving in

  9. Examining Child Care Need among Military Families. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Susan M.; Zellman, Gail L.; Moini, Joy S.

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the results of a survey of 1,137 active-duty military families, including activated Reservists, regarding child care use. These survey data were analyzed to estimate the relationship between individual family characteristics and installation characteristics and the probability that the family uses any nonparental child care,…

  10. A Feasibility Study of Female Active Duty Military Personnel and Exposure to Jet Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    exposure. Fundam Appl Toxicol. 10:224-232, 1988. 12. Murray FJ, John JA, Rampy LW, et al: Embryotoxicity of inhaled benzene in mice and rabbits. Am Ind...Hyg Assoc J. 40:993-998, 1979. 13. Ungvary G and Tatrai E: On the embryotoxic effects of benzene and its salkyl derivatives in mice, rats and rabbits...Arch Toxicol Suppl 8:425-430, 1985. 14. Kuna RA and Kapp RW: Embryotoxic /teratogenic potential of benzene vapor in rats. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 57:1

  11. Weight Management Behaviors Used by Active Duty Nurses to Maintain Compliance With Military Weight Control Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    room, and bulimia (Sweeney & Bonnabeau, 1990). Healthy weight loss techniques Conceptual: Weight loss strategies that include a healthy balance of...shown that these behaviors can lead to more serious eating disorders such as Anorexia or Bulimia . Based on results of previous studies done like this...minimally normal body weight) or bulimia nervosa (repeated episodes of binge eating followed by inappropriate compensatory behaviors)? ___ Yes ___ No

  12. Predicting Total Sick Days Experienced by an Active Duty Military Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-07

    system. 0 a - MDC 05, Disease and disorders of the circulatory system. o ma - MDC 17, Myeloproliferative diseases and disorders, and 0poorly...differentiated neoplasms . < z- MDC 18, Infectious and parasitic diseases (systemic or C fi z -4unspecified sites). M x MDCG3: Ob/Gyn. - MDC 13, Diseases and

  13. Effects of Combat Deployment on Risky and Self-Destructive Behavior Among Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    risky behavior in an attempt to create an “ adrenaline rush” similar to those that they experienced in combat (Vaughan, 2006). Increases in risky...mediators, including habituation to pain and fear (Joiner’s, 2005; Killgore et al., 2008) aswell as desire to recapture the excitement or “ adrenaline ...in risk-taking are meaningfully influenced by the number or duration of deployments experienced. Because the present findings indicated that personnel

  14. Evaluating the Training Needs of Active Duty and Reserve Military General Surgeons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    Surgical Intensive Care Data Managem3nt System." London, England. June 2nd. 1981 VII Reuni6n Nacional de Medicina CrItica y Terapia Intensiva...Asociaci6n Mexicana de Medicine Critica y Terapia Intensive. Curso de Actualizaci6n Profesional en Medicina CrItica: "Development of Intensive Care Systems

  15. The Incidence of Primary Hip Osteoarthritis in Active Duty US Military Servicemembers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-15

    Orthopaedic Surgery Department, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, 5005 North Piedras Street, El Paso, TX 79920. E-mail: Danielle.scher@amedd.army.mil...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) William Beaumont Army Medical Center,Orthopaedic Surgery Department,5005 North Piedras Street,El Paso,TX,79920 8

  16. The Active Duty Primigravada’s Perception of Prenatal Care in the Military Health Care System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    queried about their emotional as well as their physical status Technical competence was also very highly prized though the majority of the...participants did not have the knowledge to judge the technical abilities of the caregivers. Most of them judged technical competence by the outcome of the...communicated effectively, was respectful, and was clinically competent . Gender received mixed responses from the participants. There was no clear cut

  17. A Military Campaign Against Gangs: Internal Security Operations in the United States by Active Duty Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-14

    gangs sprouted as a direct result of the threat from the CRIPs . One of the more well known of these new gangs is the Bloods . Figure 2 - Spread Of The... CRIPs , red for BLOODs , etc. In addition gang members often associate themselves with designer athletic clothing. The gang’s colors are their uniform, much...associated violence and drugs are a real and growing threat to the security of the nation.’ One of the largest street gangs in the country is the CRIPs

  18. Demographic, Psychological, and Weight-Related Correlates of Weight Control Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN), 1-3% for Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and 0.7-4.0% for Binge Eating Disorder (BED; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). The gender...the female to male ratio for bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa is 10:1, the female to male ratio for binge eating disorder is only 2.5:1 (Jacobi...association between bulimia scores and selected peers increased over time, whereas there was no association between 1) bulimia scores and unselected

  19. Evaluation of Sound Therapy Tinnitus Treatments with Concurrent Counseling in Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-04

    Tinnitus Retraining Therapy (TRT). Identifying the course of treatment or intervention is multifactorial. This decision is often driven by factors such...levels (F = 16.71, p = .003). For this treatment group, pre- and post- intervention measures of both disturbance levels and BBNMML measures failed to...failed to reveal a statistically significant effect of time (i.e. use of treatment at pre- and post- intervention ) for either device used

  20. 2005 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    0.6 (0.1) Females 0.5 (0.5) 0.6 (0.3) 0.3 (0.2) 0.9 (0.3) 0.6 (0.2) Total 1.4 (0.8) 0.7 (0.1) 0.4 (0.2) 0.4 (0.1) 0.6 (0.1) Hypnosis Males...indicate how much you have been bothered by each problem in the past month. (Place an "X" on each line) Repeated, disturbing memories , thoughts or...American Healing, curanderismo) Biofeedback Hypnosis (self or led by practitioner) Art/music therapy

  1. Development of a Multilevel Prevention Program for Improved Relationship Functioning in Active Duty Military Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Experience 8 9.30 (5) Information for Children; Managing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Around Children; Single - Parent Support 6 7.00 (6...empirical support for parenting problems, but no similar program exists for couple problems. We conducted two studies with U.S. Air Force Security...integrates universal, selective, and indicated prevention/intervention. Such an approach has tremendous empirical support for parenting problems, but no

  2. The Association Between Mental Health and Cigarette Smoking in Active Duty Military Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    2.1.2 General Tobacco Use Costs ...................................................................... 1 2.1.3 Cigarette Smoking in Adolescents...Characteristics and Impact . Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. Approximately 21% of the U.S... pack of 20 cigarettes sold in the U.S. (low estimate) are $10.28. The average retail price per pack in the U.S. (including sales tax) is $4.20 (Ref

  3. Health-related impact of deployment extensions on spouses of active duty army personnel.

    PubMed

    SteelFisher, Gillian K; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Blendon, Robert J

    2008-03-01

    This study examined problems pertaining to the health and well-being of Army spouses during deployment, comparing those whose experienced extensions of their partners' deployments with those whose partners returned home on time or early. It used data from a 2004 survey of 798 spouses of active duty personnel. Controlling for demographic and deployment characteristics, spouses who experienced extensions fared worse on an array of measures, including mental well-being (e.g., feelings of depression), household strains (e.g., problems with household and car maintenance), and some areas of their jobs (having to stop work or to work fewer hours). There were no statistically significant differences regarding problems pertaining to their overall health, marriage, other work issues, finances, relationships with Army families, or safety. However, spouses who experienced extensions were more likely to perceive the Army negatively during deployment. These findings suggest that deployment extensions may exacerbate certain problems and frustrations for Army spouses.

  4. Paralysis as a Presenting Symptom of Hyperthyroidism in an Active Duty Soldier.

    PubMed

    Jennette, John; Tauferner, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is an endocrine disorder presenting with proximal motor weakness, typically greatest in the lower extremities, hypokalemia, and signs or laboratory findings consistent with hyperthyroidism. The incidence of TPP is highest in Asian males. This is a case report of a 30-year-old male active duty Soldier who presented to the emergency department complaining of several recent episodes of lower extremity paralysis. The patient underwent a workup which included serum and cerebrospinal fluid studies, and was found to be hypokalemic and hyperthyroid. Following consultation with neurology, the patient was admitted to the medicine service and treated for thyrotoxic periodic paralysis with potassium replacement and treatment of his hyperthyroidism. Since achieving a euthyroid state, he has had no recurrences of TPP. This disease should be considered in patients presenting with symmetric motor weakness and hypokalemia, whether or not symptoms of hyperthyroidism are elicited during the review of systems.

  5. Suicide risk by military occupation in the DoD active component population.

    PubMed

    Trofimovich, Lily; Reger, Mark A; Luxton, David D; Oetjen-Gerdes, Lynne A

    2013-06-01

    Suicide risk based on occupational cohorts within the U.S. military was investigated. Rates of suicide based on military occupational categories were computed for the Department of Defense (DoD) active component population between 2001 and 2010. The combined infantry, gun crews, and seamanship specialist group was at increased risk of suicide compared to the overall military population even when adjusted for gender, age, and deployment history. The results provide useful information that can help inform the DoD's suicide prevention mission. Data limitations and recommended areas for future research are discussed.

  6. 75 FR 78726 - Agency Information Collection Activities: North American Free Trade Agreement Duty Deferral

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... requirement concerning the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Duty Deferral. This request for comment... soliciting comments concerning the following information collection: Title: NAFTA Duty Deferral. OMB Number: 1651-0071. Abstract: The provisions of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) were adopted by...

  7. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding... BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY BONDING RULES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  8. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding... BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY BONDING RULES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  9. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  10. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  11. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature...

  12. Active Duty - U.S. Army Noise Induced Hearing Injury Surveillance, Calendar Years 2007-2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    summary for calendar years (CY) 2007-2011 showed increasing incidence rates for sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), tinnitus , and significant threshold...induced hearing loss (NIHL) and tinnitus among U.S. military members from World War II through 2005. The report’s authors concluded that military hearing...epidemiological data to reliably estimate the incidence of NIHL and tinnitus in the U.S. Armed Forces. In response to the IOM report, military audiologists

  13. Academic Advisors of Military and Student Veterans: An Ethnographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, there is an influx of active-duty military and student veterans enrolling in postsecondary and graduate-level education. The role of an academic advisor increases significantly with this influx of enrollment. The purpose of this study was to determine how a graduate-level academic advisor perceives…

  14. Pathways to Military Service for College Men and Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The handbook provides college students and graduates with summary information about military service opportunities. All officer and enlisted personnel programs are described, along with entrance qualifications and active duty obligations. Officer programs fall into four categories: (1) training programs for undergraduates, which include military…

  15. 2005 Workplace and Equal Opportunity Survey of Active-Duty Members Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Offender: military subordinat-Uned 599 EA060F* 60f . [ 60f ] Offender: other mil persons 465 EA060FU* [ 60f ] Offender: other mil persons-Uned 600...60e. [60e] Offender: military subordinates 464 EA060F 60f . [ 60f ] Offender: other mil persons 465 EA060G 60g. [60g] Offender: civ emplyees 466 EA060H...60d] Offender: military coworkers-Uned 598 EA060EU [60e] Offender: military subordinat-Uned 599 EA060FU [ 60f ] Offender: other mil persons-Uned 600

  16. Radical Scavenging Activities of Undaria pinnatifida Extracts Fermented with Cordyceps militaris Mycelia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yon-Suk; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Han, Young-Ki; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jeong, Jae-Hyun; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2015-06-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the various radical scavenging activities of fermented Undaria pinnatifida by the mycelia fermentation method. U. pinnatifida was fermented with Cordyceps militaris (C. militaris) mycelia using solid culture and compared with unfermentated U. pinnatifida and C. militaris mycelia for antioxidant activities. The various radical scavenging activities of extracts from U. pinnatifida fermented with C. militaris mycelia (FUCM) were evaluated by electron spin resonance. The antioxidant activities of the FUCM extracts were assayed for ferric reducing antioxidant power, 2,2'-azinobis-(3- ethybenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging activity, and oxygen radical absorption capacity. The free radical scavenging activity of FUCM extracts was higher than that of C. militaris mycelia or U. pinnatifida alone. FUCM extracts were significantly (p < 0.05) increased up to 35 times, 10 times, and 16 times that of U. pinnatifida extracts on DPPH, alkyl, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, respectively. These results indicate that FUCM extracts have different chemical ingredients from U. pinnatifida and could provide beneficial antioxidant activity.

  17. RLG Military Operations and Activities in the Laotian Panhandle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    this had disadvantages because most of these people had not been trained to perform what was expected of them and their reports could not be relied...defensive positions performing routine guard duty and little or no combat, even against the equally inept Pathet Lao forces in their areas. The... re - doubled its efforts to expand and improve the trail structure. Lam Son 719 was a convincing lesson to the North Vietnamese leadership that this

  18. A guide to treating military personnel in a civilian mental health facility.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Gwen A

    2014-11-01

    As the number of troops returning home from the Middle East continues to rise, so does the need for psychiatric treatment. More and more often, civilian mental health facilities will be faced with treating active duty service members. Because the patients are active duty status, civilian providers need to become familiar with the unique intricacies and challenges of interacting with military command and mental health clinics. Concepts such as confidentiality and consent have a slightly different meaning in the military that affects care in the civilian realm. Diagnoses, medication choices, and treatment planning can also have an impact on a service member's career in the military that civilian providers may not recognize. This guide serves as a "beginner's" manual for working with active duty service members.

  19. Breastfeeding rates and factors related to cessation in a military population.

    PubMed

    Bales, Karrn; Washburn, John; Bales, James

    2012-12-01

    Evidence continues to accumulate showing the benefits of breastfeeding to infants, mothers, and society as a whole. However, breastfeeding success rates nationwide have consistently fallen short of recommendations set forth by the American Academy of Pediatrics. There are several potential barriers to successful breastfeeding, and many of these could be magnified in the demanding careers of military members and their families. We surveyed 254 women at a regional military medical facility, both active duty members and dependents of active duty members, regarding their ability to successfully breastfeed their infants. We found that American Academy of Pediatrics target goals in this population as a whole were indeed nearly met at this facility, but also found that active duty members and those who encountered military-related difficulty fell well short of these goals. These findings suggest potential barriers to breastfeeding success that warrant further study from the U.S. Department of Defense.

  20. The Best of Both Worlds: Psychiatry Training at Combined Civilian-Military Programs.

    PubMed

    Welton, Randon S; Hamaoka, Derrick A; Broderick, Pamela J; Schillerstrom, Jason E

    2015-08-01

    Air Force psychiatry faces the task of training competent military psychiatrists in an era of continuing reductions. Beginning in the 1980s, the Air Force started collaborating with University partners to create hybrid training programs, civilian-military psychiatry residencies. These mergers provide stability for Air Force psychiatry training in the face of increased operational missions and uncertain military recruiting. As a result of these combined programs, Air Force psychiatry residents gain access to a broader range of civilian clinical experience and expertise while maintaining a focus on distinctive military requirements. The combining of programs opens up options for academic activities which may not have otherwise existed. Both military and civilian residents benefit from the occupational psychiatry experiences available within military clinical sites. These programs give civilian residents a chance to assist active duty members and their families and provide insight into the military "lifecycle." These collaborations benefit the universities by providing access to a larger pool of residents and faculty. The synthesis of the military and civilian programs raises some ongoing obstacles such as civilian residents' ability to gain access to military resources. The programs must also accommodate separate mechanisms for selecting residents (the National Residency Matching Program versus the Joint Selection Board for Graduate Medical Education). Military residents must also comply with military standards and requirements while maintaining the universities' standards of conduct and professionalism. Merging military training programs into university programs creates a vibrant opportunity to create exceptional military and civilian psychiatrists.

  1. An Analysis of the Role of Service Specific Risk Factors in Active Duty Navy Suicides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    manic - depressives , and consumers of alcohol. They draw no independent associations between military service characteristics and suicide risk (LeardMann...current and prior military members. Using Cox models for survival analysis, they find the highest suicidal correlations with males, depressives ...factors for suicide: depression , past psychiatric treatment, anxiety, alcohol abuse, and guilty/shameful disposition. They execute a Poisson model to

  2. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  3. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  4. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  5. Active objects programming for military autonomous mobile robots software prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozien, Roger F.

    2001-09-01

    tasks conflicts. Active object oriented programming is also very useful in matter of software engineering. Indeed, inside the code, the separation between the logical parts is explicit and plain. So it allows the designer to take only the robot's logical software part, regardless of the software testing environment, and to put it on the physical robot. And even among the logical parts of the robot software, the separation is quite huge, which is a good thing in terms of code engineering, upgrading and reusing. This kind of approach is, or should be, imposed by the particular constraints that lie on military robots, and on any kind of autonomous systems acting in hostile environments, if not in really unknown environments. This systems have to lead a mission on which other systems, and even human lifes, rely on. That is the reason why we want to have an accurate look on the on-board software which ensures the robot's autonomy of decision.

  6. Active object programming for military autonomous mobile robot software prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozien, Roger F.

    2001-10-01

    tasks conflicts. Active object oriented programming is also very useful in matter of software engineering. Indeed, inside the code, the separation between the logical parts is explicit and plain. So it allows the designer to take only the robot's logical software part, regardless of the software testing environment, and to put it on the physical robot. And even among the logical parts of the robot software, the separation is quite huge, which is a good thing in terms of code engineering, upgrading and reusing. This kind of approach is, or should be, imposed by the particular constraints that lie on military robots, and on any kind of autonomous systems acting in hostile environments, if not in really unknown environments. These systems have to lead a mission on which other systems, and even human lives, rely on. That is the reason why we want to have an accurate look on the on-board software which ensures the robot's autonomy of decision.

  7. 5 CFR 734.406 - Participation in political activities while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or... on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties, or using a... any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by an individual employed or...

  8. Breastfeeding during military deployment: a soldier's story.

    PubMed

    Sleutel, Martha Rider

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of women of childbearing age are serving and being deployed in the United States military. U.S. Department of Defense policies related to breastfeeding and deployment are inconsistent among the different branches of the military and sometimes conflict with evidence-based guidelines about optimal breastfeeding practices. This is the story of an active duty soldier who was deployed while breastfeeding and the obstacles she encountered trying to send breast milk home to her son. The article explores policy, health and professional practice implications.

  9. CERP in Afghanistan: Refining Military Capabilities in Development Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Appraisal when out- comes are primarily development based.39 TSPs should also cover the fundamentals of project management, monitoring and evaluation tech...while deployed. 4. Monitor Outcomes. If the military is to remain substantially engaged in efforts beyond stability, monitoring and evaluation efforts...use and how projects were prioritized; what assessment mechanisms were used to determine projects; how monitoring and evaluation (M&E) is taking

  10. Analysis of heavy-duty diesel truck activity and emissions data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huai, Tao; Shah, Sandip D.; Wayne Miller, J.; Younglove, Ted; Chernich, Donald J.; Ayala, Alberto

    Despite their relatively small population, heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) are (in 2005) disproportionate contributors to the emissions inventory for oxides of nitrogen (NO x) and particulate matter (PM) due to their high individual vehicle emissions rates, lack of engine aftertreatment, and high vehicle miles traveled. Beginning in the early 1990s, heavy-duty engine manufacturers began equipping their engines with electronic sensors and controls and on-board electronic computer modules (ECMs) to manage these systems. These ECMs can collect and store both periodic and lifetime engine operation data for a variety of engine and vehicle parameters including engine speed and load, time at idle, average vehicle speed, etc. The University of California, Riverside (UCR), under a contract with the California Air Resources Board (CARB), performed data analysis of 270 ECM data sets obtained from the CARB. The results from this analysis have provided insights into engine/vehicle operation that have not been obtained from previous on-board datalogger studies since those previous studies focused on vehicle operation and did not collect engine operating data. Results indicate that HDDVs spend a considerable amount of time at high-speed cruise and at idle and that a smaller percentage of time is spent under transient engine/vehicle operation. These results are consistent with other HDDV activity studies, and provide further proof of the validity of assumptions in CARB's emission factor (EMFAC2002) model. An additional important contribution of this paper is that the evaluation of vehicle ECM data provides several advantages over traditional global positioning system (GPS) and datalogger studies: (1) ECM data is significantly cheaper than the traditional method (50 record -1 vs. ˜2000 record -1) and (2) ECM data covers vehicle operation over the entire life of the vehicle, whereas traditional surveys cover only short periods of surveillance (days, weeks, or months). It is

  11. A frequency-duty cycle equation for the ACGIH hand activity level.

    PubMed

    Radwin, Robert G; Azari, David P; Lindstrom, Mary J; Ulin, Sheryl S; Armstrong, Thomas J; Rempel, David

    2015-01-01

    A new equation for predicting the hand activity level (HAL) used in the American Conference for Government Industrial Hygienists threshold limit value®(TLV®) was based on exertion frequency (F) and percentage duty cycle (D). The TLV® includes a table for estimating HAL from F and D originating from data in Latko et al. (Latko WA, Armstrong TJ, Foulke JA, Herrin GD, Rabourn RA, Ulin SS, Development and evaluation of an observational method for assessing repetition in hand tasks. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, 58(4):278-285, 1997) and post hoc adjustments that include extrapolations outside of the data range. Multimedia video task analysis determined D for two additional jobs from Latko's study not in the original data-set, and a new nonlinear regression equation was developed to better fit the data and create a more accurate table. The equation, HAL = 6:56 ln D[F(1:31) /1+3:18 F(1:31), generally matches the TLV® HAL lookup table, and is a substantial improvement over the linear model, particularly for F>1.25 Hz and D>60% jobs. The equation more closely fits the data and applies the TLV® using a continuous function.

  12. A hand speed-duty cycle equation for estimating the ACGIH hand activity level rating.

    PubMed

    Akkas, Oguz; Azari, David P; Chen, Chia-Hsiung Eric; Hu, Yu Hen; Ulin, Sheryl S; Armstrong, Thomas J; Rempel, David; Radwin, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    An equation was developed for estimating hand activity level (HAL) directly from tracked root mean square (RMS) hand speed (S) and duty cycle (D). Table lookup, equation or marker-less video tracking can estimate HAL from motion/exertion frequency (F) and D. Since automatically estimating F is sometimes complex, HAL may be more readily assessed using S. Hands from 33 videos originally used for the HAL rating were tracked to estimate S, scaled relative to hand breadth (HB), and single-frame analysis was used to measure D. Since HBs were unknown, a Monte Carlo method was employed for iteratively estimating the regression coefficients from US Army anthropometry survey data. The equation: HAL = 10[e(-15:87+0:02D+2:25 ln S)/(1+e(-15:87+0:02D+2:25 ln S)], R(2) = 0.97, had a residual range ± 0.5 HAL. The S equation superiorly fits the Latko et al. ( 1997 ) data and predicted independently observed HAL values (Harris 2011) better (MSE = 0.16) than the F equation (MSE = 1.28).

  13. 2013 Workplace and Equal Opportunity Survey of Active Duty Members: Overview Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    the military have changed over time. The findings provide general perceptions of whether Service members thought that race relations have improved ...received poorer treatment than you deserved from a military health care provider. • You were harassed by armed forces police. 1.9 1.3 3.0 1.9 1.3 0.9 0 20...24% 33% 15% 35% 31% NR 36% 38% 28% At a military non-work location (for example, gym , quarters/housing, exchange/commissary, bowling alley)? 21

  14. Repeat infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae among active duty U.S. Army personnel: a population-based case-series study.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Christian T; Wurapa, Eyako K; Sateren, Warren B; Morris, Sara M; Hollingsworth, Bruce P; Sanchez, Jose L

    2016-11-24

    Little information is known on the rate of repeat gonorrhea infection among U.S. military personnel. We analyzed all gonorrhea cases reported to the Defense Medical Surveillance System during 2006-2012 to determine the rate of repeat infection. During the seven-year study period, 17,602 active duty U.S. Army personnel with a first incident gonorrhea infection were reported. Among the 4987 women with a first gonorrhea infection, 14.4% had at least one repeat infection. Among the 12,615 men with a first gonorrhea infection, 13.7% had at least one repeat infection. Overall, the rate of repeat gonorrhea infection was 44.5 and 48.9 per 1000 person-years for women and men, respectively. Service members aged 17-19 years (hazard ratio [HR] for women = 1.51; HR for men = 1.71), African-American personnel (HR for women = 1.26; HR for men = 2.17), junior enlisted personnel (HR for women = 2.64; HR for men = 1.37), and those with one year or less of service (HR for women = 1.23; HR for men = 1.37) were at higher risk of repeat infection. The findings from this study highlight the need to develop targeted prevention initiatives including education, counseling, and retesting to prevent gonorrhea reinfections among U.S. Army personnel.

  15. Development and testing of virtual reality exposure therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in active duty service members who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    McLay, Robert N; Graap, Kenneth; Spira, James; Perlman, Karen; Johnston, Scott; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Difede, JoAnn; Deal, William; Oliver, David; Baird, Alicia; Bordnick, Patrick S; Spitalnick, Josh; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Rizzo, Albert

    2012-06-01

    This study was an open-label, single-group, treatment-development project aimed at developing and testing a method for applying virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) to active duty service members diagnosed with combat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Forty-two service members with PTSD were enrolled, and 20 participants completed treatment. The PTSD Checklist-Military version, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for depression, and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were used as outcome measures. Of those who completed post-treatment assessment, 75% had experienced at least a 50% reduction in PTSD symptoms and no longer met DSM-IV criteria for PTSD at post treatment. Average PSTD scores decreased by 50.4%, depression scores by 46.6%, and anxiety scores by 36%. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that statistically significant improvements in PTSD, depression, and anxiety occurred over the course of treatment and were maintained at follow up. There were no adverse events associated with VRET treatment. This study provides preliminary support for the use of VRET in combat-related PTSD. Further study will be needed to determine the wider utility of the method and to determine if it offers advantages over other established PTSD treatment modalities.

  16. December 2004 Status of Forces Survey of Active-Duty Members: Administration, Datasets. and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    nmlkj nmlkj nmlkj nmlkj SATISFACTION AND RETENTION INTENTION 21. Overall, how satisfied are you with the military way of life? nmlkjVery... satisfied nmlkj Satisfied nmlkjNeither satisfied nor dissatisfied nmlkjDissatisfied nmlkjVery dissatisfied SATISFACTION AND RETENTION INTENTION...nmlkj nmlkj SATISFACTION AND RETENTION INTENTION Edit NOT [SRSVC1] = ř" SATOVER 21. Overall, how satisfied are you with the military way of life

  17. Combination of Active Instability Control and Passive Measures to Prevent Combustion Instabilities in a 260MW Heavy Duty Gas Turbine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO 11146 TITLE: Combination of Active Instability Control and Passive...ADPO11101 thru ADP011178 UNCLASSIFIED 3 -1 Combination of Active Instability Control and Passive Measures to Prevent Combustion Instabilities in a 260MW...Military Aircrqft, Land Vehicles and Sea Vehicles held in Braunschweig, Germany, 8-11 May 2000, and published in RTO MP-051. 3 -2 tuation produces the

  18. Family stress and posttraumatic stress: the impact of military operations on military health care providers.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Barnett, Scott D; Hickling, Edward J

    2012-08-01

    This study uses data from the 2005 Department of Defense Survey of Health-Related Behaviors Among Military Personnel to examine relationships between family stress and posttraumatic stress symptoms across 4 subgroups of Operation Iraqi Freedom-deployed (i.e., war in Iraq) or Operation Enduring Freedom-deployed (i.e., war in Afghanistan) active-duty military service members. Results suggest the following: (a) the greatest positive correlation of family stressors with posttraumatic stress symptoms was found within the military health care officer group, and (b) these military health care officers differed in family stressors mediating posttraumatic stress with divorce and financial problems accounting for significant and unique portions of the variance. Implications for care of service members and their families are discussed.

  19. Military psychiatry in India

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, H. R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Military personnel, because of the unique nature of their duties and services, are likely to be under stress which at times has no parallel in civilian life. The stress of combat and service in extreme weather conditions often act as major stressors. The modern practices in military psychiatry had their beginning during the two World Wars, more particularly, the IInd World War. The GHPU concept had the beginning in India with military hospitals having such establishments in the care of their clientele. As the nation gained independence, many of the military psychiatrists shifted to the civil stream and contributed immensely in the development of modern psychiatry in India. In the recent years military psychiatry has been given the status of a subspecialty chapter and the military psychiatrists have been regularly organizing CMEs and training programs for their members to prepare them to function in the special role of military psychiatrists. PMID:21836702

  20. Military Education: Additional DOD Guidance Is Needed to Enhance Oversight of the Service Academies and Their Preparatory Schools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-27

    Military Personnel: The DOD and Coast Guard Academies Have Taken Steps to Address Incidents of Sexual Harassment and Assault , but Greater Federal Oversight...military training activities and mandatory athletic activities. In return for their free education, the graduates must serve on active duty for 5...Academies: Academic Review Processes. GAO/NSIAD-95-57. Washington, D.C.: April 5, 1995. DOD Service Academies: Update on Extent of Sexual Harassment

  1. 38 CFR 3.7 - Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. 3.7 Section 3.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Indemnity Compensation General § 3.7 Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. The following individuals and groups are considered to have performed...

  2. 38 CFR 3.7 - Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. 3.7 Section 3.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Indemnity Compensation General § 3.7 Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. The following individuals and groups are considered to have performed...

  3. 38 CFR 3.7 - Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. 3.7 Section 3.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Indemnity Compensation General § 3.7 Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. The following individuals and groups are considered to have performed...

  4. 38 CFR 3.7 - Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. 3.7 Section 3.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Indemnity Compensation General § 3.7 Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. The following individuals and groups are considered to have performed...

  5. Associations between dimensions of anxiety sensitivity and PTSD symptom clusters in active-duty police officers.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, Gordon J G; Stapleton, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that anxiety sensitivity (AS) plays an important role in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between empirically supported PTSD symptom clusters (i.e. reexperiencing, avoidance, numbing, hyperarousal) and AS dimensions (i.e. psychological concerns, social concerns, somatic concerns). Participants were 138 active-duty police officers (70.7% female; mean age = 38.9 years; mean time policing = 173.8 months) who, as a part of a larger study, completed measures of trauma exposure, PTSD symptoms, AS, and depressive symptoms. All participants reported experiencing at least one event that they perceived as traumatic, and 44 (31.9%) screened positive for PTSD. Officers with probable PTSD scored significantly higher on AS total as well as the somatic and psychological concerns dimensional scores than did those without PTSD. As well, a higher percentage of officers with probable PTSD scored positively on the AS-derived Brief Screen for Panic Disorder (Apfeldorf et al., 1994) compared with those without PTSD. A series of regression analyses revealed that depressive symptoms, number of reported traumas, and AS somatic concerns were significant predictors of PTSD total symptom severity as well as severity of reexperiencing. Avoidance was predicted by depressive symptoms and AS somatic concerns. Only depressive symptoms were significantly predictive of numbing and hyperarousal cluster scores. These findings contribute to understanding the nature of association between AS and PTSD symptom clusters. Implications for the treatment of individuals having PTSD with and without panic-related symptomatology are discussed.

  6. Influence of a 12.8-km military load carriage activity on lower limb gait mechanics and muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Rice, Hannah; Fallowfield, Joanne; Allsopp, Adrian; Dixon, Sharon

    2016-07-27

    The high stress fracture occurrence in military populations has been associated with frequent load carriage activities. This study aimed to assess the influence of load carriage and of completing a load carriage training activity on gait characteristics. Thirty-two Royal Marine recruits completed a 12.8-km load carriage activity as part of their military training. Data were collected during walking in military boots, pre and post-activity, with and without the additional load (35.5 kg). Ground contact time, lower limb sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics, and electromyographic variables were obtained for each condition. When carrying load, there was increased ground contact time, increased joint flexion and joint moments, and increased plantar flexor and knee extensor muscle activity. Post-activity, there were no changes to kinematic variables, knee extensor moments were reduced, and there was evidence of plantar flexor muscle fatigue. The observed gait changes may be associated with stress fracture development. Practitioner Summary: This study identified gait changes due to load carriage and after a military load carriage training activity. Such activities are associated with lower limb stress fractures. A pre-post study design was used. Gait mechanics changed to a greater extent when carrying load, than after completion of the activity when assessed without load.

  7. Pertussis in a military and military beneficiary population: case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Frank L; Hepburn, Matthew J; Frolichstein, Robert A

    2002-03-01

    Three cases of pertussis (whooping cough) identified in a military emergency department are reported. Two of these cases involved infants with typical presentations. One of these infants was too young to have received immunizations, and the other child was only partially immunized. The third case involved an active duty soldier with a chronic cough. Pertussis has become increasingly important as a cause of chronic cough in adults. As a result of the infectivity of this organism, close-quarter situations, such as day care centers and military barracks, create the opportunity for substantial person-to-person transmission. Typical and atypical clinical presentations of pertussis are discussed, with an emphasis on currently available diagnostic modalities. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of this disease are also reviewed. The medical management of active duty soldiers and their dependents (both pediatric and adult) with this largely underappreciated infection and their close contacts is presented.

  8. Military Personnel. Army Needs to Better Enforce Requirements and Improve Record Keeping for Soldiers Whose Medical Conditions May Call for Significant Duty Limitations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    concerns for fear of prejudicial treatment . The Army has instituted a program to provide ombudsmen to whom soldiers can bring medical concerns, but it...numerical designations they were assigned yet were reluctant to bring their concerns to their commanders for fear of prejudicial treatment . The Army...does not meet deployment standards and can receive medical treatment at deployed locations that will render them fit for duty.11 DOD guidance requires

  9. Connections, Partnerships, Opportunities, and Programs to Enhance Success for Military Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Deborah; Northrup, Pamela; Wiley, Lusharon

    2009-01-01

    Active-duty personnel, reservists, veterans, and their spouses or dependents represent 30% of the 10,000 students at the University of West Florida (UWF). With base realignment activities, a rise in the number of troops returning from deployments, and an increase in military-affiliated students on campus, the needs of veterans and their families…

  10. March 2003 Status of Forces Survey of Active-Duty Members: Tabulations of Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    completed quality control for the volume. DMDC iii Table of Contents Page Introduction to the Survey...20 d. The quality of your coworkers ...................................................................22 e. The quality of your supervisor...304 86. Suppose when you first arrived at your current duty station that the quality of both on-base housing and the type of

  11. 77 FR 73038 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Allowance in Duties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... the Application for Allowance in Duties (CBP Form 4315). This request for comment is being made... of other forms of information technology; and (e) the annual cost burden to respondents or record... Management and Budget (OMB) approval. All comments will become a matter of public record. In this...

  12. HEAVY DUTY DIESEL VEHICLE LOAD ESTIMATION: DEVELOPMENT OF VEHICLE ACTIVITY OPTIMIZATION ALGORITHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Heavy-Duty Vehicle Modal Emission Model (HDDV-MEM) developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology(Georgia Tech) has a capability to model link-specific second-by-second emissions using speed/accleration matrices. To estimate emissions, engine power demand calculated usin...

  13. Military Sexual Trauma: Improvements Made, but VA Can Do More to Track and Improve the Consistency of Disability Claim Decisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    which in the judgment of a mental health professional employed by the Department, resulted from a physical assault of a sexual nature, battery of...a sexual nature, or sexual harassment which occurred while the veteran was serving on active duty or active duty for training.”12 While MST is not...MILITARY SEXUAL TRAUMA Improvements Made, but VA Can Do More to Track and Improve the Consistency of Disability

  14. Evaluation of active and passive polarimetric electro-optic imagery for civilian and military targets discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, Daniel A.; Breton, Mélanie; Pichette, Mario; Larochelle, Vincent; Simard, Jean-Robert

    2008-04-01

    Electro-optic (EO) imaging systems are commonly used to detect civilian and military targets during surveillance operations and search and rescue missions. Adding the polarization of light as additional information to such active and passive EO imaging systems may increase the target discrimination performance, as man made objects are known to depolarized light in different manner than natural background. However, while the polarization of light has been used and studied in the past for numerous applications, the understanding of the polarization phenomenology taking place with targets used in cluttered backgrounds requires additional experimentations. Specifically, the target contrast enhancement obtained by analyzing the polarization of the reflected light from either a direct polarized laser source as encountered in active imagers, or from natural ambient illumination, needs further investigation. This paper describes an investigation of the use of polarization-based imaging sensors to discriminate civilian and military targets against different backgrounds. Measurements were carried out using two custom-designed active and passive imaging systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) and the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral bands. Polarimetric signatures were acquired during two distinct trials that occurred in 2007, using specific civilian and military targets such as cars and military vehicles. Results demonstrate to what extent and under which illumination and environmental conditions the exploitation of active and passive polarimetric images is suitable to enable target detection and recognition for some events of interest, according to various specific scenarios.

  15. 50 CFR 21.15 - Authorization of take incidental to military readiness activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Authorization of take incidental to military readiness activities. 21.15 Section 21.15 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... data for five years from the date the Armed Forces commence their action. During Integrated...

  16. Voxel-wise resting-state MEG source magnitude imaging study reveals neurocircuitry abnormality in active-duty service members and veterans with PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Xiong; Yurgil, Kate A.; Robb, Ashley; Angeles, Annemarie; Diwakar, Mithun; Risbrough, Victoria B.; Nichols, Sharon L.; McLay, Robert; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Song, Tao; Huang, Charles W.; Lee, Roland R.; Baker, Dewleen G.

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a leading cause of sustained impairment, distress, and poor quality of life in military personnel, veterans, and civilians. Indirect functional neuroimaging studies using PET or fMRI with fear-related stimuli support a PTSD neurocircuitry model that includes amygdala, hippocampus, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). However, it is not clear if this model can fully account for PTSD abnormalities detected directly by electromagnetic-based source imaging techniques in resting-state. The present study examined resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in 25 active-duty service members and veterans with PTSD and 30 healthy volunteers. In contrast to the healthy volunteers, individuals with PTSD showed: 1) hyperactivity from amygdala, hippocampus, posterolateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), and insular cortex in high-frequency (i.e., beta, gamma, and high-gamma) bands; 2) hypoactivity from vmPFC, Frontal Pole (FP), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in high-frequency bands; 3) extensive hypoactivity from dlPFC, FP, anterior temporal lobes, precuneous cortex, and sensorimotor cortex in alpha and low-frequency bands; and 4) in individuals with PTSD, MEG activity in the left amygdala and posterolateral OFC correlated positively with PTSD symptom scores, whereas MEG activity in vmPFC and precuneous correlated negatively with symptom score. The present study showed that MEG source imaging technique revealed new abnormalities in the resting-state electromagnetic signals from the PTSD neurocircuitry. Particularly, posterolateral OFC and precuneous may play important roles in the PTSD neurocircuitry model. PMID:25180160

  17. [Regularity of psychophysiological adaptation to military-professional activity among staff of Northern Fleet].

    PubMed

    Sementsov, V K; Khankevich, Iu R; Mosiagin, I G; Maruniak, S V; Chesnokova, V N

    2010-03-01

    There were examined regularities of psycho-physiological adaptation of different categories of military-navy specialists, were detected periods of maximum decrease of compensation abilities among sailor-men and staff reserve of Naval Fleet from students. Were educed psycho-physiological strategies of adaptation of military-navy specialists in dependence of reference level of adaptation capabilities. Was detected the influence on the process of psycho-physiological adaptation to service activity of young specialists of a complex of psychological and social factors. Was educed the influence of ulterior motive on success of psycho-physiological adaptation to new conditions of environment. Was elaborated a complex of measures on optimization of accompaniment of adaptation of military-navy specialists and was given financial evaluation of it's implementation.

  18. San Antonio military and civilian hand transplantation program: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tuder, D; Pederson, W C; Abrahamian, G A; Ingari, J V; Bagg, M C; Person, D W; Martyak, G G

    2011-11-01

    Presented is a report on the first female hand allotransplantation performed in the USA. The patient sustained a dominant hand amputation at the level of the wrist as a result of a bomb explosion while on active duty in the United States Air Force. A hand allotransplantation was performed at a military treatment facility by a team of physicians composed of representatives from private practice, academia, and military medical institutions.

  19. Implementation and dissemination of military informed and evidence-based interventions for community dwelling military families.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert A; Fairbank, John A

    2013-12-01

    Community dwelling military families from the National Guard and Reserve contend with deployment-related stressors in relative isolation, living in communities where mental health providers may have little knowledge of military culture. When they are community residents, active duty service members and families tend to live in close proximity to their military installations. This article will focus primarily on the challenges to quality mental health care for reserve component (RC) families. Where studies of RC families are absent, those of active component (AC) families will be highlighted as relevant. Upon completion of a deployment, reintegration for RC families is complicated by high rates of symptomatology, low service utilization, and greater barriers to care relative to AC families. A paucity of providers skilled in evidence-based treatments (EBTs) limits community mental health capacity to serve RC military families. Several emergent programs illustrate the potential for better serving community dwelling military families. Approaches include behavioral health homes, EBTs and treatment components, structured resiliency and parent training, military informed schools, outreach methods, and technology-based coping, and psychoeducation. Methods from implementation science to improve clinical skill acquisition and spread and sustainability of EBTs may advance access to and quality of mental health treatment and are reviewed herein. Recommendations related to research methods, military knowledge and treatment competencies, and transition to a public health model of service delivery are discussed.

  20. Overweight and obesity in military personnel: sociodemographic predictors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey J; Marriott, Bernadette P; Dotson, Laura; Bathalon, Gaston P; Funderburk, Leslee; White, Alan; Hadden, Louise; Young, Andrew J

    2012-07-01

    In the United States, nationally representative civilian studies have shown that BMI is associated with select sociodemographic characteristics. Active-duty military personnel are not included in these surveys and the persistence of these associations in military personnel is unknown. Data from the worldwide, representative 2002 and 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Surveys of Health-Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel were used to assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity and, the association of BMI with sociodemographic characteristics. The final response bases included 12,756 (2002) and 16,146 (2005) personnel. Results indicated that the combined prevalence of overweight and obesity in military personnel increased to an all-time high in 2005 (60.5%) with higher prevalence of obesity in 2005 compared to 2002 (12.9% vs. 8.7, respectively, P ≤ 0.01). Holding other variables constant, regression analysis indicated that women were significantly less likely than men to be overweight or obese in both survey years (P ≤ 0.0001), which is contrary to civilian data. Similar to civilian data, the prevalence of obesity was significantly associated with increased age, black or Hispanic/Latino race/ethnicity, and being married (P ≤ 0.01). US military personnel are not immune to the US obesity epidemic. Demographic characteristics associated with being overweight should be considered when developing military-sponsored weight management programs.

  1. Epidemiological Factors Associated with Increased Body Mass Index in Active Duty Military Engaged in Vigorous Physical Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-21

    and prevention for well/sick individuals from birth to old age. Selected as first-ever FNP on high-profile humanitarian mission to Guatemala...Number Maryland Board of Nursing: RN R106899 Bosch
 Page
4
 Source/Type Number American Nurses Credentialing Center FNP -BC 348790 Honors...Title/Course Level Spring 2007 PHD Integration and Application of Family Theory in Primary Care (14 FNP students, Masters Level) * Teaching

  2. December 2005 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    SATISFIED /DISSATISFIED*/ ELSE IF SATISF (J) IN (4,5) THEN SATISFR (J)=3; /* SATISFIED /VERY SATISFIED */ END; DROP J; /* coding for... SATISFACTION 21. Overall, how satisfied are you with the military way of life? A-6 ******** Page Break ********** ******** Page...E, 21; ARRAY SATISFY (*) SATMLA SATMLB SATMLC SATMLD SATMLE SATOVER; ARRAY SATISFYR (*) SATMLAR SATMLBR SATMLCR SATMLDR SATMLER SATOVERR;

  3. Women at war: understanding how women veterans cope with combat and military sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Haskell, Sally G; Krebs, Erin E; Justice, Amy C; Yano, Elizabeth M; Brandt, Cynthia

    2012-02-01

    The wars in Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom, OIF) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom, OEF) have engendered a growing population of US female veterans, with women now comprising 15% of active US duty military personnel. Women serving in the military come under direct fire and experience combat-related injuries and trauma, and are also often subject to in-service sexual assaults and sexual harassment. However, little is known regarding how women veterans cope with these combat and military sexual trauma experiences once they return from deployment. To better understand their experiences, we conducted semi-structured interviews with nineteen OEF/OIF women veterans between January-November 2009. Women veterans identified stressful military experiences and post-deployment reintegration problems as major stressors. Stressful military experiences included combat experiences, military sexual trauma, and separation from family. Women had varying abilities to address and manage stressors, and employed various cognitive and behavioral coping resources and processes to manage their stress.

  4. A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components...Lisa M. Harrington, James H . Bigelow, Alexander Rothenberg, James Pita, Paul D. Emslie Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This document...of a particular component—whether active , guard, or reserve. As a result, when personnel policies are implemented in one component, little is known

  5. Contraceptive decision-making in military women.

    PubMed

    Chung-Park, Min S

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of women in the military related to the prevention of pregnancy. Ten single women, ages 19 to 24, volunteered to be participants. They were interviewed over a 12-week period in a private setting at a military clinic. The results of the study were that their decision to use contraception was influenced by their personal goals, family values, perceived support system, and effectiveness of the birth control. These women used contraceptive methods that they felt were right for them. The conclusion of the study was that women in active military duty are in need of reproductive health education, career counseling, and support. Nurses are in a good position to provide these needed services.

  6. All Military Adolescents Are Not the Same: Sexuality and Substance Use among Adolescents in the U.S. Military Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David A.; Adelman, William P.; Thompson, Amy M.; Shoemaker, Richard G.; Shen-Gunther, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Data examining sexuality and substance use among active duty and military-dependent youth is limited; however, these psychosocial factors have military implications. Adolescents and young adults aged 12–23 were recruited from an active-duty trainee clinic (n = 225) and a military pediatric clinic (n = 223). Active duty participants were more likely to be older, male, White, previous tobacco users, and report a history of sexual activity and less contraception use at their most recent intercourse, compared to the dependent group. Over 10% of all participants indicated attraction to members of the same gender or both genders. In logistic regression analysis, non-White participants were less likely to use contraception compared to White participants. Adolescents and young adults seen in military clinics frequently engage in high-risk behavior. Clinicians who care for military youth should assess their patient’s psychosocial history. Further study of this population is warranted to identify factors that may influence risk and resilience. PMID:26512892

  7. Prazosin Augmentation of Outpatient Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders in Active Duty Soldiers with and without PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Substance Abuse Program (ASAP) at Madigan Health Care System/Joint Base Lewis McChord. The aims of this trial are 1) to determine prazosin’s efficacy... Abuse Program (ASAP) at Madigan HCS/Joint Base Lewis McChord. The aims of this trial are 1) to determine prazosin’s efficacy for AUD in OIF/OEF soldiers...Augmentation of Outpatient Treatment of AUD in Active Duty Soldiers with and without PTSD. Presented at Joint Army/NIH Substance Abuse IP – September 29

  8. Body mass index, physical activity, and smoking in relation to military readiness.

    PubMed

    Collée, Audrey; Clarys, Peter; Geeraerts, Philippe; Dugauquier, Christian; Mullie, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the influence of excess weight, regular physical activity, and smoking on the military readiness of the Belgian Armed Forces in a cross-sectional online survey. A multinomial logistic regression was used to study the influence of modifiable risk factors on participation in the physical fitness test. In our study population (n = 4,959), subjects with a body mass index higher than 25 kg/m(2), smokers, and subjects with a lower level of vigorous physical activity were significantly more likely to have failed the physical fitness test. In the Belgian Armed Forces, serious efforts should be made to encourage vigorous physical activity, smoking cessation, and weight loss to preserve our military readiness. Instead of relying on civilian public health interventions, Belgian Defense should develop its own specific approaches to prevent weight gain, improve physical fitness, and influence smoking attitude.

  9. Prevalence of Herbal Therapy Use in Active Duty Air Force Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-24

    correlated with the use of herbal therapies. Most users found the treatments beneficial, with seven of the 78 herb users reporting adverse effects. Four of the...decision to use herbs demonstrates a general belief of and willingness to use treatments other than those offered by conventional medicine. Many...respondents reported using herbs for self- treatment and illness prevention. As the military continues with "Putting Prevention into Practice" and stressing

  10. Do Active Duty Cancer Survivors with a Concurrent Behavioral Health Diagnosis Have Distinct Survivorship Care Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-23

    procedure are presented below. 24 Chi square Power and effect size calculations were performed to estimate needed sample size and predicted...military health care system and may be attenuated by early detection of and effective treatment for common behavioral health diagnoses such as anxiety... effects of this diagnosis (115; 118). Prostate cancer is classified according to tumor stage and grade as well as risk category. Risk categories are

  11. Experimental Comparison of High Duty Cycle and Pulsed Active Sonars in a Littoral Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    objectives of TREX. Please refer to Ref. [1] for an overview of the experimental goals. 3 target) but at the cost of higher technical risk. A...environmental knowledge to identify the best window of opportunity to execute military operations and provide tactical guidance for optimal deployment of...in the comments column implies HDC-PAS runs on the same track, the same direction ( inbound or outbound), and the same ER mode and gain settings

  12. Modeling Incremental Initial Active Duty Continuation Probabilities in the Selected Marine Corps Reserve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Military Manpower, last modified November 21, 2003, 2, http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/corres/pdf2/d11451p.pdf. 26 Figure 5. AFQT Score...http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/corres/pdf2/d11451p.pdf. Erhardt, Bruce J. Jr. “Development of a Markov Model for Forecasting Continuation...Technical Information Center Ft. Belvoir, Virginia 2. Dudley Knox Library Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California

  13. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS Split Benefits § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior...

  14. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS Split Benefits § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior...

  15. Impact of Military Deployment and Distance Learning on Soldier-Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, August T.

    2013-01-01

    Soldiers face complex challenges, issues, and decisions when pursuing distance learning while deployed. These challenges are encountered frequently while completing undergraduate and graduate degree programs on active duty overseas. Many learning programs and benefits are available and utilized by military online learners in a war zone. Education…

  16. Military Personnel Exhibit a Lower Presence of Obesity than the General U.S. Adult Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    307 Rankinen T & Bouchard C (2004) Fitness alters the associations of BMI and 308 waist circumference with total and abdominal fat. Obesity...either group. 152 Active duty military personnel are not included in the U.S. CDC national surveys 153 [e.g., NHANES, Behavioral Risk Factor

  17. An Analysis of Supports for Persistence for the Military Student Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Bruce; Black, Ellen Lowrie; Spohn, R. Terry

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to describe the correlation of academic, financial, and social supports to the persistence of a military student population: veterans, active duty and their families. The study also contrasted these relationships with those of nonmilitary students and looked at the results of both groups together to determine how supports…

  18. Motivating Treatment Seeking and Behavior Change by Untreated Military Personnel Abusing Alcohol or Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    ABSTRACT Conducting the efficacy trial to evaluate the utility of a Motivational Enhancement Therapy intervention to attract untreated active duty...SUBJECT TERMS Alcohol abuse, substance abuse, early intervention , motivational enhancement therapy 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...enhancement intervention (MET) for substance abusing military personnel who are not currently in substance abuse treatment . The intervention is

  19. Divorce, Race, and Military Service: More than Equal Pay and Equal Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Jay D.; Tedrow, Lucky

    2008-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested that the persistently higher rate of divorce among Blacks may be due to hard-to-measure concepts such as culture or norms. To attack this problem, we use data from the NLSY-79 to examine the risk of divorce among enlisted active-duty military servicemen where economic differences and the negative effects of…

  20. Preventing Injuries in the U.S. Military: The Process, Priorities, and Epidemiologic Evidence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    prevention. (2) METHODS. Active Duty military personnel, who sought inpatient or outpatient treatment for one or more oral-maxillofacial...just mortality measures but also morbidity measures such as disabilities, hospital discharges, and visits for emergency and other outpatient treatment ...RJ, Fulco CD, and Liverman, CT, editors. 1999. Reducing the burden of injury: advancing prevention and treatment . Washington, DC: National

  1. Views From the Pacific--Military Base Hospital Libraries in Hawaii and Guam.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Priscilla L; Trafford, Mabel A; Hadley, Alice E

    2016-01-01

    Hospital libraries serving military bases offer a different perspective on library services. Two libraries located on islands in the Pacific Ocean provide services to active duty service men and women, including those deployed to other regions of the world. In addition, these hospital libraries serve service members' families living on the base, and often citizens from the surrounding communities.

  2. Contribution of transition metals in the reactive oxygen species activity of PM emissions from retrofitted heavy-duty vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Vishal; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2010-12-01

    We assessed the contribution of water-soluble transition metals to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) from four heavy-duty vehicles in five retrofitted configurations (V-SCRT, Z-SCRT, DPX, hybrid, and school bus). A heavy-duty truck without any control device served as the baseline vehicle. Particles were collected from all vehicle-configurations on a chassis dynamometer under three driving conditions: cruise (80 km h -1), transient UDDS, and idle. A sensitive macrophage-based in vitro assay was used to determine the ROS activity of collected particles. The contribution of water-soluble transition metals in the measured activity was quantified by their removal using a Chelex ® complexation method. The study demonstrates that despite an increase in the intrinsic ROS activity (per mass basis) of exhaust PM with use of most control technologies, the overall ROS activity (expressed per km or per h) was substantially reduced for retrofitted configurations compared to the baseline vehicle. Chelex treatment of DEPs water extracts removed a substantial (≥70%) and fairly consistent fraction of the ROS activity, which ascertains the dominant role of water-soluble metals in PM-induced cellular oxidative stress. However, relatively lower removal of the activity in few vehicle-configurations (V-SCRT, DPX and school bus idle), despite a large aggregate metals removal, indicated that not all species were associated with the measured activity. A univariate regression analysis identified several transition metals (Fe, Cr, Co and Mn) as significantly correlated ( R > 0.60; p < 0.05) with the ROS activity. Multivariate linear regression model incorporating Fe, Cr and Co explained 90% of variability in ROS levels, with Fe accounting for the highest (84%) fraction of the variance.

  3. Rank, job stress, psychological distress and physical activity among military personnel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical fitness is one of the most important qualities in armed forces personnel. However, little is known about the association between the military environment and the occupational and leisure-time dimensions of the physical activity practiced there. This study assessed the association of rank, job stress and psychological distress with physical activity levels (overall and by dimensions). Methods This a cross-sectional study among 506 military service personnel of the Brazilian Army examined the association of rank, job stress and psychological distress with physical activity through multiple linear regression using a generalized linear model. Results The adjusted models showed that the rank of lieutenant was associated with most occupational physical activity (β = 0.324; CI 95% 0.167; 0.481); “high effort and low reward” was associated with more occupational physical activity (β = 0.224; CI 95% 0.098; 0.351) and with less physical activity in sports/physical exercise in leisure (β = −0.198; CI 95% −0.384; −0.011); and psychological distress was associated with less physical activity in sports/exercise in leisure (β = −0.184; CI 95% −0.321; −0.046). Conclusions The results of this study show that job stress and rank were associated with higher levels of occupational physical activity. Moreover job stress and psychological distress were associated with lower levels of physical activity in sports/exercises. In the military context, given the importance of physical activity and the psychosocial environment, both of which are related to health, these findings may offer input to institutional policies directed to identifying psychological distress early and improving work relationships, and to creating an environment more favorable to increasing the practice of leisure-time physical activity. PMID:23914802

  4. Standard of care of erectile dysfunction in U.S. Air Force aircrew and active duty not on flying status.

    PubMed

    Nast, Justin B

    2014-11-01

    In 2011, over 3,000 active duty U.S. Air Force (USAF) members were prescribed a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI). PDEIs are first-line therapy for treating erectile dysfunction and can have significant side effects that could impact aircrew performance. In total, 200 eligible subject records were randomly sampled from the active duty USAF population of those males filling a prescription for a PDEI in June 2011; 100 of those records were from aviators. The electronic records were reviewed and scored to determine if USAF aeromedical standards for prescribing PDEIs were followed, with a minimum score of 0 for no standards met and a maximum of 3 for all standards met. The average score for both groups was 1, with no significant difference between the group scores. A proper aeromedical disposition was documented in 67% of the aviator records. Although there was no significant difference in standard of care for aviators and nonaviators, the overall documented standard of care was poor. Lack of documentation was the primary reason for the low scores and the low percentage of properly rendered aeromedical dispositions. Proper medical record documentation is important for evaluating quality of care and ensuring compliance with regulations in an Air Force aviator population.

  5. Body contouring surgery for military personnel following massive weight loss.

    PubMed

    Chong, S J; Kok, Y O; Foo, C L

    2011-12-01

    The burgeoning global obesity epidemic extends to the military service, where 6-53% of military personnel are overweight. Obese military personnel who adhere to a strict training and diet regime may potentially achieve and maintain significant weight loss. They may however face physical problems such as excess skin folds causing discomfort, difficulty in uniform fitting, personal hygiene, interference with full physical activities and psychological issues such as body image dissatisfaction, low self esteem and difficulty in social acceptance. We present a case report of a highly motivated military conscript who achieved and maintained significant weight loss but had physical defects following Massive Weight Loss. Body contouring surgery was successfully utilised to correct his physical defects and allowed him to return to full physical duties.

  6. A systematic review of suicide prevention programs for military or veterans.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Steven C; Munjas, Brett; Shekelle, Paul

    2010-06-01

    Military personnel and veterans have important suicide risk factors. After a systematic review of the literature on suicide prevention, seven (five in the U.S.) studies of military personnel were identified containing interventions that may reduce the risk of suicide. The effectiveness of the individual components was not assessed, and problems in methodology or reporting of data were common. Overall, multifaceted interventions for active duty military personnel are supported by consistent evidence, although of very mixed quality, and in some cases during intervals of declines in suicide rates in the general population. There were insufficient studies of U.S. Veterans to reach conclusions.

  7. Contact dermatitis in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Dever, Tara T; Walters, Michelle; Jacob, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Military personnel encounter the same allergens and irritants as their civilian counterparts and are just as likely to develop contact dermatitis from common exposures encountered in everyday life. In addition, they face some unique exposures that can be difficult to avoid owing to their occupational duties. Contact dermatitis can be detrimental to a military member's career if he or she is unable to perform core duties or avoid the inciting substances. An uncontrolled contact dermatitis can result in the member's being placed on limited-duty (ie, nondeployable) status, needing a job or rate change, or separation from military service. We present some common causes of contact dermatitis in military personnel worldwide and some novel sources of contact dermatitis in this population that may not be intuitive.

  8. Effects of military training activities on shrub-steppe raptors in southwestern Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehman, Robert N.; Steenhof, Karen; Kochert, Michael N.; Carpenter, L.B.

    1999-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1994, we assessed relative abundance, nesting success, and distribution of ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis), northern harriers (Circus cyaneus), burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia), and short-eared owls (Asio flammeus) inside and outside a military training site in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, southwestern Idaho. The Orchard Training Area is used primarily for armored vehicle training and artillery firing by the Idaho Army National Guard. Relative abundance of nesting pairs inside and outside the training site was not significantly different from 1991 to 1993 but was significantly higher on the training site in 1994 (Pa??a??a??0.03). Nesting success varied among years but was not significantly different inside and outside the training site (Pa??>a??0.26). In 1994, short-eared owl and burrowing owl nests were significantly closer to firing ranges used early in the spring before owls laid eggs than were random points (Pa??Military activity contributed to some nesting failures from 1992 to 1994, but some pairs nested successfully near military activity.

  9. Military Ordnance: Cleanup Activities at the Former Raritan Arsenal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Appendix I Cleanup Activities at the Former Raritan Arsenal Areas suspected to be contaminated with ordnance can be surveyed with,. metal detector . According...to the Corps, surveying all of Raritan with a metal detector is not feasible because the site is too large and much of the area now contains...since these locations pose the greatcst concern for the public hc"alth and the environment. Areas 1 and 17 were surveyed with a metal detector , and no

  10. A Monetary Repayment Model for Recoupment of the Educational Costs of Air Force Sponsored Graduate Education in Lieu of Completion of an Active Duty Service Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangold, Sanford Dangler

    The study develops a model which enables the Air Force to initiate recoupment action against any officer, who is separating from active service prior to the completion of a graduate education Active Duty Service Commitment (ADSC). It is set up to determine the amount of money owed by the early existing officer, at any point in the ADSC. The…

  11. Radiation exposure of U.S. military individuals.

    PubMed

    Blake, Paul K; Komp, Gregory R

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. military consists of five armed services: the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. It directly employs 1.4 million active duty military, 1.3 million National Guard and reserve military, and 700,000 civilian individuals. This paper describes the military guidance used to preserve and maintain the health of military personnel while they accomplish necessary and purposeful work in areas where they are exposed to radiation. It also discusses military exposure cohorts and associated radiogenic disease compensation programs administered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the U.S. Department of Labor. With a few exceptions, the U.S. military has effectively employed ionizing radiation since it was first introduced during the Spanish-American War in 1898. The U.S military annually monitors 70,000 individuals for occupational radiation exposure: ~2% of its workforce. In recent years, the Departments of the Navy (including the Marine Corps), the Army, and the Air Force all have a low collective dose that remains close to 1 person-Sv annually. Only a few Coast Guard individuals are now routinely monitored for radiation exposure. As with the nuclear industry as a whole, the Naval Reactors program has a higher collective dose than the remainder of the U.S. military. The U.S. military maintains occupational radiation exposure records on over two million individuals from 1945 through the present. These records are controlled in accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974 but are available to affected individuals or their designees and other groups performing sanctioned epidemiology studies.Introduction of Radiation Exposure of U.S. Military Individuals (Video 2:19, http://links.lww.com/HP/A30).

  12. Consequences of Making Weight: A Review of Eating Disorder Symptoms and Diagnoses in the United States Military

    PubMed Central

    Bodell, Lindsay; Forney, Katherine Jean; Keel, Pamela; Gutierrez, Peter; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders are serious psychiatric illnesses associated with health problems. Such problems may compromise military performance, highlighting the need to establish the level of eating pathology that exists in military samples. This article qualitatively reviews prevalence estimates of eating disorder symptoms and diagnoses in military samples, providing nonmilitary estimates for context. Findings suggest that eating disorder symptoms are prevalent in cadets and active duty service members, especially when using self-report measures. The increased salience of weight in the military and increased exposure to trauma may influence risk for eating disorders. Alternatively, individuals at risk for eating disorders may self-select into the military. Overall, this review suggests that eating disorder symptoms are common in military samples and that further research is warranted. PMID:25642105

  13. Development and Testing of Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Active Duty Service Members Who Served in Iraq and Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Exposure Therapy for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Active Duty Service Members Who Served in Iraq and Afghanistan CDR Robert N. McLay, MC USNR...reality exposure therapy (VRET) to active duty service members diagnosed with combat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Forty-two service members with...reduction in PTSD symptoms and no longer met DSM-IV criteria for PTSD at post treatment. Average PSTD scores decreased by 50.4%, depression scores by 46.6

  14. Structural elucidation and immunostimulatory activity of polysaccharide isolated by subcritical water extraction from Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Duan, Yuqing; Yang, Wenya; Zhang, Haihui; Li, Changzheng; Zhang, Jixian

    2017-02-10

    Water-soluble polysaccharides were obtained from Cordyceps militaris (C. militaris) (CMP) by subcritical water extraction (SWE). Two polysaccharides fractions, CMP-W1 and CMP-S1, were isolated from CMP using DEAE-52 cellulose and Sephadex G-150 column chromatography. The structural characteristics of CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 were investigated. The results showed that the molecular weight of CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 are 3.66×105Da and 4.60×105Da, respectively, and both of them were heteropolysaccharides composed of d-mannose, d-glucose, d-galactose with the molar ratios of 2.84:1:1.29 and 2.05:1:1.09, respectively. FT-IR spectra analysis suggested that CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 belonged to pyranose form sugar and protein free. For immunostimulatory activity assay in vitro, CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 significantly promoted lymphatic spleen cell proliferation of mice. Therefore, the polysaccharides obtained from C. militaris by SWE can be used as potential natural immunostimulant in functional foods or medicine.

  15. Identifying obstacles to return to duty in severely injured combat-related servicemembers with amputation.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Richard K; Rivera, Jessica C; Wenke, Joseph C; Krueger, Chad A

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of servicemembers with amputation to return to duty after combat-related amputation and the associated disabilities remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the disabling conditions and return to duty rates of servicemembers with amputation across all service branches following major limb amputations from September 2001 through July 2011. Pertinent medical information, military occupation status, return to duty designation, disabling conditions, and disability ratings for each servicemember were obtained from the Physical Evaluation Board Liaison Office (PEBLO). Across all service branches, 16 (2%) servicemembers were found fit for duty (Fit) and allowed to continue with their preinjury occupation. Another 103 (11%) were allowed to continue on Active Duty (COAD) in a less physically demanding role. More than half (554, 56%) were determined fully disabled (PEBLO rating > 75); the average disability rating was 73. COAD and Fit Army servicemembers had lower Injury Severity Scores than other servicemembers (17.4, p = 0.009 and 11.2, p < 0.001, respectively). Despite improvements in their care and rehabilitation, only 13% of all servicemembers with amputation are able to return to Active Duty and many have multiple disabling conditions that contribute to a very high level of disability.

  16. DOD Financial Management: Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit Readiness of Navy Military Pay and Other Related Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    DOD FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit Readiness of Navy Military Pay and Other Related...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DOD Financial Management: Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit ...Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit Readiness of Navy Military Pay and Other Related Activities Why GAO Did This Study DOD continues to work

  17. Protein supplementation in U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; Montain, Scott J; Young, Andrew J

    2013-11-01

    Protein supplements (PSs) are, after multivitamins, the most frequently consumed dietary supplement by U.S. military personnel. Warfighters believe that PSs will improve health, promote muscle strength, and enhance physical performance. The estimated prevalence of regular PS use by military personnel is nearly 20% or more in active-duty personnel, which is comparable to collegiate athletes and recreationally active adults, but higher than that for average U.S. civilians. Although the acute metabolic effects of PS ingestion are well described, little is known regarding the benefits of PS use by warfighters in response to the metabolic demands of military operations. When dietary protein intake approaches 1.5 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), and energy intake matches energy expenditure, the use of PSs by most physically active military personnel may not be necessary. However, dismounted infantry often perform operations consisting of long periods of strenuous physical activity coupled with inadequate dietary energy and protein intake. In these situations, the use of PSs may have efficacy for preserving fat-free mass. This article reviews the available literature regarding the prevalence of PS use among military personnel. Furthermore, it highlights the unique metabolic stressors affecting U.S. military personnel and discusses potential conditions during which protein supplementation might be beneficial.

  18. Obesity classification in military personnel: A comparison of body fat, waist circumference, and body mass index measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate obesity classifications from body fat percentage (BF%), body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC). A total of 451 overweight/obese active duty military personnel completed all three assessments. Most were obese (men, 81%; women, 98%) using National...

  19. Studies on the Antifatigue Activities of Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body Extract in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jingjing; Wang, Yingwu; Teng, Meiyu; Cai, Guangsheng; Xu, Hongkai; Guo, Hanxiao; Liu, Yang; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris has been used extensively as a crude drug and a folk tonic food in East Asia due to its various pharmacological activities. Our study aims to investigate the effect of Cordyceps militaris fruit body extract (CM) on antifatigue in mouse model. Two week CM administration significantly delayed fatigue phenomenon which is confirmed via rotating rod test, forced swimming test and forced running test. Compared to nontreated mouse, CM administration increased ATP levels and antioxidative enzymes activity and reduced the levels of lactic acid, lactic dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and reactive oxygen species. Further data suggests that CM-induced fatigue recovery is mainly through activating 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways and regulating serum hormone level. Moreover, CM-enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK contributes to its antioxidant effect. Our data provides experimental evidence in supporting clinical use of CM as an effective agent against fatigue. PMID:26351509

  20. Energy drink and energy shot use in the military.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mark B; Attipoe, Selasi; Jones, Donnamaria; Ledford, Christy J W; Deuster, Patricia A

    2014-10-01

    Use of energy drinks and energy shots among military personnel is controversial. High amounts of caffeine (the primary active ingredient in these products) may impact performance of military duties. The impact of caffeine overconsumption and potential subsequent side effects that might be experienced by service members with unique roles and responsibilities is a concern. Reported here are the prevalence of use, reasons for use, and side effects associated with consumption of energy drinks and energy shots among several populations of active duty personnel in the US military. A snowball survey was sent to over 10,000 active duty personnel. A total of 586 (∼6% response rate) individuals completed a 30-item electronic survey. Over half of respondents (53%) reported consuming an energy drink at least once in the past 30 days. One in five (19%) reported energy shot consumption in the prior 30 days. One in five (19%) also reported consuming an energy drink in combination with an alcoholic beverage. Age and gender were significantly associated with energy drink consumption. Young male respondents (18-29 years) reported the highest use of both energy drinks and energy shots. Among those reporting energy drink and energy shot use, the most common reasons for consumption were to improve mental alertness (61%) and to improve mental (29%) and physical (20%) endurance. Nearly two-thirds (65%) of users self-reported at least one side effect. The most commonly reported side effects included increased pulse rate/palpitations, restlessness, and difficulty sleeping. Use of energy products among military personnel is common and has the potential to impact warrior health and military readiness.

  1. 19 CFR 148.90 - Foreign military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foreign military personnel. 148.90 Section 148.90 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.90 Foreign military...

  2. 19 CFR 148.90 - Foreign military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Foreign military personnel. 148.90 Section 148.90 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.90 Foreign military...

  3. 19 CFR 148.90 - Foreign military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foreign military personnel. 148.90 Section 148.90 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.90 Foreign military...

  4. 19 CFR 148.90 - Foreign military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Foreign military personnel. 148.90 Section 148.90 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.90 Foreign military...

  5. Select clinical recommendations for military medical practitioners conducting humanitarian and civic assistance activities.

    PubMed

    Hollon, Justin R; Hickey, Patrick W

    2010-09-01

    Training and planning for stability, security, transition, and reconstruction, to include humanitarian and civic assistance activities, has taken on new importance for today's military forces. Deployed medical forces providing medical care to local populations are presented with the challenge of limited resources, complex public health needs, and complex cultural and linguistic barriers to care. In this article, we review some of the clinical situations commonly encountered during these operations and provide an evidence-based rationale for proposed courses of action. This report is timely given expanding operations in Afghanistan and the stand-up of the U.S. African Command (AFRICOM).

  6. 5 CFR 734.306 - Participation in political activities while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... form of another employee, to the payroll employees who would process or administer such forms. However... using a Federal vehicle. 734.306 Section 734.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... employee is on duty and continues into the time when he or she is not on duty, the employee must wait...

  7. Analysis Extract. AFSC 4D0X1 Diet Therapy (Active Duty)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    87* 22* V0140 Diet(s) exp- Kosher Diet Active Active Active Active AD...98 % 94 % Total in group: 23* 29* 52* 41* 119* V0140 Diet(s) exp- Kosher Diet...13* 8* V0140 Diet(s) exp- Kosher Diet AETC ACC AMC AFMC PACAF USAFE

  8. Active Duty Military Deployments: A Respite from Job Stressors and Burnout for Air Force Acquisition Support Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-23

    Inventory ( Maslach & Jackson , 1986). The Emotional Exhaustion scale measures an individual’s feeling of being depleted of energy and an overall...drained sensation resulting from excessive psychological demands ( Maslach & Jackson , 1986). Sample items include “I feel emotionally drained from my...3), 392-401. Maslach , C., & Jackson , S. E. (1986). Maslach Burnout Inventory Manual (2nd Ed. ed.). Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press

  9. A Meta-Analysis of the Antecedents of Voluntary Turnover in Studies Involving Active Duty Military Member Populations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    subordinate outcomes Brown III, G. B. DTIC 2008 Y N A Pending Major Crisis : An Analysis of the Critical Shortage of U.S. Army Officers in Year Groups 1991...States Army Reserve McConico, J. L. DTIC 2009 Y N Ethical Imbalance: How the U.S. Army Overcame its Manning Crisis McDonald, G. K. DTIC 2007 Y Y Work...Characteristics From Multiple Data Sources With Employee Affect, Absence, Turnover Intentions, and Helth Spector, P. E., Dwyer, D. J., & Jex, S. M. JoAP 1988 N N

  10. Worldwide U.S. Active Duty Military Deaths. Alphabetical Index by Name, 1 October 1979 Through 30 September 1994

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-16

    R TANBURG DOVER ANAMOSA SONORA A B E R D E E N LUBBOCK APA LACHICOLA C LAYTON SAN F RANC I SC O DE LANCO LATTA EVANS PA NAMA CITY S T...S NATHAN I E L N M N JR NAVY J O N E S N E A L BRAD L E Y MAR I N E C O R PS J O N E S NORMA L D O N OVAN NAVY J O N E S NORMAN CHAR L...N MCCAR TY J O E Y MCCA R T Y N I N U S E D E N MCCA S L I N T I MOTHY NORMA N MCCATH E R N L U T H E R JAME S MCCA U L E Y B R I A N

  11. Risk Factors for Chorioamnion Infection and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome Among Active-Duty Military Women and Dependent Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    and/or predict chorioamnion invasion and premature birth. This study will determine if the presence of bacterial vaginosis is a risk factor for...urealyticum colonization and 564 have been assessed for Bacterial Vaginosis (BV). 731/149 or 48.8% are culturally positive for U. urealyticum and 101

  12. Risk Factors for Chorioamnion Infection and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome Among Active-Duty Military women and Dependent Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    invasion and premature birth. This study will determine if the presence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a risk factor for ureaplasmal invasion of the...urealyticum, Mycoplasma species and Bacterial Vaginosis Pre-natal Screens N=2,101 BV Uu MYCO SP NEG BV+Uu BV+MYCO SP BV+Uu+MYCO SP Uu+MYCO SP OVG* only only... bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women. Clin. Infect. Dis. 16 Suppl 4:S273-81, 1993. 5. Romero, R., M. Sirtori, E. Oyarzum, C. Avila, M. Mazor, R. Callahan

  13. Risk Factors for Chorioamnion Infection and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome Among Active-Duty Military Women and Dependent Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    to and/or predict chorioamnion invasion and premature birth. This study will determine if the presence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a risk factor for...Hillier, S.L., Krohn, M.A., Rabe, L.K., Klebanoff, S.J., Eschenbach, D.A. The normal vaginal flora, H202-producing lactobacilli, and bacterial vaginosis in...lactobacilli to bacterial vaginosis and genital microflora in pregnant women. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 79(3):369-73, 1992. 18. Martius, J, M. A. Krohn, S. L

  14. Duty, Honor, Country... & Credit: Serving the Education and Learning Needs of Active Military and Veterans. CAEL Forum and News 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Congress recently passed legislation improving the Post-9/11 GI Bill for the millions of eligible Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans to use in their pursuit of education and training. This legislation provides a tremendous opportunity for these valued Americans to obtain the skills necessary for employment at a time when they are often making the…

  15. Worldwide U.S. Active Duty Military Deaths Alphabetical Index by Name. October 1, 1979 through September 30 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-30

    1d 0 -w. w 4 i- f "Z_ Z ~ O-<< QO W< -JCo...mIn -- < z cr t w.Z w " w w 0 <W 0 ᝴-" 0 P-13 ɘ’- OW < 4 ca L0 0 M:2: r_3a --3: w-"JQ " -1 0i~ 0 u.J 2 V- 1D 𔃾’) 0/ VI) (A) WU)U)WW...2 0K w < . w. md < <- . CK Z W 4- 1d ’ - z < < < < z414140001-1- < ~ C,, ~ 4 4 (J", >-Wooo00 02ZZZO4 0ɘ "ý-no000 WI- Z Z ""ý-0" " I ý4 w" 4 22: -.

  16. The Association Between Interpersonal Relationships and the Mental and Physical Health of Postpartum Active Duty Military Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-25

    past designated maternity or paternity leave must coordinate childcare. Sick infants must be taken to the doctor, as well as cared for medically... Maternity Leave Paternity Leave Deployment Separation from Service U.S. Army Army Regulation (AR) 40-501 (September 10, 2008); Field Manual...During Pregnancy Fitness Testing After Pregnancy Weight After Pregnancy Maternity Leave Paternity Leave Deployment Separation from Service

  17. The Health Status of Women in the Military. An Epidemiological Study of Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-24

    adjustment reactions, and other symptoms/ syndromes (e.g., eating and sleep disorders) among women (26). Two- to four-fold differences in...PID) Gonorrhea ("clap") Syphilis Chlamydia Herpes or genital warts Sterility/infertility . Arthritis Neuralgia Anorexia or bulimia (eating...my life had been a failure. j. I felt fearful. k. My sleep was restless . I. I was happy. m. I talked less than usual. n. I felt lonely. o. People

  18. The Health Status of Women in the Military: An Epidemiological Study of Active Duty Navy And Marine Corps Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    ships found significantly higher rates of personality disorder, stress, and adjustment reactions, and other symptoms/ syndromes (e.g., eating and sleep...0 0 0 - hh. Gon orrhea ("clap") 0 0 0 - i i . Syphil is 0 0 0 - jj. Chlamydia 0 0 0 - kk. Herpes or genital warts 0 0 0 - I I. Steril ity...felt hopeful about the future. 0 i. I thought my life had been a fai lure. 0 j. I felt fearful . 0 k. My sleep was restless . 0 I. I was happy . . 0

  19. An Assessment of Health Literacy Rates in a Sample of Active-Duty Military Personnel at a Major Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    aeute care setting. Similarly, the concept of malpractice has been used to influence the theory and practice of risk management and along with it...failure to apply risk management techniques could adversely affect the clinical setting. In using the concept of malpractice, Roy (1996) was able to...demonstrate how nurses could identify risk management issues use this knowledge to further the use of risk management techniques in their own

  20. Military Psychology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), *MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY , *TEXTBOOKS, USSR, ORGANIZATIONS, COMBAT READINESS, PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION, REASONING, SURVEYS...TRANSLATIONS, MILITARY TRAINING, OFFICER PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY, COMMUNISM, INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS, EMOTIONS.

  1. Pilot Trial of Inpatient Cognitive Therapy for the Prevention of Suicide in Military Personnel with Acute Stress Disorder or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Military Operational Medicine Research Program to prepare a grant application to conduct a larger scale multi-site study to definitively determine the...Ghahramanlou, M. (1999, April). A correlation between the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF...mental and physical health of postpartum active duty military women. (USUHS Doctoral Dissertation, Clinical Psychology) 34 Curriculum Vitae

  2. Prevalence and correlates of needle-stick injuries among active duty police officers in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, María Luisa; Beletsky, Leo; Patiño, Efraín; Abramovitz, Daniela; Rocha, Teresita; Arredondo, Jaime; Bañuelos, Arnulfo; Rangel, Gudelia; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Police officers are at an elevated risk for needle-stick injuries (NSI), which pose a serious and costly occupational health risk for HIV and viral hepatitis. However, research on NSIs among police officers is limited, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the legality of syringe possession in Mexico, half of people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana report extrajudicial syringe-related arrests and confiscation by police, which has been associated with needle-sharing and HIV infection. We assessed the prevalence and correlates of NSIs among Tijuana police officers to inform efforts to improve occupational safety and simultaneously reduce HIV risks among police and PWID. Methods Tijuana's Department of Municipal Public Safety (SSPM) is among Mexico's largest. Our binational, multi-sectoral team analyzed de-identified data from SSPM's 2014 anonymous self-administered occupational health survey. The prevalence of NSI and syringe disposal practices was determined. Logistic regression with robust variance estimation via generalized estimating equations identified factors associated with ever having an occupational NSI. Results Approximately one-quarter of the Tijuana police force was given the occupational health survey (N=503). Respondents were predominantly male (86.5%) and ≤35 years old (42.6%). Nearly one in six officers reported ever having a NSI while working at SSPM (15.3%), of whom 14.3% reported a NSI within the past year. Most participants reported encountering needles/syringes while on duty (n=473, 94%); factors independently associated with elevated odds of NSIs included frequently finding syringes that contain drugs (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.98; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.56–5.67) and breaking used needles (AOR: 2.25; 95% CI: 1.29–3.91), while protective factors included being willing to contact emergency services in case of NSIs (AOR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.22–0.69), and wearing needle-stick resistant gloves (AOR: 0

  3. Stepping Up, Sticking Together: Military Adolescents' Support of Their Civilian Parents and Concurrent Depression Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Aubrey J; Margolin, Gayla

    2017-02-16

    The purposes of this study were to assess the ways adolescents in active-duty military families provide emotional and instrumental support to civilian mothers and to investigate the implications of such support for their own symptoms of depression. Eighty adolescents from active-duty military families provided self-report ratings of emotional and instrumental support rendered to their civilian mothers. Mother-adolescent dyads engaged in a 10-min discussion of military experiences, which was coded for adolescents' emotional validation of their mothers. Path analyses showed that adolescents who provided more instrumental support and showed more emotional validation reported fewer symptoms of depression. However, adolescents' instrumental support to the mother was not inversely associated with their depression symptoms when the mothers reported high depression symptoms. Recent military demands did not moderate associations between adolescent support and depression symptoms. In this, the first study to our knowledge assessing youth-to-parent support provision among military adolescents, results suggest that emotional validation and instrumental support given at will by adolescents to their civilian mothers are associated with lower levels of adolescent depressive symptoms. Results also underscore the impact of maternal depression on family processes and emphasize the importance of careful assessment of support processes within military families.

  4. Causation, incidence, and costs of traumatic brain injury in the U.S. military medical system.

    PubMed

    Ommaya, A K; Ommaya, A K; Dannenberg, A L; Salazar, A M

    1996-02-01

    Hospital discharge records from military facilities and private facilities reimbursed by Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services for fiscal year 1992 were reviewed to identify head injury admissions. Incidence rates, case fatality rates, causes of head injuries, and direct cost for hospital admissions were computed in this well-defined population. For fiscal year 1992, there were 5,568 hospitalized cases of noncombat head injury in the military medical system. The age-adjusted head injury rates for ages 15-44 years are higher in active-duty individuals compared with other beneficiaries (1.6 times greater for men and 2.5 times greater for women). The total cost for hospitalization in this population was $43 million. Private facility rehabilitation accounted for 26% of all private facility costs but only 6% of head injury cases. Firearms and motor vehicle crashes caused the most severe injuries for cases admitted to military facilities. Motor vehicle crashes, falls, and fighting accounted for 80% of the total military facility cost for head injuries. Military active-duty individuals are at increased risk for noncombat head injury. Prevention of head injury in military settings should focus on motor vehicle crashes, fist fights (assault), and falls.

  5. 77 FR 65707 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... Certification of Military or Naval Service, Form Number N-426; Extension, Without Change, of a Currently... Certification of Military or Naval Service. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the... collected through Form N-426 to request a verification of the military or naval service claim by...

  6. 78 FR 8183 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Certification of Military or Naval Service, Form N-426; Extension, Without Change, of a Currently Approved... Certification of Military or Naval Service. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the... collected through Form N-426 to request a verification of the military or naval service claim by...

  7. A novel protein with anti-metastasis activity on 4T1 carcinoma from medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Yin, Yalin; Yu, Guojun; Jin, Yanxia; Ye, Xiangdong; Shrestha, Alok; Liu, Wei; Yu, Wenhui; Sun, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a famous fungus used in traditional Chinese medicine for nearly one thousand years. And its fruiting body is known to possess anticancer and immunomodulatory activities. This study describes the isolation, characterization, and test of antitumor activity of a C. militaris protein, called here as "C. militaris immunoregulatory protein" (CMIP). CMIP was purified through a three-step chromatographic procedure. The MS analyses showed that CMIP corresponded to an uncharacterized protein (CCM_01955) in the C. militaris transcriptional database. Circular dichroism of CMIP revealed the composition of 35.5% β-sheet, 18.5% α-helix, 17.0% turn and 29.0% random coil. No significant cytotoxicity of CMIP was observed on HeLa, HepG2 and 4T1 tumor cells. However, CMIP demonstrated anti-metastasis activity on a mouse model of 4T1 breast cancer lung metastasis. It reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung of tumor-bearing mice and prolonged their survival time. Furthermore, proliferation of the 4T1 cells was inhibited by macrophage-CMIP conditioned media. And the mRNA levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were increased significantly in peritoneal macrophages treated by CMIP. These results reveal the antitumor potential of CMIP, thus reinforcing the importance of biochemical prospecting of C. militaris.

  8. Prolonged electrical stimulation-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation and sitting pressure in spinal cord injury: effect of duty cycle.

    PubMed

    Smit, Christof A J; Legemate, Karin J A; de Koning, Anja; de Groot, Sonja; Stolwijk-Swuste, Janneke M; Janssen, Thomas W J

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are highly prevalent in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES) activates muscles and might reduce risk factors. Our objectives were to study and compare the effects of two duty cycles during 3 h of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring activation on interface pressure distribution in sitting individuals with SCI and study the usability of a newly developed electrode garment (ES shorts). Ten individuals with SCI participated in this study, in which two ES protocols with different duty cycles (1:1 s vs 1:4 s on-off) were applied in counterbalanced order using a custom-made garment with built-in electrodes. Outcome variables included interface pressure of the ischial tuberosities (ITs) and pressure gradient. A questionnaire was used to determine usability of the ES shorts. In both protocols, ES caused a significant decrease in average IT pressure compared with rest (no ES); on average, 35% for protocol 1:4 and 13% for protocol 1:1. The ES on-off duty cycle of protocol 1:4 showed less muscle fatigue. In general, participants scored the usability of the ES shorts as satisfactory. In this study, the application of ES resulted in a significant decrease in IT pressure. The ES on-off duty cycle of 1:4 s is recommended because of the less fatiguing effect. ES of the hamstrings and gluteal muscles might be a promising method in preventing PUs, but further study is needed.

  9. US Military Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Programs and Careers of Military Child Psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Weston, Christina G; Dougherty, Joseph G; Nelson, Suzie C; Baker, Matthew J; Chow, Jennifer C

    2015-08-01

    Military child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) fellowship programs offer educational experiences universal to all civilian training programs in the USA. They also offer unique training opportunities not found in civilian CAP fellowships in order to prepare graduates to serve the needs of military families. Military-specific curricula and exposures prepare trainees to address various issues faced by military families, in contending with frequent military moves, parental deployments, and disrupted social ties. Curricula are also designed to provide the psychiatrist with a greater understanding of the rigors of military service. CAP training and subsequent assignments prepare military psychiatrists for diverse career paths in the military environment. CAP military careers often include duties in addition to treating patients. Administrative roles, academic teaching positions, as well as school consultation positions are all career options available to military CAP.

  10. Family systems and ecological perspectives on the impact of deployment on military families.

    PubMed

    Paley, Blair; Lester, Patricia; Mogil, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    The scope of sustained military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan has placed great demands on the Armed Forces of the United States, and accordingly, military families have been faced with deployments in more rapid succession than ever before. When military parents fulfill occupational duties during wartime, military children and families face multiple challenges, including extended separations, disruptions in family routines, and potentially compromised parenting related to traumatic exposure and subsequent mental health problems. Such challenges can begin to exert a significant toll on the well-being of both individuals and relationships (e.g., marital, parent-child) within military families. In order to respond more effectively to the needs of military families, it is essential that mental health clinicians and researchers have a better understanding of the challenges faced by military families throughout the entire deployment experience and the ways in which these challenges may have a cumulative impact over multiple deployments. Moreover, the mental health field must become better prepared to support service members and families across a rapidly evolving landscape of military operations around the world, including those who are making the transition from active duty to Veteran status and navigating a return to civilian life and those families in which parents will continue to actively serve and deploy in combat zones. In this article, we utilize family systems and ecological perspectives to advance our understanding of how military families negotiate repeated deployment experiences and how such experiences impact the well-being and adjustment of families at the individual, dyadic, and whole family level.

  11. Outbreak of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peruvian Military Personnel Undertaking Training Activities in the Amazon Basin, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Oré, Marianela; Sáenz, Eliana; Cabrera, Rufino; Sanchez, Juan F.; De Los Santos, Maxy B.; Lucas, Carmen M.; Núñez, Jorge H.; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Sopan, Justino; Fernández, Jorge; Carnero, Andres M.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Arrasco, Juan C.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2015-01-01

    Military personnel deployed to the Amazon Basin are at high risk for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We responded to an outbreak among Peruvian Army personnel returning from short-term training in the Amazon, conducting active case detection, lesion sample collection, and risk factor assessment. The attack rate was 25% (76/303); the incubation period was 2–36 weeks (median = 8). Most cases had one lesion (66%), primarily ulcerative (49%), and in the legs (57%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (59/61 = 97%) and L. (V.) guyanensis (2/61 = 3%). Being male (risk ratio [RR] = 4.01; P = 0.034), not wearing long-sleeve clothes (RR = 1.71; P = 0.005), and sleeping in open rooms (RR = 1.80; P = 0.009) were associated with CL. Sodium stibogluconate therapy had a 41% cure rate, less than previously reported in Peru (∼ 70%; P < 0.001). After emphasizing pre-deployment education and other basic prevention measures, trainees in the following year had lower incidence (1/278 = 0.4%; P < 0.001). Basic prevention can reduce CL risk in deployed militaries. PMID:26078320

  12. Antihyperlipidemic and hepatoprotective activities of residue polysaccharide from Cordyceps militaris SU-12.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqin; Xu, Nuo; Zhang, Jianjun; Zhao, Huajie; Lin, Lin; Jia, Shouhua; Jia, Le

    2015-10-20

    Cordyceps militaris has been artificially cultivated in China, and the great amounts of produced medium residue were discarded after the harvest. The aims of this work were to analyze the structure of the residue polysaccharide (RPS) of C. militaris SU-12, and to investigate the pharmacological effects of RPS on lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. RPS was composed of glucose, arabinose and mannose with a ratio of 62:1.6:1 by gas chromatography analysis, and the Mw (weight-average molecular weight), Mn (number-average molecular weight) and Mz (z-average molecular weight) of RPS were 2.86×10(3), 6.85×10(2), and 1.97×10(4)Da, respectively. The mice experiments demonstrated that RPS could reduce the levels of blood and liver lipid, and improve the glutamate pyruvate transaminase and antioxidant activity. The histopathological observations of mice livers indicated that RPS could attenuate liver cell injury. Results suggest that the RPS might be used as a potential antihyperlipidemic, hepatoprotective and antioxidant product.

  13. Outbreak of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peruvian Military Personnel Undertaking Training Activities in the Amazon Basin, 2010.

    PubMed

    Oré, Marianela; Sáenz, Eliana; Cabrera, Rufino; Sanchez, Juan F; De Los Santos, Maxy B; Lucas, Carmen M; Núñez, Jorge H; Edgel, Kimberly A; Sopan, Justino; Fernández, Jorge; Carnero, Andres M; Baldeviano, G Christian; Arrasco, Juan C; Graf, Paul C F; Lescano, Andres G

    2015-08-01

    Military personnel deployed to the Amazon Basin are at high risk for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We responded to an outbreak among Peruvian Army personnel returning from short-term training in the Amazon, conducting active case detection, lesion sample collection, and risk factor assessment. The attack rate was 25% (76/303); the incubation period was 2-36 weeks (median = 8). Most cases had one lesion (66%), primarily ulcerative (49%), and in the legs (57%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (59/61 = 97%) and L. (V.) guyanensis (2/61 = 3%). Being male (risk ratio [RR] = 4.01; P = 0.034), not wearing long-sleeve clothes (RR = 1.71; P = 0.005), and sleeping in open rooms (RR = 1.80; P = 0.009) were associated with CL. Sodium stibogluconate therapy had a 41% cure rate, less than previously reported in Peru (~70%; P < 0.001). After emphasizing pre-deployment education and other basic prevention measures, trainees in the following year had lower incidence (1/278 = 0.4%; P < 0.001). Basic prevention can reduce CL risk in deployed militaries.

  14. Masturbation and its relationship to sexual activities of young males in Korean military service.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y J; Lee, W H; Rha, K H; Xin, Z C; Choi, Y D; Choi, H K

    2000-04-01

    This study examined the masturbatory experiences and other sexual activities of young Korean males in military service. The actual status of masturbation and its relationship to sexual activity questionnaire. A total of 1,212 young males among military personnel in Korea were interviewed with sexuality questionnaires on masturbation, sexual intercourse and personal characteristics. We divided these subjects into four groups according to the age of initiation of masturbation and analyzed the relationship between masturbation and other sexual activities. The mean age of subjects was 22.03 +/- 1.22 (19-27) years. The percentage of men who reported ever having masturbated was 98.1% (1189/1212) and the average age of initiation of masturbation was 14.26 +/- 1.66 years. So we divided 1,212 males into four groups on the basis of the average age below and above one standard deviation. Overall, 67.7% (821/1212) had experienced sexual intercourse, and significantly, the earlier the initiation age of masturbation, the higher the coitus rate in each group (p < 0.05). About 21.5% of the men who were not virgins had experienced their first sexual intercourse with prostitutes. The mean age of first coitus, the incidence of sexually transmitted disease (STD) and the frequency of masturbation were closely linked to the initiation age of masturbation, respectively (p < 0.05). A masturbatory guilt feeling was seen in about 10.9% (132/1212) and there was no significant difference according to the types of religious worship (p = 0.227). On the basis of this study, sexual activities generally increased accordingly as the beginning of masturbation was earlier. Coital incidence in this study was 67.7% for young males in Korean military service, and 21.5% of them had their first sexual intercourse with prostitutes. Prostitution still plays an important role in the sexual lives of males in Korea. The incidence of STD was over 10% and homosexual manifestation was seen in 1.07% of subjects

  15. Studies on the Antidiabetic Activities of Cordyceps militaris Extract in Diet-Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuan; Jing, Tianjiao; Meng, Qingfan; Liu, Chungang; Hu, Shuang; Ma, Yihang; Liu, Yan; Lu, Jiahui; Cheng, Yingkun; Teng, Lirong

    2014-01-01

    Due to substantial morbidity and high complications, diabetes mellitus is considered as the third “killer” in the world. A search for alternative antidiabetic drugs from herbs or fungi is highly demanded. Our present study aims to investigate the antidiabetic activities of Cordyceps militaris on diet-streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus in rats. Diabetic rats were orally administered with water extract or alcohol extract at 0.05 g/kg and 2 g/kg for 3 weeks, and then, the factors levels related to blood glucose, lipid, free radicals, and even nephropathy were determined. Pathological alterations on liver and kidney were examined. Data showed that, similar to metformin, Cordyceps militaris extracts displayed a significant reduction in blood glucose levels by promoting glucose metabolism and strongly suppressed total cholesterol and triglycerides concentration in serum. Cordyceps militaris extracts exhibit antioxidative effects indicated by normalized superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels. The inhibitory effects on blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, uric acid, and protein revealed the protection of Cordyceps militaris extracts against diabetic nephropathy, which was confirmed by pathological morphology reversion. Collectively, Cordyceps militaris extract, a safe pharmaceutical agent, presents excellent antidiabetic and antinephropathic activities and thus has great potential as a new source for diabetes treatment. PMID:24738047

  16. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  17. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  18. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  19. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  20. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  1. 32 CFR 584.6 - Procedures governing nonactive duty or discharged personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL FAMILY SUPPORT, CHILD CUSTODY, AND PATERNITY § 584.6 Procedures governing nonactive duty or... concerned, using military channels. When the correspondence cannot be delviered through military channels... delivery. (ii) That the military department does not control the personal affairs of nonactive...

  2. Military Medicine: One Profession Not Two

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-13

    22 Treatment of Homosexuals ...clearance for duty, medical involvement with interrogation or torture, physician involvement in weapons design, and treatment of homosexuals in the...physicians involved. Treatment of Homosexuals Previous military medical dialogue reviewed tensions with the treatment of homosexuals in the military

  3. 77 FR 66515 - Military Family Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since our Nation's earliest... Military Family Month, we honor our military families and recommit to showing them the fullest care and... who have perished in the line of duty. This month, we reaffirm that we will always lift up...

  4. Nontraditional Education: The Quality Issue and Military Base Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Grover J.

    Postsecondary education programs at military installations have been offered jointly by the military and higher education institutions to meet the needs of the on-duty serviceman. Undergraduate and graduate courses are designed to contribute to skills in the military occupation, develop skills for a second career, and provide personal enrichment.…

  5. The Multi-Faceted World of Military Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumgardner, Walter H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A collection of articles on recreation for military personnel discusses: (1) cooperation of military and civilian recreational programs; (2) recreation for personnel on sea duty; (3) recreation at Camp Casey (Korea); (4) Information, Tickets, and Tours (ITT) programs; (5) intramural programs; (6) careers in military recreation; and (7) Air Force…

  6. Intersecting Discourses of Militarism: Military and Academic Gendered Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which military constructions of gender intersect with academic ones. Its focus is to connect military discourses of duty, honour and service before self with academic ones of commitment and productivity. As such, it engages in an institutional analysis of the gendered organizations of the military and academia and…

  7. Comparing Drug-Using Behaviors among High School Graduates Entering Military Service, College, and Civilian Employment. Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jerald G.; Freedman-Doan, Peter; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Johnston, Lloyd D.; Segal, David R.

    The United States armed forces adopted "zero tolerance" policies concerning illicit drug use in 1980, and later developed policies to discourage tobacco and alcohol abuse. This paper examines drug use among young active-duty recruits both before and after enlistment, compared with non-military age-mates. It also documents historical shifts in such…

  8. Military Personnel: DOD Needs to Establish a Strategy and Improve Transparency over Reserve and National Guard Compensation to Manage Significant Growth in Cost

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Comments and Our Evaluation 37 Appendix I Updated Active Duty Compensation Costs 40 Appendix II Scope and Methodology 43 Appendix III Pay and...Integrated Military Human Resources System, to consolidate their personnel and pay systems. This consolidation may improve transparency by...Establish a Strategy and Improve Transparency over Reserve and National Guard Compensation to Manage Significant Growth in Cost June 2007

  9. 2013 Workplace and Equal Opportunity Survey of Active Duty Members: Tabulations Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    214  e.  Displayed tattoos or wore distinctive clothes which were racist? ........ 216  f.  Did not include you in social activities...and/or contractors (in your workplace or on or off your installation/ship)... e. Displayed tattoos or wore distinctive clothes which were racist...contractors (in your workplace or on or off your installation/ship)... e. Displayed tattoos or wore distinctive clothes which were racist? Percent

  10. [Main types of activity of specialists of medical and preventive profile in military hospitals].

    PubMed

    Akimkin, V G; Azarov, I I; Volynkov, I O; Bobylev, V A

    2015-09-01

    Infection prevention in medical organizations is an essential task to ensure quality of medical care and create a safe environment for patients and medical staff. The main task of a specialist of medical and preventive profile in the hospital is to maintain sanitary and epidemiological safety and control fulfillment of a complex of preventive measures. To achieve these goals specialists monitor epidemiological and microbiological fulfilment of the implementation and effectiveness of preventive measures, which allow to except infection entry to the hospital and possible carrying out beyond the hospital, occurrence and spread of disease. An obligatory activity of the specialist of medical and preventive profile in the hospital is a scientific and methodical work. The authors propose adoption of preventive structural subdivisions to the state largest diversified military hospitals.

  11. USSR Report, Military Affairs, No. 1773

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Questionnaire "Psychological Steadfastness" Suitability for the Military Profession - N. Korf 41 The Food Program in Action Comprehensive Subsidiary Farm - V...60 DOSAAF AND MILITARY COMMISSARIATS DOSAAF Role in Food Program Discussed (V. Sysoyevj VOYENNYYE ZNANIYA, Nov 82) 6$ Military Patriotic...Party-Political Work on Guard Duty - N. Sirenko. 50 VOYENNYY VESTNIK QUESTIONNAIRE "PSYCHOLOGICAL STEADFASTNESS" To Win in Combat - S. Mirzoyan, S

  12. Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J C

    2012-12-01

    The combatant soldier on the battlefield remains protected from any claim in negligence by the doctrine of combat immunity for any negligent act or omission they may make when fighting. In other words, the combatant soldier does not owe a fellow soldier a duty of care on the battlefield, as the duty of care is non-justiciable. However, the non-combatant Military Healthcare Professional, although sometimes operating in the same hostile circumstances as the fighting soldier, is unlikely to benefit from combat immunity for any clinical negligence on the battlefield. This is because they continue to owe their patient a duty of care, although this has not been tested in the courts. This paper considers if any military healthcare professional could ever benefit from combat immunity, which is unlikely due to their non-combatant status. Instead, this paper suggests that a modified form of immunity; namely, Military Healthcare Battlefield Immunity could be a new, unique and viable doctrine, however, this could only be granted in rare circumstances and to a much lesser degree than combat immunity.

  13. Military Sexual Assault: Chronology of Activity in Congress and Related Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-30

    or repeated, threatening sexual harassment that occurred while the veteran was in the military.” Both men and women can experience MST during their...from the Academic Program Year (APY) 2011- 2012 Report on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the United States Military Service Academies.3 According to...release.aspx?releaseid=15585 3 “DOD Evaluates Sexual Harassment and Prevention Response Efforts at Military Academies,” DOD News, December 21, 2012, at

  14. Economic Analysis of a Basic Allowance for Health Care for Active Duty and Retired Members of the Armed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    support throughout the entire process . xvi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 1 I. INTRODUCTION A. MILITARY HEALTH CARE SYSTEM Since the... process . Because funds are allowed to accumulate over time in the HSA, and ultimately transfer with the individual when he or she departs the service...CARE Money for DOD health care is appropriated through the Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution process . The Unified Military Health System

  15. Thermal Manikin Evaluation of Passive and Active Cooling Garments to Improve Comfort of Military Body Armor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    increased TM evaporative cooling potential approximately 18%. Military use of these garments could allow for increases in sweat evaporation and overall thermal comfort during operational heat exposure.

  16. Considerations for incorporating eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic omega-3 fatty acids into the military food supply chain.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Adam; Rice, Harry B

    2014-11-01

    The U.S. military may consider exploring the inclusion of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the diets of active duty military personnel. To be successful, certain challenges must be overcome including determining appropriate dosage, ensuring cost efficiency, and optimizing stability. To increase EPA and DHA intake, the military should consider using one of three strategies, including mandates or recommendations on omega-3 supplement usage, contracts to purchase commercially available foods for distribution in the food supply chain, or direct addition of EPA and DHA into currently consumed foods. This review presents the challenges and strategies and provides potential suggestions to the military to increase the likelihood of success.

  17. "I Serve 2": Meeting the needs of military children in civilian practice.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Alicia Gill; Dumas, Mary Anne; Wilmoth, Margaret C; Patrician, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    The American Academy of Nursing launched the "Have You Ever Served in the Military?" campaign in 2013 in conjunction with the Joining Forces campaign spearheaded by First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden. The "Have You Ever Served in the Military?" campaign provides guidance and resources for nurses outside the Military Health System and Veterans Health Administration where upwards of 80% of veterans receive care. However, most military personnel do not serve alone. More than half of the 2.2 million active duty, National Guard, and Reserve service members currently serving in the armed forces have families and many military children experience stress and anxiety secondary to parental military service. Although strides have been made to improve identification and treatment of the visible and invisible wounds of war for service members, little to no information exists regarding the impact parental service has on the physical, psychological, and behavioral health of military children. In addition, there is no mechanism in place to identify military children in civilian practice nor resources providing evidence-based best practices when caring for these children.

  18. Understanding the Cycle of Military Deployment: How It Affects Young Children and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    The statistics of children and families experiencing military life and affected by deployment are astounding. Many children who have an uncle, aunt, brother, or other family member serving in the military live near a military duty station, but others live far from other military families. Caregivers and teachers of young children share a common…

  19. Long-term community dynamics of small landbirds with and without exposure to extensive disturbance from military training activities.

    PubMed

    Rivers, James W; Gipson, Philip S; Althoff, Donald P; Pontius, Jeffrey S

    2010-02-01

    Military training activities are known to impact individual species, yet our understanding of how such activities influence animal communities is limited. In this study, we used long-term data in a case study approach to examine the extent to which the local small landbird community differed between a site in northeast Kansas that experienced intensive disturbance from military training activities (Ft. Riley Military Installation) and a similar, nearby site that experienced minimal human disturbance (Konza Prairie Biological Station). In addition, we characterized how the regional pool of potential colonizers influenced local community dynamics using Breeding Bird Survey data. From 1991 to 2001, most species of small terrestrial landbirds (73%) recorded during breeding surveys were found at both sites and the mean annual richness at Ft. Riley (39.0 +/- 2.86 [SD]) was very similar to that of Konza Prairie (39.4 +/- 2.01). Richness was maintained at relatively constant levels despite compositional changes because colonizations compensated local extinctions at both sites. These dynamics were driven primarily by woodland species that exhibited stochastic losses and gains and were present at a low local and regional abundance. Our results suggest that military training activities may mimic natural disturbances for some species in this area because the small landbird community did not differ markedly between sites with and sites without extensive human disturbance. Although our results suggest that military training is not associated with large changes in the avian community, additional studies are needed to determine if this pattern is found in other ecological communities.

  20. Long-Term Community Dynamics of Small Landbirds with and Without Exposure to Extensive Disturbance from Military Training Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, James W.; Gipson, Philip S.; Althoff, Donald P.; Pontius, Jeffrey S.

    2010-02-01

    Military training activities are known to impact individual species, yet our understanding of how such activities influence animal communities is limited. In this study, we used long-term data in a case study approach to examine the extent to which the local small landbird community differed between a site in northeast Kansas that experienced intensive disturbance from military training activities (Ft. Riley Military Installation) and a similar, nearby site that experienced minimal human disturbance (Konza Prairie Biological Station). In addition, we characterized how the regional pool of potential colonizers influenced local community dynamics using Breeding Bird Survey data. From 1991 to 2001, most species of small terrestrial landbirds (73%) recorded during breeding surveys were found at both sites and the mean annual richness at Ft. Riley (39.0 ± 2.86 [SD]) was very similar to that of Konza Prairie (39.4 ± 2.01). Richness was maintained at relatively constant levels despite compositional changes because colonizations compensated local extinctions at both sites. These dynamics were driven primarily by woodland species that exhibited stochastic losses and gains and were present at a low local and regional abundance. Our results suggest that military training activities may mimic natural disturbances for some species in this area because the small landbird community did not differ markedly between sites with and sites without extensive human disturbance. Although our results suggest that military training is not associated with large changes in the avian community, additional studies are needed to determine if this pattern is found in other ecological communities.

  1. A Preliminary Analysis of Noise Exposure and Medical Outcomes for Department of Defense Military Musicians.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cindy; Beamer, Sharon; Hall, Shane; Helfer, Thomas; Kluchinsky, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Noise exposure is a known occupational health hazard to those serving in the military. Previous military epidemiology studies have identified military occupations at risk of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL); however, musicians have not been specifically mentioned. The focus of military NIHL studies is usually on those service members of the combat arms occupations. This project was a preliminary examination of Department of Defense (DoD) active duty military musicians in regard to their noise exposure, annual hearing test rates, and hearing injury rates using available data sources. The analysis concluded that DoD military musicians are an underserved population in terms of hearing conservation efforts. Noise surveillance data extracted from the Defense Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System-Industrial Hygiene showed that every musician similar exposure group (SEG) with noise survey data from 2009 to 2013 exceeded the occupation exposure level adopted by DoD Instruction 6055.12. However, only a small percentage of all DoD active duty military musicians (5.5% in the peak year of 2012) were assigned to a SEG that was actually surveyed. Hearing test data based on Current Procedural Terminology coding extracted from the Military Health System revealed that the percentage of musicians with annual hearing tests increased over the 5 years studied in all services except the Air Force. During 2013, the data showed that the Navy had the highest percentage of musicians with annual hearing tests at 70.9%, and the Air Force had the lowest at 11.4%. The Air Force had the highest percentage of hearing injuries of those musicians with annual hearing tests for all 5 years analyzed. Although noise surveillance and annual hearing tests are being conducted, they occur at a much lower rate than required for a population that is known to be overexposed to noise.

  2. Posttraumatic stress disorder in veterans and military personnel: epidemiology, screening, and case recognition.

    PubMed

    Gates, Margaret A; Holowka, Darren W; Vasterling, Jennifer J; Keane, Terence M; Marx, Brian P; Rosen, Raymond C

    2012-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that affects 7-8% of the general U.S. population at some point during their lifetime; however, the prevalence is much higher among certain subgroups, including active duty military personnel and veterans. In this article, we review the empirical literature on the epidemiology and screening of PTSD in military and veteran populations, including the availability of sensitive and reliable screening tools. Although estimates vary across studies, evidence suggests that the prevalence of PTSD in deployed U.S. military personnel may be as high as 14-16%. Prior studies have identified trauma characteristics and pre- and posttrauma factors that increase risk of PTSD among veterans and military personnel. This information may help to inform prevention and screening efforts, as screening programs could be targeted to high-risk populations. Large-scale screening efforts have recently been implemented by the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs. Given the prevalence and potential consequences of PTSD among veterans and active duty military personnel, development and continued evaluation of effective screening methods is an important public health need.

  3. Semen analysis of military personnel associated with military duty assignments.

    PubMed

    Weyandt, T B; Schrader, S M; Turner, T W; Simon, S D

    1996-01-01

    A collaborative study between the U.S. Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory (USABRDL) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was designed to assess fecundity of male artillery soldiers with potential exposures to airborne lead aerosols. Potential exposure assessment was based upon information provided in an interactive questionnaire. It became apparent from extensive questionnaire data that many soldiers in the initial control population had potentially experienced microwave exposure as radar equipment operators. As a result, a third group of soldiers without potential for lead or microwave exposures, but with similar environmental conditions, was selected as a comparison population. Blood hormone levels and semen analyses were conducted on artillerymen (n = 30), radar equipment operators (n = 20), and the comparison group (n = 31). Analysis of the questionnaire information revealed that concern about fertility problems motivated participation of some soldiers with potential artillery or microwave exposures. Although small study population size and the confounding variable of perceived infertility limit the reliability of the study, several statistically significant findings were identified. Artillerymen who perceived a possible fertility concern demonstrated lower sperm counts/ejaculate (P = 0.067) and lower sperm/mL (P = 0.014) than the comparison group. The group of men with potential microwave exposures demonstrated lower sperm counts/mL (P = 0.009) and sperm/ejaculate (P = 0.027) than the comparison group. Variables used to assess endocrine, accessory sex gland, and sperm cell function were not different than the comparison group. Additional studies, incorporating larger numbers of individuals, should be performed in order to more optimally characterize potential lead and microwave exposure effects on male fecundity.

  4. Bodybuilding, Energy, and Weight-Loss Supplements are Associated with Deployment and Physical Activity in U.S. Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    the herbal weight-loss supplement hydroxycut. Ann Intern Med. 2005;142:477–478. 22. Baum M, Weiss M. The influence of a taurine containing drink on...Naval Health Research Center Bodybuilding, Energy, and Weight-Loss Supplements Are Associated With Deployment and Physical Activity in U.S...Weight-Loss Supplements Are Associated With Deployment and Physical Activity in U.S. Military Personnel ISABEL G. JACOBSON, MPH, JAIME L. HORTON, BS

  5. 78 FR 70533 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2013-28359] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-570-904] Certain... Fourth Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2011-2012, 78 FR 26748 (May 8, 2013) (``Preliminary...., 78 FR at 26749. \\4\\ See Memorandum to Christian Marsh, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Antidumping...

  6. Cancer Incidence in the U.S. Military Population: Comparison with Rates from the SEER Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-08

    analysis, 34% of active-duty women and 29% of women in the general population used oral contraceptive pills in the preceding 12 months. Oral... contraceptive pill use has been shown to increase the risk for breast cancer, particu- larly in younger women (33, 34). Military women are also more likely to...screening with mam- mography in Sweden. Int J Cancer 2005;117:842–7. 33. Pymar HC, Creinin MD. The risks of oral contraceptive pills . Semin Reprod Med

  7. Determinants of physical activity based on the theory of planned behavior in Iranian Military Staff's Wives: a path analysis.

    PubMed

    Gholamnia Shirvani, Zeinab; Ghofranipour, Fazlollah; Gharakhanlou, Reza; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2014-11-30

    Level of physical activity as a key determinant of healthy lifestyle less than is required in individuals particularly women. Applying theories of behavioral change about complex behaviors such as physical activity leads to identify effective factors and their relations. The aim of this study was to determine predictors of physical activity behavior based on the Theory of Planned Behavior in military staff's wives in Tehran. This cross-sectional study was performed in 180 military personnel's spouses residing in organizational houses, in Tehran, Iran in 2014. The participants were randomly selected with multi-stage cluster sampling. The validity and reliability of the theory based scale evaluated before conducting the path analysis. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS16 and LISREL8.8. The results indicated the model explained 77% and 17% of intention and behavior variance. Subjective norms (Beta=0.83) and intention (Beta=0.37) were the strongest predictors of intention and behavior, respectively. The instrumental and affective attitude had no significant path to intention and behavior. The direct relation of perceived behavioral control to behavior was non-significant. This research demonstrated relative importance and relationships of Theory of Planned Behavior constructs in physical activity behavior of military personnel's spouses in Tehran. It is essential to consider these determinants in designing of educational interventions for promoting and maintaining physical activity behavior in this target group.

  8. Public-academic partnerships: working together to meet the needs of Army National Guard soldiers: an academic-military partnership.

    PubMed

    Dalack, Gregory W; Blow, Adrian J; Valenstein, Marcia; Gorman, Lisa; Spinner, Jane; Marcus, Sheila; Kees, Michelle; McDonough, Susan; Greden, John F; Ames, Barbara; Francisco, Burton; Anderson, James R; Bartolacci, James; Lagrou, Robert

    2010-11-01

    The conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq have greatly increased the number of veterans returning home with combat exposure, reintegration issues, and psychiatric symptoms. National Guard soldiers face additional challenges. Unlike active duty soldiers, they do not return to military installations with access to military health services or peers. The authors describe the formation and activities of a partnership among two large state universities in Michigan and the Michigan Army National Guard, established to assess and develop programming to meet the needs of returning soldiers. The process of forming the partnership and the challenges, opportunities, and benefits arising from it are described.

  9. Preventing Obesity in the Military Community (POMC): The Development of a Clinical Trials Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Spieker, Elena A.; Sbrocco, Tracy; Theim, Kelly R.; Maurer, Douglas; Johnson, Dawn; Bryant, Edny; Bakalar, Jennifer L.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Ress, Rachel; Seehusen, Dean; Klein, David A.; Stice, Eric; Yanovski, Jack A.; Chan, Linda; Gentry, Shari; Ellsworth, Carol; Hill, Joanne W.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Stephens, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity impacts the U.S. military by affecting the health and readiness of active duty service members and their families. Preventing Obesity in Military Communities (POMC) is a comprehensive research program within Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs) in three Military Training Facilities. This paper describes three pilot randomized controlled trials that target critical high risk periods for unhealthy weight gain from birth to young adulthood: (1) pregnancy and early infancy (POMC-Mother-Baby), (2) adolescence (POMC-Adolescent), and (3) the first tour of duty after boot camp (POMC-Early Career). Each study employs a two-group randomized treatment or prevention program with follow up. POMC offers a unique opportunity to bring together research and clinical expertise in obesity prevention to develop state-of-the-art programs within PCMHs in Military Training Facilities. This research builds on existing infrastructure that is expected to have immediate clinical benefits to DoD and far-reaching potential for ongoing collaborative work. POMC may offer an economical approach for widespread obesity prevention, from conception to young adulthood, in the U.S. military as well as in civilian communities. PMID:25648176

  10. Preventing Obesity in the Military Community (POMC): the development of a clinical trials research network.

    PubMed

    Spieker, Elena A; Sbrocco, Tracy; Theim, Kelly R; Maurer, Douglas; Johnson, Dawn; Bryant, Edny; Bakalar, Jennifer L; Schvey, Natasha A; Ress, Rachel; Seehusen, Dean; Klein, David A; Stice, Eric; Yanovski, Jack A; Chan, Linda; Gentry, Shari; Ellsworth, Carol; Hill, Joanne W; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Stephens, Mark B

    2015-01-22

    Obesity impacts the U.S. military by affecting the health and readiness of active duty service members and their families. Preventing Obesity in Military Communities (POMC) is a comprehensive research program within Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs) in three Military Training Facilities. This paper describes three pilot randomized controlled trials that target critical high risk periods for unhealthy weight gain from birth to young adulthood: (1) pregnancy and early infancy (POMC-Mother-Baby), (2) adolescence (POMC-Adolescent), and (3) the first tour of duty after boot camp (POMC-Early Career). Each study employs a two-group randomized treatment or prevention program with follow up. POMC offers a unique opportunity to bring together research and clinical expertise in obesity prevention to develop state-of-the-art programs within PCMHs in Military Training Facilities. This research builds on existing infrastructure that is expected to have immediate clinical benefits to DoD and far-reaching potential for ongoing collaborative work. POMC may offer an economical approach for widespread obesity prevention, from conception to young adulthood, in the U.S. military as well as in civilian communities.

  11. Active Duty- U.S. Army Noise-Induced Hearing Injury Quarterly Surveillance: Q1 2010 Thru Q2 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-10

    threshold shift, tinnitus , and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss. RECOMMENDATIONS: Commanders and Preventive Medicine assets at multiple levels should use...Humes LE, Jollenbeck LM, Durch JS: Noise and military service: Implications for hearing loss and tinnitus . Washington, DC: National Academy Press...NONSPECIFIC ABNORMAL AUDITORY FUNCTION STUDIES TINN Tinnitus 38830 TINNITUS UNSPECIFIED TINN Tinnitus 38831 SUBJECTIVE TINNITUS TINN Tinnitus 38832 OBJECTIVE

  12. Active Duty-U.S. Army Noise Induced Hearing Injury Quarterly Surveillance Q3 2011 thru Q4 2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-30

    incident case rates for sensorineural hearing loss significant threshold shift, tinnitus , and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss. RECOMMENDATIONS: Commanders...2013 A-1 APPENDIX A REFERENCES Humes LE, Jollenbeck LM, Durch JS: Noise and military service: Implications for hearing loss and tinnitus . Washington...FUNCTION STUDIES TINN Tinnitus 38830 TINNITUS UNSPECIFIED TINN Tinnitus 38831 SUBJECTIVE TINNITUS TINN Tinnitus 38832 OBJECTIVE TINNITUS CPT Codes

  13. The Effect of Reserve Activations and Active-Duty Deployments on Local Employment During the Global War on Terrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    by the Stata procedure, xtregar. - 25 - 4. ECONOMETRIC RESULTS In this section, we present the results of estimating the econometric model of...Department of Defense federally funded research and development centers. - iii - PREFACE This report presents an econometric analysis of the impact of...Personnel Activated and Deployed...........19 Econometric Methods.............................................20 Sample Selection

  14. A theoretical model for the study of active and passive smoking in military women: an at-risk population.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, A M

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents a model designed for the study of active and passive smoking in military women with children. Some constructs have been adapted from a transtheoretical model of behavior change. Transtheoretical model constructs of relevance to this model include (1) stages of behavior change, (2) decisional balance, and (3) self-efficacy. Other model constructs include (1) personal and situational factors, (2) a mother's self-efficacy to reduce the child's smoke exposure, (3) a mother's expectation for the child's smoke exposure, (4) smoke avoidance, (5) nicotine dependence, and (6) social support for quitting smoking. The occurrence of health problems associated with smoking is the outcome variable. The results of a study under way at present may support the use of this model and may make data available to substantiate the need for behavior-specific interventions designed to prevent and reduce active and passive smoking among military personnel.

  15. The effects of basic fitness parameters on the implementation of specific military activities.

    PubMed

    Sporiš, Goran; Harasin, Dražen; Baić, Mario; Krističević, Tomislav; Krakan, Ivan; Milanović, Zoran; Cular, Dražen; Bagarić-Krakan, Lucija

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether basic fitness parameters have the impact on the specific military activity such as walking 18 km with 25 kg of load. The members of Croatian Armed Forces (30 soldiers) were tested before the beginning of the training program. The study has included variables for the assessment of muscular endurance: push-ups in 2 minutes, sit-ups in 2 minutes, maximum number of pull-ups before dropping from the bar, bench press with 70% of body weight-max number of repetitions, max number of squats for 60 seconds, then the variables for the assessment of aerobic capacity: the 3200m run and relative oxygen uptake using the direct method of measurement on a treadmill as well as the variable for the assessment of body fat (body fat %). As the criterion variable, it was used the 18 km walking with 25 kg of load. The results of the regression analysis have shown statistically significant relation of predictor variables with the criterion variable. The two variables, 3200m run and RVO2 had a significant Beta coefficient. Based on the obtained results it could be concluded that great cardio-respiratory endurance has a much larger impact on the walking length of 18 km with a load of 25 kg than other fitness parameters.

  16. Robust active noise control in the loadmaster area of a military transport aircraft.

    PubMed

    Kochan, Kay; Sachau, Delf; Breitbach, Harald

    2011-05-01

    The active noise control (ANC) method is based on the superposition of a disturbance noise field with a second anti-noise field using loudspeakers and error microphones. This method can be used to reduce the noise level inside the cabin of a propeller aircraft. However, during the design process of the ANC system, extensive measurements of transfer functions are necessary to optimize the loudspeaker and microphone positions. Sometimes, the transducer positions have to be tailored according to the optimization results to achieve a sufficient noise reduction. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a controller design method for such narrow band ANC systems. The method can be seen as an extension of common transducer placement optimization procedures. In the presented method, individual weighting parameters for the loudspeakers and microphones are used. With this procedure, the tailoring of the transducer positions is replaced by adjustment of controller parameters. Moreover, the ANC system will be robust because of the fact that the uncertainties are considered during the optimization of the controller parameters. The paper describes the necessary theoretic background for the method and demonstrates the efficiency in an acoustical mock-up of a military transport aircraft.

  17. Automated ambulatory assessment of cognitive performance, environmental conditions, and motor activity during military operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Harris R.; Kramer, F. Matthew; Montain, Scott J.; Niro, Philip; Young, Andrew J.

    2005-05-01

    Until recently scientists had limited opportunities to study human cognitive performance in non-laboratory, fully ambulatory situations. Recently, advances in technology have made it possible to extend behavioral assessment to the field environment. One of the first devices to measure human behavior in the field was the wrist-worn actigraph. This device, now widely employed, can acquire minute-by-minute information on an individual"s level of motor activity. Actigraphs can, with reasonable accuracy, distinguish sleep from waking, the most critical and basic aspect of human behavior. However, rapid technologic advances have provided the opportunity to collect much more information from fully ambulatory humans. Our laboratory has developed a series of wrist-worn devices, which are not much larger then a watch, which can assess simple and choice reaction time, vigilance and memory. In addition, the devices can concurrently assess motor activity with much greater temporal resolution then the standard actigraph. Furthermore, they continuously monitor multiple environmental variables including temperature, humidity, sound and light. We have employed these monitors during training and simulated military operations to collect information that would typically be unavailable under such circumstances. In this paper we will describe various versions of the vigilance monitor and how each successive version extended the capabilities of the device. Samples of data from several studies are presented, included studies conducted in harsh field environments during simulated infantry assaults, a Marine Corps Officer training course and mechanized infantry (Stryker) operations. The monitors have been useful for documenting environmental conditions experienced by wearers, studying patterns of sleep and activity and examining the effects of nutritional manipulations on warfighter performance.

  18. Influence of fermentation conditions on polysaccharide production and the activities of enzymes involved in the polysaccharide synthesis of Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Liu, Xiao-Cui; Dong, Feng-Ying; Guo, Ming-Zhu; Wang, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2016-05-01

    The influence of different fermentation conditions on intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) production and activities of the phosphoglucomutase (PGM), UDPG-pyrophosphorylase (UGP), phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), UDPG-dehydrogenase (UGD), and glucokinase (GK) implicated in metabolite synthesis in Cordyceps militaris was evaluated. The highest IPS production (327.57 ± 6.27 mg/100 mL) was obtained when the strain was grown in the optimal medium containing glucose (40 g · L(-1)), beef extract (10 g · L(-1)), and CaCO3 (0.5 g · L(-1)), and the initial pH and temperature were 7 and 25 °C, respectively. The activities of PGM, UGP, and PGI were proved to be influenced by the fermentation conditions. A strong correlation between the activities of these enzymes and the production of IPS was found. The transcription level of the pgm gene (encoding PGM) was 1.049 times and 1.467 times compared to the ugp gene and pgi gene (encoding UGP and PGI), respectively, in the optimal culture medium. This result indicated that PGM might be the highly key enzyme to regulate the biosynthesis of IPS of C. militaris in a liquid-submerged culture. Our study might be helpful for further research on the pathway of polysaccharide biosynthesis aimed to improve the IPS production of C. militaris.

  19. Salinity-Induced Anti-Angiogenesis Activities and Structural Changes of the Polysaccharides from Cultured Cordyceps Militaris

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yangyang; Han, Zhangrun; Qiu, Peiju; Zhou, Zijing; Tang, Yang; Zhao, Yue; Zheng, Sha; Xu, Chenchen; Zhang, Xiuli; Yin, Pinghe; Jiang, Xiaolu; Lu, Hong; Yu, Guangli; Zhang, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Cordyceps is a rare and exotic mushroom that grows out of the head of a mummified caterpillar. Many companies are cultivating Cordyceps to meet the increased demand for its medicinal applications. However, the structures and functions of polysaccharides, one of the pharmaceutical active ingredients in Cordyceps, are difficult to reproduce in vitro. We hypothesized that mimicking the salty environment inside caterpillar bodies might make the cultured fungus synthesize polysaccharides with similar structures and functions to that of wild Cordyceps. By adding either sodium sulfate or sodium chloride into growth media, we observed the salinity-induced anti-angiogenesis activities of the polysaccharides purified from the cultured C. Militaris. To correlate the activities with the polysaccharide structures, we performed the 13C-NMR analysis and observed profound structural changes including different proportions of α and β glycosidic bonds and appearances of uronic acid signals in the polysaccharides purified from the culture after the salts were added. By coupling the techniques of stable 34S-sulfate isotope labeling, aniline- and D5-aniline tagging, and stable isotope facilitated uronic acid-reduction with LC-MS analysis, our data revealed for the first time the existence of covalently linked sulfate and the presence of polygalacuronic acids in the polysaccharides purified from the salt added C. Militaris culture. Our data showed that culturing C. Militaris with added salts changed the biosynthetic scheme and resulted in novel polysaccharide structures and functions. These findings might be insightful in terms of how to make C. Militaris cultures to reach or to exceed the potency of wild Cordyceps in future. PMID:25203294

  20. Creating healing environments in support of the U.S. Military: a commitment to quality through the built environment.

    PubMed

    Casscells, S Ward; Kurmel, Colonel Thom; Ponatoski, Ed

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Military Health System (MHS) provides care to 9.2 million beneficiaries with approximately 130 thousand military and civilian staff in 70 military hospitals, 411 primary care clinics, and 417 dental clinics around the world. In anticipation of nearly $11 billion of new medical construction planned for the next 5 years, this paper describes the commitment of the MHS leadership and its approach to creating healing physical environments across the system, employing a set of principles, projected outcomes, and design features to achieve world-class facilities for service members and the military "family." The results of a survey of active duty personnel and spouses indicated a desire for MHS facilities to provide space for family members to be able to spend the night, to control environmental features such as lighting and temperature, and to communicate more effectively with family and friends outside the facility via e-mail and telephone.

  1. Tobacco Research in the Military: Reflections on 20 Years of Research in the United States Air Force.

    PubMed

    Talcott, G Wayne; Ebbert, Jon O; Klesges, Robert C; Linde, Brittany D; Seals, Robert W; Krukowski, Rebecca A; Grieser, Emily A; Oh, John Y; Martin-Zona, Denise M

    2015-08-01

    The U.S. military is one of the world's largest employers. Approximately 30% of active duty military personnel smoke cigarettes and more than 14% use smokeless tobacco. The military has historically supported tobacco use and more recently is attempting to combat its use. Through 20 years of collaborative research with the United States Air Force, we have learned that smoking bans are effective, recruits who have never previously smoked cigarettes initiate tobacco use, smokeless tobacco serves as a gateway for smoking initiation, smoking is associated with discharge, smoking adds significant proximal training costs, tobacco use increases during deployment, and tobacco quitline counseling with a provision of medication is effective. Our findings may provide groundwork for future tobacco control efforts in the U.S. military.

  2. Temperament dimensions and posttraumatic stress symptoms in a previously deployed military sample.

    PubMed

    Escolas, Sandra M; Escolas, Holliel D

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of temperament on self-reported posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms from a convenience sample of US military service members (N=559). Previously deployed active duty service members completed anonymous questionnaires that included demographics, temperament, and PTSD measures. This study also examines demographic variables such as age, gender, ethnicity, race, education, and marital status, and service-related variables such as branch, grade, and years of military service for moderating effects. Results suggest a relationship between the temperament dimensions and PTSD symptoms in that the temperament dimensions of low mood quality, high levels of activity generally and during sleep, and low flexibility were found to predict high levels of self-reported PTSD symptoms. This is the first study incorporating temperament as a predictor of PTSD within a military population and provides the basis for future research in this area.

  3. Active Duty-U.S. Army Noise Induced Hearing Injury Quarterly Surveillance Q3 2007 thru Q4 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-11

    years (CY) Q3 2007-Q4 2009 shows incident case rates for sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), significant threshold shift (STS), tinnitus , and Noise-Induced...Prev Med. 2010;38(1S):S71-S77. Humes LE, Jollenbeck LM, Durch JS. Noise and military service: Implications for hearing loss and tinnitus . Washington...threshold shift 79415 NONSPECIFIC ABNORMAL AUDITORY FUNCTION STUDIES TINN Tinnitus 38830 TINNITUS UNSPECIFIED TINN Tinnitus 38831 SUBJECTIVE TINNITUS

  4. Protective Immunity to Hepatitis B and Streptococcus Pneumoniae in Active Duty Women Versus Men: Prevalence and Responses to Preventive Immunization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    difference between groups. After the initial enrollment of personnel with a history of a primary series of hepatitis B vaccine , 30 (14.2%) subjects...presented with additional records demonstrating the fact that only 1 or 2 hepatitis B vaccine doses had been given rather than the primary series as...may be merited to address the issue of 2 to 5 mcgs of hepatitis B vaccine IM as a booster strategy compared to 2 mcg ID. For military and travel

  5. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-99-1-9478 TITLE: COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION ...COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 99 – 31 Dec 06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMMITTEE ON MILITARY NUTRITION RESEARCH 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...report presents the activities of the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Military Nutrition Research (CMNR) for the

  6. Coccidioidomycosis--the airborne assault continues: an unusual presentation with a review of the history, epidemiology, and military relevance.

    PubMed

    Olivere, J W; Meier, P A; Fraser, S L; Morrison, W B; Parsons, T W; Drehner, D M

    1999-08-01

    Despite remarkable advances in detection and therapy, coccidioidomycosis remains a persistent threat to military troops deployed in endemic areas. Pregnant women, immunocompromised hosts, and dark-skinned persons, particularly those of Filipino, African, Hispanic or Asian ancestry, are at greatest risk for disseminated coccidioidomycosis. The ethnically diverse military forces have susceptible active duty and reserve members stationed at or temporarily trained on bases located in endemic areas for Coccidioides immitis. Although the vast majority of infections with this organism are subclinical, unusual patterns of dissemination pose a diagnostic challenge. The military physician may be tasked with recognizing acute non-specific symptoms as well as bizarre, occult manifestations of coccidioidomycosis. We present a case of disseminated coccidioidomycosis in an active duty Caucasian male who presented with a right shoulder mass. Our patient is atypical in that he had disseminated disease although immunocompetent and Caucasian. Another unusual feature is that the mass was not preceded or accompanied by any other symptoms. We could find only two other reported cases of coccidioidomycosis presenting as a soft tissue mass, both in African-American patients. The epidemiology and history of coccidioidomycosis will be reviewed, with an emphasis on military populations. The insidious nature of coccidioidomycosis, the importance of early detection and treatment in decreasing morbidity and mortality, and the presence of large numbers of military members in the endemic areas make the lessons of this case particularly relevant for all flight surgeons.

  7. Safety of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine among Pregnant U.S. Military Women and Their Newborns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Naval Health Research Center Safety of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine among Pregnant Women and Their Newborns Ava M.S. Conlin Anna...Safety of the Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Among Pregnant U.S. Military Women and Their Newborns Ava Marie S. Conlin, DO, MPH, Anna T. Bukowinski...active-duty U.S. military women who received pandemic H1N1 vaccine during pregnancy as well as adverse health outcomes among the newborns resulting from

  8. [Santiago Ramón y Cajal: his activity as a military doctor (1873-1875)].

    PubMed

    Moreno Martinez, J M; Martin Araguz, A

    Santiago Ram n y Cajal entered the Medical Corps after graduating in Medicine in 1873. His marked Spanish nationalist character and his excellent physical condition led him to serve in the third Carlist war as a medical lieutenant and later in the Cuban War as a captain. His stay in Cuba, however, was marked by hardship and illness. The decline of Spain s colonialist policy, the war that was fought in a hostile climate and atmosphere, and the corruption of the military officers led to Santiago being posted to the frontlines on a fixed logistics system of trails. All this was to end in military failure and the subsequent loss of the colony. Disillusioned and seriously ill from malaria, which nearly killed him, he returned to Spain after being discharged for illness. Shortly afterwards, thanks to Dr. Jenaro Casas, he became a university lecturer, which put an end to his military career

  9. What is the risk associated with being a qualified military parachutist?

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C; Amoroso, P J; Yore, M M

    1999-04-01

    Military parachuting has been recognized as a hazardous activity since it was first introduced in World War II. Other risks associated with military service include actual war-fighting, training with weapons and explosives, operating with armoured vehicles or deployment to climatic extremes. These other hazards should be considered in any assessment of the additional risk associated with military parachuting. The aim of this study was to identify the risk attributable to parachuting amongst US Army enlisted soldiers. This study identified a cohort of infantry soldiers who served between 1990-94. They were separated by receipt of parachute hazardous duty pay. There was a total of 329,794 person-years (PY) available for study of which 18% were in the exposed group. The rate of hospitalization was very similar in both groups [123.9 per 1,000 PYs for the exposed group, 127 in the non-exposed group: relative risk (RR) = 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.96-1.00). The exposed group was 1.49 times (CI = 1.42-1.57) more likely to be admitted as a result of an injury as compared with the non-exposed group. Military parachuting was 20 times (CI = 16.6-24.3) more likely to be the cause of an injury. This study has shown that receipt of hazardous duty pay for military parachuting can be used as a marker in identifying significant additional risks to the health of infantry soldiers associated with military parachuting. This was reflected in an increased incidence of admission for acute injury and musculoskeletal trauma (particularly a trauma pattern associated with parachuting) as a result of military parachuting. Other risks, which are associated with parachute pay, are admission for the effects of heat, battle injury and helicopter accidents.

  10. 38 CFR 17.31 - Duty periods defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Definitions and Active Duty § 17.31 Duty periods defined. Full-time duty as a member of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, Women's Reserve of the Navy and Marine Corps and Women's Reserve of the Coast Guard... Patient Rights...

  11. A Descriptive Study of Military Nurse Practitioners’ Practice Settings and Clinical Practice Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    prevention, wellness promotion and patient education are not new concepts to nurses . For hundreds of years it has been the nurse who carried this...f orward. With this nursing experience and the acquisition of advanced education , the Nurse Practitioner is capable of providing a broad range of...Member . .. . ....... 43 Table 5 : Educational Background of Military Nurse Practitioners . ... ... ............ .. ..... . . . . . 45 Table 6

  12. A Systematic Process to Prioritize Prevention Activities: Sustaining Progress Toward the Reduction of Military Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    turns/ slips ithout fall, military motor vehicle crashes, nontraffıc mo- or vehicle incidents, and machinery/tools. These cause cat- gorieswere...McQuillan KA, K. V, Hart- sock R, Flynn MB, Whalen E, eds. Trauma nursing: from resuscitation through rehabilitation. Philadelphia PA: WB Saunders, 2001. 9

  13. Psycho-Active Pharmaceuticals and Military Performance in an Ethical Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    for detection of airplanes, ships or submarines at large distances. More recently night vision goggles were introduced to enhance human vision at...Caldwell JL, and Crowley JS. (1997). Sustaining female helicopter pilot performance with Dexedrine during sustained operations. International Journal of... night . The military developed the Global Positioning System for enhancement of situational awareness, which is now also widely used in civilian society

  14. Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-10-01

    The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

  15. Determinants of health-promoting behaviors in military spouses during deployment separation.

    PubMed

    Padden, Diane L; Connors, Rebecca A; Agazio, Janice G

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe predictors of participation in health-promoting behaviors among military spouses. A total of 105 female spouses of currently deployed active duty military members were surveyed to determine their perceived stress and participation in the health-promoting behaviors of exercise, diet, checkups, substance use/avoidance, social behaviors, stress management/rest, and safety/environmental behaviors. Demographic and deployment information was also collected. Regression analyses showed perceived stress was predictive of several health behaviors including exercise, social behaviors, stress management/rest, and safety/environmental behaviors. Increased perceived stress was associated with decreased participation in these behaviors. Deployment factors predicted only dietary behaviors and stress management/rest. As the minimum anticipated length of the deployment increased, healthy dietary behavior decreased. Likewise, as the number of deployments experienced increased, stress management and rest decreased. Stress brought on by military deployment may have detrimental effects upon participation in a health-promoting lifestyle.

  16. Stress, coping, and well-being in military spouses during deployment separation.

    PubMed

    Padden, Diane L; Connors, Rebecca A; Agazio, Janice G

    2011-03-01

    This study examined the relationships between stress, coping, general well-being, and sociodemographic characteristics using Lazarus and Folkman's theory of stress and coping. A descriptive correlational design was used. The sample consisted of 105 female spouses of currently deployed active duty military members. Instruments included the Perceived Stress Scale, the Jalowiec Coping Scale, and the RAND-36. Perceived stress was the best predictor of both mental and physical well-being, accounting for 51.7% and 25.4% of the variance, respectively. Evasive and optimistic coping contributed an additional 1.9 % and 4.3%, respectively, to the variance in mental well-being. Differences in coping use were found among rank groups, those who grew up in a military family, and those with a previous deployment separation. Nurses are in an ideal position to identify military spouses at risk and provide education on effective coping behaviors shown to positively affect well-being during deployment separation.

  17. Severe Neuropsychiatric Reaction in a Deployed Military Member after Prophylactic Mefloquine

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Alan L.; Seegmiller, Robert A.; Schindler, Libby S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of military personnel who have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan have reported a number of combat-related psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and traumatic brain injury. This case report involves a 27-year-old male active-duty US military service member who developed severe depression, psychotic hallucinations, and neuropsychological sequelae following the prophylactic use of the antimalarial medication mefloquine hydrochloride. The patient had a recent history of depression and was taking antidepressant medications at the time of his deployment to the Middle East. Psychiatrists and other health care providers should be aware of the possible neuropsychiatric side effects of mefloquine in deployed military personnel and should consider the use of other medications for malaria prophylaxis in those individuals who may be at increased risk for side effects. PMID:22937403

  18. Agency is associated with decreased emotional distress and suicidal ideation in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Andreski, Sarah Rae; McNaughton-Cassill, Mary; Osman, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Suicides in the U.S. military continue to rise at a rapid rate. Identification of protective factors that reduce risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors among military personnel are therefore needed. Agency--the sense that one is competent, effective, and in control of one's life--has shown to reduce the effects of hopelessness and emotional distress on suicidal thoughts and attempts in non-military populations. The current study explores the association of agency with suicidal ideation in a sample (n = 273) of active duty Air Force Security Forces personnel. Results of generalized regression modeling suggest that agency is directly associated with decreased emotional distress and severity of suicidal ideation, but does not moderate the effect of emotional distress on suicidal ideation.

  19. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, Military Affairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    on the occasion of the loss of the bread -winner have been provided for the families of military personnel who have died while fulfilling their...international duty. In particular, non able-bodied parents and wives of these military personnel are given pensions for the loss of the bread -winner...of deceased servicemen who receive a pension for the loss of the bread -winner are paid at 50 percent of the normal rent, and excess housing space

  20. 48 CFR 252.225-7013 - Duty-free entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Agreement country end product, other than a Bahrainian end product or a Moroccan end product, as defined in... shipment will be consigned to other than a military installation, e.g., a domestic contractor's plant, the... the shipment will be consigned to a contractor's plant and no duty-free entry certificate is...

  1. Characteristics of particle number and mass emissions during heavy-duty diesel truck parked active DPF regeneration in an ambient air dilution tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seungju; Quiros, David C.; Dwyer, Harry A.; Collins, John F.; Burnitzki, Mark; Chernich, Donald; Herner, Jorn D.

    2015-12-01

    Diesel particle number and mass emissions were measured during parked active regeneration of diesel particulate filters (DPF) in two heavy-duty diesel trucks: one equipped with a DPF and one equipped with a DPF + SCR (selective catalytic reduction), and compliant with the 2007 and 2010 emission standards, respectively. The emission measurements were conducted using an ambient air dilution tunnel. During parked active regeneration, particulate matter (PM) mass emissions measured from a 2007 technology truck were significantly higher than the emissions from a 2010 technology truck. Particle number emissions from both trucks were dominated by nucleation mode particles having a diameter less than 50 nm; nucleation mode particles were orders of magnitude higher than accumulation mode particles having a diameter greater than 50 nm. Accumulation mode particles contributed 77.8 %-95.8 % of the 2007 truck PM mass, but only 7.3 %-28.2 % of the 2010 truck PM mass.

  2. Military Government

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-07-01

    CGSC MG MILITARY GOVERNMENT LIBHARY ARI\\’IY WAR COLLEGE CJ\\RLISLE BARRACKS, PAa This text is approved for resident and extension-course...and functions · of ’ military government . It conforms ·substantially to the subject matter , of Field Manual 27-5, Civil Affairs/ Military Government ...Teaching experience at the Command and General Staff College has ···--·demonstrated the need for a military government text which brings to- gether

  3. Life Support: A System of Care for Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the issue of separation and its impact on military families, including on infants and toddlers. Deployments and unaccompanied tours of duty (temporary assignments and 12-24 month assignments, both without family members, respectively) take military personnel away from their loved ones for extended periods of time. …

  4. 19 CFR 148.90 - Foreign military personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Foreign military personnel. 148.90 Section 148.90... International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.90 Foreign military personnel... country, and of their immediate families under subheading 9806.00.20, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of...

  5. An Exploratory Study of Educational Participation Issues Confronting Active Duty Air Force Personnel Assigned to McConnell Air Force Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Terry L., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    Serving in the military today is a very specialized and intense experience, with the use of technology requiring dedicated training and education. The military provides much of this specialized training, but also recognizes the value of higher education for its personnel. Our military personnel are supporting our country daily and their increased…

  6. Pain management strategies and lessons from the military: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Vallerand, April Hazard; Cosler, Patricia; Henningfield, Jack E; Galassini, Pam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Wounded soldiers often experience substantial pain, which must be addressed before returning to active duty or civilian life. The United States (US) military has instituted several guidelines and initiatives aimed at improving pain management by providing rapid access to medical care, and developing interdisciplinary multimodal pain management strategies based on outcomes observed both in combat and hospital settings. OBJECTIVE: To provide a narrative review regarding US military pain management guidelines and initiatives, which may guide improvements in pain management, particularly chronic pain management and prevention, for the general population. METHODS: A literature review of US military pain management guidelines and initiatives was conducted, with a particular focus on the potential of these guidelines to address shortcomings in chronic pain management in the general population. DISCUSSION: The application of US military pain management guidelines has been shown to improve pain monitoring, education and relief. In addition, the US military has instituted the development of programs and guidelines to ensure proper use and discourage aberrant behaviours with regard to opioid use, because opioids are regarded as a critical part of acute and chronic pain management schemes. Inadequate pain management, particularly inadequate chronic pain management, remains a major problem for the general population in the US. Application of military strategies for pain management to the general US population may lead to more effective pain management and improved long-term patient outcomes. PMID:26448972

  7. The Effect of Military Training Activity on Eastern Lupine and the Karner Blue Butterfly at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark A.; Turner, Monica G.; Rusch, Donald H.

    2002-01-01

    The US Department of Defense (DOD) manages over 10.1 million ha of land, much of which is used for training military personnel. However, vast sections receive little or no use, and military lands have become refuges for many species. At Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, USA, populations of the endangered Karner blue butterfly ( Lycaeides melissa samuelis) are found in oak and pine barren communities where wild lupine ( Lupinus perennis), a perennial forb required by Karner blue butterfly larvae, still occurs. Oak and pine barren communities are disturbance-dependent, and the barrens ecosystems in the Midwest have declined in extent by 98% because of fire suppression, succession, and habitat fragmentation. We studied the effects of disturbance by military manuever training on the density of lupine and Karner blue butterfly at Fort McCoy. We also wanted to determine whether military training activity could enhance Karner blue butterfly habitat. At locations where tracked vehicles had driven through lupine patches, the abundance of lupine and nectar-producing plants was greater in the median strip between vehicle ruts than in vehicle ruts or 5 m outside the vehicle ruts. The proportion of lupine stems with Karner blue butterfly larvae feeding sign (the ratio of stems fed upon to stems examined) was greater in areas where military vehicles had traveled than where they had not. The proportion of lupine stems with feeding sign and lupine stem density was also positively related to the occurrence of prior bivouacs and fires caused by military munitions. Shrub and forest canopy abundance were lower in areas traveled by tracked vehicles. At the scale of the lupine patch, lupine abundance and the proportion of lupine stems with feeding sign were positively correlated with military training activities, suggesting that maintenance of lupine habitat can be achieved in concert with military training.

  8. The effect of military training activity on eastern lupine and the Karner blue butterfly at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, USA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark A; Turner, Monica G; Rusch, Donald H

    2002-01-01

    The US Department of Defense (DOD) manages over 10.1 million ha of land, much of which is used for training military personnel. However, vast sections receive little or no use, and military lands have become refuges for many species. At Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, USA, populations of the endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) are found in oak and pine barren communities where wild lupine (Lupinus perennis), a perennial forb required by Karner blue butterfly larvae, still occurs. Oak and pine barren communities are disturbance-dependent, and the barrens ecosystems in the Midwest have declined in extent by 98% because of fire suppression, succession, and habitat fragmentation. We studied the effects of disturbance by military manuever training on the density of lupine and Karner blue butterfly at Fort McCoy. We also wanted to determine whether military training activity could enhance Karner blue butterfly habitat. At locations where tracked vehicles had driven through lupine patches, the abundance of lupine and nectar-producing plants was greater in the median strip between vehicle ruts than in vehicle ruts or 5 m outside the vehicle ruts. The proportion of lupine stems with Karner blue butterfly larvae feeding sign (the ratio of stems fed upon to stems examined) was greater in areas where military vehicles had traveled than where they had not. The proportion of lupine stems with feeding sign and lupine stem density was also positively related to the occurrence of prior bivouacs and fires caused by military munitions. Shrub and forest canopy abundance were lower in areas traveled by tracked vehicles. At the scale of the lupine patch, lupine abundance and the proportion of lupine stems with feeding sign were positively correlated with military training activities, suggesting that maintenance of lupine habitat can be achieved in concert with military training.

  9. Health and mental health needs of children in US military families.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Benjamin S; Davis, Beth Ellen

    2013-06-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have been challenging for US uniformed service families and their children. Almost 60% of US service members have family responsibilities. Approximately 2.3 million active duty, National Guard, and Reserve service members have been deployed since the beginning of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq (2001 and 2003, respectively), and almost half have deployed more than once, some for up to 18 months' duration. Up to 2 million US children have been exposed to a wartime deployment of a loved one in the past 10 years. Many service members have returned from combat deployments with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and traumatic brain injury. The mental health and well-being of spouses, significant others, children (and their friends), and extended family members of deployed service members continues to be significantly challenged by the experiences of wartime deployment as well as by combat mortality and morbidity. The medical system of the Department of Defense provides health and mental health services for active duty service members and their families as well as activated National Guard and Reserve service members and their families. In addition to military pediatricians and civilian pediatricians employed by military treatment facilities, nonmilitary general pediatricians care for >50% of children and family members before, during, and after wartime deployments. This clinical report is for all pediatricians, both active duty and civilian, to aid in caring for children whose loved ones have been, are, or will be deployed.

  10. Military Report More Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use than Civilians

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Bernadette P.; Finch, Michael D.; Bray, Robert M.; Williams, Thomas V.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Hadden, Louise S.; Colleran, Heather L.; Jonas, Wayne B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The study objective was to estimate complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among active duty military and compare data with civilian use. Design A global survey on CAM use in the 12 previous months was conducted. Final participants (16,146) were stratified by gender, service, region, and pay grade. Analysis included prevalence of CAM use, demographic and lifestyle characteristics. Results Approximately 45% of respondents reported using at least one type of CAM therapy. Most commonly used therapies were as follows: prayer for one's own health (24.4%), massage therapy (14.1%), and relaxation techniques (10.8%). After exclusion of prayer for one's own health, adjusting to the 2000 U.S. census, overall CAM use in the military (44.5%) was higher than that in comparable civilian surveys (36.0% and 38.3%). Conclusions Military personnel reported using three CAM stress-reduction therapies at 2.5–7 times the rate of civilians. Among the military, high utilization of CAM practices that reduce stress may serve as markers for practitioners assessing an individual's health and well-being. PMID:23323682

  11. Cosmetology Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for three occupations in the cosmetology series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide…

  12. Microcomputer Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for eight occupations in the microcomputer series. Each occupation is divided into 5 to 11 duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space…

  13. Printing Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for 10 occupations in the printing series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space for…

  14. Welding Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for six occupations in the welding series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space for…

  15. An Analysis of Foreign Military Sales Management Viewed at the Field Activity Level.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    that usually resides in the informal organization . These advantages , however , may not be sufficient to enable the bureaucratic organization to...bureaucracy. The Military Assistance and Sales Manual, the Bible of the FMS program provides the “best conceptual” source of information on the system ...The political volatility of FMS requires a system that can provide top management with information rapidly in response to outside influences. However

  16. Uncovering the Molecular Mechanism of Anti-Allergic Activity of Silkworm Pupa-Grown Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting-Feng; Chan, Yu-Yi; Shi, Wan-Yin; Jhong, Meng-Ting

    2017-04-02

    Cordyceps militaris has been widely used as an herbal drug and tonic food in East Asia and has also been recently studied in the West because of its various pharmacological activities such as antitumoral, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-allergic activity of ethanol extract prepared from silkworm pupa-cultivated Cordyceps militaris fruit bodies in activated mast cells. Our results showed that ethanol extract treatment significantly inhibited the release of β-hexosaminidase (a degranulation marker) and mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-[Formula: see text] as well as interleukin-4 in RBL-2H3 cells. The cells were sensitized with 2,4-dinitrophenol specific IgE and then stimulated with human serum albumin conjugated with 2,4-dinitrophenol. Oral administration of 300[Formula: see text]mg/kg ethanol extract significantly ameliorated IgE-induced allergic reaction in mice with passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Western immunoblotting results demonstrated that ethanol extract incubation significantly inhibited Syk/PI3K/MEKK4/JNK/c-jun biochemical cascade in activated RBL-2H3 cells, which activated the expression of various allergic cytokines. In addition, it suppressed Erk activation and PLC[Formula: see text] evocation, which would respectively evoke the synthesis of lipid mediators and Ca[Formula: see text] mobilization to induce degranulation in stimulated RBL-2H3 cells. A compound, identified as β-sitostenone, was shown to inhibit β-hexosaminidase secretion from activated mast cells. Our study demonstrated that ethanol extract contained the ingredients, which could inhibit immediate degranulation and de novo synthesis of allergic lipid mediators and cytokines in activated mast cells.

  17. Performance validity test and neuropsychological assessment battery screening module performances in an active-duty sample with a history of concussion.

    PubMed

    Grills, Chad E; Armistead-Jehle, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The current retrospective investigation sought to replicate previous findings demonstrating the significant impact of performance validity test (PVT) performance and evaluation context on neuropsychological testing. We examined differences on performance validity testing between active-duty service members undergoing neurocognitive screening for concussion who were seen in a clinical context and those who were seen in a disability-seeking context, as well as the overall impact of PVT performance on a neurocognitive screening battery. Overall, 38.2% of the sample failed the Word Memory Test (WMT). Of those involved in a disability evaluation, the failure rate was 51.9%, which was significantly higher than the 36.8% failure rate among those evaluated in a clinical context. The effect size of WMT performance on a cognitive screening measure was also large. The current retrospective analysis served to replicate previous work.

  18. Pilot study of the effects of mixed light touch manual therapies on active duty soldiers with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder and injury to the head.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lauren; Hanson, Brenda; Gilliam, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to examine the effects of mixed Light Touch Manual Therapies (LTMT) on headache, anxiety and other symptoms suffered by active duty United States service members experiencing chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Ten service members diagnosed with PTSD and having a self-reported injury to the head acquired at least two years prior, were provided with two hour-long sessions of mixed LTMT given a week apart. Data to assess the immediate and durable effects were gathered before and after the LTMT sessions. Results indicate that headache, anxiety, and pain interference were significantly reduced during the course of the pilot study. This suggests that mixed LTMT may be helpful in reducing some of the symptoms of PTSD and injury to the head. Further studies will be needed to determine if LTMT is an effective non-pharmacological treatment for headache, anxiety or other problems associated with PTSD or injury to the head.

  19. Successful Nonoperative Management of HAGL (Humeral Avulsion of Glenohumeral Ligament) Lesion With Concurrent Axillary Nerve Injury in an Active-Duty US Navy SEAL.

    PubMed

    Ernat, Justin J; Bottoni, Craig R; Rowles, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    Humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) is a lesion that has been recognized as a cause of recurrent shoulder instability. To our knowledge there are no reports of successful return to full function in young, competitive athletes or return to manual labor following nonoperative management of a HAGL lesion. A 26-year-old Navy SEAL was diagnosed with a HAGL injury, and associated traction injury of the axillary nerve as well as a partial tear of the rotator cuff. Operative intervention was recommended; however, due to issues with training and with inability to properly rehab with the axillary nerve injury, surgical plans were delayed. Interestingly, the patient demonstrated both clinical and radiographic magnetic resonance imaging healing of his lesion over an 18-month period. At 18 months the patient had returned to full active duty without pain or instability as a Navy SEAL.

  20. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  1. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  2. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  3. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  4. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  5. Physical and functional outcomes following multidisciplinary residential rehabilitation for prearthritic hip pain among young active UK military personnel

    PubMed Central

    Coppack, Russell J; Bilzon, James L; Wills, Andrew K; McCurdie, Ian M; Partridge, Laura K; Nicol, Alastair M; Bennett, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Background There are no studies describing the clinical outcomes of a residential, multidisciplinary team (MDT) rehabilitation intervention for patients with prearthritic hip pain. The aim of this cohort study was to describe the functional and physical outcomes of multidisciplinary residential rehabilitation for UK military personnel with prearthritic hip pain. Methods Participants (N=40) with a mean age of 33 years referred to a specialist residential rehabilitation centre completed a comprehensive multidisciplinary residential intervention. The main outcome measures were mean pain, physical function (modified shuttle test (MST) and Y-balance test), hip range of motion (HROM) and a patient-reported outcome measure (The Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score, HAGOS). All scores for symptomatic hips were taken at baseline and post-treatment. Results There were improvements in the Y-balance test and HROM following rehabilitation. There were significant improvements in mean difference (T1-to-T2) for Y-balance scores (15.8 cm, 95% CI 10.7 to 20.9, p<0.001), HROM (6.5° increase in hip flexion, 95% CI 4.6 to 9.4, p<0.001) and hip internal rotation (4.6°, 95% CI 2.7 to 6.6, p<0.001). Scores for HAGOS, pain, MST and functional activity assessment showed no improvement. Conclusions Among UK military personnel with prearthritic hip pain, MDT residential rehabilitation resulted in improvements in a functional Y-balance test, hip flexion and internal rotation. The study suggests short-term benefits across some outcomes for the current UK military approach to MDT residential rehabilitation. PMID:27900174

  6. DEVELOPMENT WORK FOR IMPROVED HEAVY-DUTY VEHICLE MODELING CAPABILITY DATA MINING--FHWA DATASETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A heavy-duty vehicle can produce 10 to 100 times the emissions (of NOx and PM emissions especially) of a light-duty vehicle, so heavy-duty vehicle activity needs to be well characterized. Key uncertainties with the use of MOBILE6 regarding heavy-duty vehicle emissions include th...

  7. Descriptive epidemiology and natural history of idiopathic venous thromboembolism in U.S. active duty enlisted personnel, 1998-2007.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Randall J; Li, Yuanzhang; Niebuhr, David W

    2011-05-01

    The estimated incidence of idiopathic venous thromboembolism (IVTE) cases in the United States ranges from 24,000 to 282,000/year. This analysis explores the incidence and prevalence of IVTE in the military and if cases experience increased attrition. The Defense Medical Surveillance System was searched for incident IVTE cases from 1998 through 2007. Enlisted cases were each matched to 3 controls. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard modeling were performed. We matched 463 cases to 1,389 controls. Outpatient IVTE rates have increased markedly from 1998 through 2007. Cases of all-cause attrition risk (0.56 [95% CI = 0.44, 0.72]) and rates were significantly less than controls (p < 0.0001), and cases of medical attrition risk (1.64 [95% CI = 1.13, 2.37]) and rates were significantly higher (p < 0.01). Increasing rates with lower attrition suggests increasing case prevalence. Health care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion for venous thromboembolism to minimize adverse sequelae affecting health, unit readiness, and medical costs.

  8. DoD Education Activity Needed Better Planning for Military Construction Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-24

    responsible for managing the education of military dependent children around the world. In FY 2010, DoDEA began a major facilities renovation and...13,050 (14) 13,050 (14) Learning Impaired-Severe 1,600 800 (50) 800 (50) Music and Performance 5,475 4,825 (12) 4,375 (20) Neighborhood* 29,800...25,000 (16) 22,600 (24) Occupational / Physical Therapy 1,400 400 (71) 400 (71) * See page 4 for definition. Conclusion DoDEA officials did not

  9. Success of High Tibial Osteotomy in the United States Military

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Brian R.; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D.; Laughlin, Matthew D.; Burks, Robert; Pallis, Mark P.; Tokish, John M.; Belmont, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Historically, high tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been performed to treat isolated medial gonarthrosis with varus deformity. Purpose: To evaluate the occupational outcomes of HTO in a high-demand military cohort. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A retrospective analysis of active duty service members undergoing HTO for coronal plane malalignment and/or intra-articular pathology was performed using the Military Health System between 2003 and 2011. Demographic parameters and surgical variables, including rates of perioperative complications, secondary surgery, activity limitations, and medical discharge, were extracted from electronic medical records. For the current study, cumulative failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty or postoperative medical discharge for persistent knee dysfunction. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify statistical associations with cumulative failure after HTO. Results: A total of 181 service members (202 HTOs) were identified at an average follow-up of 47.5 months (range, 24-96 months). Mean age was 35.7 years (range, 19-55 years), and the majority were men (93%) and of enlisted rank (78%). All index procedures utilized a valgus-producing, opening wedge technique. Concomitant or staged procedures were performed in 87 patients (48%), including 40 ligamentous, 48 meniscal, and 48 chondral procedures. Complications occurred in 19.3% of knees (n = 39), with unplanned reoperation in 26 knees (12.8%). Fifty-three patients (40.7%) had minor activity limitations during military duty postoperatively. Eleven knees (5.4%) underwent conversion to total knee arthroplasty. The cumulative failure rate was 28.2% (n = 51) at 2- to 8-year follow-up. Patient age younger than 30 years at the time of surgery was associated with an independently higher risk of failure, whereas sex, concomitant/staged procedures, and perioperative complications were not significantly associated with

  10. 1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook. Appendix G: Frequency and Percentage Distributions for Variables in the Survey Analysis Files.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    characteristics of your current residence and community at your permanent duty station? M9909B - Quality and condition of residence OS DATA...the following characteristics of your current residence and community at your permanent duty station? M9909E - Quality of housing in the area... Eldercare [See also M9914SK.] OS DATA _ SAS DATA _ | COLS |LENGTH| | FORMAT NAME

  11. Is rest after concussion "the best medicine?": recommendations for activity resumption following concussion in athletes, civilians, and military service members.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Noah D; Iverson, Grant L

    2013-01-01

    Practice guidelines universally recommend an initial period of rest for people who sustain a sports-related concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in daily life or military service. This practice is difficult to reconcile with the compelling evidence that other health conditions can be worsened by inactivity and improved by early mobilization and exercise. We review the scientific basis for the recommendation to rest after MTBI, the challenges and potential unintended negative consequences of implementing it, and how patient management could be improved by refining it. The best available evidence suggests that complete rest exceeding 3 days is probably not helpful, gradual resumption of preinjury activities should begin as soon as tolerated (with the exception of activities that have a high MTBI exposure risk), and supervised exercise may benefit patients with persistent symptoms.

  12. [Civilian-military coordination].

    PubMed

    de Montravel, G

    2002-01-01

    Current humanitarian emergencies create complex, mutidimensional situations that stimulate simultaneous responses from a wide variety of sources including governments, non-governmental organizations (NGO), United Nations agencies, and private individuals. As a result, it has become essential to establish a coherent framework in which each actor can contribute promptly and effectively to the overall effort. This is the role of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Regardless of the circumstances and level of coordination, cooperation and collaboration between humanitarian and military personnel, it is necessary to bear in mind their objectives. The purpose of humanitarian action is to reduce human suffering. The purpose of military intervention is to stop warfare. The author of this article will discuss the three major obstacles to civilian-military coordination (strategic, tactical, and operational). Operations cannot be conducted smoothly and differences cannot be ironed out without mutual respect between the two parties, an explicit definition of their respective duties and responsibilities, a clear understanding of their cultural differences, and the presence of an organization and facilities for coordination and arbitrage by a neutral referee.

  13. Gunshot Wounds in Military Working Dogs in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom: 29 cases (2003-2009)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    severity at the time of presentation to veterinary care was not correlated with length of time until return to duty. (J Vet Emerg Crit Care 2013; 23(1...action MWD Military Working Dogs OEF Operation Enduring Freedom OIF Operation Iraqi Freedom RTD Return to duty time TACEVAC tactical evacuation TCCC...Tactical Combat Casualty Care WIA wounded in action Introduction Military Working Dogs (MWDs) have been used exten- sively in current military areas of

  14. The associations of physical and sexual assault with suicide risk in nonclinical military and undergraduate samples.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; McNaugton-Cassill, Mary; Osman, Augustine; Hernandez, Ann Marie

    2013-04-01

    The associations of various forms of sexual and physical assault with a history of suicide attempts and recent suicide ideation were studied in two distinct samples: active duty military and undergraduate students. A total of 273 active duty Air Force personnel and 309 undergraduate students anonymously completed self-report surveys of assault victimization, emotional distress, belongingness, recent suicide ideation, and previous suicide attempts. Among military personnel, rape, robbery, or violent assault was associated with a nonsignificant trend toward increased risk for suicide attempts, whereas physical abuse or battering as an adult was significantly associated with recent suicide ideation. Among undergraduates, unwanted sexual experiences as an adult and physical or sexual abuse as a child were significantly associated with increased risk for suicide attempt, but only unwanted experiences as an adult was significantly associated with increased risk for suicide ideation. Experiencing multiple forms of assault increased risk for suicide attempts and ideation in both groups. Results suggest that different types of assault contribute differentially to suicide risk in military versus undergraduate populations, but experiencing multiple types of assault is associated with increased risk in both groups.

  15. [Morbidity in draft military personnel].

    PubMed

    Mukhametzhanov, A M; Smagulov, N K

    2015-01-01

    Military service activity appeared to influence health state of military personnel. Body strain at initial stages of the service, connected with stress situation, affects general body resistance and manifests in higher general morbidity level with transitory disablement that decreases with adaptation. Based on normalized intensity parameters, the equation enables to ease a procedure of evaluation and forecast of transitory disablement morbidity in draft military personnel.

  16. Light Duty Vehicle Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    View a fact sheet on how the Final Endangerment Finding will allow EPA to finalize the first greenhouse gas standards for new light-duty vehicles as part of the joint rulemaking with the Department of Transportation.

  17. [Surgical activity at the military health service antenna during the Turquoise operation in Rwanda June-August 1994].

    PubMed

    Pons, F; Rigal, S; Dupeyron, C; de Saint-Julien, J

    1996-01-01

    The military health service provided a surgery antenna during the two months of the Turquoise operation in Zaire and Rwanda. During this period, the antenna functioned as a back-up station for the French troop and the local populations subjected to various conditions: Rwanda refugees who had escaped the massacres, subjects wounded by canon shots, war wounds, surgery emergencies in the refugee population. There were 315 operations performed including 33% in children and 70% for lesions of the limbs. The activity during the mission was analyzed on the basis of strategy for surgical diagnosis and treatment under local conditions (lack of complementary examinations, limited number of personnel, disrupted families in the refugee population, no possibility for transfer, major cholera and dysentery epidemic...).

  18. Military Service Absences and Family Members’ Mental Health: A Timeline Followback Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Aubrey J.; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-01-01

    Though military service, and particularly absence due to deployment, has been linked to risk for depression and anxiety among some spouses and children of active duty service members, there is limited research to explain the heterogeneity in family members’ reactions to military service stressors. The current investigation introduces the Timeline Followback Military Family Interview (TFMFI) as a clinically useful strategy to collect detailed time-linked information about the service member’s absences. Two dimensions of parent absence—the extent to which absences coincide with important family events and cumulative time absent—were tested as potential risks to family members’ mental health. Data from 70 mother-adolescent pairs revealed that the number of important family events missed by the service member was linked to elevated youth symptoms of depression, even when accounting for the number of deployments and cumulative duration of the service member’s absence. However, youth who reported more frequent contact with the service member during absences were buffered from the effects of extensive absence. Mothers’ symptoms were associated with the cumulative duration of the service members’ time away, but not with family events missed by the service member. These results identify circumstances that increase the risk for mental health symptoms associated with military family life. The TFMFI provides an interview-based strategy for clinicians wishing to understand military family members’ lived experience during periods of service member absence. PMID:26075736

  19. Prescription Stimulants and PTSD Among U.S. Military Service Members.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Frasco, Melissa A; Armenta, Richard F; Phillips, Christopher J; Horton, Jaime; Ryan, Margaret A K; Russell, Dale W; LeardMann, Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent condition among military service members and civilians who have experienced traumatic events. Stimulant use has been postulated to increase the risk of incident PTSD; however, research in this area is lacking. In this study, the association between receipt of prescription stimulants and PTSD was examined in a secondary analysis among active duty U.S. military members (n = 25,971), participating in the Millennium Cohort Study, who completed a baseline (2001-2003) and two follow-up surveys (between 2004-2008). Prescription stimulant data were obtained from the military Pharmacy Data Transaction Service. PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version and incident PTSD was defined as meeting the criteria at follow-up among those who did not have a history of PTSD at baseline. Overall, 1,215 (4.7%) persons developed new-onset PTSD during follow-up. Receipt of prescription stimulants were significantly associated with incident PTSD, hazard ratio = 5.09, 95% confidence interval [3.05, 8.50], after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, military characteristics, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, baseline mental and physical health status, deployment experiences, and physical/sexual trauma. Findings suggested that prescription stimulants are associated with incident PTSD among military personnel; these data may inform the underlying pathogenesis of and preventive strategies for PTSD.

  20. Military service absences and family members' mental health: A timeline followback assessment.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Aubrey J; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-08-01

    Although military service, and particularly absence due to deployment, has been linked to risk for depression and anxiety among some spouses and children of active duty service members, there is limited research to explain the heterogeneity in family members' reactions to military service stressors. The current investigation introduces the Timeline Followback Military Family Interview (TFMFI) as a clinically useful strategy to collect detailed time-linked information about the service member's absences. Two dimensions of parent absence--the extent to which absences coincide with important family events and cumulative time absent--were tested as potential risks to family members' mental health. Data from 70 mother-adolescent pairs revealed that the number of important family events missed by the service member was linked to elevated youth symptoms of depression, even when accounting for the number of deployments and cumulative duration of the service member's absence. However, youth who reported more frequent contact with the service member during absences were buffered from the effects of extensive absence. Mothers' symptoms were associated with the cumulative duration of the service members' time away, but not with family events missed by the service member. These results identify circumstances that increase the risk for mental health symptoms associated with military family life. The TFMFI provides an interview-based strategy for clinicians wishing to understand military family members' lived experience during periods of service-member absence.

  1. 20 CFR 1002.54 - Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in the uniformed services?”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Are all military fitness examinations... Service in the Uniformed Services § 1002.54 Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in... determine his or her fitness to perform duty in the uniformed services. Military fitness examinations...

  2. 20 CFR 1002.54 - Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in the uniformed services?”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Are all military fitness examinations... Service in the Uniformed Services § 1002.54 Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in... determine his or her fitness to perform duty in the uniformed services. Military fitness examinations...

  3. 20 CFR 1002.54 - Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in the uniformed services?”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Are all military fitness examinations... Service in the Uniformed Services § 1002.54 Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in... determine his or her fitness to perform duty in the uniformed services. Military fitness examinations...

  4. 20 CFR 1002.54 - Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in the uniformed services?”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Are all military fitness examinations... Service in the Uniformed Services § 1002.54 Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in... determine his or her fitness to perform duty in the uniformed services. Military fitness examinations...

  5. 20 CFR 1002.54 - Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in the uniformed services?”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are all military fitness examinations... Service in the Uniformed Services § 1002.54 Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in... determine his or her fitness to perform duty in the uniformed services. Military fitness examinations...

  6. 5 CFR 734.502 - Participation in political activity while on duty, in uniform, in any room or building occupied...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... while she is giving a speech at a political fundraiser. Example 3: The head of an executive department... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participation in political activity while... (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES...

  7. Laterally coupled distributed feedback lasers emitting at 2 μm with quantum dash active region and high-duty-cycle etched semiconductor gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papatryfonos, Konstantinos; Saladukha, Dzianis; Merghem, Kamel; Joshi, Siddharth; Lelarge, Francois; Bouchoule, Sophie; Kazazis, Dimitrios; Guilet, Stephane; Le Gratiet, Luc; Ochalski, Tomasz J.; Huyet, Guillaume; Martinez, Anthony; Ramdane, Abderrahim

    2017-02-01

    Single-mode diode lasers on an InP(001) substrate have been developed using InAs/In0.53Ga0.47As quantum dash (Qdash) active regions and etched lateral Bragg gratings. The lasers have been designed to operate at wavelengths near 2 μm and exhibit a threshold current of 65 mA for a 600 μm long cavity, and a room temperature continuous wave output power per facet >5 mW. Using our novel growth approach based on the low ternary In0.53Ga0.47As barriers, we also demonstrate ridge-waveguide lasers emitting up to 2.1 μm and underline the possibilities for further pushing the emission wavelength out towards longer wavelengths with this material system. By introducing experimentally the concept of high-duty-cycle lateral Bragg gratings, a side mode suppression ratio of >37 dB has been achieved, owing to an appreciably increased grating coupling coefficient of κ ˜ 40 cm-1. These laterally coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB) lasers combine the advantage of high and well-controlled coupling coefficients achieved in conventional DFB lasers, with the regrowth-free fabrication process of lateral gratings, and exhibit substantially lower optical losses compared to the conventional metal-based LC-DFB lasers.

  8. The Impact of Environment and Occupation on the Health and Safety of Active Duty Air Force Members: Database Development and De-Identification.

    PubMed

    Erich, Roger; Eaton, Melinda; Mayes, Ryan; Pierce, Lamar; Knight, Andrew; Genovesi, Paul; Escobar, James; Mychalczuk, George; Selent, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Preparing data for medical research can be challenging, detail oriented, and time consuming. Transcription errors, missing or nonsensical data, and records not applicable to the study population may hamper progress and, if unaddressed, can lead to erroneous conclusions. In addition, study data may be housed in multiple disparate databases and complex formats. Merging methods may be incomplete to obtain temporally synchronized data elements. We created a comprehensive database to explore the general hypothesis that environmental and occupational factors influence health outcomes and risk-taking behavior among active duty Air Force personnel. Several databases containing demographics, medical records, health survey responses, and safety incident reports were cleaned, validated, and linked to form a comprehensive, relational database. The final step involved removing and transforming personally identifiable information to form a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant limited database. Initial data consisted of over 62.8 million records containing 221 variables. When completed, approximately 23.9 million clean and valid records with 214 variables remained. With a clean, robust database, future analysis aims to identify high-risk career fields for targeted interventions or uncover potential protective factors in low-risk career fields.

  9. Melanoma Incidence Rates in Active Duty Military Personnel Compared With a Population-Based Registry in the United States, 2000-2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    for Research on Cancer Working Group on artifi- cial ultraviolet ( UV ) light and skin cancer: The association of use of sunbeds with cutaneous...later in life, especially among those with fair skin pigmentation, light eye and hair color, and propensity to freckle.’*"^ Studies comparing melanoma...occupations, " aircrew survival equipmentman" and "engineman," were found to have at least a two-fold risk of melanoma compared with general population rates

  10. A multisite study of the relationships between blast exposures and symptom reporting in a post-deployment active duty military population with mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reid, Matthew W; Miller, Kelly J; Lange, Rael T; Cooper, Douglas B; Tate, David F; Bailie, Jason; Brickell, Tracey A; French, Louis M; Asmussen, Sarah; Kennedy, Jan E

    2014-12-01

    Explosive devices have been the most frequent cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among deployed contemporary U.S. service members. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of previous cumulative blast exposures (that did or did not result in TBI) on later post-concussion and post-traumatic symptom reporting after sustaining a mild TBI (MTBI). Participants were 573 service members who sustained MTBI divided into four groups by number of blast exposures (1, 2, 3, and 4-10) and a nonblast control group. Post-concussion symptoms were measured using the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms using the Post-traumatic Checklist-Civilian version (PCL-C). Results show groups significantly differed on total NSI scores (p<0.001), where symptom endorsement increased as number of reported blast exposures increased. Total NSI scores were significantly higher for the 3- and 4-10 blast groups compared with the 1- and 2-blast groups with effect sizes ranging from small to moderate (d=0.31 to 0.63). After controlling for PTSD symptoms using the PCL-C total score, NSI total score differences remained between the 4-10-blast group and the 1- and 2-blast groups, but were less pronounced (d=0.35 and d=0.24, respectively). Analyses of NSI subscale scores using PCL-C scores as a covariate revealed significant between-blast group differences on cognitive, sensory, and somatic, but not affective symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that cumulative blast exposures accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance in total NSI scores (4.8%; p=0.009) and total PCL-C scores (2.3%; p<0.001). Among service members exposed to blast, post-concussion symptom reporting increased as a function of cumulative blast exposures. Future research will need to determine the relationship between cumulative blast exposures, symptom reporting, and neuropathological changes.

  11. An Analysis of Alternatives for Reducing Outpatient Military Health Care Costs for Active Duty Members and their Families: Implementing a Recommended Savings Strategy Using Defense Acquisition Principles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    now a powerful dose of Tylenol or Aleve may quickly relieve his/her symptoms. Naturally, this is the fastest and least expensive method of...drugs do not require a provider’s prescription and are also available through the internet. Some of the more common drugs are Tylenol , Aleve, and Advil...Uncommon Drugstore. Accessed in July 2007. http://www.drugstore.com. Products Symptoms Price Children’s Tylenol Common Flu $ 9.49 Tylenol Cold

  12. Individual Differences and Short-Term Military Factors Associated With Unhealthy Weight Control Behaviors Among Active Duty and Reserve Army Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    dieting in binge eating disorder: Etiology and treatment implications. Clinical Psychology Review , 19(1), 25-44. Hudson, J. I., Hiripi, E., Pope, H...eating among males. Clinical Psychology Review , 27(5), 582-606. 123 Rodin, J., Silberstein, L., & Striegel-Moore, R. (1984). Women and weight...dissatisfaction: A meta-analytic review. Clinical Psychology Review , 21(4), 521-551. Wynd, C. A., & Ryan-Wenger, N. A. (2004). Factors predicting health

  13. Evaluation of a Self-Administered Intravaginal Swab for PCR Detection of Genitourinary Tract Infections Including Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Trichomonas and Human Papillomavirus in Active Duty Military Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    and 65 women (8%) reported tubal ligation /hysterectomy. Of the 73 women with chiamydia diagnosed by EIA, 44 were treated at the day of their initial...discharge to detect increased numbers of polymorphonuclear cells is helpful to confirm a " syndromic diagnosis" that may be due to chlamydia, but...methods. Trichomonas vaginalis infection is the most prevalent nonvi- branes, premature labor, low birth weight, and post -abortion ral sexually transmitted

  14. The Long-Term Hospitalization Experience Following Military Service in the 1991 Gulf War Among Veterans Remaining on Active Duty, 1994-2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-13

    16.1 Other disorders of breast 259 8.7 Disorders of lipoid metabolism 69 9.8 Other disorders of male genital organs 231 7.8 Nontoxic nodular goiter 56...Metabolic Diseases, and Immunity Disorders (240–279) 10.4 5.8 9.4 14.7 16.9 Diseases of the Blood and Blood-Forming Organs (280–289) 5.4 3.3 5.9 6.2...5.3 Mental Disorders (290–319) 13.8 10.4 13.3 14.0 14.8 Diseases of the Nervous System and Sense Organs (320–389) 7.5 6.8 5.3 5.4 5.8 Diseases of the

  15. Effectiveness and Patient Acceptability of Stellate Ganglion Block (SGB) for Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms Among Active Duty Military Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Page 1 of 63 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0015 TITLE: Effectiveness and Patient Acceptability of Stellate Ganglion Block (SGB) for Treatment of...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-2-0015 Effectiveness and Patient Acceptability of Stellate Ganglion Block (SGB) for Treatment...study seeks to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of stellate ganglion block (SGB) for treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD

  16. Frequent Binge Drinking After Combat-Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury Among Active Duty Military Personnel With a Past Year Combat Deployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    in 2008 reported drinking at or above hazardous drinking levels, including 5% who met screening cri- teria for possible alcohol dependence. 10 These...stop 035, Waltham, MA 02454 (radams@brandeis.edu). DOI: 10.1097/ HTR .0b013e318268db94 Copyright © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S

  17. Substance Use and Mental Health Trends among U.S. Military Active Duty Personnel: Key Findings from the 2008 DoD Health Behavior Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    marijuana or hashish, cocaine. LSD, PCP. MDMA , other hallucino- gens, methamphetamine, heroin, GHB/GBL, and inhalants. Prescription drugs included...dayB. Any Illinit Dmg LJsp inRluning Prèsf.nptinn Drug K îsiLsa = »sa nt manjuana cocaine (including crackl, hallucinogens (PCP WDA MDMA and othet...S. bartnlurates/sedaiivas. orpain wlievers Illiril nn [Isp. F^i:lnili = use o( marijuana, cocaine ¡including Crack), hallucinpgens (PCP. MDA, MDMA

  18. Worldwide U.S. Active Duty Military Deaths: Alphabetical Index by Name, (Aakhus Daniel Joseph - Zysk Carol Rose), October 1, 1979 thru September 30, 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    ezw "w - - 4 0~-.c w C in x m -i an 3 - 0~ a~ wO "J x4 z) Oz ’j w O InOz C)>x a .4, e W (A l0 0 0 I-I LLW4 > - I-)I > ;- )I- aa- )I- 3 02-:- o...cc, 0 000w w z LIwz -J )-IJ-J WO0 C.0h )-4 LZ W’LiZ -J- Q de Iat~ i 0~4 4 1 x4~ ILZ ZZ Z14 U 0 L-.J EZW w P4 LL. LL. LL. z z z>-~ w 0000004ɜw4444ɜ

  19. Worldwide U.S. Active Duty Military Deaths, Alphabetical Index by Name. Part 2 (LE BLANK WENDELL JOHN - ZYSK CAROL ROSE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Z aZ w _1-- 3 ix u . LU w3 .<C ZUJx iZwO W(0 0 w4w-t I-- o:~ -i w z z w .I-mo 3c w4>0EI- ’Wi 1- :0 N 02~ W 0 I (0 w u -i~~~~~~~~ -i ac . ŗ O 00 1D : w...iw c 0. & -in2z WZ(D x > WP-,1Ř"-" 0-1 (A0>- WU ezw m 0 :3LU -i n > m D W- C /)0Z - W Z: >0 < 14 cc "- < < w w x m " w w 0--- U 4Z Ŕ O -l, w 4- -L

  20. The Health Status of Women in the Military: An Epidemiologic Study of Active-Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel, Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    Swan, S.H. (1992). Moderate maternal and paternal alcohol consumption and the risk of spontaneous abortion. Epidemiology, 3, 364-370. Windham, G.C...produce a viable embryo or fetus. Maternal factors affecting the length of pregnancy include exposure to organic solvents (Lindbohm, Taskinen, Sallmen...version of the DIS, the Quick DIS is a self-contained computer program and is considerably shorter than the parent version. Thus, training was greatly

  1. A Multisite Study of the Relationships between Blast Exposures and Symptom Reporting in a Post-Deployment Active Duty Military Population with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kelly J.; Lange, Rael T.; Cooper, Douglas B.; Tate, David F.; Bailie, Jason; Brickell, Tracey A.; French, Louis M.; Asmussen, Sarah; Kennedy, Jan E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Explosive devices have been the most frequent cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among deployed contemporary U.S. service members. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of previous cumulative blast exposures (that did or did not result in TBI) on later post-concussion and post-traumatic symptom reporting after sustaining a mild TBI (MTBI). Participants were 573 service members who sustained MTBI divided into four groups by number of blast exposures (1, 2, 3, and 4–10) and a nonblast control group. Post-concussion symptoms were measured using the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms using the Post-traumatic Checklist-Civilian version (PCL-C). Results show groups significantly differed on total NSI scores (p<0.001), where symptom endorsement increased as number of reported blast exposures increased. Total NSI scores were significantly higher for the 3– and 4–10 blast groups compared with the 1- and 2-blast groups with effect sizes ranging from small to moderate (d=0.31 to 0.63). After controlling for PTSD symptoms using the PCL-C total score, NSI total score differences remained between the 4–10-blast group and the 1- and 2-blast groups, but were less pronounced (d=0.35 and d=0.24, respectively). Analyses of NSI subscale scores using PCL-C scores as a covariate revealed significant between-blast group differences on cognitive, sensory, and somatic, but not affective symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that cumulative blast exposures accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance in total NSI scores (4.8%; p=0.009) and total PCL-C scores (2.3%; p<0.001). Among service members exposed to blast, post-concussion symptom reporting increased as a function of cumulative blast exposures. Future research will need to determine the relationship between cumulative blast exposures, symptom reporting, and neuropathological changes. PMID:25036531

  2. The preparation of three selenium-containing Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides: Characterization and anti-tumor activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Sun, Xiaoli; Gao, Hui; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, three fractions of selenized Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides (SeCPS) named SeCPS- I, SeCPS- II and SeCPS- III were isolated and purified by ultra-filtration. Their selenium content were measured as 541.3, 863.7 and 623.3μg/g respectively by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. The monosaccharide comformation analysis showed that they were mainly consisted of D-Mannose, D-Glucose, and D-Galactose in mole ratios of 1:7.63:0.83, 1:1.34:0.31 and 1:3.77:0.41 respectively. Their structure characteristics were compared by IFR and NMR spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Congo red (CR) spectrophotometric method were used to investigate their morphological characteristics and conformational transition. SeCPS-II showed the strongest anti-tumor effects judging from the result of in vitro anti-tumor assays against two tumor cell lines (hepatocellular carcinoma HepG-2 cells and lung adenocarcinom A549 cells).

  3. Synthesis, characterization and antioxidant activity of selenium polysaccharide from Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Liu, Fei; Gao, Hui; Sun, Huiqing; Meng, Meng; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2016-12-01

    A purified selenium-containing derivatives of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharide synthesized using H2SeO3/HNO3 and BaCl2 as a catalyst was investigated in this paper. The reaction condition was optimized by selecting different reaction temperature and period. Afterward, the one with the highest Se content was purified by ultra-filtration device with a molecular cut off size of 10KDa. Followed by its structural characterizations. Results of IFR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy indicated that C-6 substitution was predominant in selenized polysaccharide. The modified polysaccharide with molecular weight of 1998 KDa was mainly consisted of mannose, glucose and galactose in the mole ratios of with the mole ratios of 1:28.63:1.41. Thermogravimetric and morphological analyses of the samples were carried out by AFS, SEM and AFM. In addition, the in vitro antioxidant results suggested that selenium-containing polysaccharide should be applied as a novel selenium source in dietary supplements, with potent antioxidant properties.

  4. The Impact of Environment and Occupation on the Health and Safety of Active Duty Air Force Members - Database Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    abuse, and physical altercations), high-risk sexual behavior (e.g., unprotected sexual intercourse), and physical health issues, such as high blood... sexual activity questions (section 12- reproductive ) PHA Sexually transmitted disease Sponsor ID (SSN), dependent status, DOB, sponsor pay grade...based on encounters and responses. The requested Health Assessment data consisted of specific information relating to tobacco, alcohol, and sexual

  5. Comparing learning environments in U.S. military officer educational settings: a field test.

    PubMed

    Schumm, Walter R; Turek, David E; Jones, Kenneth D

    2003-06-01

    U.S. Army field grade officers who had attended two military schools evaluated two learning environments. For a majority of variables studied, the subjects reported higher satisfaction with institutional support at Fort Leavenworth as opposed to the other site. Satisfaction with that institutional report was strongly related to satisfaction with lodging used (hotels), quality of instruction, and the culture of an active duty installation. Most of the subjects (72-82%) expressed a preference for attending the Command and General Staff College course at Fort Leavenworth, if given a choice.

  6. Outcomes of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in the Context of Universal Access to Healthcare: The U.S. Military HIV Natural History Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-27

    Hepatitis C virus ( HCV ) co- infection was defined as having at least one positive HCV antibody test. ARV use referred to any antiretroviral ther...Factors associated with higher mor- tality included non-active duty status, lower CD4 count at HAART initiation, higher VL at HAART initiation, HCV ...clinical and immunologic outcomes as well as a higher likelihood of VS (data not shown), no difference was found with time to VF. Marconi et al. AIDS

  7. Military Exposures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Military Sexual Trauma Radiation Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Weapons Cold Injury Hearing Impairment Visual Impairment Former Prisoners ... Categories Chemicals (Agent Orange, contaminated water…) Radiation (nuclear weapons, X-rays…) Air Pollutants (burn pit smoke, dust…) ...

  8. A direct protein kinase B-targeted anti-inflammatory activity of cordycepin from artificially cultured fruit body of Cordyceps militaris

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ju Young; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Geum Soog; Lee, Seung Eun; Lee, Dae Young; Choi, Je Hun; Kim, Seung Yu; Park, Hyun Bong; Sung, Gi-Ho; Lee, Kang Ro; Cho, Jae Youl; Noh, Hyung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cordyceps militaris is one of well-known medicinal mushrooms with anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, and anti-obesity activities. Objective: The objective of the following study is to isolate chemical components from the ethanol extract (Cm-EE) from Cordyceps militaris and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory activities. Materials and Methods: Column chromatographic separation was performed and anti-inflammatory roles of these compounds were also examined by using NO production and protein kinase B (AKT) activity assays. Results: From Cm-EE, 13 constituents, including trehalose (1), cordycepin (2), 6-hydroxyethyladenosine (3), nicotinic amide (4), butyric acid (5), β-dimorphecolic acid (6), α-dimorphecolic acid (7), palmitic acid (8), linoleic acid (9), cordycepeptide A (10), 4-(2-hydroxy-3-((9E,12E)-octadeca-9,12-dienoyloxy)propoxy)-2-(trimethylammonio)butanoate (11), 4-(2-hydroxy-3-(palmitoyloxy)propoxy)-2-(trimethylammonio)butanoate (12), and linoleic acid methyl ester (13) were isolated. Of these components, compound 2 displayed a significant inhibitory effect on NO production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, this compound strongly and directly suppressed the kinase activity of AKT, an essential signalling enzyme in LPS-induced NO production, by interacting with its ATP binding site. Conclusion: C. militaris could have anti-inflammatory activity mediated by cordycepin-induced suppression of AKT. PMID:26246722

  9. Early-onset Infectious Complications among Penetrating and Severe Closed Traumatic Brain Injury in Active Duty Deployed during OIF and OEF, 2008-2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Military traumatic brain injury and spinal column injury: 5-year study of the impact of blast and other military grade weaponry on the central...seizures, hydrocephalus, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leaks, infections inside the skull, vascular injuries, and cranial nerve injuries. 9-11 The...Infectious complications were a subset of medical complications grouped by type of infection (systemic, cerebral spinal fluid, pneumonia, fungal, and other

  10. Further Development of the Assessment of Military Multitasking Performance: Iterative Reliability Testing

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Karen L.; Radomski, Mary V.; Finkelstein, Marsha; Cecchini, Amy S.; Davidson, Leslie F.; Heaton, Kristin J.; Smith, Laurel B.; Scherer, Matthew R.

    2017-01-01

    The Assessment of Military Multitasking Performance (AMMP) is a battery of functional dual-tasks and multitasks based on military activities that target known sensorimotor, cognitive, and exertional vulnerabilities after concussion/mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The AMMP was developed to help address known limitations in post concussive return to duty assessment and decision making. Once validated, the AMMP is intended for use in combination with other metrics to inform duty-readiness decisions in Active Duty Service Members following concussion. This study used an iterative process of repeated interrater reliability testing and feasibility feedback to drive modifications to the 9 tasks of the original AMMP which resulted in a final version of 6 tasks with metrics that demonstrated clinically acceptable ICCs of > 0.92 (range of 0.92–1.0) for the 3 dual tasks and > 0.87 (range 0.87–1.0) for the metrics of the 3 multitasks. Three metrics involved in recording subject errors across 2 tasks did not achieve ICCs above 0.85 set apriori for multitasks (0.64) and above 0.90 set for dual-tasks (0.77 and 0.86) and were not used for further analysis. This iterative process involved 3 phases of testing with between 13 and 26 subjects, ages 18–42 years, tested in each phase from a combined cohort of healthy controls and Service Members with mTBI. Study findings support continued validation of this assessment tool to provide rehabilitation clinicians further return to duty assessment methods robust to ceiling effects with strong face validity to injured Warriors and their leaders. PMID:28056045

  11. Humoral Immunity to Primary Smallpox Vaccination: Impact of Childhood versus Adult Immunization on Vaccinia Vector Vaccine Development in Military Populations.

    PubMed

    Slike, Bonnie M; Creegan, Matthew; Marovich, Mary; Ngauy, Viseth

    2017-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia virus has been shown to be a safe and immunogenic vector platform for delivery of HIV vaccines. Use of this vector is of particular importance to the military, with the implementation of a large scale smallpox vaccination campaign in 2002 in active duty and key civilian personnel in response to potential bioterrorist activities. Humoral immunity to smallpox vaccination was previously shown to be long lasting (up to 75 years) and protective. However, using vaccinia-vectored vaccine delivery for other diseases on a background of anti-vector antibodies (i.e. pre-existing immunity) may limit their use as a vaccine platform, especially in the military. In this pilot study, we examined the durability of vaccinia antibody responses in adult primary vaccinees in a healthy military population using a standard ELISA assay and a novel dendritic cell neutralization assay. We found binding and neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to vaccinia waned after 5-10 years in a group of 475 active duty military, born after 1972, who were vaccinated as adults with Dryvax®. These responses decreased from a geometric mean titer (GMT) of 250 to baseline (<20) after 10-20 years post vaccination. This contrasted with a comparator group of adults, ages 35-49, who were vaccinated with Dryvax® as children. In the childhood vaccinees, titers persisted for >30 years with a GMT of 210 (range 112-3234). This data suggests limited durability of antibody responses in adult vaccinees compared to those vaccinated in childhood and further that adult vaccinia recipients may benefit similarly from receipt of a vaccinia based vaccine as those who are vaccinia naïve. Our findings may have implications for the smallpox vaccination schedule and support the ongoing development of this promising viral vector in a military vaccination program.

  12. Humoral Immunity to Primary Smallpox Vaccination: Impact of Childhood versus Adult Immunization on Vaccinia Vector Vaccine Development in Military Populations

    PubMed Central

    Slike, Bonnie M.; Creegan, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia virus has been shown to be a safe and immunogenic vector platform for delivery of HIV vaccines. Use of this vector is of particular importance to the military, with the implementation of a large scale smallpox vaccination campaign in 2002 in active duty and key civilian personnel in response to potential bioterrorist activities. Humoral immunity to smallpox vaccination was previously shown to be long lasting (up to 75 years) and protective. However, using vaccinia-vectored vaccine delivery for other diseases on a background of anti-vector antibodies (i.e. pre-existing immunity) may limit their use as a vaccine platform, especially in the military. In this pilot study, we examined the durability of vaccinia antibody responses in adult primary vaccinees in a healthy military population using a standard ELISA assay and a novel dendritic cell neutralization assay. We found binding and neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to vaccinia waned after 5–10 years in a group of 475 active duty military, born after 1972, who were vaccinated as adults with Dryvax®. These responses decreased from a geometric mean titer (GMT) of 250 to baseline (<20) after 10–20 years post vaccination. This contrasted with a comparator group of adults, ages 35–49, who were vaccinated with Dryvax® as children. In the childhood vaccinees, titers persisted for >30 years with a GMT of 210 (range 112–3234). This data suggests limited durability of antibody responses in adult vaccinees compared to those vaccinated in childhood and further that adult vaccinia recipients may benefit similarly from receipt of a vaccinia based vaccine as those who are vaccinia naïve. Our findings may have implications for the smallpox vaccination schedule and support the ongoing development of this promising viral vector in a military vaccination program. PMID:28046039

  13. Health impact of US military service in a large population-based military cohort: findings of the Millennium Cohort Study, 2001-2008

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Combat-intense, lengthy, and multiple deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan have characterized the new millennium. The US military's all-volunteer force has never been better trained and technologically equipped to engage enemy combatants in multiple theaters of operations. Nonetheless, concerns over potential lasting effects of deployment on long-term health continue to mount and are yet to be elucidated. This report outlines how findings from the first 7 years of the Millennium Cohort Study have helped to address health concerns related to military service including deployments. Methods The Millennium Cohort Study was designed in the late 1990s to address veteran and public concerns for the first time using prospectively collected health and behavioral data. Results Over 150 000 active-duty, reserve, and National Guard personnel from all service branches have enrolled, and more than 70% of the first 2 enrollment panels submitted at least 1 follow-up survey. Approximately half of the Cohort has deployed in support of operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Conclusion The Millennium Cohort Study is providing prospective data that will guide public health policymakers for years to come by exploring associations between military exposures and important health outcomes. Strategic studies aim to identify, reduce, and prevent adverse health outcomes that may be associated with military service, including those related to deployment. PMID:21281496

  14. After the parade: military nurses' reintegration experiences from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Mary Ellen; Scannell-Desch, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to describe reintegration experiences of U.S. military nurses returning from deployments in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. A qualitative study using a phenomenological method was conducted. The population comprised nurses who served in the U.S. Army, Navy, or Air Force in Iraq or Afghanistan during 2003-2013, including Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve nurses. Purposive sampling with Veteran and professional nursing organizations yielded a sample of 35 nurses. Nine themes emerged from analysis: (a) homecoming; (b) renegotiating roles; (c) painful memories of trauma; (d) getting help; (e) needing a clinical change of scenery; (f) petty complaints and trivial whining; (g) military unit or civilian job: support versus lack of support; (h) family and social networks: support versus lack of support; and (i) reintegration: a new normal.

  15. 20 CFR 212.2 - Military service defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Military service defined. 212.2 Section 212.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT MILITARY SERVICE § 212.2 Military service defined. Military service is the performance of active service by an...

  16. 20 CFR 212.3 - Crediting of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crediting of military service. 212.3 Section... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.3 Crediting of military service. In determining an individual's entitlement to an... of a calendar month during which the individual was in the active military service of the...

  17. 20 CFR 212.2 - Military service defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Military service defined. 212.2 Section 212.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT MILITARY SERVICE § 212.2 Military service defined. Military service is the performance of active service by an...

  18. 20 CFR 212.2 - Military service defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Military service defined. 212.2 Section 212.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT MILITARY SERVICE § 212.2 Military service defined. Military service is the performance of active service by an...

  19. 20 CFR 212.2 - Military service defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Military service defined. 212.2 Section 212.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT MILITARY SERVICE § 212.2 Military service defined. Military service is the performance of active service by an...

  20. 20 CFR 212.3 - Crediting of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Crediting of military service. 212.3 Section... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.3 Crediting of military service. In determining an individual's entitlement to an... of a calendar month during which the individual was in the active military service of the...