Science.gov

Sample records for active military service

  1. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Top-Line Estimates for Active-Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    SEXUAL ASSAULT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE U.S. MILITARY Top-Line Estimates for Active -Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace...SUBTITLE Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Top-Line Estimates for Active -Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace...and Tables Figures 1. Estimated Percentage of Active -Duty Service Men and Women Who Experienced Unwanted Sexual Contact in the Past Year, as

  2. 38 CFR 3.7 - Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. 3.7 Section 3.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Indemnity Compensation General § 3.7 Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military... military, naval, or air service: (a) Aerial transportation of mail (Pub. L. 140, 73d Congress). Persons...

  3. Military Deployments and Mental Health Utilization Among Spouses of Active Duty Service Members.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Todd C; Kum, Hye-Chung; Dabney, Alan; Wells, Rebecca

    2016-10-01

    Since the onset of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan attention has increased on the importance of mental health with military service members. An integral component, although far less studied, are the ties between mental health and military spouses. Military deployments place considerable stress on military families. This study analyzed the mental health utilization of military spouses of active duty service members assigned to an aircraft carrier between 2011 and 2014. A negative binomial generalized estimating equation was used to examine the rate of change in mental health utilization over time against various deployment phases. Associations emerged between select deployment phases (i.e., deployment 1, between deployments, deployment 2) with increases in mental health utilization ranging between 12% and 20% for military spouses. This study demonstrated, for military spouses, the in between deployment phase has associations with mental health utilization rates similar to actual deployed periods. As a result, military leaders should continue to monitor the well-being of their service members' families throughout all deployment phases.

  4. 38 CFR 3.7 - Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. 3.7 Section 3.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Indemnity Compensation General § 3.7 Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. The following individuals and groups are considered to have performed...

  5. 38 CFR 3.7 - Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. 3.7 Section 3.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Indemnity Compensation General § 3.7 Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. The following individuals and groups are considered to have performed...

  6. 38 CFR 3.7 - Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. 3.7 Section 3.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Indemnity Compensation General § 3.7 Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. The following individuals and groups are considered to have performed...

  7. 38 CFR 3.7 - Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. 3.7 Section 3.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Indemnity Compensation General § 3.7 Individuals and groups considered to have performed active military, naval, or air service. The following individuals and groups are considered to have performed...

  8. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  9. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  10. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  11. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  12. 20 CFR 212.5 - Verification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Verification of military service. 212.5... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.5 Verification of military service. Military service may be verified by the... armed forces that shows the beginning and ending dates of the individual's active military service; or...

  13. 77 FR 65707 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... Certification of Military or Naval Service, Form Number N-426; Extension, Without Change, of a Currently... Certification of Military or Naval Service. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the... collected through Form N-426 to request a verification of the military or naval service claim by...

  14. 78 FR 8183 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Certification of Military or Naval Service, Form N-426; Extension, Without Change, of a Currently Approved... Certification of Military or Naval Service. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the... collected through Form N-426 to request a verification of the military or naval service claim by...

  15. 20 CFR 212.2 - Military service defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Military service defined. 212.2 Section 212.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT MILITARY SERVICE § 212.2 Military service defined. Military service is the performance of active service by an...

  16. 20 CFR 212.2 - Military service defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Military service defined. 212.2 Section 212.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT MILITARY SERVICE § 212.2 Military service defined. Military service is the performance of active service by an...

  17. 20 CFR 212.2 - Military service defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Military service defined. 212.2 Section 212.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT MILITARY SERVICE § 212.2 Military service defined. Military service is the performance of active service by an...

  18. 20 CFR 212.2 - Military service defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Military service defined. 212.2 Section 212.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT MILITARY SERVICE § 212.2 Military service defined. Military service is the performance of active service by an...

  19. 20 CFR 212.2 - Military service defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Military service defined. 212.2 Section 212.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT MILITARY SERVICE § 212.2 Military service defined. Military service is the performance of active service by an...

  20. 20 CFR 212.3 - Crediting of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crediting of military service. 212.3 Section... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.3 Crediting of military service. In determining an individual's entitlement to an... of a calendar month during which the individual was in the active military service of the...

  1. 20 CFR 212.3 - Crediting of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Crediting of military service. 212.3 Section... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.3 Crediting of military service. In determining an individual's entitlement to an... of a calendar month during which the individual was in the active military service of the...

  2. 20 CFR 212.3 - Crediting of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Crediting of military service. 212.3 Section... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.3 Crediting of military service. In determining an individual's entitlement to an... of a calendar month during which the individual was in the active military service of the...

  3. 20 CFR 212.3 - Crediting of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Crediting of military service. 212.3 Section... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.3 Crediting of military service. In determining an individual's entitlement to an... of a calendar month during which the individual was in the active military service of the...

  4. 20 CFR 212.3 - Crediting of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Crediting of military service. 212.3 Section... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.3 Crediting of military service. In determining an individual's entitlement to an... of a calendar month during which the individual was in the active military service of the...

  5. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  6. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  7. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  8. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  9. 20 CFR 404.111 - When we consider a person fully insured based on World War II active military or naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... on World War II active military or naval service. 404.111 Section 404.111 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL... War II active military or naval service. We consider that a person, who was not otherwise fully... States during World War II; (b) The person died within three years after separation from service...

  10. Masturbation and its relationship to sexual activities of young males in Korean military service.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y J; Lee, W H; Rha, K H; Xin, Z C; Choi, Y D; Choi, H K

    2000-04-01

    This study examined the masturbatory experiences and other sexual activities of young Korean males in military service. The actual status of masturbation and its relationship to sexual activity questionnaire. A total of 1,212 young males among military personnel in Korea were interviewed with sexuality questionnaires on masturbation, sexual intercourse and personal characteristics. We divided these subjects into four groups according to the age of initiation of masturbation and analyzed the relationship between masturbation and other sexual activities. The mean age of subjects was 22.03 +/- 1.22 (19-27) years. The percentage of men who reported ever having masturbated was 98.1% (1189/1212) and the average age of initiation of masturbation was 14.26 +/- 1.66 years. So we divided 1,212 males into four groups on the basis of the average age below and above one standard deviation. Overall, 67.7% (821/1212) had experienced sexual intercourse, and significantly, the earlier the initiation age of masturbation, the higher the coitus rate in each group (p < 0.05). About 21.5% of the men who were not virgins had experienced their first sexual intercourse with prostitutes. The mean age of first coitus, the incidence of sexually transmitted disease (STD) and the frequency of masturbation were closely linked to the initiation age of masturbation, respectively (p < 0.05). A masturbatory guilt feeling was seen in about 10.9% (132/1212) and there was no significant difference according to the types of religious worship (p = 0.227). On the basis of this study, sexual activities generally increased accordingly as the beginning of masturbation was earlier. Coital incidence in this study was 67.7% for young males in Korean military service, and 21.5% of them had their first sexual intercourse with prostitutes. Prostitution still plays an important role in the sexual lives of males in Korea. The incidence of STD was over 10% and homosexual manifestation was seen in 1.07% of subjects

  11. Active-duty military service members’ visual representations of PTSD and TBI in masks

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Melissa S.; Kaimal, Girija; Gonzaga, Adele M. L.; Myers-Coffman, Katherine A.; DeGraba, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Active-duty military service members have a significant risk of sustaining physical and psychological trauma resulting in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Within an interdisciplinary treatment approach at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence, service members participated in mask making during art therapy sessions. This study presents an analysis of the mask-making experiences of service members (n = 370) with persistent symptoms from combat- and mission-related TBI, PTSD, and other concurrent mood issues. Data sources included mask images and therapist notes collected over a five-year period. The data were coded and analyzed using grounded theory methods. Findings indicated that mask making offered visual representations of the self related to individual personhood, relationships, community, and society. Imagery themes referenced the injury, relational supports/losses, identity transitions/questions, cultural metaphors, existential reflections, and conflicted sense of self. These visual insights provided an increased understanding of the experiences of service members, facilitating their recovery.

  12. New Sources of Active Duty Military Personnel: The Prior Service Accessions Pool.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    reverse aide it necessry a"d identify by block nmrber) See Reverse Side DO I J’AN75, 1473 EDITION OF INOV 48 1SOSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY...nurse 926 91E 91 Dental Dental hygienist 081 Specialist 94B 94 Food Service Cook, cafeteria 912 Specialist Food service worker 916 95B 95 Military police...houising, subs idized food prices, etc. ). It t heit ad ’justs the new f igure for di fferences in the tax treatment o~f m ili tary an~d cmvilIian

  13. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  14. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  15. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... Satisfied by June 30, 1997 § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior to that date, credit for military...

  16. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  17. 5 CFR 831.301 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military service. 831.301 Section 831.301...) RETIREMENT Credit for Service § 831.301 Military service. (a) Service of an individual who first became an... is not receiving military retired pay awarded for reasons other than (i) service-connected...

  18. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  19. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  20. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  1. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  2. 5 CFR 842.306 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Military service. 842.306 Section 842.306... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.306 Military service. (a) Except as...' Retirement System Act of 1986, an employee's or Member's military service is creditable if it was...

  3. 5 CFR 842.306 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military service. 842.306 Section 842.306... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.306 Military service. (a) Except as...' Retirement System Act of 1986, an employee's or Member's military service is creditable if it was...

  4. 5 CFR 842.306 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military service. 842.306 Section 842.306... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.306 Military service. (a) Except as...' Retirement System Act of 1986, an employee's or Member's military service is creditable if it was...

  5. 5 CFR 842.306 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military service. 842.306 Section 842.306... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.306 Military service. (a) Except as...' Retirement System Act of 1986, an employee's or Member's military service is creditable if it was...

  6. 5 CFR 842.306 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military service. 842.306 Section 842.306... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Credit for Service § 842.306 Military service. (a) Except as...' Retirement System Act of 1986, an employee's or Member's military service is creditable if it was...

  7. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS Split Benefits § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior...

  8. 31 CFR 29.333 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military service. 29.333 Section 29... CERTAIN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RETIREMENT PROGRAMS Split Benefits § 29.333 Military service. (a) For employees who entered on duty on or before June 30, 1997, and whose military service was performed prior...

  9. Military Service, Race, and the Transition to Marriage and Cohabitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Study of Youth, the author investigates the relationship between military service and the transition to the first intimate union. The author argues that active-duty military service promotes marriage over cohabitation. The results are consistent with this argument, showing that active-duty members of…

  10. 20 CFR 212.4 - Periods of creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Periods of creditable military service. 212.4... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.4 Periods of creditable military service. In order for military service to be... may be credited with the service if: (1) They were in military service on December 31, 1946, or...

  11. 20 CFR 212.4 - Periods of creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Periods of creditable military service. 212.4... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.4 Periods of creditable military service. In order for military service to be... may be credited with the service if: (1) They were in military service on December 31, 1946, or...

  12. 20 CFR 212.4 - Periods of creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Periods of creditable military service. 212.4... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.4 Periods of creditable military service. In order for military service to be... may be credited with the service if: (1) They were in military service on December 31, 1946, or...

  13. 20 CFR 212.4 - Periods of creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Periods of creditable military service. 212.4... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.4 Periods of creditable military service. In order for military service to be... may be credited with the service if: (1) They were in military service on December 31, 1946, or...

  14. 20 CFR 212.4 - Periods of creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Periods of creditable military service. 212.4... MILITARY SERVICE § 212.4 Periods of creditable military service. In order for military service to be... may be credited with the service if: (1) They were in military service on December 31, 1946, or...

  15. Is rest after concussion "the best medicine?": recommendations for activity resumption following concussion in athletes, civilians, and military service members.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Noah D; Iverson, Grant L

    2013-01-01

    Practice guidelines universally recommend an initial period of rest for people who sustain a sports-related concussion or mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in daily life or military service. This practice is difficult to reconcile with the compelling evidence that other health conditions can be worsened by inactivity and improved by early mobilization and exercise. We review the scientific basis for the recommendation to rest after MTBI, the challenges and potential unintended negative consequences of implementing it, and how patient management could be improved by refining it. The best available evidence suggests that complete rest exceeding 3 days is probably not helpful, gradual resumption of preinjury activities should begin as soon as tolerated (with the exception of activities that have a high MTBI exposure risk), and supervised exercise may benefit patients with persistent symptoms.

  16. [Surgical activity at the military health service antenna during the Turquoise operation in Rwanda June-August 1994].

    PubMed

    Pons, F; Rigal, S; Dupeyron, C; de Saint-Julien, J

    1996-01-01

    The military health service provided a surgery antenna during the two months of the Turquoise operation in Zaire and Rwanda. During this period, the antenna functioned as a back-up station for the French troop and the local populations subjected to various conditions: Rwanda refugees who had escaped the massacres, subjects wounded by canon shots, war wounds, surgery emergencies in the refugee population. There were 315 operations performed including 33% in children and 70% for lesions of the limbs. The activity during the mission was analyzed on the basis of strategy for surgical diagnosis and treatment under local conditions (lack of complementary examinations, limited number of personnel, disrupted families in the refugee population, no possibility for transfer, major cholera and dysentery epidemic...).

  17. A Need to Address Illiteracy Problems in the Military Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    To determine the effects of deficient reading skills in the military service, researchers met with military and civilian officials from four recruit training centers, major research activities personnel, and the commands accountable for education and training. Next, questionnaires were sent to fifteen recruit training centers to obtain data on the…

  18. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... include participation in a military reserve or the National Guard unless the borrower is called to active... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military...

  19. 5 CFR 332.322 - Persons who lost eligibility because of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... military service. 332.322 Section 332.322 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Eligibility Restoration of Eligibility § 332.322 Persons who lost eligibility because of military service. (a... date of his entrance on active military duty, exclusive of any additional service imposed pursuant...

  20. 20 CFR 226.61 - Use of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of military service. 226.61 Section 226... § 226.61 Use of military service. (a) Claim for use of military service. An employee is deemed to have filed a claim for the use of military service and earnings as service and compensation under...

  1. 20 CFR 226.61 - Use of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Use of military service. 226.61 Section 226.61... Use of military service. (a) Claim for use of military service. An employee is deemed to have filed a claim for the use of military service and earnings as service and compensation under the...

  2. 20 CFR 226.61 - Use of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Use of military service. 226.61 Section 226.61... Use of military service. (a) Claim for use of military service. An employee is deemed to have filed a claim for the use of military service and earnings as service and compensation under the...

  3. Models Used by the Military Services to Develop Budgets for Activities Associated with Operational Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Request 27.6 23.9 12.0 15.3 78.8 Percentage Modeled 69 76 94 26 67 All Services The facilit operations that the se to that fun Corps do the Army...FunctionsMiscellaneousMaintenanceand Training Facilities Depending o roughly 45 pe requests for o models by fun nance, faciliti functions, op dollar amoun eled, and the...the length of the line at the dining hall). The Navy and the Army determine the amount and quality of services they will provide and multiply that

  4. 5 CFR 846.303 - Crediting military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Crediting military service. 846.303... Become Subject to FERS § 846.303 Crediting military service. (a) Military service performed before the... paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. (b) Military service described in paragraph (a) of this section...

  5. 20 CFR 226.61 - Use of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... her family would receive higher total benefits than if the military service were credited under the... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of military service. 226.61 Section 226... § 226.61 Use of military service. (a) Claim for use of military service. An employee is deemed to...

  6. 20 CFR 226.61 - Use of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... her family would receive higher total benefits than if the military service were credited under the... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Use of military service. 226.61 Section 226... § 226.61 Use of military service. (a) Claim for use of military service. An employee is deemed to...

  7. 5 CFR 846.303 - Crediting military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Crediting military service. 846.303... Become Subject to FERS § 846.303 Crediting military service. (a) Military service performed before the... paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. (b) Military service described in paragraph (a) of this section...

  8. 5 CFR 846.303 - Crediting military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Crediting military service. 846.303... Become Subject to FERS § 846.303 Crediting military service. (a) Military service performed before the... paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. (b) Military service described in paragraph (a) of this section...

  9. 5 CFR 846.303 - Crediting military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Crediting military service. 846.303... Become Subject to FERS § 846.303 Crediting military service. (a) Military service performed before the... paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. (b) Military service described in paragraph (a) of this section...

  10. 5 CFR 846.303 - Crediting military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Crediting military service. 846.303... Become Subject to FERS § 846.303 Crediting military service. (a) Military service performed before the... paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. (b) Military service described in paragraph (a) of this section...

  11. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military...

  12. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military...

  13. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military...

  14. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military...

  15. Addressing Needs of Military Families during Deployment: Military Service Providers' Perceptions of Integrating Support Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Seth Christian Walter

    2011-01-01

    Service providers are increasingly recognizing the need to develop effective methods for delivering supporting services to military families during deployment. Research suggests that military families experience increased levels of stress during the cycle of deployment. Bronfenbrenner (1979) conceptualized the family operating within the context…

  16. 78 FR 22252 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; FFEL/Direct Loan/Perkins Military...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; FFEL/ Direct Loan/Perkins Military Service.../Perkins Military Service Deferment/Post-Active Duty Student Deferment Request & SCRA Request. OMB Control... Number of Annual Burden Hours: 9,177. Abstract: The Military Service/Post-Active Duty Student...

  17. The psychometric properties of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) in a clinical sample of active duty military service members.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Damon; Francis, Joseph P; Tafrate, Raymond Chip

    2005-11-01

    The increasing prominence of the construct of readiness to change in the field of substance abuse treatment has led to the development of instruments designed to assess the construct. We examined the psychometric properties of one such instrument, the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), in a sample of treatment-seeking, active duty, U.S. military service members diagnosed with alcohol and/or drug dependence. A principal components analysis of the items was consistent with the tridimensional structure of the SOCRATES found among treatment-seeking civilians but resulted in a 14-item scale, as opposed to the 19-item version found for civilians. Normative data, in the form of means and decile rankings for the SOCRATES subscales, for substance-dependent military patients are provided to complement those available for civilian patients. Future research should examine the concurrent and predictive validity of the scale.

  18. Impact of Transcendental Meditation on Psychotropic Medication Use Among Active Duty Military Service Members With Anxiety and PTSD.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Vernon A; Monto, Andrea; Williams, Jennifer J; Rigg, John L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether the regular practice of Transcendental Meditation (TM) decreased the need for psychotropic medications required for anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) management and increased psychological wellbeing. The sample included 74 military Service Members with documented PTSD or anxiety disorder not otherwise specified (ADNOS), 37 that practiced TM and 37 that did not. At 1 month, 83.7% of the TM group stabilized, decreased, or ceased medications and 10.8% increased medication dosage; compared with 59.4% of controls that showed stabilizations, decreases, or cessations; and 40.5% that increased medications (p < 0.03). A similar pattern was observed after 2 (p < 0.27), 3 (p < 0.002), and 6 months (p < 0.34). Notably, there was a 20.5% difference between groups in severity of psychological symptoms after 6 months, that is, the control group experienced an increase in symptom severity compared with the group practicing TM. These findings provide insight into the benefits of TM as a viable treatment modality in military treatment facilities for reducing PTSD and ADNOS psychological symptoms and associated medication use.

  19. Economic Returns to Military Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    on subsequent earnings, the short time horizon over which vets could return to school and catchup , and employer discrimination against and societal...the military, drop below those of nonveterans for a brief period after discharge, and then catchup and overtake the earnings of nonveterans thereafter... catchup , and employer discrimination against and societal rejection of Vietnam vets as noted in previous sections of this report. In sum, his studies do not

  20. Status Configurations, Military Service and Higher Education

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Elder, Glen H.; Spence, Naomi J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Armed Forces offer educational and training benefits as incentives for service. This study investigates the influence of status configurations on military enlistment and their link to greater educational opportunity. Three statuses (socioeconomic status of origin, cognitive ability and academic performance) have particular relevance for life course options. We hypothesize that young men with inconsistent statuses are more likely to enlist than men with consistent status profiles, and that military service improves access to college for certain configurations. Analyses of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) show (1. that several status configurations markedly increased the likelihood of military enlistment and (2. within status configurations, recruits were generally more likely to enroll in higher education than nonveterans, with associate degrees being more likely. PMID:24511161

  1. Status Configurations, Military Service and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Elder, Glen H., Jr.; Spence, Naomi J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Armed Forces offer educational and training benefits as incentives for service. This study investigates the influence of status configurations on military enlistment and their link to greater educational opportunity. Three statuses (socioeconomic status of origin, cognitive ability and academic performance) have particular relevance for…

  2. Pathways to Military Service for College Men and Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The handbook provides college students and graduates with summary information about military service opportunities. All officer and enlisted personnel programs are described, along with entrance qualifications and active duty obligations. Officer programs fall into four categories: (1) training programs for undergraduates, which include military…

  3. 34 CFR 674.59 - Cancellation for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cancellation for military service. 674.59 Section 674... Cancellation for military service. (a) Cancellation on a Defense loan. (1) An institution must cancel up to 50... fraction of a year beyond a complete year of service, does not qualify for military cancellation....

  4. 5 CFR 842.307 - Deposits for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deposits for military service. 842.307... Deposits for military service. (a) Eligibility to make a deposit. (1) An employee or Member subject to FERS may make a deposit for any distinct period of military service by filing an application in a...

  5. 38 CFR 7.2 - Certification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Certification of military service. (a) A statement over the signature of the Commanding Officer or a... a certification that the insured is a person in the military service. (b) If the insured is... that the insured is a person in the military service. (Authority 50 U.S.C. app. 547)...

  6. 5 CFR 842.307 - Deposits for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Deposits for military service. 842.307... Deposits for military service. (a) Eligibility to make a deposit. (1) An employee or Member subject to FERS may make a deposit for any distinct period of military service by filing an application in a...

  7. 5 CFR 842.307 - Deposits for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Deposits for military service. 842.307... Deposits for military service. (a) Eligibility to make a deposit. (1) An employee or Member subject to FERS may make a deposit for any distinct period of military service by filing an application in a...

  8. 34 CFR 674.59 - Cancellation for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cancellation for military service. 674.59 Section 674... Cancellation for military service. (a) Cancellation on a Defense loan. (1) An institution must cancel up to 50... fraction of a year beyond a complete year of service, does not qualify for military cancellation....

  9. 5 CFR 842.307 - Deposits for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Deposits for military service. 842.307... Deposits for military service. (a) Eligibility to make a deposit. (1) An employee or Member subject to FERS may make a deposit for any distinct period of military service by filing an application in a...

  10. 5 CFR 842.307 - Deposits for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Deposits for military service. 842.307... Deposits for military service. (a) Eligibility to make a deposit. (1) An employee or Member subject to FERS may make a deposit for any distinct period of military service by filing an application in a...

  11. 34 CFR 674.59 - Cancellation for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cancellation for military service. 674.59 Section 674... Cancellation for military service. (a) Cancellation on a Defense loan. (1) An institution must cancel up to 50... fraction of a year beyond a complete year of service, does not qualify for military cancellation....

  12. GIS interoperability: current activities and military implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Sylvia

    1997-07-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are gaining importance in military operations because of their capability to spatially and visually integrate various kinds of information. In an era of limited resources, geospatial data must be shared efficiently whenever possible. The military-initiated Global Geospatial Information and Services (GGI&S) Project aims at developing the infrastructure for GIS interoperability for the military. Current activities in standardization and new technology have strong implications on the design and development of GGI&S. To facilitate data interoperability at both the national and international levels, standards and specifications in geospatial data sharing are being studied, developed and promoted. Of particular interest to the military community are the activities related to the NATO DIGEST, ISO TC/211 Geomatics standardization and the industry-led Open Geodata Interoperability Specifications (OGIS). Together with new information technology, standardization provides the infrastructure for interoperable GIS for both civilian and military environments. The first part of this paper describes the major activities in standardization. The second part presents the technologies developed at DREV in support of the GGI&S. These include the Open Geospatial Datastore Interface (OGDI) and the geospatial data warehouse. DREV has been working closely with Defence Geomatics and private industry in the research and development of new technology for the GGI&S project.

  13. Updates: Routine screening for antibodies to HIV-1, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components.

    PubMed

    2011-08-01

    During routine testing of civilian applicants for U.S. military service, the overall seroprevalence of antibodies to HIV-1 was lower in 2010 than in any year since 1990. Among members of the active components of the U.S. Army and Air Force, HIV-1 seroprevalences were higher in 2008-2010 than in recent prior years. Among members of the active components of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, the Marine Corps Reserve, and the Army National Guard, HIV-1 seroprevalences have slightly declined or remained relatively stable for at least ten years. In the reserve components of most of the service branches, it is difficult to discern long-term trends because of instability of seroprevalences observed in the relatively small numbers of reserve component members tested each year.

  14. [The Russian Armed Forces Military Medical Service: condition and ways of improvement].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ia

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 the main efforts of the Medical Service were aimed at the following tasks: optimization of management system of military medical service, improvement of medical evacuation system, medical service security for military contingents, assigned according to territory principle to military-medical facilities of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation, implementation of innovations at all stages of medical evacuation in peace- and wartime, security of combat and mobilization readiness of regulatory bodies of the Medical Service, medical military units and military medical facilities, medical service of troops battle training, improvement of material and technical resources, security of regular pharmacy and equipment supply, activation of research work in the Medical Service interests. Lines of military medicine development in 2014 are: transfer of treatment facilities that are not used by the Ministry of Defence into the Federal Biomedical Agency till the end of 2014, prevention of pneumonia and meningitis in military personnel, improvement of early diagnosis system, medical service for military contingents according to territory principle, improvement of diagnostic and treatment work in military-medical units and subunits and military-medical facilities by means of development of material and technical resources, monitor the implementation of innovative diagnostic and treatment technologies, completion of construction projects of central military hospitals and etc.

  15. Report of the Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    that military separation physicals shall include an assessment of sexual trauma, previously disclosed or undisclosed, during active duty service...comply with these standards. Further, SAPRO must be actively engaged in prevention policy development and legislation. Defense Task Force on Sexual ...SAPRO develop training policies and exercise oversight over Military Service training programs. Sexual assault prevention and response training must

  16. 38 CFR 7.2 - Certification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certification of military... Certification of military service. (a) A statement over the signature of the Commanding Officer or a... a certification that the insured is a person in the military service. (b) If the insured...

  17. 38 CFR 7.2 - Certification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certification of military... Certification of military service. (a) A statement over the signature of the Commanding Officer or a... a certification that the insured is a person in the military service. (b) If the insured...

  18. 38 CFR 7.2 - Certification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certification of military... Certification of military service. (a) A statement over the signature of the Commanding Officer or a... a certification that the insured is a person in the military service. (b) If the insured...

  19. 38 CFR 7.2 - Certification of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certification of military... Certification of military service. (a) A statement over the signature of the Commanding Officer or a... a certification that the insured is a person in the military service. (b) If the insured...

  20. 20 CFR 210.6 - Service credited for creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Service credited for creditable military... RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD SERVICE § 210.6 Service credited for creditable military service. Any calendar month in which an employee performed creditable military service, as defined in part 212 of...

  1. 20 CFR 210.6 - Service credited for creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Service credited for creditable military... RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD SERVICE § 210.6 Service credited for creditable military service. Any calendar month in which an employee performed creditable military service, as defined in part 212 of...

  2. 20 CFR 210.6 - Service credited for creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Service credited for creditable military... RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD SERVICE § 210.6 Service credited for creditable military service. Any calendar month in which an employee performed creditable military service, as defined in part 212 of...

  3. 20 CFR 210.6 - Service credited for creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Service credited for creditable military... RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD SERVICE § 210.6 Service credited for creditable military service. Any calendar month in which an employee performed creditable military service, as defined in part 212 of...

  4. [Influence of work factors on health state in personnel servicing military nuclear technical objects].

    PubMed

    Poluboiarinov, V N; Iusov, I G; Ivanchenko, A V; Turlakov, Iu S

    2014-01-01

    Complex of occupational studies and medical, statistical research helped to reveal climate, geographic and other factors influencing health state of personnel servicing military nuclear technical objects. Considering peculiarities of occupational activities in various specialists, the authors specified measures to improve medical service for nuclear technical military officers directly working with nuclear ammunition. Practical application of the measures helped to gain 1.5-1.7 times improvement in morbidity parameters among nuclear technical military officers.

  5. Update: Routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components, January 2011-June 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    This report contains an update through June 2016 of the results of routine screening for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among civilian applicants for military service and among members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces. During the surveillance period, annual seroprevalences among civilian applicants for military service peaked in 2015 (0.31 per 1,000 tested), up 29% from 2014 (0.24 per 1,000 tested). Seroprevalences among Marine Corps reservists, Navy active component service members, and Navy reservists also peaked in 2015. In the Army National Guard and the reserve component of the Marine Corps, full-year seroprevalences have trended upward since 2011. Overall (January 2011-June 2016) seroprevalences were highest for Army reservists, Army National Guard members, Navy active component members, and Navy reservists. Among active and reserve component service members, seroprevalences continue to be higher among Army and Navy members and males than their respective counterparts.

  6. School and College Students' Attitudes toward Military Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevtsov, V. V.

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years there has been a considerable increase in the number of conscientious objectors and people evading military service. In order to make the necessary administrative decisions, organize military and patriotic indoctrination, and provide for professional military fitness it is vital to have knowledge about attitudes toward…

  7. Requirements and applications for robotic servicing of military space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledford, Otto C., Jr.; Bennett, Rodney G.

    1992-01-01

    The utility of on-orbit servicing of spacecraft has been demonstrated by NASA several times using shuttle-based astronaut EVA. There has been interest in utilizing on-orbit servicing for military space systems as well. This interest has been driven by the increasing reliance of all branches of the military upon space-based assets, the growing numbers, complexity, and cost of those assets, and a desire to normalize support policies for space-based operations. Many military satellites are placed in orbits which are unduly hostile for astronaut operations and/or cannot be reached by the shuttle. In addition, some of the projected tasks may involve hazardous operations. This has led to a focus on robotic systems, instead of astronauts, for the basis of projected servicing systems. This paper describes studies and activities which will hopefully lead to on-orbit servicing being one of the tools available to military space systems designers and operators. The utility of various forms of servicing has been evaluated for present and projected systems, critical technologies have been identified, and strategies for the development and insertion of this technology into operational systems have been developed. Many of the projected plans have been adversely affected by budgetary restrictions and evolving architectures, but the fundamental benefits and requirements are well understood. A method of introducing servicing capabilities in a manner which has a low impact on the system designer and does not require the prior development of an expensive infrastructure is discussed. This can potentially lead to an evolutionary implementation of the full technology.

  8. Weight Change Following US Military Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-10

    8217 ’ ’ ’Weight ·.Cha~:~ge Following .US.Milifary Servic~ . Azyson J. Littman· .Isabel G. Jacobson · Edward J. ,Boyko f eresa’ y. ,P~e# Tyler C...Millennium Cohort Study participants by military status (n 38686) Men Characteristics" 07 (%) 02 (%) CSM (%) N 2912 2914 23 008 Birth year 1979 or later...20 27.1 21.5 34.1 21 25 29.7 42.4 18.2 ;;,:26 16.9 17.5 16.6 © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Umited • 3 Women 07 (%) 02 (%) CSM (%) 1088 931 7700

  9. A Study to Develop a Decision Support Model for the Assessment of Needs and Prioritization of Recruitment/Selection Activities Under the Military- Civilian Health Services Partnership Program at Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    physicians within military medical treatment facilities. The model is designed to aid the commander and his supporting staff in the objective...OF THE ARMY US ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT ACTIVITY FORT POLK. LOUISIANA 71459-6000 REPLY TO ATTENTION OF: HSXV-CSD 27 September 1989 MEMORANDUM THRU COL...Relevant Factors . . . . . . . . . . 39 Conduct a Comparative Analysis of Competing Medical Service Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Prioritize

  10. 20 CFR 212.6 - Board's determination for use of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RETIREMENT ACT MILITARY SERVICE § 212.6 Board's determination for use of military service. (a) Military... determine whether an employee's military service should be used as railroad service or as Social Security... does not agree with the Board's determination for use of the employee's military service, the...

  11. UK role 4 military infection services: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Dufty, Ngozi E; Bailey, M S

    2013-09-01

    NATO describes 'Role 4' military medical services as those provided for the definitive care of patients who cannot be treated within a theatre of operations and these are usually located in a military force's country of origin and may include the involvement of civilian medical services. The UK Defence Medical Services have a proud history of developing and providing clinical services in infectious diseases and tropical medicine, sexual health and HIV medicine, and medical microbiology and virology. These UK Role 4 Military Infection Services have adapted well to recent overseas deployments, but new challenges will arise due to current military cutbacks and a greater diversity of contingency operations in the future. Further evidence-based development of these services will require leadership by military clinicians and improved communication and support for 'reach-back' services.

  12. Counseling and Connecting with the Military Undergraduate: The Intersection of Military Service and University Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, Ted C.; Domenici, Paula L.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of military undergraduates at universities are National Guard and Reserve personnel and prior-service military veterans, all difficult to identify on campus. These students face unique cultural challenges. Though the academic literature primarily addresses disability services and administrative programs often focus on "wounded…

  13. Military Drill in the Service of American Hegemony over Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, C. Kalani

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in investigating who have historically served in the American military, particularly during periods of war. These studies report that men from lower socio-economic groups tend to be over represented in military service, especially after voluntary service replaced the draft during the 1970s. Much work remains to…

  14. Military Service in the Vietnam Era and Educational Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Young Men for 1966-81, this study examined the effect of military service on the highest grade of schooling completed. Fixed-effects estimators were used to generate estimates of the effect of military service on the schooling trajectories of veterans and nonveterans that are…

  15. A Life-Course Analysis of Military Service in Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, John Paul; Carter, David E.; Cullen, Francis T.

    2005-01-01

    Prior research demonstrates that military service disconnects men from past social and personal disadvantages and thus potentially alters normal life-course patterns of development. Much of this research, however, has been conducted only with World War II veterans. Relatively few studies have examined the influence of military service in Vietnam…

  16. A systematic review of help-seeking and mental health service utilization among military service members.

    PubMed

    Hom, Melanie A; Stanley, Ian H; Schneider, Matthew E; Joiner, Thomas E

    2017-02-04

    Research has demonstrated that military service members are at elevated risk for a range of psychiatric problems, and mental health services use is a conduit to symptom reduction and remission. Nonetheless, there is a notable underutilization of mental health services in this population. This systematic review aimed to identify and critically examine: (1) rates of service use; (2) barriers and facilitators to care; and (3) programs and interventions designed to enhance willingness to seek care and increase help-seeking behaviors among current military personnel (e.g., active duty, National Guard, Reserve). Overall, 111 peer-reviewed articles were identified for inclusion. Across studies, the rate of past-year service use among service members with mental health problems during the same time frame was 29.3% based on weighted averages. Studies identified common barriers to care (e.g., concerns regarding stigma, career impact) and facilitators to care (e.g., positive attitudes toward treatment, family/friend support, military leadership support) among this population. Although programs (e.g., screening, gatekeeper training) have been developed to reduce these barriers, leverage facilitators, and encourage service use, further research is needed to empirically test the effectiveness of these interventions in increasing rates of service utilization. Critical areas for future research on treatment engagement among this high-risk population are discussed.

  17. [Hygienic characteristics of daily ration, designed for military servicemen doing call-up military service].

    PubMed

    Smagulov, N K; Mukhametzhanov, A M

    2016-01-01

    The article gives the hygienic characteristics of the daily diet of soldiers doing call-up military service. The object of study--military servicemen aged 18-22 years doing call-up military service. The material of the study data was obtained from a continuous cross-sectional study of dietary intake among military personnel. Investigation pointed out that consumption of nutrients and energy value of the surveyed military personnel was broadly in accordance with recommended physiological requirements for nutrients and energy for this age group. However; despite the adequacy of energy supply, showed signs of imbalance on the nutrients of rations provided in the military establishment. Structure of consumption of products is not in full compliance with the existing recommendations of the Kazakh academy of Nutrition.

  18. Stability operations and the implications for military health services support.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C M; Hanhart, N

    2007-03-01

    This paper examines the implications of the new military campaign type--Stability Operations--on military health service support. The paper uses the format of the medical estimate process and shows how the health service support planning factors of Mission Analysis; Ground; Enemy forces; Friendly forces; Time and Space; Security; Casualty Estimate; Medical Command, Control, Communication, Computers and Information (C4I); Medical Capabilities; Medical Force Protection; Medical Logistics; and Medical CBRN are affected by this change. The paper also identifies two new roles for military medical services, assistance to security sector reform and assistance to reconstruction and development. These two new roles will be discussed more fully in later papers.

  19. Professional Military Education. Hearings before the Military Education Panel of the Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress. First Session (February 5, April 17, 24, September 18, November 1, 5, and December 16, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Armed Services.

    This document reports the oral and written statements of persons who testified at congressional hearings on the subject of professional military education. Witnesses included members of Congress, active and reserve military officers from various branches of the armed services, and supervisors of the services' military colleges. Testimony,…

  20. Selective Service and Military Policies on Classification, Deferment, and Delay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dargusch, Carlton S.; Alden, John D.

    This handbook was primarily designed to inform employers of selective service and military policies, so that their responsibilities to the military liability of their employees may be exercised effectively. Six steps were recommended for employers in executing their responsibilities. The information for employers which is issued by the Selective…

  1. Military Service Absences and Family Members’ Mental Health: A Timeline Followback Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Aubrey J.; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-01-01

    Though military service, and particularly absence due to deployment, has been linked to risk for depression and anxiety among some spouses and children of active duty service members, there is limited research to explain the heterogeneity in family members’ reactions to military service stressors. The current investigation introduces the Timeline Followback Military Family Interview (TFMFI) as a clinically useful strategy to collect detailed time-linked information about the service member’s absences. Two dimensions of parent absence—the extent to which absences coincide with important family events and cumulative time absent—were tested as potential risks to family members’ mental health. Data from 70 mother-adolescent pairs revealed that the number of important family events missed by the service member was linked to elevated youth symptoms of depression, even when accounting for the number of deployments and cumulative duration of the service member’s absence. However, youth who reported more frequent contact with the service member during absences were buffered from the effects of extensive absence. Mothers’ symptoms were associated with the cumulative duration of the service members’ time away, but not with family events missed by the service member. These results identify circumstances that increase the risk for mental health symptoms associated with military family life. The TFMFI provides an interview-based strategy for clinicians wishing to understand military family members’ lived experience during periods of service member absence. PMID:26075736

  2. Military service absences and family members' mental health: A timeline followback assessment.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Aubrey J; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-08-01

    Although military service, and particularly absence due to deployment, has been linked to risk for depression and anxiety among some spouses and children of active duty service members, there is limited research to explain the heterogeneity in family members' reactions to military service stressors. The current investigation introduces the Timeline Followback Military Family Interview (TFMFI) as a clinically useful strategy to collect detailed time-linked information about the service member's absences. Two dimensions of parent absence--the extent to which absences coincide with important family events and cumulative time absent--were tested as potential risks to family members' mental health. Data from 70 mother-adolescent pairs revealed that the number of important family events missed by the service member was linked to elevated youth symptoms of depression, even when accounting for the number of deployments and cumulative duration of the service member's absence. However, youth who reported more frequent contact with the service member during absences were buffered from the effects of extensive absence. Mothers' symptoms were associated with the cumulative duration of the service members' time away, but not with family events missed by the service member. These results identify circumstances that increase the risk for mental health symptoms associated with military family life. The TFMFI provides an interview-based strategy for clinicians wishing to understand military family members' lived experience during periods of service-member absence.

  3. 32 CFR 728.43 - Members of other foreign military services and their dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Members of other foreign military services and... Members of Foreign Military Services and Their Dependents § 728.43 Members of other foreign military services and their dependents. (a) Foreign military service members. For the purpose of § 728.43,...

  4. 42 CFR 71.34 - Carriers of U.S. military services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carriers of U.S. military services. 71.34 Section... Carriers of U.S. military services. (a) Carriers belonging to or operated by the military services of the... regulations of the military services which also meet the requirements of the regulations in this part....

  5. 5 CFR 630.504 - Reestablishment of leave account after military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... military service. 630.504 Section 630.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... military service. (a) When an employee leaves his or her civilian position to enter the military service... returns to a civilian position following military service, the agency to which the employee returns...

  6. 5 CFR 630.504 - Reestablishment of leave account after military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... military service. 630.504 Section 630.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... military service. (a) When an employee leaves his or her civilian position to enter the military service... returns to a civilian position following military service, the agency to which the employee returns...

  7. 5 CFR 630.504 - Reestablishment of leave account after military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... military service. 630.504 Section 630.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... military service. (a) When an employee leaves his or her civilian position to enter the military service... returns to a civilian position following military service, the agency to which the employee returns...

  8. 42 CFR 71.34 - Carriers of U.S. military services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carriers of U.S. military services. 71.34 Section... Carriers of U.S. military services. (a) Carriers belonging to or operated by the military services of the... regulations of the military services which also meet the requirements of the regulations in this part....

  9. 5 CFR 630.504 - Reestablishment of leave account after military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... military service. 630.504 Section 630.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... military service. (a) When an employee leaves his or her civilian position to enter the military service... returns to a civilian position following military service, the agency to which the employee returns...

  10. 5 CFR 630.504 - Reestablishment of leave account after military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... military service. 630.504 Section 630.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... military service. (a) When an employee leaves his or her civilian position to enter the military service... returns to a civilian position following military service, the agency to which the employee returns...

  11. 42 CFR 71.34 - Carriers of U.S. military services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carriers of U.S. military services. 71.34 Section... Carriers of U.S. military services. (a) Carriers belonging to or operated by the military services of the... regulations of the military services which also meet the requirements of the regulations in this part....

  12. A Vertically Integrated Manpower Management Model for Military Veterinary Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    MANAGEMENT MODEL FOR MILITARY VETERINARY SERVICES 12 PERSONAL AUWOR(S)a ThTomas a anzaro 1~T1P OF RPORT13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (YearMonth, Dy...identify by block number) This study was conducted to develop a model for vertically integrating the existing military Veterinary Service manpower...management systems. Current manpower databases were examined and integrated into a proposed manpower management model . The advantages and disadvantages

  13. Five Deficits and a Physics Problem: Restructuring the Military Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    i~ ~ . I t National Defense University National War College Five Deficits and a Physics Problem: Restructuring the Military Services Longer...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Five Deficits and a Physics Problem: Restructuring the Military Services 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Thkd, the limitations of multiple deficits are discussed. And f’mally, given this background, several observations and recommendations are offered to

  14. Intimate partner violence among military veterans and active duty servicemen.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Amy D; Panuzio, Jillian; Taft, Casey T

    2005-11-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious public health problem that has received increased attention in the military. We review existing literature regarding prevalence, consequences, correlates, and treatment of IPV perpetration among military veterans and active duty servicemen. Rates of IPV across these military populations range from 13.5% to 58%, with considerably lower rates obtained among samples not selected on the basis of psychopathology. For both military veterans and active duty servicemen, IPV results in significant victim injury and negative child outcomes, and problematic substance use, depression, and antisocial characteristics represent psychiatric correlates of IPV perpetration. For veterans, posttraumatic stress disorder also is an important correlate that largely accounts for the relationship between combat exposure and IPV perpetration. Additional correlates include military service factors, relationship adjustment, childhood trauma, and demographic factors. The only experimentally controlled IPV treatment study indicates that standard treatments are ineffective for active duty servicemen. Further research is needed to advance the development of etiological models of IPV among military populations, to determine whether such models necessarily differ from those developed among civilians, and to rigorously test IPV interventions tailored to the specific characteristics of these individuals.

  15. Update: routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components, January 2008-June 2013.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    This report contains an update through June 2013 on the results of screening for HIV infection among civilian applicants for military service and among members of the active and reserve components of the Armed Forces. Among civilian applicants, annual rates of prevalence of HIV infection showed a continuing downward trend. Rates among black, non-Hispanic applicants were higher than other racial/ethnic groups but have declined sharply since 2008. Among service members, annual rates have varied by service and component, with higher rates in the Army and Navy and lower rates in the Marine Corps and Air Force. Members of the Army and Air Force Reserves have had consistently higher rates than members of their respective active components. For both civilian applicants and service members, rates among men are notably higher than among women. The possible roles of unprotected sex and pre-deployment behaviors and the associated challenges to prevention of HIV infection are discussed.

  16. Evaluation of Military Service Youth Advertisements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    the military, and to realign the market research program to better support military advertising . In Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001, a two-pronged...efforts and advertising campaigns that are based on sound market research. The Joint Recruiting Advertising Program (JRAP) and Joint Market Research...assess levels of support provided by advertising agencies, and to recommend improved marketing strategies. The Eskew-Murphy Advertising Review made a

  17. 24 CFR 203.472 - Relief for borrower in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Relief for borrower in military... Relief for borrower in military service. If the borrower is a person in military service, as defined in... borrower, postpone for the period of military service, and 3 months thereafter, any part of the...

  18. 24 CFR 203.472 - Relief for borrower in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Relief for borrower in military... Relief for borrower in military service. If the borrower is a person in military service, as defined in... borrower, postpone for the period of military service, and 3 months thereafter, any part of the...

  19. 20 CFR 1002.60 - Does USERRA cover an individual attending a military service academy?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... military service academy? 1002.60 Section 1002.60 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR... Uniformed Services § 1002.60 Does USERRA cover an individual attending a military service academy? Yes. Attending a military service academy is considered uniformed service for purposes of USERRA. There are...

  20. 20 CFR 1002.54 - Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in the uniformed services?”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Are all military fitness examinations... Service in the Uniformed Services § 1002.54 Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in... determine his or her fitness to perform duty in the uniformed services. Military fitness examinations...

  1. 20 CFR 1002.54 - Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in the uniformed services?”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Are all military fitness examinations... Service in the Uniformed Services § 1002.54 Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in... determine his or her fitness to perform duty in the uniformed services. Military fitness examinations...

  2. 20 CFR 1002.54 - Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in the uniformed services?”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Are all military fitness examinations... Service in the Uniformed Services § 1002.54 Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in... determine his or her fitness to perform duty in the uniformed services. Military fitness examinations...

  3. 20 CFR 1002.54 - Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in the uniformed services?”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Are all military fitness examinations... Service in the Uniformed Services § 1002.54 Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in... determine his or her fitness to perform duty in the uniformed services. Military fitness examinations...

  4. 20 CFR 1002.54 - Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in the uniformed services?”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are all military fitness examinations... Service in the Uniformed Services § 1002.54 Are all military fitness examinations considered “service in... determine his or her fitness to perform duty in the uniformed services. Military fitness examinations...

  5. 32 CFR 1630.10 - Class 1-A: Available for unrestricted military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.10 Class 1-A: Available for unrestricted military service. (a) All registrants available for unrestricted military service shall be in Class 1-A. (b) All registrants... unrestricted Military Service, except those determined by a classifying authority to be eligible for...

  6. Update: routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components, January 2010-June 2015.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    This report contains an update through June 2015 of the results of routine screening for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among civilian applicants for military service and among members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces. Seroprevalences among civilian applicants in 2014 and the first half of 2015 (0.21 and 0.22 per 1,000 tested, respectively) were markedly lower than in 2012 (0.28 per 1,000 tested). In nearly every component of every military service, seroprevalences in 2014 and 2015 were either lower than, or relatively similar to, prevalences in prior years; however, in the Army National Guard, seroprevalences increased each year and approximately doubled from 2010 (0.18 per 1,000 tested) to 2014-2015 (0.36-0.39 per 1,000 tested). Among active and reserve component service members, seroprevalences continue to be higher among Army and Navy members and males than their respective counterparts.

  7. Children of Military Service Members Resource Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    access to the companion website to help children express themselves while their parent is away. deployment Journal for Kids R. Robertson middLe sChooL...Journal for Kids R. Robertson Publisher: Candlewick Press Year: 2000 isbN: 978-0763609436 Pages: 80 Love You, Soldier is a novel that...Blogs by Four military Teens m.d. sherman and d.m. sherman Publisher: Houghton Mifflin/ Seymour Lawrence Year: 1993 isbN: 978-0395595084 Rebel

  8. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  9. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  10. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  11. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  12. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  13. Cooperative Efforts within the US Military Health Services System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    sultation provi’dtd in the diagnosis of disease. The Center for Advanced Pathology includes such specialized areas as forensic , radiologic, dental and...medical entomology programs within the three Military Medical- Services were-reorganized into a single Department of Defense Organizational Board

  14. Lessons from the Cold War: Military Service and College Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Alair

    2005-01-01

    Since World War II, the federal government has provided funds to pay for the education of veterans through the GI bill. Yet, these funds were unavailable from 1955 to 1965. This article considers four potentially overlapping hypotheses to describe the effect of military service on veterans' educational attainment in the absence of government…

  15. 34 CFR 674.59 - Cancellation for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cancellation for military service. 674.59 Section 674.59 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL PERKINS LOAN PROGRAM Loan Cancellation §...

  16. How Military Service Affects Student Veteran Success at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Patrick C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly more service members are separating from the military as the United States draws down the force and moves towards a post-war era. Tens of thousands of these veterans will leverage their GI Bill tuition and housing benefits in an attempt to access Southern California community colleges and bolster their transition into mainstream…

  17. Long-term trajectories and service needs for military families.

    PubMed

    Link, Patrick E; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2013-12-01

    The deployment of US military personnel to recent conflicts has been a significant stressor for their families; yet, we know relatively little about the long-term family effects of these deployments. Using data from prior military service eras, we review our current understanding of the long-term functioning and needs of military families. These data suggest that overseas deployment, exposure to combat, experiencing or participating in violence during war deployment, service member injury or disability, and combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) all have profound impacts on the functioning of military families. We offer several recommendations to address these impacts such as the provision of family-centered, trauma-informed resources to families of veterans with PTSD and veterans who experienced high levels of combat and war violence. Recent efforts to address the needs of caregivers of veterans should be evaluated and expanded, as necessary. We should also help military families plan for predictable life events likely to challenge their resilience and coping capacities. Future research should focus on the following: factors that mediate the relationship between PTSD, war atrocities, caregiver burden, and family dysfunction; effective family-centered interventions that can be scaled-up to meet the needs of a dispersed population; and system-level innovations necessary to ensure adequate access to these interventions.

  18. 24 CFR 203.31 - Mortgagor of a principal residence in military service cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in military service cases. 203.31 Section 203.31 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating... military service cases. (a) A mortgage that is otherwise eligible for insurance under any of the provisions... mortgagor to meet the occupancy requirement is by reason of his or her entry into military service after...

  19. 5 CFR 1605.31 - Contributions missed as a result of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... military service. 1605.31 Section 1605.31 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT... result of military service. (a) Applicability. This section applies to employees who meet the conditions... agency contributions missed as a result of military service. (b) Missed employee contributions....

  20. 32 CFR 728.45 - Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... military services) and their dependents. 728.45 Section 728.45 National Defense Department of Defense... DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Members of Foreign Military Services and Their Dependents § 728.45 Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents. (a) Care authorized. Beneficiaries covered...

  1. 32 CFR 1630.44 - Class 4-F: Registrant not acceptable for military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... military service. 1630.44 Section 1630.44 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.44 Class 4-F: Registrant not acceptable for military... accomplished and such registrant continues to be found not acceptable for military service....

  2. 5 CFR 332.312 - Applicants in military or overseas service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... examination, because of military service, or hospitalization continuing for 1 year or less following discharge from military service; (b) An employee of the Federal Government who, as a member of a reserve unit of the military service, could not file an application during the filing period, or appear for...

  3. 38 CFR 17.94 - Outpatient medical services for military retirees and other beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... services for military retirees and other beneficiaries. 17.94 Section 17.94 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.94 Outpatient medical services for military retirees and other beneficiaries. Outpatient medical services for military retirees...

  4. 24 CFR 203.472 - Relief for borrower in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Relief for borrower in military service. If the borrower is a person in military service, as defined in... borrower, postpone for the period of military service, and 3 months thereafter, any part of the monthly... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Relief for borrower in...

  5. Building net-centric military applications over service oriented architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birman, Kenneth; Hillman, Robert; Pleisch, Stefan

    2005-05-01

    We compare the overall structure of military GIG and NCES architectures with that of the object oriented architectures (CORBA, J2EE and .NET) and of the emerging Web Services architecture. While the match is good in many ways, particularly with respect to Web Services, we also identify a series of shortcomings that could stymie attempts to implement a GIG or NCES system directly on a commercial Web Services platform. Our comparison leads to suggestions for experimental investigations of some topics, but also for more fundamental inquiry in some areas where the scientific base is inadequate. Several issues of the latter sort arise when we consider the mixture of scalability, security, robustness, and time-criticality that must be simultaneously satisfied in demanding military applications.

  6. The Military Services and Professional Development of Public Affairs Officers -- Is There a Better Way?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-23

    Virtually every major network, newspaper, wire service, news magazine and military journal maintains a 2 correspondent in the Pentagon. Finally, the...officers and enlisted people in the communication arts. Given this common foundation for public affairs activities, it is interesting how each service...Navy Chief of Information, Rear Admiral J.B. Finkelstein.2 He has recently stated that virtually every element of the model is now in place. It will

  7. Department of Defense Offshore Military Activities Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-16

    joint use of offshore areas for military and mineral exploration or developmental purposes. (See enclosure 2.) In carrying out negotiations with elements...that from time to time and from place to place the requirements for mineral exploration /development and defense related activities may conflict. In...area, certain defense- related activities on the OCS may be irreconcilable with mineral exploration / development and will, under the procedures

  8. Military Education: Additional DOD Guidance Is Needed to Enhance Oversight of the Service Academies and Their Preparatory Schools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-27

    Military Personnel: The DOD and Coast Guard Academies Have Taken Steps to Address Incidents of Sexual Harassment and Assault , but Greater Federal Oversight...military training activities and mandatory athletic activities. In return for their free education, the graduates must serve on active duty for 5...Academies: Academic Review Processes. GAO/NSIAD-95-57. Washington, D.C.: April 5, 1995. DOD Service Academies: Update on Extent of Sexual Harassment

  9. Health promotion in active-duty military women with children.

    PubMed

    Agazio, Janice G; Ephraim, Paula M; Flaherty, Norma B; Gurney, Cynthia A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which selected demographic characteristics, definition of health, perceived health status, perceived self-efficacy, and resources are related to the health promoting behaviors of active-duty women with children and to describe qualitatively the experience of being an active-duty mother. Grounded in Pender's (1996) Health Promotion Model, this study used methodological triangulation to test a hypothesized model. A sample of 141 active-duty women with children using military health services participated. Resource availability and commitment were key components of being successful at balancing home and work demands.

  10. 20 CFR 211.7 - Compensation credited for creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.7 Compensation credited for creditable military service... for each month of military service, provided the employee's combined monthly railroad and military... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensation credited for creditable...

  11. 24 CFR 203.472 - Relief for borrower in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Relief for borrower in military... AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Rehabilitation Loans § 203.472 Relief for borrower in military service. If the borrower is a person in military service, as defined...

  12. 20 CFR 211.7 - Compensation credited for creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Compensation credited for creditable military... RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.7 Compensation credited for creditable military service... for each month of military service, provided the employee's combined monthly railroad and...

  13. 20 CFR 211.7 - Compensation credited for creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Compensation credited for creditable military... RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.7 Compensation credited for creditable military service... for each month of military service, provided the employee's combined monthly railroad and...

  14. 24 CFR 203.610 - Relief for mortgagor in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Relief for mortgagor in military....610 Relief for mortgagor in military service. The mortgagee shall specifically give consideration to... person in the military service as that term is defined in the Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act...

  15. 20 CFR 211.7 - Compensation credited for creditable military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Compensation credited for creditable military... RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.7 Compensation credited for creditable military service... for each month of military service, provided the employee's combined monthly railroad and...

  16. 24 CFR 203.610 - Relief for mortgagor in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Relief for mortgagor in military....610 Relief for mortgagor in military service. The mortgagee shall specifically give consideration to... person in the military service as that term is defined in the Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act...

  17. The Potential Effects of the Defense Business Board Military Compensation Task Group’s 2011 Recommendations on Active-Duty Service Member Retirement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Plan 5 The military did not begin participating in the TSP until 2001. Although this is the case , the TSP has been in existence since 1986 when...Human Resource Strategy did not recommend cuts in military compensation due to the unfairness of the MRRA. Taking the lead from the DSB, Congress...per year (Henning, 2011). The task group drew three main conclusions from their study. First, the system is unfair because, due to the 20-year

  18. Military Postal Service Task Group. Recommendations Regarding the Military Postal System of the Department of Defense.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    unify the processes, technology, training, procedures and funding for military mail. Such an approach would allow DoD to achieve economies of scale...business model that capitalizes on economies of scale and organizational efficiencies • Require compatibility with current supply chain management...0 8 8 0 0 0 210 2016 2226 0 0 0 210 2024 2234 Government Service (GS) 29 48 290 2 352 Contractors 36 63 199 65 363 Totals 630 793 3243 532 5198 US

  19. Military walking blood bank and the civilian blood service.

    PubMed

    Berséus, Olle; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2012-06-01

    In most countries whole blood transfusions have been replaced by component therapy. This has allowed for both better usage of the blood donations and better quality during storage. While this strategy was initially motivated by the commercial need for plasma the plasma reduction also reduced the levels of low grade proteases and sialidase, hence minimizing the cellular storage lesion/microvesiculation during prolonged storage. Plasma reduction also reduces transfusion reactions associated with plasma. During special military conditions, however, blood transfusion is urgently needed without corresponding access to blood components, in particular platelets. Accordingly, new focus on whole blood has aroused and added a new challenge to the blood transfusion services. This special issue of "what is happening" highlights the planed efforts by Swedish and Norwegian groups in the developments of military walking blood bank, which is applicable to civil blood services.

  20. The Obligations of Military Professionalism. Service Unsullied by Partisanship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    swears an oath to this living document, an agreement “We   3 Lt.‐General Sir  John   Winthrop  Hackett, the Profession of Arms: The 1962 Lees Knowles...keskel.html. Accessed 4 December 2010.  7  Sir  John   Winthrop  Hackett, “The Military in the Service of the State,” in War, Morality, and the Military...former JCS Chairman General John Vessey, “is the survival of the nation, but the service of every sailor, soldier, airman, Marine or Coast Guardsman is

  1. Honoring their service: behavioral health services in North Carolina for military service members, veterans, and their families.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Bratcher, Kimberly M; Martin, Grier; Purcell, William R; Watson, Michael; Silberman, Pam

    2011-01-01

    The North Carolina Institute of Medicine Task Force on Behavioral Health Services for the Military and Their Families examined the adequacy of Medicaid- and state-funded services for mental health conditions, developmental disabilities (including traumatic brain injury), and substance abuse that are currently available in North Carolina to military service members, veterans, and their families. The task force determined that there are several gaps in services and made 13 recommendations related to federal, state, and local community resources. This article reviews the work of the task force and current efforts to improve services in North Carolina.

  2. Prescription Stimulants and PTSD Among U.S. Military Service Members.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Frasco, Melissa A; Armenta, Richard F; Phillips, Christopher J; Horton, Jaime; Ryan, Margaret A K; Russell, Dale W; LeardMann, Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent condition among military service members and civilians who have experienced traumatic events. Stimulant use has been postulated to increase the risk of incident PTSD; however, research in this area is lacking. In this study, the association between receipt of prescription stimulants and PTSD was examined in a secondary analysis among active duty U.S. military members (n = 25,971), participating in the Millennium Cohort Study, who completed a baseline (2001-2003) and two follow-up surveys (between 2004-2008). Prescription stimulant data were obtained from the military Pharmacy Data Transaction Service. PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version and incident PTSD was defined as meeting the criteria at follow-up among those who did not have a history of PTSD at baseline. Overall, 1,215 (4.7%) persons developed new-onset PTSD during follow-up. Receipt of prescription stimulants were significantly associated with incident PTSD, hazard ratio = 5.09, 95% confidence interval [3.05, 8.50], after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, military characteristics, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, baseline mental and physical health status, deployment experiences, and physical/sexual trauma. Findings suggested that prescription stimulants are associated with incident PTSD among military personnel; these data may inform the underlying pathogenesis of and preventive strategies for PTSD.

  3. Prospective post-traumatic stress disorder symptom trajectories in active duty and separated military personnel.

    PubMed

    Porter, Ben; Bonanno, George A; Frasco, Melissa A; Dursa, Erin K; Boyko, Edward J

    2017-06-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious mental illness that affects current and former military service members at a disproportionately higher rate than the civilian population. Prior studies have shown that PTSD symptoms follow multiple trajectories in civilians and military personnel. The current study examines whether the trajectories of PTSD symptoms of veterans separated from the military are similar to continuously serving military personnel. The Millennium Cohort Study is a population-based study of military service members that commenced in 2001 with follow-up assessments occurring approximately every 3 years thereafter. PTSD symptoms were assessed at each time point using the PTSD Checklist. Latent growth mixture modeling was used to compare PTSD symptom trajectories between personnel who separated (veterans; n = 5292) and personnel who remained in military service (active duty; n = 16,788). Four distinct classes (resilient, delayed-onset, improving, and elevated-recovering) described PTSD symptoms trajectories in both veterans and active duty personnel. Trajectory shapes were qualitatively similar between active duty and veterans. However, within the resilient, improving, and elevated recovering classes, the shapes were statistically different. Although the low-symptom class was the most common in both groups (veterans: 82%; active duty: 87%), veterans were more likely to be classified in the other three classes (in all cases, p < 0.01). The shape of each trajectory was highly similar between the two groups despite differences in military and civilian life.

  4. 48 CFR 237.102-71 - Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICE CONTRACTING Service Contracts-General 237.102-71 Limitation on service contracts for military... Law 110-181, DoD is prohibited from entering into a service contract to acquire a military flight... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitation on...

  5. 48 CFR 237.102-71 - Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICE CONTRACTING Service Contracts-General 237.102-71 Limitation on service contracts for military... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators. 237.102-71 Section 237.102-71 Federal Acquisition...

  6. 48 CFR 237.102-71 - Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICE CONTRACTING Service Contracts-General 237.102-71 Limitation on service contracts for military... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators. 237.102-71 Section 237.102-71 Federal Acquisition...

  7. 48 CFR 237.102-71 - Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICE CONTRACTING Service Contracts-General 237.102-71 Limitation on service contracts for military... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators. 237.102-71 Section 237.102-71 Federal Acquisition...

  8. 48 CFR 237.102-71 - Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICE CONTRACTING Service Contracts-General 237.102-71 Limitation on service contracts for military... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Limitation on service contracts for military flight simulators. 237.102-71 Section 237.102-71 Federal Acquisition...

  9. Update: Routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components, January 2009-June 2014.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    This report contains an update through June 2014 of the results of routine screening for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among civilian applicants for military service and among members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces. Seroprevalences among civilian applicants in 2013 and the first half of 2014 (0.19 and 0.15 per 1,000 tested, respectively) were markedly lower than in 2012 (0.27 per 1,000 tested). In nearly every component of every service, seroprevalences in 2013 and 2014 were either similar or lower than in prior years; however, in the Army National Guard, seroprevalences increased each year and approximately doubled from 2010 (0.18 per 1,000 tested) to 2013-2014 (0.35-0.41 per 1,000 tested). Among active and reserve component service members, seroprevalences continue to be higher among Army and Navy members and males than their respective counterparts.

  10. The influence of military service on auditory health and the efficacy of a Hearing Conservation Program.

    PubMed

    Muhr, Per; Rosenhall, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    The influence of military service on self-assessed hearing symptoms and measured auditory function was studied as well as the efficacy of the Hearing Conservation Program (HCP) of the Swedish Armed Forces. 839 conscripts were recruited for the study at reporting to military service. They were all exposed to noise over the risk-limits from weapons and vehicles and used earmuffs and/or earplugs. Questionnaires and pure tone screening audiometry were studied at the start and the end of the military service. Retrospective information regarding audiometry at conscription before military service was included as control. The prevalence values of tinnitus were 23% before and 32% after the service and of sensitivity to noise 16% and 19% respectively. The prevalence values of hearing impairment were 6.3% at conscription, 14.5% at reporting to military service, and 24% after the training period. The incidence values of hearing decline were 3.7% during the period with no military noise exposure and 6.6% during the military service. Acoustic accident increased the risk of worsened tinnitus and sensitivity to noise four times and for a high frequency hearing decline six times. We observed elevated prevalence values of tinnitus, sensitivity to noise and hearing impairment at discharge compared to before military service. We observed an elevated risk of hearing decline during military service. Acoustic accident increased the risk of tinnitus, noise sensitivity and hearing decline. We suggest improvements regarding inclusion criteria for military service, and for education regarding the HCP.

  11. Chronic pain management in the active-duty military

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David; Cohen, Steven P.

    2012-06-01

    As in the general population, chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome affliction in active-duty military personnel. Painful conditions in military members can be categorized broadly in terms of whether they arise directly from combat injuries (gunshot, fragmentation wound, blast impact) or whether they result from non-combat injuries (sprains, herniated discs, motor vehicle accidents). Both combat-related and non-combat-related causes of pain can further be classified as either acute or chronic. Here we discuss the state of pain management as it relates to the military population in both deployed and non-deployed settings. The term non-battle injury (NBI) is commonly used to refer to those conditions not directly associated with the combat actions of war. In the history of warfare, NBI have far outstripped battle-related injuries in terms not only of morbidity, but also mortality. It was not until improvements in health care and field medicine were applied in World War I that battle-related deaths finally outnumbered those attributed to disease and pestilence. However, NBI have been the leading cause of morbidity and hospital admission in every major conflict since the Korean War. Pain remains a leading cause of presentation to military medical facilities, both in and out of theater. The absence of pain services is associated with a low return-to-duty rate among the deployed population. The most common pain complaints involve the low-back and neck, and studies have suggested that earlier treatment is associated with more significant improvement and a higher return to duty rate. It is recognized that military medicine is often at the forefront of medical innovation, and that many fields of medicine have reaped benefit from the conduct of war.

  12. [Surgical service at the Central Military Hospital of People's Commissariat of Defence shortly before the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Krainyukov, P E; Efimenko, N A; Abashin, V G

    2015-04-01

    Authors present the article historical data on the foundation and development of surgical service at the 1st Therapeutic Red Cross Hospital (Central Military Hospital of People's Commissariat. of Defense) since its organization. The structure of the hospital surgical service and organization of surgical activity during the pre-war years is presented. Provided information about outstanding surgeons who was working in the hospital.

  13. The application status of Chinese herbal medicine in military health service in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ge-Liang; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Hui-Qing; Zhai, Xiao-Feng; Li, Xiao-Qian; Ling, Chang-Quan

    2016-07-01

    Military medicine has had a long history in China since the emergence of the war. Chinese medicine, especially Chinese herbs, was widely used in China as well as other Asian countries for the prevention and treatment of diseases in the military for hundreds of years. However, the use of Chinese medicine in military health service has never been well studied. In this article, we briefly summarize the application status of Chinese herbal medicine in military health service in China, putting particular emphasis on special military environment, in an attempt to build a bridge between Chinese medicine and military health service and promote the quality of health service for the military and maintain world peace.

  14. Barriers to Seeking Mental Health Services among Adolescents in Military Families

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Sara J.; Swenson, Rebecca; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Cataldo, Andrea; Spirito, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Military families with adolescents experience high levels of stress associated with parental deployment, but many of these families do not seek or utilize mental health services. The current qualitative study was designed to better understand barriers to mental health treatment experienced by adolescents in military families. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with military adolescents (n = 13), military (non-enlisted) parents (n = 12), and mental health service providers who treat adolescents in military families (n = 20). Discussions primarily explored barriers to seeking treatment, with supplemental questions assessing the ideal elements of mental health services for this population. Seven barriers to engaging in mental health services were identified: four internal (confidentiality concerns, stigma, ethic of self-reliance, lack of perceived relevance) and three external (time and effort concerns, logistical concerns, financial concerns). Challenges engaging military adolescents in mental health services are discussed and several recommendations are offered for service providers attempting to work with this population. PMID:25574070

  15. Thank You for Your Service: Military Initiatives on College Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kristin Bailey

    2014-01-01

    Military students and their dependents arrive on college campuses with a diverse array of academic goals and support needs. A military friendly college understands that military students are transitioning from the professional military environment to the workforce, and academic work is part of that transition. A military friendly college is not…

  16. Pertussis diagnoses among service members and other beneficiaries of the U.S. Military Health System, January 2005-June 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    Pertussis ("whooping cough") is a highly infectious respiratory disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. Individuals at highest risk are infants and unvaccinated children; however, there have been recent increases in incidence among adolescent and young adult populations in the United States. During the surveillance period, there were 476 confirmed and 3,073 probable cases of pertussis among U.S. military members and other beneficiaries of the U.S. Military Health System. Among service members there were 77 and 13 confirmed cases in active and reserve component members, respectively. In comparison, infants and children aged 15 years and younger accounted for over half of all confirmed cases (n=244). Several spatiotemporal clusters of pertussis among military healthcare beneficiaries were associated with outbreaks in adjacent non-military communities, particularly in five states (California, Texas, Florida, Washington, and New York); one cluster occurred in a military community in Okinawa, Japan.

  17. Updates: Routine screening for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1), civilian applicants for U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces, active and reserve components.

    PubMed

    2012-08-01

    During routine testing of civilian applicants for U.S. military service, the overall seroprevalence of antibodies to HIV-1 in 2011 was the second lowest of any year since 1990. Among members of the active components of the U.S. Army, HIV-1 seroprevalences were higher during 2008 to 2011 than in recent prior years. Among members of the active components of the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps, the Marine Corps Reserve, and the Army National Guard, HIV-1 seroprevalences have slightly declined or remained relatively stable for at least ten years. In the reserve components of most service branches, it is difficult to discern long-term trends because of instability of seroprevalences in the relatively small numbers of reserve component members tested each year. Monitoring of HIV-1 seroprevalences can help target and focus prevention initiatives. The recent repeal of the Don't Ask Don't Tell policy has created opportunities for prevention messages targeted to men who have sex with men.

  18. 32 CFR 728.43 - Members of other foreign military services and their dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of foreign military services include only: (1) Military personnel carried on the current Diplomatic List (Blue) or on the List of Employees of Diplomatic Missions (White) published by the Department of... personnel on foreign military supply missions accredited to and recognized by one of the...

  19. 32 CFR 728.43 - Members of other foreign military services and their dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of foreign military services include only: (1) Military personnel carried on the current Diplomatic List (Blue) or on the List of Employees of Diplomatic Missions (White) published by the Department of... personnel on foreign military supply missions accredited to and recognized by one of the...

  20. 24 CFR 203.346 - Postponement of foreclosure-mortgagors in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-mortgagors in military service. 203.346 Section 203.346 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Forbearance Relief for Military Personnel § 203.346 Postponement of foreclosure—mortgagors in military...

  1. 24 CFR 203.346 - Postponement of foreclosure-mortgagors in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-mortgagors in military service. 203.346 Section 203.346 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Forbearance Relief for Military Personnel § 203.346 Postponement of foreclosure—mortgagors in military...

  2. The Children of Military Service Members: Challenges, Supports, and Future Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Pedro, Kris M. Tunac; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami; Estrada, Jose; Smith, Gabrielle R. Dejoie; Esqueda, Monica Christina

    2011-01-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have led to concerning psychological, behavioral, and academic outcomes for children in military families. Of the 1.2 million school-aged children of military service members, only 86,000 actually attend schools administered by the Department of Defense on military installations throughout the world. The remaining…

  3. 24 CFR 203.346 - Postponement of foreclosure-mortgagors in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-mortgagors in military service. 203.346 Section 203.346 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Forbearance Relief for Military Personnel § 203.346 Postponement of foreclosure—mortgagors in military...

  4. 24 CFR 203.346 - Postponement of foreclosure-mortgagors in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-mortgagors in military service. 203.346 Section 203.346 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Forbearance Relief for Military Personnel § 203.346 Postponement of foreclosure—mortgagors in military...

  5. 24 CFR 203.346 - Postponement of foreclosure-mortgagors in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-mortgagors in military service. 203.346 Section 203.346 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Forbearance Relief for Military Personnel § 203.346 Postponement of foreclosure—mortgagors in military...

  6. 5 CFR 332.312 - Applicants in military or overseas service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Applicants in military or overseas... Acceptance of Applications After Closing Date of Examinations § 332.312 Applicants in military or overseas... examination, because of military service, or hospitalization continuing for 1 year or less following...

  7. 48 CFR 37.109 - Services of quasi-military armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services of quasi-military... quasi-military armed forces. Contracts with Pinkerton Detective Agencies or similar organizations are...-military armed forces for hire, or with their employees, regardless of the contract's character....

  8. 5 CFR 332.312 - Applicants in military or overseas service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Applicants in military or overseas... Acceptance of Applications After Closing Date of Examinations § 332.312 Applicants in military or overseas... examination, because of military service, or hospitalization continuing for 1 year or less following...

  9. 5 CFR 332.312 - Applicants in military or overseas service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Applicants in military or overseas... Acceptance of Applications After Closing Date of Examinations § 332.312 Applicants in military or overseas... examination, because of military service, or hospitalization continuing for 1 year or less following...

  10. 48 CFR 37.109 - Services of quasi-military armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services of quasi-military... quasi-military armed forces. Contracts with Pinkerton Detective Agencies or similar organizations are...-military armed forces for hire, or with their employees, regardless of the contract's character....

  11. 5 CFR 332.312 - Applicants in military or overseas service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Applicants in military or overseas... Acceptance of Applications After Closing Date of Examinations § 332.312 Applicants in military or overseas... examination, because of military service, or hospitalization continuing for 1 year or less following...

  12. 5 CFR 890.305 - Reinstatement of enrollment after military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... military service. 890.305 Section 890.305 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.305 Reinstatement of enrollment after military service. (a) The enrollment of an employee or...

  13. 32 CFR 1630.40 - Class 4-A: Registrant who has completed military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class 4-A: Registrant who has completed military service. 1630.40 Section 1630.40 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.40 Class 4-A: Registrant who has completed military service....

  14. MilitaryKidsConnect: Web-based prevention services for military children.

    PubMed

    Blasko, Kelly A

    2015-08-01

    Military children often present with psychological health concerns related to their experience of deployments, reintegration, and frequent moves common in military life. MilitaryKidsConnect is a Department of Defense (DoD) Web site designed to enhance the coping of military children in the context of their military life experience. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of the Web site as a resource that provides psychoeducation, coping strategies, and peer support to military children.

  15. The Defence Medical Library Service and military medicine.

    PubMed

    Walker, S B

    2005-01-01

    The Defence Medical Library Service (DMLS) supports the clinical practice and career development of military health professionals across the world. Clinical governance and the need for medical knowledge to be evidence-based means the DMLS has a central role to play in support of defence medicine. The DMLS is important for enabling health professionals to make sense of the evidence-based pyramid and the hierarchy of medical knowledge. The Royal Centre for Defence Medicine (RCDM) in Birmingham is recognised as an international centre of excellence. The information, knowledge and research requirements of the RCDM will provide opportunities for the DMLS to support and engage with the academic community.

  16. [Specificities of war surgery, and capacities of the military health service].

    PubMed

    de Saint-Julien, Jacques; Auroy, Yves; Pons, François

    2013-12-01

    In view of the recent evolution of military conflicts, particularly in the Afghan theater, and the conditions in which wounded warriors are managed in the field prior to hospitalization, the authors examine the technical specificities of medical teams, based on studies of avoidable mortality. War surgery has become a separate specialty, following the disappearance in France of the general surgical specialty, of which it was the military coun-terpart. The authors stress the role of hemorrhaging and its treatment, based on three strategies: damage control resuscitation, blood transfusion, and early evacuation within the "golden hour ". The French Armed Forces Health Service, in a new strategic plan, is refocusing its activity on war traumatology, through better education and training of medical-surgical teams and by opening up its scholarship structures to the French civilian public health service sector.

  17. 48 CFR 237.109 - Services of quasi-military armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services of quasi-military armed forces. 237.109 Section 237.109 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Contracts-General 237.109 Services of quasi-military armed forces. See 237.102-70b for prohibition...

  18. 48 CFR 237.109 - Services of quasi-military armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of quasi-military armed forces. 237.109 Section 237.109 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Contracts-General 237.109 Services of quasi-military armed forces. See 237.102-70b for prohibition...

  19. 75 FR 30002 - Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... terminating the Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military Services, effective June 1, 2010. FOR... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Defense Task Force on Sexual Assault in the Military Services AGENCY: Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Termination of federal advisory committee....

  20. Military Service and Educational Attainment in the All-Volunteer Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Jay

    2007-01-01

    This article uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine the relationship between service in the All Volunteer Force (AVF) military and educational attainment. Through the use of fixed-effects estimators, the author generated estimates of the effect of military service on the highest grade of school completed by men that…

  1. 24 CFR 203.610 - Relief for mortgagor in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....610 Relief for mortgagor in military service. The mortgagee shall specifically give consideration to... person in the military service as that term is defined in the Soldiers and Sailors Civil Relief Act of... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Relief for mortgagor in...

  2. 39 CFR 927.2 - Noncontractual air service for international and military mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... military mail. 927.2 Section 927.2 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF... and military mail. (a) Report of infraction. Each mail handling irregularity will be reported in the... adapted to the respective modes of transportation, see International Mail Operations, Handbook...

  3. 39 CFR 927.2 - Noncontractual air service for international and military mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... military mail. 927.2 Section 927.2 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF... and military mail. (a) Report of infraction. Each mail handling irregularity will be reported in the... adapted to the respective modes of transportation, see International Mail Operations, Handbook...

  4. 39 CFR 927.2 - Noncontractual air service for international and military mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... military mail. 927.2 Section 927.2 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF... and military mail. (a) Report of infraction. Each mail handling irregularity will be reported in the... adapted to the respective modes of transportation, see International Mail Operations, Handbook...

  5. 39 CFR 927.2 - Noncontractual air service for international and military mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... military mail. 927.2 Section 927.2 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF... and military mail. (a) Report of infraction. Each mail handling irregularity will be reported in the... adapted to the respective modes of transportation, see International Mail Operations, Handbook...

  6. 5 CFR 1605.31 - Contributions missed as a result of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... military service is eligible to receive agency makeup contributions when he or she is reemployed or... employing agency must calculate the agency automatic (1%) makeup contributions and report those... the period of military service is also immediately entitled to receive agency matching...

  7. 5 CFR 1605.31 - Contributions missed as a result of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... military service is eligible to receive agency makeup contributions when he or she is reemployed or... employing agency must calculate the agency automatic (1%) makeup contributions and report those... the period of military service is also immediately entitled to receive agency matching...

  8. 5 CFR 1605.31 - Contributions missed as a result of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... military service is eligible to receive agency makeup contributions when he or she is reemployed or... employing agency must calculate the agency automatic (1%) makeup contributions and report those... the period of military service is also immediately entitled to receive agency matching...

  9. 5 CFR 1605.31 - Contributions missed as a result of military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... military service is eligible to receive agency makeup contributions when he or she is reemployed or... employing agency must calculate the agency automatic (1%) makeup contributions and report those... the period of military service is also immediately entitled to receive agency matching...

  10. 76 FR 57642 - TRICARE: Unfortunate Sequelae From Noncovered Services in a Military Treatment Facility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... Services in a Military Treatment Facility AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Defense. ACTION... otherwise covered services and supplies required in the treatment of complications (unfortunate sequelae) resulting from a noncovered incident of treatment provided in a Military Treatment Facility (MTF), when...

  11. 24 CFR 203.610 - Relief for mortgagor in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Relief for mortgagor in military... AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Servicing Responsibilities Mortgagee Action and Forbearance § 203.610 Relief for mortgagor in military service. The mortgagee shall specifically give consideration...

  12. 48 CFR 237.109 - Services of quasi-military armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services of quasi-military armed forces. 237.109 Section 237.109 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Contracts-General 237.109 Services of quasi-military armed forces. See 237.102-70b for prohibition...

  13. 48 CFR 237.109 - Services of quasi-military armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services of quasi-military armed forces. 237.109 Section 237.109 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Contracts-General 237.109 Services of quasi-military armed forces. See 237.102-70b for prohibition...

  14. 48 CFR 237.109 - Services of quasi-military armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services of quasi-military armed forces. 237.109 Section 237.109 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Contracts-General 237.109 Services of quasi-military armed forces. See 237.102-70b for prohibition...

  15. 5 CFR 890.305 - Reinstatement of enrollment after military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reinstatement of enrollment after military service. 890.305 Section 890.305 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT....305 Reinstatement of enrollment after military service. (a) The enrollment of an employee or...

  16. Mental health among reserve component military service members and veterans.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Gregory H; Fink, David S; Sampson, Laura; Galea, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Since 2001, the US military has increasingly relied on National Guard and reserve component forces to meet operational demands. Differences in preparation and military engagement experiences between active component and reserve component forces have long suggested that the psychiatric consequences of military engagement differ by component. We conducted a systematic review of prevalence and new onset of psychiatric disorders among reserve component forces and a meta-analysis of prevalence estimates comparing reserve component and active component forces, and we documented stage-sequential drivers of psychiatric burden among reserve component forces. We identified 27 reports from 19 unique samples published between 1985 and 2012: 9 studies reporting on the reserve component alone and 10 reporting on both the reserve component and the active component. The pooled prevalence for alcohol use disorders of 14.5% (95% confidence interval: 12.7, 15.2) among the reserve component was higher than that of 11.7% (95% confidence interval: 10.9, 12.6) among the active component, while there were no component differences for depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. We observed substantial heterogeneity in prevalence estimates reported by the reserve component. Published studies suggest that stage-sequential risk factors throughout the deployment cycle predicted alcohol use disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and, to a lesser degree, depression. Improved and more standardized documentation of the mental health burden, as well as study of explanatory factors within a life-course framework, is necessary to inform mitigating strategies and to reduce psychiatric burden among reserve component forces.

  17. Mental Health Among Reserve Component Military Service Members and Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gregory H.; Fink, David S.; Sampson, Laura; Galea, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Since 2001, the US military has increasingly relied on National Guard and reserve component forces to meet operational demands. Differences in preparation and military engagement experiences between active component and reserve component forces have long suggested that the psychiatric consequences of military engagement differ by component. We conducted a systematic review of prevalence and new onset of psychiatric disorders among reserve component forces and a meta-analysis of prevalence estimates comparing reserve component and active component forces, and we documented stage-sequential drivers of psychiatric burden among reserve component forces. We identified 27 reports from 19 unique samples published between 1985 and 2012: 9 studies reporting on the reserve component alone and 10 reporting on both the reserve component and the active component. The pooled prevalence for alcohol use disorders of 14.5% (95% confidence interval: 12.7, 15.2) among the reserve component was higher than that of 11.7% (95% confidence interval: 10.9, 12.6) among the active component, while there were no component differences for depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. We observed substantial heterogeneity in prevalence estimates reported by the reserve component. Published studies suggest that stage-sequential risk factors throughout the deployment cycle predicted alcohol use disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and, to a lesser degree, depression. Improved and more standardized documentation of the mental health burden, as well as study of explanatory factors within a life-course framework, is necessary to inform mitigating strategies and to reduce psychiatric burden among reserve component forces. PMID:25595172

  18. Sleep disturbances among Swedish soldiers after military service abroad.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Karolina; Saers, Johannes; Lindberg, Eva; Janson, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Aims Since 1956, more than 100,000 Swedish soldiers have served abroad on various international missions. The aim of this paper was to determine whether there was a connection between military service abroad and sleep disorders among Swedish soldiers. Methods The prevalence of sleep disturbances among 1,080 veterans from Kosovo and Afghanistan was compared with almost 27,000 Swedes from a general population sample, using propensity score matching and logistic regression. The sleep disturbances studied were habitual snoring, difficulty inducing sleep (DIS), difficulty maintaining sleep (DMS), early morning awakenings (EMA), and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Insomnia was defined as having at least one of DIS, DMS, or EMA. The covariates used in the matching and adjustments were age, gender, smoking habits, BMI, education, ever having had asthma, moist snuff, and exercise habits. Results The veterans had a significantly lower prevalence of insomnia (26.2% versus 30.4%) and EDS (22.7% versus 29.4%) compared with a matched group from the reference population, using propensity score matching. Analyses with logistic regression showed that belonging to the military population was related to a lower risk of having DMS (adjusted OR (95% CI) 0.77 (0.64-0.91)), insomnia (OR 0.82 (0.71-0.95)), and EDS (OR 0.74 (0.63-0.86)), whereas no significant difference was found for snoring, DIS, and EMA. Conclusion Swedish veterans have fewer problems with insomnia and daytime sleepiness than the general Swedish population. The explanation of our findings may be the selection processes involved in becoming a soldier and when sampling personnel for military assignments abroad.

  19. CE: Veteran Women: Mental Health-Related Consequences of Military Service.

    PubMed

    Ganzer, Christine Anne

    2016-11-01

    : The last two decades have seen increasing numbers of women entering all branches of the U.S. armed forces. Now that women in the military are no longer prohibited from holding direct combat positions, they are often exposed to traumatic events that place them at higher risk for mental health conditions. Nurses working within the Veterans Affairs (VA) system and those working in non-VA settings are likely to encounter female veterans. It's essential for all nurses to be knowledgeable about the mental health issues commonly seen in this population, and to understand the importance of screening, not only for mental health issues but also for physical conditions that may be related to service.Numerous studies have focused on the mental health effects of deployment among military men, but very few have been conducted among military women. To learn more, the literature was searched for relevant articles published between January 2005 and December 2015. The research supports the contention that both active-duty and veteran women are at increased risk for postdeployment mental health problems, including posttraumatic stress disorder, military sexual trauma, and suicide. This article discusses the relevant research; identifies gaps in the literature; and addresses the nursing practice implications, including screening.

  20. Health impact of US military service in a large population-based military cohort: findings of the Millennium Cohort Study, 2001-2008

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Combat-intense, lengthy, and multiple deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan have characterized the new millennium. The US military's all-volunteer force has never been better trained and technologically equipped to engage enemy combatants in multiple theaters of operations. Nonetheless, concerns over potential lasting effects of deployment on long-term health continue to mount and are yet to be elucidated. This report outlines how findings from the first 7 years of the Millennium Cohort Study have helped to address health concerns related to military service including deployments. Methods The Millennium Cohort Study was designed in the late 1990s to address veteran and public concerns for the first time using prospectively collected health and behavioral data. Results Over 150 000 active-duty, reserve, and National Guard personnel from all service branches have enrolled, and more than 70% of the first 2 enrollment panels submitted at least 1 follow-up survey. Approximately half of the Cohort has deployed in support of operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Conclusion The Millennium Cohort Study is providing prospective data that will guide public health policymakers for years to come by exploring associations between military exposures and important health outcomes. Strategic studies aim to identify, reduce, and prevent adverse health outcomes that may be associated with military service, including those related to deployment. PMID:21281496

  1. 20 CFR 670.420 - Are there any special requirements for enrollment related to the Military Selective Service Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... enrollment related to the Military Selective Service Act? 670.420 Section 670.420 Employees' Benefits... there any special requirements for enrollment related to the Military Selective Service Act? (a) Yes... of the Military Selective Service Act (50 U.S.C. App. 451 et seq.) if required; and (b) When a...

  2. 20 CFR 667.250 - What requirements relate to the enforcement of the Military Selective Service Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the Military Selective Service Act? 667.250 Section 667.250 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND... enforcement of the Military Selective Service Act? The requirements relating to the enforcement of the Military Selective Service Act are found at WIA section 189(h)....

  3. Final Environmental Assessment of Military Service Station Privatization at Five AETC Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    cubic meter of air AAFES Army and Air Force Exchange Service AAQS Ambient Air Quality Standards ACM asbestos -containing material AETC Air Education...and endangered; ACM= asbestos -containing material; LBP=lead-based paint; MSS=Military Service Station(s) Description of the Proposed Action and...threatened and endangered; ACM= asbestos - containing material; LBP=lead-based paint; MSS=Military Service Station(s) Description of the Proposed

  4. Active Duty Female Military’s Experience of Fear, Embarrassment, and Distress During Pelvic Examinations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    1 1. Sexual Violence While on Active Duty...............................................2 2. Sexual Violence Prior to Military...Service .........................................3 3. History of Sexual Violence Associated With Physical and Mental Health Issues...experience of one or more of the following: (1) verbal and/or physical sexual harassment; (2) attempted sexual assault, or the attempt to force sexual

  5. The Earnings of Veterans: Effects of Military Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    identifies premiUlllS and penalties in the civilian labor market associated with active service during conscription and the All- Volunteer Force. The...in the civilian labor market associated with active service during conscription and the All-Volunteer Force. The analysis controls for educational...and civilian labor market earnings. Chapter VI presents conclusions and recommendations. 3 LITERATURE REVIEW II. A. OVERVIEW This chapter reviews

  6. Concussions and the military: issues specific to service members.

    PubMed

    Rigg, John L; Mooney, Scott R

    2011-10-01

    Since October 2001, more than 1.6 million American military service members have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan in the Global War on Terrorism. It is estimated that between 5% and 35% of them have sustained a concussion, also called mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), during their deployment. Up to 80% of the concussions experienced in theater are secondary to blast exposures. The unique circumstances and consequences of sustaining a concussion in combat demands a unique understanding and treatment plan. The current literature was reviewed and revealed a paucity of pathophysiological explanations on the nature of the injury and informed treatment plans. However, through observation and experience, a theoretical but scientifically plausible model for why and how blast injuries experienced in combat give rise to the symptoms that affect day-to-day function of service members who have been concussed has been developed. We also are able to offer treatment strategies based on our evaluation of the current literature and experience to help palliate postconcussive symptoms. The purpose of this review is to elucidate common physical, cognitive, emotional, and situational challenges, and possible solutions for this special population of patients who will be transitioning into the civilian sector and interfacing with health professionals. There is a need for further investigation and testing of these strategies.

  7. The Many Faces of Military Families: Unique Features of the Lives of Female Service Members.

    PubMed

    Southwell, Kenona H; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley M

    2016-01-01

    Female service members' family structures differ from the traditional male service member-female spouse composition of military families. Consequently, this mixed-methods study reviewed demographic data, empirical evidence, and presented findings from secondary analyses of the 2010 wave of the Military Family Life Project regarding structural differences in male and female service members' families and perceptions and experiences of military spouses. In addition, to gain an understanding of the influence of women's service on their family functioning, we conducted in-depth telephone interviews with 20 civilian husbands residing in 11 states around the United States. Empirical evidence suggests service women had higher rates or remarriage and divorce than service men. Women were also more likely than men to be part of nontraditional family forms. Civilian husbands of female service members, however, reported lower marital satisfaction, less support from the community, and less satisfaction with the military lifestyle than military wives. Husbands' accounts indicated that their families experienced both benefits and challenges from wives' service. Integration in the military community and separation presented major challenges for women's families. Implications of benefits and challenges of women's service for their families are discussed.

  8. The Career Cost: Does It Pay for a Military Pilot to Leave the Service for the Airlines?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    DOES IT PAY FOR A MILITARY PILOT TO LEAVE THE SERVICE FOR THE AIRLINES? by Jeffrey A. Hodges June 2015 Thesis Advisor: Thomas Albright...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE CAREER COST: DOES IT PAY FOR A MILITARY PILOT TO LEAVE THE SERVICE FOR... it is financially prudent for military pilots to remain in the service until retirement. The current policies enable a retired military pilot to

  9. [Characteristics of urinary tract infections in military personnel in military service in Far North].

    PubMed

    Sergienko, H F; Vasil'chenko, M I; Plekhanov, V N

    2010-12-01

    For the purpose of improvement of the effectiveness of the treatment of urinary tract infections in military personnel in condition of High North were studied 505 clinical records of military personnel took the treatment from 1998 till 2009. It is established that the part of urinary tract infections from the urologic pathology in contract military personnel is higher than in draft military personnel. Among urinary tract infections prevails pyelonephritis associated with urolithiasis and abnormal development of kidneys. The main type of contamination under the acute pyelonephritis in military personnel is ascending. For this type dysuria, leukocyturia and bacteriuria are characteristic. For the hematogenous contamination pain in lumbar region, imperceptible leukocyturia, proteinuria are characteristic. Kidney carbuncles are higher in 2.5 times in draft military personnel. The main pathogen is aurococcus. "Gates" of this infection are furunculuses of different localization.

  10. Facilitating reintegration for military service personnel, veterans, and their families: An introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Kilmer, Ryan P

    2017-01-01

    As service members return from active duty and, in some cases, exit the military, they face a process of reintegration (also referred to as community reintegration) as they seek to resume participation in their life roles as civilians. Facilitating this dynamic process of reintegration for service members, veterans, and their families-including outlining potential strategies for supporting this return to civilian life and its demands, roles, and responsibilities-is the focus of this Special Issue. Reintegration has been framed as a national priority (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, 2015) and has been a point of emphasis of efforts at federal, state, and local levels. As the articles in this issue suggest, multiple public, private, and voluntary systems and the communities to which service members, veterans, and their families return can help influence their health outcomes and, ultimately, their reintegration. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Military Service for Female and Black Youth: A Perceived Mobility Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, David R.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Data suggest that military service is viewed as a potential mobility channel by women and Blacks. Among high school seniors, White females perceived the opportunities for advancement to more responsible positions more positively than Black males. The most positive views of opportunities in the military are held by Black women. (Author/WI)

  12. Tri-Service Medical Transformation - Time for a Unified Military Medical Command (USMEDCOM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and Military Traffic Management Command ( MTMC ) into one functional combatant command with global reach. USTRANSCOM aptly fit the definition of a...Sealift Command MTMC Military Traffic Management Command NCA National Capital Area SASC Senate Armed Services Committee SIMLM Single Integrated Medical

  13. 75 FR 47519 - TRICARE: Unfortunate Sequelae From Noncovered Services in a Military Treatment Facility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... in a Military Treatment Facility AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Defense. ACTION... otherwise covered services and supplies required in the treatment of complications (unfortunate sequelae) resulting from a noncovered incident of treatment provided in a Military Treatment Facility (MTF), when...

  14. 24 CFR 203.345 - Postponement of principal payments-mortgagors in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-mortgagors in military service. 203.345 Section 203.345 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Forbearance Relief for Military Personnel § 203.345 Postponement of principal payments—mortgagors in...

  15. 24 CFR 203.345 - Postponement of principal payments-mortgagors in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-mortgagors in military service. 203.345 Section 203.345 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Forbearance Relief for Military Personnel § 203.345 Postponement of principal payments—mortgagors in...

  16. 24 CFR 203.345 - Postponement of principal payments-mortgagors in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-mortgagors in military service. 203.345 Section 203.345 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Forbearance Relief for Military Personnel § 203.345 Postponement of principal payments—mortgagors in...

  17. 24 CFR 203.345 - Postponement of principal payments-mortgagors in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-mortgagors in military service. 203.345 Section 203.345 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Forbearance Relief for Military Personnel § 203.345 Postponement of principal payments—mortgagors in...

  18. 24 CFR 203.345 - Postponement of principal payments-mortgagors in military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-mortgagors in military service. 203.345 Section 203.345 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Forbearance Relief for Military Personnel § 203.345 Postponement of principal payments—mortgagors in...

  19. 20 CFR 408.420 - What evidence of World War II military service do you need to give us?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What evidence of World War II military... SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Military Service § 408.420 What evidence of World War II military service do you need to give us? (a) Kinds of evidence you can give us....

  20. 20 CFR 408.420 - What evidence of World War II military service do you need to give us?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What evidence of World War II military... SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Military Service § 408.420 What evidence of World War II military service do you need to give us? (a) Kinds of evidence you can give us....

  1. 20 CFR 408.420 - What evidence of World War II military service do you need to give us?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What evidence of World War II military... SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Military Service § 408.420 What evidence of World War II military service do you need to give us? (a) Kinds of evidence you can give us....

  2. 20 CFR 408.420 - What evidence of World War II military service do you need to give us?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What evidence of World War II military... SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Military Service § 408.420 What evidence of World War II military service do you need to give us? (a) Kinds of evidence you can give us....

  3. 20 CFR 408.420 - What evidence of World War II military service do you need to give us?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What evidence of World War II military... SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements Military Service § 408.420 What evidence of World War II military service do you need to give us? (a) Kinds of evidence you can give us....

  4. [The measurement of bronchial hyperreactivity for military service fitness].

    PubMed

    Ferrante, E; Grasso, S; Corbo, G M; Ciappi, G

    1991-10-01

    The authors discuss the efficacy of methacholine challenge to discriminate fit subjects to military service. We evaluated the relation between bronchial hyperreactivity and clinical symptoms, airways caliber and atopic status in a group of italian conscripts who reported to have bronchial asthma. Five-hundred-four subjects were studied. Bronchial hyperreactivity was measured by methacholine test, and atopic status was assessed by skin-tests. A measurable PC20 FEV1 was detected in 424 subjects. On the basis of the methacholine threshold concentration the overall sample was divided in four categories. The four categories differed as regards onset of disease, lung function and skin reactivity towards Dermatophagoides Pter, whereas no difference was found as regards skin reactivity towards Grass. In the group evaluated in spring, the four categories differed as regards skin reactivity towards Grass. In conclusion we found that bronchial hyperreactivity is related to clinical history, lung function and atopic status; the measurement of bronchial hyperreactivity is important to evaluate conscripts referring bronchial asthma.

  5. Low back pain during military service predicts low back pain later in life

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Ville M.; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Santtila, Matti; Pihlajamäki, Harri

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess associations between physician diagnosed unspecified low back pain (LBP) during compulsory military service and self-reported LBP and physical fitness measured on average four years after military service. From a total of 1155 persons who had been pass medical examination for military service and who had completed physically demanding military training between 1997 and 2007, 778 men participated in a refresher military training course and physical tests. In this study, the association between LBP during military service and LBP in later life in addition to the association between LBP and physical fitness were examined. A total of 219 out of 778 participants (28%) had visited a physician due to some musculoskeletal symptom (ICD-10 M-diagnosis) during their military service. Seventy-four participants (9.5%) had visited a physician due to unspecified LBP during their service, and 41 (5.3%) had temporarily been absent from duty due to LBP. At the follow-up examination, 122 (15.7%) had reported LBP during the past month. LBP during military service was associated with self-reported LBP in the follow-up (p = 0.004). Of those who had been absent from duty due to LBP during their military service, 13 (31.7%) reported LBP during the past month. In risk factor analysis, no initial health behaviour and physical performance variables were associated with baseline LBP in the follow-up. The main finding of the present study was that unspecified LBP during military service predicts LBP in later life. On the basis of previous literature, it is also known that LBP is a common symptom and thus, one cannot expect to be symptomless the entire life. Interestingly, none of the health behaviours nor the physical performance studied in the follow-up were associated with baseline LBP. It appears that individuals prone to LBP have symptoms during physically demanding military service and also later in their life. PMID:28282419

  6. Is Military Disability Compensation Adequate to Offset Civilian Earnings Losses from Service-Connected Disabilities?

    PubMed

    Buddin, Richard; Han, Bing

    2012-01-01

    The Departments of Defense and Veterans' Affairs (DoD and VA) pay about $35 billion in disability compensation to about 3.2 million veterans each year. Their disabilities range from battlefield injuries to health conditions like diabetes and asthma. This research examines the adequacy of disability compensation to offset the reduction in civilian earnings opportunities that are associated with service-connected disabilities (SCDs). The authors focus on cohorts of veterans who left active military service between fiscal year (FY) 1993 and FY 2004. They track these veterans' civilian earnings and labor force participation for up to 12 years, from 1994 through 2005, compare the labor-market success of veterans with and without SCDs, and recommend changes to disability compensation.

  7. Alcohol Use and Trauma Exposure among Male and Female Veterans Before, During, and After Military Service

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Michelle L.; Runnals, Jennifer; Pearson, Matthew R.; Miller, Marinell; Fairbank, John A.; Brancu, Mira

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined lifespan and combat-related trauma exposure as predictors of alcohol use among male and female veterans. Posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms were examined as mediators of the effects of trauma exposure on alcohol use. Data were examined from 1825 (1450 male, 375 female) veterans and active duty service members who took part in a multi-site research study conducted through the Department of Veterans Affairs Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (VISN 6 MIRECC). For both men and women, depressive symptoms significantly mediated the effects of non-combat trauma exposure experienced before, during and after the military, as well as combat- exposure, on alcohol use. With posttraumatic stress symptoms, the models for men and women differed. For men, the effects of non-combat trauma exposure during and after military service, and combat exposure, on alcohol use were mediated by PTSD symptoms; however, for women, PTSD symptoms did not mediate these relationships. Findings are discussed in the context of potential gender differences in response to trauma such as use of alcohol to cope with traumatic events. PMID:24054989

  8. [Psychological aspects of voluntary induced abortion among fathers drafted into military service].

    PubMed

    Dubouis-bonnefond, J C; Galle-tessonneau, J R

    1982-06-01

    This work examines the symptomatology of 4 young men recently drafted into military service in France who had negative reactions to their partner's abortions. The men ranged in age from 19-21 years. In all cases there was frank depression, accompanied or not by activity illegal in the eyes of the military (unauthorized leave) or of the common law (theft, use of drugs). The abortion was either a pretext for a rapid decompensation of a pathological personality, or it occasioned a crisis in personalities previously relatively well adapted despite immaturity, psychopathology, or weakness. The organization of the couples tended to be recent, unstable, precarious, and without a promising future either affectively or socioeconomically. Either the woman decided to seek an abortion herself and presented the father with an accomplished fact, or the couple tacitly made a joint decision to seek an abortion, in which case the subsequent illegal activity of the father tended to be more serious. Each of the men had conflictive family relationships with their fathers especially perceived as hostile and rejecting. All of the men had attempted suicide or had considered it. Induction into the army has traditionally been seen as a rite of passage to adult life, but in some cases the emotional distances it causes and the socioeconomic difficulties it aggravates prevent the man from undertaking the responsibilities of fatherhood. In these cases it is as if social maturity can be acquired only at the expense of fatherhood; the 2 states cannot coexist. Frustration and sacrifice of fatherhood nevertheless may occasion loss of the social maturity stemming from military service. The abortion is followed by guilt, psychic suffering, and behavioral problems leading to expulsion from the military. On the symbolic level the man does not become either man or father. Another point is that depression, anxiety, and guilt are an affective expression of the idea of death; the embryo is thought of as

  9. [Regularity of psychophysiological adaptation to military-professional activity among staff of Northern Fleet].

    PubMed

    Sementsov, V K; Khankevich, Iu R; Mosiagin, I G; Maruniak, S V; Chesnokova, V N

    2010-03-01

    There were examined regularities of psycho-physiological adaptation of different categories of military-navy specialists, were detected periods of maximum decrease of compensation abilities among sailor-men and staff reserve of Naval Fleet from students. Were educed psycho-physiological strategies of adaptation of military-navy specialists in dependence of reference level of adaptation capabilities. Was detected the influence on the process of psycho-physiological adaptation to service activity of young specialists of a complex of psychological and social factors. Was educed the influence of ulterior motive on success of psycho-physiological adaptation to new conditions of environment. Was elaborated a complex of measures on optimization of accompaniment of adaptation of military-navy specialists and was given financial evaluation of it's implementation.

  10. Dental utilization by spouses of active duty U.S. military personnel.

    PubMed

    Chisick, M C; Poindexter, F R; York, A K

    1998-03-01

    This study explores dental utilization and access barriers to dental care for spouses of active duty U.S. military personnel as reported by their military sponsor. It also compares dental utilization of spouses and civilians. The data, collected using self-administered questionnaires between April 1994 and January 1995, are from 5,732 Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marine personnel with nonmilitary spouses. Comparative civilian data are from the most recent (1985-1986) U.S. oral health survey of working adults. Results show that dental utilization of military spouses parallels that of civilians. Cost was the most commonly cited barrier to dental care for spouses. Logistic regression results show that the likelihood of a spouse having seen a dentist within the past year is influenced by insurance status, sex, branch of service of sponsor, and rank of sponsor. Insurance status is the strongest predictor of dental utilization for spouses.

  11. 32 CFR 700.847 - Responsibility of a master of an in-service ship of the Military Sealift Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a master of an in-service ship of the Military Sealift Command. (a) In an in-service ship of the... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibility of a master of an in-service ship of the Military Sealift Command. 700.847 Section 700.847 National Defense Department of...

  12. 47 CFR 63.66 - Closure of or reduction of hours of service at telephone exchanges at military establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of service at telephone exchanges at military establishments. Where a carrier desires to close or reduce hours of service at a telephone exchange located at a military establishment because of the... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Closure of or reduction of hours of service...

  13. 32 CFR 1630.48 - Class 4-A-A: Registrant who has performed military service for a foreign nation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... military service for a foreign nation. 1630.48 Section 1630.48 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.48 Class 4-A-A: Registrant who has performed military service for a foreign nation. In Class 4-A-A shall be placed any...

  14. Developing a New Transition Course for Military Service Members in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furtek, Diane

    2012-01-01

    As a result of President Obama's drawdown of military troops in Afghanistan and Iraq, many service members will be returning to the United States. With service members returning to civilian life and to campuses, the relevance to a changing education environment is enormous both for this population and for today's higher education institutions.…

  15. 32 CFR 1630.16 - Class 1-O: Conscientious objector to all military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class 1-O: Conscientious objector to all military service. 1630.16 Section 1630.16 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.16 Class 1-O: Conscientious objector to all...

  16. 32 CFR 1630.16 - Class 1-O: Conscientious objector to all military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Class 1-O: Conscientious objector to all... SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION RULES § 1630.16 Class 1-O: Conscientious objector to all military... and service in the Armed Forces shall be classified in Class 1-O. (b) Upon the written request of...

  17. Perceived deprivation in active duty military nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Julie A; Fallacaro, Michael D; Pellegrini, Joseph E

    2009-02-01

    There is a shortage of military Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs). Relative deprivation is a perception of unfairness due to discrepancies between what one has and what one could or should have that is dependent on feelings (subjective data) and facts (objective data). Feelings of relative deprivation could contribute to the military CRNA shortage. The purposes of this study were to measure relative deprivation in active-duty military CRNAs and explore variables that correlate with relative deprivation. The descriptive, correlational study was conducted using a self-administered survey sent to 435 active-duty Army, Navy, and Air Force CRNAs. Surveys were distributed to subjects by mail and could be answered by mail or by secured website. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Analysis of the data revealed a calculated response rate of 57.7%. There was no significant correlation (P < .05) between years as a CRNA, military pay, promotion opportunity, or scope of practice/autonomy and relative deprivation. Correlations of the psychological factors "wanting" and "deserving" with relative deprivation were significant (P < .001). Further research is indicated to identify definitive factors that can be modified to improve feelings of deprivation as they relate to retention and recruitment of military CRNAs.

  18. Parental Military Service, Agent Orange Exposure, and the Risk of Rhabdomyosarcoma in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Grufferman, Seymour; Lupo, Philip J.; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Danysh, Heather E.; Erhardt, Erik B.; Ognjanovic, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of parental military service-related exposures and rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) risk in offspring using data from a large case-control study of childhood RMS. Study design Cases (n=319) were enrolled from the third trial run by the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group. Population-based controls (n=319) were pair-matched to cases on race, sex, and age. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate parental military service-related exposures and their associations with childhood RMS by generating adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Statistical significance was defined as p<0.05. Results There were no significant associations between parental military service and childhood RMS. The strongest association was with maternal military service; however, this association was attenuated and did not remain significant after adjusting for covariates (aOR=2.75, 95% CI: 0.71, 10.62). An elevated effect estimate was found when assessing paternal exposure to AO and childhood RMS but was not statistically significant (aOR=1.72, 95% CI: 0.55, 5.41). Conclusions We found little evidence that parental military service of AO exposure influences the risk of RMS in offspring these factors influence disease risk. These findings are notable in light of the continuing controversies surrounding the intergenerational effects of AO exposure. PMID:25241182

  19. Health Potential of Female Candidates to the Professional Military Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Alicja; Sokolowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess health and social characteristics of female candidates for professional officers and non-commissioned officers of Polish Army. Material and methods: All female students of officer and non-commissioned officer Military Academies (16 each) were studied in 2009. Two questionnaires were applied in the study: IPAQ (short) for…

  20. Influence of military activities on raptor abundance and behavior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schueck, Linda S.; Marzluff, J.M.; Steenhof, Karen

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the influence of military training on the abundance and behavior of raptors at a military training area in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in Idaho during the breeding seasons of 1991a??1994. Raptor counts on military training ranges did not differ when we compared all training days to all non-training days. However, during one period of intensive military training in one breeding season, raptor counts were lower during training than on non-training days. During training, Northern Harriers (Circus cyaneus) did not alter their behavior on training days. In years when prey numbers were low, falcons, hawks, and eagles perched and flew at low levels less often and flew at higher altitudes more often during training than they did when training did not occur. We observed fewer prey capture attempts on ranges on days with training than on days without training. Specific types of military training activity affected counts of raptors on ranges. The lowest raptor counts were associated with firing of artillery, small arms, and main turret guns or machine guns on tanks. Raptor counts associated with tank preparation (i.e., assembling and loading ammunition), driving, laser training, and convoy traffic were similar to non-training periods.

  1. Military and civilian emergency aeromedical services: common goals and different approaches.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, R A

    1997-01-01

    Military and civilian organizations in the U.S. operate separate but parallel emergency aeromedical services. Despite common origins, military and civilian approaches and methods have diverged. This article compares and contrasts the capabilities, priorities, safety, equipment, training and personnel of the largest military service, the U.S. Army, to civilian rotary wing (helicopter) emergency aeromedical programs. The different successes of military and civilian emergency aeromedical programs can be considered for use to improve the services of each. In general, Army programs operate larger aircraft and utilize two pilots per aircraft. Safety is a high priority and the Army aeromedical safety record is excellent. The Army also places a high degree of emphasis on crashworthiness and protective gear for the crew. Most civilian air Emergency Medical Service (EMS) programs operate small to moderate-sized aircraft flying with a single pilot. The recent safety record has improved dramatically. Civilian programs may add to their safety by considering two pilots and incorporating the crashworthy and protective advancements made by the military. Civilian programs fly with two highly trained medical technicians, nurses or physicians, equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment. Army helicopters fly with one lesser-trained medical crewmember and less equipment. Improved combat casualty care and battlefield survival may be possible by increasing both the number and training of the medical attendants on Army aircraft.

  2. Paternal military service in Vietnam and the risk of late adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Aschengrau, A; Monson, R R

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between paternal military service in Vietnam and the risk of late adverse pregnancy outcomes, we conducted a case-control study of women who delivered infants from August 1977 until March 1980 at Boston Hospital for Women. Paternal military service history among 857 congenital anomaly cases, 61 stillbirth cases, and 48 neonatal death cases were compared with that of 998 normal controls. Military service veterans were identified by crossmatching identifying information from obstetric records with state and national military records. After controlling for confounding variables, we found that the Vietnam veterans' relative risk of fathering an infant with one or more major malformations was 1.7 (95% CI = 0.8, 3.5) compared to non-Vietnam veterans. The increased risk was present in several organ systems and did not seem to be related to a particular type of defect. No associations or highly unstable associations were found between paternal military service in Vietnam and the occurrence of congenital anomalies overall, minor malformations, normal variants, stillbirths, and neonatal deaths. These findings should be viewed with caution since maternal and delivery characteristics appear to have contributed to the etiology of several of the major malformations among the Vietnam veterans' children. PMID:2400033

  3. Military Service and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in a Population-based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Cudkowicz, Merit E.; Johnson, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Military service has been suggested to be associated with an increased risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but only one prospective study—of a volunteer cohort—has examined this question. Methods: We prospectively assessed the relation between service in the military and ALS mortality among participants in the National Longitudinal Mortality Study, a population-representative cohort of U.S. men and women surveyed from 1973 through 2002. Participant follow-up was conducted from 1979 through 2002 for ALS mortality. There were 696,743 men and 392,571 women who were 25 years old or more with military service data. In this group, there were 375 male ALS deaths and 96 female ALS deaths. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards. Results: Men who served in the military had an increased adjusted ALS death rate [HR: 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98, 1.53] compared with those who did not serve. An increase in ALS mortality was found among those who served during World War II (HR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.91) but not during other time periods. This pattern of results was similar for women, but with larger confidence intervals (HR for military service: 1.26; 95% CI: 0.29, 5.59; HR for service during World War II: 2.03; 95% CI: 0.45, 9.05). Conclusions: Military personnel have an increased risk of ALS, which may be specific to certain service periods although there was no data on actual deployment. Because of the longer follow-up time for World War II veterans, we cannot rule out that increased risk for those who served during other periods would be seen with further follow-up. PMID:26414854

  4. Simulation and Optimization Methodologies for Military Transportation Network Routing and Scheduling and for Military Medical Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-03

    optimization into simulations, although to a somewhat lesser extent than we have. In his doctoral thesis , Travis Cusick (Cusick, 2000) models and optimizes a... thesis (Grindey, 2002) simulates a military brigade airdrop. In the simulation, different aircraft may perform different roles. Grindey uses an integer...Off-load at APOD OBBS 1298 1553 1298 1553 2563 Recovery Base LEMO 1755 1950 1755 1950 1962 Return to APOE KDOV 2412 2412 2412 2412 2838 Figure 2: A

  5. Why Women Join the Military: Enlistment Decisions and Postdeployment Experiences of Service Members and Veterans.

    PubMed

    Mankowski, Mariann; Tower, Leslie E; Brandt, Cynthia A; Mattocks, Kristin

    2015-10-01

    Over the past three decades women's enlistment has continued to increase. In an effort to help social workers better meet the needs of female veterans, this study sought to learn women's enlistment motivations and postdeployment experiences. This qualitative study was nested within the Women Veterans Cohort Study. Using a semistructured interview guide, authors interviewed 18 enlisted female service members and veterans. The themes that emerged, based on grounded theory, included not only opportunity and calling, but also outcomes. Unexpectedly, enlistment resulted in a professional military career, with over half of the participants making the military their life's work. Further study on the motivation, retention, and the reintegration needs of women postmilitary is necessary, particularly with military recruitment targets of 20 percent women by the year 2020 and the increased awareness of the military as a potentially hostile work environment for women.

  6. Improving maternal and newborn nursing services in a military medical center.

    PubMed

    Padderatz, A Y

    1999-07-01

    As military treatment facility leaders become more knowledgeable regarding apportionment of resources, decision making involving primary family member support services must be clear and concise. Continuing in its effort to meet the maternal and child health care expectations of its patients, a large military treatment facility command instituted several changes to consolidate its maternal and newborn services. This article presents findings and outcomes of actions taken in support of quality improvement and efficient use of budgetary resources to maximize patient satisfaction and bring about cost savings.

  7. Civilian Returns to Earnings from Prior Military Service.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    65 2. Intelligence-------------------------------- 65 3. Health -------------------------------------- 65 4. Marital Status...APPENDIX C - AGE BY VETERAN STATUS BY RACE -------------- 116 APPENDIX D - IQ SCORE BY VETERAN STATUS BY RACE ----------118 APPENDIX E - HEALTH BY VETERAN...RATE X PART TIME SCHOOL PART RATE X FULL TIME UNION MEMBERSHIP X WORK ETHOS X GEOGRAPHIC MOBILITY X GOVERNMENT WORKER X HEALTH X X MILITARY BASE X X

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Military Service Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-07

    quantitative nucleic acid result for HIV infection according to a Food and Drug Administration-approved test. ...07 JUN 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Military...and Readiness (USD(P&R)),” June 23, 2008 (b) DoD Instruction 6485.01, “Human Immunodeficiency Virus ,” October 17, 2006 (hereby cancelled) (c) DoD

  9. Life-Course Timing and Sequencing of Marriage and Military Service and Their Effects on Marital Stability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Call, Vaughn R. A.; Teachman, Jay D.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the life-course sequencing hypothesis that marriage before military service has a greater disruptive effect on marital stability than marriage during or after military service. Used event-history data from a 13-year panel study of 2,857 white males from Washington State high schools in 1966. Compares Vietnam combat veterans (n=610),…

  10. 32 CFR 1630.11 - Class 1-A-0: Conscientious objector available for noncombatant military service only.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class 1-A-0: Conscientious objector available for noncombatant military service only. 1630.11 Section 1630.11 National Defense Other Regulations...: Conscientious objector available for noncombatant military service only. In accord with part 1636 of...

  11. ENLISTED MEN SEPARATING FROM THE MILITARY SERVICE AS A POTENTIAL SOURCE OF TEACHERS FOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HENSEL, JAMES W.; AND OTHERS

    THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO DETERMINE WHETHER THE MILITARY SERVICES OFFERED A POTENTIAL SOURCE FOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL TEACHERS. MILITARY OFFICIALS DESIGNATED ONE ARMY, ONE NAVY, AND ONE AIR FORCE BASE WHICH REPRESENTED A TYPICAL SEPARATION CENTER FOR EACH PARTICULAR SERVICE. A QUESTIONNAIRE, ADMINISTERED BY DESIGNATED BASE…

  12. 47 CFR 63.66 - Closure of or reduction of hours of service at telephone exchanges at military establishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... telephone exchanges at military establishments. 63.66 Section 63.66 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS..., REDUCTION, OUTAGE AND IMPAIRMENT OF SERVICE BY COMMON CARRIERS; AND GRANTS OF RECOGNIZED PRIVATE OPERATING... of service at telephone exchanges at military establishments. Where a carrier desires to close...

  13. [The outstanding figure of domestic military and civil public health services].

    PubMed

    Pavlovskiĭ, L N

    2011-01-01

    The article presents data on the outstanding Soviet theorist and the organizer of Health Care, full member of Academy of Medical Science of the U.S.S.R., the Hero of Socialist Work, the colonel general of a health service E.I. Smirnov who has developed a lot on the theory and practice of civil and military public health services. Its contribution to communication between organizational forms of medical maintenance of armies and principles of military art, and also dependence of quality of medical aid to the population on the organizational structure of a treatment-and-prophylactic network were considered. E.I. Smirnova's personal role in improvement of organizational forms of medical maintenance of armies, theory and practice development of intermediate treatments with evacuation to destination, in the organization of antiepidemic maintenance of armies and development number of actual questions of modern military medicine are shown in the article.

  14. Military positions and post-service occupational mobility of Union Army veterans, 1861–1880

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chulhee

    2009-01-01

    Although the Civil War has attracted a great deal of scholarly attention, little is known about how different wartime experiences of soldiers influenced their civilian lives after the war. This paper examines how military rank and duty of Union Army soldiers while in service affected their post-service occupational mobility. Higher ranks and non-infantry duties appear to have provided more opportunities for developing skills, especially those required for white-collar jobs. Among the recruits who were unskilled workers at the time of enlistment, commissioned and non-commissioned officers were much more likely to move up to a white-collar job by 1880. Similarly, unskilled recruits assigned to white-collar military duties were more likely to enter a white-collar occupation by 1880. The higher occupational mobility of higher-ranking soldiers is likely to have resulted from disparate human capital accumulations offered by their military positions rather than from their superior abilities. PMID:20234792

  15. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  16. The Spillover Effects of Military Communities on the Need for Health Care Safety-Net Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    California Health Interview Survey.” http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu/shic-county.html UNC Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research...D. Kallich, and Dana Goldman . 2000. “Providing Managed Care Options for a Large Population: Evaluating the CHAMPUS Reform Initiative.”. Military

  17. Military and Civilian L2 Instructors: Decoding Perceptions of U.S. Service Academy Cadets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Zachary F.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether cadets at a U.S. service academy perceived attitudinal differences toward their military and civilian L2 instructors along three variables: foreign language expertise, communicative anxiety, and relatability. Cadets' proficiency levels (divided by beginning and intermediate classes) and current instructor (civilian or…

  18. Technology complementing military psychology programs and services in the Pacific Regional Medical Command.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Van Horn, Sandra; Ruseborn, Daniel; Samuel, Kevin M

    2013-08-01

    The Tripler Army Medical Center is the only federal tertiary care hospital serving the Pacific Regional Medical Command. Due to Tripler's large area of responsibility, many behavioral health professionals are starting to employ more technology during their sessions. As explained in this article, virtual reality and telepsychology efforts are proving to benefit military service members and their families in the Pacific Rim.

  19. Supporting School Success for Homeless Children of Veterans and Active Duty Military Members. Best Practices in Interagency Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This brief is designed for local staff of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), state McKinney-Vento coordinators and school district McKinney-Vento liaisons, educators, and other providers of services to active members of the military and veterans, and their children. It provides basic information to assist homeless children of veterans or…

  20. The Cold War and Modern Memory: Veterans Reflect on Military Service

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Alair

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses data from focused interviews to look at how veterans who served primarily during the peacetime Cold War portrayed the effects of military service. Most veterans described being a soldier, sailor, or airman as a neutral, transitional role. Veterans also described their service as having features that are consistent with views of such service as both a positive turning point and a negative disruption. However, only one veteran described military service as operating as a positive turning point in his own life, and just two described it has having been a disruption in their lives. In addition, veterans who served as officers described learning leadership and confidence in the armed forces, which may help explain an observed quantitative officer premium. This latter finding is consistent with a view of the armed forces as facilitating the accumulation of advantage. PMID:25328253

  1. Military service, deployments, and exposures in relation to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis etiology and survival.

    PubMed

    Beard, John D; Kamel, Freya

    2015-01-01

    Rates of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have been reported to be higher among US military veterans, who currently number more than 21 million, but the causal factor(s) has not been identified. We conducted a review to examine the weight of evidence for associations between military service, deployments, and exposures and ALS etiology and survival. Thirty articles or abstracts published through 2013 were reviewed. Although the current evidence suggests a positive association with ALS etiology, it is too limited to draw firm conclusions regarding associations between military service and ALS etiology or survival. Some evidence suggests that deployment to the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War may be associated with ALS etiology, but there is currently no strong evidence that any particular military exposure is associated with ALS etiology. Future studies should address the limitations of previous ones, such as reliance on mortality as a surrogate for incidence, a dearth of survival analyses, lack of clinical data, low statistical power, and limited exposure assessment. The Genes and Environmental Exposures in Veterans with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (GENEVA) Study is one such study, but additional research is needed to determine whether military-related factors are associated with ALS and to assess potential prevention strategies.

  2. Military Service, Deployments, and Exposures in Relation to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Etiology and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Beard, John D.; Kamel, Freya

    2015-01-01

    Rates of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have been reported to be higher among US military veterans, who currently number more than 21 million, but the causal factor(s) has not been identified. We conducted a review to examine the weight of evidence for associations between military service, deployments, and exposures and ALS etiology and survival. Thirty articles or abstracts published through 2013 were reviewed. Although the current evidence suggests a positive association with ALS etiology, it is too limited to draw firm conclusions regarding associations between military service and ALS etiology or survival. Some evidence suggests that deployment to the 1990–1991 Persian Gulf War may be associated with ALS etiology, but there is currently no strong evidence that any particular military exposure is associated with ALS etiology. Future studies should address the limitations of previous ones, such as reliance on mortality as a surrogate for incidence, a dearth of survival analyses, lack of clinical data, low statistical power, and limited exposure assessment. The Genes and Environmental Exposures in Veterans with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (GENEVA) Study is one such study, but additional research is needed to determine whether military-related factors are associated with ALS and to assess potential prevention strategies. PMID:25365170

  3. 20 CFR 404.133 - When we give you quarters of coverage based on military service to establish a period of disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... on military service to establish a period of disability. 404.133 Section 404.133 Employees' Benefits... based on military service to establish a period of disability. For purposes of establishing a period of disability only, we give you quarters of coverage (QCs) for your military service before 1957 (see subpart...

  4. Civilian Demonstrations Near the Military Installation: Restraints on Military Surveillance and Other Intelligence Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    may be used as a tool to deter lawful political activity, and courts may view overt military surveillance as evidence of a bad faith purpose instead of...a good faith physical security purpose.19 Evidence of bad faith makes it more likely that a court will find standing.󈨧 Surveillance can become...event of a delu~ohoal aflhto srenewved or the iiaUtKi’i is o)therisie nainr and assorted Srauik" fils may be McAWi~i * retnainabh!e munder this

  5. Higher Education Benefits for Post-9/11 Military Service Members and Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-17

    examinations that provide college credit for knowledge and experience gained in the military to various kinds of tuition assistance and student aid...veterans could have in navigating and accessing these benefits, the challenges veterans face in completing college degrees, and how “non-traditional...For example, each branch of service has its own tuition assistance (TA) program, which provide funds that eligible service members can use toward

  6. Test-retest reliability of four computerized neurocognitive assessment tools in an active duty military population.

    PubMed

    Cole, Wesley R; Arrieux, Jacques P; Schwab, Karen; Ivins, Brian J; Qashu, Felicia M; Lewis, Steven C

    2013-11-01

    Computerized neurocognitive assessment tools (NCATs) are increasingly used for baseline and post-concussion assessments. To date, NCATs have not demonstrated strong test-retest reliabilities. Most studies have used non-military populations and different methodologies, complicating the determination of the utility of NCATs in military populations. The test-retest reliability of four NCATs (Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics 4 [ANAM4], CNS-Vital Signs, CogState, and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test [ImPACT]) was investigated in a healthy active duty military sample. Four hundred and nineteen Service Members were randomly assigned to take one NCAT and 215 returned after approximately 30 days for retest. Participants deemed to have inadequate effort during one or both testing sessions, according to the NCATs scoring algorithms, were removed from analyses. Each NCAT had at least one reliability score (intraclass correlation) in the "adequate" range (.70-.79), only ImPACT had one score considered "high" (.80-.89), and no scores met "very high" criteria (.90-.99). However, overall test-retest reliabilities in four NCATs in a military sample are consistent with reliabilities reported in the literature and are lower than desired for clinical decision-making.

  7. Committee on Military Nutrition Research Activity Report 1986 - 1992.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-29

    Heart Study. ubrin the effects of dietary Intervention strategies en verious health status parametrs such as body weight . blood lipid. and blood...approach the upper limt of acceptable body weight as determined by military sanards. The question ares whether overweight wome would resort to holi In order...or 1.6 grams/kilogram of body weight for adults . 4. Balance food intake and physical activity to maintain appropriate body weight . 5. The Committee

  8. [Morbidity in draft military personnel].

    PubMed

    Mukhametzhanov, A M; Smagulov, N K

    2015-01-01

    Military service activity appeared to influence health state of military personnel. Body strain at initial stages of the service, connected with stress situation, affects general body resistance and manifests in higher general morbidity level with transitory disablement that decreases with adaptation. Based on normalized intensity parameters, the equation enables to ease a procedure of evaluation and forecast of transitory disablement morbidity in draft military personnel.

  9. U.S. military officer participation in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Epidemic Intelligence Service (1951-2001).

    PubMed

    Noah, Donald L; Ostroff, Stephen M; Cropper, Thomas L; Thacker, Stephen B

    2003-05-01

    The Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) was created in 1951 to provide epidemiologists to investigate natural and intentional disease epidemics. From an initial class of 23 U.S. citizens, the program has evolved into a globally recognized, hands-on learning experience, accepting approximately 65 to 75 new officers each year. The first U.S. military epidemic intelligence service officer (EISO) was accepted into the program in 1994. Since that time, 12 such officers have completed, or have begun, EIS training. They have comprised 2.1% of all EISOs from 1994 to 2001 and 0.47% of all EISOs. This total has included nine Air Force veterinarians, one Army veterinarian, one Army physician, and one Navy physician. Each military EISO had the opportunity to lead investigations of significant public health events (e.g., Ebola, monkeypox, malaria, Nipah virus, West Nile fever, and anthrax outbreaks). All graduates from the military returned to active duty assignments in operational medical units, research institutes, or the intelligence community.

  10. The impact of military activities on the concentration of mercury in soils of military training grounds and marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Gębka, Karolina; Bełdowski, Jacek; Bełdowska, Magdalena

    2016-11-01

    Military activities have been conducted on land and at sea. Both during conflicts and in peace time, some regions served as a military training ground which included firing positions and bunkers. Mercury fulminate has been used in ammunition primers and detonators. Certain amount of ammunition was dumped into the Baltic Sea after the Second World War. Because of corroded containers, mercury can be released into the marine environment. The soil and sediment samples were taken from military training grounds, southern Baltic in 2014 and 2015. The concentration of mercury was determined by AMA-254 analyzer. Hg concentration was higher in the places of military activities, as compared to other areas. Ten times increased concentration of Hg was determined in soil sample collected in area of active gun range compared to the reference station. The significant higher concentration of mercury was detected in stations where chemical warfare agents were found.

  11. Military Base Closures and Affected Defense Department Civil Service Employees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-07

    5 Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Voluntary Separation Incentive Payments (VSIPs...be eligible for transition assistance. Voluntary Early Retirement Authority (VERA) Employees who are at least 50 years of age with at least 20 years...of creditable service (or 25 years of service at any age) may be eligible for early retirement . These requirements apply to individuals covered by

  12. Soft tissue sarcoma and military service in Vietnam: a case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.; Enziger, F.; Breslin, P.; Feil, M.; Lee, Y.; Shepard, B.

    1987-10-01

    A case-control study was conducted in men who were of draftable age during the Vietnam conflict to examine the association of soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) with military service in Vietnam as well as other host and environmental risk factors. A total of 217 STS cases selected from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology were compared to 599 controls for Vietnam service, occupational and nonoccupational exposure to various chemicals, occupational history, medical history, and life-style (smoking, alcohol, coffee, etc.). Military service information was verified by a review of the patient's military personnel records. Other information was ascertained from a telephone interview with either subjects or their next of kin. Cases and controls were stratified on the basis of the hospital type (civilian, Veterans Administration, and military); the Mantel-Haenszel estimate of the odds ratio (OR), adjusted for the effects of the stratification variable, was calculated. Vietnam veterans in general did not have an increased risk of STS when compared to those men who had never been in Vietnam (OR, 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-1.36). Subgroups of Vietnam veterans who had higher estimated opportunities for Agent Orange exposure seemed to be at greater risk of STSs when their counterparts in Vietnam were taken as a reference group. However, this risk was not statistically significant.

  13. DSM-5 Criteria and Its Implications for Diagnosing PTSD in Military Service Members and Veterans.

    PubMed

    Guina, Jeffrey; Welton, Randon S; Broderick, Pamela J; Correll, Terry L; Peirson, Ryan P

    2016-05-01

    This review addresses how changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) criteria has the potential to affect the care and careers of those who have served in the military, where the diagnosis often determines fitness for duty and veterans' benefits. PTSD criteria changes were intended to integrate new knowledge acquired since previous DSM editions. Many believe the changes will improve diagnosis and treatment, but some worry these could have negative clinical, occupational, and legal consequences. We analyze the changes in classification, trauma definition, symptoms, symptom clusters, and subtypes and possible impacts on the military (e.g., over- and under-diagnosis, "drone" video exposure, subthreshold PTSD, and secondary PTSD). We also discuss critiques and proposals for future changes. Our objectives are to improve the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of those service members who have survived trauma and to improve policies related to the military mental healthcare and disability systems.

  14. [Health conditions and physical development of soldiers during enrollment in the Armed Forces of Ukraine and military service in 2001-2010].

    PubMed

    Didenko, L V; Ustinova, L A; Khyzhniak, M I

    2012-01-01

    Fitness of soldiers in military reserve for military service at the stage in the Armed Forces of Ukraine has been studied in the article. It has been established that the growing number of soldiers in military reserve with changes in health and physical condition indicates insufficient level of their health which has a negative impact on their capability and gradually on their fitness for military service. Priorities of changes in organization of the process of completion by human resources of the soldiers' military reserve in the Armed Forces of Ukraine during their transition towards professional army have been defined, to include optimization of criteria of fitness for military service.

  15. US military service members vaccinated against smallpox in 2003 and 2004 experience a slightly higher risk of hospitalization postvaccination.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Isabel G; Smith, Tyler C; Smith, Besa; Wells, Timothy S; Reed, Robert J; Ryan, Margaret A K

    2008-07-29

    This study explores adverse events severe enough to warrant hospitalization that may have been associated with receiving the smallpox vaccine in conjunction with military service. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify the risk of hospitalization among US active-duty military personnel during a 1-year period following receipt of the smallpox vaccine. The reference group consisted of active-duty military personnel who also received the smallpox vaccine after the conclusion of their health care observation period, allowing for comparison to a temporally and demographically similar population. The risk of hospitalization was slightly elevated among the postvaccine group for any-cause hospitalization and for hospitalization in several broad diagnostic categories. Hospitalizations for asthma, autoimmune diseases, and myopericarditis, were more likely in the postvaccine group. The increased risk of hospitalization for varied outcomes does not necessarily imply a cause-effect relationship, but it does offer areas for more focused study, using longitudinal data to explore the long-term impact of smallpox vaccination on the health of young adults.

  16. Rank, job stress, psychological distress and physical activity among military personnel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical fitness is one of the most important qualities in armed forces personnel. However, little is known about the association between the military environment and the occupational and leisure-time dimensions of the physical activity practiced there. This study assessed the association of rank, job stress and psychological distress with physical activity levels (overall and by dimensions). Methods This a cross-sectional study among 506 military service personnel of the Brazilian Army examined the association of rank, job stress and psychological distress with physical activity through multiple linear regression using a generalized linear model. Results The adjusted models showed that the rank of lieutenant was associated with most occupational physical activity (β = 0.324; CI 95% 0.167; 0.481); “high effort and low reward” was associated with more occupational physical activity (β = 0.224; CI 95% 0.098; 0.351) and with less physical activity in sports/physical exercise in leisure (β = −0.198; CI 95% −0.384; −0.011); and psychological distress was associated with less physical activity in sports/exercise in leisure (β = −0.184; CI 95% −0.321; −0.046). Conclusions The results of this study show that job stress and rank were associated with higher levels of occupational physical activity. Moreover job stress and psychological distress were associated with lower levels of physical activity in sports/exercises. In the military context, given the importance of physical activity and the psychosocial environment, both of which are related to health, these findings may offer input to institutional policies directed to identifying psychological distress early and improving work relationships, and to creating an environment more favorable to increasing the practice of leisure-time physical activity. PMID:23914802

  17. Analysis of Factors Influencing Inpatient and Outpatient Satisfaction with the Chinese Military Health Service

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng; Liu, Xu; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Lulu

    2016-01-01

    Background Relatively few articles have focused on exploring factors influencing soldiers’ overall satisfaction and differences between inpatients’ and outpatients’ satisfaction, particularly in the Chinese army. Elucidating factors influencing military inpatient and outpatient care separately and analyzing their differences may provide more information for the healthsystem. Methods The Revised China National Health Service Survey questionnaire was used in the survey. The questionnaire included 5 sections and 32 items concerning demographic, inpatient, and outpatient characteristics and perception variables for both inpatients and outpatients. Bivariate and multivariate techniques were used to reveal relationships between satisfaction and the variables assessed. Results Outpatients’ and inpatients’ overall satisfaction rates were 19.0% and 18.5%, respectively. The strongest determinant of outpatients’ satisfaction was satisfaction with doctor’s communication regarding therapeutic regimen followed by length of military service, level of trust in medical staff, and disease severity. Determinants of inpatients’ satisfactionincludedstaff categories, satisfaction with environment, and satisfaction with medical quality. Conclusion The factors influencing military outpatients’ satisfaction differed from those of inpatients. Exploring the causes of satisfaction and dissatisfaction with military health institutions is important in their fulfillment of their responsibility to maintain soldiers’ health. PMID:27007805

  18. Sonoran pronghorn habitat use on landscapes disturbed by military activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krausman, P.R.; Harris, L.K.; Haas, S.K.; Koenen, Kiana K. G.; Devers, P.; Bunting, D.; Barb, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Sonoran pronghorn (Antilocapra americana sonoriensis) population in the United States declined to ???33 animals in January 2003. Low population numbers and unstable recruitment are concerns for biologists managing this subspecies. We examined habitat use by pronghorn from 1999 to 2002 on a portion of the Barry M. Goldwater Range (BMGR) used for military exercises. We overlaid locations of pronghorn (n= 1,203) on 377 1-km2 blocks within the North (NTAC) and South Tactical Ranges (STAC), BMGR; we classified vegetation associations and disturbance status (e.g., airfields, targets, roads) for each block. Locations of pronghorn were distributed in proportion to vegetation associations on NTAC and STAC. Sightings of pronghorns were biased toward disturbed blocks, with 73% of locations of pronghorn occurring in proximity to mock airfields, high-explosive hills (e.g., targets for live high-explosive bombs and rockets), other targets, and roads. Disturbed landscapes on the BMGR may attract Sonoran pronghorn by creating favorable forage. Habitat manipulations simulating the effects of military disturbances on the landscape (e.g., improved forage) may improve remaining Sonoran pronghorn habitat. Antilocapra americana sonoriensis, Barry M. Goldwater Air Force Range, disturbed habitat, habitat availability, habitat use, military activity, Sonoran pronghorn.

  19. State Policies on Service Dogs for Military Veterans.

    PubMed

    Reed, James B

    2015-12-01

    U.S. service members returning home from combat often face physical, mental and emotional challenges. Providing service dogs to these veterans is one method being used successfully to help address the difficulties they face. Under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a service animal is defined as "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual or other mental disability." The work the dog undertakes must be directly related to the person's disability. Examples include guiding people who are blind, pulling a wheelchair, alerting a person with hearing loss, protecting a person having a seizure, and calming someone with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack or psychiatric episode.

  20. Military Sexual Assault: Chronology of Activity in Congress and Related Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-30

    or repeated, threatening sexual harassment that occurred while the veteran was in the military.” Both men and women can experience MST during their...from the Academic Program Year (APY) 2011- 2012 Report on Sexual Harassment and Violence at the United States Military Service Academies.3 According to...release.aspx?releaseid=15585 3 “DOD Evaluates Sexual Harassment and Prevention Response Efforts at Military Academies,” DOD News, December 21, 2012, at

  1. Neuropsychiatric Outcomes After Mefloquine Exposure Among U.S. Military Service Members.

    PubMed

    Eick-Cost, Angelia A; Hu, Zheng; Rohrbeck, Patricia; Clark, Leslie L

    2017-01-11

    Mefloquine was widely prescribed to U.S. military service members until 2009 when use was limited to personnel with contraindications to doxycycline and no contraindications to mefloquine. The need to estimate the occurrence of neuropsychiatric outcomes (NPOs) in service members prescribed mefloquine warranted a comprehensive evaluation of this issue. Active component service members filling a prescription for mefloquine, doxycycline, or atovaquone/proguanil (A/P) between January 1, 2008 and June 30, 2013, were included in the analysis. The risk of developing incident NPOs and the risk of subsequent NPOs among subjects with a history of the condition were assessed. A total of 367,840 individuals were evaluated (36,538 received mefloquine, 318,421 received doxycycline, and 12,881 received A/P). Among deployed individuals prescribed mefloquine, an increased risk of incident anxiety was seen when compared with doxycycline recipients (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.12 [1.01-1.24]). Among nondeployed mefloquine recipients, an increased risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was seen when compared with A/P recipients (IRR = 1.83 [1.07-3.14]). An increased risk of tinnitus was seen for both deployed and nondeployed mefloquine recipients compared with A/P recipients (IRR = 1.81 [1.18-2.79]), 1.51 (1.13-2.03), respectively). Six percent of the mefloquine cohort had an NPO in the year before receiving mefloquine. When comparing individuals with a prior neuropsychiatric history to those without, the ratio of relative risks for adjustment disorder, anxiety, insomnia, and PTSD were higher (not statistically significant) for mefloquine compared with doxycycline. These findings emphasize the continued need for physicians prescribing mefloquine to conduct contraindication screening.

  2. Pathways of Risk and Resilience: Impact of a Family Resilience Program on Active-Duty Military Parents.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, William R; Lester, Patricia; Milburn, Norweeta; Woodward, Kirsten; Stein, Judith

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, studies into the impact of wartime deployment and related adversities on service members and their families have offered empirical support for systemic models of family functioning and a more nuanced understanding of the mechanisms by which stress and trauma reverberate across family and partner relationships. They have also advanced our understanding of the ways in which families may contribute to the resilience of children and parents contending with the stressors of serial deployments and parental physical and psychological injuries. This study is the latest in a series designed to further clarify the systemic functioning of military families and to explicate the role of resilient family processes in reducing symptoms of distress and poor adaptation among family members. Drawing upon the implementation of the Families Overcoming Under Stress (FOCUS) Family Resilience Program at 14 active-duty military installations across the United States, structural equation modeling was conducted with data from 434 marine and navy active-duty families who participated in the FOCUS program. The goal was to better understand the ways in which parental distress reverberates across military family systems and, through longitudinal path analytic modeling, determine the pathways of program impact on parental distress. The findings indicated significant cross-influence of distress between the military and civilian parents within families, families with more distressed military parents were more likely to sustain participation in the program, and reductions in distress among both military and civilian parents were significantly mediated by improvements in resilient family processes. These results are consistent with family systemic and resilient models that support preventive interventions designed to enhance family resilient processes as an important part of comprehensive services for distressed military families.

  3. A Study of the Market Potential for Recruiting Non-Prior Service Females for Military Service. Volume 1. Supplement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    AD -A143 3?? R STUDY OF THE MARET POTENTIAL FOR RECRUITING NON-PRIOR SERVICE FEMALES F..(U) GREY ADVERTISING INC 3 NEW YORK J T HEISLER NAY S0 *?831...having different sets of job interests, information about which the military can use in recruiting marketing and advertising . Key characterisitics of...20 + 4 R.O.T.C. - - HAVE SEEN/HEARD JOINT SERVICES AD 44 36 C Base: (181) (1419) < Significant at .05 Q.14a Have you seen or heard any advertising for

  4. Population Representation in the Military Services, Fiscal Year 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    refer to completing training; repairing, maintaining, or operating technical equipment and systems; and functioning either independently or as part of a...individuals. After an independent study of the test scores was conducted, the test was correctly calibrated. Reviews of the difficulties in recruiting high...broadening its mission. The Services must ensure that the smaller number of recruits are capable of performing more technical duties and in a more independent

  5. Integration of Chiropractic Services in Military and Veteran Health Care Facilities: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire D; Daniels, Clinton J; Napuli, Jason G; Gliedt, Jordan A; Paris, David J

    2016-04-01

    This literature review examined studies that described practice, utilization, and policy of chiropractic services within military and veteran health care environments. A systematic search of Medline, CINAHL, and Index to Chiropractic Literature was performed from inception through April 2015. Thirty articles met inclusion criteria. Studies reporting utilization and policy show that chiropractic services are successfully implemented in various military and veteran health care settings and that integration varies by facility. Doctors of chiropractic that are integrated within military and veteran health care facilities manage common neurological, musculoskeletal, and other conditions; severe injuries obtained in combat; complex cases; and cases that include psychosocial factors. Chiropractors collaboratively manage patients with other providers and focus on reducing morbidity for veterans and rehabilitating military service members to full duty status. Patient satisfaction with chiropractic services is high. Preliminary findings show that chiropractic management of common conditions shows significant improvement.

  6. Military Advertising Exposure and Service Images: Findings from the 1988 Youth Attitude Tracking Study II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    market group reporting awareness of military advertising stayed the same or increased from 1986 to 1988 for all Services, but still remained below 1984... advertising awareness. All of the market groups show nearly identical patterns regarding order of mention on the first response, and even the 16 Figure...males) and 2.4 (for young females) present the combined aided and unaided advertising awareness levels for four market subgroups of the 16 to 21 year olds

  7. The Military Health Service System: Beneficiary Satisfaction and an Option for Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    grow at this rate, they will reach $19.2 billion by 1995. The program is currently growing by about $1 billion a year. In 1986, the services estimated...been to the military medical facility several times for abdominal pain/severe cramps. She was repeatedly given Mylanta and told to drink peppermint ...I can handle that mistake for me but imagine if my child had the same illness and was diagnosed as growing pains are a plain headache--the suffering

  8. 2011 Health Related Behaviors Survey of Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    with about 1.4% reporting illicit drug, synthetic cannabis , or inhalant use in the past 12 months.1  About one-quarter (24.9%) of active duty personnel...drug use began by asking about the use of a variety of illicit drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Two substances, synthetic cannabis and...of any “illicit” drug use. Since survey administration in 2011, many of the compounds found in synthetic cannabis have been classified by the military

  9. State institutions and social identity: National representation in soldiers' and civilians' interview talk concerning military service.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Stephen; Condor, Susan

    2009-06-01

    Theory and research deriving from social identity or self-categorization perspectives often starts out with the presumption that social actors necessarily view societal objects such as nations or states as human categories. However, recent work suggests that this may be only one of a number of forms that societal representation may take. For example, nations may be understood variously as peoples, places, or institutions. This paper presents findings from a qualitative interview study conducted in England, in which soldiers and civilians talked about nationhood in relation to military service. Analysis indicated that, in this context, speakers were often inclined to use the terms 'Britain', 'nation', and 'country' as references to a political institution as opposed to a category of people. In addition, there were systematic differences between the ways in which the two samples construed their nation in institutional terms. The civilians were inclined to treat military service as a matter of obedience to the dictates of the Government of the day. In contrast, the soldiers were more inclined to frame military service as a matter of loyalty to state as symbolically instantiated in the body of the sovereign. Implications for work adopting a social identity perspective are discussed.

  10. [A spectacular revolution: evolution of French military health service].

    PubMed

    Lefort, Hugues; Ferrandis, Jean-Jacques; Tabbagh, Xavier; Lanoe, Vincent; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2014-06-01

    After the sanitary disaster caused by the first months of the conflict, the Health service of the French armies undertook a true revolution. By 1918, it had become the most efficient of all the opposing armies. At the end of 1914, through the spacing out of the evacuating hospitals within the zone of the armies, the most efficient teams were placed as close as possible to the front. Injured soldiers were categorized at every step of the chain. Technical progress, especially in war surgery, pushed medicine into the moderne era.

  11. Military Health Service System Ambulatory Work Unit (AWU).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    probability of a value outside 2.0 standard deviations ranges from .0456 for A-3 -Al" 122 NILITRY HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM AMULRTORY MORKe UurNT CANdU )(U) ARMY...00 2 w w >4 &4~ ~z til 0n0 rz~ co00 P - xU) I : 0 ) ) %z E-4 z U) HHw H~~ ~ ~ 0 olf4 E1E- 004 H U) UDm 0 4 E- H wE- ~ H E-4 H 04 H Z U H Q z HO H % x z

  12. Divorce, Race, and Military Service: More than Equal Pay and Equal Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Jay D.; Tedrow, Lucky

    2008-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested that the persistently higher rate of divorce among Blacks may be due to hard-to-measure concepts such as culture or norms. To attack this problem, we use data from the NLSY-79 to examine the risk of divorce among enlisted active-duty military servicemen where economic differences and the negative effects of…

  13. Military Personnel: Joint Officer Development Has Improved, But a Strategic Approach Is Needed. Report to the Subcommittee on Military Personnel, Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    In response to the need of military leaders to be better prepared to plan, support, and conduct joint (multi-service and multi-national) operations, Congress enacted the Goldwater- Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986. Positive steps were taken to implement provisions in the Act that address the education, assignment, and…

  14. Assessing posttraumatic stress in military service members: improving efficiency and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Fissette, Caitlin L; Snyder, Douglas K; Balderrama-Durbin, Christina; Balsis, Steve; Cigrang, Jeffrey; Talcott, G Wayne; Tatum, JoLyn; Baker, Monty; Cassidy, Daniel; Sonnek, Scott; Heyman, Richard E; Smith Slep, Amy M

    2014-03-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is assessed across many different populations and assessment contexts. However, measures of PTSD symptomatology often are not tailored to meet the needs and demands of these different populations and settings. In order to develop population- and context-specific measures of PTSD it is useful first to examine the item-level functioning of existing assessment methods. One such assessment measure is the 17-item PTSD Checklist-Military version (PCL-M; Weathers, Litz, Herman, Huska, & Keane, 1993). Although the PCL-M is widely used in both military and veteran health-care settings, it is limited by interpretations based on aggregate scores that ignore variability in item endorsement rates and relatedness to PTSD. Based on item response theory, this study conducted 2-parameter logistic analyses of the PCL-M in a sample of 196 service members returning from a yearlong, high-risk deployment to Iraq. Results confirmed substantial variability across items both in terms of their relatedness to PTSD and their likelihood of endorsement at any given level of PTSD. The test information curve for the full 17-item PCL-M peaked sharply at a value of θ = 0.71, reflecting greatest information at approximately the 76th percentile level of underlying PTSD symptom levels in this sample. Implications of findings are discussed as they relate to identifying more efficient, accurate subsets of items tailored to military service members as well as other specific populations and evaluation contexts.

  15. Experiences of military CRNAs with service personnel who are emerging from general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John Tyler; Pokorny, Marie E

    2012-08-01

    We conducted this qualitative study to understand the experiences of military Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) working with service personnel who have traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and are emerging from general anesthesia. This study is important because there are no studies in the literature that describe the experiences of anesthetists working with patients with these specific problems. The leading questions were: "Out of all the anesthesia cases both abroad and stateside (post 9/11/2001), have you noticed service members wake from general anesthesia (not utilizing total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA), in a state of delirium? If so, can you tell me your experiences and thought processes as to why it was occurring?" Five themes emerged: (1) Emergence delirium (ED) exists and to a much higher degree in the military than in the general population. (2) ED was much more prevalent in the younger military population. (3) TIVA was a superior anesthetic for patients thought to have TBI and/or PTSD. (4) Talking to all patients suspected of having TBI and/or PTSD before surgery and on emergence was vital for a smooth emergence. (5) There is something profound happening in regard to ketamine and PTSD and TBI.

  16. INDUSTRIAL/MILITARY ACTIVITY-INITIATED ACCIDENT SCREENING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Kalinich

    1999-09-27

    Impacts due to nearby installations and operations were determined in the Preliminary MGDS Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1996) to be potentially applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of the potential activities ongoing on or off the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is intended that the Industrial/Military Activity-Initiated Accident Screening Analysis provided herein will meet the requirements of the ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987) in establishing whether this external event can be screened from further consideration or must be included as a design basis event (DBE) in the development of accident scenarios for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis only considers issues related to preclosure radiological safety. Issues important to waste isolation as related to impact from nearby installations will be covered in the MGR performance assessment.

  17. Evolving Markets for Commercial, Civil, and Military Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Marshall H.

    2003-01-01

    Recent commercial failures in the LEO market, declining budgets for research, and other political factors have made it difficult for entrepreneurs and financial institutions to realize returns from investments in new space transportation systems and satellites. This paper explores the major factors impacting future markets that make use of our space infrastructure. At the top of the list is the high cost of space access. This has been extremely expensive, and will continue to be expensive as long as space access remains low on the nation's priority list. While launch prices have generally been reduced over the past several years, they remain well above the elastic range of supply and demand. Our best estimate is that it will take an order of magnitude reduction to significantly expand the market. Projections about market segments that will represent future winners in space and launch demand forecasts are presented. Future markets, outside of traditional strongholds, are explored, including a long-term view of new commercial space activities, conventional and ambitious future/futuristic activities, and related business aspects.

  18. Barriers and Facilitators of Breastfeeding for Primiparous Active Duty Military Mothers: A Qualitative Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-11

    allowing more rapid involution of the uterus and decreased postpartum bleeding. Amenorrhea caused by breastfeeding results in less menstrual blood loss in...BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS OF BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY Kristine Markley Bristow APPROVED... BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY” beyond brief excerpts is with the permission of the copyright owner, and

  19. Barriers and Facilitators of Breasteeding for Primiparous Active Duty Military Mothers: A Qualitative Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    Breastfeeding increases oxytocin levels, allowing more rapid involution of the uterus and decreased postpartum bleeding. Amenorrhea caused by breastfeeding ...BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS OF BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY Kristine Markley Bristow APPROVED...FACILITATORS OF BREASTFEEDING FOR PRIMIPAROUS ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY MOTHERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  20. Factors Affecting Quality of Emergency Service in Iran’s Military Hospitals: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Zaboli, Rouhollah; Shokri, Mohamad; Javadi, Maryam Seyed; Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Ameryoun, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Quality is a key factor for the success of any organization. Moreover, accessing quality in the emergency department is highly significant due to the sensitive and complex role of this department in hospitals as well as the healthcare and medical treatment system. This study aimed to identify, from the perspective of medical experts and nurses serving in the military health and medical treatment system, the factors that affect the quality of emergency service provided in selected military hospitals in Iran. Methods This qualitative research was performed in Valiaser Hospital of Tehran (Iran) in 2015, using the framework analysis method. The purposive sampling technique was used for data collection. A total of 14 participants included two emergency medicine specialists, four general physicians, two senior nurses (holding M.Sc. degrees), and six nurses (holding B.Sc. degree). Data were collected through semistructured interviews. Sampling continued until data saturation occurred. The Atlas/Ti software was employed for data analysis. Results Four basic themes emerged as the effective factors on the quality of emergency services, namely, structural themes, process/performance themes, outcome themes, and environmental/contextual themes. Moreover, through a framework analysis, 47 subthemes were specified and summarized as indicators of the different aspects of the main themes. Conclusion The factors affecting the quality of emergency services in Iran’s selected military hospitals are especially complicated due to the diversity of the missions involved; thus, different factors can influence this quality. Therefore, an effort should be made to tackle the existing obstacles, facilitate the identification of these effective factors, and promotion of the quality of healthcare services. PMID:27790355

  1. Life as a military spouse.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Military spouses live a capricious life. They often move away from everything familiar to support their active duty spouse. Honor, courage, and commitment are values military spouses need to assist them in being strong and resilient. Effective coping skills aid in the various roles these spouses assume, which may cause personal sacrifices to be made in support of the service member.

  2. They Self-Ignited: Adult Student Journeys to an Associate's Degree While Active Duty Military or Military Spouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibus, Lindsay Pohl

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study was undertaken in order to gain an understanding of the lived experiences of adult students and how they made meaning of their journey. To that end, through in-depth interviews with twenty participants, the study inquired into the journeys to an associate's degree of adult students who were also active duty military service…

  3. Economic Sanctions, Military Activity, and Road Traffic Crashes in Vojvodina, Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Ðurić, Predrag; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Political violence has not been examined as a risk factor for traumatic injuries from road traffic crashes. We identify trends in road traffic crashes related to war-related military activity and international economic sanctions in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina, Serbia. Methods Overall road traffic crashes and crashes leading to hospitalization and fatality in Vojvodina, Serbia were examined from 1996 through 2001. Rates were calculated per 100,000 population and per 10,000 registered vehicles. Three time periods were examined: years with international sanctions and military activity; years with international sanctions but no military activity; and, years with neither sanctions nor military activity. Results Compared to the period with neither sanctions nor military activity, severe injury crashes were 1.23 times more frequent (95% CI = 1.19 – 1.27) during the period with sanctions and military activity and 1.21 times more frequent (95% CI= 1.16 – 1.27) during the period with sanctions but no military activity. Conclusions Our data suggest that vehicle travel became safer following the end of military action and economic sanctions. Road traffic safety needs to be a priority both during periods of political unrest and its recovery phase. PMID:19074242

  4. Military Service Member and Veteran Reintegration: A Conceptual Analysis, Unified Definition, and Key Domains.

    PubMed

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Fisher, Michael P; Blevins, Cara L

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) may experience a variety of stress-related disorders and challenges when reintegrating from the military to the community. Facilitating the reintegration, transition, readjustment and coping, and community integration, of MSMVs is a societal priority. To date, research addressing MSMV reintegration has not identified a comprehensive definition of the term or defined the broader context within which the process of reintegration occurs although both are needed to promote valid and reliable measurement of reintegration and clarify related challenges, processes, and their impact on outcomes. Therefore, this principle-based concept analysis sought to review existing empirical reintegration measurement instruments and identify the problems and needs of MSMV reintegration to provide a unified definition of reintegration to guide future research, clinical practice, and related services. We identified 1,459 articles in the health and social sciences literature, published between 1990 and 2015, by searching multiple electronic databases. Screening of abstracts and full text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 117 articles for review. Two investigators used constant conceptual comparison to evaluate relevant articles independently. We examined the term reintegration and related terms (i.e., transition, readjustment, community integration) identifying trends in their use over time, analyzed the eight reintegration survey instruments, and synthesized service member and veteran self-reported challenges and needs for reintegration. More reintegration research was published during the last 5 years (n = 373) than in the previous 10 years combined (n = 130). The research suggests coping with life stresses plays an integral role in military service member and veteran post-deployment reintegration. Key domains of reintegration include individual, interpersonal, community organizations, and societal factors

  5. Military Service Member and Veteran Reintegration: A Conceptual Analysis, Unified Definition, and Key Domains

    PubMed Central

    Elnitsky, Christine A.; Fisher, Michael P.; Blevins, Cara L.

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) may experience a variety of stress-related disorders and challenges when reintegrating from the military to the community. Facilitating the reintegration, transition, readjustment and coping, and community integration, of MSMVs is a societal priority. To date, research addressing MSMV reintegration has not identified a comprehensive definition of the term or defined the broader context within which the process of reintegration occurs although both are needed to promote valid and reliable measurement of reintegration and clarify related challenges, processes, and their impact on outcomes. Therefore, this principle-based concept analysis sought to review existing empirical reintegration measurement instruments and identify the problems and needs of MSMV reintegration to provide a unified definition of reintegration to guide future research, clinical practice, and related services. We identified 1,459 articles in the health and social sciences literature, published between 1990 and 2015, by searching multiple electronic databases. Screening of abstracts and full text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 117 articles for review. Two investigators used constant conceptual comparison to evaluate relevant articles independently. We examined the term reintegration and related terms (i.e., transition, readjustment, community integration) identifying trends in their use over time, analyzed the eight reintegration survey instruments, and synthesized service member and veteran self-reported challenges and needs for reintegration. More reintegration research was published during the last 5 years (n = 373) than in the previous 10 years combined (n = 130). The research suggests coping with life stresses plays an integral role in military service member and veteran post-deployment reintegration. Key domains of reintegration include individual, interpersonal, community organizations, and societal factors

  6. Optimizing fitness for duty and post-combat clinical services for military personnel and combat veterans with ADHD—a systematic review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Iliyan; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyper activity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder, most often diagnosed in childhood, and characterized by hyperactivity and inattention that negatively impacts one's ability to function and fulfill social and personal obligations. Individuals with past history of ADHD may enlist in the military under certain conditions, however the full impact of military training and deployment of later in life ADHD symptoms is unclear. It is of particular interest how military experience may affect ADHD in remission and if such individuals might be at elevated risk for relapse of ADHD symptoms. Method We performed a systematic review f the available literature including the Department of Defense (DOD) guidelines for both eligibility to enlist and fitness for deployment based on reported history and current symptomatology of ADHD. Results The after care for veterans with ADHD relapse is inconsistent and presents with number of challenges. We evaluate the DOD policies regarding the implications of ADHD for fitness for military service and post-combat mental health. Conclusion The full extend of the interaction between pre-existing ADHD and post-combat PTSD are not fully understood. The development of comprehensive and clear algorithms for diagnosing and treating ADHD in the military before and after deployment will have a strong positive impact on the quality of care delivered to soldiers and veterans. PMID:25206949

  7. Incidence of Campylobacter infections among service members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces and among other beneficiaries of the Military Health System, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    This report reviews the incidence of illness due to Campylobacter bacteria based on diagnoses recorded in healthcare records and reported through the Armed Forces reportable medical event (RME) system. During 2000-2013, incident cases of Campylobacter infection were diagnosed in 1,393 active component service members, 188 members of the reserve component, and 3,891 retirees and family members. Among members of the active component, incidence rates tended to be higher among females, those aged 40 years or older, members of the Army and Air Force, and offi cers. Incidence rates declined from 2002 through 2007 but have risen steadily since, especially from 2010 through 2013. Among retirees and family members, the highest numbers of cases were diagnosed among those aged 5 years or younger and those aged 75 years or older. Cases identifi ed through RME reports (n=2,938) showed the highest numbers of cases in May-August, especially July, and that cases reported from Fort Shafter, HI, accounted for 20% of all cases. Measures and precautions important in preventing Campylobacter infections as well as other food- and waterborne infections are discussed.

  8. Military Personnel: DOD Is Expanding Combat Service Opportunities for Women, but Should Monitor Long-Term Integration Progress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    cohesion, women’s health , and facilities. As of May 2015, the Secretary of the Navy was the only military department Secretary to recommend an...requirements. First, the military services have established general physical fitness standards to promote overall health and physical fitness among...these challenges in areas such as unit cohesion, women’s health , equipment, facilities (e.g., separate restrooms and sleeping quarters), women’s

  9. 5 CFR 875.410 - May I continue my coverage when I leave Federal or military service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May I continue my coverage when I leave Federal or military service? 875.410 Section 875.410 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE...

  10. 5 CFR 875.410 - May I continue my coverage when I leave Federal or military service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false May I continue my coverage when I leave Federal or military service? 875.410 Section 875.410 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE...

  11. 5 CFR 875.410 - May I continue my coverage when I leave Federal or military service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false May I continue my coverage when I leave Federal or military service? 875.410 Section 875.410 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE...

  12. 5 CFR 875.410 - May I continue my coverage when I leave Federal or military service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false May I continue my coverage when I leave Federal or military service? 875.410 Section 875.410 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE...

  13. 5 CFR 875.410 - May I continue my coverage when I leave Federal or military service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May I continue my coverage when I leave Federal or military service? 875.410 Section 875.410 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE...

  14. Trends in suicidal behaviour and use of mental health services in Canadian military and civilian populations

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Jitender; Afifi, Tracie O.; Taillieu, Tamara; Cheung, Kristene; Turner, Sarah; Bolton, Shay-Lee; Erickson, Julie; Stein, Murray B.; Fikretoglu, Deniz; Zamorski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the context of the Canadian mission in Afghanistan, substantial media attention has been placed on mental health and lack of access to treatment among Canadian Forces personnel. We compared trends in the prevalence of suicidal behaviour and the use of mental health services between Canadian military personnel and the general population from 2002 to 2012/13. Methods: We obtained data for respondents aged 18–60 years who participated in 4 nationally representative surveys by Statistics Canada designed to permit comparisons between populations and trends over time. Surveys of the general population were conducted in 2002 (n = 25 643) and 2012 (n = 15 981); those of military personnel were conducted in 2002 (n = 5153) and 2013 (n = 6700). We assessed the lifetime and past-year prevalence of suicidal ideation, plans and attempts, as well as use of mental health services. Results: In 2012/13, but not in 2002, military personnel had significantly higher odds of both lifetime and past-year suicidal ideation than the civilian population (lifetime: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–1.50; past year: adjusted OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.09–1.66). The same was true for suicidal plans (lifetime: adjusted OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.35–1.99; past year: adjusted OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.18–2.33). Among respondents who reported past-year suicidal ideation, those in the military had a significantly higher past-year utilization rate of mental health services than those in the civilian population in both 2002 (adjusted OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.31–3.13) and 2012/13 (adjusted OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.86–5.28). Interpretation: Canadian Forces personnel had a higher prevalence of suicidal ideation and plans in 2012/13 and a higher use of mental health services in 2002 and 2012/13 than the civilian population. PMID:27221270

  15. [Personal e-cards for military personnel and military-medical information system].

    PubMed

    Kalachev, O V; Stolyar, V P; Kuandykov, M G; Papkov, A Yu

    2015-08-01

    The article presents main directions of activities of the medical service, dealing with implementation of personal electronic cards for military personnel, organizing the process of automation of medical service management, military and medical organizations and health care departments. The given article, reveals the on-going activity, concerning creation of the military-medical information system, which will unite all medical units, organizations, and governments into one information space.

  16. Services and Support Programs for Military Service Members and Veterans at Postsecondary Institutions, 2012-13. First Look. NCES 2014-017

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, Barbara; Lewis, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    This report provides descriptive national data on the prevalence and characteristics of services and support programs for military service members and veterans at postsecondary institutions in the United States. This survey provides the first nationally representative data on this topic. The data presented in this First Look were collected for the…

  17. Immunomodulatory and antioxidative activity of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-yu; Feng, Cui-ping; Li, Xing; Chang, Ming-chang; Meng, Jun-long; Xu, Li-jing

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the immune activation and reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides (CMP) in vivo, 24 male and 24 female Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. The mice in the four experimental groups were administered 0 (normal control), 50, 100, or 200mg/kg/d body weight CMP via gavage. After 30 days, the viscera index, leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, immunoglobulin (IgG) levels, and biochemical parameters were measured. The effect of CMP on the expression of tumor necrosis (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, and interleukin (IL)-1β in the spleens of experimental mice was investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the administration of CMP improved the immune function in mice, significantly increased the spleen and thymus indices, the spleen lymphocyte activity, the total quantity of white blood cells, and IgG function in mice serum. CMP exhibited significant antioxidative activity in mice, and decreased malondialdehyde levels in vivo. CMP upregulated the expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β mRNA in high-dose groups compared to that observed for the control mice. We can thus conclude that CMP effectively improved the immune function through protection against oxidative stress. CMP thus shows potential for development as drugs and health supplements.

  18. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  19. Gender differences in the expression of PTSD symptoms among active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Laurel; Williams, Jason; Bray, Robert; Kandel, Denise

    2015-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and symptom factors in the total U.S. active duty force. Data were drawn from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel including 17,939 men and 6751 women from all services. The results indicated that women expressed more distress than men across almost all the symptoms on the PTSD Checklist except for hypervigilance. Women also scored significantly higher on all four factors examined: Re-experiencing, Avoidance, Emotionally Numb, Hyperarousal. More women than men were distressed by combat experiences that involved some type of violence, such as being wounded, witnessing or engaging in acts of cruelty, engaging in hand-to-hand combat, and, to a lesser extent, handling dead bodies. Men who had been sexually abused had a greater number of symptoms and were consistently more distressed than women on individual symptoms and symptom factors.

  20. Suicide Risk by Military Occupation in the DoD Active Component Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trofimovich, Lily; Reger, Mark A.; Luxton, David D.; Oetjen-Gerdes, Lynne A.

    2013-01-01

    Suicide risk based on occupational cohorts within the U.S. military was investigated. Rates of suicide based on military occupational categories were computed for the Department of Defense (DoD) active component population between 2001 and 2010. The combined infantry, gun crews, and seamanship specialist group was at increased risk of suicide…

  1. Manual of Military Decorations and Awards: DoD Service Awards - Campaign, Expeditionary, and Service Medals. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-23

    procedures and guidance regarding creation, activation, and award of DoD service awards – campaign, expeditionary, and service (CE& S ) medals. (2...Provides the basis and eligibility requirements for award of DoD CE& S medals. (3) Incorporates and cancels References (d) through (y). 2...Service Awards - Campaign, Expeditionary, and Service Medals 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT

  2. Health Impact of U.S. Military Service in a Large Population-based Military Cohort: Findings of the Millennium Cohort Study, 2001-2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    outlines how findings from the first 7 years of the Millennium Cohort Study have helped to address health concerns related to military service...standard health assessment instruments embedded in the study questionnaire found high inter- nal consistency for 14 of 16 health components [ 7 ]. Only...moderate stability was found for more dynamic variables [ 7 ]. Deployment and Deployment-Related Exposures A major objective when designing the

  3. Biomedical Informatics Techniques for Processing and Analyzing Web Blogs of Military Service Members

    PubMed Central

    Konovalov, Sergiy; Post, Lori; Brandt, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Web logs (“blogs”) have become a popular mechanism for people to express their daily thoughts, feelings, and emotions. Many of these expressions contain health care-related themes, both physical and mental, similar to information discussed during a clinical interview or medical consultation. Thus, some of the information contained in blogs might be important for health care research, especially in mental health where stress-related conditions may be difficult and expensive to diagnose and where early recognition is often key to successful treatment. In the field of biomedical informatics, techniques such as information retrieval (IR) and natural language processing (NLP) are often used to unlock information contained in free-text notes. These methods might assist the clinical research community to better understand feelings and emotions post deployment and the burden of symptoms of stress among US military service members. Methods In total, 90 military blog posts describing deployment situations and 60 control posts of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) were collected. After “stop” word exclusion and stemming, a “bag-of-words” representation and term weighting was performed, and the most relevant words were manually selected out of the high-weight words. A pilot ontology was created using Collaborative Protégé, a knowledge management application. The word lists and the ontology were then used within General Architecture for Text Engineering (GATE), an NLP framework, to create an automated pipeline for recognition and analysis of blogs related to combat exposure. An independent expert opinion was used to create a reference standard and evaluate the results of the GATE pipeline. Results The 2 dimensions of combat exposure descriptors identified were: words dealing with physical exposure and the soldiers’ emotional reactions to it. GATE pipeline was able to retrieve blog texts describing combat exposure with

  4. Lowering the Retirement Age for Military Reservists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-11

    not bring them to the same level, or equal pay , but it would provide a slightly more equitable treatment than the current age 60 rule. By drawing...receive retirement pay once they have reached the age of 60. For some military reservists this could mean waiting an additional 22 years before...receiving retirement pay after completing 20 years of active military service. By contrast, retired active duty military personnel can start receiving

  5. Women in the Military. Hearings before the Military Personnel and Compensation Subcommitee of the Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives. One Hundredth Congress, First and Second Sessions (October 1, November 19, 1987 and February 4, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Armed Services.

    Within this document is the testimony delivered by 15 individuals at congressional hearings. Among the issues spoken to are: the combat exclusion law and its effect on the careers of women in the military; the kinds of jobs open to female armed services personnel; special problems that women in the military face; their promotion and retention…

  6. 29 CFR 36.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 36.210 Military and... institution whose primary purpose is the training of individuals for a military service of the United...

  7. 29 CFR 36.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 36.210 Military and... institution whose primary purpose is the training of individuals for a military service of the United...

  8. Preparing MSW Students to Provide Mental and Behavioral Health Services to Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families in Rural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rishel, Carrie W.; Hartnett, Helen P.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of mental health disorders constitutes a nationwide public health crisis. Estimates suggest that more than 90 million people live in areas designated mental health professional shortage areas, with almost 6,000 additional practitioners needed to meet the service needs in these areas. Military personnel and veterans have greater…

  9. Medical Service Specialist, Blocks III, V, VI, 10-11. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This second course of a two-course, postsecondary-level series for medical service specialist is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The purpose stated for the 89-hour course is to provide training in the basic theory and…

  10. Leaving the Parental Nest: Adjustment Problems, Attachment Representations, and Social Support during the Transition from High School to Military Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharf, Miri; Mayseless, Ofra; Kivenson-Baron, Inbal

    2011-01-01

    Adjustment to the transition from high school to military service in Israel was examined in a longitudinal study with a sample of 120 late-adolescent girls. During their senior year in high school (Time 1) the young women were administered the Adult Attachment Interview. Their coping and adjustment to the new environment were assessed (at two…

  11. Medical Service Specialist, Blocks I & II, 10-10. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This first course of a two-course, postsecondary-level series for medical service specialists is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The purpose stated for the 50-hour course is to provide training in the basic theory and…

  12. Home Leaving to Military Service: Attachment Concerns, Transfer of Attachment Functions from Parents to Peers, and Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayselessx, Ofra

    2004-01-01

    The home-leaving transition of male adolescents in Israel, where most 18-year-olds leave home to perform a 3-year mandatory military service, was examined. Transfer of attachment functions from parents to peers across the transition and adjustment to the basic-training period were investigated. Adolescents ( N = 143) filled out questionnaires 3…

  13. Long-term Outcomes of Military Service in Aging and the Life Course: A Positive Re-envisioning.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Avron; Settersten, Richard A; Aldwin, Carolyn M

    2016-02-01

    Most research on military service focuses on its short-term negative consequences, especially the mental and physical injuries of those deployed in warzones. However, studies of long-term outcomes reveal surprisingly positive effects of military service--both those early in adulthood that grow over time and others that can emerge later in life. These multidomain effects have been found in veterans of World War II and the Korean War and are now being seen in veterans of the Vietnam War. Although some are directly attributable to public policies such as the GI Bill, which facilitate educational and economic gains, there are personal developmental gains as well, including autonomy, emotional maturity and resilience, mastery, and leadership skills, that lead to better health and well-being in later life. These long-term effects vary across persons, change over time within persons, and often reflect processes of cumulative advantage and disadvantage. We propose a life-span model of the effects of military service that provides a perspective for probing both long-term positive and negative outcomes for aging veterans. We further explicate the model by focusing on both sociocultural dynamics and individual processes. We identify public-use data that can be examined to evaluate this model, and offer a set of questions that can be used to assess military service. Finally, we outline an agenda for dedicated inquiry into such effects and consider policy implications for the health and well-being of aging veterans in later life.

  14. Geographic mapping of HIV infection among civilian applicants for United States military service.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Christian T; Sateren, Warren B; Sanchez, José L; Singer, Darrell E; Scott, Paul

    2008-09-01

    We assessed the geographic distribution of HIV infection among civilian applicants for US military service. High smoothed HIV prevalences were observed among white applicants in California, Texas, Florida, New York, and New Jersey, and among African-American applicants in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Washington DC, North and South Carolina, Florida, and California. Three HIV spatial clusters were found among whites: New York/New Jersey, southern California, and in south and central Texas. Among African-Americans, three HIV spatial clusters were found: New York/New Jersey, Washington DC/Virginia, and south and central California. The South accounted for a significant proportion of HIV-infected African-American applicants.

  15. The history and evolution of traumatic brain injury rehabilitation in military service members and veterans.

    PubMed

    Cifu, David X; Cohen, Sara I; Lew, Henry L; Jaffee, Michael; Sigford, Barbara

    2010-08-01

    The field of traumatic brain injury has evolved since the time of the Civil War in response to the needs of patients with injuries and disabilities resulting from war. The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center have been in the forefront of the development of the interdisciplinary approach to the rehabilitation of soldiers with traumatic brain injury, particularly those injured from the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The objectives of this literature review are to examine how the casualties resulting from major wars in the past led to the establishment of the current model of evaluation and treatment of traumatic brain injury and to review how the field has expanded in response to the growing cohort of military service members and veterans with TBI.

  16. Military Service and Economic Mobility: Evidence from the American Civil War

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    How did geographic and occupational mobility after the Civil War differ between Union Army veterans and nonveterans? By 1880, Union veterans were more likely to migrate to a different state or region than nonveterans. The higher geographic mobility of veterans is likely attributable to their experience of traveling away from their hometowns while in service. Union veterans who held unskilled jobs prior to enlistment were more likely to move up to white-collar or farming jobs by 1880 than unskilled nonveterans. In contrast, unskilled veterans were less likely to become artisans than nonveterans. The differences in occupational mobility by veteran status might be explained by the effects of military experiences such as learning from comrades in the company. PMID:23275679

  17. [Studies on prenosological diagnostics of health of armed forces personnel on compulsory military service].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Federal budget scientific institution "Nizhny Novgorod research institute for hygiene and occupational pathology", Federal service of supervision in sphere of protection of the rights of consumers and wellbeing of the person. The authors have evaluated physical development of contract military persons divided in following age groups (under 30, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, over 50 years old), according to morphofunctional indices, index of functional measurement in human organism, pathological affection. Obtained data give evidence about presence of health risk factors in all observed groups. Preventive measures are the most necessary in 1 and 2 groups. The highest health risk group is age group of 35-39 years old.

  18. Suicide risk by military occupation in the DoD active component population.

    PubMed

    Trofimovich, Lily; Reger, Mark A; Luxton, David D; Oetjen-Gerdes, Lynne A

    2013-06-01

    Suicide risk based on occupational cohorts within the U.S. military was investigated. Rates of suicide based on military occupational categories were computed for the Department of Defense (DoD) active component population between 2001 and 2010. The combined infantry, gun crews, and seamanship specialist group was at increased risk of suicide compared to the overall military population even when adjusted for gender, age, and deployment history. The results provide useful information that can help inform the DoD's suicide prevention mission. Data limitations and recommended areas for future research are discussed.

  19. U.S. military service and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome: Findings from a cross-sectional analysis of the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study, 1979-2013.

    PubMed

    Janak, Jud C; Pérez, Adriana; Alamgir, Hasanat; Orman, Jean A; Cooper, Sharon P; Shuval, Kerem; DeFina, Laura; Barlow, Carolyn E; Gabriel, Kelley Pettee

    2017-02-01

    U.S. military service confers both health benefits and risks potentially associated with a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors called metabolic syndrome. However, the association between prior military service and metabolic syndrome has not sufficiently been examined. The purpose of the study was to compare the prevalence of metabolic syndrome by prior military service status. Among 42,370 men (887 with prior military service) examined from 1979 to 2013 at the Cooper Clinic (Dallas, TX), we used a cross-sectional study design to examine the association between military service and metabolic syndrome. First, an unadjusted log binomial regression model was performed by regressing the prevalence of metabolic syndrome on prior service. This was followed by performing Kleinbaum's modeling strategy for assessing confounding. The same methodology was used to explore the association between individual metabolic syndrome risk factors and prior service. Prior military service was not significantly associated with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (PR=0.98, 0.89-1.07). None of the variables explored were identified as confounders. Participants with prior military service had lower prevalence of both elevated levels of triglycerides (PR=0.89, 0.80-0.99) and low levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (PR=0.78, 0.70-0.88). They had a higher prevalence of elevated resting systolic blood pressure (PR=1.23, 1.12-1.35). However, none of these associations were significant after adjusting for identified confounders: age; cardiorespiratory fitness; and exam year. Study findings indicate that military service was not independently associated with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome or its components. Future research is warranted longitudinally assessing the impact of military service on long-term outcomes.

  20. Military Housing: Enhancements Needed to Housing Allowance Process and Information Sharing among Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    United States Government Accountability Office GAO Report to Congressional Committees MILITARY HOUSING Enhancements Needed...separately. Page ii GAO-11-462 Military Housing Page 1 GAO-11-462 United States Government Accountability Office Washington, DC 20548 May 16...00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Housing : Enhancements Needed to Housing Allowance Process and Information Sharing among

  1. Prevalence of mental health problems, treatment need, and barriers to care among primary care-seeking spouses of military service members involved in Iraq and Afghanistan deployments.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Karen M; Hoge, Charles W; Messer, Stephen C; Whitt, Allison A; Cabrera, Oscar A; McGurk, Dennis; Cox, Anthony; Castro, Carl A

    2008-11-01

    Military spouses must contend with unique issues such as a mobile lifestyle, rules and regulations of military life, and frequent family separations including peacekeeping and combat deployments. These issues may have an adverse effect on the health of military spouses. This study examined the mental health status, rates of care utilization, source of care, as well as barriers and stigma of mental health care utilization among military spouses who were seeking care in military primary care clinics. The data show spouses have similar rates of mental health problems compared to soldiers. Spouses were more likely to seek care for their mental health problems and were less concerned with the stigma of mental health care than were soldiers. Services were most often received from primary care physicians, rather than specialty mental health professionals, which may relate to the lack of availability of mental health services for spouses on military installations.

  2. Long-term Outcomes of Military Service in Aging and the Life Course: A Positive Re-envisioning

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, Avron; Settersten, Richard A.; Aldwin, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Most research on military service focuses on its short-term negative consequences, especially the mental and physical injuries of those deployed in warzones. However, studies of long-term outcomes reveal surprisingly positive effects of military service—both those early in adulthood that grow over time and others that can emerge later in life. These multidomain effects have been found in veterans of World War II and the Korean War and are now being seen in veterans of the Vietnam War. Although some are directly attributable to public policies such as the GI Bill, which facilitate educational and economic gains, there are personal developmental gains as well, including autonomy, emotional maturity and resilience, mastery, and leadership skills, that lead to better health and well-being in later life. These long-term effects vary across persons, change over time within persons, and often reflect processes of cumulative advantage and disadvantage. We propose a life-span model of the effects of military service that provides a perspective for probing both long-term positive and negative outcomes for aging veterans. We further explicate the model by focusing on both sociocultural dynamics and individual processes. We identify public-use data that can be examined to evaluate this model, and offer a set of questions that can be used to assess military service. Finally, we outline an agenda for dedicated inquiry into such effects and consider policy implications for the health and well-being of aging veterans in later life. PMID:26655859

  3. Radical Scavenging Activities of Undaria pinnatifida Extracts Fermented with Cordyceps militaris Mycelia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yon-Suk; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Han, Young-Ki; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jeong, Jae-Hyun; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2015-06-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the various radical scavenging activities of fermented Undaria pinnatifida by the mycelia fermentation method. U. pinnatifida was fermented with Cordyceps militaris (C. militaris) mycelia using solid culture and compared with unfermentated U. pinnatifida and C. militaris mycelia for antioxidant activities. The various radical scavenging activities of extracts from U. pinnatifida fermented with C. militaris mycelia (FUCM) were evaluated by electron spin resonance. The antioxidant activities of the FUCM extracts were assayed for ferric reducing antioxidant power, 2,2'-azinobis-(3- ethybenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging activity, and oxygen radical absorption capacity. The free radical scavenging activity of FUCM extracts was higher than that of C. militaris mycelia or U. pinnatifida alone. FUCM extracts were significantly (p < 0.05) increased up to 35 times, 10 times, and 16 times that of U. pinnatifida extracts on DPPH, alkyl, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, respectively. These results indicate that FUCM extracts have different chemical ingredients from U. pinnatifida and could provide beneficial antioxidant activity.

  4. Spice: A New Legal Herbal Mixture Abused by Young Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Spice: A New “Legal” Herbal Mixture Abused by Young Active Duty Military Personnel Vikhyat S. Bebarta, MD Sasha Ramirez, DO Shawn M. Varney, MD...ABSTRACT. Spice is an herbal mixture smoked for euphoria and mixed with synthetic cannabinoids that are undetected on urine drug screens. Spice use has...drug paraphernalia. Spice is a new herbal mixture that is increasingly used in the military. Expected effects are similar to cannabis, but may include

  5. [Sanitary service of West Special Military District on the eve and in the first days of the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945].

    PubMed

    Shelepov, A M; Ishutin, O S; Leonik, S I

    2011-06-01

    This article evaluates military and political situation in the world and operational-strategic environment on the West Theater of operations on the eve of the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945). We analyze structure and overall condition of sanitary service of West Special Military District of the Workers and Peasants Red Army and causes of failure of mobilization, organization and deployment of military units and establishments from the beginning of aggression of Fascist Germany to the Soviet Union.

  6. Adequate Compensation for a Permanent Change of Station Move: A Study Comparing the Policies of the Military, Civil Service, and Private Sector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    home for five days while their household goods are packed and picked up, the house is cleaned by a professional cleaning service, and a final inspection ...OF THE MILITARY, CIVIL SERVICE, AND PRIVATE SECTOR by Gregory Lee Hansen __. and __ Dwight Warner Handforth March 1980 L LJ Thesis Advisor: EA. Finnkp...Change o Masr esis Station Mrove: A Study cmpaing the Policiesarh1 of the Military, Civil Service, and Private a. PROMISNG 00G. REPORT uU6860 6. CONTRACT

  7. The Association between Sexually Transmitted Infections, Length of Service and Other Demographic Factors in the U.S. Military

    PubMed Central

    Deiss, Robert; Bower, Richard J.; Co, Edgie; Mesner, Octavio; Sanchez, Jose L.; Masel, Jennifer; Ganesan, Anuradha; Macalino, Grace E.; Agan, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have found higher rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among military personnel than the general population, but the cumulative risk of acquiring STIs throughout an individual’s military career has not been described. Methods Using ICD-9 diagnosis codes, we analyzed the medical records of 100,005 individuals from all service branches, divided in equal cohorts (n = 6,667) between 1997 and 2011. As women receive frequent STI screening compared to men, these groups were analyzed separately. Incidence rates were calculated for pathogen-specific STIs along with syndromic diagnoses. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the individuals within each accession year cohort; repeat infections were censored. Results The total sample included 29,010 females and 70,995 males. The STI incidence rates (per 100 person-years) for women and men, respectively, were as follows: chlamydia (3.5 and 0.7), gonorrhea (1.1 and 0.4), HIV (0.04 and 0.07) and syphilis (0.14 and 0.15). During the study period, 22% of women and 3.3% of men received a pathogen-specific STI diagnosis; inclusion of syndromic diagnoses increased STI prevalence to 41% and 5.5%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, factors associated with etiologic and syndromic STIs among women included African American race, younger age and fewer years of education. In the overall sample, increasing number of years of service was associated with an increased likelihood of an STI diagnosis (p<0.001 for trend). Conclusion In this survey of military personnel, we found very high rates of STI acquisition throughout military service, especially among women, demonstrating that STI-related risk is significant and ongoing throughout military service. Lower STI incidence rates among men may represent under-diagnosis and demonstrate a need for enhancing male-directed screening and diagnostic interventions. PMID:27936092

  8. Assessing the service quality of Iran military hospitals: Joint Commission International standards and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Yaghoubi, Maryam; Alimohammadzadeh, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Military hospitals are responsible for preserving, restoring and improving the health of not only armed forces, but also other people. According to the military organizations strategy, which is being a leader and pioneer in all areas, providing quality health services is one of the main goals of the military health care organizations. This study was aimed to evaluate the service quality of selected military hospitals in Iran based on the Joint Commission International (JCI) standards and comparing these hospitals with each other and ranking them using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) technique in 2013. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional and descriptive study conducted on five military hospitals, selected using the purposive sampling method, in 2013. Required data collected using checklists of accreditation standards and nominal group technique. AHP technique was used for prioritizing. Furthermore, Expert Choice 11.0 was used to analyze the collected data. Results: Among JCI standards, the standards of access to care and continuity of care (weight = 0.122), quality improvement and patient safety (weight = 0.121) and leadership and management (weight = 0.117) had the greatest importance, respectively. Furthermore, in the overall ranking, BGT (weight = 0.369), IHM (0.238), SAU (0.202), IHK (weight = 0.125) and SAB (weight = 0.066) ranked first to fifth, respectively. Conclusion: AHP is an appropriate technique for measuring the overall performance of hospitals and their quality of services. It is a holistic approach that takes all hospital processes into consideration. The results of the present study can be used to improve hospitals performance through identifying areas, which are in need of focus for quality improvement and selecting strategies to improve service quality. PMID:25250364

  9. Military services fitness database: development of a computerized physical fitness and weight management database for the U.S. Army.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Donald A; Bathalon, Gaston P; Sigrist, Lori D; Allen, H Raymond; Friedl, Karl E; Young, Andrew J; Martin, Corby K; Stewart, Tiffany M; Burrell, Lolita; Han, Hongmei; Hubbard, Van S; Ryan, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has mandated development of a system to collect and manage data on the weight, percent body fat (%BF), and fitness of all military personnel. This project aimed to (1) develop a computerized weight and fitness database to track individuals and Army units over time allowing cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluations and (2) test the computerized system for feasibility and integrity of data collection over several years of usage. The computer application, the Military Services Fitness Database (MSFD), was designed for (1) storage and tracking of data related to height, weight, %BF for the Army Weight Control Program (AWCP) and Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) scores and (2) generation of reports using these data. A 2.5-year pilot test of the MSFD indicated that it monitors population and individual trends of changing body weight, %BF, and fitness in a military population.

  10. Military Services Fitness Database: Development of a Computerized Physical Fitness and Weight Management Database for the U.S. Army

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Donald A.; Bathalon, Gaston P.; Sigrist, Lori D.; Allen, H. Raymond; Friedl, Karl E.; Young, Andrew J.; Martin, Corby K.; Stewart, Tiffany M.; Burrell, Lolita; Han, Hongmei; Hubbard, Van S.; Ryan, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has mandated development of a system to collect and manage data on the weight, percent body fat (%BF), and fitness of all military personnel. This project aimed to (1) develop a computerized weight and fitness database to track individuals and Army units over time allowing cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluations and (2) test the computerized system for feasibility and integrity of data collection over several years of usage. The computer application, the Military Services Fitness Database (MSFD), was designed for (1) storage and tracking of data related to height, weight, %BF for the Army Weight Control Program (AWCP) and Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) scores and (2) generation of reports using these data. A 2.5-year pilot test of the MSFD indicated that it monitors population and individual trends of changing body weight, %BF, and fitness in a military population. PMID:19216292

  11. The Millennium Cohort Family Study: a prospective evaluation of the health and well-being of military service members and their families.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Fairbank, John A; Marmar, Charlie R; Schlenger, William

    2014-09-01

    The need to understand the impact of war on military families has never been greater than during the past decade, with more than three million military spouses and children affected by deployments to Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Understanding the impact of the recent conflicts on families is a national priority, however, most studies have examined spouses and children individually, rather than concurrently as families. The Department of Defense (DoD) has recently initiated the largest study of military families in US military history (the Millennium Cohort Family Study), which includes dyads of military service members and their spouses (n > 10,000). This study includes US military families across the globe with planned follow-up for 21+ years to evaluate the impact of military experiences on families, including both during and after military service time. This review provides a comprehensive description of this landmark study including details on the research objectives, methodology, survey instrument, ancillary data sets, and analytic plans. The Millennium Cohort Family Study offers a unique opportunity to define the challenges that military families experience, and to advance the understanding of protective and vulnerability factors for designing training and treatment programs that will benefit military families today and into the future.

  12. A Pilot Study of the Retention of Basic Military Subject Matter After Separation from the Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-05-15

    active service Army enlisted men who had completed 20 to 24 months of service at the time of testing. (Inducted Army enlisted personnel typically serve...that further . investigation in this area would be more feasible with activ reservS or.. tcort ineo DD ’, 1473 EOITIO, o, 1NOV65 ISOBSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED...Robert Baker of the Human Resources Research Office. He also acknowledges the cooperation of the officers and men of the United States Army Reserve

  13. A meta-analytic review of internalizing, externalizing, and academic adjustment among children of deployed military service members.

    PubMed

    Card, Noel A; Bosch, Leslie; Casper, Deborah M; Wiggs, Christine Bracamonte; Hawkins, Stacy Ann; Schlomer, Gabriel L; Borden, Lynne M

    2011-08-01

    Parental deployment during military conflicts has the potential to impact child adjustment. As increased numbers of military Service members have children, it is critical to understand the association between military deployment and child adjustment. In order to resolve inconsistencies in the existing literature, we performed a meta-analytic review of 16 studies that report associations of military deployment with internalizing, externalizing, and academic adjustment among children. Results indicate a small association between deployment and poorer adjustment. This association varied across several features of the studies. Age moderation was such that the associations are strongest in middle childhood and weakest during adolescence. The method that adjustment was assessed also moderated this association, such that maladjustment was evident primarily with parents' reports. Study design also moderated associations, such that comparisons to civilian controls indicated associations with maladjustment, whereas comparisons to nondeployed military and prepost comparisons did not. These findings summarize the existing quantitative literature to indicate that parental deployment has a negligible association with child maladjustment and provide a foundation for future research.

  14. Incidence of Salmonella infections among service members of the active and reserve components of the U.S. Armed Forces and among other beneficiaries of the Military Health System, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Clark, Leslie L; Daniele, Denise O; O'Donnell, Francis L

    2015-01-01

    This report reviews the incidence of cases of typhoidal and non-typhoidal Salmonella infections based on diagnoses recorded in healthcare records and reported through the Armed Forces reportable medical event (RME) system. During 2000-2013, there were 1,815 incident cases of non-typhoidal Salmonella and 456 incident cases of typhoidal Salmonella diagnosed in the active component force. The crude incidence rate for non-typhoidal Salmonella was 0.91 cases per 10,000 person years (p-yrs) and the rate for typhoidal Salmonella was 0.23 cases per 10,000 p-yrs. Among retirees and family members, children under 5 years of age and those aged 75 years or older comprised the greatest number of non-typhoidal Salmonella cases. Preventive measures for reducing the risk of infection with Salmonella are discussed.

  15. Determining optimal clothing ensembles based on weather forecasts, with particular reference to outdoor winter military activities.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Marco; Pavlinic, Daniela Z; Crisci, Alfonso; Capecchi, Valerio; Orlandini, Simone; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2011-07-01

    Military and civil defense personnel are often involved in complex activities in a variety of outdoor environments. The choice of appropriate clothing ensembles represents an important strategy to establish the success of a military mission. The main aim of this study was to compare the known clothing insulation of the garment ensembles worn by soldiers during two winter outdoor field trials (hike and guard duty) with the estimated optimal clothing thermal insulations recommended to maintain thermoneutrality, assessed by using two different biometeorological procedures. The overall aim was to assess the applicability of such biometeorological procedures to weather forecast systems, thereby developing a comprehensive biometeorological tool for military operational forecast purposes. Military trials were carried out during winter 2006 in Pokljuka (Slovenia) by Slovene Armed Forces personnel. Gastrointestinal temperature, heart rate and environmental parameters were measured with portable data acquisition systems. The thermal characteristics of the clothing ensembles worn by the soldiers, namely thermal resistance, were determined with a sweating thermal manikin. Results showed that the clothing ensemble worn by the military was appropriate during guard duty but generally inappropriate during the hike. A general under-estimation of the biometeorological forecast model in predicting the optimal clothing insulation value was observed and an additional post-processing calibration might further improve forecast accuracy. This study represents the first step in the development of a comprehensive personalized biometeorological forecast system aimed at improving recommendations regarding the optimal thermal insulation of military garment ensembles for winter activities.

  16. Determining optimal clothing ensembles based on weather forecasts, with particular reference to outdoor winter military activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, Marco; Pavlinic, Daniela Z.; Crisci, Alfonso; Capecchi, Valerio; Orlandini, Simone; Mekjavic, Igor B.

    2011-07-01

    Military and civil defense personnel are often involved in complex activities in a variety of outdoor environments. The choice of appropriate clothing ensembles represents an important strategy to establish the success of a military mission. The main aim of this study was to compare the known clothing insulation of the garment ensembles worn by soldiers during two winter outdoor field trials (hike and guard duty) with the estimated optimal clothing thermal insulations recommended to maintain thermoneutrality, assessed by using two different biometeorological procedures. The overall aim was to assess the applicability of such biometeorological procedures to weather forecast systems, thereby developing a comprehensive biometeorological tool for military operational forecast purposes. Military trials were carried out during winter 2006 in Pokljuka (Slovenia) by Slovene Armed Forces personnel. Gastrointestinal temperature, heart rate and environmental parameters were measured with portable data acquisition systems. The thermal characteristics of the clothing ensembles worn by the soldiers, namely thermal resistance, were determined with a sweating thermal manikin. Results showed that the clothing ensemble worn by the military was appropriate during guard duty but generally inappropriate during the hike. A general under-estimation of the biometeorological forecast model in predicting the optimal clothing insulation value was observed and an additional post-processing calibration might further improve forecast accuracy. This study represents the first step in the development of a comprehensive personalized biometeorological forecast system aimed at improving recommendations regarding the optimal thermal insulation of military garment ensembles for winter activities.

  17. Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Military Sexual Trauma What is military sexual trauma (MST)? Military sexual trauma, or MST, is the term used by VA to refer to experiences of sexual assault ... that a Veteran experienced during his or her military service. The definition used by the VA comes ...

  18. Development of a multilevel prevention program for improved relationship functioning in active duty military members.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Richard E; Smith Slep, Amy M; Sabathne, C; Eckardt Erlanger, Ann C; Hsu, Teresa T; Snyder, Douglas K; Balderrama-Durbin, Christina; Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Talcott, Gerald W; Tatum, JoLyn; Baker, Monty T; Cassidy, Daniel; Sonnek, Scott M

    2015-06-01

    The relationships and families of active duty (AD) service members have been tremendously strained by deployments and high operations' tempo. This study involves the first steps in developing a multilevel approach to preventing relationship problems that integrates universal, selective, and indicated prevention/intervention. Such an approach has tremendous empirical support for parenting problems, but no similar program exists for couple problems. We conducted two studies with U.S. Air Force Security Forces members. Study 1 elicited the target population's topics of highest interest. For almost all topics, 70% to 95% of participants who desired information reported being underserved by current prevention offerings (i.e., not receiving needed information). Using the top topics generated in Study 1, we developed prevention information/action planning sheets on 18 relationship issues. In Study 2, we had AD members who gave feedback on the form and content of the sheets. Overall, AD members believed that the sheets were moderately to very useful and were presented well, had pithy but comprehensive information and conveyed the content well. Results imply that a multilevel approach may be a useful complement to formal services in meeting underserved military members' needs and that further research and development of this dissemination vector for evidence-based information is warranted.

  19. Active objects programming for military autonomous mobile robots software prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozien, Roger F.

    2001-09-01

    tasks conflicts. Active object oriented programming is also very useful in matter of software engineering. Indeed, inside the code, the separation between the logical parts is explicit and plain. So it allows the designer to take only the robot's logical software part, regardless of the software testing environment, and to put it on the physical robot. And even among the logical parts of the robot software, the separation is quite huge, which is a good thing in terms of code engineering, upgrading and reusing. This kind of approach is, or should be, imposed by the particular constraints that lie on military robots, and on any kind of autonomous systems acting in hostile environments, if not in really unknown environments. This systems have to lead a mission on which other systems, and even human lifes, rely on. That is the reason why we want to have an accurate look on the on-board software which ensures the robot's autonomy of decision.

  20. Active object programming for military autonomous mobile robot software prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozien, Roger F.

    2001-10-01

    tasks conflicts. Active object oriented programming is also very useful in matter of software engineering. Indeed, inside the code, the separation between the logical parts is explicit and plain. So it allows the designer to take only the robot's logical software part, regardless of the software testing environment, and to put it on the physical robot. And even among the logical parts of the robot software, the separation is quite huge, which is a good thing in terms of code engineering, upgrading and reusing. This kind of approach is, or should be, imposed by the particular constraints that lie on military robots, and on any kind of autonomous systems acting in hostile environments, if not in really unknown environments. These systems have to lead a mission on which other systems, and even human lives, rely on. That is the reason why we want to have an accurate look on the on-board software which ensures the robot's autonomy of decision.

  1. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 57 - Procedures for the Provision of Related Services by the Military Medical Departments to DoDDS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... by the Military Medical Departments to DoDDS Students on IEPs C Appendix C to Part 57 National... Appendix C to Part 57—Procedures for the Provision of Related Services by the Military Medical Departments to DoDDS Students on IEPs A. Evaluation Procedures (1) Upon request by a DoDDS CSC, the...

  2. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 57 - Procedures for the Provision of Related Services by the Military Medical Departments to DoDDS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... by the Military Medical Departments to DoDDS Students on IEPs C Appendix C to Part 57 National... Appendix C to Part 57—Procedures for the Provision of Related Services by the Military Medical Departments to DoDDS Students on IEPs A. Evaluation Procedures (1) Upon request by a DoDDS CSC, the...

  3. History of Military Service and the Risk of Suicidal Ideation: Findings from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Richard; Barber, Catherine; Azrael, Deb; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Miller, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Studies of completed suicide by history of military service have produced inconsistent findings; no representative population-based study has compared the risk of nonfatal suicidal behavior among veterans with risk among nonveterans. The objective of this study was to examine whether male veterans of the U.S. military are at heightened risk of…

  4. CERP in Afghanistan: Refining Military Capabilities in Development Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Appraisal when out- comes are primarily development based.39 TSPs should also cover the fundamentals of project management, monitoring and evaluation tech...while deployed. 4. Monitor Outcomes. If the military is to remain substantially engaged in efforts beyond stability, monitoring and evaluation efforts...use and how projects were prioritized; what assessment mechanisms were used to determine projects; how monitoring and evaluation (M&E) is taking

  5. Women and Military Service: A History, Analysis, and Overview of Key Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    Women in the Military. ed. Wendy Chapkls (Washington. D.C.: Transnational Institute. 1981). 31-35. 26. Stiehm. 224-27. 27. See Stiehm. 149: and M. C...Military. ed. Wendy Chapkls (Washington, D.C.: Transnational Institute. 1981). 31-35. 3. Judith Hicks Stiehm, Arms and the Enlisted Woman (Philadelphia...Report on Women and the Military 6. no. I (Spring 1988): 29-43: see also Stiehm. 208. 12. Brian Mitchell. Weak Link: The Feminization of the American

  6. 75 FR 13572 - Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... National Park Service Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission AGENCY: National Park Service... dates of the April 7, 2006 and October 5, 2006 meetings of the Gettysburg National Military Park... Park Activities which consists of an update on Gettysburg National Battlefield Museum Foundation...

  7. Treatment of persistent post-concussive symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury: a systematic review of cognitive rehabilitation and behavioral health interventions in military service members and veterans.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Douglas B; Bunner, Anne E; Kennedy, Jan E; Balldin, Valerie; Tate, David F; Eapen, Blessen C; Jaramillo, Carlos A

    2015-09-01

    Increased prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with service members and veterans who completed combat deployments in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Management of persistent post-concussive symptoms (PCS) has been a challenge to healthcare providers throughout the Military and Veterans Healthcare Systems, as well as civilian healthcare providers, due in part to the chronic nature of symptoms, co-occurrence of behavioral health disorders such as depression, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and substance use disorders, and fear of a potential stigma associated with psychiatric diagnoses and behavioral health treatment(s). This systematic review examined non-pharmacologic behavioral health interventions and cognitive rehabilitation interventions for PCS in military service members and veterans with a history of mild TBI (mTBI). Six electronic databases were searched with specific term limitations, identifying 121 citations. Ultimately, 19 articles met criteria for inclusion in this systematic review. Studies were broadly categorized into four subtypes: psychoeducational interventions, cognitive rehabilitation, psychotherapeutic approaches, and integrated behavioral health interventions for PCS and PTSD. The review provides an update of the empirical evidence for these four types of interventions for PCS in active duty service members and veterans. Recommendations for future research are discussed, including the need to expand and improve the limited evidence basis on how to manage persistent post-concussive symptoms in this population.

  8. Military service member and veteran reintegration: A critical review and adapted ecological model.

    PubMed

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Blevins, Cara L; Fisher, Michael P; Magruder, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) experience a wide range of stress-related disorders in addition to social and occupational difficulties when reintegrating to the community. Facilitating reintegration of MSMVs following deployment is a societal priority. With an objective of identifying challenges and facilitators for reintegration of MSMVs of the current war era, we critically review and identify gaps in the literature. We searched 8 electronic databases and identified 1,764 articles. Screening of abstracts and full-text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 186 articles for review. Two investigators evaluating relevant articles independently found a lack of clear definition or comprehensive theorizing about MSMV reintegration. To address these gaps, we linked the findings from the literature to provide a unified definition of reintegration and adapted the social ecological systems theory to guide research and practice aimed at MSMV reintegration. Furthermore, we identified individual, interpersonal, community, and societal challenges related to reintegration. The 186 studies published from 2001 (the start of the current war era) to 2015 included 6 experimental studies or clinical trials. Most studies do not adequately account for context or more than a narrow set of potential influences on MSMV reintegration. Little evidence was found that evaluated interventions for health conditions, rehabilitation, and employment, or effective models of integrated delivery systems. We recommend an ecological model of MSMV reintegration to advance research and practice processes and outcomes at 4 levels (individual, interpersonal, organizational, and societal). (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. 48 CFR 37.109 - Services of quasi-military armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... armed forces. 37.109 Section 37.109 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... quasi-military armed forces. Contracts with Pinkerton Detective Agencies or similar organizations are...-military armed forces for hire, or with their employees, regardless of the contract's character....

  10. 48 CFR 37.109 - Services of quasi-military armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... armed forces. 37.109 Section 37.109 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... quasi-military armed forces. Contracts with Pinkerton Detective Agencies or similar organizations are...-military armed forces for hire, or with their employees, regardless of the contract's character....

  11. Health Services Management Education On-Site at a Military Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stephen J.; Poss, W. Bradley; Cupp, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A cooperative educational program with the U.S. military is described to illustrate a unique opportunity that confronted a graduate healthcare management program. The resulting degree program supported the military's operational medical mission but also presented interesting and unexpected challenges resulting from the wars in Iraq and…

  12. Service Delivery Experiences and Intervention Needs of Military Families with Children with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jennifer M.; Finke, Erinn; Hickerson, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of military families with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) specifically as it relates to relocation. Online survey methodology was used to gather information from military spouses with children with ASD. The finalized dataset included 189 cases. Descriptive statistics and…

  13. 48 CFR 37.109 - Services of quasi-military armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... armed forces. 37.109 Section 37.109 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... quasi-military armed forces. Contracts with Pinkerton Detective Agencies or similar organizations are...-military armed forces for hire, or with their employees, regardless of the contract's character....

  14. Prevalence of Perceived Stress and Mental Health Indicators Among Reserve-Component and Active-Duty Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Marian E.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Bray, Robert M.; Williams, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined stress levels and other indicators of mental health in reservists and active-duty military personnel by deployment status. Methods. We used data from the Department of Defense Health-Related Behaviors surveys, which collect comprehensive, population-based data for reserve and active-duty forces. Data were collected from 18 342 reservists and 16 146 active-duty personnel. Results. Overall, with adjustment for sociodemographic and service differences, reservists reported similar or less work and family stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms than did active-duty personnel. However, reservists who had been deployed reported higher rates of suicidal ideation and attempts than did active-duty personnel who had been deployed and higher rates of post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology than did any active-duty personnel and reservists who had not been deployed. The highest rates of suicidal ideation and attempts were among reservists who had served in theaters other than Iraq and Afghanistan. Conclusions. Our results suggest that deployment has a greater impact on reservists than on active-duty members, thus highlighting the urgent need for services addressing reservists’ unique postdeployment mental health issues. Also, deployment to any theater, not only Iraq or Afghanistan, represents unique threats to all service members’ mental well-being. PMID:22571709

  15. Effects of Military Service on Earnings and Education, Revisited: Variation by Service Duration, Occupation, and Civilian Unemployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    were compared with military-eligible applicants who chose not to enlist, controlling for the detailed covariates available on the military...gender, and age); the applicant’s home state; educational status; his or her percentile score on the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT); and... score ). The AFQT in particular is a very important measure of cognitive ability and has been shown to be a powerful predictor of labor market

  16. Military women as wives and mothers.

    PubMed

    Wahl, C K; Rundall, V F

    1996-01-01

    The increasing number of women in the military, especially married women and mothers, is forcing the military to accommodate populations it did not have to deal with in the past. The military community has responded by initiating programs that address the needs of active duty wives and mothers, especially with regard to family support, health care, and available child care facilities. However, many policy questions pertaining to military women remain, including nondeployment of breastfeeding women or mothers of small infants, treating the family as the unit of analysis and not just the service member, and providing programs such as WIC and Head Start to its members overseas.

  17. Influence of a 12.8-km military load carriage activity on lower limb gait mechanics and muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Rice, Hannah; Fallowfield, Joanne; Allsopp, Adrian; Dixon, Sharon

    2016-07-27

    The high stress fracture occurrence in military populations has been associated with frequent load carriage activities. This study aimed to assess the influence of load carriage and of completing a load carriage training activity on gait characteristics. Thirty-two Royal Marine recruits completed a 12.8-km load carriage activity as part of their military training. Data were collected during walking in military boots, pre and post-activity, with and without the additional load (35.5 kg). Ground contact time, lower limb sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics, and electromyographic variables were obtained for each condition. When carrying load, there was increased ground contact time, increased joint flexion and joint moments, and increased plantar flexor and knee extensor muscle activity. Post-activity, there were no changes to kinematic variables, knee extensor moments were reduced, and there was evidence of plantar flexor muscle fatigue. The observed gait changes may be associated with stress fracture development. Practitioner Summary: This study identified gait changes due to load carriage and after a military load carriage training activity. Such activities are associated with lower limb stress fractures. A pre-post study design was used. Gait mechanics changed to a greater extent when carrying load, than after completion of the activity when assessed without load.

  18. Serving God and Country? Religious Involvement and Military Service among Young Adult Men

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, Amy M.; Elder, Glen H.; Benson, Janel; Wang, Victor; Hill, Terrance

    2012-01-01

    Despite important connections between religion and military action throughout world history, scholars have seldom explored the association between religiosity and military enlistment. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we used a person-oriented analysis to categorize young men according to patterns of adolescent religious involvement. Youth indentified as “highly religious evangelical” are more likely to enlist in the military compared to their “highly religious non-evangelical” and “non-religious” counterparts; however, these findings hold only for those young men without college experience. These findings are discussed along with study limitations and promising directions for future research. PMID:22984296

  19. Suicide Attempt Characteristics Among Veterans and Active-Duty Service Members Receiving Mental Health Services: A Pooled Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Villatte, Jennifer L.; O’Connor, Stephen S.; Leitner, Rebecca; Kerbrat, Amanda H.; Johnson, Lora L.; Gutierrez, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Past suicidal behaviors are among the strongest and most consistent predictors of eventual suicide and may be particularly salient in military suicide. The current study compared characteristics of suicide attempts in veterans (N = 746) and active-duty service members (N = 1,013) receiving treatment for acute suicide risk. Baseline data from six randomized controlled trials were pooled and analyzed using robust regression. Service members had greater odds of having attempted suicide relative to veterans, though there were no differences in number of attempts made. Service members also had higher rates of premilitary suicide attempts and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Veterans disproportionately attempted suicide by means of overdose. In veterans, combat deployment was associated with lower odds of lifetime suicide attempt, while history of NSSI was associated with greater attempt odds. Neither was significantly associated with lifetime suicide attempt in service members. Implications for suicide assessment and treatment are discussed. PMID:26740909

  20. Health in the news: an analysis of magazines coverage of health issues in veterans and military service organizations.

    PubMed

    Jitnarin, Nattinee; Poston, Walker S C; Haddock, Christopher K; Jahnke, Sara

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a content analysis of Veterans and Military Service Organizations (VMSOs) magazines to determine what health-related topics VMSOs target and how they inform their constituencies about health issues. Health-related topics in 288 VMSOs' magazines from 21 VMSOs published in 2011 and 2012 were coded by trained raters using a standardized manual. The top three most addressed health topics were Health Services (Health care, Insurance), Disability and Disability benefits, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Topics least frequently covered were Tobacco and Smoking cessation, Illegal drugs, Alcohol, Gulf War Syndrome, and Weight and Body composition. VMSOs are concerned about the health and well-being of their members given the considerable amount of content devoted to certain health topics such as health insurance concerns, disability, and post-traumatic stress disorder. However, other health concerns that affect a considerable number of both current military personnel and veterans and cost both the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense millions annually, such as drug and alcohol problems, and tobacco use and smoking cessation, are infrequently covered. The results of this study improve our understanding of the health-related information that reaches the military and veteran populations through this important media outlet.

  1. Relationship between anxiety and medical disorders among compulsory military service candidates between the years 1998-2013.

    PubMed

    Shelef, Leah; Dotan, Shron; Kaminsky, Dan; Kedem, Ron; Margulis, Alexander; Hassidim, Ayal

    2016-10-30

    One of the most common psychiatric diagnoses among adolescents is anxiety disorder. Many of the anxiety symptoms are expressed physiologically, and therefore can mimic other medical conditions. The aim of this study was to examine the association between anxiety disorders and other medical conditions sharing common symptoms with anxiety (MDSCSA: Irritable Bowel Syndrome, asthma, migraine and hyperhidrosis). The study was based on the national database of the candidates for military service in Israel. Data for the years 1998-2013 was retrieved to create the study dataset. The final cohort population was comprised of 1,229,461 military service candidates. Anxiety prevalence and its association with other medical conditions sharing the same symptoms was examined in the cohort. The results showed significant statistical association between anxiety and IBS, asthma, migraine and hyperhidrosis. These findings support the fact that there is a clear association between anxiety disorder and the examined medical conditions. Moreover, in the military setting, the primary care physician has an important role in giving a correct diagnosis for soldiers presenting with symptoms that can be regarded both to anxiety and to other physical illnesses.

  2. Evaluation of active and passive polarimetric electro-optic imagery for civilian and military targets discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, Daniel A.; Breton, Mélanie; Pichette, Mario; Larochelle, Vincent; Simard, Jean-Robert

    2008-04-01

    Electro-optic (EO) imaging systems are commonly used to detect civilian and military targets during surveillance operations and search and rescue missions. Adding the polarization of light as additional information to such active and passive EO imaging systems may increase the target discrimination performance, as man made objects are known to depolarized light in different manner than natural background. However, while the polarization of light has been used and studied in the past for numerous applications, the understanding of the polarization phenomenology taking place with targets used in cluttered backgrounds requires additional experimentations. Specifically, the target contrast enhancement obtained by analyzing the polarization of the reflected light from either a direct polarized laser source as encountered in active imagers, or from natural ambient illumination, needs further investigation. This paper describes an investigation of the use of polarization-based imaging sensors to discriminate civilian and military targets against different backgrounds. Measurements were carried out using two custom-designed active and passive imaging systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) and the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral bands. Polarimetric signatures were acquired during two distinct trials that occurred in 2007, using specific civilian and military targets such as cars and military vehicles. Results demonstrate to what extent and under which illumination and environmental conditions the exploitation of active and passive polarimetric images is suitable to enable target detection and recognition for some events of interest, according to various specific scenarios.

  3. 50 CFR 21.15 - Authorization of take incidental to military readiness activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Authorization of take incidental to military readiness activities. 21.15 Section 21.15 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... data for five years from the date the Armed Forces commence their action. During Integrated...

  4. Environmental factors, immune changes and respiratory diseases in troops during military activities.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Chciałowski, Andrzej; Korsak, Jolanta

    2013-06-01

    Combat operations in contemporary theaters of war, as well as combat training, are carried out in all parts of the world, typically in a harsh environment. Specific environmental conditions, such as heat, cold, high-altitudes, desert climates, as well as chemical and biological pollution of both the atmosphere and soil, together with over-exertion, food restrictions, sleep deprivation, and psychological stress can all result in changes in the immune system and the occurrence of associated diseases. Respiratory diseases are one of the most common health problems among military personnel participating in combat training or deployed to operations in areas characterized by difficult climatic and sanitary conditions. They are, therefore, one of the main reasons for military personnel requiring ambulant and hospital treatment. The aim of the study was to discuss the influence of environmental factors and the conditions in which active duty is performed on changes in the immune system and the occurrence of respiratory tract diseases in a military environment.

  5. Mental Health and Substance Use Factors Associated with Unwanted Sexual Contact among U.S. Active Duty Service Women

    PubMed Central

    Stahlman, Shauna; Javanbakht, Marjan; Cochran, Susan; Hamilton, Alison B.; Shoptaw, Steven; Gorbach, Pamina M.

    2015-01-01

    Many U.S. military women are exposed to unwanted sexual contact during military service, which can have important implications for mental health. Using data from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors, we employed multiple logistic regression methods to examine whether unwanted sexual contact was associated with stress, screening positive for mental disorders, or substance use, among active duty service women. The sample included 7,415 female military personnel, of whom 13.4% reported unwanted sexual contact (including any touching of genitals) since entering the military. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, factors independently associated with unwanted sexual contact included military-related stress (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 2.44), family/personal life-related stress (AOR = 1.78), and gender-related stress (AOR = 1.98) in the past 12 months. In addition, screening positive for depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, psychological distress, and suicidal ideation or attempt were associated with unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.57–2.11). For drug/alcohol use, only misuse of tranquilizers/muscle relaxers (past 12 months) was associated with report of unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.35). Given the prevalence of unwanted sexual contact and corresponding adverse health outcomes in this sample of active duty women, strategies to create military structural/cultural changes and reduce gender-related stress and sexism are needed. PMID:25976935

  6. MARO - Mass Atrocity Response Operations: A Military Planning Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    innovative dimension was the creation of a standing body of retired and active duty military planners to provide pro- fessional horsepower for thinking...The strategic guidance should provide clarity with respect to ac- tions taken against the host nation’s government or its military (if they are...services, develop infrastructure, and foster economic growth. Military plans usually are phased, based on anticipated activities or condi- tions. Although

  7. Acupuncture therapy for fever induced by viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in military medical service: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kwon, SeungWon; Shin, KyoungHo; Jung, WooSang; Moon, SangKwan; Cho, KiHo

    2014-12-01

    We report the cases of eight military patients with fever (≥38°C) induced by viral upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) who requested treatment with acupuncture in the military medical service room. All patients were treated immediately after diagnosis with classical acupuncture (GV14, GB20, TE8 points) and a new type of acupuncture, equilibrium acupuncture (Feibing and Ganmao points). After one treatment session (20 min), reduction of body temperature was confirmed in all patients. Accompanying symptoms such as headache, myalgia and nasal obstruction also showed a tendency to decrease. Within 3 days of treatment, six of the eight patients had recovered from the URTI. No adverse effects of acupuncture treatment were reported.

  8. 45 CFR 2555.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Military and merchant marine educational... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 2555.210 Military and merchant marine... purpose is the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the...

  9. 24 CFR 3.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Military and merchant marine... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 3.210 Military and merchant marine educational... the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the merchant marine....

  10. 24 CFR 3.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Military and merchant marine... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 3.210 Military and merchant marine educational... the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the merchant marine....

  11. 34 CFR 106.13 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military and merchant marine educational institutions... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 106.13 Military and merchant marine educational... individuals for a military service of the United States or for the merchant marine. (Authority: Secs. 901,...

  12. 34 CFR 106.13 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military and merchant marine educational institutions... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 106.13 Military and merchant marine educational... individuals for a military service of the United States or for the merchant marine. (Authority: Secs. 901,...

  13. 34 CFR 106.13 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military and merchant marine educational institutions... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 106.13 Military and merchant marine educational... individuals for a military service of the United States or for the merchant marine. (Authority: Secs. 901,...

  14. 32 CFR 196.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military and merchant marine educational... OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 196.210 Military and merchant marine... purpose is the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the...

  15. 10 CFR 5.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military and merchant marine educational institutions. 5... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 5.210 Military and... institution whose primary purpose is the training of individuals for a military service of the United...

  16. 7 CFR 15a.13 - Military and merchant marine educational institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military and merchant marine educational institution... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 15a.13 Military and merchant... purpose is the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the...

  17. 32 CFR 196.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military and merchant marine educational... OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 196.210 Military and merchant marine... purpose is the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the...

  18. 36 CFR 1211.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military and merchant marine... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1211.210 Military and merchant marine... purpose is the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the...

  19. 24 CFR 3.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Military and merchant marine... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 3.210 Military and merchant marine educational... the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the merchant marine....

  20. 29 CFR 36.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Military and merchant marine educational institutions. 36... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 36.210 Military and... institution whose primary purpose is the training of individuals for a military service of the United...

  1. 45 CFR 2555.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Military and merchant marine educational... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 2555.210 Military and merchant marine... purpose is the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the...

  2. 24 CFR 3.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Military and merchant marine... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 3.210 Military and merchant marine educational... the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the merchant marine....

  3. 24 CFR 3.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Military and merchant marine... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 3.210 Military and merchant marine educational... the training of individuals for a military service of the United States or for the merchant marine....

  4. 34 CFR 106.13 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military and merchant marine educational institutions... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 106.13 Military and merchant marine educational... individuals for a military service of the United States or for the merchant marine. (Authority: Secs. 901,...

  5. 34 CFR 106.13 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military and merchant marine educational institutions... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 106.13 Military and merchant marine educational... individuals for a military service of the United States or for the merchant marine. (Authority: Secs. 901,...

  6. Is Military Disability Compensation Adequate to Offset Civilian Earnings Losses from Service-Connected Disabilities?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    STD rates differed by industry, with high-tech industries having the highest rate at 95 percent and nonprofit services and gov- ernment having the...ability compensation exceeded earnings for a 40-percent rating by 47 percent ($6,696/$4,569) and for the highest rating group by 76 percent ($29,947...percent and 50–60 percent have higher earnings after initially leaving active duty than in subsequent years. LFP for the highest ratings are also higher

  7. Health Problems during Compulsory Military Service Predict Disability Retirement: A Register-Based Study on Secular Trends during 40 Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Frilander, Heikki; Lallukka, Tea; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Heliövaara, Markku; Solovieva, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Disability retirement causes a significant burden on the society and affects the well-being of individuals. Early health problems as determinants of disability retirement have received little attention. The objective was to study, whether interrupting compulsory military service is an early indicator of disability retirement among Finnish men and whether seeking medical advice during military service increases the risk of all-cause disability retirement and disability retirement due to mental disorders and musculoskeletal diseases. We also looked at secular trends in these associations. We examined a nationally representative sample of 2069 men, who had entered military service during 1967–1996. We linked military service health records with cause-specific register data on disability retirement from 1968 to 2008. Secular trends were explored in three service time strata. We used the Cox regression model to estimate proportional hazard ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. During the follow-up time altogether 140 (6.8%) men retired due to disability, mental disorders being the most common cause. The men who interrupted service had a remarkably higher cumulative incidence of disability retirement (18.9%). The associations between seeking medical advice during military service and all-cause disability retirement were similar across the three service time cohorts (overall hazard ratio 1.40 per one standard deviation of the number of visits; 95% confidence interval 1.26–1.56). Visits due to mental problems predicted disability retirement due to mental disorders in the men who served between 1987 and 1996 and a tendency for a similar cause-specific association was seen for musculoskeletal diseases in the men who served in 1967–1976. In conclusion, health problems—in particular mental problems—during late adolescence are strong determinants of disability retirement. Call-up examinations and military service provide access to the entire age cohort of men

  8. Military Personnel: DOD Needs More Complete Data on Active-Duty Servicemembers Use of Food Assistance Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    programs. GAO reviewed information on government and charitable food assistance programs and policies . GAO also interviewed DOD and service officials at...quality-of-life matters.7 USD (P&R) is the Secretary’s senior policy advisor on recruitment, career development, and pay and benefits for military...Manpower Data Center, Military Community and Family Policy , and others. USD (P&R) responsibilities include, but are not limited to, developing policies

  9. Military Skills for America’s Future: Leveraging Military Service and Experience to Put Veterans and Military Spouses Back to Work

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-31

    high-demand occupations, starting with certifications in manufacturing. The Department of Defense, at the President’s direction, has established a...credit for long-term unemployed veterans with service-connected disabilities. o Challenging the private sector to hire or train 100,000 veterans and...November 2009, President Obama signed an Executive Order with the goal of expanding the opportunities that veterans have for employment in the Federal

  10. Using architecture and technology to promote improved quality of life for military service members with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pasquina, Paul F; Pasquina, Lavinia Fici; Anderson-Barnes, Victoria C; Giuggio, Jeffrey S; Cooper, Rory A

    2010-02-01

    Today, injured service members are surviving wounds that would have been fatal in previous wars. A recent RAND report estimates that approximately 320,000 service members may have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) during deployment, and it is not uncommon for a soldier to sustain multiple associated injuries such as limb loss, paralysis, sensory loss, and psychological damage. As a result, many military service members and their families face significant challenges returning to a high quality of independent life. The architectural concepts of universal design (UD) and evidence-based design (EBD) are gaining interest as an integral part of the rehabilitation process of veterans with TBI. This article examines the possibilities presented by UD and EBD in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, in terms of high-end building and interior design quality, and possible technological options for individuals with disabilities.

  11. A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components...Lisa M. Harrington, James H . Bigelow, Alexander Rothenberg, James Pita, Paul D. Emslie Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This document...of a particular component—whether active , guard, or reserve. As a result, when personnel policies are implemented in one component, little is known

  12. Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Assessment Program (DLAP), which incorporates the active duty health behaviors study and expands the scope to include the National Guard and Reserves, as...well as other special studies . Findings from the program provide information on the fitness of the force, including estimates of alcohol, drug, and...first to include Coast Guard personnel. The study has three broad aims for active duty military personnel: continue to assess the nature, extent, and

  13. U.S. military recruits waived for pathological curvature of the spine: increased risk of discharge from service.

    PubMed

    Bedno, Sheryl A; Gardiner, Bradley; Li, Yuanzhang; Wiesen, Andrew R; Firestone, Jordan A; Niebuhr, David W

    2011-05-01

    Selective accession waivers for medically disqualifying conditions like spinal curvature are one way the military meets its manpower needs. We evaluated retention patterns during the first 2 years of service of a cohort of military recruits with waivers for pathological curvature of the spine (spinal curvature). Recruits waived for spinal curvature (n = 417), who accessed from 1998 to 2005 were identified and matched with 3 qualified recruits. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards model were used to compare survival patterns and adjusted attrition hazard estimates. Waived recruits experienced significantly increased risk of "all cause" discharge (relative risk = 1.3; 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 1.5) and "existing prior to service" discharge (relative risk = 2.4; confidence interval: 1.6, 3.5). Despite the increased risk of discharge, current waiver criteria allowed a majority with spinal curvature to complete at least 2 years of service. Policy makers must consider risks and benefits before modifying the current accession standard for spinal curvature.

  14. Medical examination of Israeli 17-year-olds before military service as a national resource for health information.

    PubMed

    Kark, J D; Kedem, R; Revach, M

    1986-01-01

    At age 17 years Israelis undergo medical examination for the purpose of health classification for military service. The potential use of this extensive data collection system for epidemiologic studies is illustrated for selected conditions. Trends in diagnosed disorders over a 25-year period are exemplified in the changing prevalence of tuberculosis, bronchial asthma, diabetes, epilepsy and heart defects. Within birth cohorts, cross-sectional analyses of height, body mass, blood pressure and disorders--such as bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, diabetes, psychiatric diagnoses and such genetic conditions as familial Mediterranean fever--point to clear ethnic differences. Educational level is strongly associated with measures of health status. Potential uses of this resource include: detecting groups in need of preventive, curative and rehabilitative care, assessing changing needs and priorities of health care, evaluation of intervention programs and health services provided in childhood, a wide spectrum of etiologic studies including assessment of health effects of social change, follow-up studies including the natural history of disorders, and developing data systems such as national registries of rare or important conditions. Issues relating to data reliability and validity, changing disease classification and nonexamination of groups exempted from military service limit interpretation of findings and restrict uses of this resource. Emphasis on standardization of data collection and diagnostic criteria, quality assurance and improved data management will be necessary.

  15. Body mass index, physical activity, and smoking in relation to military readiness.

    PubMed

    Collée, Audrey; Clarys, Peter; Geeraerts, Philippe; Dugauquier, Christian; Mullie, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the influence of excess weight, regular physical activity, and smoking on the military readiness of the Belgian Armed Forces in a cross-sectional online survey. A multinomial logistic regression was used to study the influence of modifiable risk factors on participation in the physical fitness test. In our study population (n = 4,959), subjects with a body mass index higher than 25 kg/m(2), smokers, and subjects with a lower level of vigorous physical activity were significantly more likely to have failed the physical fitness test. In the Belgian Armed Forces, serious efforts should be made to encourage vigorous physical activity, smoking cessation, and weight loss to preserve our military readiness. Instead of relying on civilian public health interventions, Belgian Defense should develop its own specific approaches to prevent weight gain, improve physical fitness, and influence smoking attitude.

  16. Lower health related quality of life in U.S. military personnel is associated with service-related disorders and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jessica; Lee, Hyunhwa; Barr, Taura; Baxter, Tristin; Heinzelmann, Morgan; Rak, Hannah; Mysliwiec, Vincent

    2014-04-30

    Military personnel who have combat exposures are at increased risk for the service-related disorders of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, sleep disturbances and decreased health related quality of life (HRQOL). Those with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at even greater risk. Inflammation is associated with these disorders and may underlie the risk for health declines. We evaluated 110 recently deployed, military personnel presenting with sleep disturbances for service-related disorders (TBI, PTSD, and depression) as well as HRQOL. ANOVA models were used to examine differences among military personnel with two or more service-related disorders (high comorbid group), or one or no disorders (low comorbid group). Logistic regression models were used to determine associations among interleukin-6 (IL-6) to HRQOL and service-related disorders. Approximately one-third of the sample had two or more service-related disorders. HRQOL was lower and IL-6 concentrations were higher in military personnel with PTSD or depression, with the most profound differences in those with more service-related disorders, regardless of sleep disorder. Having symptoms of depression and PTSD resulted in a 3.5-fold risk to be in the lower quartile of HRQOL and the highest quartile of IL-6. In a linear regression model, 41% of the relationship between HRQOL and IL-6 concentrations was mediated by PTSD and depression. Military personnel with PTSD and depression are at high risk for lower HRQOL, and higher IL-6 concentrations. Comprehensive treatment is required to address co-occurring service-related disorders in military personnel to promote health and well-being.

  17. Department of Defense Report and Plan on Services to Military Dependent Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Military families who have a member with autism would like to have expanded options for providing care, easing financial burden, and increasing the prospect for greater results for their family member. The Department of Defense (DoD) issued a report in July, covering its belief in the efficacy of applied behavior analysis (ABA) as a form of…

  18. 22 CFR 124.2 - Exemptions for training and military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... in Category III for the firearms in Category I; (iii) Nuclear weapons strategic delivery systems and... to military specifications listed in Category XVI(c); (x) Category XV; (xi) Nuclear weapons design... associated equipment; (iv) Naval nuclear propulsion equipment listed in USML Category VI and USML Category...

  19. Beyond Military Service: An Analysis of United States Naval Academy Graduates’ Civilian Career Experiences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xiii LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Demographic Breakdown of the Currently Enrolled Classes’ Incoming Plebe Profiles...approximately 1,200 candidates enter as Plebes (USNA Website, 2005). B. ADMISSIONS Admission to military academies differs greatly from civilian colleges and...3. Demographics Even with criticism of the selection process, a quick statistical overview of the incoming freshman ( Plebes ) demonstrates the very

  20. A Statistical Analysis of the Deterrence Effects of the Military Services’ Drug Testing Policies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    Trends in Alcohol, Illicit Drug, and Cigarette Use among U.S. Military Personnel: 1980- 1992. Armed Forces and Society (Summer) . 36. Gujarati ... Damodar N., 1995. Basic Econometrics. 3rd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill. 37. Klienbaum, David G. 1994. Logistic Regression: A Self Learning Text. New

  1. 32 CFR 728.43 - Members of other foreign military services and their dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Assistance Training Programs (SATP) and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) are not included (see § 728.44). (3... regarding the physical and mental condition of the individual concerned and full identification, diagnosis... surgical conditions, exclusive of nervous, mental, or contagious diseases or those requiring...

  2. The Role of Natural Support Systems in the Post-deployment Adjustment of Active Duty Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Janet A; Olson, Jonathan; Perkins, Daniel F; Travis, Wendy J; Ormsby, LaJuana

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the relations among three different types of naturally occurring social support (from romantic partners, friends and neighbors, and unit leaders) and three indices of service member well-being (self reports of depressive symptoms, satisfaction with military life, and perceptions of unit readiness) for service members who did and did not report negative experiences associated with military deployment. Data were drawn from the 2011 Community Assessment completed anonymously by more than 63,000 USAF personnel. Regression analyses revealed that higher levels of social support was associated with better outcomes regardless of negative deployment experiences. Evidence of moderation was also noted, with all forms of social support moderating the impact of negative deployment experiences on depressive symptoms and support from unit leaders moderating the impact of negative deployment experience on satisfaction with military life. No moderation was found for perceptions of unit readiness. Subgroup analyses revealed slightly different patterns for male and female service members, with support providing fewer moderation effects for women. These findings may have value for military leaders and mental health professionals working to harness the power of naturally occurring relationships to maximize the positive adjustment of service members and their families. Implications for practices related to re-integration of post-deployment military personnel are discussed.

  3. Defense Health Care: Applying Key Management Practices Should Help Achieve Efficiencies within the Military Health System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    5. Realign the TRICARE Management Activity and establish a Joint Military Health Service Directorate to consolidate shared services and common...Directorate to consolidate shared services and common functions Realign TRICARE Management Activity and establish a TRICARE Health Plan Agency to...Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, (2) TRICARE health plan, (3) Health Management Support, and (4) Shared Services division

  4. Military Education: Implementation of Recommendations at the Armed Forces Staff College. Report to the Chairman, Panel on Military Education, Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. National Security and International Affairs Div.

    This study evaluates the Armed Forces Staff College's implementation of selected recommendations from the April 1989 report of the Panel on Military Education. In particular, this report discusses Phase II officer professional military education (PME) programs taught at the Joint and Combined Staff Officer School in Norfolk, Virginia. The study…

  5. 78 FR 42057 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... and Approval; Comment Request; FFEL/Direct Loan/Perkins Military Service Deferment/Post- Active Duty... considered public records. Title of Collection: FFEL/Direct Loan/Perkins Military Service Deferment/Post.... Abstract: The Military Service/Post-Active Duty Student Deferment request form serves as the means by...

  6. Active Citizenship, Education and Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwell, Jonathan; Scott, Ralph; Horley, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how active citizenship can be encouraged through education and community action. It proposes that service learning and a renewed focus on voluntarism can both promote social cohesion between different ethnic and cultural groups while also fostering among the population a greater understanding of and commitment to civic…

  7. Inferring Internet Denial-of-Service Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Inferring Internet Denial-of-Service Activity David Moore CAIDA San Diego Supercomputer Center University of California, San Diego dmoore@caida.org...the local network topology. kc claffy and Colleen Shannon at CAIDA provided support and valuable feed- back throughout the project. David Wetherall

  8. A Brief Intervention to Reduce Suicide Risk in Military Service Members and Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    to the general population. There are limited evidence-based suicide prevention interventions that have been developed for military personnel and...veteran populations in three ways by: (1) evaluating suicide risk using a structured assessment measure; (2) enhancing suicide-related coping strategies ...Institutional Review Board Processes The PIs and SAFEMIL project team members participated in face-to-face, phone, and/or email communication to determine the

  9. Army ’New Standards’ Personnel: Effect of Remedial Literacy Training on Performance in Military Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    placed in remedial training programs (Army Preparatory Training, APT), designed to upgrade their literacy status to a fifth-grade level or higher. The...research sought to determine whether success in remedial literacy training was associated with superior military performance. Another objective was...to develop an equation for predicting terminal literacy scores. Analysis for 9,000 Army personnel was carried out on data extracted from the

  10. Effects of military training activities on shrub-steppe raptors in southwestern Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehman, Robert N.; Steenhof, Karen; Kochert, Michael N.; Carpenter, L.B.

    1999-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1994, we assessed relative abundance, nesting success, and distribution of ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis), northern harriers (Circus cyaneus), burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia), and short-eared owls (Asio flammeus) inside and outside a military training site in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, southwestern Idaho. The Orchard Training Area is used primarily for armored vehicle training and artillery firing by the Idaho Army National Guard. Relative abundance of nesting pairs inside and outside the training site was not significantly different from 1991 to 1993 but was significantly higher on the training site in 1994 (Pa??a??a??0.03). Nesting success varied among years but was not significantly different inside and outside the training site (Pa??>a??0.26). In 1994, short-eared owl and burrowing owl nests were significantly closer to firing ranges used early in the spring before owls laid eggs than were random points (Pa??Military activity contributed to some nesting failures from 1992 to 1994, but some pairs nested successfully near military activity.

  11. Efficacy of a Tobacco Quitline in Active Duty Military and TRICARE Beneficiaries: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Klesges, Robert C; Ebbert, Jon O; Talcott, G Wayne; Thomas, Fridtjof; Richey, Phyllis A; Womack, Catherine; Hryshko-Mullen, Ann; Oh, John

    2015-08-01

    A higher proportion of military personnel than civilians smoke cigarettes. Few randomized trials of tobacco use interventions have been conducted in the U.S. military. We evaluated the efficacy of a tobacco quitline (QL) in 1298 active duty military personnel, their dependents, reservists, and retirees who smoke cigarettes. Participants were randomized to either a proactive (counselor-initiated) or reactive (participant-initiated) QL intervention for 8 weeks. The proactive condition included up to an 8-week supply of free nicotine replacement therapy, and the reactive condition included a 2-week supply. The primary outcome was 12-month smoking abstinence. The enrolled population was predominantly affiliated with the Air Force and Army. At the end of treatment, proactive treatment was associated with a greater odds of both prolonged (44.22% vs. 24.96%; odds ratio [OR] = 2.4, P < 0.0001) and 7-day point prevalence (49.92% vs. 28.20%; OR = 2.5, P < 0.0001) smoking abstinence, a difference that was maintained for prolonged smoking abstinence at 12 months (22.03% vs. 13.41%; OR = 1.8, P < 0.0001). Our findings provide evidence that a proactive QL with nicotine replacement therapy is highly efficacious among Air Force and Army active duty and TRICARE beneficiaries and would provide an effective telephonic treatment option for this population of smokers.

  12. Validity of the Virtual Reality Stroop Task (VRST) in active duty military.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Christina M; Reger, Greg M; Edwards, Joseph; Rizzo, Albert A; Courtney, Christopher G; Parsons, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    Virtual environments provide the ability to systematically deliver test stimuli in simulated contexts relevant to real world behavior. The current study evaluated the validity of the Virtual Reality Stroop Task (VRST), which presents test stimuli during a virtual reality military convoy with simulated combat threats. Active duty Army personnel (N = 49) took the VRST, a customized version of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM)-Fourth Edition TBI Battery (2007) that included the addition of the ANAM Stroop and Tower tests, and traditional neuropsychological measures, including the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System version of the Color-Word Interference Test. Preliminary convergent and discriminant validity was established, and performance on the VRST was significantly associated with computerized and traditional tests of attention and executive functioning. Valid virtual reality cognitive assessments open new lines of inquiry into the impact of environmental stimuli on performance and offer promise for the future of neuropsychological assessments used with military personnel.

  13. Military Ordnance: Cleanup Activities at the Former Raritan Arsenal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Appendix I Cleanup Activities at the Former Raritan Arsenal Areas suspected to be contaminated with ordnance can be surveyed with,. metal detector . According...to the Corps, surveying all of Raritan with a metal detector is not feasible because the site is too large and much of the area now contains...since these locations pose the greatcst concern for the public hc"alth and the environment. Areas 1 and 17 were surveyed with a metal detector , and no

  14. Military hospitalizations among deployed US service members following anthrax vaccination, 1998-2001.

    PubMed

    Wells, Timothy Steven; Sato, Paul A; Smith, Tyler Clain; Wang, Linda Zhenling; Reed, Robert John; Ryan, Margaret Angela Kappel

    2006-01-01

    Safety concerns have confronted the Department of Defense Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program since inception in 1998. To determine if anthrax vaccination was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization, a historical cohort study utilizing pre- and post-anthrax-vaccination hospitalizations was undertaken and analyzed with Cox proportional hazards models. The study population consisted of 170,723 active duty US service members who were anthrax-vaccinated and deployed during the time period January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2001. Study outcomes included hospitalizations due to any-cause, 14 broad International Classification of Diseases diagnostic categories, autoimmune organ specific and organ non-specific hospitalizations, and asthma. After adjustment, anthrax vaccination was associated with significantly fewer hospitalizations for any-cause, diseases of the blood and blood forming organs, and diseases of the respiratory system. Comparing anthrax post-vaccination hospitalization experience with the pre-vaccination period resulted in no significant increased hazard for any of the hospitalization outcomes studied. Although there was no apparent increase in risk of morbidity in this study population, the relationship between anthrax vaccine and deployment on health outcomes among US service members needs further study.

  15. Effects of personal and occupational stress on injuries in a young, physically active population: a survey of military personnel.

    PubMed

    Bedno, Sheryl; Hauret, Keith; Loringer, Kelly; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Mallon, Timothy; Jones, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to document risk factors for any injury and sports- and exercise-related injuries, including personal and occupational stress among active duty service members (SMs) in the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. A total of 10,692 SMs completed the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members. The survey asked about demographics, personal stress and occupational stress, injuries from any cause, and participation in sports- and exercise- related activities in the past year. The survey used a complex sampling procedure to create a representative sample of SMs. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations of injury outcomes with potential risk factors. 49% of SMs sought medical care for an injury in the past year and 25% sustained a sports- and exercise-related activities injury. Odds of injury were higher for the Army and Marine Corps than for the Air Force or Navy. This survey showed that higher personal and occupational stress was associated with higher risks of injury. SMs who experienced higher levels of personal or occupational stress reported higher risks of injuries. The effects of stress reduction programs on injury risks should be evaluated in military and other young physically active populations.

  16. Reference values for performance on the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics V3.0 in an active duty military sample.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Dennis L; Bleiberg, Joseph; Roebuck-Spencer, Tresa; Cernich, Alison N; Schwab, Karen; Ivins, Brian; Salazar, Andres M; Harvey, Sally C; Brown, Fred H; Warden, Deborah

    2006-10-01

    The Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) is a computerized measure of processing speed, cognitive efficiency, and memory. This study describes performance and psychometric properties of ANAM in an active duty, healthy military sample (N = 2,371) composed primarily of young (18-46 years) adult males. Rarely have neuropsychological reference values for use with individuals in the military been derived from a large, active duty military population, and this is the first computerized neuropsychological test battery with military-specific reference values. Although these results do not provide demographically corrected, formal normative data, they provide reference points for neuropsychologists and other health care providers who are using ANAM data in research or clinical settings, with patients of comparable demographics to the present sample.

  17. Parental mental health after the accidental death of a son during military service: 23-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Pål; Heir, Trond; Herlofsen, Pål H; Langsrud, Øyvind; Weisæth, Lars

    2012-01-01

    We prospectively studied parental mental health after suddenly losing a son in a military training accident. Parents (N = 32) were interviewed at 1, 2 and 23 years after the death of their son. The General Health Questionnaire and Expanded Texas Inventory of Grief were self-reported at 1, 2, 5, and 23 years; the Inventory of Complicated Grief was self-reported at 23 years. We observed a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders at 1- and 2-year follow-ups (57% and 45%, respectively), particularly major depression (43% and 31%, respectively). Only one mental disorder was diagnosed at the 23-year follow-up. Grief and psychological distress were highest at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Spouses exhibited a high concordance of psychological distress. Mothers reported more intense grief reactions than did fathers. The loss of a son during military service may have a substantial impact on parental mental health particularly during the first 2 years after death. Spouses' grief can be interrelated and may contribute to their psychological distress.

  18. The impact of a civic service program on biopsychosocial outcomes of post 9/11 U.S. military veterans.

    PubMed

    Matthieu, Monica M; Lawrence, Karen A; Robertson-Blackmore, Emma

    2017-02-01

    Volunteering as a health promotion intervention, improves physical health, mental health, and social outcomes particularly in older adults, yet limited research exists for veterans. We conducted a preliminary study to explore whether volunteering impacts a variety of biopsychosocial outcomes, including symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, among returning military veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan. A survey enrolling a prospective cohort of United States (U.S.) veterans who served in the military after 11 September 2001 and who participated in a national civic service program was conducted. A total of 346 veterans completed standardized health, mental health, and psychosocial self-report measures before and after the program. Statistically significant differences were detected in overall health rating, level of emotional difficulty, PTSD and depression symptoms, purpose in life, self-efficacy, social isolation, and the perceived availability of social support at program completion. Screening positive for probable PTSD predicted improved perceived self-efficacy while probable depression predicted a decrease in loneliness, an increase in purpose in life, and an increase in perceived social support, at program completion. Volunteering was associated with significant improvements in health, mental health and social outcomes in returning veterans.

  19. Military psychiatry in India

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, H. R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Military personnel, because of the unique nature of their duties and services, are likely to be under stress which at times has no parallel in civilian life. The stress of combat and service in extreme weather conditions often act as major stressors. The modern practices in military psychiatry had their beginning during the two World Wars, more particularly, the IInd World War. The GHPU concept had the beginning in India with military hospitals having such establishments in the care of their clientele. As the nation gained independence, many of the military psychiatrists shifted to the civil stream and contributed immensely in the development of modern psychiatry in India. In the recent years military psychiatry has been given the status of a subspecialty chapter and the military psychiatrists have been regularly organizing CMEs and training programs for their members to prepare them to function in the special role of military psychiatrists. PMID:21836702

  20. Structural elucidation and immunostimulatory activity of polysaccharide isolated by subcritical water extraction from Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Duan, Yuqing; Yang, Wenya; Zhang, Haihui; Li, Changzheng; Zhang, Jixian

    2017-02-10

    Water-soluble polysaccharides were obtained from Cordyceps militaris (C. militaris) (CMP) by subcritical water extraction (SWE). Two polysaccharides fractions, CMP-W1 and CMP-S1, were isolated from CMP using DEAE-52 cellulose and Sephadex G-150 column chromatography. The structural characteristics of CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 were investigated. The results showed that the molecular weight of CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 are 3.66×105Da and 4.60×105Da, respectively, and both of them were heteropolysaccharides composed of d-mannose, d-glucose, d-galactose with the molar ratios of 2.84:1:1.29 and 2.05:1:1.09, respectively. FT-IR spectra analysis suggested that CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 belonged to pyranose form sugar and protein free. For immunostimulatory activity assay in vitro, CMP-W1 and CMP-S1 significantly promoted lymphatic spleen cell proliferation of mice. Therefore, the polysaccharides obtained from C. militaris by SWE can be used as potential natural immunostimulant in functional foods or medicine.

  1. DOD Financial Management: Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit Readiness of Navy Military Pay and Other Related Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    DOD FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit Readiness of Navy Military Pay and Other Related...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DOD Financial Management: Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit ...Additional Efforts Needed to Improve Audit Readiness of Navy Military Pay and Other Related Activities Why GAO Did This Study DOD continues to work

  2. Measuring Underemployment Among Military Spouses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    widespread underemployment among military wives, this underemployment does not necessarily translate into dissatisfaction with the military...households (DMDC, 2004). Thus, a per- sistent lack of employment opportunity affects a spouse’s quality of life, and perennial dissatisfaction with...its own right, since wives’ dissatisfaction may translate into higher service member attrition from military service. The primary outcome of interest

  3. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military. Volume 2. Estimates for Department of Defense Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    past year. Accord- ing to DoD directives, both sexual harassment and gender discrimination are sex- based military equal opportunity (MEO) violations...instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send... gender discrimination in the military ??? an assessment last conducted in 2012 by the Department of Defense using the Workplace and Gender Relations

  4. TRICARE, Military Health System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preventive Services Healthy Living Enter Profile Get My Plan Info Service Status Countries Zip Code Enter valid ... My Military Health Record Less Find a TRICARE Plan Answer some questions to find the right TRICARE ...

  5. Implementation and dissemination of military informed and evidence-based interventions for community dwelling military families.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert A; Fairbank, John A

    2013-12-01

    Community dwelling military families from the National Guard and Reserve contend with deployment-related stressors in relative isolation, living in communities where mental health providers may have little knowledge of military culture. When they are community residents, active duty service members and families tend to live in close proximity to their military installations. This article will focus primarily on the challenges to quality mental health care for reserve component (RC) families. Where studies of RC families are absent, those of active component (AC) families will be highlighted as relevant. Upon completion of a deployment, reintegration for RC families is complicated by high rates of symptomatology, low service utilization, and greater barriers to care relative to AC families. A paucity of providers skilled in evidence-based treatments (EBTs) limits community mental health capacity to serve RC military families. Several emergent programs illustrate the potential for better serving community dwelling military families. Approaches include behavioral health homes, EBTs and treatment components, structured resiliency and parent training, military informed schools, outreach methods, and technology-based coping, and psychoeducation. Methods from implementation science to improve clinical skill acquisition and spread and sustainability of EBTs may advance access to and quality of mental health treatment and are reviewed herein. Recommendations related to research methods, military knowledge and treatment competencies, and transition to a public health model of service delivery are discussed.

  6. Attitudes of Youth Toward Military Service: A Comparison of Results of National Surveys Conducted in May 1971 and November 1971. Consulting Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Allan H., Jr.

    A comparative analysis of two surveys conducted in May 1971 and November 1971 to gather information on the attitudes of young male civilians (between 16-21 years) towards the military service is presented. Information was collected through interviews with 2,845 individuals in May and 1,960 individuals in November. The results of the surveys are…

  7. Academic and Military Programs of the Five Service Academies. Report to the Congress by the Comptroller General of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staats, Elmer B.

    The academic and military programs of the five service academies are reviewed and found generally to produce qualified officers, but several aspects of their program could be improved. It is noted that only the Naval and Merchant Marine Academies require a comprehensive examination to evaluate students' professional competence before graduation…

  8. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 47 - The DoD Civilian/Military Service Review Board and the Advisory Panel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and the Advisory Panel B Appendix B to Part 47 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... Pt. 47, App. B Appendix B to Part 47—The DoD Civilian/Military Service Review Board and the Advisory... panel is provided with administrative and legal support. B. Functions 1. The board shall meet...

  9. Long-term health effects of Vietnam-era military service: A quasi-experiment using Australian conscription lotteries.

    PubMed

    Johnston, David W; Shields, Michael A; Siminski, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper estimates the long-term health effects of Vietnam-era military service using Australia's National conscription lotteries for identification. Our primary contribution is the quality and breadth of our health outcomes. We use several administrative sources, containing a near-universe of records on mortality (1994-2011), cancer diagnoses (1982-2008), and emergency hospital presentations (2005-2010). We also analyse a range of self-reported morbidity indicators (2006-2009). We find no significant long-term effects on mortality, cancer or emergency hospital visits. In contrast, we find significant detrimental effects on a number of morbidity measures. Hearing and mental health appear to be particularly affected.

  10. Leaving the parental nest: adjustment problems, attachment representations, and social support during the transition from high school to military service.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Miri; Mayseless, Ofra; Kivenson-Baron, Inbal

    2011-01-01

    Adjustment to the transition from high school to military service in Israel was examined in a longitudinal study with a sample of 120 late-adolescent girls. During their senior year in high school (Time 1) the young women were administered the Adult Attachment Interview. Their coping and adjustment to the new environment were assessed (at two further points in time after the transition) by reports of the young women, their mothers, their fathers, and their friends. Young women with preoccupied attachment representations demonstrated the lowest levels of adjustment at both the second and third time points. Young women with dismissing attachment representations did not differ from those with autonomous attachment representations. Satisfaction with social support from parents mediated the association between attachment representations and adjustment (assessed by the young women's reports).

  11. Youth and the Military Service: 1980 National Longitudinal Survey Studies of Enlistment, Intentions to Serve, Reenlistment and Labor Market Experience of Veterans and Attriters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    alternatives; some receive post-service training and educational benefits; and some individuals, especially those without high school diplomas, benefit...interruption. 3 Others, however, found a positive relationship between military service and subsequent civilian earnings, especially among minorities. 4 Most...or fringe benefits..,... 1 0 76/ L, I can get money for a college. educacion 1..... 0 77/ AS~O~i3TY MOE THA ONE " Ta- E’ (C ODE .IN .10.OERS, 103

  12. Studies on the Antifatigue Activities of Cordyceps militaris Fruit Body Extract in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jingjing; Wang, Yingwu; Teng, Meiyu; Cai, Guangsheng; Xu, Hongkai; Guo, Hanxiao; Liu, Yang; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris has been used extensively as a crude drug and a folk tonic food in East Asia due to its various pharmacological activities. Our study aims to investigate the effect of Cordyceps militaris fruit body extract (CM) on antifatigue in mouse model. Two week CM administration significantly delayed fatigue phenomenon which is confirmed via rotating rod test, forced swimming test and forced running test. Compared to nontreated mouse, CM administration increased ATP levels and antioxidative enzymes activity and reduced the levels of lactic acid, lactic dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and reactive oxygen species. Further data suggests that CM-induced fatigue recovery is mainly through activating 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways and regulating serum hormone level. Moreover, CM-enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK contributes to its antioxidant effect. Our data provides experimental evidence in supporting clinical use of CM as an effective agent against fatigue. PMID:26351509

  13. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    protocol changes. The amendments were routed through all 5 IRBs (RAND, Palmer, NHP, NMCSD, and WRNMMC) prior to site implementation. Samueli ...Chiropractic care on reaction and response times. CONTACT INFORMATION: Ian Coulter, PhD ACT Principal Investigator RAND Corp Samueli Chair in...Chiropractic Research Ph: (563)885-5150 Email: christine.goertz@palmer.edu Joan Walter, JD, PA ACT Co-Investigator Samueli Institute/VP, Military

  14. 48 CFR 217.171 - Multiyear contracts for services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., and operation of military family housing and may pay the costs of such contracts for each year from..., vehicles, and other highly complex military equipment. (iii) Specialized training requiring high quality... disposal). (v) Environmental remediation services for— (A) An active military installation; (B) A...

  15. Effects of combat deployment on risky and self-destructive behavior among active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Cynthia J; Stander, Valerie A; McWhorter, Stephanie K; Rabenhorst, Mandy M; Milner, Joel S

    2011-10-01

    Although research has documented negative effects of combat deployment on mental health, few studies have examined whether deployment increases risky or self-destructive behavior. The present study addressed this issue. In addition, we examined whether deployment effects on risky behavior varied depending on history of pre-deployment risky behavior, and assessed whether psychiatric conditions mediated effects of deployment on risky behavior. In an anonymous survey, active duty members of the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Navy (N = 2116) described their deployment experiences and their participation in risky recreational activities, unprotected sex, illegal drug use, self-injurious behavior, and suicide attempts during three time frames (civilian, military pre-deployment, and military post-deployment). Respondents also reported whether they had problems with depression, anxiety, or PTSD during the same three time frames. Results revealed that risky behavior was much more common in civilian than in military life, with personnel who had not deployed, compared to those who had deployed, reporting more risky behavior and more psychiatric problems as civilians. For the current time period, in contrast, personnel who had deployed (versus never deployed) were significantly more likely to report both risky behavior and psychiatric problems. Importantly, deployment was associated with increases in risky behavior only for personnel with a pre-deployment history of engaging in risky behavior. Although psychiatric conditions were associated with higher levels of risky behavior, psychiatric problems did not mediate associations between deployment and risky behavior. Implications for understanding effects of combat deployment on active duty personnel and directions for future research are discussed.

  16. Total and cause-specific mortality of Finnish military personnel following service in international peacekeeping operations 1990–2010: a comprehensive register-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Laukkala, T; Parkkola, K; Henriksson, M; Pirkola, S; Kaikkonen, N; Pukkala, E; Jousilahti, P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate total and cause-specific mortality after international peacekeeping deployments among the Finnish military peacekeeping personnel in comparison to the general population of similar age and sex. Design A register-based study of a cohort of military peacekeeping personnel in 1990–2010 followed for mortality until the end of 2013. Causes of death were obtained from the national Causes of Death Register. The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) for total and cause-specific mortality was calculated as the ratio of observed and expected number of deaths. Setting Finland (peacekeeping operations in different countries in Africa, Asia and in an area of former Yugoslavia in Europe). Participants 14 584 men and 418 women who had participated in international military peacekeeping operations ending between 1990 and 2010. Interventions Participation in military peacekeeping operations. Main outcome Total and cause-specific mortality. Results 209 men and 3 women died after their peacekeeping service. The SMR for all-cause mortality was 0.55 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.62). For the male peacekeeping personnel, the SMR for all diseases was 0.44 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.53) and for accidental and violent deaths 0.69 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.82). The SMR for suicides was 0.71 (95% CI 0.53 to 0.92). Conclusions Even though military peacekeeping personnel are working in unique and often stressful conditions, their mortality after their service is lower compared with the general population. Military peacekeeping personnel appear to be a selected population group with low general mortality and no excess risk of any cause of death after peacekeeping service. PMID:27799241

  17. Select clinical recommendations for military medical practitioners conducting humanitarian and civic assistance activities.

    PubMed

    Hollon, Justin R; Hickey, Patrick W

    2010-09-01

    Training and planning for stability, security, transition, and reconstruction, to include humanitarian and civic assistance activities, has taken on new importance for today's military forces. Deployed medical forces providing medical care to local populations are presented with the challenge of limited resources, complex public health needs, and complex cultural and linguistic barriers to care. In this article, we review some of the clinical situations commonly encountered during these operations and provide an evidence-based rationale for proposed courses of action. This report is timely given expanding operations in Afghanistan and the stand-up of the U.S. African Command (AFRICOM).

  18. Military Psychology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), *MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY , *TEXTBOOKS, USSR, ORGANIZATIONS, COMBAT READINESS, PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION, REASONING, SURVEYS...TRANSLATIONS, MILITARY TRAINING, OFFICER PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY, COMMUNISM, INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS, EMOTIONS.

  19. The Military and the Transition to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelty, Ryan; Kleykamp, Meredith; Segal, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Ryan Kelty, Meredith Kleykamp, and David Segal examine the effect of military service on the transition to adulthood. They highlight changes since World War II in the role of the military in the lives of young adults, focusing especially on how the move from a conscription to an all-volunteer military has changed the way military service affects…

  20. Why Change to Active Learning? Pre-Service and In-Service Science Teachers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Grady, Audrey; Simmie, Geraldine Mooney; Kennedy, Therese

    2014-01-01

    This article explores pre-service and in-service science teachers' perceptions on active learning, and examines the effectiveness of active learning by pre-service science teachers in the Irish second level classroom through a two-phase study. In the first phase, data on perceptions were gathered from final year pre-service teachers and in-service…