Science.gov

Sample records for active mode control

  1. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  2. Broadband radiation modes: estimation and active control.

    PubMed

    Berkhoff, Arthur P

    2002-03-01

    In this paper we give a formulation of the most efficiently radiating vibration patterns of a vibrating body, the radiation modes, in the time domain. The radiation modes can be used to arrive at efficient weighting schemes for an array of sensors in order to reduce the controller dimensionality. Because these particular radiation modes are optimum in a broadband sense, they are termed broadband radiation modes. Methods are given to obtain these modes from measured data. The broadband radiation modes are used for the design of an actuator array in a feedback control system to reduce the sound power radiated from a plate. Three methods for the design of the actuator are compared, taking into account the reduction of radiated sound power in the controlled frequency range, but also the possible increase of radiated sound power in the uncontrolled frequency range.

  3. Active Control of Linear Periodic System with Two Unstable Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    tV;;;.~II.~9 - B ~ZV ~- p1 . ,,~ >. ~ ACTIVE CONTROL OF LINEAR PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS by Gregory E. Myers, B.S.E. 2nd Lt...PERIODIC SYSTEM WITH TWO UNSTABLE MODES THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University...December 1982 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited -ow PREFACE This thesis is a continuation of the work done by Yeakel in the control of

  4. Active noise control using a distributed mode flat panel loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Rajamani, R; Dudney, J; Stelson, K A

    2003-07-01

    A flat panel distributed mode loudspeaker (DML) has many advantages over traditional cone speakers in terms of its weight, size, and durability. However, its frequency response is uneven and complex, thus bringing its suitability for active noise control (ANC) under question. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the effective use of panel DML speakers in an ANC application. Both feedback and feedforward control techniques are considered. Effective feedback control with a flat panel speaker could open up a whole range of new noise control applications and has many advantages over feedforward control. The paper develops a new control algorithm to attenuate tonal noise of a known frequency by feedback control. However, due to the uneven response of the speakers, feedback control is found to be only moderately effective even for this narrow-band application. Feedforward control proves to be most capable for the flat panel speaker. Using feedforward control, the sound pressure level can be significantly reduced in close proximity to an error microphone. The paper demonstrates an interesting application of the flat panel in which the panel is placed in the path of sound and effectively used to block sound transmission using feedforward control. This is a new approach to active noise control enabled by the use of flat panels and can be used to prevent sound from entering into an enclosure in the first place rather than the traditional approach of attempting to cancel sound after it enters the enclosure.

  5. Hybrid sliding mode control of semi-active suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadsangabi, Babak; Eghtesad, Mohammad; Daneshmand, Farhang; Vahdati, Nader

    2009-12-01

    In order to design a controller which can take both ride comfort and road holding into consideration, a hybrid model reference sliding mode controller (HMRSMC) is proposed. The controller includes two separate model reference sliding mode controllers (MRSMC). One of the controllers is designed so as to force the plant to follow the ideal Sky-hook model and the other is to force the plant to follow the ideal Ground-hook model; then the outputs of these two controllers are linearly combined and applied to the plant as the input. Also, since the designed controller requires a knowledge of the terrain input, this input is approximated by the unsprung mass displacement. Finally, in the simulation section of this study, the effect of the relative ratio between the two MRSMCs and the knowledge of the terrain on the performance of the controller is numerically investigated for both steady-state and transient cases.

  6. Disturbance observer based sliding mode control of active suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Vaijayanti S.; Mohan, B.; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel scheme to reduce the acceleration of the sprung mass, used in combination with sliding mode control, is proposed. The proposed scheme estimates the effects of the uncertain, nonlinear spring and damper, load variation and the unknown road disturbance. The controller needs the states of sprung mass only, obviating the need to measure the states of the unsprung mass. The ultimate boundedness of the overall suspension system is proved. The efficacy of the method is verified through simulations for three different types of road profiles and load variation and the scheme is validated on an experimental setup. The results are compared with passive suspension system.

  7. Design and control of a prosthetic leg for above-knee amputees operated in semi-active and active modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Yoon, Gun-Ha; Kang, Je-Won; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new prosthesis operated in two different modes; the semi-active and active modes. The semi-active mode is achieved from a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper, while the active mode is obtained from an electronically commutated (EC) motor. The knee joint part of the above knee prosthesis is equipped with the MR damper and EC motor. The MR damper generates reaction force by controlling the field-dependent yield stress of the MR fluid, while the EC motor actively controls the knee joint angle during gait cycle. In this work, the MR damper is designed as a two-end type flow mode mechanism without air chamber for compact size. On other hand, in order to predict desired knee joint angle to be controlled by EC motor, a polynomial prediction function using a statistical method is used. A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller integrated with the computed torque method is then designed and applied to both MR damper and EC motor to control the knee joint angle. It is demonstrated that the desired knee joint angle is well achieved in different walking velocities on the ground ground.

  8. Active Noise Control of Low Speed Fan Rotor-Stator Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hu, Ziqiang; Pla, Frederic G.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for active noise cancellation of fan tones. The control system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is cancelled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. Controller inputs are signals from a shaft encoder and a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. The key results are that the (6,0) mode was completely eliminated at 920 Hz and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 9.4 dB. Farfield 2BPF SPL reductions of 13 dB were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB modal PWL decrease. Global attenuation of PWL was obtained using an actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct.

  9. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  10. Passive feedback control of actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchvarov, Ivan C.; Saltiel, Solomon M.

    1992-11-01

    A passive feedback control in an actively mode-locked pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to shorten the pulse duration or obtain millisecond trains of ultra-short light pulses. The intracavity second harmonic generation in a crystal situated at proper distance from the output mirror served as a positive or negative feedback. When negative feedback was used, the length of the train was limited by the length of the flash lamp pumping pulse.

  11. Semi-active sliding mode control of vehicle suspension with magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Enrong; Zhang, Ning; Min, Fuhong; Subash, Rakheja; Su, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    The vehicle semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological damper(MRD) has been a hot topic since this decade, in which the robust control synthesis considering load variation is a challenging task. In this paper, a new semi-active controller based upon the inverse model and sliding mode control (SMC) strategies is proposed for the quarter-vehicle suspension with the magneto-rheological (MR) damper, wherein an ideal skyhook suspension is employed as the control reference model and the vehicle sprung mass is considered as an uncertain parameter. According to the asymptotical stability of SMC, the dynamic errors between the plant and reference systems are used to derive the control damping force acquired by the MR quarter-vehicle suspension system. The proposed modified Bouc-wen hysteretic force-velocity ( F- v) model and its inverse model of MR damper, as well as the proposed continuous modulation (CM) filtering algorithm without phase shift are employed to convert the control damping force into the direct drive current of the MR damper. Moreover, the proposed semi-active sliding mode controller (SSMC)-based MR quarter-vehicle suspension is systematically evaluated through comparing the time and frequency domain responses of the sprung and unsprung mass displacement accelerations, suspension travel and the tire dynamic force with those of the passive quarter-vehicle suspension, under three kinds of varied amplitude harmonic, rounded pulse and real-road measured random excitations. The evaluation results illustrate that the proposed SSMC can greatly suppress the vehicle suspension vibration due to uncertainty of the load, and thus improve the ride comfort and handling safety. The study establishes a solid theoretical foundation as the universal control scheme for the adaptive semi-active control of the MR full-vehicle suspension decoupled into four MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension systems.

  12. Sliding mode fault detection and fault-tolerant control of smart dampers in semi-active control of building structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeganeh Fallah, Arash; Taghikhany, Touraj

    2015-12-01

    Recent decades have witnessed much interest in the application of active and semi-active control strategies for seismic protection of civil infrastructures. However, the reliability of these systems is still in doubt as there remains the possibility of malfunctioning of their critical components (i.e. actuators and sensors) during an earthquake. This paper focuses on the application of the sliding mode method due to the inherent robustness of its fault detection observer and fault-tolerant control. The robust sliding mode observer estimates the state of the system and reconstructs the actuators’ faults which are used for calculating a fault distribution matrix. Then the fault-tolerant sliding mode controller reconfigures itself by the fault distribution matrix and accommodates the fault effect on the system. Numerical simulation of a three-story structure with magneto-rheological dampers demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control system. It was shown that the fault-tolerant control system maintains the performance of the structure at an acceptable level in the post-fault case.

  13. State observer-based sliding mode control for semi-active hydro-pneumatic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sizhong; Zhao, Yuzhuang; Liu, Gang; Yang, Lin

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an improved virtual reference model for semi-active suspension to coordinate the vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. The reference model combines the virtues of sky-hook with ground-hook control logic, and the hybrid coefficient is tuned according to the longitudinal and lateral acceleration so as to improve the vehicle stability especially in high-speed condition. Suspension state observer based on unscented Kalman filter is designed. A sliding mode controller (SMC) is developed to track the states of the reference model. The stability of the SMC strategy is proven by means of Lyapunov function taking into account the nonlinear damper characteristics and sprung mass variation of the vehicle. Finally, the performance of the controller is demonstrated under three typical working conditions: the random road excitation, speed bump road and sharp acceleration and braking. The simulation results indicated that, compared with the traditional passive suspension, the proposed control algorithm can offer a better coordination between vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. This approach provides a viable alternative to costlier active suspension control systems for commercial vehicles.

  14. Sliding-mode control for semi-active suspension with actuator dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo-Chiuan; Shiu, Yu-Hua; Hsieh, Feng-Chi

    2011-02-01

    A sliding-mode controller (SMC) is proposed for semi-active suspensions to achieve ride comfort and handling performance simultaneously. First, a nonlinear quarter-car model of Macpherson strut suspension is established in Matlab/Simulink. Constrained damper force and actuator dynamics are considered for the damper model. System identification is applied to the nonlinear model for obtaining the linear model parameters. Kalman filter is designed based on the linear model and the actuator dynamics to estimate the state responses required for SMC. The sliding surface consists of tyre deflection and sprung mass acceleration. The proposed SMC is evaluated using the nonlinear model for both time and frequency domain responses. Robustness due to the increased sprung mass and deteriorated suspension is also investigated in this paper. Preliminary simulation results show improved ride comfort without sacrificing the road holding performance.

  15. The MODE family of on-orbit experiments: The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.; Deluis, Javier; Waldman, Mel; Bicos, Andy

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment entitled the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), proposed by the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is described. This is the second in a family of flight experiments being developed at MIT. The first is the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) which investigates the nonlinear behavior of contained fluids and truss structures in zero gravity. The objective of the MACE program is to investigate and validate the modeling of the dynamics of an actively controlled flexible, articulating, multibody platform free floating in zero gravity. A rationale and experimental approach for the program are presented. The rationale shows that on-orbit testing, coupled with ground testing and a strong analytical program, is necessary in order to fully understand both how flexibility of the platform affects the pointing problem, as well as how gravity perturbs this structural flexibility causing deviations between 1- and 0-gravity behavior. The experimental approach captures the essential physics of multibody platforms, by identifying the appropriate attributes, tests, and performance metrics of the test article and defines the tests required to successfully validate the analytical framework.

  16. The MODE family of on-orbit experiments: The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.; Deluis, Javier; Waldman, Mel; Bicos, Andy

    1990-12-01

    A flight experiment entitled the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), proposed by the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is described. This is the second in a family of flight experiments being developed at MIT. The first is the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) which investigates the nonlinear behavior of contained fluids and truss structures in zero gravity. The objective of the MACE program is to investigate and validate the modeling of the dynamics of an actively controlled flexible, articulating, multibody platform free floating in zero gravity. A rationale and experimental approach for the program are presented. The rationale shows that on-orbit testing, coupled with ground testing and a strong analytical program, is necessary in order to fully understand both how flexibility of the platform affects the pointing problem, as well as how gravity perturbs this structural flexibility causing deviations between 1- and 0-gravity behavior. The experimental approach captures the essential physics of multibody platforms, by identifying the appropriate attributes, tests, and performance metrics of the test article and defines the tests required to successfully validate the analytical framework.

  17. Development of Radar Control system for Multi-mode Active Phased Array Radar for atmospheric probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Modern multi-mode active phased array radars require highly efficient radar control system for hassle free real time radar operation. The requirement comes due to the distributed architecture of the active phased array radar, where each antenna element in the array is connected to a dedicated Transmit-Receive (TR) module. Controlling the TR modules, which are generally few hundreds in number, and functioning them in synchronisation, is a huge task during real time radar operation and should be handled with utmost care. Indian MST Radar, located at NARL, Gadanki, which is established during early 90's, as an outcome of the middle atmospheric program, is a remote sensing instrument for probing the atmosphere. This radar has a semi-active array, consisting of 1024 antenna elements, with limited beam steering, possible only along the principle planes. To overcome the limitations and difficulties, the radar is being augmented into fully active phased array, to accomplish beam agility and multi-mode operations. Each antenna element is excited with a dedicated 1 kW TR module, located in the field and enables to position the radar beam within 20° conical volume. A multi-channel receiver makes the radar to operate in various modes like Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS), Spaced Antenna (SA), Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) etc. Present work describes the real-time radar control (RC) system for the above described active phased array radar. The radar control system consists of a Spartan 6 FPGA based Timing and Control Signal Generator (TCSG), and a computer containing the software for controlling all the subsystems of the radar during real-time radar operation and also for calibrating the radar. The main function of the TCSG is to generate the control and timing waveforms required for various subsystems of the radar. Important components of the RC system software are (i) TR module configuring software which does programming, controlling and health parameter monitoring of the

  18. Bumblebees minimize control challenges by combining active and passive modes in unsteady winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Schneider, Kai; Wang, Chun; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Liu, Hao

    2016-10-01

    The natural wind environment that volant insects encounter is unsteady and highly complex, posing significant flight-control and stability challenges. It is critical to understand the strategies insects employ to safely navigate in natural environments. We combined experiments on free flying bumblebees with high-fidelity numerical simulations and lower-order modeling to identify the mechanics that mediate insect flight in unsteady winds. We trained bumblebees to fly upwind towards an artificial flower in a wind tunnel under steady wind and in a von Kármán street formed in the wake of a cylinder. Analysis revealed that at lower frequencies in both steady and unsteady winds the bees mediated lateral movement with body roll - typical casting motion. Numerical simulations of a bumblebee in similar conditions permitted the separation of the passive and active components of the flight trajectories. Consequently, we derived simple mathematical models that describe these two motion components. Comparison between the free-flying live and modeled bees revealed a novel mechanism that enables bees to passively ride out high-frequency perturbations while performing active maneuvers at lower frequencies. The capacity of maintaining stability by combining passive and active modes at different timescales provides a viable means for animals and machines to tackle the challenges posed by complex airflows.

  19. Bumblebees minimize control challenges by combining active and passive modes in unsteady winds

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Schneider, Kai; Wang, Chun; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The natural wind environment that volant insects encounter is unsteady and highly complex, posing significant flight-control and stability challenges. It is critical to understand the strategies insects employ to safely navigate in natural environments. We combined experiments on free flying bumblebees with high-fidelity numerical simulations and lower-order modeling to identify the mechanics that mediate insect flight in unsteady winds. We trained bumblebees to fly upwind towards an artificial flower in a wind tunnel under steady wind and in a von Kármán street formed in the wake of a cylinder. Analysis revealed that at lower frequencies in both steady and unsteady winds the bees mediated lateral movement with body roll - typical casting motion. Numerical simulations of a bumblebee in similar conditions permitted the separation of the passive and active components of the flight trajectories. Consequently, we derived simple mathematical models that describe these two motion components. Comparison between the free-flying live and modeled bees revealed a novel mechanism that enables bees to passively ride out high-frequency perturbations while performing active maneuvers at lower frequencies. The capacity of maintaining stability by combining passive and active modes at different timescales provides a viable means for animals and machines to tackle the challenges posed by complex airflows. PMID:27752047

  20. Study on active vibration control for high order mode of flexible beam using smart material piezoelectric ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Da-fang; Huang, Liang; Mu, Meng; Wang, Yue-wu; Wu, Shuang

    2011-11-01

    In order to reduce effective load and lower the launch cost, many light-weight flexible structures are employed in spacecraft. The research of active control on flexible structural vibration is very important in spacecraft design. Active vibration control on a flexible beam with smart material piezoelectric pieces bonded in surface is investigated experimentally using independent modal space control method, which is able to control the first three modes independently. A comparison between the systems responses before and after control indicates that the modal damping of flexible structure is greatly improved after active control is performed, indicating remarkable vibration suppression effect. Dynamic equation of the flexible beam is deducted by Hamilton principle, and numerical simulation of active vibration control on the first three order vibration modes is also conducted in this paper. The simulation result matches experimental result very well. Both experimental and numerical results indicate that the independent modal control method using piezoelectric patch as driving element is a very effective approach to realize vibration suppression, which has promising applications in aerospace field.

  1. Study on active vibration control for high order mode of flexible beam using smart material piezoelectric ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Da-fang; Huang, Liang; Mu, Meng; Wang, Yue-wu; Wu, Shuang

    2012-04-01

    In order to reduce effective load and lower the launch cost, many light-weight flexible structures are employed in spacecraft. The research of active control on flexible structural vibration is very important in spacecraft design. Active vibration control on a flexible beam with smart material piezoelectric pieces bonded in surface is investigated experimentally using independent modal space control method, which is able to control the first three modes independently. A comparison between the systems responses before and after control indicates that the modal damping of flexible structure is greatly improved after active control is performed, indicating remarkable vibration suppression effect. Dynamic equation of the flexible beam is deducted by Hamilton principle, and numerical simulation of active vibration control on the first three order vibration modes is also conducted in this paper. The simulation result matches experimental result very well. Both experimental and numerical results indicate that the independent modal control method using piezoelectric patch as driving element is a very effective approach to realize vibration suppression, which has promising applications in aerospace field.

  2. Equilibrium and global MHD stability study of KSTAR high beta plasmas under passive and active mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, O.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Park, H. K.; Bak, J. G.; Chung, J.; Hahn, S. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Kwon, M.; Lee, S. G.; Yoon, S. W.; You, K.-I.; Glasser, A. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2010-02-01

    The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research, KSTAR, is designed to operate a steady-state, high beta plasma while retaining global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability to establish the scientific and technological basis of an economically attractive fusion reactor. An equilibrium model is established for stability analysis of KSTAR. Reconstructions were performed for the experimental start-up scenario and experimental first plasma operation using the EFIT code. The VALEN code was used to determine the vacuum vessel current distribution. Theoretical high beta equilibria spanning the expected operational range are computed for various profiles including generic L-mode and DIII-D experimental H-mode pressure profiles. Ideal MHD stability calculations of toroidal mode number of unity using the DCON code shows a factor of 2 improvement in the wall-stabilized plasma beta limit at moderate to low plasma internal inductance. The planned stabilization system in KSTAR comprises passive stabilizing plates and actively cooled in-vessel control coils (IVCCs) designed for non-axisymmetric field error correction and stabilization of slow timescale MHD modes including resistive wall modes (RWMs). VALEN analysis using standard proportional gain shows that active stabilization near the ideal wall limit can be reached with feedback using the midplane segment of the IVCC. The RMS power required for control using both white noise and noise taken from NSTX active stabilization experiments is computed for beta near the ideal wall limit. Advanced state-space control algorithms yield a factor of 2 power reduction assuming white noise while remaining robust with respect to variations in plasma beta.

  3. Active control of electromagnetically induced transparency with dual dark mode excitation pathways using MEMS based tri-atomic metamolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchappa, Prakash; Manjappa, Manukumara; Ho, Chong Pei; Singh, Ranjan; Singh, Navab; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental results of the active switching of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) analogue by controlling the dark mode excitation pathways in a microelectromechanical system based tri-atomic metamolecule, operating in the terahertz spectral region. The tri-atomic metamolecule consists of two bright cut wire resonators (CWRs) on either side of the dark split ring resonators (SRRs). Each of the CWRs can independently excite the dark inductive-capacitive resonance mode of the SRRs through inductive coupling, and this allows for the dual pathways of dark mode excitation. The CWRs are made movable along the out-of-plane direction and electrically isolated to achieve selective reconfiguration. Hence, by controlling the physical position of these CWRs, the excitation pathways can be actively reconfigured. This enables the strong excitation of EIT analogue at 0.65 THz, only when one of the pathways is made accessible. Moreover, the transparency peak is completely modulated when both pathways are made either inaccessible or equally accessible. The proposed approach of realizing independent control of constituent resonators in a multi-resonator coupled system, enables the realization of efficient slow light devices and tunable high-Q resonators in terahertz spectral region.

  4. PCB bioavailability control in Lumbriculus variegatus through different modes of activated carbon addition to sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Xueli Sun; Upal Ghosh

    2007-07-01

    PCB bioavailability to a freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) was studied using sediments from a PCB-impacted river that was treated with different modes of granular activated carbon (GAC) addition. The GAC used was bituminous coal-based type TOP. For sediment treated with 2.6% GAC and mixed for 2 min prior to L. variegatus addition, the reduction in total PCB biouptake was 70% for 75-300 {mu}m size carbon, and 92% for the 45-180 {mu}m size carbon. For the case where the GAC was placed as a thin layer on top of the sediments without mixing, the reduction in total PCB uptake was 70%. PCB biouptake kinetics study using treated and untreated sediment showed that the maximum PCB uptake in tissue was achieved at 28 days and decreased after that time. Although the absolute uptake of PCB changed over time, the percent reduction in total PCB uptake upon GAC amendment remained constant after the first few days. Our results indicated that PCB bioavailability was reduced upon the addition and little or no mixing of GAC into sediments. PCB aqueous equilibrium concentration and desorption rates were greatly reduced after GAC amendment, indicating reductions in the two primary mechanisms of PCB bioavailability in sediments: chemical activity and chemical accessibility. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. PCB bioavailability control in Lumbriculus variegatus through different modes of activated carbon addition to sediments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xueli; Ghosh, Upal

    2007-07-01

    PCB bioavailability to a freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) was studied using sediments from a PCB-impacted river that was treated with different modes of granular activated carbon (GAC) addition. For sedimenttreated with 2.6% GAC and mixed for 2 min prior to L. variegatus addition, the reduction in total PCB biouptake was 70% for 75-300 microm size carbon, and 92% for the 45-180 microm size carbon. For the case where the GAC was placed as a thin layer on top of the sediments without mixing, the reduction in total PCB uptake was 70%. PCB biouptake kinetics study using treated and untreated sediment showed that the maximum PCB uptake in tissue was achieved at 28 days and decreased after that time. Although the absolute uptake of PCB changed over time, the percent reduction in total PCB uptake upon GAC amendment remained constant after the first few days. Our results indicated that PCB bioavailability was reduced upon the addition and little or no mixing of GAC into sediments. PCB aqueous equilibrium concentration and desorption rates were greatly reduced after GAC amendment, indicating reductions in the two primary mechanisms of PCB bioavailability in sediments: chemical activity and chemical accessibility.

  6. Optimal control of a Cope rearrangement by coupling the reaction path to a dissipative bath or a second active mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chenel, A.; Meier, C.; Dive, G.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.

    2015-01-14

    We compare the strategy found by the optimal control theory in a complex molecular system according to the active subspace coupled to the field. The model is the isomerization during a Cope rearrangement of Thiele’s ester that is the most stable dimer obtained by the dimerization of methyl-cyclopentadienenylcarboxylate. The crudest partitioning consists in retaining in the active space only the reaction coordinate, coupled to a dissipative bath of harmonic oscillators which are not coupled to the field. The control then fights against dissipation by accelerating the passage across the transition region which is very wide and flat in a Cope reaction. This mechanism has been observed in our previous simulations [Chenel et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 11273 (2012)]. We compare here, the response of the control field when the reaction path is coupled to a second active mode. Constraints on the integrated intensity and on the maximum amplitude of the fields are imposed limiting the control landscape. Then, optimum field from one-dimensional simulation cannot provide a very high yield. Better guess fields based on the two-dimensional model allow the control to exploit different mechanisms providing a high control yield. By coupling the reaction surface to a bath, we confirm the link between the robustness of the field against dissipation and the time spent in the delocalized states above the transition barrier.

  7. Dynamic optimal sliding-mode control for six-DOF follow-up robust tracking of active satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuankai, Li; Zhongliang, Jing; Shiqiang, Hu

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a six-DOF follow-up tracking scheme for active target satellite tracking. The scheme is mainly composed of a robust tracking algorithm and a six-DOF follow-up control law. Firstly, a relative motion model using osculating reference orbit (ORO) is built and applied to the redundant adaptive robust extended Kalman filter (RAREKF) to form an ORO-based robust method as the tracking algorithm. Then, a dynamic optimal sliding-mode control (DOSMC) with dynamic optimal sliding surface (DOSS) is proposed to design the six-DOF follow-up control of both relative orbit and chaser attitude. The scheme structure is also discussed in the paper. Three cases are simulated to illustrate the advantage of ORO-based RAREKF and DOSMC and to verify the effectiveness of the presented follow-up tracking scheme.

  8. Active quench and reset integrated circuit with novel hold-off time control logic for Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shijie; Morrison, Alan P

    2012-09-15

    This Letter presents an active quench-and-reset circuit for Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs). The integrated circuit was fabricated using a conventional 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor process. Experimental results show that the circuit is capable of linearly setting the hold-off time from several nanoseconds to microseconds with a resolution of 6.5 ns. This allows the selection of the optimal afterpulse-free hold-off time for the GM-APD via external digital inputs or additional signal processing circuitry. Moreover, this circuit resets the APD automatically following the end of the hold-off period, thus simplifying the control for the end user. Results also show that a minimum dead time of 28.4 ns is achieved, demonstrating a saturated photon-counting rate of 35.2 Mcounts/s.

  9. Robotic Arm Manipulator Using Active Control for Sample Acquisition and Transfer, and Passive Mode for Surface Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jun; Underhill, Michael L.; Trease, Brian P.; Lindemann, Randel A.

    2010-01-01

    A robotic arm that consists of three joints with four degrees of freedom (DOF) has been developed. It can carry an end-effector to acquire and transfer samples by using active control and comply with surface topology in a passive mode during a brief surface contact. The three joints are arranged in such a way that one joint of two DOFs is located at the shoulder, one joint of one DOF is located at the elbow, and one joint of one DOF is located at the wrist. Operationally, three DOFs are moved in the same plane, and the remaining one on the shoulder is moved perpendicular to the other three for better compliance with ground surface and more flexibility of sample handling. Three out of four joints are backdriveable, making the mechanism less complex and more cost effective

  10. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2005-07-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic.

  11. Telerobot control mode performance assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Backes, Paul; Chirikjian, Greg

    1992-01-01

    With the maturation of various developing robot control schemes, it is becoming extremely important that the technical community evaluate the performance of these various control technologies against an established baseline to determine which technology provides the most reliable robust, and safe on-orbit robot control. The Supervisory Telerobotics Laboratory (STELER) at JPL has developed a unique robot control capability which has been evaluated by the NASA technical community and found useful for augmenting both the operator interface and control of intended robotic systems on-board the Space Station. As part of the technology development and prototyping effort, the STELER team has been evaluating the performance of different control modes; namely, teleoperation under position, or rate, control, teleoperation with force reflection and shared control. Nine trained subjects were employed in the performance evaluation involving several high fidelity servicing tasks. Four types of operator performance data were collected; task completion time, average force, peak force, and number of operator successes and errors. This paper summarizes the results of this performance evaluation.

  12. Adaptive mode control in few mode fibers and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashry, Islam; Lu, Peng; Xu, Yong

    2016-10-01

    With the development of mode-division-multiplexing (MDM), few mode fibers (FMFs) have found a wide range of applications in optical sensing and communications. However, how to precisely control the mode composition of optical signals in FMFs remains a difficult challenge. In this paper, we present an adaptive mode control method that can selectively excite the linearly polarized (LP) mode within the FMF. The method is based on using optical pulses reflected by a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) for wavefront optimization. Two potential applications are discussed. First, we theoretically demonstrate the feasibility of large scale multiplexing of absorption based fiber optical sensors. Second, we discuss the possibility of using mode dependent loss to reconstruct the spatial distributions of absorptive chemicals diffused within a FMF.

  13. Control of stationary cross-flow modes in a mach 3.5 boundary layer using patterned passive and active roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuele, Chan Yong

    Spanwise-periodic roughness designed to excite selected wavelengths of stationary cross-flow modes was investigated in a 3-D boundary layer at Mach 3.5. The test model was a sharp-tipped 14° right-circular cone. The model and integrated sensor traversing system were placed in the Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low Disturbance Tunnel (SLDT) equipped with a "quiet design" nozzle at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model was oriented at a 4.2 angle of attack to produce a mean cross-flow velocity component in the boundary layer over the cone. Five removable cone tips have been investigated. One has a smooth surface that is used to document the baseline ("natural") conditions. Two had minute (20 - 40 mum) "dimples" that are equally spaced around the circumference, at a streamwise location that is just upstream of the linear stability neutral growth branch for cross-flow modes. The azimuthal mode numbers of the dimpled tips were selected to either enhance the most amplified wave numbers, or to suppress the growth of the most amplified wave numbers. Two of the cone tips had an array of plasma streamwise vortex generators that were designed to simulate the disturbances produced by the passive patterned roughness. The results indicate that the stationary cross-flow modes were highly receptive to the patterned roughness of both passive and active types. The patterned passive roughness that was designed to suppress the growth of the most amplified modes had an azimuthal wavelength that was 66% smaller that that of the most amplified stationary cross-flow mode. This had the effect to increase the transition Reynolds number from 25% to 50% depending on the measurement technique. The application of the research is on turbulent transition control on swept wings of supersonic aircraft. The plasma-based roughness has the advantage over the passive roughness of being able to be adaptable to different conditions that would occur during a flight mission.

  14. Control of Stationary Cross-Flow Modes in a Mach 3.5 Boundary Layer Using Patterned Passive and Active Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuele, Chan Yong

    2011-01-01

    Spanwise-periodic roughness designed to excite selected wavelengths of stationary cross- ow modes was investigated in a 3-D boundary layer at Mach 3.5. The test model was a sharp-tipped 14deg right-circular cone. The model and integrated sensor traversing system were placed in the Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low Disturbance Tunnel (SLDT) equipped with a "quiet design" nozzle at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model was oriented at a 4:2deg angle of attack to produce a mean cross-fl ow velocity component in the boundary layer over the cone. Five removable cone tips have been investigated. One has a smooth surface that is used to document the baseline ("natural") conditions. Two had minute (20 - 40 micron) "dimples" that are equally spaced around the circumference, at a streamwise location that is just upstream of the linear stability neutral growth branch for cross- ow modes. The azimuthal mode numbers of the dimpled tips were selected to either enhance the most amplified wave numbers, or to suppress the growth of the most amplified wave numbers. Two of the cone tips had an array of plasma streamwise vortex generators that were designed to simulate the disturbances produced by the passive patterned roughness. The results indicate that the stationary cross-fl ow modes were highly receptive to the patterned roughness of both passive and active types. The patterned passive roughness that was designed to suppress the growth of the most amplified modes had an azimuthal wavelength that was 66% smaller that that of the most amplified stationary cross- ow mode. This had the effect to increase the transition Reynolds number from 25% to 50% depending on the measurement technique. The application of the research is on turbulent transition control on swept wings of supersonic aircraft. The plasma-based roughness has the advantage over the passive roughness of being able to be adaptable to different conditions that would occur during a flight mission.

  15. Preparation of topological modes by Lyapunov control

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Z. C.; Zhao, X. L.; Yi, X. X.

    2015-01-01

    By Lyapunov control, we present a proposal to drive quasi-particles into a topological mode in quantum systems described by a quadratic Hamiltonian. The merit of this control is the individual manipulations on the boundary sites. We take the Kitaev’s chain as an illustration for Fermi systems and show that an arbitrary excitation mode can be steered into the Majorana zero mode by manipulating the chemical potential of the boundary sites. For Bose systems, taking the noninteracting Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model as an example, we illustrate how to drive the system into the edge mode. The sensitivity of the fidelity to perturbations and uncertainties in the control fields and initial modes is also examined. The experimental feasibility of the proposal and the possibility to replace the continuous control field with square wave pulses is finally discussed. PMID:26346317

  16. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 5; Numerical Computation of Acoustic Mode Reflection Coefficients for an Unflanged Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    A computational method to predict modal reflection coefficients in cylindrical ducts has been developed based on the work of Homicz, Lordi, and Rehm, which uses the Wiener-Hopf method to account for the boundary conditions at the termination of a thin cylindrical pipe. The purpose of this study is to develop a computational routine to predict the reflection coefficients of higher order acoustic modes impinging on the unflanged termination of a cylindrical duct. This effort was conducted wider Task Order 5 of the NASA Lewis LET Program, Active Noise Control of aircraft Engines: Feasibility Study, and will be used as part of the development of an integrated source noise, acoustic propagation, ANC actuator coupling, and control system algorithm simulation. The reflection coefficient prediction will be incorporated into an existing cylindrical duct modal analysis to account for the reflection of modes from the duct termination. This will provide a more accurate, rapid computation design tool for evaluating the effect of reflected waves on active noise control systems mounted in the duct, as well as providing a tool for the design of acoustic treatment in inlet ducts. As an active noise control system design tool, the method can be used preliminary to more accurate but more numerically intensive acoustic propagation models such as finite element methods. The resulting computer program has been shown to give reasonable results, some examples of which are presented. Reliable data to use for comparison is scarce, so complete checkout is difficult, and further checkout is needed over a wider range of system parameters. In future efforts the method will be adapted as a subroutine to the GEAE segmented cylindrical duct modal analysis program.

  17. Multi-Objective Sliding Mode Control on Vehicle Cornering Stability with Variable Gear Ratio Actuator-Based Active Front Steering Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xinbo; Wong, Pak Kin; Zhao, Jing; Xie, Zhengchao

    2016-01-01

    Active front steering (AFS) is an emerging technology to improve the vehicle cornering stability by introducing an additional small steering angle to the driver’s input. This paper proposes an AFS system with a variable gear ratio steering (VGRS) actuator which is controlled by using the sliding mode control (SMC) strategy to improve the cornering stability of vehicles. In the design of an AFS system, different sensors are considered to measure the vehicle state, and the mechanism of the AFS system is also modelled in detail. Moreover, in order to improve the cornering stability of vehicles, two dependent objectives, namely sideslip angle and yaw rate, are considered together in the design of SMC strategy. By evaluating the cornering performance, Sine with Dwell and accident avoidance tests are conducted, and the simulation results indicate that the proposed SMC strategy is capable of improving the cornering stability of vehicles in practice. PMID:28036037

  18. Multi-Objective Sliding Mode Control on Vehicle Cornering Stability with Variable Gear Ratio Actuator-Based Active Front Steering Systems.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinbo; Wong, Pak Kin; Zhao, Jing; Xie, Zhengchao

    2016-12-28

    Active front steering (AFS) is an emerging technology to improve the vehicle cornering stability by introducing an additional small steering angle to the driver's input. This paper proposes an AFS system with a variable gear ratio steering (VGRS) actuator which is controlled by using the sliding mode control (SMC) strategy to improve the cornering stability of vehicles. In the design of an AFS system, different sensors are considered to measure the vehicle state, and the mechanism of the AFS system is also modelled in detail. Moreover, in order to improve the cornering stability of vehicles, two dependent objectives, namely sideslip angle and yaw rate, are considered together in the design of SMC strategy. By evaluating the cornering performance, Sine with Dwell and accident avoidance tests are conducted, and the simulation results indicate that the proposed SMC strategy is capable of improving the cornering stability of vehicles in practice.

  19. Active control of Type-I Edge-Localized Modes with n=1 Perturbation Fields in the JET Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.; Koslowski, R.; Thomas, P.; Nardon, E.; Alper, B.; Baranov, Y.; Beurskens, M.; Bigi, M.; Crombe, K.; de la Luna, E.; De Vries, P.; Fundamenski, W.; Rachlew, Elisabeth G; Zimmermann, O.

    2007-06-01

    Type-I edge-localized modes (ELMs) have been mitigated at the JET tokamak using a static external n=1 perturbation field generated by four error field correction coils located far from the plasma. During the application of the n=1 field the ELM frequency increased by a factor of 4 and the amplitude of the D signal decreased. The energy loss per ELM normalized to the total stored energy, W/W, dropped to values below 2%. Transport analyses shows no or only a moderate (up to 20%) degradation of energy confinement time during the ELM mitigation phase.

  20. Modelling of edge localised modes and edge localised mode control

    SciTech Connect

    Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Loarte, A.; Chang, C. S.; Ferraro, N.; Sugiyama, L.; Waelbroeck, F.; Xu, X. Q.; Futatani, S.

    2015-02-15

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in ITER Q = 10 H-mode plasmas are likely to lead to large transient heat loads to the divertor. To avoid an ELM induced reduction of the divertor lifetime, the large ELM energy losses need to be controlled. In ITER, ELM control is foreseen using magnetic field perturbations created by in-vessel coils and the injection of small D2 pellets. ITER plasmas are characterised by low collisionality at a high density (high fraction of the Greenwald density limit). These parameters cannot simultaneously be achieved in current experiments. Therefore, the extrapolation of the ELM properties and the requirements for ELM control in ITER relies on the development of validated physics models and numerical simulations. In this paper, we describe the modelling of ELMs and ELM control methods in ITER. The aim of this paper is not a complete review on the subject of ELM and ELM control modelling but rather to describe the current status and discuss open issues.

  1. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Study of the spectral width of intermode beats and optical spectrum of an actively mode-locked three-mirror semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharyash, Valerii F.; Kashirsky, Aleksandr V.; Klementyev, Vasilii M.; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Pivtsov, V. S.

    2005-09-01

    Various oscillation regimes of an actively mode-locked semiconductor laser are studied experimentally. Two types of regimes are found in which the minimal spectral width (~3.5 kHz) of intermode beats is achieved. The width of the optical spectrum of modes is studied as a function of their locking and the feedback coefficients. The maximum width of the spectrum is ~3.7 THz.

  2. Navigation, behaviors, and control modes in an autonomous vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byler, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    An Intelligent Mobile Sensing System (IMSS) has been developed for the automated inspection of radioactive and hazardous waste storage containers in warehouse facilities at Department of Energy sites. A 2D space of control modes was used that provides a combined view of reactive and planning approaches wherein a 2D situation space is defined by dimensions representing the predictability of the agent's task environment and the constraint imposed by its goals. In this sense selection of appropriate systems for planning, navigation, and control depends on the problem at hand. The IMSS vehicle navigation system is based on a combination of feature based motion, landmark sightings, and an a priori logical map of the mockup storage facility. Motion for the inspection activities are composed of different interactions of several available control modes, several obstacle avoidance modes, and several feature identification modes. Features used to drive these behaviors are both visual and acoustic.

  3. Segmented Liner to Control Mode Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Jones, Michael G.; Brown, Martha C.

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic performance of duct liners can be improved by segmenting the treatment. In a segmented liner treatment, one stage of liner reduces the target sound and scatters energy into other acoustic modes, which are attenuated by a subsequent stage. The Curved Duct Test Rig is an experimental facility in which sound incident on the liner can be generated in a specific mode and the scatter of energy into other modes can be quantified. A series of experiments is performed in which the baseline configuration is asymmetric, that is, a liner is on one side wall of the test duct and the wall opposite is acoustically hard. Segmented liner treatment is achieved by progressively replacing sections of the hard wall opposite with liner in the axial direction, from 25% of the wall surface to 100%. It is found that the energy scatter from the (0,0) to the (0,1) mode reduces as the percentage of opposite wall treatment increases, and the frequency of peak attenuation shifts toward higher frequency. Similar results are found when the incident mode is of order (0,1) and scatter is into the (0,0) mode. The propagation code CDUCT-LaRC is used to predict the effect of liner segmenting on liner performance. The computational results show energy scatter and the effect of liner segmentation that agrees with the experimental results. The experiments and computations both show that segmenting the liner treatment is effective to control the scatter of incident mode energy into other modes. CDUCT-LaRC is shown to be a valuable tool to predict trends of liner performance with liner configuration.

  4. Control simulation of neoclassical tearing modes in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2006-10-01

    Control of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) is one of the key issues to achieve stable high performance discharges for future advanced tokamaks. In KSTAR, active suppression of m/n = 3/2 and 2/1 NTMs will be pursued by using a 3MW electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) system. To develop a NTM control system in KSTAR, a prototype NTM control simulator is developed. A NTM stability model is constructed by the modified Rutherford equation (MRE) with KSTAR equilibrium parameters. In the NTM controller, the plasma radial position is controlled to align the ECCD to the resonant flux surface where the tearing mode resides by utilizing the fast in-vessel control coils (IVCCs) of KSTAR. To model radial plasma responses during the control sequence, a linear, non-rigid plasma model is constructed by following perturbed equilibrium formulation. Performance of the prototype simulator is assessed in terms of suppressing the NTM modes in KSTAR and utilized to provide controller design criteria for the complete suppression of the modes. The prototype simulator will be used to develop a new NTM control algorithm for the model-based advanced controller with high control efficiency.

  5. Mode Selective Excitation Using Coherent Control Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ajay K.; Konradi, Jakow; Materny, Arnulf; Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2008-11-14

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) gives access to ultrafast molecular dynamics. However, femtosecond laser pulses are spectrally broad and therefore coherently excite several molecular modes. While the temporal resolution is high, usually no mode-selective excitation is possible. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of selectively exciting specific molecular vibrations in solution phase with shaped fs laser excitation using a feedback-controlled optimization technique guided by an evolutionary algorithm. This approach is also used to obtain molecule-specific CARS spectra from a mixture of different substances. The optimized phase structures of the fs pulses are characterized to get insight into the control process. Possible applications of the spectrum control are discussed.

  6. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  7. Sliding Mode Control of Steerable Needles

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, D. Caleb; Das, Jadav; Gilbert, Hunter B.; Swaney, Philip J.; Miga, Michael I.; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Webster, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Steerable needles can potentially increase the accuracy of needle-based diagnosis and therapy delivery, provided they can be adequately controlled based on medical image information. We propose a novel sliding mode control law that can be used to deliver the tip of a flexible asymmetric-tipped needle to a desired point, or to track a desired trajectory within tissue. The proposed control strategy requires no a priori knowledge of model parameters, has bounded input speeds, and requires little computational resources. We show that if the standard nonholonomic model for tip-steered needles holds, then the control law will converge to desired targets in a reachable workspace, within a tolerance that can be defined by the control parameters. Experimental results validate the control law for target points and trajectory following in phantom tissue and ex vivo liver. Experiments with targets that move during insertion illustrate robustness to disturbances caused by tissue deformation. PMID:25400527

  8. Sliding Mode Control of Steerable Needles.

    PubMed

    Rucker, D Caleb; Das, Jadav; Gilbert, Hunter B; Swaney, Philip J; Miga, Michael I; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Webster, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Steerable needles can potentially increase the accuracy of needle-based diagnosis and therapy delivery, provided they can be adequately controlled based on medical image information. We propose a novel sliding mode control law that can be used to deliver the tip of a flexible asymmetric-tipped needle to a desired point, or to track a desired trajectory within tissue. The proposed control strategy requires no a priori knowledge of model parameters, has bounded input speeds, and requires little computational resources. We show that if the standard nonholonomic model for tip-steered needles holds, then the control law will converge to desired targets in a reachable workspace, within a tolerance that can be defined by the control parameters. Experimental results validate the control law for target points and trajectory following in phantom tissue and ex vivo liver. Experiments with targets that move during insertion illustrate robustness to disturbances caused by tissue deformation.

  9. Actively mode-locked diode laser with a mode spacing stability of ∼6 × 10{sup -14}

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharyash, V F; Kashirsky, A V; Klementyev, V M

    2015-10-31

    We have studied mode spacing stability in an actively mode-locked external-cavity semiconductor laser. It has been shown that, in the case of mode spacing pulling to the frequency of a highly stable external microwave signal produced by a hydrogen standard (stability of 4 × 10{sup -14} over an averaging period τ = 10 s), this configuration ensures a mode spacing stability of 5.92 × 10{sup -14} (τ = 10 s). (control of radiation parameters)

  10. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  11. Shape control of distributed parameter reflectors using sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Fukashi; Washington, Gregory N.; Utkin, Vadim

    2001-08-01

    Sliding mode control has become one of the most powerful control methods for variable structure systems, a set of continuous systems with an appropriate switching logic. Its robustness properties and order reduction capability have made sliding mode control one of the most efficient tools for relatively higher order nonlinear plants operating under uncertain conditions. Piezo-electric materials possess the property of creating a charge when subjected to a mechanical strain, and of generating a strain when subjected to an electric field. Piezo-electric actuators are known to have a hysteresis due to the thermal motion and Coulomb interaction of Weiss domains. Because of the thermal effect the hysteresis of piezo-electric actuators is reproducible only with some uncertainty in experiments. The robustness of sliding mode control under uncertain conditions has an advantage in handling the hysteresis of piezo-electric actuators. In this research sliding mode control is used to control the shape of one- and two-dimensionally curved adaptive reflectors with piezo-electric actuators. Four discrete linear actuators for the one-dimensionally curved reflector and eight actuators for the two-dimensionally curved reflector are assumed.

  12. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2015-09-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest, despite other studies having reported differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, in this study we compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate the findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation, beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies had used small groups, whereas in the present study we tested these hypotheses in a larger group. The results indicated that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network, relative to an active task, for meditators as compared to controls. Regions of the default mode network showing a Group × Task interaction included the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that the suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and they suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task.

  13. Sliding Mode Control Applied to Reconfigurable Flight Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Wells, S. R.; Bacon, Barton (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sliding mode control is applied to the design of a flight control system capable of operating with limited bandwidth actuators and in the presence of significant damage to the airframe and/or control effector actuators. Although inherently robust, sliding mode control algorithms have been hampered by their sensitivity to the effects of parasitic unmodeled dynamics, such as those associated with actuators and structural modes. It is known that asymptotic observers can alleviate this sensitivity while still allowing the system to exhibit significant robustness. This approach is demonstrated. The selection of the sliding manifold as well as the interpretation of the linear design that results after introduction of a boundary layer is accomplished in the frequency domain. The design technique is exercised on a pitch-axis controller for a simple short-period model of the High Angle of Attack F-18 vehicle via computer simulation. Stability and performance is compared to that of a system incorporating a controller designed by classical loop-shaping techniques.

  14. Mode-selective control of the crystal lattice.

    PubMed

    Först, M; Mankowsky, R; Cavalleri, A

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Driving phase changes by selective optical excitation of specific vibrational modes in molecular and condensed phase systems has long been a grand goal for laser science. However, phase control has to date primarily been achieved by using coherent light fields generated by femtosecond pulsed lasers at near-infrared or visible wavelengths. This field is now being advanced by progress in generating intense femtosecond pulses in the mid-infrared, which can be tuned into resonance with infrared-active crystal lattice modes of a solid. Selective vibrational excitation is particularly interesting in complex oxides with strong electronic correlations, where even subtle modulations of the crystallographic structure can lead to colossal changes of the electronic and magnetic properties. In this Account, we summarize recent efforts to control the collective phase state in solids through mode-selective lattice excitation. The key aspect of the underlying physics is the nonlinear coupling of the resonantly driven phonon to other (Raman-active) modes due to lattice anharmonicities, theoretically discussed as ionic Raman scattering in the 1970s. Such nonlinear phononic excitation leads to rectification of a directly excited infrared-active mode and to a net displacement of the crystal along the coordinate of all anharmonically coupled modes. We present the theoretical basis and the experimental demonstration of this phenomenon, using femtosecond optical spectroscopy and ultrafast X-ray diffraction at a free electron laser. The observed nonlinear lattice dynamics is shown to drive electronic and magnetic phase transitions in many complex oxides, including insulator-metal transitions, charge/orbital order melting and magnetic switching in manganites. Furthermore, we show that the selective vibrational excitation can drive high-TC cuprates into a transient structure with enhanced superconductivity. The combination of nonlinear phononics with ultrafast crystallography at

  15. Analog neural network control method proposed for use in a backup satellite control mode

    SciTech Connect

    Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1998-03-01

    The authors propose to use an analog neural network controller implemented in hardware, independent of the active control system, for use in a satellite backup control mode. The controller uses coarse sun sensor inputs. The field of view of the sensors activate the neural controller, creating an analog dead band with respect to the direction of the sun on each axis. This network controls the orientation of the vehicle toward the sunlight to ensure adequate power for the system. The attitude of the spacecraft is stabilized with respect to the ambient magnetic field on orbit. This paper develops a model of the controller using real-time coarse sun sensor data and a dynamic model of a prototype system based on a satellite system. The simulation results and the feasibility of this control method for use in a satellite backup control mode are discussed.

  16. Flexible Modes Control Using Sliding Mode Observers: Application to Ares I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri B.; Hall, Charles E.; Baev, Simon; Orr, Jeb S.

    2010-01-01

    The launch vehicle dynamics affected by bending and sloshing modes are considered. Attitude measurement data that are corrupted by flexible modes could yield instability of the vehicle dynamics. Flexible body and sloshing modes are reconstructed by sliding mode observers. The resultant estimates are used to remove the undesirable dynamics from the measurements, and the direct effects of sloshing and bending modes on the launch vehicle are compensated by means of a controller that is designed without taking the bending and sloshing modes into account. A linearized mathematical model of Ares I launch vehicle was derived based on FRACTAL, a linear model developed by NASA/MSFC. The compensated vehicle dynamics with a simple PID controller were studied for the launch vehicle model that included two bending modes, two slosh modes and actuator dynamics. A simulation study demonstrated stable and accurate performance of the flight control system with the augmented simple PID controller without the use of traditional linear bending filters.

  17. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking.

  18. A digital control system for external magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J. M.; Klein, A. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. Sunn

    2009-04-15

    A feedback system for controlling external, long-wavelength magnetohydrodynamic activity is described. The system is comprised of a network of localized magnetic pickup and control coils driven by four independent, low-latency field-programable gate array controllers. The control algorithm incorporates digital spatial filtering to resolve low mode number activity, temporal filtering to correct for frequency-dependent amplitude and phase transfer effects in the control hardware, and a Kalman filter to distinguish the unstable plasma mode from noise.

  19. A digital control system for external magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hanson, J M; Klein, A J; Mauel, M E; Maurer, D A; Navratil, G A; Pedersen, T Sunn

    2009-04-01

    A feedback system for controlling external, long-wavelength magnetohydrodynamic activity is described. The system is comprised of a network of localized magnetic pickup and control coils driven by four independent, low-latency field-programable gate array controllers. The control algorithm incorporates digital spatial filtering to resolve low mode number activity, temporal filtering to correct for frequency-dependent amplitude and phase transfer effects in the control hardware, and a Kalman filter to distinguish the unstable plasma mode from noise.

  20. Mode Switching Control for Personal Mobility Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Noriaki; Sukigara, Kazutoshi; Kajima, Hideki; Yamaoka, Masaaki

    The present paper introduces a novel standing-up control strategy based on Initial Value Compensation (IVC) for a Personal Mobility Robot (PMR). PMRs, which are wheeled-inverted-pendulum-type mobility-assist devices, offer the following advantages: (1) they can turn at a point; (2) they can maintain a level seating posture on a slope; and (3) they have a smaller footprint than conventional electric wheelchairs with four wheels. On the other hand, the user must maintain the posture of the PMR by using additional assist wheels on the ground when mounting/dismounting the PMR and working while seated on the PMR. In order to satisfy these requirements, we propose the following approach. First, the PMR accelerates to lift its assist wheels off the ground and determines whether the assist wheels are in contact with the ground. The feedback controller is then switched to wheeled-inverted-pendulum mode using the proposed IVC. The proposed IVC is designed such that the transient responses are improved and the amplitude of the control input and the jerk component are suppressed, in order to reduce the shock felt by the driver. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been verified by conducting numerical simulations and experiments using a prototype PMR.

  1. Anthropomorphic Telemanipulation System in Terminus Control Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Lewis, M. Anthony; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a prototype anthropomorphic kinesthetic telepresence system that is being developed at JPL. It utilizes dexterous terminus devices in the form of an exoskeleton force-sensing master glove worn by the operator and a replica four finger anthropomorphic slave hand. The newly developed master glove is integrated with our previously developed non-anthropomorphic six degree of freedom (DOF) universal force-reflecting hand controller (FRHC). The mechanical hand and forearm are mounted to an industrial robot (PUMA 560), replacing its standard forearm. The notion of 'terminus control mode' refers to the fact that only the terminus devices (glove and robot hand) are of anthropomorphic nature, and the master and slave arms are non-anthropomorphic. The system is currently being evaluated, focusing on tool handling and astronaut equivalent task executions. The evaluation revealed the system's potential for tool handling but it also became evident that hand tool manipulations and space operations require a dual arm robot. This paper describes the system's principal components, its control and computing architecture, discusses findings of the tool handling evaluation, and explains why common tool handling and EVA space tasks require dual arm robots.

  2. Controller-structure interaction compensation using adaptive residual mode filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Balas, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    It is not feasible to construct controllers for large space structures or large scale systems (LSS's) which are of the same order as the structures. The complexity of the dynamics of these systems is such that full knowledge of its behavior cannot by processed by today's controller design methods. The controller for system performance of such a system is therefore based on a much smaller reduced-order model (ROM). Unfortunately, the interaction between the LSS and the ROM-based controller can produce instabilities in the closed-loop system due to the unmodeled dynamics of the LSS. Residual mode filters (RMF's) allow the systematic removal of these instabilities in a matter which does not require a redesign of the controller. In addition RMF's have a strong theoretical basis. As simple first- or second-order filters, the RMF CSI compensation technique is at once modular, simple and highly effective. RMF compensation requires knowledge of the dynamics of the system modes which resulted in the previous closed-loop instabilities (the residual modes), but this information is sometimes known imperfectly. An adaptive, self-tuning RMF design, which compensates for uncertainty in the frequency of the residual mode, has been simulated using continuous-time and discrete-time models of a flexible robot manipulator. Work has also been completed on the discrete-time experimental implementation on the Martin Marietta flexible robot manipulator experiment. This paper will present the results of that work on adaptive, self-tuning RMF's, and will clearly show the advantage of this adaptive compensation technique for controller-structure interaction (CSI) instabilities in actively-controlled LSS's.

  3. Dual Mode Inverter Control Test Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.M.

    2001-04-25

    Permanent Magnet Motors with either sinusoidal back emf (permanent magnet synchronous motor [PMSM]) or trapezoidal back emf (brushless dc motor [BDCM]) do not have the ability to alter the air gap flux density (field weakening). Since the back emf increases with speed, the system must be designed to operate with the voltage obtained at its highest speed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) has developed a dual mode inverter controller (DMIC) that overcomes this disadvantage. This report summarizes the results of tests to verify its operation. The standard PEEMRC 75 kW hard-switched inverter was modified to implement the field weakening procedure (silicon controlled rectifier enabled phase advance). A 49.5 hp motor rated at 2800 rpm was derated to a base of 400 rpm and 7.5 hp. The load developed by a Kahn Industries hydraulic dynamometer, was measured with a MCRT9-02TS Himmelstein and Company torque meter. At the base conditions a current of 212 amperes produced the 7.5 hp. Tests were run at 400, 1215, and 2424 rpm. In each run, the current was no greater than 214 amperes. The horsepower obtained in the three runs were 7.5, 9.3, and 8.12. These results verified the basic operation of the DMIC in producing a Constant Power Speed Ratios (CPSR) of six.

  4. PROMINENCE ACTIVATION BY CORONAL FAST MODE SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Takuya; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    An X5.4 class flare occurred in active region NOAA11429 on 2012 March 7. The flare was associated with a very fast coronal mass ejection (CME) with a velocity of over 2500 km s{sup −1}. In the images taken with the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-B/COR1, a dome-like disturbance was seen to detach from an expanding CME bubble and propagated further. A Type-II radio burst was also observed at the same time. On the other hand, in extreme ultraviolet images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the expanding dome-like structure and its footprint propagating to the north were observed. The footprint propagated with an average speed of about 670 km s{sup −1} and hit a prominence located at the north pole and activated it. During the activation, the prominence was strongly brightened. On the basis of some observational evidence, we concluded that the footprint in AIA images and the ones in COR1 images are the same, that is, the MHD fast mode shock front. With the help of a linear theory, the fast mode Mach number of the coronal shock is estimated to be between 1.11 and 1.29 using the initial velocity of the activated prominence. Also, the plasma compression ratio of the shock is enhanced to be between 1.18 and 2.11 in the prominence material, which we consider to be the reason for the strong brightening of the activated prominence. The applicability of linear theory to the shock problem is tested with a nonlinear MHD simulation.

  5. On spacecraft maneuvers control subject to propellant engine modes.

    PubMed

    Mazinan, A H

    2015-09-01

    The paper attempts to address a new control approach to spacecraft maneuvers based upon the modes of propellant engine. A realization of control strategy is now presented in engine on mode (high thrusts as well as further low thrusts), which is related to small angle maneuvers and engine off mode (specified low thrusts), which is also related to large angle maneuvers. There is currently a coarse-fine tuning in engine on mode. It is shown that the process of handling the angular velocities are finalized via rate feedback system in engine modes, where the angular rotations are controlled through quaternion based control (QBCL)strategy in engine off mode and these ones are also controlled through an optimum PID (OPIDH) strategy in engine on mode.

  6. Active flat optics using a guided mode resonance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Brongersma, Mark L

    2017-01-01

    Dynamically-controlled flat optics relies on achieving active and effective control over light-matter interaction in ultrathin layers. A variety of metasurface designs have achieved efficient amplitude and phase modulation. Particularly, noteworthy progress has been made with the incorporation of newly emerging electro-optical materials into such metasurfaces, including graphene, phase change materials, and transparent conductive oxides. In this Letter, we demonstrate dynamic light-matter interaction in a silicon-based subwavelength grating that supports a guided mode resonance. By overcoating the grating with indium tin oxide as an electrically tunable material, its reflectance can be tuned from 4% to 86%. Guided mode resonances naturally afford higher optical quality factors than the optical antennas used in the construction of metasurfaces. As such, they facilitate more effective control over the flow of light within the same layer thickness.

  7. Adaptive Control of Flexible Structures Using Residual Mode Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.; Frost, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Flexible structures containing a large number of modes can benefit from adaptive control techniques which are well suited to applications that have unknown modeling parameters and poorly known operating conditions. In this paper, we focus on a direct adaptive control approach that has been extended to handle adaptive rejection of persistent disturbances. We extend our adaptive control theory to accommodate troublesome modal subsystems of a plant that might inhibit the adaptive controller. In some cases the plant does not satisfy the requirements of Almost Strict Positive Realness. Instead, there maybe be a modal subsystem that inhibits this property. This section will present new results for our adaptive control theory. We will modify the adaptive controller with a Residual Mode Filter (RMF) to compensate for the troublesome modal subsystem, or the Q modes. Here we present the theory for adaptive controllers modified by RMFs, with attention to the issue of disturbances propagating through the Q modes. We apply the theoretical results to a flexible structure example to illustrate the behavior with and without the residual mode filter. We have proposed a modified adaptive controller with a residual mode filter. The RMF is used to accommodate troublesome modes in the system that might otherwise inhibit the adaptive controller, in particular the ASPR condition. This new theory accounts for leakage of the disturbance term into the Q modes. A simple three-mode example shows that the RMF can restore stability to an otherwise unstable adaptively controlled system. This is done without modifying the adaptive controller design.

  8. Multi-mode ultrasonic welding control and optimization

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Jason C.H.; Cai, Wayne W

    2013-05-28

    A system and method for providing multi-mode control of an ultrasonic welding system. In one embodiment, the control modes include the energy of the weld, the time of the welding process and the compression displacement of the parts being welded during the welding process. The method includes providing thresholds for each of the modes, and terminating the welding process after the threshold for each mode has been reached, the threshold for more than one mode has been reached or the threshold for one of the modes has been reached. The welding control can be either open-loop or closed-loop, where the open-loop process provides the mode thresholds and once one or more of those thresholds is reached the welding process is terminated. The closed-loop control provides feedback of the weld energy and/or the compression displacement so that the weld power and/or weld pressure can be increased or decreased accordingly.

  9. Modelling of edge localised modes and edge localised mode control [Modelling of ELMs and ELM control

    SciTech Connect

    Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Chang, C. S.; Ferraro, N.; Sugiyama, L.; Waelbroeck, F.; Xu, X. Q.; Loarte, A.; Futatani, S.

    2015-02-07

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in ITER Q = 10 H-mode plasmas are likely to lead to large transient heat loads to the divertor. In order to avoid an ELM induced reduction of the divertor lifetime, the large ELM energy losses need to be controlled. In ITER, ELM control is foreseen using magnetic field perturbations created by in-vessel coils and the injection of small D2 pellets. ITER plasmas are characterised by low collisionality at a high density (high fraction of the Greenwald density limit). These parameters cannot simultaneously be achieved in current experiments. Thus, the extrapolation of the ELM properties and the requirements for ELM control in ITER relies on the development of validated physics models and numerical simulations. Here, we describe the modelling of ELMs and ELM control methods in ITER. The aim of this paper is not a complete review on the subject of ELM and ELM control modelling but rather to describe the current status and discuss open issues.

  10. Modelling of edge localised modes and edge localised mode control [Modelling of ELMs and ELM control

    DOE PAGES

    Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Chang, C. S.; Ferraro, N.; ...

    2015-02-07

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in ITER Q = 10 H-mode plasmas are likely to lead to large transient heat loads to the divertor. In order to avoid an ELM induced reduction of the divertor lifetime, the large ELM energy losses need to be controlled. In ITER, ELM control is foreseen using magnetic field perturbations created by in-vessel coils and the injection of small D2 pellets. ITER plasmas are characterised by low collisionality at a high density (high fraction of the Greenwald density limit). These parameters cannot simultaneously be achieved in current experiments. Thus, the extrapolation of the ELM properties andmore » the requirements for ELM control in ITER relies on the development of validated physics models and numerical simulations. Here, we describe the modelling of ELMs and ELM control methods in ITER. The aim of this paper is not a complete review on the subject of ELM and ELM control modelling but rather to describe the current status and discuss open issues.« less

  11. Sliding Mode Control (SMC) of Robot Manipulator via Intelligent Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Neha; Ohri, Jyoti

    2016-06-01

    Inspite of so much research, key technical problem, naming chattering of conventional, simple and robust SMC is still a challenge to the researchers and hence limits its practical application. However, newly developed soft computing based techniques can provide solution. In order to have advantages of conventional and heuristic soft computing based control techniques, in this paper various commonly used intelligent techniques, neural network, fuzzy logic and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) have been combined with sliding mode controller (SMC). For validation, proposed hybrid control schemes have been implemented for tracking a predefined trajectory by robotic manipulator, incorporating structured and unstructured uncertainties in the system. After reviewing numerous papers, all the commonly occurring uncertainties like continuous disturbance, uniform random white noise, static friction like coulomb friction and viscous friction, dynamic friction like Dhal friction and LuGre friction have been inserted in the system. Various performance indices like norm of tracking error, chattering in control input, norm of input torque, disturbance rejection, chattering rejection have been used. Comparative results show that with almost eliminated chattering the intelligent SMC controllers are found to be more efficient over simple SMC. It has also been observed from results that ANFIS based controller has the best tracking performance with the reduced burden on the system. No paper in the literature has found to have all these structured and unstructured uncertainties together for motion control of robotic manipulator.

  12. Sliding Mode Control (SMC) of Robot Manipulator via Intelligent Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Neha; Ohri, Jyoti

    2017-02-01

    Inspite of so much research, key technical problem, naming chattering of conventional, simple and robust SMC is still a challenge to the researchers and hence limits its practical application. However, newly developed soft computing based techniques can provide solution. In order to have advantages of conventional and heuristic soft computing based control techniques, in this paper various commonly used intelligent techniques, neural network, fuzzy logic and adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) have been combined with sliding mode controller (SMC). For validation, proposed hybrid control schemes have been implemented for tracking a predefined trajectory by robotic manipulator, incorporating structured and unstructured uncertainties in the system. After reviewing numerous papers, all the commonly occurring uncertainties like continuous disturbance, uniform random white noise, static friction like coulomb friction and viscous friction, dynamic friction like Dhal friction and LuGre friction have been inserted in the system. Various performance indices like norm of tracking error, chattering in control input, norm of input torque, disturbance rejection, chattering rejection have been used. Comparative results show that with almost eliminated chattering the intelligent SMC controllers are found to be more efficient over simple SMC. It has also been observed from results that ANFIS based controller has the best tracking performance with the reduced burden on the system. No paper in the literature has found to have all these structured and unstructured uncertainties together for motion control of robotic manipulator.

  13. Laser mode control using leaky plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjević, B. Z.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    The evolution and propagation of a non-Gaussian laser pulse in matched parabolic channels as well as leaky channels are investigated. It has previously been shown for a Gaussian pulse that matched guiding can be achieved using such channels. In the low power regime, analytical work demonstrates that, for multi-mode pulses, there is significant transverse beating. The interaction between different modes may have an adverse effect on the laser pulse as it propagates through the primary channel, in which plasma wakefield acceleration of the electron beam is to occur, and this effect can be shown in numerical simulations of high-power laser-plasma interactions. To improve guiding of the pulse, we propose using leaky channels. Higher order mode content is minimized through the leaky channel, while the fundamental mode remains well-guided. In addition to numerical simulations, it can be qualitatively shown, through the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method and the Source Dependent Expansion (SDE) analysis, that in finite channels, higher order modes either leak out or transfer energy to the fundamental. In conclusion, an idealized plasma filter based on leaky channels is found to filter out the higher order modes and leave a near-Gaussian profile before the pulse enters the primary channel.

  14. Sliding Mode Thermal Control System for Space Station Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson Mark E.; Shtessel, Yuri B.

    1998-01-01

    The decoupled control of the nonlinear, multiinput-multioutput, and highly coupled space station furnace facility (SSFF) thermal control system is addressed. Sliding mode control theory, a subset of variable-structure control theory, is employed to increase the performance, robustness, and reliability of the SSFF's currently designed control system. This paper presents the nonlinear thermal control system description and develops the sliding mode controllers that cause the interconnected subsystems to operate in their local sliding modes, resulting in control system invariance to plant uncertainties and external and interaction disturbances. The desired decoupled flow-rate tracking is achieved by optimization of the local linear sliding mode equations. The controllers are implemented digitally and extensive simulation results are presented to show the flow-rate tracking robustness and invariance to plant uncertainties, nonlinearities, external disturbances, and variations of the system pressure supplied to the controlled subsystems.

  15. Switched control of vehicle suspension based on motion-mode detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Haiping; Zhang, Nong; Wang, Lifu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study on switched control of vehicle suspension based on motion-mode detection. This control strategy can be potentially implemented via the interconnected suspension such as hydraulically interconnected suspension by actively switching its interconnection configuration in terms of the dominant vehicle body motion-mode. The design of the switched control law is developed focusing on three vehicle body motion-modes: bounce, pitch, and roll. At first, an H∞ optimal controller will be designed for each motion-mode with the use of a common quadratic Lyapunov function, which guarantees the stability of the switched system under arbitrary switching functions. Then, a motion-mode detection method based on the calculation of the motion-mode energy is introduced. And then, the possible implementation of the control system in practice is discussed. Finally, numerical simulations are used to validate the proposed study.

  16. Adaptive control of waveguide modes using a directional coupler.

    PubMed

    Lu, Peng; Shipton, Matthew; Wang, Anbo; Xu, Yong

    2014-08-25

    Using adaptive optics (AO) and a directional coupler, we demonstrate adaptive control of linearly polarized (LP) modes in a two mode fiber. The AO feedback is provided by the coupling ratio of the directional coupler, and does not depend on the spatial profiles of optical field distributions. As a proof of concept demonstration, this work confirms the feasibility of using AO and all fiber devices to control the waveguide modes in a multimode network in a quasi-distributed manner.

  17. Multi-mode sliding mode control for precision linear stage based on fixed or floating stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiwen; Long, Zhili; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Lufan; Dai, Xufei

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the control performance of a linear motion stage driven by Voice Coil Motor (VCM). Unlike the conventional VCM, the stator of this VCM is regulated, which means it can be adjusted as a floating-stator or fixed-stator. A Multi-Mode Sliding Mode Control (MMSMC), including a conventional Sliding Mode Control (SMC) and an Integral Sliding Mode Control (ISMC), is designed to control the linear motion stage. The control is switched between SMC and IMSC based on the error threshold. To eliminate the chattering, a smooth function is adopted instead of a signum function. The experimental results with the floating stator show that the positioning accuracy and tracking performance of the linear motion stage are improved with the MMSMC approach.

  18. Adaptive sliding mode control for a class of chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Zalam, B.

    2015-03-01

    Chaos control here means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, an Adaptive Sliding Mode Controller (ASMC) is presented based on Lyapunov stability theory. The well known Chua's circuit is chosen to be our case study in this paper. The study shows the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive sliding mode controller.

  19. Adaptive sliding mode control for a class of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Zalam, B.

    2015-03-30

    Chaos control here means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, an Adaptive Sliding Mode Controller (ASMC) is presented based on Lyapunov stability theory. The well known Chua's circuit is chosen to be our case study in this paper. The study shows the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive sliding mode controller.

  20. Direct Torque Control of a Small Wind Turbine with a Sliding-Mode Speed Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sri Lal Senanayaka, Jagath; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Robbersmyr, Kjell G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper. the method of direct torque control in the presence of a sliding-mode speed controller is proposed for a small wind turbine being used in water heating applications. This concept and control system design can be expanded to grid connected or off-grid applications. Direct torque control of electrical machines has shown several advantages including very fast dynamics torque control over field-oriented control. Moreover. the torque and flux controllers in the direct torque control algorithms are based on hvsteretic controllers which are nonlinear. In the presence of a sliding-mode speed control. a nonlinear control system can be constructed which is matched for AC/DC conversion of the converter that gives fast responses with low overshoots. The main control objectives of the proposed small wind turbine can be maximum power point tracking and soft-stall power control. This small wind turbine consists of permanent magnet synchronous generator and external wind speed. and rotor speed measurements are not required for the system. However. a sensor is needed to detect the rated wind speed overpass events to activate proper speed references for the wind turbine. Based on the low-cost design requirement of small wind turbines. an available wind speed sensor can be modified. or a new sensor can be designed to get the required measurement. The simulation results will be provided to illustrate the excellent performance of the closed-loop control system in entire wind speed range (4-25 m/s).

  1. Sliding mode control for chaotic systems based on LMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Han, Zheng-zhi; Xie, Qi-yue; Zhang, Wei

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates the chaos control problem for a general class of chaotic systems. A feedback controller is established to guarantee asymptotical stability of the chaotic systems based on the sliding mode control theory. A new reaching law is introduced to solve the chattering problem that is produced by traditional sliding mode control. A dynamic compensator is designed to improve the performance of the closed-loop system in sliding mode, and its parameter is obtained from a linear matrix inequality (LMI). Simulation results for the well known Chua's circuit and Lorenz chaotic system are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  2. Sliding mode controllers for a tempered glass furnace.

    PubMed

    Almutairi, Naif B; Zribi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the design of two sliding mode controllers (SMCs) applied to a tempered glass furnace system. The main objective of the proposed controllers is to regulate the glass plate temperature, the upper-wall temperature and the lower-wall temperature in the furnace to a common desired temperature. The first controller is a conventional sliding mode controller. The key step in the design of this controller is the introduction of a nonlinear transformation that maps the dynamic model of the tempered glass furnace into the generalized controller canonical form; this step facilitates the design of the sliding mode controller. The second controller is based on a state-dependent coefficient (SDC) factorization of the tempered glass furnace dynamic model. Using an SDC factorization, a simplified sliding mode controller is designed. The simulation results indicate that the two proposed control schemes work very well. Moreover, the robustness of the control schemes to changes in the system's parameters as well as to disturbances is investigated. In addition, a comparison of the proposed control schemes with a fuzzy PID controller is performed; the results show that the proposed SDC-based sliding mode controller gave better results.

  3. Sliding mode control application in ABWR plant pressure regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhengyu; Edwards, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    A sliding mode controller is designed for an ABWR nuclear power plant turbine throttle pressure regulation. To avoid chattering problem, which is common to conventional sliding mode controllers, and estimation of uncertainties and disturbances, the recursive-form sliding mode control algorithm is developed. To apply the sliding mode control technique, the original plant's 11.-order dynamics model is first transformed to a canonical form differential equation of a relative order of 2 for turbine throttle pressure's dynamics. Simulation results show that the design objectives are achieved and the resulting controller is superior to the existing PI controller in many aspects, including settling time, overshoot/undershoot in response to setpoint step input and fluctuation amplitude in the presence of external disturbances. (authors)

  4. An adaptive sliding mode control technology for weld seam tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Hu, Youmin; Wu, Bo; Zhou, Kaibo; Ge, Mingfeng

    2015-03-01

    A novel adaptive sliding mode control algorithm is derived to deal with seam tracking control problem of welding robotic manipulator, during the process of large-scale structure component welding. The proposed algorithm does not require the precise dynamic model, and is more practical. Its robustness is verified by the Lyapunov stability theory. The analytical results show that the proposed algorithm enables better high-precision tracking performance with chattering-free than traditional sliding mode control algorithm under various disturbances.

  5. Adaptive control of waveguide modes in a two-mode-fiber

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peng; Shipton, Matthew; Wang, Anbo; Soker, Shay; Xu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an adaptive-optics-based approach that allows selective excitation of waveguide modes and their mixtures in a two-mode fiber (TMF). A phase-only spatial light modulator is used for wavefront control, using feedback signals provided by the correlation between the experimentally measured field distribution and the desired mode profiles. Experimental results show the optical field within the TMF can be shaped to be pure linearly polarized (LP) modes or their combinations. Analysis shows selective mode excitation can be achieved using only 5 × 5 independent phase blocks. With proper feedback signals, this method should enable one to precisely control the optical field within any multimode fiber or other types of waveguides in real time. PMID:24663587

  6. Robust sliding mode continuous control of an IM drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jezernik, K.; Hren, A.; Drevensek, D.

    1995-12-31

    A control approach for robust trajectory tracking of IM servodrive based on the variable structure systems (VSS) is described. A new discrete-time control algorithm has been developed by combining VSS and Lyapunov design. It possesses all the good properties of the sliding mode and avoids the unnecessary discontinuity of the control input, thus eliminating chattering which has been considering as serious obstacles for applications of VSS. A unified control approach for current, torque and motion control based on the discrete-time sliding mode for application in indirect vector control of an IM drive is developed. The sliding mode approach can be applied to the control of an Im drive due to the replacement of the hysteresis controller with widely used PWM technique. All the theoretical issues are verified by experiment. The experimental system consists of a transputer and a microcontroller, thus allowing parallel processing.

  7. Motion-mode energy method for vehicle dynamics analysis and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nong; Wang, Lifu; Du, Haiping

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle motion and vibration control is a fundamental motivation for the development of advanced vehicle suspension systems. In a vehicle-fixed coordinate system, the relative motions of the vehicle between body and wheel can be classified into several dynamic stages based on energy intensity, and can be decomposed into sets of uncoupled motion-modes according to modal parameters. Vehicle motions are coupled, but motion-modes are orthogonal. By detecting and controlling the predominating vehicle motion-mode, the system cost and energy consumption of active suspensions could be reduced. A motion-mode energy method (MEM) is presented in this paper to quantify the energy contribution of each motion-mode to vehicle dynamics in real time. The control of motion-modes is prioritised according to the level of motion-mode energy. Simulation results on a 10 degree-of-freedom nonlinear full-car model with the magic-formula tyre model illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed MEM. The contribution of each motion-mode to the vehicle's dynamic behaviour is analysed under different excitation inputs from road irregularities, directional manoeuvres and braking. With the identified dominant motion-mode, novel cost-effective suspension systems, such as active reconfigurable hydraulically interconnected suspension, can possibly be used to control full-car motions with reduced energy consumption. Finally, discussion, conclusions and suggestions for future work are provided.

  8. Active control of combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Masoud, Nidal A.

    A theoretical analysis of active control of combustion thermo-acoustic instabilities is developed in this dissertation. The theoretical combustion model is based on the dynamics of a two-phase flow in a liquid-fueled propulsion system. The formulation is based on a generalized wave equation with pressure as the dependent variable, and accommodates all influences of combustion, mean flow, unsteady motions and control inputs. The governing partial differential equations are converted to an equivalent set of ordinary differential equations using Galerkin's method by expressing the unsteady pressure and velocity fields as functions of normal mode shapes of the chamber. This procedure yields a representation of the unsteady flow field as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators that is used as a basis for controllers design. Major research attention is focused on the control of longitudinal oscillations with both linear and nonlinear processes being considered. Starting with a linear model using point actuators, the optimal locations of actuators and sensors are developed. The approach relies on the quantitative measures of the degree of controllability and component cost. These criterion are arrived at by considering the energies of the system's inputs and outputs. The optimality criteria for sensor and actuator locations provide a balance between the importance of the lower order (controlled) and the higher (residual) order modes. To address the issue of uncertainties in system's parameter, the minimax principles based controller is used. The minimax corresponds to finding the best controller for the worst parameter deviation. In other words, choosing controller parameters to minimize, and parameter deviation to maximize some quadratic performance metric. Using the minimax-based controller, a remarkable improvement in the control system's ability to handle parameter uncertainties is achieved when compared to the robustness of the regular control schemes such as LQR

  9. Sliding mode controller for a photovoltaic pumping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElOugli, A.; Miqoi, S.; Boutouba, M.; Tidhaf, B.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a sliding mode control scheme (SMC) for maximum power point tracking controller for a photovoltaic pumping system, is proposed. The main goal is to maximize the flow rate for a water pump, by forcing the photovoltaic system to operate in its MPP, to obtain the maximum power that a PV system can deliver.And this, through the intermediary of a sliding mode controller to track and control the MPP by overcoming the power oscillation around the operating point, which appears in most implemented MPPT techniques. The sliding mode control approach is recognized as one of the efficient and powerful tools for nonlinear systems under uncertainty conditions.The proposed controller with photovoltaic pumping system is designed and simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. In addition, to evaluate its performances, a classical MPPT algorithm using perturb and observe (P&O) has been used for the same system to compare to our controller. Simulation results are shown.

  10. Observing Mode Attitude Controller for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Philip C.; Garrick, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission is the first of a series of lunar robotic spacecraft scheduled for launch in Fall 2008. LRO will spend at least one year in a low altitude polar orbit around the Moon, collecting lunar environment science and mapping data to enable future human exploration. The LRO employs a 3-axis stabilized attitude control system (ACS) whose primary control mode, the "Observing mode", provides Lunar Nadir, off-Nadir, and Inertial fine pointing for the science data collection and instrument calibration. The controller combines the capability of fine pointing with that of on-demand large angle full-sky attitude reorientation into a single ACS mode, providing simplicity of spacecraft operation as well as maximum flexibility for science data collection. A conventional suite of ACS components is employed in this mode to meet the pointing and control objectives. This paper describes the design and analysis of the primary LRO fine pointing and attitude re-orientation controller function, known as the "Observing mode" of the ACS subsystem. The control design utilizes quaternion feedback, augmented with a unique algorithm that ensures accurate Nadir tracking during large angle yaw maneuvers in the presence of high system momentum and/or maneuver rates. Results of system stability analysis and Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the observing mode controller can meet fine pointing and maneuver performance requirements.

  11. Global MHD Mode Stabilization and Control for Tokamak Disruption Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.; Berkery, J. W.; Bialek, J. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Park, Y. S.; Bell, R. E.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Goumiri, I.; Grierson, B.; Holcomb, C.

    2015-11-01

    The near-complete elimination of plasma disruptions in fusion-producing tokamaks is the present ``grand challenge'' for stability research. Meeting this goal requires multiple approaches, important components of which are prediction, stabilization, and control of global MHD instabilities. Research on NSTX and its upgrade is synergizing these elements to make quantified progress on this challenge. Initial results from disruption characterization and prediction analyses describe physical disruption event chains in NSTX. Analysis of NSTX and DIII-D experiments show that stabilization of global modes is dominated by precession drift and bounce orbit resonances respectively. Stability therefore depends on the plasma rotation profile. A model-based rotation profile controller for NSTX-U using both neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity is shown in simulations to evolve profiles away from unstable states. Active RWM control is addressed using dual field component sensor feedback and a model-based RWM state-space controller. Comparison of measurements and synthetic diagnostics is examined for off-normal event handling. A planned 3D coil system upgrade can allow RWM control close to the ideal n = 1 with-wall limit. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-FG02-99ER54524 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. Reusable Launch Vehicle Control In Multiple Time Scale Sliding Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A reusable launch vehicle control problem during ascent is addressed via multiple-time scaled continuous sliding mode control. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust, de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of bounded external disturbances and plant uncertainties. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues placement. Overall stability of a two-loop control system is addressed. An optimal control allocation algorithm is designed that allocates torque commands into end-effector deflection commands, which are executed by the actuators. The dual-time scale sliding mode controller was designed for the X-33 technology demonstration sub-orbital launch vehicle in the launch mode. Simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties. This is a significant advancement in performance over that achieved with linear, gain scheduled control systems currently being used for launch vehicles.

  13. Robust sliding mode control applied to double Inverted pendulum system

    SciTech Connect

    Mahjoub, Sonia; Derbel, Nabil; Mnif, Faical

    2009-03-05

    A three hierarchical sliding mode control is presented for a class of an underactuated system which can overcome the mismatched perturbations. The considered underactuated system is a double inverted pendulum (DIP), can be modeled by three subsystems. Such structure allows the construction of several designs of hierarchies for the controller. For all hierarchical designs, the asymptotic stability of every layer sliding mode surface and the sliding mode surface of subsystems are proved theoretically by Barbalat's lemma. Simulation results show the validity of these methods.

  14. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  15. A sliding mode controller for vehicular traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongfu; Kang, Yuhao; Yang, Bin; Peeta, Srinivas; Zhang, Li; Zheng, Taixong; Li, Yinguo

    2016-11-01

    This study proposes a sliding mode controller for vehicular traffic flow based on a car-following model to enhance the smoothness and stability of traffic flow evolution. In particular, the full velocity difference (FVD) model is used to capture the characteristics of vehicular traffic flow. The proposed sliding mode controller is designed in terms of the error between the desired space headway and the actual space headway. The stability of the controller is guaranteed using the Lyapunov technique. Numerical experiments are used to compare the performance of sliding mode control (SMC) with that of feedback control. The results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed SMC method in terms of the distribution smoothness and stability of the space headway, velocity, and acceleration profiles. They further illustrate that the SMC strategy is superior to that of the feedback control strategy, while enabling computational efficiency that can aid in practical applications.

  16. Resonant mode controllers for launch vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, Ken E.; Roth, Mary Ellen

    1992-01-01

    Electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) systems are currently being investigated for the National Launch System (NLS) as a replacement for hydraulic actuators due to the large amount of manpower and support hardware required to maintain the hydraulic systems. EMA systems in weight sensitive applications, such as launch vehicles, have been limited to around 5 hp due to system size, controller efficiency, thermal management, and battery size. Presented here are design and test data for an EMA system that competes favorably in weight and is superior in maintainability to the hydraulic system. An EMA system uses dc power provided by a high energy density bipolar lithium thionyl chloride battery, with power conversion performed by low loss resonant topologies, and a high efficiency induction motor controlled with a high performance field oriented controller to drive a linear actuator.

  17. Resonant mode controllers for launch vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, Ken E.; Roth, Mary Ellen

    Electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) systems are currently being investigated for the National Launch System (NLS) as a replacement for hydraulic actuators due to the large amount of manpower and support hardware required to maintain the hydraulic systems. EMA systems in weight sensitive applications, such as launch vehicles, have been limited to around 5 hp due to system size, controller efficiency, thermal management, and battery size. Presented here are design and test data for an EMA system that competes favorably in weight and is superior in maintainability to the hydraulic system. An EMA system uses dc power provided by a high energy density bipolar lithium thionyl chloride battery, with power conversion performed by low loss resonant topologies, and a high efficiency induction motor controlled with a high performance field oriented controller to drive a linear actuator.

  18. Environmental stability of actively mode locked fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Calum H.; Lee, Stephen T.; Reid, Derryck T.; Baili, Ghaya; Davies, John

    2016-10-01

    Lasers developed for defence related applications typically encounter issues with reliability and meeting desired specification when taken from the lab to the product line. In particular the harsh environmental conditions a laser has to endure can lead to difficulties. This paper examines a specific class of laser, namely actively mode-locked fibre lasers (AMLFLs), and discusses the impact of environmental perturbations. Theoretical and experimental results have assisted in developing techniques to improve the stability of a mode-locked pulse train for continuous operation. Many of the lessons learned in this research are applicable to a much broader category of lasers. The AMLFL consists of a fibre ring cavity containing a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), an isolator, an output coupler, a circulator, a bandpass filter and a modulator. The laser produces a train of 6-ps pulses at 800 nm with a repetition rate in the GHz regime and a low-noise profile. This performance is realisable in a laboratory environment. However, even small changes in temperature on the order of 0.1 °C can cause a collapse of mode-locked dynamics such that the required stability cannot be achieved without suitable feedback. Investigations into the root causes of this failure were performed by changing the temperature of components that constitute the laser resonator and observing their properties. Several different feedback mechanisms have been investigated to improve laser stability in an environment with dynamic temperature changes. Active cavity length control will be discussed along with DC bias control of the Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM).

  19. Implementation of Enhanced Propulsion Control Modes for Emergency Flight Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Chin, Jeffrey C.; May, Ryan D.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engines can be effective actuators to help pilots avert or recover from emergency situations. Emergency control modes are being developed to enhance the engines performance to increase the probability of recovery under these circumstances. This paper discusses a proposed implementation of an architecture that requests emergency propulsion control modes, allowing the engines to deliver additional performance in emergency situations while still ensuring a specified safety level. In order to determine the appropriate level of engine performance enhancement, information regarding the current emergency scenario (including severity) and current engine health must be known. This enables the engine to operate beyond its nominal range while minimizing overall risk to the aircraft. In this architecture, the flight controller is responsible for determining the severity of the event and the level of engine risk that is acceptable, while the engine controller is responsible for delivering the desired performance within the specified risk range. A control mode selector specifies an appropriate situation-specific enhanced mode, which the engine controller then implements. The enhanced control modes described in this paper provide additional engine thrust or response capabilities through the modification of gains, limits, and the control algorithm, but increase the risk of engine failure. The modifications made to the engine controller to enable the use of the enhanced control modes are described, as are the interaction between the various subsystems and importantly, the interaction between the flight controller/pilot and the propulsion control system. Simulation results demonstrate how the system responds to requests for enhanced operation and the corresponding increase in performance.

  20. Stable, Robust Tracking by Sliding Mode Control,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    Linear Systems , Prentice-Hall, 1980. 9. O.M.E. El-Ghesawi, S.A. Billings and A.S.I. Zinober, Variable structure systems and system zeros, Proc. IEE...82, January 1987. 7. G.C. Verghese and T. Kailath, Rational matrix structure, IEEE Trans. Auto. Control, AC-26, 434-438, April 1981. 8. T. Kailath

  1. Adaptive robust controller based on integral sliding mode concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleb, M.; Plestan, F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes, for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems, an adaptive controller based on adaptive second-order sliding mode control and integral sliding mode control concepts. The adaptation strategy solves the problem of gain tuning and has the advantage of chattering reduction. Moreover, limited information about perturbation and uncertainties has to be known. The control is composed of two parts: an adaptive one whose objective is to reject the perturbation and system uncertainties, whereas the second one is chosen such as the nominal part of the system is stabilised in zero. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, an application on an academic example is shown with simulation results.

  2. GENERAL: Mode shift and stability control of a current mode controlled buck-boost converter operating in discontinuous conduction mode with ramp compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Bo-Cheng; Xu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Zhong

    2009-11-01

    By establishing the discrete iterative mapping model of a current mode controlled buck-boost converter, this paper studies the mechanism of mode shift and stability control of the buck-boost converter operating in discontinuous conduction mode with a ramp compensation current. With the bifurcation diagram, Lyapunov exponent spectrum, time-domain waveform and parameter space map, the performance of the buck-boost converter circuit utilizing a compensating ramp current has been analysed. The obtained results indicate that the system trajectory is weakly chaotic and strongly intermittent under discontinuous conduction mode. By using ramp compensation, the buck-boost converter can shift from discontinuous conduction mode to continuous conduction mode, and effectively operates in the stable period-one region.

  3. Automated manual transmission mode selection controller

    DOEpatents

    Lawrie, Robert E.

    1999-11-09

    A powertrain system for a hybrid vehicle. The hybrid vehicle includes a heat engine, such as a diesel engine, and an electric machine, which operates as both an electric motor and an alternator, to power the vehicle. The hybrid vehicle also includes a manual-style transmission configured to operate as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver. The engine and the electric machine drive an input shaft which in turn drives an output shaft of the transmission. In addition to driving the transmission, the electric machine regulates the speed of the input shaft in order to synchronize the input shaft during either an upshift or downshift of the transmission by either decreasing or increasing the speed of the input shaft. When decreasing the speed of the input shaft, the electric motor functions as an alternator to produce electrical energy which may be stored by a storage device. Operation of the transmission is controlled by a transmission controller which receives input signals and generates output signals to control shift and clutch motors to effect smooth launch, upshift shifts, and downshifts of the transmission, so that the transmission functions substantially as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver, while internally substantially functioning as a manual transmission.

  4. Decentralized sliding mode control of nonlinear flexible robots

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Robinett, R.D.; Segalman, D.J.; Inman, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    A technique using augmented sliding mode control for robust, real-time control of flexible multiple link robots is presented. For the purpose of controller design, the n-link, n-joint robot is subdivided into n single joint, single link subsystems. A sliding surface for each subsystem is specified so as to be globally, asymptotically stable. Each sliding surface contains rigid-body angular velocity, angular displacement and flexible body generalized velocities. The flexible body generalized accelerations are treated as disturbances during the controller design. This has the advantage of not requiring explicit equations for the flexible body motion. The result is n single input, single output controllers acting at the n joints of the robot, controlling rigid body angular displacement and providing damping for flexible body modes. Furthermore, the n controllers can be operated in parallel so that compute speed is independent of the number of links, affording real-time, robust, control.

  5. Robust observer-based adaptive fuzzy sliding mode controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oveisi, Atta; Nestorović, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a new observer-based adaptive fuzzy integral sliding mode controller is proposed based on the Lyapunov stability theorem. The plant is subjected to a square-integrable disturbance and is assumed to have mismatch uncertainties both in state- and input-matrices. Based on the classical sliding mode controller, the equivalent control effort is obtained to satisfy the sufficient requirement of sliding mode controller and then the control law is modified to guarantee the reachability of the system trajectory to the sliding manifold. In order to relax the norm-bounded constrains on the control law and solve the chattering problem of sliding mode controller, a fuzzy logic inference mechanism is combined with the controller. An adaptive law is then introduced to tune the parameters of the fuzzy system on-line. Finally, for evaluating the controller and the robust performance of the closed-loop system, the proposed regulator is implemented on a real-time mechanical vibrating system.

  6. A multi-mode operation control strategy for flexible microgrid based on sliding-mode direct voltage and hierarchical controls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinjin; Liu, Yancheng; Zhao, Youtao; Wang, Ning

    2016-03-01

    Multi-mode operation and transient stability are two problems that significantly affect flexible microgrid (MG). This paper proposes a multi-mode operation control strategy for flexible MG based on a three-layer hierarchical structure. The proposed structure is composed of autonomous, cooperative, and scheduling controllers. Autonomous controller is utilized to control the performance of the single micro-source inverter. An adaptive sliding-mode direct voltage loop and an improved droop power loop based on virtual negative impedance are presented respectively to enhance the system disturbance-rejection performance and the power sharing accuracy. Cooperative controller, which is composed of secondary voltage/frequency control and phase synchronization control, is designed to eliminate the voltage/frequency deviations produced by the autonomous controller and prepare for grid connection. Scheduling controller manages the power flow between the MG and the grid. The MG with the improved hierarchical control scheme can achieve seamless transitions from islanded to grid-connected mode and have a good transient performance. In addition the presented work can also optimize the power quality issues and improve the load power sharing accuracy between parallel VSIs. Finally, the transient performance and effectiveness of the proposed control scheme are evaluated by theoretical analysis and simulation results.

  7. Feedback control of subcritical Turing instability with zero mode.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A A; Kanevsky, Y; Nepomnyashchy, A A

    2009-04-01

    A global feedback control of a system that exhibits a subcritical monotonic instability at a nonzero wave number (short-wave or Turing instability) in the presence of a zero mode is investigated using a Ginzburg-Landau equation coupled to an equation for the zero mode. This system is studied analytically and numerically. It is shown that feedback control, based on measuring the maximum of the pattern amplitude over the domain, can stabilize the system and lead to the formation of localized unipulse stationary states or traveling solitary waves. It is found that the unipulse traveling structures result from an instability of the stationary unipulse structures when one of the parameters characterizing the coupling between the periodic pattern and the zero mode exceeds a critical value that is determined by the zero mode damping coefficient.

  8. Output feedback sliding mode control under networked environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinhui; Lam, James; Xia, Yuanqing

    2013-04-01

    This article considers the problem of sliding mode output feedback control for networked control systems (NCSs). The key idea is to make use of not only the current and previous measurements, but also previous inputs for the reconstruction of the state variables. Using this idea, sliding mode controllers are designed for systems with constant or time-varying network delay. The approach is not only more practical but also easy to implement. To illustrate this, the design technique is applied to an inverted pendulum system.

  9. Mixed mode control method and engine using same

    DOEpatents

    Kesse, Mary L.; Duffy, Kevin P.

    2007-04-10

    A method of mixed mode operation of an internal combustion engine includes the steps of controlling a homogeneous charge combustion event timing in a given engine cycle, and controlling a conventional charge injection event to be at least a predetermined time after the homogeneous charge combustion event. An internal combustion engine is provided, including an electronic controller having a computer readable medium with a combustion timing control algorithm recorded thereon, the control algorithm including means for controlling a homogeneous charge combustion event timing and means for controlling a conventional injection event timing to be at least a predetermined time from the homogeneous charge combustion event.

  10. Sliding mode control of a simulated MEMS gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Batur, C; Sreeramreddy, T; Khasawneh, Q

    2006-01-01

    The microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are penetrating more and more into measurement and control problems because of their small size, low cost, and low power consumption. The vibrating gyroscope is one of those MEMS devices that will have a significant impact on the stability control systems in transportation industry. This paper studies the design and control of a vibrating gyroscope. The device has been constructed in a Pro-E environment and its model has been simulated in the finite-element domain in order to approximate its dynamic characteristics with a lumped model. A model reference adaptive feedback controller and the sliding mode controller have been considered to guarantee the stability of the device. It is shown that the sliding mode controller of the vibrating proof mass results in a better estimate of the unknown angular velocity than that of the model reference adaptive feedback controller.

  11. Adaptive Control Using Residual Mode Filters Applied to Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Many dynamic systems containing a large number of modes can benefit from adaptive control techniques, which are well suited to applications that have unknown parameters and poorly known operating conditions. In this paper, we focus on a model reference direct adaptive control approach that has been extended to handle adaptive rejection of persistent disturbances. We extend this adaptive control theory to accommodate problematic modal subsystems of a plant that inhibit the adaptive controller by causing the open-loop plant to be non-minimum phase. We will augment the adaptive controller using a Residual Mode Filter (RMF) to compensate for problematic modal subsystems, thereby allowing the system to satisfy the requirements for the adaptive controller to have guaranteed convergence and bounded gains. We apply these theoretical results to design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility-scale, variable-speed wind turbine that has minimum phase zeros.

  12. Dynamics of the L {yields} H transition, VH-mode evolution, edge localized modes and R.F. driven confinement control in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.H.; Lebedev, V.B.; Liang, Y.M.; Gruzinov, A.V.; Gruzinov, I.; Medvedev, M.; Carreras, B.A.; Newman, D.E.; Charlton, L.; Sidikman, K.L.

    1995-02-01

    Several novel theoretical results related to L {yields} H transition physics, VH-mode evolution, Edge Localized Modes and active confinement control are presented. Critical issues are identified, results are discussed and important unresolved questions are listed. The basic physics is discussed in the contexts of current experiments and of ITER.

  13. Recent Advances In Structural Vibration And Failure Mode Control In Mainland China: Theory, Experiments And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hui; Ou Jinping

    2008-07-08

    A number of researchers have been focused on structural vibration control in the past three decades over the world and fruit achievements have been made. This paper introduces the recent advances in structural vibration control including passive, active and semiactive control in mainland China. Additionally, the co-author extends the structural vibration control to failure mode control. The research on the failure mode control is also involved in this paper. For passive control, this paper introduces full scale tests of buckling-restrained braces conducted to investigate the performance of the dampers and the second-editor of the Code of Seismic Design for Buildings. For active control, this paper introduces the HMD system for wind-induced vibration control of the Guangzhou TV tower. For semiactive control, the smart damping devices, algorithms for semi-active control, design methods and applications of semi-active control for structures are introduced in this paper. The failure mode control for bridges is also introduced.

  14. Learning guide for the terminal configured vehicle advanced guidance and control system mode select panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. A.; Callahan, R.

    1981-01-01

    This learning guide is designed to assist pilots in taking the PLATO presimulator training course on the advanced guidance and control system mode select panel. The learning guide is divided into five sections. The first section, the introduction, presents the course goals, prerequisites, definition of PLATO activities, and a suggested approach to completing the course. The remaining four sections present the purpose, learning activities and summary of each lesson of the AGCS PLATO course, which consists of (1) AGCS introduction; (2) lower order modes; (3) higher order modes; and (4) an arrival route exercise.

  15. Fuzzy Current-Mode Control and Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a current-mode control (CMC) methodology is developed for a buck converter by using a fuzzy logic controller. Conventional CMC methodologies are based on lead-lag compensation with voltage and inductor current feedback. In this paper the converter lead-lag compensation will be substituted with a fuzzy controller. A small-signal model of the fuzzy controller will also be developed in order to examine the stability properties of this buck converter control system. The paper develops an analytical approach, introducing fuzzy control into the area of CMC.

  16. Mode control for high performance laser diode sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisher, Paul; Price, Kirk; Bashar, Shabbir; Bao, Ling; Huang, Hua; Wang, Jun; Wise, Damian; Zhang, Shiguo; Das, Suhit; DeFranza, Mark; Hodges, Aaron; Trifan, Utsu; Balsley, David; Dong, Weimin; Grimshaw, Mike; DeVito, Mark; Bell, Jake; Martinsen, Robert; Farmer, Jason; Crump, Paul; Patterson, Steve

    2008-04-01

    We report on recent progress in the control of optical modes toward the improvement of commercial high-performance diode laser modules. Control of the transverse mode has allowed scaling of the optical mode volume, increasing the peak output power of diode laser emitters by a factor of two. Commercially-available single emitter diodes operating at 885 nm now exhibit >25 W peak (12 W rated) at >60% conversion efficiency. In microchannel-cooled bar format, these lasers operate >120 W at 62% conversion efficiency. Designs of similar performance operating at 976 nm have shown >37,000 equivalent device hours with no failures. Advances in the control of lateral modes have enabled unprecedented brightness scaling in a fiber-coupled package format. Leveraging scalable arrays of single emitters, the conductively-cooled nLIGHT Pearl TM package now delivers >80 W peak (50 W rated) at >53% conversion efficiency measured from a 200-μm core fiber output and >45 W peak (35 W rated) at >52% conversion efficiency measured from a 100-μm fiber output. nLIGHT has also expanded its product portfolio to include wavelength locking by means of external volume Bragg gratings. By controlling the longitudinal modes of the laser, this technique is demonstrated to produce a narrow, temperature-stabilized spectrum, with minimal performance degradation relative to similar free-running lasers.

  17. Chattering-Free Sliding Mode Control with Unmodeled Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupp, Don; Shtessel, Yuri B.

    1999-01-01

    Sliding mode control systems are valued for their robust accommodation of uncertainties and their ability to reject disturbances. In this paper, a design methodology is proposed to eliminate the chattering phenomenon affecting sliding mode controlled plants with input unmodeled actuator dynamics of second order or greater. The proposed controller design is based on the relative degrees of the plant and the unmodeled actuator dynamics and the ranges of the uncertainties of the plant and actuator. The controller utilizes the pass filter characteristics of the physical actuating device to provide a smoothing effect on the discontinuous control signal rather than introducing any artificial dynamics into the controller design thus eliminating chattering in the system's output response.

  18. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H.

    2017-03-01

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications.

  19. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H.

    2017-01-01

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications. PMID:28272422

  20. Failure Mode Effects Analysis for an Accelerator Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) has been used in industry for design, manufacturing and assembly process quality control. It describes a formal approach for categorizing how a process may fail and for prioritizing failures based on their severity, frequency and likelihood of detection. Experience conducting a partial FMEA of an accelerator subsystem and its related control system will be reviewed. The applicability of the FMEA process to an operational accelerator control system will be discussed.

  1. Experimental Study of Flexible Plate Vibration Control by Using Two-Loop Sliding Mode Control Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingyu; Lin, Jiahui; Liu, Yuejun; Yang, Kang; Zhou, Lanwei; Chen, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that intelligent control theory has been used in many research fields, novel modeling method (DROMM) is used for flexible rectangular active vibration control, and then the validity of new model is confirmed by comparing finite element model with new model. In this paper, taking advantage of the dynamics of flexible rectangular plate, a two-loop sliding mode (TSM) MIMO approach is introduced for designing multiple-input multiple-output continuous vibration control system, which can overcome uncertainties, disturbances or unstable dynamics. An illustrative example is given in order to show the feasibility of the method. Numerical simulations and experiment confirm the effectiveness of the proposed TSM MIMO controller.

  2. Electromechanical modelling and design for phase control of locked modes in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, K. E. J.; Choi, W.; Humphreys, D. A.; La Haye, R. J.; Shiraki, D.; Sweeney, R.; Volpe, F. A.; Welander, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    A basic nonlinear electromechanical model is developed for the interaction between a pre-existing near-saturated tearing-mode, a conducting wall, active coils internal to the wall, and active coils external to the wall. The tearing-mode is represented by a perturbed helical surface current and its island has a small but finite moment of inertia. The model is shown to have several properties that are qualitatively consistent with the experimental observations of mode-wall and mode-coil interactions. The main purpose of the model is to guide the design of a phase control system for locked modes (LMs) in tokamaks. Such a phase controller may become an important component in integrated disruption avoidance systems. A realistic feedback controller for the LM phase is designed and tested for the electromechanical model. The results indicate that a simple fixed-gain controller can perform phase control of LMs with a range of sizes, and at arbitrary misalignment relative to a realistically dimensioned background error field. The basic model is expected to be a useful minimal dynamical system representation also for other aspects of mode-wall-coil interactions.

  3. Sliding mode control method having terminal convergence in finite time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkataraman, Subramanian T. (Inventor); Gulati, Sandeep (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide robust nonlinear controllers for robotic operations in unstructured environments based upon a new class of closed loop sliding control methods, sometimes denoted terminal sliders, where the new class will enforce closed-loop control convergence to equilibrium in finite time. Improved performance results from the elimination of high frequency control switching previously employed for robustness to parametric uncertainties. Improved performance also results from the dependence of terminal slider stability upon the rate of change of uncertainties over the sliding surface rather than the magnitude of the uncertainty itself for robust control. Terminal sliding mode control also yields improved convergence where convergence time is finite and is to be controlled. A further object is to apply terminal sliders to robot manipulator control and benchmark performance with the traditional computed torque control method and provide for design of control parameters.

  4. Study of Kink Modes and Error Fields using Rotation Control with a Biased Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoafer, Chris C.; Levesque, J. P.; Peng, Q.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    A bias probe has been installed in the High Beta Tokamak - Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) for studying MHD mode rotation and stability. When the probe is inserted into the edge of the plasma and a voltage applied, the rotation of long-wavelength kink instabilities is strongly modified. A large poloidal plasma flow results, measured with a bi-directional Mach probe, and changes in plasma flow correlate to changes in edge kink mode rotation. An active controller is used to adjust the probe voltage in real time for controlling both the plasma flow and mode rotation. Bias probe voltages are generated through an active GPU-based digital feedback system. Mode rotation control is desirable and allows for MHD stability studies under conditions of varying mode rotation rates. At large positive biases, the probe current induces a torque that opposes the natural direction of mode rotation. We are able to apply sufficiently large torque to induce a transition to a fast rotation state (both mode and plasma rotation). The bias required to induce the transition is shown to depend on an applied error field, establishing a technique to determine the natural error field on HBT-EP. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  5. Stabilization and tracking control of X-Z inverted pendulum with sliding-mode control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Jun

    2012-11-01

    X-Z inverted pendulum is a new kind of inverted pendulum which can move with the combination of the vertical and horizontal forces. Through a new transformation, the X-Z inverted pendulum is decomposed into three simple models. Based on the simple models, sliding-mode control is applied to stabilization and tracking control of the inverted pendulum. The performance of the sliding mode control is compared with that of the PID control. Simulation results show that the design scheme of sliding-mode control is effective for the stabilization and tracking control of the X-Z inverted pendulum.

  6. Surface-controlled patterned vertical alignment mode with reactive mesogen.

    PubMed

    Lee, You-Jin; Kim, Young-Ki; Jo, Soo In; Gwag, Jin Seog; Yu, Chang-Jae; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2009-06-08

    We proposed a patterned vertical alignment (PVA) mode controlled by a modified surface with ultraviolet (UV) curable reactive mesogen (RM) mixed with vertical alignment material for a liquid crystal display (LCD) with fast response time. In the surface-controlled PVA (SC-PVA) mode, the RM monomers in the alignment layer are polymerized along the LC directors by UV exposure under an applied voltage. The polymerized RMs produce a pretilt against the substrate normal depending on the applied field direction in the patterned electrode configuration. In such SC-PVA mode, fast response time was achieved at whole grey levels with the predetermined rotational preference of the LC directors governed by the pretilt direction.

  7. Beyond the Intelligent-shell Concept: the Clean-mode-control for Tearing Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanca, Paolo

    The Intelligent Shell scheme, where a grid of active coils counteracts in a feedback scheme the measurements provided by an identical grid of sensors, has shown some limitations in the control of the dynamo tearing modes in RFX-mod. The origin of the problem is the aliasing on the measurements coming from the high periodicity sideband harmonics produced by the discrete nature of the active coils. A more efficient feedback on tearing modes is obtained by removing the sidebands from the measurements, thereby counteracting the true tearing Fourier modes. In this scheme, named Clean-Mode-Control, the sidebands are computed in real time from the coils currents using the cylindrical geometry approximation. The Clean-Mode-Control significantly alleviates the wall-locking of tearing modes in RFX-mod, giving the possibility of operating at a plasma current (1.5 MA) never reached before in a RFP machine. These features are well explained by a MHD model describing the tearing mode dynamic under the viscous torque due to the fluid motion and the electromagnetic torques produced by the feedback, the conductive structures surrounding the plasma and the non-linear interaction between the different modes [P. Zanca, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 51, No. 1, 015006 (2009)]. Here some new results obtained with this model are discussed. In particular we will show that the edge radial field control improves by reducing the ratio between the delay introduced by the digital acquisition of the measurements and the time constant of the shell that contains the plasma. In this formulation the active coils are assumed to be located outside the shell.

  8. Active control system trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yore, E. E.; Gunderson, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The active control concepts which achieve the benefit of improved mission performance and lower cost and generate system trends towards improved dynamic performance, more integration, and digital fly by wire mechanization are described. Analytical issues and implementation requirements and tools and approaches developed to address the analytical and implementation issues are briefly discussed.

  9. CO₂ laser emission modes to control enamel erosion.

    PubMed

    Scatolin, Renata Siqueira; Alonso-Filho, Fernando Luiz; Galo, Rodrigo; Rios, Daniela; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2015-08-01

    Considering the importance and prevalence of dental erosion, the aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different modes of pulse emission of CO2 laser associated or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) 1.23% gel, in controlling enamel erosion by profilometry. Ninety-six fragments of bovine enamel were flattened and polished, and the specimens were subjected to initial erosive challenge with hydrochloric acid (pH = 2). Specimens were randomly assigned according to surface treatment: APF 1.23% gel and gel without fluoride (control), and subdivided according to the modes of pulse CO2 laser irradiation: no irradiation (control), continuous, ultrapulse, and repeated pulse (n = 12). After surface treatment, further erosive challenges were performed for 5 days, 4 × 2 min/day. Enamel structure loss was quantitatively determined by a profilometer, after surface treatment and after 5 days of erosive challenges. Two-away ANOVA revealed a significant difference between the pulse emission mode of the CO2 laser and the presence of fluoride (P ≤ 0.05). The Duncan's test showed that CO2 laser irradiation in continuous mode and the specimens only received fluoride, promoted lower enamel loss than that other treatments. A lower dissolution of the enamel prisms was observed when it was irradiated with CO2 laser in continuous mode compared other groups. It can be concluded that CO2 laser irradiation in continuous mode was the most effective to control the enamel structure loss submitted to erosive challenges with hydrochloric acid.

  10. Mode competition and mode control in free electron lasers with one and two dimensional Bragg resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P.N.; Ginzburg, N.S.; Sergeev, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    In the report we present a time domain approach to the theory of FELs with one and two dimensional Bragg resonators. It is demonstrated that traditional 1-D Bragg resonators provide possibilities for effective longitudinal mode control. In particular, simulation of the FEL realized in the joint experiment of JINR (Dybna) and IAP (N. Novgord) confirms achievement of the single mode operating regime with high efficiency of about 20%. However, 1-D Bragg resonators lose their selectivity as the transverse size of the system is increased. We simulate mode competition in FELs with coaxial 1-D Bragg resonators and observe a progressively more complicated azimuthal mode competition pattern as the perimeter of the resonator is increased. At the same time, using 2-D Bragg resonators for the same electron beam and microwave system perimeter gives very fast establishment of the single frequency regime with an azimuthally symmetric operating mode. Therefore, FELs utilising 2-D Bragg resonators with coaxial and planar geometry may be considered as attractive sources of high power spatially coherent radiation in the mm and sub-mm wave bands.

  11. Residual mode filters and adaptive control in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Balas, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in controlling large systems and structures is compensating for the destructive interaction which can occur between the reduced-order model (ROM) of the plant, which is used by the controller, and the unmodeled dynamics of the plant, often called the residual modes. The problem is more significant in the case of large space structures because their naturally light damping and high performance requirements lead to more frequent, destructive residual mode interaction (RMI). Using the design/compensation technique of residual mode filters (RMF's), effective compensation of RMI can be accomplished in a straightforward manner when using linear controllers. The use of RMF's has been shown to be effective for a variety of large structures, including a space-based laser and infinite dimensional systems. However, the dynamics of space structures is often uncertain and may even change over time due to on-orbit erosion from space debris and corrosive chemicals in the upper atmosphere. In this case, adaptive control can be extremely beneficial in meeting the performance requirements of the structure. Adaptive control for large structures is also based on ROM's and so destructive RMI may occur. Unfortunately, adaptive control is inherently nonlinear, and therefore the known results of RMF's cannot be applied. The purpose is to present the results of new research showing the effects of RMI when using adaptive control and the work which will hopefully lead to RMF compensation of this problem.

  12. Magnetic Control of Locked Modes in Present Devices and ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Sabbagh, S.; Sweeney, R.; Hender, T.; Kirk, A.; La Haye, R. J.; Strait, E. J.; Ding, Y. H.; Rao, B.; Fietz, S.; Maraschek, M.; Frassinetti, L.; in, Y.; Jeon, Y.; Sakakihara, S.

    2014-10-01

    The toroidal phase of non-rotating (``locked'') neoclassical tearing modes was controlled in several devices by means of applied magnetic perturbations. Evidence is presented from various tokamaks (ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET, J-TEXT, KSTAR), spherical tori (MAST, NSTX) and a reversed field pinch (EXTRAP-T2R). Furthermore, the phase of interchange modes was controlled in the LHD helical device. These results share a common interpretation in terms of torques acting on the mode. Based on this interpretation, it is predicted that control-coil currents will be sufficient to control the phase of locking in ITER. This will be possible both with the internal coils and with the external error-field-correction coils, and might have promising consequences for disruption avoidance (by aiding the electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of locked modes), as well as for spatially distributing heat loads during disruptions. This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-SC0008520, DE-FC-02-04ER54698 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Robust Neural Sliding Mode Control of Robot Manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiep, Nguyen Tran; cat, Pham Thuong

    2009-03-01

    This paper proposes a robust neural sliding mode control method for robot tracking problem to overcome the noises and large uncertainties in robot dynamics. The Lyapunov direct method has been used to prove the stability of the overall system. Simulation results are given to illustrate the applicability of the proposed method

  14. Robust Neural Sliding Mode Control of Robot Manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Tran Hiep; Pham Thuong Cat

    2009-03-05

    This paper proposes a robust neural sliding mode control method for robot tracking problem to overcome the noises and large uncertainties in robot dynamics. The Lyapunov direct method has been used to prove the stability of the overall system. Simulation results are given to illustrate the applicability of the proposed method.

  15. Experimental sliding mode control of a flexible single link manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Timothy Wei Tie

    1993-09-01

    A study was conducted to explore and develop practical controller designs for a flexible manipulator based on the variable structure (VS) system and sliding mode (SM) theory. A new control design method is first proposed based on the continuous time VSSM theory, which can significantly simplify the VS system design process. Moreover, the variables concerned can be assigned separate gains. Direct application of the VSSM control system to the flexible arm, however, has limitations due to the inherent properties of the system. To solve this problem, facilitate digital implementation, and eliminate undesirable chattering in conventional VS system control, the discrete time quasi sliding mode control (DQSMC) is developed. Two control algorithms are derived satisfying the conditions for existence of discrete time sliding hypersurfaces. It is proven that the DQSMC design is equivalent to a full state feedback with its steady state motion constrained to the sliding hypersurfaces, and that DQSMC provides a general structure unifying the three different kinds of discrete time SM control. Experimental testing of the DQSMC controller showed good results, which compared favorably to the linear quadratic Gaussian controller under the same load variations. A novel approach was then devised to realize the proposed new controller designs.

  16. Tensor Product Model Transformation Based Adaptive Integral-Sliding Mode Controller: Equivalent Control Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoliang; Li, Hongxing

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes new methodologies for the design of adaptive integral-sliding mode control. A tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode control law with respect to uncertainties and perturbations is studied, while upper bounds on the perturbations and uncertainties are assumed to be unknown. The advantage of proposed controllers consists in having a dynamical adaptive control gain to establish a sliding mode right at the beginning of the process. Gain dynamics ensure a reasonable adaptive gain with respect to the uncertainties. Finally, efficacy of the proposed controller is verified by simulations on an uncertain nonlinear system model. PMID:24453897

  17. Tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode controller: equivalent control method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoliang; Sun, Kaibiao; Li, Hongxing

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes new methodologies for the design of adaptive integral-sliding mode control. A tensor product model transformation based adaptive integral-sliding mode control law with respect to uncertainties and perturbations is studied, while upper bounds on the perturbations and uncertainties are assumed to be unknown. The advantage of proposed controllers consists in having a dynamical adaptive control gain to establish a sliding mode right at the beginning of the process. Gain dynamics ensure a reasonable adaptive gain with respect to the uncertainties. Finally, efficacy of the proposed controller is verified by simulations on an uncertain nonlinear system model.

  18. Modes of active deformation in Eastern Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2012-04-01

    Eastern Hispaniola and the Puerto Rico Island are the emerged part of a doubly vergent thrust wedge formed by oblique arc-continent collision with subduction and underthrusting of the North America Plate in the Puerto Rico trench and underthrusting of the Caribbean crust in The Muertos trough (Dolan et al. 1998, Mann et al., 2002, ten Brink et al. 2010). In the relatively small area of Eastern Hispaniola several types of active crustal deformation have been recognized: 1) At the prowedge of the orogene, the rear of the accretionary prism is cut by the strike-slip Septentrional Fault, bounding a sliver plate (Mann et al, 2002). Recent detailed mapping and aeromagnetic surveys in the onshore part of the prism (Samaná Peninsula and Septentrional Cordillera, Sysmin Team) revealed that the internal structure of the sliver is made of parallel bands of sigmoidal, left-lateral, NW-SE thrust splays, bounded by steep strike-slip faults. We interpreted these structures as transpressional strike-slip duplex. It is worth to note the similarity between the strike and dip of the thrust splays and the 303, 62, 74 focal mechanism calculated by Russo and Villaseñor (1995) for the thrust event of the August 4, 1946 Hispaniola earthquake. 2) The uplifted core of the orogen extends between the accretionary prism and the beginning of the Muertos retrowedge. Half of this area is occupied by the Oriental Cordillera, a recent uplift of cretaceous island-arc rocks arching the Late Neogene reef. The rest of the territory is the Caribbean Coastal Plain modelled on the Late Neogene reef. The Oriental Cordillera is made of two en echelon left-stepping uplifts: the domal-shaped Haitises and the rhombohedral-shaped Seibo (García-Senz et al, 2007); the latter share structural similarities and scaling relations with the 90° neutral stepover model of McClay and Bonora (2001). Therefore we interpret it as a restraining stepover developed over a blind splay of the Septentrional Fault, and the main

  19. Optical Mode Control by Geometric Phase in Quasicrystal Metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulevich, Igor; Maguid, Elhanan; Shitrit, Nir; Veksler, Dekel; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2015-11-01

    We report on the observation of optical spin-controlled modes from a quasicrystalline metasurface as a result of an aperiodic geometric phase induced by anisotropic subwavelength structure. When geometric phase defects are introduced in the aperiodic structured surface, the modes exhibit polarization helicity dependence resulting in the optical spin-Hall effect. The radiative thermal dispersion bands from a quasicrystal structure are studied where the observed bands arise from the optical spin-orbit interaction induced by the aperiodic space-variant orientations of anisotropic antennas. The optical spin-flip behavior of the revealed modes that arise from the geometric phase pickup is experimentally observed within the visible spectrum by measuring the spin-projected diffraction patterns. The introduced ability to manipulate the light-matter interaction of quasicrystals in a spin-dependent manner provides the route for molding light via spin-optical aperiodic artificial planar surfaces.

  20. Mode transition coordinated control for a compound power-split hybrid car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhao, Zhiguo; Zhang, Tong; Li, Mengna

    2017-03-01

    With a compound power-split transmission directly connected to the engine in hybrid cars, dramatic fluctuations in engine output torque result in noticeable jerks when the car is in mode transition from electric drive mode to hybrid drive mode. This study designed a mode transition coordinated control strategy, and verified that strategy's effectiveness with both simulations and experiments. Firstly, the mode transition process was analyzed, and ride comfort issues during the mode transition process were demonstrated. Secondly, engine ripple torque was modeled using the measured cylinder pumping pressure when the engine was not in operation. The complete dynamic plant model of the power-split hybrid car was deduced, and its effectiveness was validated by a comparison of experimental and simulation results. Thirdly, a coordinated control strategy was designed to determine the desired engine torque, motor torque, and the moment of fuel injection. Active damping control with two degrees of freedom, based on reference output shaft speed estimation, was designed to mitigate driveline speed oscillations. Carrier torque estimation based on transmission kinematics and dynamics was used to suppress torque disturbance during engine cranking. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed strategy effectively suppressed vehicle jerks and improved ride comfort during mode transition.

  1. Application and Evaluation of Control Modes for Risk-Based Engine Performance Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane; Owen, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The engine control system for civil transport aircraft imposes operational limits on the propulsion system to ensure compliance with safety standards. However, during certain emergency situations, aircraft survivability may benefit from engine performance beyond its normal limits despite the increased risk of failure. Accordingly, control modes were developed to improve the maximum thrust output and responsiveness of a generic high-bypass turbofan engine. The algorithms were designed such that the enhanced performance would always constitute an elevation in failure risk to a consistent predefined likelihood. This paper presents an application of these risk-based control modes to a combined engine/aircraft model. Through computer and piloted simulation tests, the aim is to present a notional implementation of these modes, evaluate their effects on a generic airframe, and demonstrate their usefulness during emergency flight situations. Results show that minimal control effort is required to compensate for the changes in flight dynamics due to control mode activation. The benefits gained from enhanced engine performance for various runway incursion scenarios are investigated. Finally, the control modes are shown to protect against potential instabilities during propulsion-only flight where all aircraft control surfaces are inoperable.

  2. Application and Evaluation of Control Modes for Risk-Based Engine Performance Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane; Owen, A. Karl (Compiler); Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The engine control system for civil transport aircraft imposes operational limits on the propulsion system to ensure compliance with safety standards. However, during certain emergency situations, aircraft survivability may benefit from engine performance beyond its normal limits despite the increased risk of failure. Accordingly, control modes were developed to improve the maximum thrust output and responsiveness of a generic high-bypass turbofan engine. The algorithms were designed such that the enhanced performance would always constitute an elevation in failure risk to a consistent predefined likelihood. This paper presents an application of these risk-based control modes to a combined engine/aircraft model. Through computer and piloted simulation tests, the aim is to present a notional implementation of these modes, evaluate their effects on a generic airframe, and demonstrate their usefulness during emergency flight situations. Results show that minimal control effort is required to compensate for the changes in flight dynamics due to control mode activation. The benefits gained from enhanced engine performance for various runway incursion scenarios are investigated. Finally, the control modes are shown to protect against potential instabilities during propulsion-only flight where all aircraft control surfaces are inoperable.

  3. Adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode control for microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incremona, Gian Paolo; Cucuzzella, Michele; Ferrara, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the design of adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode (ASSOSM) control laws for grid-connected microgrids. Due to the presence of the inverter, of unpredicted load changes, of switching among different renewable energy sources, and of electrical parameters variations, the microgrid model is usually affected by uncertain terms which are bounded, but with unknown upper bounds. To theoretically frame the control problem, the class of second-order systems in Brunovsky canonical form, characterised by the presence of matched uncertain terms with unknown bounds, is first considered. Four adaptive strategies are designed, analysed and compared to select the most effective ones to be applied to the microgrid case study. In the first two strategies, the control amplitude is continuously adjusted, so as to arrive at dominating the effect of the uncertainty on the controlled system. When a suitable control amplitude is attained, the origin of the state space of the auxiliary system becomes attractive. In the other two strategies, a suitable blend between two components, one mainly working during the reaching phase, the other being the predominant one in a vicinity of the sliding manifold, is generated, so as to reduce the control amplitude in steady state. The microgrid system in a grid-connected operation mode, controlled via the selected ASSOSM control strategies, exhibits appreciable stability properties, as proved theoretically and shown in simulation.

  4. Active mode locking of lasers by piezoelectrically induced diffraction modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krausz, F.; Turi, L.; Kuti, Cs.; Schmidt, A. J.

    1990-04-01

    A new amplitude-modulation mode-locking technique is presented. Acoustic waves are generated directly on the faces of a resonant photoelastic medium. The created standing waves cause a highly efficient diffraction modulation of light. The modulation depth of standing-wave mode lockers is related to material and drive parameters and a figure of merit is introduced. With a lithium niobate crystal modulation depths over 10 are achieved at 1.054 μm and 1 W of radio frequency power. Using this device for the active mode locking of a continuous-wave Nd:glass laser pulses as short as 3.8 ps are produced at a repetition rate of 66 MHz. Limitations of amplitude-modulation mode locking by standing acoustic waves are discussed.

  5. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  6. Extended observer based on adaptive second order sliding mode control for a fixed wing UAV.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Herman; Salas-Peña, Oscar S; León-Morales, Jesús de

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the design of attitude and airspeed controllers for a fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicle. An adaptive second order sliding mode control is proposed for improving performance under different operating conditions and is robust in presence of external disturbances. Moreover, this control does not require the knowledge of disturbance bounds and avoids overestimation of the control gains. Furthermore, in order to implement this controller, an extended observer is designed to estimate unmeasurable states as well as external disturbances. Additionally, sufficient conditions are given to guarantee the closed-loop stability of the observer based control. Finally, using a full 6 degree of freedom model, simulation results are obtained where the performance of the proposed method is compared against active disturbance rejection based on sliding mode control.

  7. Real time MHD mode control using ECCD in KSTAR: Plan and requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, M.; Woo, M. H.; Jeong, J. H.; Hahn, S. H.; Yun, S. W.; Lee, W. R.; Bae, Y. S.; Oh, Y. K.; Kwak, J. G.; Yang, H. L.; Namkung, W.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, K. J.; Na, Y. S.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.

    2014-02-01

    For a high-performance, advanced tokamak mode in KSTAR, we have been developing a real-time control system of MHD modes such as sawtooth and Neo-classical Tearing Mode (NTM) by ECH/ECCD. The active feedback control loop will be also added to the mirror position and the real-time detection of the mode position. In this year, for the stabilization of NTM that is crucial to plasma performance we have implemented open-loop ECH antenna control system in KSTAR Plasma Control System (PCS) for ECH mirror movement during a single plasma discharge. KSTAR 170 GHz ECH launcher which was designed and fabricated by collaboration with PPPL and POSTECH has a final mirror of a poloidally and toroidally steerable mirror. The poloidal steering motion is only controlled in the real-time NTM control system and its maximum steering speed is 10 degree/sec by DC motor. However, the latency of the mirror control system and the return period of ECH antenna mirror angle are not fast because the existing launcher mirror control system is based on PLC which is connected to the KSTAR machine network through serial to LAN converter. In this paper, we present the design of real time NTM control system, ECH requirements, and the upgrade plan.

  8. Real time MHD mode control using ECCD in KSTAR: Plan and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, M.; Woo, M. H.; Jeong, J. H.; Hahn, S. H.; Yun, S. W.; Lee, W. R.; Bae, Y. S.; Oh, Y. K.; Kwak, J. G.; Yang, H. L.; Namkung, W.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, K. J.; Na, Y. S.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.

    2014-02-12

    For a high-performance, advanced tokamak mode in KSTAR, we have been developing a real-time control system of MHD modes such as sawtooth and Neo-classical Tearing Mode (NTM) by ECH/ECCD. The active feedback control loop will be also added to the mirror position and the real-time detection of the mode position. In this year, for the stabilization of NTM that is crucial to plasma performance we have implemented open-loop ECH antenna control system in KSTAR Plasma Control System (PCS) for ECH mirror movement during a single plasma discharge. KSTAR 170 GHz ECH launcher which was designed and fabricated by collaboration with PPPL and POSTECH has a final mirror of a poloidally and toroidally steerable mirror. The poloidal steering motion is only controlled in the real-time NTM control system and its maximum steering speed is 10 degree/sec by DC motor. However, the latency of the mirror control system and the return period of ECH antenna mirror angle are not fast because the existing launcher mirror control system is based on PLC which is connected to the KSTAR machine network through serial to LAN converter. In this paper, we present the design of real time NTM control system, ECH requirements, and the upgrade plan.

  9. Adaptive backstepping slide mode control of pneumatic position servo system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haipeng; Fan, Juntao

    2016-09-01

    With the price decreasing of the pneumatic proportional valve and the high performance micro controller, the simple structure and high tracking performance pneumatic servo system demonstrates more application potential in many fields. However, most existing control methods with high tracking performance need to know the model information and to use pressure sensor. This limits the application of the pneumatic servo system. An adaptive backstepping slide mode control method is proposed for pneumatic position servo system. The proposed method designs adaptive slide mode controller using backstepping design technique. The controller parameter adaptive law is derived from Lyapunov analysis to guarantee the stability of the system. A theorem is testified to show that the state of closed-loop system is uniformly bounded, and the closed-loop system is stable. The advantages of the proposed method include that system dynamic model parameters are not required for the controller design, uncertain parameters bounds are not need, and the bulk and expensive pressure sensor is not needed as well. Experimental results show that the designed controller can achieve better tracking performance, as compared with some existing methods.

  10. Controlling magnetic and electric dipole modes in hollow silicon nanocylinders.

    PubMed

    van de Haar, Marie Anne; van de Groep, Jorik; Brenny, Benjamin J M; Polman, Albert

    2016-02-08

    We propose a dielectric nanoresonator geometry consisting of hollow dielectric nanocylinders which support geometrical resonances. We fabricate such hollow Si particles with an outer diameter of 108-251 nm on a Si substrate, and determine their resonant modes with cathodo-luminescence (CL) spectroscopy and optical dark-field (DF) scattering measurements. The scattering behavior is numerically investigated in a systematic fashion as a function of wavelength and particle geometry. We find that the additional design parameter as a result of the introduction of a center gap can be used to control the relative spectral spacing of the resonant modes, which will enable additional control over the angular radiation pattern of the scatterers. Furthermore, the gap offers direct access to the enhanced magnetic dipole modal field in the center of the particle.

  11. Simulation and Research of Control-System for PMSM Based on Sliding Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baofeng, Lv; Guoxiang, Zhang

    In this paper, permanent magnet synchronous motor rotor flux oriented control strategy is studied, for the key issues of vector control is to observe the rotor flux, the control system is given based on sliding mode observer, and the sliding mode rotor flux observer is designed, with MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation, the results of simulation show that the system with wide speed range, has a good dynamic and static performance.

  12. Logistic Regression Model on Antenna Control Unit Autotracking Mode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-20

    412TW-PA-15240 Logistic Regression Model on Antenna Control Unit Autotracking Mode DANIEL T. LAIRD AIR FORCE TEST CENTER EDWARDS AFB, CA...OCTOBER 20 2015 4 1 2 T W Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 412TW-PA-15240 AIR FORCE TEST ...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES CA: Air Force Test Center Edwards AFB CA CC: 012100 14. ABSTRACT Over the past several years

  13. Active control of convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    1991-12-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that active (feedback) control can be used to alter the characteristics of thermal convection in a toroidal, vertical loop heated from below and cooled from above. As the temperature difference between the heated and cooled sections of the loop increases, the flow in the uncontrolled loop changes from no motion to steady, time-independent motion to temporally oscillatory, chaotic motion. With the use of a feedback controller effecting small perturbations in the boundary conditions, one can maintain the no-motion state at significantly higher temperature differences than the critical one corresponding to the onset of convection in the uncontrolled system. Alternatively, one can maintain steady, time-independent flow under conditions in which the flow would otherwise be chaotic. That is, the controller can be used to suppress chaos. Likewise, it is possible to stabilize periodic nonstable orbits that exist in the chaotic regime of the uncontrolled system. Finally, the controller also can be used to induce chaos in otherwise laminar (fully predictable), nonchaotic flow.

  14. Sliding mode control of electromagnetic tethered satellite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallaj, Mohammad Amin Alandi; Assadian, Nima

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the control of tethered satellite formation actuated by electromagnetic dipoles and reaction wheels using the robust sliding mode control technique. Generating electromagnetic forces and moments by electric current coils provides an attractive control actuation alternative for tethered satellite system due to the advantages of no propellant consumption and no obligatory rotational motion. Based on a dumbbell model of tethered satellite in which the flexibility and mass of the tether is neglected, the equations of motion in Cartesian coordinate are derived. In this model, the J2 perturbation is taken into account. The far-field and mid-field models of electromagnetic forces and moments of two satellites on each other and the effect of the Earth's magnetic field are presented. A robust sliding mode controller is designed for precise trajectory tracking purposes and to deal with the electromagnetic force and moment uncertainties and external disturbances due to the Earth's gravitational and magnetic fields inaccuracy. Numerical simulation results are presented to validate the effectiveness of the developed controller and its superiority over the linear controller.

  15. Pressure versus volume controlled modes in invasive mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Garnero, A J; Abbona, H; Gordo-Vidal, F; Hermosa-Gelbard, C

    2013-05-01

    The first generation of mechanical ventilators were controlled and cycled by pressure. Unfortunately, they did not allow control of the delivered tidal volume under changes in the dynamics of the respiratory system. This led to a second generation of ventilators that allowed volume control, hence favoring the ventilatory strategy based on normalization of the arterial gases. Studies conducted in the 1980s which related lung injury to the high ventilator pressures utilized while treating acute respiratory distress syndrome patients renewed interest in pressure-controlled mechanical ventilation. In addition, new evidence became available, leading to the development of pulmonary protective strategies aiming at preventing the progression of ventilator-induced lung injury. This review provides a detailed description of the control of pressure or volume using certain ventilatory modes, and offers a general view of their advantages and disadvantages, based on the latest available evidence.

  16. Sliding Mode Control of a Thermal Mixing Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Hanz; Figueroa, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we consider the robust control of a thermal mixer using multivariable Sliding Mode Control (SMC). The mixer consists of a mixing chamber, hot and cold fluid valves, and an exit valve. The commanded positions of the three valves are the available control inputs, while the controlled variables are total mass flow rate, chamber pressure and the density of the mixture inside the chamber. Unsteady thermodynamics and linear valve models are used in deriving a 5th order nonlinear system with three inputs and three outputs, An SMC controller is designed to achieve robust output tracking in the presence of unknown energy losses between the chamber and the environment. The usefulness of the technique is illustrated with a simulation.

  17. Passive mode control in the recirculating planar magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Franzi, Matthew; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.; Greening, Geoff; Zhang, Peng; Hoff, Brad

    2013-03-15

    Preliminary experiments of the recirculating planar magnetron microwave source have demonstrated that the device oscillates but is susceptible to intense mode competition due, in part, to poor coupling of RF fields between the two planar oscillators. A novel method of improving the cross-oscillator coupling has been simulated in the periodically slotted mode control cathode (MCC). The MCC, as opposed to a solid conductor, is designed to electromagnetically couple both planar oscillators by allowing for the propagation of RF fields and electrons through resonantly tuned gaps in the cathode. Using the MCC, a 12-cavity anode block with a simulated 1 GHz and 0.26 c phase velocity (where c is the speed of light) was able to achieve in-phase oscillations between the two sides of the device in as little as 30 ns. An analytic study of the modified resonant structure predicts the MCC's ability to direct the RF fields to provide tunable mode separation in the recirculating planar magnetron. The self-consistent solution is presented for both the degenerate even (in phase) and odd (180 Degree-Sign out of phase) modes that exist due to the twofold symmetry of the planar magnetrons.

  18. Spatial Mode Control of High-Order Harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, I.; Mevel, E.; Zerne, R.; LHuillier, A.; Antoine, P.; Wahlstroem, C. |

    1996-08-01

    We demonstrate that the spatial mode of high-order harmonics can be continuously controlled. The control is achieved by spatially modulating the degree of elliptical polarization of the fundamental field using birefringent optics. A highly sensitive relationship between the efficiency of harmonic generation and the degree of laser elliptical polarization leads to atoms emitting harmonics only in regions of linear polarization. The harmonics are emitted as annular beams whose angles of divergence can be continuously varied. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Constrained modes in control theory - Transmission zeros of uniform beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T.

    1992-01-01

    Mathematical arguments are presented demonstrating that the well-established control system concept of the transmission zero is very closely related to the structural concept of the constrained mode. It is shown that the transmission zeros of a flexible structure form a set of constrained natural frequencies for it, with the constraints depending explicitly on the locations and the types of sensors and actuators used for control. Based on this formulation, an algorithm is derived and used to produce dimensionless plots of the zero of a uniform beam with a compatible sensor/actuator pair.

  20. Sliding Mode Control of a Slewing Flexible Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David G.; Parker, Gordon G.; Starr, Gregory P.; Robinett, Rush D., III

    1997-01-01

    An output feedback sliding mode controller (SMC) is proposed to minimize the effects of vibrations of slewing flexible manipulators. A spline trajectory is used to generate ideal position and velocity commands. Constrained nonlinear optimization techniques are used to both calibrate nonlinear models and determine optimized gains to produce a rest-to-rest, residual vibration-free maneuver. Vibration-free maneuvers are important for current and future NASA space missions. This study required the development of the nonlinear dynamic system equations of motion; robust control law design; numerical implementation; system identification; and verification using the Sandia National Laboratories flexible robot testbed. Results are shown for a slewing flexible beam.

  1. Smooth integral sliding mode controller for the position control of Stewart platform.

    PubMed

    Kumar P, Ramesh; Chalanga, Asif; Bandyopadhyay, B

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes the application of a new algorithm for the position control of a Stewart platform. The conventional integral sliding mode controller is a combination of nominal control and discontinuous feedback control hence the overall control is discontinuous in nature. The discontinuity in the feedback control is undesirable for practical applications due to chattering which causes the wear and tear of the mechanical actuators. In this paper the existing integral sliding mode control law for systems with matched disturbances is modified by replacing the discontinuous part by a continuous modified twisting control. This proposed controller is continuous in nature due to the combinations of two continuous controls. The desired position of the platform has been achieved using the proposed controller even in the presence of matched disturbances. The effectiveness of the proposed controller has been proved with the simulation results.

  2. Large motion tracking control for thrust magnetic bearings with fuzzy logic, sliding mode, and direct linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minihan, T. P.; Lei, S.; Sun, G.; Palazzolo, A.; Kascak, A. F.; Calvert, T.

    2003-06-01

    Conventional use of magnetic bearings relies on a zero reference to keep the rotor centered in the radial and axial axes. This paper compares different control methods developed for the alternate control task of tracking an axial dynamic target. Controllers based on fuzzy logic, sliding mode, and direct linearization were designed to meet this task. Performance criteria, such as maximum axial displacement, minimum phase lag and I2R power losses were compared for each controller. The large motion, tracking problem for a rotor has utility in applications where dynamic seal clearances are required. This has a variety of potential applications in turbo-machinery, such as active stall control.

  3. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  4. Controllable damping of high-Q violin modes in fused silica suspension fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Mescheriakov, S. D.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Mitrofanov, V. P.

    2010-01-01

    Fused silica fiber suspension of the test masses will be used in the interferometric gravitational wave detectors of the next generation. This allows a significant reduction of losses in the suspension and thermal noise associated with the suspension. Unfortunately, unwanted violin modes may be accidentally excited in the suspension fibers. The Q-factor of the violin modes also exceeds 108. They have a ring-down time that is too long and may complicate the stable control of the interferometer. Results of the investigation of a violin mode active damping system are described. An original sensor and actuator were especially developed to realize the effective coupling of a thin, optically transparent, non-conducting fused silica fiber with an electric circuit. The damping system allowed the changing of the violin mode's damping rate over a wide range.

  5. Adaptive feedback control of wall modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhipeng

    The goal of this study is to stabilize the resistive wall modes (RWM) in tokamaks with adaptive stochastic feedback control. This is the first ever attempt at adaptive stochastic feedback optimal control of RWM in tokamaks. Both adaptive optimal state feedback and adaptive output feedback control have been studied. The adaptive optimal state feedback control design successfully stabilizes a slowly time-evolving RWM in a tokamak in a time scale of 4 times the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized system output for the time-invariant model is twice the system noise level. For the time-varying model, it is several times larger than the time-invariant case. The adaptive stochastic output feedback can also stabilize the slowly time-evolving RWM. It can do this in a time about 3 times that of the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized system output is twice as large as that of the state feedback case. In order to avoid the bottleneck encountered in the various sequential computations with big matrices in the feedback algorithms, neural network control has been proposed. It has been used to implement the adaptive stochastic output feedback control. It can stabilize the RWM instability in a time of 3 times the inverse of the growth rate of the RWM. The stabilized wall modes have the steady state output similar to the output feedback case. The developed algorithms, state feedback, output feedback, neural network control, can be readily applied to other plasma instabilities.

  6. New mode switching algorithm for the JPL 70-meter antenna servo controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The design of control mode switching algorithms and logic for JPL's 70 m antenna servo controller are described. The old control mode switching logic was reviewed and perturbation problems were identified. Design approaches for mode switching are presented and the final design is described. Simulations used to compare old and new mode switching algorithms and logic show that the new mode switching techniques will significantly reduce perturbation problems.

  7. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  8. A model for the control mode man-computer interface dialogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafin, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A four stage model is presented for the control mode man-computer interface dialogue. It consists of context development, semantic development syntactic development, and command execution. Each stage is discussed in terms of the operator skill levels (naive, novice, competent, and expert) and pertinent human factors issues. These issues are human problem solving, human memory, and schemata. The execution stage is discussed in terms of the operators typing skills. This model provides an understanding of the human process in command mode activity for computer systems and a foundation for relating system characteristics to operator characteristics.

  9. Direct power control of DFIG wind turbine systems based on an intelligent proportional-integral sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanzhi; Wang, Haoping; Tian, Yang; Aitouch, Abdel; Klein, John

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an intelligent proportional-integral sliding mode control (iPISMC) for direct power control of variable speed-constant frequency wind turbine system. This approach deals with optimal power production (in the maximum power point tracking sense) under several disturbance factors such as turbulent wind. This controller is made of two sub-components: (i) an intelligent proportional-integral module for online disturbance compensation and (ii) a sliding mode module for circumventing disturbance estimation errors. This iPISMC method has been tested on FAST/Simulink platform of a 5MW wind turbine system. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed iPISMC method outperforms the classical PI and intelligent proportional-integral control (iPI) in terms of both active power and response time.

  10. Motorized CPM/CAM physiotherapy device with sliding-mode Fuzzy Neural Network control loop.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hung-Jung; Chen, Tien-Chi

    2009-11-01

    Continuous passive motion (CPM) and controllable active motion (CAM) physiotherapy devices promote rehabilitation of damaged joints. This paper presents a computerized CPM/CAM system that obviates the need for mechanical resistance devices such as springs. The system is controlled by a computer which performs sliding-mode Fuzzy Neural Network (FNN) calculations online. CAM-type resistance force is generated by the active performance of an electric motor which is controlled so as to oppose the motion of the patient's leg. A force sensor under the patient's foot on the device pedal provides data for feedback in a sliding-mode FNN control loop built around the motor. Via an active impedance control feedback system, the controller drives the motor to behave similarly to a damped spring by generating and controlling the amplitude and direction of the pedal force in relation to the patient's leg. Experiments demonstrate the high sensitivity and speed of the device. The PC-based feedback nature of the control loop means that sophisticated auto-adaptable CPM/CAM custom-designed physiotherapy becomes possible. The computer base also allows extensive data recording, data analysis and network-connected remote patient monitoring.

  11. Design and development of a structural mode control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A program was conducted to compile and document some of the existing information about the conceptual design, development, and tests of the B-1 structural mode control system (SMCS) and its impact on ride quality. This report covers the following topics: (1) Rationale of selection of SMCS to meet ride quality criteria versus basic aircraft stiffening. (2) Key considerations in designing an SMCS, including vane geometry, rate and deflection requirements, power required, compensation network design, and fail-safe requirements. (3) Summary of key results of SMCS vane wind tunnel tests. (4) SMCS performance. (5) SMCS design details, including materials, bearings, and actuators. (6) Results of qualification testing of SMCS on the "Iron Bird" flight control simulator, and lab qualification testing of the actuators. (7) Impact of SMCS vanes on engine inlet characteristics from wind tunnel tests.

  12. Controlled generation of intrinsic localized modes in microelectromechanical cantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qingfei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Dietz, David

    2010-12-01

    We propose a scheme to induce intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) at an arbitrary site in microelectromechanical cantilever arrays. The idea is to locate the particular cantilever beam in the array that one wishes to drive to an oscillating state with significantly higher amplitude than the average and then apply small adjustments to the electrical signal that drives the whole array system. Our scheme is thus a global closed-loop control strategy. We argue that the dynamical mechanism on which our global driving scheme relies is spatiotemporal chaos and we develop a detailed analysis based on the standard averaging method in nonlinear dynamics to understand the working of our control scheme. We also develop a Markov model to characterize the transient time required for inducing ILMs.

  13. Multicell actuator based on a sliding mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, O.; Barbot, J.-P.; Hilairet, M.

    2008-08-01

    This paper deals with reliability of motor drive systems. It focuses on the switching power converter which is the weakest drive part. It investigates a new architecture which provides intrinsic redundancy. The method used in this fault switch detection and diagnosis is based on a sliding mode observer. The original aspect of this new approach is that the observer influences the control algorithm in order to rule out or accept the possibility of the device failure. This leads to the right decision which induces the rebuilding of the converter topology. This fault tolerant control strategy assures continuous operation even though one switch failure occurs. This article has been submitted as part of “IET Colloquium on Reliability in Electromagnetic Systems”, 24 and 25 May 2007, Paris

  14. Second order sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    PubMed

    Zheng, En-Hui; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Luo, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    A method based on second order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed to design controllers for a small quadrotor UAV. For the switching sliding manifold design, the selection of the coefficients of the switching sliding manifold is in general a sophisticated issue because the coefficients are nonlinear. In this work, in order to perform the position and attitude tracking control of the quadrotor perfectly, the dynamical model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. For the former, a sliding manifold is defined by combining the position and velocity tracking errors of one state variable, i.e., the sliding manifold has two coefficients. For the latter, a sliding manifold is constructed via a linear combination of position and velocity tracking errors of two state variables, i.e., the sliding manifold has four coefficients. In order to further obtain the nonlinear coefficients of the sliding manifold, Hurwitz stability analysis is used to the solving process. In addition, the flight controllers are derived by using Lyapunov theory, which guarantees that all system state trajectories reach and stay on the sliding surfaces. Extensive simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  15. Active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Poinsot, T.; Candel, S.

    1987-12-01

    The principle of 'antisound' is used to construct a method for the suppression of combustion instabilities. This active instability control (AIC) method uses external acoustic excitation by a loudspeaker to suppress the oscillations of a flame. The excitation signal is provided by a microphone located upstream of the flame. This signal is filtered, processed, amplified, and sent to the loudspeaker. The AIC method is validated on a laboratory combustor. It allows the suppression of all unstable modes of the burner for any operating ratio. The influence of the microphone and loudspeaker locations on the performance of the AIC system is described. For a given configuration, domains of stability, i.e., domains where the AIC system parameters provide suppression of the oscillation, are investigated. Measurements of the electric input of the loudspeaker show that the energy consumption of the AIC system is almost negligible and suggest that this method could be used for industrial combustor stabilization. Finally, a simple model describing the effects of the AIC system is developed and its results compared to the experiment.

  16. Active/passive mode-locked laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Fountain, William D.; Johnson, Bertram C.

    1977-01-01

    A Q-switched/mode-locked Nd:YAG laser oscillator employing simultaneous active (electro-optic) and passive (saturable absorber) loss modulation within the optical cavity is described. This "dual modulation" oscillator can produce transform-limited pulses of duration ranging from about 30 psec to about 5 nsec with greatly improved stability compared to other mode-locked systems. The pulses produced by this system lack intrapulse frequency or amplitude modulation, and hence are idealy suited for amplification to high energies and for other applications where well-defined pulses are required. Also, the pulses of this system have excellent interpulse characteristics, wherein the optical noise between the individual pulses of the pulse train has a power level well below the power of the peak pulse of the train.

  17. Improved feedback control of wall-stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Rhodes, D. J.; Hughes, P. E.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    The HBT-EP tokamak can excite strong, saturated kink modes whose growth rates and rotation frequencies evolve on a millisecond timescale. To control such modes, HBT-EP uses a GPU-based feedback system in a low latency architecture. When feedback is applied, the mode amplitude and rotation frequency can change quickly. We describe an improved algorithm that captures the rapid phase changes in the mode while also removing transient amplitude jumps. Additionally, the control coil driving signal is implemented using a current-controller instead of a voltage-controller. The feedback performance is improved and has been tested under more unstable regimes, including different wall configurations and plasmas slowed by a bias probe. Feedback suppression is observed in all cases and the feedback parameters' dependency on different experimental conditions is studied. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  18. Control Strategies for HCCI Mixed-Mode Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean

    2010-03-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to expand the operational range of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mixed-mode combustion for gasoline en-gines. ORNL has extensive experience in the analysis, interpretation, and control of dynamic engine phenomena, and Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain compo-nents and subsystems. The partnership of these knowledge bases was important to address criti-cal barriers associated with the realistic implementation of HCCI and enabling clean, efficient operation for the next generation of transportation engines. The foundation of this CRADA was established through the analysis of spark-assisted HCCI data from a single-cylinder research engine. This data was used to (1) establish a conceptual kinetic model to better understand and predict the development of combustion instabilities, (2) develop a low-order model framework suitable for real-time controls, and (3) provide guidance in the initial definition of engine valve strategies for achieving HCCI operation. The next phase focused on the development of a new combustion metric for real-time characterization of the combustion process. Rapid feedback on the state of the combustion process is critical to high-speed decision making for predictive control. Simultaneous to the modeling/analysis studies, Delphi was focused on the development of engine hardware and the engine management system. This included custom Delphi hardware and control systems allowing for flexible control of the valvetrain sys-tem to enable HCCI operation. The final phase of this CRADA included the demonstration of conventional and spark assisted HCCI on the multi-cylinder engine as well as the characterization of combustion instabilities, which govern the operational boundaries of this mode of combustion. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout this project. Meetings were held on a bi-weekly basis with additional reports, presentation, and

  19. Hybrid neural network fraction integral terminal sliding mode control of an Inchworm robot manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mehran; Ghanbari, Ahmad; Ettefagh, Mir Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes a control scheme based on the fraction integral terminal sliding mode control and adaptive neural network. It deals with the system model uncertainties and the disturbances to improve the control performance of the Inchworm robot manipulator. A fraction integral terminal sliding mode control applies to the Inchworm robot manipulator to obtain the initial stability. Also, an adaptive neural network is designed to approximate the system uncertainties and unknown disturbances to reduce chattering phenomena. The weight matrix of the proposed adaptive neural network can be updated online, according to the current state error information. The stability of the proposed control method is proved by Lyapunov theory. The performance of the adaptive neural network fraction integral terminal sliding mode control is compared with three other conventional controllers such as sliding mode control, integral terminal sliding mode control and fraction integral terminal sliding mode control. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  20. Optimization of Feedback Control Coils for Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    1999-11-01

    Recent experiments in DIII--D on Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) stabilization with active feedback have been very promising. We investigated extensions to the sensor and control coil set that would further improve RWM stabilization. The VALEN computer code models the RWM as an equivalent current distribution on the unperturbed plasma boundary which duplicates the plasma external magnetic field of the mode, as calculated by GATO. This surface current determines the plasma interaction with all conducting structures. In three dimensions the VALEN code models the unstable plasma, passive structure, proposed sensors, and proposed control coils together with the control logic. The problem may be examined as a transient simulation, or for a linear power supply model, as an eigenvalue calculation. A summary of the configurations examined and their predicted effectiveness will be presented.

  1. Actively mode-locked fiber laser using acousto-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikodem, Michal P.; Sergeant, Hendrik; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years we have observed growing interest in mode-locked fiber lasers. Development of erbium doped fiber (EDF) amplifiers and WDM technique made 3rd telecommunication window extremely interesting region for ultrafast optics. The main advantages of fiber lasers i.e. narrow linewidth and wide gain bandwidth make them very attractive sources in various applications. In this paper we present an actively mode-locked erbium doped fiber ring laser. Modelocking is obtained using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) coupled into the laser cavity. The impact of different parameters (e.g. light polarization, modulation frequency) is investigated. We study mechanisms of controlling the wavelength of the laser.

  2. Flight Control Design for an Autonomous Rotorcraft Using Pseudo-Sliding Mode Control and Waypoint Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallory, Nicolas Joseph

    The design of robust automated flight control systems for aircraft of varying size and complexity is a topic of continuing interest for both military and civilian industries. By merging the benefits of robustness from sliding mode control (SMC) with the familiarity and transparency of design tradeoff offered by frequency domain approaches, this thesis presents pseudo-sliding mode control as a viable option for designing automated flight control systems for complex six degree-of-freedom aircraft. The infinite frequency control switching of SMC is replaced, by necessity, with control inputs that are continuous in nature. An introduction to SMC theory is presented, followed by a detailed design of a pseudo-sliding mode control and automated flight control system for a six degree-of-freedom model of a Hughes OH6 helicopter. This model is then controlled through three different waypoint missions that demonstrate the stability of the system and the aircraft's ability to follow certain maneuvers despite time delays, large changes in model parameters and vehicle dynamics, actuator dynamics, sensor noise, and atmospheric disturbances.

  3. Actively Controlling Buffet-Induced Excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Galea, Stephen C.; Manokaran, Donald S.; Zimcik, David G.; Wickramasinghe, Viresh; Pitt, Dale M.; Gamble, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    High performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails, encounter unsteady buffet loads when flying at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. An international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States, conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) contributed resources toward a program that coalesced a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration. The research team investigated the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads by applying advanced directional piezoelectric actuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers, and advanced control strategies on an F/A-18 aircraft empennage. Some results of the full-scale investigation are presented herein.

  4. Optical multistability and Fano line-shape control via mode coupling in whispering-gallery-mode microresonator optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Suzhen; Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Wang, Wei; Wu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    We study a three-mode (i.e., a clockwise mode, a counterclockwise mode, and a mechanical mode) coherent coupling regime of the optical whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonator optomechanical system by considering a pair of counterpropagating modes in a general case. The WGM microresonator is coherently driven by a strong control laser field and a relatively weak probe laser field via a tapered fiber. The system parameters utilized to explore this process correspond to experimentally demonstrated values in the WGM microresonator optomechanical systems. By properly adjusting the coupling rate of these two counterpropagating modes in the WGM microresonator, the steady-state displacement behaviors of the mechanical oscillation and the normalized power transmission and reflection spectra of the output fields are analyzed in detail. It is found that the mode coupling plays a crucial role in rich line-shape structures. Some interesting phenomena of the system, including optical multistability and sharp asymmetric Fano-shape optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT), can be generated with a large degree of control and tunability. Our obtained results in this study can be used for designing efficient all-optical switching and high-sensitivity sensor. PMID:28045120

  5. Optical multistability and Fano line-shape control via mode coupling in whispering-gallery-mode microresonator optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Suzhen; Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Wang, Wei; Wu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    We study a three-mode (i.e., a clockwise mode, a counterclockwise mode, and a mechanical mode) coherent coupling regime of the optical whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonator optomechanical system by considering a pair of counterpropagating modes in a general case. The WGM microresonator is coherently driven by a strong control laser field and a relatively weak probe laser field via a tapered fiber. The system parameters utilized to explore this process correspond to experimentally demonstrated values in the WGM microresonator optomechanical systems. By properly adjusting the coupling rate of these two counterpropagating modes in the WGM microresonator, the steady-state displacement behaviors of the mechanical oscillation and the normalized power transmission and reflection spectra of the output fields are analyzed in detail. It is found that the mode coupling plays a crucial role in rich line-shape structures. Some interesting phenomena of the system, including optical multistability and sharp asymmetric Fano-shape optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT), can be generated with a large degree of control and tunability. Our obtained results in this study can be used for designing efficient all-optical switching and high-sensitivity sensor.

  6. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  7. Mode Orientation Control For Sapphire Dielectric Ring Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, David G.; Dick, G. John; Prata, Aluizio

    1996-01-01

    Small sapphire tuning wedge used in technique for solving mode-purity problem associated with sapphire dielectric-ring resonator part of cryogenic microwave frequency discriminator. Breaks quasi-degeneracy of two modes and allows selective coupling to just one mode. Wedge mounted on axle entering resonator cavity and rotated while resonator cryogenically operating in vacuum. Furthermore, axle moved vertically to tune resonant frequency.

  8. Speed tracking and synchronization of multiple motors using ring coupling control and adaptive sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Li, Le-Bao; Sun, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Sheng-Zhou; Yang, Qing-Quan

    2015-09-01

    A new control approach for speed tracking and synchronization of multiple motors is developed, by incorporating an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) technique into a ring coupling synchronization control structure. This control approach can stabilize speed tracking of each motor and synchronize its motion with other motors' motion so that speed tracking errors and synchronization errors converge to zero. Moreover, an adaptive law is exploited to estimate the unknown bound of uncertainty, which is obtained in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem to minimize the control effort and attenuate chattering. Performance comparisons with parallel control, relative coupling control and conventional PI control are investigated on a four-motor synchronization control system. Extensive simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  9. Generalized Predictive Control of Dynamic Systems with Rigid-Body Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations to assess the effectiveness of Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) for active control of dynamic systems having rigid-body modes are presented. GPC is a linear, time-invariant, multi-input/multi-output predictive control method that uses an ARX model to characterize the system and to design the controller. Although the method can accommodate both embedded (implicit) and explicit feedforward paths for incorporation of disturbance effects, only the case of embedded feedforward in which the disturbances are assumed to be unknown is considered here. Results from numerical simulations using mathematical models of both a free-free three-degree-of-freedom mass-spring-dashpot system and the XV-15 tiltrotor research aircraft are presented. In regulation mode operation, which calls for zero system response in the presence of disturbances, the simulations showed reductions of nearly 100%. In tracking mode operations, where the system is commanded to follow a specified path, the GPC controllers produced the desired responses, even in the presence of disturbances.

  10. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  11. Active lower order mode damping for the four rod LHC crab cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, A. C.; Burt, G.; Apsimon, R.

    2017-02-01

    The high luminosity upgrade planned for the LHC requires crab cavities to rotate bunches into alignment at the interaction points. They compensate for a crossing angle near 500 μ r ad . It is anticipated that four crab cavities in succession will be utilized to achieve this rotation on either side of each IP in a local crossing scheme. A crab cavity operates in a dipole mode but always has an accelerating mode that may be above or below the frequency of the operating mode. Crab cavities are given couplers to ensure that unwanted acceleration modes are strongly damped however employing standard practice these unwanted modes will always have some level of excitation. Where this excitation has a random phase it might promote bunch growth and limit beam lifetime. This paper sets out a method for active control of the phase and amplitude of the unwanted lowest accelerating mode in the crab cavities. The paper investigates the level of suppression that can be achieved as a function cavity quality factor and proximity to resonance.

  12. Fault tolerant control based on interval type-2 fuzzy sliding mode controller for coaxial trirotor aircraft.

    PubMed

    Zeghlache, Samir; Kara, Kamel; Saigaa, Djamel

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a robust controller for a Six Degrees of Freedom (6 DOF) coaxial trirotor helicopter control is proposed in presence of defects in the system. A control strategy based on the coupling of the interval type-2 fuzzy logic control and sliding mode control technique are used to design a controller. The main purpose of this work is to eliminate the chattering phenomenon and guaranteeing the stability and the robustness of the system. In order to achieve this goal, interval type-2 fuzzy logic control has been used to generate the discontinuous control signal. The simulation results have shown that the proposed control strategy can greatly alleviate the chattering effect, and perform good reference tracking in presence of defects in the system.

  13. Third-order voltage-mode active-C band pass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Ashish; Ghosh, Mourina; Paul, Sajal K.

    2015-05-01

    In this research article, a new third-order voltage-mode active-C asymmetrical band pass filter is proposed. It uses three numbers of current-controlled current conveyors and three numbers of equal-valued capacitors. The topology has the following important features: uses only three active elements, uses three capacitors, uses all grounded capacitors and no resistor is suitable for integrated circuit design, there is no matching constraint, high input impedance, low output impedance, central frequency can easily be electronically controlled by bias current, and frequency response is asymmetrical in nature. The application of the proposed topology in the realisation of a voltage-mode sixth-order symmetrical band pass filter has been demonstrated. The workability of the proposed topology and sixth-order filter has been confirmed by simulation results using 0.35-µm Austria Micro Systems complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology.

  14. Singularity-free integral-augmented sliding mode control for combined energy and attitude control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshghi, Samira; Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2017-01-01

    A combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is a synergized system in which flywheels are used as attitude control actuators and simultaneously as a power storage system. This paper, a subsequent to previous research on CEACS, addresses the attitude-tracking problem. Integral Augmented Sliding Mode Control with Boundary-Layer (IASMC-BL), a locally asymptotically stable controller, is developed to provide a robust and accurate solution for the CEACS's attitude-tracking problem. The controller alleviates the chattering phenomenon associated with the sliding mode using a boundary-layer technique. Simultaneously, it reduces the steady-state error using an integral action. This paper highlights the uncertainty of inertia matrix as a contributing factor to singularity problem. The inversion of the uncertain inertia matrix in simulation of a spacecraft dynamics is also identified as a leading factor to a singular situation. Therefore, an avoidance strategy is proposed in this paper to guarantee a singular-free dynamics behavior in faces of the uncertainties. This maiden work attempts to employ the singularity-free Integral Augmented Sliding Mode Control with Boundary-Layer (IASMC-BL) to provide a robust, accurate and nonsingular attitude-tracking solution for CEACS.

  15. Sliding-Mode Control Applied for Robust Control of a Highly Unstable Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, Travis Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    An investigation into the application of an observer based sliding mode controller for robust control of a highly unstable aircraft and methods of compensating for actuator dynamics is performed. After a brief overview of some reconfigurable controllers, sliding mode control (SMC) is selected because of its invariance properties and lack of need for parameter identification. SMC is reviewed and issues with parasitic dynamics, which cause system instability, are addressed. Utilizing sliding manifold boundary layers, the nonlinear control is converted to a linear control and sliding manifold design is performed in the frequency domain. An additional feedback form of model reference hedging is employed which is similar to a prefilter and has large benefits to system performance. The effects of inclusion of actuator dynamics into the designed plant is heavily investigated. Multiple Simulink models of the full longitudinal dynamics and wing deflection modes of the forward swept aero elastic vehicle (FSAV) are constructed. Additionally a linear state space models to analyze effects from various system parameters. The FSAV has a pole at +7 rad/sec and is non-minimum phase. The use of 'model actuators' in the feedback path, and varying there design, is heavily investigated for the resulting effects on plant robustness and tolerance to actuator failure. The use of redundant actuators is also explored and improved robustness is shown. All models are simulated with severe failure and excellent tracking, and task dependent handling qualities, and low pilot induced oscillation tendency is shown.

  16. Time-scaling based sliding mode control for Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation under uncertain relative degrees.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tiago Roux; Costa, Luiz Rennó; Catunda, João Marcos Yamasaki; Pino, Alexandre Visintainer; Barbosa, William; Souza, Márcio Nogueira de

    2017-03-28

    This paper addresses the application of the sliding mode approach to control the arm movements by artificial recruitment of muscles using Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES). Such a technique allows the activation of motor nerves using surface electrodes. The goal of the proposed control system is to move the upper limbs of subjects through electrical stimulation to achieve a desired elbow angular displacement. Since the human neuro-motor system has individual characteristics, being time-varying, nonlinear and subject to uncertainties, the use of advanced robust control schemes may represent a better solution than classical Proportional-Integral (PI) controllers and model-based approaches, being simpler than more sophisticated strategies using fuzzy logic or neural networks usually applied in this control problem. The objective is the introduction of a new time-scaling base sliding mode control (SMC) strategy for NMES and its experimental evaluation. The main qualitative advantages of the proposed controller via time-scaling procedure are its independence of the knowledge of the plant relative degree and the design/tuning simplicity. The developed sliding mode strategy allows for chattering alleviation due to the impact of the integrator in smoothing the control signal. In addition, no differentiator is applied to construct the sliding surface. The stability analysis of the closed-loop system is also carried out by using singular perturbation methods. Experimental results are conducted with healthy volunteers as well as stroke patients. Quantitative results show a reduction of 45% in terms of root mean square (RMS) error (from 5.9° to [Formula: see text] ) in comparison with PI control scheme, which is similar to that obtained in the literature.

  17. Predicting the secondary dynamic mode interference phenomenon in thermoacoustic instability control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalluhoglu, Umut; Olgac, Nejat

    2016-07-01

    This paper brings a novel mathematical perspective in assessing the rise of the secondary dynamic modes to prominence during the suppression of thermoacoustic instability. This phenomenon is observed by many earlier investigators; however, without a complete analytical reasoning. We consider a Rijke tube with both a passive Helmholtz resonator and an active feedback control to suppress instabilities. The core dynamics is represented as a linear time-invariant multiple time-delay system of neutral type. Parametric stability of the resulting infinite-dimensional dynamics is investigated using a recent analytical tool: cluster treatment of characteristic roots paradigm. This tool reveals the stability outlook of such systems exhaustively and non-conservatively in the parameter space of the system. First, we examine the stability with and without the Helmholtz resonator. We then select an unstable operation for the resonator-mounted Rijke tube, impose a time-delayed integral feedback control over it and reveal the stabilizing controller parameters using the cluster treatment of characteristic roots methodology. When high control gains are inappropriately selected, the new analytical procedure declares how the secondary dynamic modes of the system exhibit instability although the initially unstable mode is now stabilized. All of these stability assessments are cross-validated using experimental results from a laboratory-scale Rijke tube set-up.

  18. A new optimal sliding mode controller design using scalar sign function.

    PubMed

    Singla, Mithun; Shieh, Leang-San; Song, Gangbing; Xie, Linbo; Zhang, Yongpeng

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a new optimal sliding mode controller using the scalar sign function method. A smooth, continuous-time scalar sign function is used to replace the discontinuous switching function in the design of a sliding mode controller. The proposed sliding mode controller is designed using an optimal Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) approach. The sliding surface of the system is designed using stable eigenvectors and the scalar sign function. Controller simulations are compared with another existing optimal sliding mode controller. To test the effectiveness of the proposed controller, the controller is implemented on an aluminum beam with piezoceramic sensor and actuator for vibration control. This paper includes the control design and stability analysis of the new optimal sliding mode controller, followed by simulation and experimental results. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed approach is very effective.

  19. Mean deviation coupling synchronous control for multiple motors via second-order adaptive sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Li, Lebao; Sun, Lingling; Zhang, Shengzhou

    2016-05-01

    A new mean deviation coupling synchronization control strategy is developed for multiple motor control systems, which can guarantee the synchronization performance of multiple motor control systems and reduce complexity of the control structure with the increasing number of motors. The mean deviation coupling synchronization control architecture combining second-order adaptive sliding mode control (SOASMC) approach is proposed, which can improve synchronization control precision of multiple motor control systems and make speed tracking errors, mean speed errors of each motor and speed synchronization errors converge to zero rapidly. The proposed control scheme is robustness to parameter variations and random external disturbances and can alleviate the chattering phenomena. Moreover, an adaptive law is employed to estimate the unknown bound of uncertainty, which is obtained in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem to minimize the control effort. Performance comparisons with master-slave control, relative coupling control, ring coupling control, conventional PI control and SMC are investigated on a four-motor synchronization control system. Extensive comparative results are given to shown the good performance of the proposed control scheme.

  20. Active control of transmitted sound in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompsett, Russell Harvey George

    The problem of noise from neighbours has increased dramatically over the last few years. Many of the noise complaints are due to the high level, low frequency noise from modern stereo equipment, and are often described in terms of the low frequency characteristics of the music; the repetitive, booming, bass beat. The objective of this research was to establish the feasibility of applying active noise control to alleviate this problem. The initial approach was to evaluate the possibility of exploiting the dominance of individual modes in the response of rooms at low frequency to effect global control. However, initial investigations using a modal model of the sound field revealed that this would be difficult due to the contribution of many acoustic modes excited off resonance. This conclusion was supported by measurements of acoustic room responses in typical buildings, illustrating a non-resonant characteristic. Consequently, attention was turned to the feasibility of using local active control systems to create zones of quiet by concentrating control at a specific location near the observers ears, for example in a seat headrest, or near the pillows of a bed. The lack of a reference signal in either approach requires the use of a feedback control strategy. With a typically non-resonant system, the predictability in the disturbance necessary for successful feedback control must be contained in the primary excitation, namely the music. Examples of different music styles were investigated and of those with the potential to be a nuisance surprisingly few were significantly more predictable than a random disturbance. As expected the most encouraging control performance simulations were found for modern dance music, with a strong repetitive beat. A real-time, local controller was demonstrated in the laboratory with such a disturbance signal and the properties of the quiet zone were measured. The subjective response when hearing the controller in operation was found to be

  1. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  2. Active control of sound transmission using structural modal filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaizuka, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Nobuo; Nakano, Kimihiko

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses active sound transmission control based on structural sensors and actuators. The proposed methodology is to independently measure and control the targeted structural modes, which significantly contribute to sound transmission, with structural modal filters, i.e., modal sensors and modal actuators. The targeting is performed by using modal sound transmission coefficients before control as the criteria. The modal sound transmission coefficient enables the contribution from a structural mode to the sound transmission via the modal interaction with the other structural modes to be determined. The structural modal filters effectively facilitate decreasing the sound transmission and guarantee that the structural vibration and near-field sound, side effects of sound transmission control, will not increase. It is shown with numerical examples that sound transmission can be reduced significantly in a broad frequency band by controlling a small number of structural modes and neither the structural vibration nor near-field sound are increased.

  3. The salience network causally influences default mode network activity during moral reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Stephen M.; D’Esposito, Mark; Kayser, Andrew S.; Grossman, Scott N.; Poorzand, Pardis; Seeley, William W.; Miller, Bruce L.; Rankin, Katherine P.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale brain networks are integral to the coordination of human behaviour, and their anatomy provides insights into the clinical presentation and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease, which targets the default mode network, and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, which targets a more anterior salience network. Although the default mode network is recruited when healthy subjects deliberate about ‘personal’ moral dilemmas, patients with Alzheimer’s disease give normal responses to these dilemmas whereas patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia give abnormal responses to these dilemmas. We hypothesized that this apparent discrepancy between activation- and patient-based studies of moral reasoning might reflect a modulatory role for the salience network in regulating default mode network activation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging to characterize network activity of patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and healthy control subjects, we present four converging lines of evidence supporting a causal influence from the salience network to the default mode network during moral reasoning. First, as previously reported, the default mode network is recruited when healthy subjects deliberate about ‘personal’ moral dilemmas, but patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia producing atrophy in the salience network give abnormally utilitarian responses to these dilemmas. Second, patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia have reduced recruitment of the default mode network compared with healthy control subjects when deliberating about these dilemmas. Third, a Granger causality analysis of functional neuroimaging data from healthy control subjects demonstrates directed functional connectivity from nodes of the salience network to nodes of the default mode network during moral reasoning. Fourth, this Granger causal influence is diminished in

  4. Designing a robust minimum variance controller using discrete slide mode controller approach.

    PubMed

    Alipouri, Yousef; Poshtan, Javad

    2013-03-01

    Designing minimum variance controllers (MVC) for nonlinear systems is confronted with many difficulties. The methods able to identify MIMO nonlinear systems are scarce. Harsh control signals produced by MVC are among other disadvantages of this controller. Besides, MVC is not a robust controller. In this article, the Vector ARX (VARX) model is used for simultaneously modeling the system and disturbance in order to tackle these disadvantages. For ensuring the robustness of the control loop, the discrete slide mode controller design approach is used in designing MVC and generalized MVC (GMVC). The proposed method for controller design is tested on a nonlinear experimental Four-Tank benchmark process and is compared with nonlinear MVCs designed by neural networks. In spite of the simplicity of designing GMVCs for the VARX models with uncertainty, the results show that the proposed method is accurate and implementable.

  5. Diagnostic for two-mode variable valve activation device

    SciTech Connect

    Fedewa, Andrew M

    2014-01-07

    A method is provided for diagnosing a multi-mode valve train device which selectively provides high lift and low lift to a combustion valve of an internal combustion engine having a camshaft phaser actuated by an electric motor. The method includes applying a variable electric current to the electric motor to achieve a desired camshaft phaser operational mode and commanding the multi-mode valve train device to a desired valve train device operational mode selected from a high lift mode and a low lift mode. The method also includes monitoring the variable electric current and calculating a first characteristic of the parameter. The method also includes comparing the calculated first characteristic against a predetermined value of the first characteristic measured when the multi-mode valve train device is known to be in the desired valve train device operational mode.

  6. Mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry and Cyt toxins and their potential for insect control.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario

    2007-03-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal (Cry) and Cytolitic (Cyt) protein families are a diverse group of proteins with activity against insects of different orders--Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera and also against other invertebrates such as nematodes. Their primary action is to lyse midgut epithelial cells by inserting into the target membrane and forming pores. Among this group of proteins, members of the 3-Domain Cry family are used worldwide for insect control, and their mode of action has been characterized in some detail. Phylogenetic analyses established that the diversity of the 3-Domain Cry family evolved by the independent evolution of the three domains and by swapping of domain III among toxins. Like other pore-forming toxins (PFT) that affect mammals, Cry toxins interact with specific receptors located on the host cell surface and are activated by host proteases following receptor binding resulting in the formation of a pre-pore oligomeric structure that is insertion competent. In contrast, Cyt toxins directly interact with membrane lipids and insert into the membrane. Recent evidence suggests that Cyt synergize or overcome resistance to mosquitocidal-Cry proteins by functioning as a Cry-membrane bound receptor. In this review we summarize recent findings on the mode of action of Cry and Cyt toxins, and compare them to the mode of action of other bacterial PFT. Also, we discuss their use in the control of agricultural insect pests and insect vectors of human diseases.

  7. Default-mode-like network activation in awake rodents.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Baker, Scott J; Chandran, Prasant; Miller, Loan; Lee, Younglim; Marek, Gerard J; Sakoglu, Unal; Chin, Chih-Liang; Luo, Feng; Fox, Gerard B; Day, Mark

    2011-01-01

    During wakefulness and in absence of performing tasks or sensory processing, the default-mode network (DMN), an intrinsic central nervous system (CNS) network, is in an active state. Non-human primate and human CNS imaging studies have identified the DMN in these two species. Clinical imaging studies have shown that the pattern of activity within the DMN is often modulated in various disease states (e.g., Alzheimer's, schizophrenia or chronic pain). However, whether the DMN exists in awake rodents has not been characterized. The current data provides evidence that awake rodents also possess 'DMN-like' functional connectivity, but only subsequent to habituation to what is initially a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment as well as physical restraint. Specifically, the habituation process spanned across four separate scanning sessions (Day 2, 4, 6 and 8). At Day 8, significant (p<0.05) functional connectivity was observed amongst structures such as the anterior cingulate (seed region), retrosplenial, parietal, and hippocampal cortices. Prior to habituation (Day 2), functional connectivity was only detected (p<0.05) amongst CNS structures known to mediate anxiety (i.e., anterior cingulate (seed region), posterior hypothalamic area, amygdala and parabracial nucleus). In relating functional connectivity between cingulate-default-mode and cingulate-anxiety structures across Days 2-8, a significant inverse relationship (r = -0.65, p = 0.0004) was observed between these two functional interactions such that increased cingulate-DMN connectivity corresponded to decreased cingulate anxiety network connectivity. This investigation demonstrates that the cingulate is an important component of both the rodent DMN-like and anxiety networks.

  8. 75 FR 77569 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System Mode...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System Mode Annunciation AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... design features include an electronic flight control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do... system. This system provides an electronic interface between the pilot's flight controls and ] the...

  9. Active Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in Low Rotation, High Beta NSTX Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.

    2006-10-01

    An active feedback system to stabilize the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is used to maintain plasma stability for greater than 90 RWM growth times. These experiments are the first to demonstrate RWM active stabilization in high beta, low aspect ratio tokamak plasmas with toroidal plasma rotation significantly below the critical rotation profile for passive stability and in the range predicted for ITER. Actively stabilized, low rotation plasmas reached normalized beta of 5.6, and the ratio of normalized beta to the toroidal mode number, n = 1 and 2 ideal no-wall stability limits reached 1.2 and 1.15 respectively, determined by DCON stability analysis of the time-evolving reconstructed experimental equilibria. The significant, controlled reduction of the plasma rotation to less than one percent of the Alfven speed was produced by non-resonant magnetic braking by an applied n = 3 field. The observed plasma rotation damping is in quantitative agreement with neoclassical toroidal viscosity theory including trapped particle effects [1]. The active stabilization system employs a mode control algorithm using RWM sensor input analyzed to distinguish the amplitude and phase of the n = 1 mode. During n = 1 stabilization, the n = 2 mode amplitude increases and surpasses the n = 1 amplitude, but the mode remains stable. By varying the system gain, and relative phase between the measured n = 1 RWM phase and the applied control field, both positive and negative feedback were demonstrated. Contrary to past experience in moderate aspect ratio tokamaks with poloidally continuous stabilizing structure, the RWM can become unstable in certain cases by deforming poloidally, an important consideration for feedback system sensor and control coil design in future devices such as ITER and KSTAR. **In collaboration with R.E. Bell, J.E. Menard, D.A. Gates, A.C. Sontag, J.M. Bialek, B.P. LeBlanc, F.M. Levinton, K. Tritz, H. Yuh. [1] W. Zhu, S

  10. Frequency-Shaped Sliding Mode Control for Rudder Roll Damping System of Robotic Boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xinping; Yu, Zhenyu; Nonami, Kenzo

    In this paper, a robotic boat model of combined yaw and roll rate is obtained by a system identification approach. The identified system is designed with frequency-shaped sliding mode control. The control scheme is composed of a sliding mode observer and a sliding mode controller. The stability and reachability of the switching function are proved by Lyapunov theory. Computer simulations and experiment carried out at INAGE offshore show that successful course keeping and roll reduction results are achieved.

  11. Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discusses active control of turbine tip clearance from a control systems perspective. It is a subset of charts that were presented at the 2003 meeting of the International Society of Air Breathing Engines which was held August 31 through September 5 in Cleveland, Ohio. The associated reference paper is cited at the end of the presentation. The presentation describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, it is believed that the technologies developed as part of this research will benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first part of the presentation discusses the concept of tip clearance, problems associated with it, and the benefits of controlling it. It lays out a framework for implementing tip clearance controls that enables the implementation to progress from purely analytical to hardware-in-the-loop to fully experimental. And it briefly discusses how the technologies developed will be married to the previously described ACC Test Rig for hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations. The final portion of the presentation, describes one of the key technologies in some detail by presenting equations and results for a functional dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena. As shown, the model exhibits many of the clearance dynamics found in commercial gas turbine engines. However, initial attempts to validate the model identified limitations that are being addressed to make the model more realistic.

  12. Modes of hurricane activity variability in the eastern Pacific: Implications for the 2016 season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucharel, Julien; Jin, Fei-Fei; England, Matthew H.; Lin, I. I.

    2016-11-01

    A gridded product of accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) in the eastern Pacific is constructed to assess the dominant mode of tropical cyclone (TC) activity variability. Results of an empirical orthogonal function decomposition and regression analysis of environmental variables indicate that the two dominant modes of ACE variability (40% of the total variance) are related to different flavors of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The first mode, more active during the later part of the hurricane season (September-November), is linked to the eastern Pacific El Niño through the delayed oceanic control associated with the recharge-discharge mechanism. The second mode, dominant in the early months of the hurricane season, is related to the central Pacific El Niño mode and the associated changes in atmospheric variability. A multilinear regression forecast model of the dominant principal components of ACE variability is then constructed. The wintertime subsurface state of the eastern equatorial Pacific (characterizing ENSO heat discharge), the east-west tilt of the thermocline (describing ENSO phase transition), the anomalous ocean surface conditions in the TC region in spring (portraying atmospheric changes induced by persistence of local surface anomalies), and the intraseasonal atmospheric variability in the western Pacific are found to be good predictors of TC activity. Results complement NOAA's official forecast by providing additional spatial and temporal information. They indicate a more active 2016 season ( 2 times the ACE mean) with a spatial expansion into the central Pacific associated with the heat discharge from the 2015/2016 El Niño.

  13. Microgravity Isolation Control System Design Via High-Order Sliding Mode Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shkolnikov, Ilya; Shtessel, Yuri; Whorton, Mark S.; Jackson, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Vibration isolation control system design for a microgravity experiment mount is considered. The controller design based on dynamic sliding manifold (DSM) technique is proposed to attenuate the accelerations transmitted to an isolated experiment mount either from a vibrating base or directly generated by the experiment, as well as to stabilize the internal dynamics of this nonminimum phase plant. An auxiliary DSM is employed to maintain the high-order sliding mode on the primary sliding manifold in the presence of uncertain actuator dynamics of second order. The primary DSM is designed for the closed-loop system in sliding mode to be a filter with given characteristics with respect to the input external disturbances.

  14. Layered mode selection logic control for border security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, T.; Ferrer, G.; Wright, A. M.; Wright, A. B.

    2007-04-01

    Challenges in border security may be resolved through a team of autonomous mobile robots configured as a flexible sensor array. The robots will have a prearranged formation along a section of a border, and each robot will attempt to maintain a uniform distance with its nearest neighbors. The robots will carry sensor packages which can detect a signature that is representative of a human (for instance, a thermal signature). When a robot detects an intruder, it will move away such that it attempts to maintain a constant distance from the intruder and move away from the border (i.e. into its home territory). As the robot moves away from the border, its neighbors will move away from the border to maintain a uniform distance with the moving robot and with their fixed neighbors. The pattern of motion in the team of robots can be identified, either algorithmically by a computer or by a human monitor of a display. Unique patterns are indicative of animal movement, human movement, and mass human movement. To realize such a scheme, a new control architecture must be developed. This architecture must be fault tolerant to sensor and manipulator failures, scalable in number of agents, and adaptable to different robotic base platforms (for instance, a UGV may be appropriate at the southern border and a UAV may be appropriate at the northern border). The Central Arkansas Robotics Consortium has developed an architecture, called Layered Mode Selection Logic (LMSL), which addresses all of these concerns. The overall LMSL scheme as applied to a multi-agent flexible sensor array is described in this paper.

  15. Active Control of Fan-Generated Tone Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment to control the noise radiated from the inlet of a ducted fan using a time domain active adaptive system. The control ,sound source consists of loudspeakers arranged in a ring around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same, when the dominant wave in the duct is a plane wave. The presence of higher order modes in the duct reduces the noise reduction efficiency, particularly near the mode cut-on where the standing wave component is strong, but the control system converges stably. The control system is stable and converges when the first circumferential mode is generated in the duct. The control system is found to reduce the fan noise in the far field on an arc around the fan inlet by as much as 20 dB with none of the sound amplification associated with mode spillover.

  16. Telerobotic hand controller study of force reflection with position control mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, Kelli F.; Hankins, Walter W.; Morris, A. Terry; Mixon, Randolph W.

    1992-01-01

    To gain further information about the effectiveness of kinesthetic force feedback or force reflection in position control mode for a telerobot, two Space Station related tasks were performed by eight subjects with and without the use of force reflection. Both time and subjective responses were measured. No differences due to force were found, however, other differences were found, e.g., gender. Comparisons of these results with other studies are discussed.

  17. Sliding mode control of magnetic suspensions for precision pointing and tracking applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misovec, Kathleen M.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Johnson, Bruce G.; Hedrick, J. Karl

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed nonlinear control method, sliding mode control, is examined as a means of advancing the achievable performance of space-based precision pointing and tracking systems that use nonlinear magnetic actuators. Analytic results indicate that sliding mode control improves performance compared to linear control approaches. In order to realize these performance improvements, precise knowledge of the plant is required. Additionally, the interaction of an estimating scheme and the sliding mode controller has not been fully examined in the literature. Estimation schemes were designed for use with this sliding mode controller that do not seriously degrade system performance. The authors designed and built a laboratory testbed to determine the feasibility of utilizing sliding mode control in these types of applications. Using this testbed, experimental verification of the authors' analyses is ongoing.

  18. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-15

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco{sup ®} 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m/n=3/1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  19. Mode of antibacterial activity of Eclalbasaponin isolated from Eclipta alba.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Bharali, P; Konwar, B K

    2013-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the mode of antibacterial activity of Eclalbasaponin isolated from Eclipta alba, against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The probable chemical structure was determined by using various spectroscopic techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and mass spectroscopy. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by well diffusion technique, pH sensitivity, chemotaxis, and crystal violet assays. Eclalbasaponin showed clear zone of inhibition against both Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and exhibited growth inhibition at the pH range of 5.5-9.0. The isolated saponin exhibited its positive chemoattractant property for both bacterial strains. Results of crystal violet assay and the presence of UV-sensitive materials in the cell-free supernatant confirmed the cellular damages caused by the treatment of Eclalbasaponin. The release of intracellular proteins due to the membrane damage was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Changes in the cell surface structure and membrane disruption were further revealed by FTIR and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The present study suggests that the isolated saponin from E. alba causes the disruption of the bacterial cell membrane which leads to the loss of bacterial cell viability.

  20. Impedance Control of the Rehabilitation Robot Based on Sliding Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiawang; Zhou, Zude; Ai, Qingsong

    As an auxiliary treatment, the 6-DOF parallel robot plays an important role in lower limb rehabilitation. In order to improve the efficiency and flexibility of the lower limb rehabilitation training, this paper studies the impedance controller based on the position control. A nonsingular terminal sliding mode control is developed to ensure the trajectory tracking precision and in contrast to traditional PID control strategy in the inner position loop, the system will be more stable. The stability of the system is proved by Lyapunov function to guarantee the convergence of the control errors. Simulation results validate the effectiveness of the target impedance model and show that the parallel robot can adjust gait trajectory online according to the human-machine interaction force to meet the gait request of patients, and changing the impedance parameters can meet the demands of different stages of rehabilitation training.

  1. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  2. Differential activation of the default mode network in jet lagged individuals.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Joana Fernandes; Gonçalves, Oscar Filipe; Maia, Liliana; Fernandes Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Perrone-McGovern, Kristin; Simon-Dack, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kristina; Oliveira-Silva, Patricia; Mesquita, Ana Raquel; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-02-01

    Long-term exposure to transmeridian flights has been shown to impact cognitive functioning. Nevertheless, the immediate effects of jet lag in the activation of specific brain networks have not been investigated. We analyzed the impact of short-term jet lag on the activation of the default mode network (DMN). A group of individuals who were on a transmeridian flight and a control group went through a functional magnetic resonance imaging acquisition. Statistical analysis was performed to test for differences in the DMN activation between groups. Participants from the jet lag group presented decreased activation in the anterior nodes of the DMN, specifically in bilateral medial prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex. No areas of increased activation were observed for the jet lag group. These results may be suggestive of a negative impact of jet lag on important cognitive functions such as introspection, emotional regulation and decision making in a few days after individuals arrive at their destination.

  3. Spatiotemporal Control of Light Transmission through a Multimode Fiber with Strong Mode Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wen; Ambichl, Philipp; Bromberg, Yaron; Redding, Brandon; Rotter, Stefan; Cao, Hui

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally generate and characterize eigenstates of the Wigner-Smith time-delay matrix, called principal modes, in a multimode fiber with strong mode coupling. The unique spectral and temporal properties of principal modes enable global control of temporal dynamics of optical pulses transmitted through the fiber, despite random mode mixing. Our analysis reveals that well-defined delay times of the eigenstates are formed by multipath interference, which can be effectively manipulated by spatial degrees of freedom of input wave fronts. This study is essential to controlling dynamics of wave scattering, paving the way for coherent control of pulse propagation through complex media.

  4. Finite-time control of DC-DC buck converters via integral terminal sliding modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chian-Song; Shen, Chih-Teng

    2012-05-01

    This article presents novel terminal sliding modes for finite-time output tracking control of DC-DC buck converters. Instead of using traditional singular terminal sliding mode, two integral terminal sliding modes are introduced for robust output voltage tracking of uncertain buck converters. Different from traditional sliding mode control (SMC), the proposed controller assures finite convergence time for the tracking error and integral tracking error. Furthermore, the singular problem in traditional terminal SMC is removed from this article. When considering worse modelling, adaptive integral terminal SMC is derived to guarantee finite-time convergence under more relaxed stability conditions. In addition, several experiments show better start-up performance and robustness.

  5. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  6. Nd:YAG laser with passive-active mode-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weijiang; Chen, Zhenlei; Ren, Deming; Qu, Yanchen; Mo, Shuang; Huang, Jinjer; Andreev, Yury M.; Gorobets, Vadim A.; Petukhov, Vladimir O.; Zemlyanov, Aleksei A.

    2008-03-01

    All solid-state flash-lamp pumped passive-active mode-locked Nd3+:YAG laser is designed and experimentally studded. Saturation absorber Cr4+:YAG with initial transparency 25 and 47% are used as a passive Q-switcher and acousto-optical fused quartz modulator as an active mode-locker. Efficient length of the laser cavity with fixed mirror positions (1.45 m spaced) is droved by changes of 100% flat mirror for concave mirrors with different focus lengths. Changeable output mirrors with transparencies of 15 and 50% are used. Driving of the cavity parameters, laser and acousto-optical modulator power supply voltages let us to control output pulse train and single pulse parameters. As it goes from the analyses of oscillograms fixed with pyroelectric detector (τ=0.5 ns) and 1 GHz oscilloscope, over 95% of pulse output energy has been mode-locked. Average duration of the pulse train envelope of 5 to 50 single pulses at FWHM has been droved within 50 to 600 ns. When this single pulse duration is controlled but did not exceed 2 ns.

  7. Volume production of polarization controlled single-mode VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabherr, Martin; King, Roger; Jäger, Roland; Wiedenmann, Dieter; Gerlach, Philipp; Duckeck, Denise; Wimmer, Christian

    2008-02-01

    Over the past 3 years laser based tracking systems for optical PC mice have outnumbered the traditional VCSEL market datacom by far. Whereas VCSEL for datacom in the 850 nm regime emit in multipe transverse modes, all laser based tracking systems demand for single-mode operation which require advanced manufacturing technology. Next generation tracking systems even require single-polarization characteristics in order to avoid unwanted movement of the pointer due to polarization flips. High volume manufacturing and optimized production methods are crucial for achieving the addressed technical and commercial targets of this consumer market. The resulting ideal laser source which emits single-mode and single-polarization at low cost is also a promising platform for further applications like tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) or miniature atomic clocks when adapted to the according wavelengths.

  8. Posture and Vibration Control Based on Virtual Suspension Model Using Sliding Mode Control for Six-Legged Walking Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qingjiu; Fukuhara, Yasuyuki; Chen, Xuedong

    In this paper, we proposed a robust control method based on the virtual suspension model for keeping the posture stability and decreasing the tiny vibration of the robot body when it is walking on irregular terrain. Firstly, we developed a six-legged walking robot for this study based on stable theory of wave gaits and CAD dynamic model. Secondly, in order to keep the posture stability of body when robot walks, we designed a virtual suspension model with one degree of freedom, which has virtual spring and damper, for the direction of the center of gravity, the pitch angle, and the roll angle of body respectively. And then, in order to decrease the tiny vibration of body when robot walks, we proposed an active suspension control by using sliding mode control based on a virtual suspension model. These proposed methods are discussed using the walking experimental results of the developed six-legged walking robot.

  9. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  10. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-08-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  11. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  12. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  13. Batch Mode Active Learning for Regression With Expected Model Change.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wenbin; Zhang, Muhan; Zhang, Ya

    2016-04-20

    While active learning (AL) has been widely studied for classification problems, limited efforts have been done on AL for regression. In this paper, we introduce a new AL framework for regression, expected model change maximization (EMCM), which aims at choosing the unlabeled data instances that result in the maximum change of the current model once labeled. The model change is quantified as the difference between the current model parameters and the updated parameters after the inclusion of the newly selected examples. In light of the stochastic gradient descent learning rule, we approximate the change as the gradient of the loss function with respect to each single candidate instance. Under the EMCM framework, we propose novel AL algorithms for the linear and nonlinear regression models. In addition, by simulating the behavior of the sequential AL policy when applied for k iterations, we further extend the algorithms to batch mode AL to simultaneously choose a set of k most informative instances at each query time. Extensive experimental results on both UCI and StatLib benchmark data sets have demonstrated that the proposed algorithms are highly effective and efficient.

  14. Vibration control of an active mirror pointing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Joseph C.; Huang, Chien Y.; Austin, Fred; Knowles, Gareth J.

    1993-09-01

    An active vibration control experiment for precision mirror pointing using smart structure is described. The setup consists of a flexible plate clamped to the shaft of an electric motor. Part of the plate is polished to reflect a laser beam whose direction accuracy is the performance criterion. Electroceramic actuators and sensors are incorporated into the plate to control vibration. The analytical model is generated using the ANSYS program. Six flexible modes are kept to investigate the interaction between the rigid and the flexible modes. Three different control strategies were examined. The goal is to suppress the first and the second mode with very little spillover effects from other modes. Simulation results show that the performance objectives can be met. These analytical studies are verified in actual experiments in the near future.

  15. Avoidance of Tearing Mode Locking and Disruption with Electro-Magnetic Torque Introduced by Feedback-based Mode Rotation Control in DIII-D and RFX-mod

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, M.; Zanca, P.; Strait, E. J.

    2014-09-01

    Disruptions caused by tearing modes (TMs) are considered to be one of the most critical roadblocks to achieving reliable, steady-state operation of tokamak fusion reactors. Here we have demonstrated a very promising scheme to avoid such disruptions by utilizing the electro-magnetic (EM) torque produced with 3D coils that are available in many tokamaks. In this scheme, the EM torque to the modes is created by a toroidal phase shift between the externally-applied field and the excited TM fields, compensating for the mode momentum loss due to the interaction with the resistive wall and uncorrected error fields. Fine control of torque balance is provided by a feedback scheme. We have explored this approach in two vastly different devices and plasma conditions: DIII-D and RFX-mod operated in tokamak mode. In DIII-D, the plasma target was high βN plasmas in a non-circular divertor tokamak. In RFX-mod, the plasma was ohmically-heated plasma with ultralow safety factor in a circular limiter discharge of active feedback coils outside the thick resistive shell. The DIII-D and RFX-mod experiments showed remarkable consistency with theoretical predictions of torque balance. The application to ignition-oriented devices such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) would expand the horizon of its operational regime. The internal 3D coil set currently under consideration for edge localized mode suppression in ITER would be well suited to this purpose.

  16. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  17. Active Control of Stationary Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Giovanni; Breidenthal, Robert; Bhide, Aditi; Sridhar, Aditya

    2016-11-01

    A system for active stationary vortex control is presented. The system uses a combination of plasma actuators, pressure sensors and electrical circuits deposited on aerodynamic surfaces using printing electronics methods. Once the pressure sensors sense a change on the intensity or on the position of the stationary vortices, its associated controller activates a set of plasma actuator to return the vortices to their original or intended positions. The forces produced by the actuators act on the secondary flow in the transverse plane, where velocities are much less than in the streamwise direction. As a demonstration case, the active vortex control system is mounted on a flat plate under low speed wind tunnel testing. Here, a set of vortex generators are used to generate the stationary vortices and the plasma actuators are used to move them. Preliminary results from the experiments are presented and compared with theoretical values. Thanks to the USAF AFOSR STTR support under contract # FA9550-15-C-0007.

  18. Application of attachment modes in the control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Various ways are examined to obtain reduced order mathematical models of structures for use in dynamic response analyses and in controller design studies. Attachment modes are deflection shapes of a structure subjected to specified unit load distributions. Attachment modes are frequently employed to supplement free-interface normal modes to improve the modeling of components (structures) employed in component mode synthesis analyses. Deflection shapes of structures subjected to generalized loads of some specified distribution and of unit magnitude can also be considered to be attachment modes. Several papers which were written under this contract are summarized herein.

  19. Optimized feedback control system modeling of resistive wall modes for burning plasmas experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, Oksana Nikolaevna

    A numerical study of active feedback control system performance and optimization for tokamak Resistive Wall Modes (RWM) is the subject of this thesis. The ability to accurately model and predict the performance of an active MHD control systems is critical to present and future advanced confinement scenarios and fusion reactor design studies. The computer code VALEN has been designed to calculate the performance of a MHD feedback control system in an arbitrary geometry. The simulation of realistic effects in feedback systems, such as noise, time delays and filters is of particular importance. In this work realistic measurement noise analysis was added to VALEN and used to design the RWM feedback control amplifier power level for the DIII-D experiment. Modern control theory based on a state-space formulation obtained from VALEN was applied to design an Optimal Controller and Observer based on a reduced VALEN model. A quantitative low order model of the VALEN state space was derived from the high dimensional intrinsic state space structure of the VALEN using methods of a balanced realization and matched DC gain truncation. These techniques for the design of an optimal controller and optimal observer were applied to models of the DIII-D and ITER experiments and showed an order of magnitude reduction of the required control coil current and voltage in the presence of white noise as compared to a traditional, classical PID controller. This optimal controller for the ITER burning plasma experiment was robust from the no-wall pressure limit to a pressure value well above those achieved with a classical PID controller and could approach the ideal wall limit.

  20. A coordinated MIMO control design for a power plant using improved sliding mode controller.

    PubMed

    Ataei, Mohammad; Hooshmand, Rahmat-Allah; Samani, Siavash Golmohammadi

    2014-03-01

    For the participation of the steam power plants in regulating the network frequency, boilers and turbines should be co-ordinately controlled in addition to the base load productions. Lack of coordinated control over boiler-turbine may lead to instability; oscillation in producing power and boiler parameters; reduction in the reliability of the unit; and inflicting thermodynamic tension on devices. This paper proposes a boiler-turbine coordinated multivariable control system based on improved sliding mode controller (ISMC). The system controls two main boiler-turbine parameters i.e., the turbine revolution and superheated steam pressure of the boiler output. For this purpose, a comprehensive model of the system including complete and exact description of the subsystems is extracted. The parameters of this model are determined according to our case study that is the 320MW unit of Islam-Abad power plant in Isfahan/Iran. The ISMC method is simulated on the power plant and its performance is compared with the related real PI (proportional-integral) controllers which have been used in this unit. The simulation results show the capability of the proposed controller system in controlling local network frequency and superheated steam pressure in the presence of load variations and disturbances of boiler.

  1. Optimal nonlinear coherent mode transitions in Bose-Einstein condensates utilizing spatiotemporal controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David; Yan, Julia; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-05-01

    Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) offer the potential to examine quantum behavior at large length and time scales, as well as forming promising candidates for quantum technology applications. Thus, the manipulation of BECs using control fields is a topic of prime interest. We consider BECs in the mean-field model of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE), which contains linear and nonlinear features, both of which are subject to control. In this work we report successful optimal control simulations of a one-dimensional GPE by modulation of the linear and nonlinear terms to stimulate transitions into excited coherent modes. The linear and nonlinear controls are allowed to freely vary over space and time to seek their optimal forms. The determination of the excited coherent modes targeted for optimization is numerically performed through an adaptive imaginary time propagation method. Numerical simulations are performed for optimal control of mode-to-mode transitions between the ground coherent mode and the excited modes of a BEC trapped in a harmonic well. The results show greater than 99 % success for nearly all trials utilizing reasonable initial guesses for the controls, and analysis of the optimal controls reveals primarily direct transitions between initial and target modes. The success of using solely the nonlinearity term as a control opens up further research toward exploring novel control mechanisms inaccessible to linear Schrödinger-type systems.

  2. Use of active extracts of poplar buds against Penicillium italicum and possible modes of action.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuzhen; Liu, Limei; Li, Dongmei; Xia, Huan; Su, Xiaojun; Peng, Litao; Pan, Siyi

    2016-04-01

    Antifungal components, from poplar buds active fraction (PBAF) against Penicillium italicum, the causal agent of blue mold in citrus fruits, were identified and possible action modes were investigated. Pinocembrin, chrysin and galangin were determined as active components in PBAF, using HPLC and HPLC-MS analysis. The antifungal activity is stable at temperatures ranging from 4 °C to 100 °C and pH levels ranging from 4 to 8. In the presence of PBAF, the hyphae become shriveled, wrinkled and the cell membrane became seriously disrupted. Further investigation on cell permeability, nucleic acid content and alkaline phosphatase suggest that the cell membrane might be the target. Mycelial oxygen consumption and the respiration-related enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and ATPase were all inhibited by PBAF. We propose that PBAF is a potentially useful alternative for blue mold control and may act against P. italicum by interfering with respiration and disrupting the cell membrane.

  3. Promotion of protein crystal growth by actively switching crystal growth mode via femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Yusuke; Maruyama, Mihoko; Yoshimura, Masashi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Masaru; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-11-01

    Large single crystals with desirable shapes are essential for various scientific and industrial fields, such as X-ray/neutron crystallography and crystalline devices. However, in the case of proteins the production of such crystals is particularly challenging, despite the efforts devoted to optimization of the environmental, chemical and physical parameters. Here we report an innovative approach for promoting the growth of protein crystals by directly modifying the local crystal structure via femtosecond laser ablation. We demonstrate that protein crystals with surfaces that are locally etched (several micrometers in diameter) by femtosecond laser ablation show enhanced growth rates without losing crystal quality. Optical phase-sensitive microscopy and X-ray topography imaging techniques reveal that the local etching induces spiral growth, which is energetically advantageous compared with the spontaneous two-dimensional nucleation growth mode. These findings prove that femtosecond laser ablation can actively switch the crystal growth mode, offering flexible control over the size and shape of protein crystals.

  4. A Sliding Mode Control with Optimized Sliding Surface for Aircraft Pitch Axis Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangchul; Kim, Kwangjin; Kim, Youdan

    A sliding mode controller with an optimized sliding surface is proposed for an aircraft control system. The quadratic type of performance index for minimizing the angle of attack and the angular rate of the aircraft in the longitudinal motion is used to design the sliding surface. For optimization of the sliding surface, a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation is formulated and it is solved through a numerical algorithm using a Generalized HJB (GHJB) equation and the Galerkin spectral method. The solution of this equation denotes a nonlinear sliding surface, on which the trajectory of the system approximately satisfies the optimality condition. Numerical simulation is performed for a nonlinear aircraft model with an optimized sliding surface and a simple linear sliding surface. The simulation result demonstrates that the proposed controller can be effectively applied to the longitudinal maneuver of an aircraft.

  5. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  6. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  7. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  8. Two alternative modes for diffuse pollution control in Wuhan City Zoo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-Feng; Shan, Bao-Qing; Yin, Cheng-Qing; Hu, Cheng-Xiao

    2007-01-01

    Pollution in urban zoos arises from diffuse and small point sources. However, its control has received little attention in past decades. Online and offline modes of ecological engineering technology were designed to control pollution from small point and diffuse sources in Wuhan City Zoo, China. Their characteristics and performances were investigated in sixteen runoff events from 2003 to 2005. The results showed that the two modes both improved runoff water quality and had high retention rates for water and pollutants. In the outflows, the event mean concentrations (EMCs) of total suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were reduced by 88%, 59%, 46% and 71% for the online mode, and those were 77%, 42%, 50% and 66% for the offline mode. The annual retention rates of pollutant loads for the online mode were 94.9%-98.5% in the three study years; those for the offline mode were 70.5%-86.4%. Based on calculation, the online mode was able to store the runoff of 66.7 mm rainfall completely, and the offline mode could store that of 31.3 mm rainfall. In addition, the online mode can provide an effective way for rainwater utilization and good habitats for aquatic wildlives, and has an excellent aesthetics value for recreationsal pastimes. The offline mode can save land resources and may be an effective and economical measure for diffuse pollution control in urban areas.

  9. A Hybrid Nonlinear Control Scheme for Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, F.; Albritton, N. G.; Hung, J. Y.; Nelms, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    A nonlinear control scheme for active magnetic bearings is presented in this work. Magnet winding currents are chosen as control inputs for the electromechanical dynamics, which are linearized using feedback linearization. Then, the desired magnet currents are enforced by sliding mode control design of the electromagnetic dynamics. The overall control scheme is described by a multiple loop block diagram; the approach also falls in the class of nonlinear controls that are collectively known as the 'integrator backstepping' method. Control system hardware and new switching power electronics for implementing the controller are described. Various experiments and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the concepts' potentials.

  10. Development of a sliding mode control model for quiet upright stance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Nussbaum, Maury A; Agnew, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Human upright stance appears maintained or controlled intermittently, through some combination of passive and active ankle torques, respectively representing intrinsic and contractile contributions of the ankle musculature. Several intermittent postural control models have been proposed, though it has been challenging to accurately represent actual kinematics and kinetics and to separately estimate passive and active ankle torque components. Here, a simplified single-segment, 2D (sagittal plane) sliding mode control model was developed for application to track kinematics and kinetics during upright stance. The model was implemented and evaluated using previous experimental data consisting of whole body angular kinematics and ankle torques. Tracking errors for the whole-body center-of-mass (COM) angle and angular velocity, as well as ankle torque, were all within ∼10% of experimental values, though tracking performance for COM angular acceleration was substantially poorer. The model also enabled separate estimates of the contributions of passive and active ankle torques, with overall contributions estimated here to be 96% and 4% of the total ankle torque, respectively. Such a model may have future utility in understanding human postural control, though additional work is needed, such as expanding the model to multiple segments and to three dimensions.

  11. Coherent control of Floquet-mode dressed plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Regine

    2012-05-01

    We study the coherent properties of plasmon polaritons optically excited on periodic nanostructures. The gold grains are coupled to a single-mode photonic waveguide which exhibits a dramatically reduced transmission originating from the derived quantum interference. With a nonequilibrium description of Floquet-dressed polaritons we demonstrate the switching of light transmission through the waveguide due to sheer existence of intraband transitions in gold from right above the Fermi level driven by the external laser light.

  12. Power transmission line operating modes calculation with controllable phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashev, M. G.; Novikov, M. A.; Panfilov, D. I.; Rashitov, P. A.; Remizevich, T. V.; Fedorova, M. I.

    2016-12-01

    The article contains the analysis of the influence of the phase shifter (PS) on the energy processes in the power transmission line in terms of the two-unit model of the electric network. The approach to synthesis of the models regulated by the phase shifter providing for both calculation of the steady operation modes of the electric networks with the phase shifters and research of the electromagnetic processes and designing of the device itself is offered.

  13. Fuzzy control of shear-mode MR damper under impact force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jeongmok; Kim, Hyoun Young; Jung, Taegeun; Joh, Joongseon

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a number of researches about linear magnetorheological(MR) damper using valve-mode characteristics of MR fluid have sufficiently undertaken, but researches about rotary MR damper using shear-mode characteristics of MR fluid are not enough. In this paper, we performed vibration control of shear-mode MR damper for unlimited rotating actuator of mobile robot. Also fuzzy logic based vibration control for shear-mode MR damper is suggested. The parameters, like scaling factor of input/output and center of the triangular membership functions associated with the different linguistic variables, are tuned by genetic algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the fuzzy-skyhook controller for vibration control of shear-mode MR damper under impact force.

  14. Design and Demonstration of Emergency Control Modes for Enhanced Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2013-01-01

    A design concept is presented for developing control modes that enhance aircraft engine performance during emergency flight scenarios. The benefits of increased engine performance to overall vehicle survivability during these situations may outweigh the accompanied elevated risk of engine failure. The objective involves building control logic that can consistently increase engine performance beyond designed maximum levels based on an allowable heightened probability of failure. This concept is applied to two previously developed control modes: an overthrust mode that increases maximum engine thrust output and a faster response mode that improves thrust response to dynamic throttle commands. This paper describes the redesign of these control modes and presents simulation results demonstrating both enhanced engine performance and robust maintenance of the desired elevated risk level.

  15. LaRC controls activity for LSST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Math models were developed for various types of large flexible structures. These models were used to study the uncontrolled dynamic characteristics of the structures in orbit and to devise control concepts in order to control their orientation and geometrical shape. Reduced order decoupled control of the 100 meter long free free beam were studied. The inplane orientation and shape of the beam was controlled in a decoupled manner with as few actuators as possible. Using two controllers, near each end of the beam, to produce a 0.01 radian pitch change, perfect decoupled control was achieved for the rigid body pitch theta mode and the first flexible mode A sub 1.

  16. Active control of multi-dimensional random sound in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Elliott, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated how active control may be applied to the control of random noise in ducts. These implementations, however, have been restricted to frequencies where only plane waves are propagating in the duct. In spite of this, the need for this technology at low frequencies has progressed to the point where commercial products that apply these concepts are currently available. Extending the frequency range of this technology requires the extension of current single channel controllers to multi-variate control systems as well as addressing the problems inherent in controlling higher order modes. The application of active control in the multi-dimensional propagation of random noise in waveguides is examined. An adaptive system is implemented using measured system frequency response functions. Experimental results are presented illustrating attained suppressions of 15 to 30 dB for random noise propagating in multiple modes.

  17. Flight test and analyses of the B-1 structural mode control system at supersonic flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wykes, J. H.; Kelpl, M. J.; Brosnan, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    A practical structural mode control system (SMCS) that could be turned on at takeoff and be left on for the entire flight was demonstrated. The SMCS appears to be more effective in damping the key fuselage bending modes at supersonic speeds than at the design point of Mach 0.85 (for fixed gains). The SMCS has an adverse effect on high frequency symmetric modes; however, this adverse effect did not make the system unstable and does not appear to affect ride quality performance. The vertical ride quality analyses indicate that the basic configuration without active systems is satisfactory for long term exposure. If clear air turbulence were to be encountered, indications are that the SMCS would be very effective in reducing the adverse accelerations. On the other hand, lateral ride quality analyses indicate that the aircraft with the SMCS on does not quite meet the long term exposure criteria, but would be satisfactory for shot term exposure at altitude. Again, the lateral SMCS was shown to be very effective in reducing peak lateral accelerations.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic modes analysis and control of Fusion Advanced Studies Torus high-current scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Villone, F.; Mastrostefano, S.; Calabrò, G.; Vlad, G.; Crisanti, F.; Fusco, V.; Marchiori, G.; Bolzonella, T.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2014-08-15

    One of the main FAST (Fusion Advanced Studies Torus) goals is to have a flexible experiment capable to test tools and scenarios for safe and reliable tokamak operation, in order to support ITER and help the final DEMO design. In particular, in this paper, we focus on operation close to a possible border of stability related to low-q operation. To this purpose, a new FAST scenario has then been designed at I{sub p} = 10 MA, B{sub T} = 8.5 T, q{sub 95} ≈ 2.3. Transport simulations, carried out by using the code JETTO and the first principle transport model GLF23, indicate that, under these conditions, FAST could achieve an equivalent Q ≈ 3.5. FAST will be equipped with a set of internal active coils for feedback control, which will produce magnetic perturbation with toroidal number n = 1 or n = 2. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode analysis and feedback control simulations performed with the codes MARS, MARS-F, CarMa (both assuming the presence of a perfect conductive wall and using the exact 3D resistive wall structure) show the possibility of the FAST conductive structures to stabilize n = 1 ideal modes. This leaves therefore room for active mitigation of the resistive mode (down to a characteristic time of 1 ms) for safety purposes, i.e., to avoid dangerous MHD-driven plasma disruption, when working close to the machine limits and magnetic and kinetic energy density not far from reactor values.

  19. A novel adaptive sliding mode control with application to MEMS gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Fei, Juntao; Batur, Celal

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive sliding mode controller for MEMS gyroscope; an adaptive tracking controller with a proportional and integral sliding surface is proposed. The adaptive sliding mode control algorithm can estimate the angular velocity and the damping and stiffness coefficients in real time. A proportional and integral sliding surface, instead of a conventional sliding surface is adopted. An adaptive sliding mode controller that incorporates both matched and unmatched uncertainties and disturbances is derived and the stability of the closed-loop system is established. The numerical simulation is presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. It is shown that the proposed adaptive sliding mode control scheme offers several advantages such as the consistent estimation of gyroscope parameters including angular velocity and large robustness to parameter variations and external disturbances.

  20. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  1. Reduced salience and default mode network activity in women with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Kristina L.; Tregellas, Jason R.; Shott, Megan E.; Frank, Guido K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The neurobiology of anorexia nervosa is poorly understood. Neuronal networks contributing to action selection, self-regulation and interoception could contribute to pathologic eating and body perception in people with anorexia nervosa. We tested the hypothesis that the salience network (SN) and default mode network (DMN) would show decreased intrinsic activity in women with anorexia nervosa and those who had recovered from the disease compared to controls. The basal ganglia (BGN) and sensorimotor networks (SMN) were also investigated. Methods Between January 2008 and January 2012, women with restricting-type anorexia nervosa, women who recovered from the disease and healthy control women completed functional magnetic resonance imaging during a conditioned stimulus task. Network activity was studied using independent component analysis. Results We studied 20 women with anorexia nervosa, 24 recovered women and 24 controls. Salience network activity in the anterior cingulate cortex was reduced in women with anorexia nervosa (p = 0.030; all results false-discovery rate–corrected) and recovered women (p = 0.039) compared to controls. Default mode network activity in the precuneus was reduced in women with anorexia compared to controls (p = 0.023). Sensorimotor network activity in the supplementary motor area (SMA; p = 0.008), and the left (p = 0.028) and right (p = 0.002) postcentral gyrus was reduced in women with anorexia compared to controls; SMN activity in the SMA (p = 0.019) and the right postcentral gyrus (p = 0.008) was reduced in women with anorexia compared to recovered women. There were no group differences in the BGN. Limitations Differences between patient and control populations (e.g., depression, anxiety, medication) are potential confounds, but were included as covariates. Conclusion Reduced SN activity in women with anorexia nervosa and recovered women could be a trait-related biomarker or illness remnant, altering the drive to approach

  2. Reusable Launch Vehicle Attitude Control Using a Time-Varying Sliding Mode Control Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri B.; Zhu, J. Jim; Daniels, Dan; Jackson, Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a time-varying sliding mode control (TVSMC) technique for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) attitude control in ascent and entry flight phases. In ascent flight the guidance commands Euler roll, pitch and yaw angles, and in entry flight it commands the aerodynamic angles of bank, attack and sideslip. The controller employs a body rate inner loop and the attitude outer loop, which are separated in time-scale by the singular perturbation principle. The novelty of the TVSMC is that both the sliding surface and the boundary layer dynamics can be varied in real time using the PD-eigenvalue assignment technique. This salient feature is used to cope with control command saturation and integrator windup in the presence of severe disturbance or control effector failure, which enhances the robustness and fault tolerance of the controller. The TV-SMC ascent and descent designs are currently being tested with high fidelity, 6-DOF dispersion simulations. The test results will be presented in the final version of this paper.

  3. Pilot/vehicle control optimization using averaged operational mode and subsystem relative performance index sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.; Lehtinen, B.; Riehl, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for designing optimal feedback controllers for systems having subsystem sensitivity constraints. Such constraints reflect the presence of subsystem performance indices which are in conflict with the performance index of the overall system. The key to the approach is the use of relative performance index sensitivity (a measure of the deviation of a performance index from its optimum value). The weighted sum of subsystem and/or operational mode relative performance index sensitivies is defined as an overall performance index. A method is developed to handle linear systems with quadratic performance indices and either full or partial state feedback. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated by applying it to the design of a stability augmentation system (SAS) for a VTOL aircraft. A desirable VTOL SAS design is one that produces good VTOL transient response both with and without active pilot control. The system designed using this method is shown to effect a satisfactory compromise solution to this problem.

  4. Synergetic fMRI-EEG brain mapping in alpha-rhythm voluntary control mode.

    PubMed

    Shtark, M B; Verevkin, E G; Kozlova, L I; Mazhirina, K G; Pokrovskii, M A; Petrovskii, E D; Savelov, A A; Starostin, A S; Yarosh, S V

    2015-03-01

    For the first time in neurobiology-related issues, the synergistic spatial dynamics of EEG and fMRI (BOLD phenomenon) was studied during cognitive alpha biofeedback training in the operant conditioning mode (acoustic reinforcement of alpha-rhythm development and stability). Significant changes in alpha-rhythm intensity were found in T6 electrode area (Brodmann area 37). Brodmann areas related to solving alpha-training tasks and maximally involved in the formation of new neuronal network were middle and superior temporal gyri (areas 21, 22, and 37), fusiform gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus (areas 4, 6, and 46), anterior cingulate gyrus (areas 23 and 24), cuneus, and precuneus (area 7). Wide involvement of Brodmann areas is determined by psychological architecture of alpha-rhythm generating system control that includes complex cognitive activities: decision making, retrieval of long-term memory, evaluation of the reward and control efficiency during alpha-EEG biofeedback.

  5. Control of focusing fields for positron acceleration in nonlinear plasma wakes using multiple laser modes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.-L. Li, F.-Y.; Chen, M.; Weng, S.-M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Sheng, Z.-M.

    2014-12-15

    Control of transverse wakefields in the nonlinear laser-driven bubble regime using a combination of Hermite-Gaussian laser modes is proposed. By controlling the relative intensity ratio of the two laser modes, the focusing force can be controlled, enabling matched beam propagation for emittance preservation. A ring bubble can be generated with a large longitudinal accelerating field and a transverse focusing field suitable for positron beam focusing and acceleration.

  6. Piezo activated mode tracking system for widely tunable mode-hop-free external cavity mid-IR semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Gerard (Inventor); Tittel, Frank K. (Inventor); Curl, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A widely tunable, mode-hop-free semiconductor laser operating in the mid-IR comprises a QCL laser chip having an effective QCL cavity length, a diffraction grating defining a grating angle and an external cavity length with respect to said chip, and means for controlling the QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle. The laser of claim 1 wherein said chip may be tuned over a range of frequencies even in the absence of an anti-reflective coating. The diffraction grating is controllably pivotable and translatable relative to said chip and the effective QCL cavity length can be adjusted by varying the injection current to the chip. The laser can be used for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multi species trace-gas detection. Mode-hopping is avoided by controlling the effective QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle so as to replicate a virtual pivot point.

  7. Placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial on the immunomodulating activities of low- and high-dose bromelain after oral administration - new evidence on the antiinflammatory mode of action of bromelain.

    PubMed

    Müller, Silke; März, Reinhard; Schmolz, Manfred; Drewelow, Bernd; Eschmann, Klaus; Meiser, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Bromelain has been used for treatment of inflammatory diseases for decades. However, the exact mechanism of action remains poorly understood. While in vitro investigations have shown conflicting effects on the release of various cytokines, no in vivo data were available. In this study, the effects on inflammation-related cytokines of two doses of bromelain were tested in a single dose placebo-controlled 3 × crossover randomized clinical trial. Cytokine circadian profiles were used to investigate the effects of bromelain on the human immune system by using stimulated whole-blood leukocytes. The effects seen in these cultures demonstrated a significant shift in the circadian profiles of the Th1 cell mediator interferon gamma (IFNγ; p < 0.043) after bromelain 3000 FIP (Fédération Internationale Pharmaceutique) units, and trends in those of the Th2-type cytokine IL-5 as well as the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10. This suggests a general effect on the antigen-specific (T cell) compartment of the human immune system. This is the first time that bromelain has been shown to modulate the cellular responses of lymphocyte after oral use. It is postulated that the immunomodulating effect of bromelain observed in this trial is part of its known antiinflammatory activities. Further investigations will be necessary to verify the relevance of these findings to a diseased immune system.

  8. Mode control and direct modulation for waveguide-coupled square microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong; Weng, Hai-Zhong; Xiao, Jin-Long; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Lasing mode control and direct modulation characteristics have been investigated for waveguide-coupled unidirectional-emission square microcavity lasers. A quasi-analytical model is introduced to analyze the mode field distributions and quality (Q) factors for the confined modes inside the square optical microcavities with directly coupled waveguide, where high-Q whispering-gallery-like (WG-like) modes are induced by the mode coupling between doubly-degenerate modes. AlGaInAs/InP waveguide-coupled unidirectional-emission square microcavity lasers are fabricated by using standard planar technology, and electrically-injected lasing is realized at room temperature. The lasing modes are controlled by properly designing the lasing cavity, output waveguide and injection pattern. Dual-transverse-mode lasing with a tunable wavelength interval from 0.25 to 0.39 nm is realized by using a spatially selective current injection to modulate the refractive index, as the mode field distributions of different transverse are spatially separated. The wavelength interval can be further increased to a few nanometers by reducing the cavity size and replacing the flat sidewalls with circular arcs. The field distributions of WG-like modes distribute uniformly in square microcavity, which avoid the burning-induced carrier diffusion in high-speed direct modulation. A small-signal modulation 3dB bandwidth exceeding 16 GHz, and an open eye diagram at 25 Gb/s are demonstrated for the high-speed direct modulated square microcavity laser.

  9. A sliding mode control proposal for open-loop unstable processes.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rubén; Camacho, Oscar; González, Luis

    2004-04-01

    This papers presents a sliding mode controller based on a first-order-plus-dead-time model of the process for controlling open-loop unstable systems. The proposed controller has a simple and fixed structure with a set of tuning equations as a function of the desired performance. Both linear and nonlinear models were used to study the controller performance by computer simulations.

  10. Avoidance of tearing mode locking with electro-magnetic torque introduced by feedback-based mode rotation control in DIII-D and RFX-mod

    DOE PAGES

    Okabayashi, M.; Zanca, P.; Strait, E. J.; ...

    2016-11-25

    Disruptions caused by tearing modes (TMs) are considered to be one of the most critical roadblocks to achieving reliable, steady-state operation of tokamak fusion reactors. We have demonstrated a promising scheme to avoid mode locking by utilizing the electro-magnetic (EM) torque produced with 3D coils that are available in many tokamaks. In this scheme, the EM torque is delivered to the modes by a toroidal phase shift between the externally applied field and the excited TM fields, compensating for the mode momentum loss through the interaction with the resistive wall and uncorrected error fields. Fine control of torque balance ismore » provided by a feedback scheme. We have explored this approach in two widely different devices and plasma conditions: DIII-D and RFX-mod operated in tokamak mode. In DIII-D, the plasma target was high β N in a non-circular divertor tokamak. We define β N as β N = β/(I p /aB t) (%Tm/MA), where β, I p, a, B t are the total stored plasma pressure normalized by the magnetic pressure, plasma current, plasma minor radius and toroidal magnetic field at the plasma center, respectively. The RFX-mod plasma was ohmically-heated with ultra-low safety factor in a circular limiter discharge with active feedback coils outside the thick resistive shell. The DIII-D and RFX-mod experiments showed remarkable consistency with theoretical predictions of torque balance. The application to ignition-oriented devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) would expand the horizon of its operational regime. Finally, the internal 3D coil set currently under consideration for edge localized mode suppression in ITER would be well suited for this purpose.« less

  11. Avoidance of tearing mode locking with electro-magnetic torque introduced by feedback-based mode rotation control in DIII-D and RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, M.; Zanca, P.; Strait, E. J.; Garofalo, A. M.; Hanson, J. M.; In, Y.; La Haye, R. J.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Paccagnella, R.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Piron, L.; Shiraki, D.; Volpe, F. A.; DIII-D, The; RFX-mod Teams

    2017-01-01

    Disruptions caused by tearing modes (TMs) are considered to be one of the most critical roadblocks to achieving reliable, steady-state operation of tokamak fusion reactors. Here we have demonstrated a promising scheme to avoid mode locking by utilizing the electro-magnetic (EM) torque produced with 3D coils that are available in many tokamaks. In this scheme, the EM torque is delivered to the modes by a toroidal phase shift between the externally applied field and the excited TM fields, compensating for the mode momentum loss through the interaction with the resistive wall and uncorrected error fields. Fine control of torque balance is provided by a feedback scheme. We have explored this approach in two widely different devices and plasma conditions: DIII-D and RFX-mod operated in tokamak mode. In DIII-D, the plasma target was high β N in a non-circular divertor tokamak. Here β N is defined as β N  =  β/(I p /aB t) (%Tm/MA), where β, I p, a, B t are the total stored plasma pressure normalized by the magnetic pressure, plasma current, plasma minor radius and toroidal magnetic field at the plasma center, respectively. The RFX-mod plasma was ohmically-heated with ultra-low safety factor in a circular limiter discharge with active feedback coils outside the thick resistive shell. The DIII-D and RFX-mod experiments showed remarkable consistency with theoretical predictions of torque balance. The application to ignition-oriented devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) would expand the horizon of its operational regime. The internal 3D coil set currently under consideration for edge localized mode suppression in ITER would be well suited for this purpose.

  12. Avoidance of tearing mode locking with electro-magnetic torque introduced by feedback-based mode rotation control in DIII-D and RFX-mod

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, M.; Zanca, P.; Strait, E. J.; Garofalo, A. M.; Hanson, J. M.; In, Y.; La Haye, R. J.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Paccagnella, R.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Piron, L.; Shiraki, D.; Volpe, F. A.

    2016-11-25

    Disruptions caused by tearing modes (TMs) are considered to be one of the most critical roadblocks to achieving reliable, steady-state operation of tokamak fusion reactors. We have demonstrated a promising scheme to avoid mode locking by utilizing the electro-magnetic (EM) torque produced with 3D coils that are available in many tokamaks. In this scheme, the EM torque is delivered to the modes by a toroidal phase shift between the externally applied field and the excited TM fields, compensating for the mode momentum loss through the interaction with the resistive wall and uncorrected error fields. Fine control of torque balance is provided by a feedback scheme. We have explored this approach in two widely different devices and plasma conditions: DIII-D and RFX-mod operated in tokamak mode. In DIII-D, the plasma target was high β N in a non-circular divertor tokamak. We define β N as β N = β/(I p /aB t) (%Tm/MA), where β, I p, a, B t are the total stored plasma pressure normalized by the magnetic pressure, plasma current, plasma minor radius and toroidal magnetic field at the plasma center, respectively. The RFX-mod plasma was ohmically-heated with ultra-low safety factor in a circular limiter discharge with active feedback coils outside the thick resistive shell. The DIII-D and RFX-mod experiments showed remarkable consistency with theoretical predictions of torque balance. The application to ignition-oriented devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) would expand the horizon of its operational regime. Finally, the internal 3D coil set currently under consideration for edge localized mode suppression in ITER would be well suited for this purpose.

  13. Designing for Damage: Robust Flight Control Design using Sliding Mode Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, T. K.; Wells, S. R.; Hess, Ronald A.; Bacon, Barton (Technical Monitor); Davidson, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A brief review of sliding model control is undertaken, with particular emphasis upon the effects of neglected parasitic dynamics. Sliding model control design is interpreted in the frequency domain. The inclusion of asymptotic observers and control 'hedging' is shown to reduce the effects of neglected parasitic dynamics. An investigation into the application of observer-based sliding mode control to the robust longitudinal control of a highly unstable is described. The sliding mode controller is shown to exhibit stability and performance robustness superior to that of a classical loop-shaped design when significant changes in vehicle and actuator dynamics are employed to model airframe damage.

  14. Optimal integral sliding mode control scheme based on pseudospectral method for robotic manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongjie; Li, Shihua

    2014-06-01

    For a multi-input multi-output nonlinear system, an optimal integral sliding mode control scheme based on pseudospectral method is proposed in this paper. And the controller is applied on rigid robotic manipulators with constraints. First, a general form of integral sliding mode is designed with the aim of restraining disturbance. Then, pseudospectral method is adopted to deal with constrained optimal control problem. In consideration of the benefits of both methods, an optimal integral sliding mode controller is given, which is based on the combination of integral sliding mode and pseudospectral method. The stability analysis shows that the controller can guarantee stability of robotic manipulator system. Simulations show the effectiveness of proposed method.

  15. Feedback-Driven Mode Rotation Control by Electro-Magnetic Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.; Garofalo, A. M.; La Haye, R. J.; in, Y.; Hanson, J. M.; Shiraki, D.; Volpe, F.

    2013-10-01

    The recent experimental discovery of feedback-driven mode rotation control, supported by modeling, opens new approaches for avoidance of locked tearing modes that otherwise lead to disruptions. This approach is an application of electro-magnetic (EM) torque using 3D fields, routinely maximized through a simple feedback system. In DIII-D, it is observed that a feedback-applied radial field can be synchronized in phase with the poloidal field component of a large amplitude tearing mode, producing the maximum EM torque input. The mode frequency can be maintained in the 10 Hz to 100 Hz range in a well controlled manner, sustaining the discharges. Presently, in the ITER internal coils designed for edge localized mode (ELM) control can only be varied at few Hz, yet, well below the inverse wall time constant. Hence, ELM control system could in principle be used for this feedback-driven mode control in various ways. For instance, the locking of MHD modes can be avoided during the controlled shut down of multi hundreds Mega Joule EM stored energy in case of emergency. Feedback could also be useful to minimize mechanical resonances at the disruption events by forcing the MHD frequency away from dangerous ranges. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC-02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-08ER85195, and DE-FG02-04ER54761.

  16. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  17. Sliding Mode Control of the X-33 with an Engine Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri B.; Hall, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    Ascent flight control of the X-3 is performed using two XRS-2200 linear aerospike engines. in addition to aerosurfaces. The baseline control algorithms are PID with gain scheduling. Flight control using an innovative method. Sliding Mode Control. is presented for nominal and engine failed modes of flight. An easy to implement, robust controller. requiring no reconfiguration or gain scheduling is demonstrated through high fidelity flight simulations. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust. de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of engine failure, bounded external disturbances (wind gusts) and uncertain matrix of inertia. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues. Conditions that restrict engine failures to robustness domain of the sliding mode controller are derived. Overall stability of a two-loop flight control system is assessed. Simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in the presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties, as well as the single engine failed case. The designed robust controller will significantly reduce the time and cost associated with flying new trajectory profiles or orbits, with new payloads, and with modified vehicles

  18. Identification and stochastic control of helicopter dynamic modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molusis, J. A.; Bar-Shalom, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A general treatment of parameter identification and stochastic control for use on helicopter dynamic systems is presented. Rotor dynamic models, including specific applications to rotor blade flapping and the helicopter ground resonance problem are emphasized. Dynamic systems which are governed by periodic coefficients as well as constant coefficient models are addressed. The dynamic systems are modeled by linear state variable equations which are used in the identification and stochastic control formulation. The pure identification problem as well as the stochastic control problem which includes combined identification and control for dynamic systems is addressed. The stochastic control problem includes the effect of parameter uncertainty on the solution and the concept of learning and how this is affected by the control's duel effect. The identification formulation requires algorithms suitable for on line use and thus recursive identification algorithms are considered. The applications presented use the recursive extended kalman filter for parameter identification which has excellent convergence for systems without process noise.

  19. Minimum sliding mode error feedback control for fault tolerant reconfigurable satellite formations with J2 perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lu; Chen, Xiaoqian; Misra, Arun K.

    2014-03-01

    Minimum Sliding Mode Error Feedback Control (MSMEFC) is proposed to improve the control precision of spacecraft formations based on the conventional sliding mode control theory. This paper proposes a new approach to estimate and offset the system model errors, which include various kinds of uncertainties and disturbances, as well as smoothes out the effect of nonlinear switching control terms. To facilitate the analysis, the concept of equivalent control error is introduced, which is the key to the utilization of MSMEFC. A cost function is formulated on the basis of the principle of minimum sliding mode error; then the equivalent control error is estimated and fed back to the conventional sliding mode control. It is shown that the sliding mode after the MSMEFC will approximate to the ideal sliding mode, resulting in improved control performance and quality. The new methodology is applied to spacecraft formation flying. It guarantees global asymptotic convergence of the relative tracking error in the presence of J2 perturbations. In addition, some fault tolerant situations such as thruster failure for a period of time, thruster degradation and so on, are also considered to verify the effectiveness of MSMEFC. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology to maintain and reconfigure the satellite formation with the existence of initial offsets and J2 perturbation effects, even in the fault-tolerant cases.

  20. Active controls for ride smoothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.; Thompson, G. O.

    1976-01-01

    Active controls technology offers great promise for significantly smoothing the ride, and thus improving public and air carrier acceptance, of certain types of transport aircraft. Recent findings which support this promise are presented in the following three pertinent areas: (1) Ride quality versus degree of traveler satisfaction; (2) significant findings from a feasibility study of a ride smoothing system; and (3) potential ride problems identified for several advanced transport concepts.

  1. Analysis and control of unified active power filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthu, Subramanian

    1999-11-01

    The combined series and shunt active filters have been proposed to alleviate the power quality problems at the demand-side power systems. However, the conventional approach for the control of the combined active filter systems have resulted in large operating capacity of the shunt active filter because reactive power compensation involves only the shunt active filter. Furthermore, the harmonic mitigation problems are handled mainly by indirect harmonic compensation schemes rather than direct harmonic isolation schemes. This thesis presents the analysis and control of Unified Active Power Filter (UAPF) and proposes a novel concept of load reactive power compensation involving both the series active filter and the shunt active filter. The thesis also applies discrete-time sliding-mode control technique to enhance the performance of the combined active filter system in terms of fast dynamic response and effective solution to harmonic mitigation problems. The thesis also presents simulation and experimental results to provide verification of the proposed UAPF concept. The involvement of series active filter for reactive power compensation is achieved by controlling the phase difference between the load voltage and the utility voltage. The complete steady-state operating characteristics of UAPF are analyzed with the identification of the different operating modes of UAPF and the analysis of active and reactive power handled by the active filter components. The performance of UAPF to meet the stringent power quality standards are realized by applying discrete-time sliding-mode control schemes for the load voltage regulation and the active power factor correction. The control algorithms are developed to track a given load voltage and line current reference signals respectively. The effect of computational delay in DSP implementation is studied extensively and the control law is designed with the consideration for the computational delay. The systematic approach for the

  2. Modeling and control of distributed energy systems during transition between grid connected and standalone modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafat, Md Nayeem

    Distributed generation systems (DGs) have been penetrating into our energy networks with the advancement in the renewable energy sources and energy storage elements. These systems can operate in synchronism with the utility grid referred to as the grid connected (GC) mode of operation, or work independently, referred to as the standalone (SA) mode of operation. There is a need to ensure continuous power flow during transition between GC and SA modes, referred to as the transition mode, in operating DGs. In this dissertation, efficient and effective transition control algorithms are developed for DGs operating either independently or collectively with other units. Three techniques are proposed in this dissertation to manage the proper transition operations. In the first technique, a new control algorithm is proposed for an independent DG which can operate in SA and GC modes. The proposed transition control algorithm ensures low total harmonic distortion (THD) and less voltage fluctuation during mode transitions compared to the other techniques. In the second technique, a transition control is suggested for a collective of DGs operating in a microgrid system architecture to improve the reliability of the system, reduce the cost, and provide better performance. In this technique, one of the DGs in a microgrid system, referred to as a dispatch unit , takes the additional responsibility of mode transitioning to ensure smooth transition and supply/demand balance in the microgrid. In the third technique, an alternative transition technique is proposed through hybridizing the current and droop controllers. The proposed hybrid transition control technique has higher reliability compared to the dispatch unit concept. During the GC mode, the proposed hybrid controller uses current control. During the SA mode, the hybrid controller uses droop control. During the transition mode, both of the controllers participate in formulating the inverter output voltage but with different

  3. The aircraft energy efficiency active controls technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Broad outlines of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program for expediting the application of active controls technology to civil transport aircraft are presented. Advances in propulsion and airframe technology to cut down on fuel consumption and fuel costs, a program for an energy-efficient transport, and integrated analysis and design technology in aerodynamics, structures, and active controls are envisaged. Fault-tolerant computer systems and fault-tolerant flight control system architectures are under study. Contracts with leading manufacturers for research and development work on wing-tip extensions and winglets for the B-747, a wing load alleviation system, elastic mode suppression, maneuver-load control, and gust alleviation are mentioned.

  4. Assessment of body mapping sportswear using a manikin operated in constant temperature mode and thermoregulatory model control mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Faming; Del Ferraro, Simona; Molinaro, Vincenzo; Morrissey, Matthew; Rossi, René

    2014-09-01

    Regional sweating patterns and body surface temperature differences exist between genders. Traditional sportswear made from one material and/or one fabric structure has a limited ability to provide athletes sufficient local wear comfort. Body mapping sportswear consists of one piece of multiple knit structure fabric or of different fabric pieces that may provide athletes better wear comfort. In this study, the `modular' body mapping sportswear was designed and subsequently assessed on a `Newton' type sweating manikin that operated in both constant temperature mode and thermophysiological model control mode. The performance of the modular body mapping sportswear kit and commercial products were also compared. The results demonstrated that such a modular body mapping sportswear kit can meet multiple wear/thermal comfort requirements in various environmental conditions. All body mapping clothing (BMC) presented limited global thermophysiological benefits for the wearers. Nevertheless, BMC showed evident improvements in adjusting local body heat exchanges and local thermal sensations.

  5. Assessment of body mapping sportswear using a manikin operated in constant temperature mode and thermoregulatory model control mode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Del Ferraro, Simona; Molinaro, Vincenzo; Morrissey, Matthew; Rossi, René

    2014-09-01

    Regional sweating patterns and body surface temperature differences exist between genders. Traditional sportswear made from one material and/or one fabric structure has a limited ability to provide athletes sufficient local wear comfort. Body mapping sportswear consists of one piece of multiple knit structure fabric or of different fabric pieces that may provide athletes better wear comfort. In this study, the 'modular' body mapping sportswear was designed and subsequently assessed on a 'Newton' type sweating manikin that operated in both constant temperature mode and thermophysiological model control mode. The performance of the modular body mapping sportswear kit and commercial products were also compared. The results demonstrated that such a modular body mapping sportswear kit can meet multiple wear/thermal comfort requirements in various environmental conditions. All body mapping clothing (BMC) presented limited global thermophysiological benefits for the wearers. Nevertheless, BMC showed evident improvements in adjusting local body heat exchanges and local thermal sensations.

  6. Parallel Control of Velocity Control and Energy-Saving Control for a Hydraulic Valve-Controlled Cylinder System Using Self-Organizing Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Mao-Hsiung; Chien, Yu-Wei

    Conventional hydraulic valve-controlled systems that incorporate positive displacement pumps and relief valves have a problem of low energy efficiency. The objective of the research is to implement parallel control of energy-saving control in an electro-hydraulic load-sensing system and velocity control in a hydraulic valve-controlled cylinder system to achieve both high velocity control accuracy and low input power simultaneously. The overall control system is a two-input two-output system. For that, the control strategy of self-organizing fuzzy sliding mode control (SOFSMC) is developed in this study to reduce the fuzzy rule number and to self-organize on-line the fuzzy rules. To compare the energy-saving performance, the velocity control is implemented under three different energy-saving control systems, such as load-sensing control system, constant supply pressure control system and conventional hydraulic system. The parallel control of the velocity control and energy-saving control by the SOFSMC is implemented experimentally.

  7. Fractional order sliding-mode control based on parameters auto-tuning for velocity control of permanent magnet synchronous motor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, BiTao; Pi, YouGuo; Luo, Ying

    2012-09-01

    A fractional order sliding mode control (FROSMC) scheme based on parameters auto-tuning for the velocity control of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is proposed in this paper. The control law of the proposed F(R)OSMC scheme is designed according to Lyapunov stability theorem. Based on the property of transferring energy with adjustable type in F(R)OSMC, this paper analyzes the chattering phenomenon in classic sliding mode control (SMC) is attenuated with F(R)OSMC system. A fuzzy logic inference scheme (FLIS) is utilized to obtain the gain of switching control. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that the proposed FROSMC not only achieve better control performance with smaller chatting than that with integer order sliding mode control, but also is robust to external load disturbance and parameter variations.

  8. Optogenetic control of epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Tønnesen, Jan; Sørensen, Andreas T.; Deisseroth, Karl; Lundberg, Cecilia; Kokaia, Merab

    2009-01-01

    The optogenetic approach to gain control over neuronal excitability both in vitro and in vivo has emerged as a fascinating scientific tool to explore neuronal networks, but it also opens possibilities for developing novel treatment strategies for neurologic conditions. We have explored whether such an optogenetic approach using the light-driven halorhodopsin chloride pump from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR), modified for mammalian CNS expression to hyperpolarize central neurons, may inhibit excessive hyperexcitability and epileptiform activity. We show that a lentiviral vector containing the NpHR gene under the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα promoter transduces principal cells of the hippocampus and cortex and hyperpolarizes these cells, preventing generation of action potentials and epileptiform activity during optical stimulation. This study proves a principle, that selective hyperpolarization of principal cortical neurons by NpHR is sufficient to curtail paroxysmal activity in transduced neurons and can inhibit stimulation train-induced bursting in hippocampal organotypic slice cultures, which represents a model tissue of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. This study demonstrates that the optogenetic approach may prove useful for controlling epileptiform activity and opens a future perspective to develop it into a strategy to treat epilepsy. PMID:19581573

  9. Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnov, Oksana; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Three existing and two new excitation magnitude scaling options for active separation control at Reynolds numbers below one Million. The physical background for the scaling options was discussed and their relevance was evaluated using two different sets of experimental data. For F+ approx. 1, 2D excitation: a) The traditional VR and C(mu) - do not scale the data. b) Only the Re*C(mu) is valid. This conclusion is also limited for positive lift increment.. For F+ > 10, 3D excitation, the Re corrected C(mu), the St corrected velocity ratio and the vorticity flux coefficient, all scale the amplitudes equally well. Therefore, the Reynolds weighted C(mu) is the preferred choice, relevant to both excitation modes. Incidence also considered, using Ue from local Cp.

  10. On longitudinal control of high speed aircraft in the presence of aeroelastic modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Kelkar, Atul G.

    1996-01-01

    Longitudinal control system design is considered for a linearized dynamic model of a supersonic transport aircraft concept characterized by relaxed static stability and significant aeroelastic interactions. Two LQG-type controllers are designed using the frequency-domain additive uncertainty formulation to ensure robustness to unmodeled flexible modes. The first controller is based on a 4th-order model containing only the rigid-body modes, while the second controller is based on an 8th-order model that additionally includes the two most prominent flexible modes. The performance obtainable from the 4th-order controller is not adequate, while the 8th-order controller is found to provide better performance. Frequency-domain and time-domain (Lyapunov) methods are subsequently used to assess the robustness of the 8th-order controller to parametric uncertainties in the design model.

  11. Terminal sliding mode tracking control for a class of SISO uncertain nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mou; Wu, Qing-Xian; Cui, Rong-Xin

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the terminal sliding mode tracking control is proposed for the uncertain single-input and single-output (SISO) nonlinear system with unknown external disturbance. For the unmeasured disturbance of nonlinear systems, terminal sliding mode disturbance observer is presented. The developed disturbance observer can guarantee the disturbance approximation error to converge to zero in the finite time. Based on the output of designed disturbance observer, the terminal sliding mode tracking control is presented for uncertain SISO nonlinear systems. Subsequently, terminal sliding mode tracking control is developed using disturbance observer technique for the uncertain SISO nonlinear system with control singularity and unknown non-symmetric input saturation. The effects of the control singularity and unknown input saturation are combined with the external disturbance which is approximated using the disturbance observer. Under the proposed terminal sliding mode tracking control techniques, the finite time convergence of all closed-loop signals are guaranteed via Lyapunov analysis. Numerical simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed terminal sliding mode tracking control.

  12. Open-phase operating modes of power flow control topologies in a Smart Grid Distribution Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashev, M. G.; Novikov, M. A.; Panfilov, D. I.; Rashitov, P. A.; Remizevich, T. V.; Fedorova, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    The power flow regulating circuit node in an alternating current system is reviewed. The circuit node is accomplished based on a thyristor controlled phase angle regulator (TCPAR) with controlled thyristor switch. Research results of the individual phase control of the output voltage for the TCPAR are presented. Analytical expressions for the overvoltage factor calculation in the thyristor switch circuit for open-phase operating modes are received. Based on evaluation of overvoltage in operational and emergency modes, the implementability conditions of the individual phase control of the output voltage are determined. Under these conditions, maximal performance and complete controllability are provided.

  13. DISCHARGE IMPROVEMENT THROUGH CONTROL OF NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODES BY LOCALIZED ECCD IN DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PRATER,R; LAHAYE,RJ; LOHR,J; LUCE,TC; PETTY,CC; FERRON,JR; HUMPHREYS,DA; STRAIT,EJ; PERKINS,FW; HARVEY,RW

    2002-10-01

    A271 DISCHARGE IMPROVEMENT THROUGH CONTROL OF NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODES BY LOCALIZED ECCD IN DIII-D. Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are MHD modes which can limit the performance of high beta discharges in tokamaks, in some cases leading to a major disruption. The destabilizing effect which results in NTM growth is a helical decrease in the bootstrap current caused by a local reduction of the plasma pressure gradient by seed magnetic islands. The NTM is particularly well suited to control since the mode is linearly stable although nonlinearly unstable, so if the island amplitude can be decreased below a threshold size the mode will decay and vanish. One means of shrinking the island is the replacement of the missing bootstrap current by a localized current generated by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). This method has been applied to the m=3/n=2 neoclassical tearing mode in DIII-D, in H-mode plasmas with ongoing ELMs and sawteeth, both of which generate seed islands periodically. In the case of the 3/2 mode, full suppression was obtained robustly by applying about 1.5 MW of ECCD very near the rational surface of the mode. When the mode first appears in the plasma the stored energy decreases by 20%, but after the mode is stabilized by the ECCD the beta may be raised above the initial threshold pressure by 20% by additional neutral beam heating, thereby generating an improvement in the limiting beta of nearly a factor 2. An innovative automated search algorithm was implemented to find and retain the optimum location for the ECCD in the presence of the mode.

  14. Control of self-excitation mode in thermoacoustic system using heat phase adjuster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Aiko; Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Taga, Kazusa; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-01

    The capability of a heat phase adjuster (HPA) to control the resonance mode in a loop-tube-type thermoacoustic system by locally heating the outside is experimentally investigated. It is shown that the HPA enables the resonance mode of the tube to shift to lower modes with higher thermoacoustic conversion efficiency, thus significantly enhancing the energy conversion efficiency. The transition of the resonance mode due to the stepwise change in the input electric power to the HPA is also investigated. As a result, it is demonstrated that the resonance mode changes with the temperature and a threshold exists for the HPA temperature at which the transition is induced. These results suggest the possibility of externally controlling a loop-tube-type thermoacoustic system.

  15. Feedback control of two-mode output entanglement and steering in cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asjad, Muhammad; Tombesi, Paolo; Vitali, David

    2016-11-01

    We show that the closed-loop control obtained by feeding back the derivative of the signal from the homodyne measurement of one mode of the light exiting a two-mode optical cavity interacting with a mechanical resonator permits us to control and increase optical output entanglement. In particular, the proposed feedback-enhanced setup allows us to achieve a fidelity of coherent-state teleportation greater than the threshold value of 2/3 for secure teleportation and two-way steering between the two cavities' output modes down the line in the presence of loss, which otherwise would not be possible without feedback.

  16. Distinct sets of locomotor modules control the speed and modes of human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hikaru; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Kawashima, Noritaka; Shinya, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Although recent vertebrate studies have revealed that different spinal networks are recruited in locomotor mode- and speed-dependent manners, it is unknown whether humans share similar neural mechanisms. Here, we tested whether speed- and mode-dependence in the recruitment of human locomotor networks exists or not by statistically extracting locomotor networks. From electromyographic activity during walking and running over a wide speed range, locomotor modules generating basic patterns of muscle activities were extracted using non-negative matrix factorization. The results showed that the number of modules changed depending on the modes and speeds. Different combinations of modules were extracted during walking and running, and at different speeds even during the same locomotor mode. These results strongly suggest that, in humans, different spinal locomotor networks are recruited while walking and running, and even in the same locomotor mode different networks are probably recruited at different speeds. PMID:27805015

  17. 76 FR 14795 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System Mode...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System Mode Annunciation. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... electronic flight control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or...). Novel or Unusual Design Features The GVI will have a fly-by-wire electronic flight control system....

  18. Mosquitocidal Activity and Mode of Action of the Isoxazoline Fluralaner

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shiyao; Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R.; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes, such as Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae, are important vectors of human diseases. Fluralaner, a recently introduced parasiticide, was evaluated as a mosquitocide in this study. On Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae fourth-instar larvae, fluralaner had 24-h LC50 (lethal concentration for 50% mortality) values of 1.8 ppb and 0.4 ppb, respectively. Following topical application to adult Ae. aegypti, fluralaner toxicity reached a plateau in about 3 days, with 1- and 3-day LD50 (lethal dose for 50% mortality) values of 1.3 ng/mg and 0.26 ng/mg, suggesting a slowly developing toxicity. Fipronil outperformed fluralaner by up to 100-fold in adult topical, glass contact, and feeding assays on Ae. aegypti. These data show that fluralaner does not have exceptional toxicity to mosquitoes in typical exposure paradigms. In electrophysiological recordings on Drosophila melanogaster larval central nervous system, the effectiveness of fluralaner for restoring nerve firing after gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment, a measure of GABA antagonism, was similar in susceptible Oregon-R and cyclodiene-resistant rdl-1675 strains, with EC50 (half maximal effective concentration) values of 0.34 µM and 0.29 µM. Although this finding suggests low cross resistance in the presence of rdl, the moderate potency, low contact activity, and slow action of fluralaner argue against its use as an adult mosquitocide for vector control. PMID:28178191

  19. Advanced Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control for Robot Manipulator

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji-Hwan; Kang, Young-Chang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, advanced interval type-2 fuzzy sliding mode control (AIT2FSMC) for robot manipulator is proposed. The proposed AIT2FSMC is a combination of interval type-2 fuzzy system and sliding mode control. For resembling a feedback linearization (FL) control law, interval type-2 fuzzy system is designed. For compensating the approximation error between the FL control law and interval type-2 fuzzy system, sliding mode controller is designed, respectively. The tuning algorithms are derived in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem. Two-link rigid robot manipulator with nonlinearity is used to test and the simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method that can control unknown system well. PMID:28280505

  20. New improved reconstruction of solar activity over 3 millennia: Evidence for distinct solar dynamo modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, Ilya; Kovaltsov, Gennady; Hulot, Gauthier.; Gallet, Yves; Roth, Raphael; Licht, Alexis; Joos, Fortunat; Th, E.; Khokhlov, A.; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.

    The solar magnetic dynamo can operate in distinct modes - a main general mode, a Grand minimum mode corresponding to an inactive Sun, and a possible Grand maximum mode corresponding to an unusually active Sun, as e.g., observed recently. The reality of such mode separation has recently been the subject of much debate, with different theoretical speculations discussed. Here we present the first adjustment-free physical reconstruction of solar activity over the past three millennia, using the latest carbon cycle, (14) C production and archeomagnetic field models. This new improved reconstruction shows that the solar dynamo process indeed switches between different modes, either corresponding to different regimes of the dynamo or to changes in the driving parameters. These results provide important constraints for both dynamo models of Sun-like stars and investigations of possible solar influence on Earth’s climate.

  1. Comparison of the activation time effects and the internal energy distributions for the CID, PQD and HCD excitation modes.

    PubMed

    Ichou, Farid; Schwarzenberg, Adrian; Lesage, Denis; Alves, Sandra; Junot, Christophe; Machuron-Mandard, Xavier; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2014-06-01

    Reproducibility among different types of excitation modes is a major bottleneck in the field of tandem mass spectrometry library development in metabolomics. In this study, we specifically evaluated the influence of collision voltage and activation time parameters on tandem mass spectrometry spectra for various excitation modes [collision-induced dissociation (CID), pulsed Q dissociation (PQD) and higher-energy collision dissociation (HCD)] of Orbitrap-based instruments. For this purpose, internal energy deposition was probed using an approach based on Rice-Rampserger-Kassel-Marcus modeling with three thermometer compounds of different degree of freedom (69, 228 and 420) and a thermal model. This model treats consecutively the activation and decomposition steps, and the survival precursor ion populations are characterized by truncated Maxwell-Boltzmann internal energy distributions. This study demonstrates that the activation time has a significant impact on MS/MS spectra using the CID and PQD modes. The proposed model seems suitable to describe the multiple collision regime in the PQD and HCD modes. Linear relationships between mean internal energy and collision voltage are shown for the latter modes and the three thermometer molecules. These results suggest that a calibration based on the collision voltage should provide reproducible for PQD, HCD to be compared with CID in tandem in space instruments. However, an important signal loss is observed in PQD excitation mode whatever the mass of the studied compounds, which may affect not only parent ions but also fragment ions depending on the fragmentation parameters. A calibration approach for the CID mode based on the variation of activation time parameter is more appropriate than one based on collision voltage. In fact, the activation time parameter in CID induces a modification of the collisional regime and thus helps control the orientation of the fragmentation pathways (competitive or consecutive dissociations).

  2. Investigation of Timing to Switch Control Mode in Powered Knee Prostheses during Task Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Liu, Ming; Huang, He

    2015-01-01

    Current powered prosthetic legs require switching control modes according to the task the user is performing (e.g. level-ground walking, stair climbing, walking on slopes, etc.). To allow prosthesis users safely and seamlessly transition between tasks, it is critical to determine when to switch the prosthesis control mode during task transitions. Our previous study defined critical timings for different types of task transitions in ambulation; however, it is unknown whether it is the unique timing that allows safe and seamless transitions. The goals of this study were to (1) systematically investigate the effects of mode switch timing on the prosthesis user’s performance in task transitions, and (2) identify appropriate timing to switch the prosthesis control mode so that the users can seamlessly transition between different locomotion tasks. Five able-bodied (AB) and two transfemoral (TF) amputee subjects were tested as they wore a powered knee prosthesis. The prosthesis control mode was switched manually at various times while the subjects performed different types of task transitions. The subjects’ task transition performances were evaluated by their walking balance and success in performing seamless task transitions. The results demonstrated that there existed a time window within which switching the prosthesis control mode neither interrupted the subjects’ task transitions nor disturbed their walking balance. Therefore, the results suggested the control mode switching of a lower limb prosthesis can be triggered within an appropriate time window instead of a specific timing or an individual phase. In addition, a generalized criterion to determine the appropriate mode switch timing was proposed. The outcomes of this study could provide important guidance for future designs of neurally controlled powered knee prostheses that are safe and reliable to use. PMID:26197084

  3. Augmented Adaptive Control of a Wind Turbine in the Presence of Structural Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.; Wright, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Wind turbines operate in highly turbulent environments resulting in aerodynamic loads that can easily excite turbine structural modes, potentially causing component fatigue and failure. Two key technology drivers for turbine manufacturers are increasing turbine up time and reducing maintenance costs. Since the trend in wind turbine design is towards larger, more flexible turbines with lower frequency structural modes, manufacturers will want to develop methods to operate in the presence of these modes. Accurate models of the dynamic characteristics of new wind turbines are often not available due to the complexity and expense of the modeling task, making wind turbines ideally suited to adaptive control. In this paper, we develop theory for adaptive control with rejection of disturbances in the presence of modes that inhibit the controller. We use this method to design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility-scale, variable-speed wind turbine operating in Region 3. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller is to regulate generator speed, accommodate wind gusts, and reduce the interference of certain structural modes in feedback. The control objective is accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. The adaptive pitch controller for Region 3 is compared in simulations with a baseline classical Proportional Integrator (PI) collective pitch controller.

  4. External kink modes as a model for MHD activity associated with ELMs

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1992-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas in the high confinement mode of operation are known to exhibit edge localized activity referred to as ELMs. A model is proposed for the underlying cause in terms of the external kink mode. The build up of the current density near the plasma edge is shown to decrease the shear in the safety-factor, q, profile and lead to destabilization of the kink mode. The role of the plasma geometry and equilibrium profiles is discussed.

  5. An Experimental Evaluation of Generalized Predictive Control for Tiltrotor Aeroelastic Stability Augmentation in Airplane Mode of Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Piatak, David J.; Nixon, Mark W.; Langston, Chester W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Bennett, Richard L.; Brown, Ross K.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a joint NASA/Army/Bell Helicopter Textron wind-tunnel test to assess the potential of Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) for actively controlling the swashplate of tiltrotor aircraft to enhance aeroelastic stability in the airplane mode of flight are presented. GPC is an adaptive time-domain predictive control method that uses a linear difference equation to describe the input-output relationship of the system and to design the controller. The test was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel using an unpowered 1/5-scale semispan aeroelastic model of the V-22 that was modified to incorporate a GPC-based multi-input multi-output control algorithm to individually control each of the three swashplate actuators. Wing responses were used for feedback. The GPC-based control system was highly effective in increasing the stability of the critical wing mode for all of the conditions tested, without measurable degradation of the damping in the other modes. The algorithm was also robust with respect to its performance in adjusting to rapid changes in both the rotor speed and the tunnel airspeed.

  6. Finite time control for MIMO nonlinear system based on higher-order sliding mode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangjie; Han, Yaozhen

    2014-11-01

    Considering a class of MIMO uncertain nonlinear system, a novel finite time stable control algorithm is proposed based on higher-order sliding mode concept. The higher-order sliding mode control problem of MIMO nonlinear system is firstly transformed into finite time stability problem of multivariable system. Then continuous control law, which can guarantee finite time stabilization of nominal integral chain system, is employed. The second-order sliding mode is used to overcome the system uncertainties. High frequency chattering phenomenon of sliding mode is greatly weakened, and the arbitrarily fast convergence is reached. The finite time stability is proved based on the quadratic form Lyapunov function. Examples concerning the triple integral chain system with uncertainty and the hovercraft trajectory tracking are simulated respectively to verify the effectiveness and the robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  7. Spurious-Mode Control of Same-Phase Drive-Type Ultrasonic Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Manabu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Tomikawa, Yoshiro; Takano, Takehiro

    2002-05-01

    A same-phase drive-type ultrasonic motor requires a single power source for its operation. In particular, self-oscillation driving is useful for driving a small ultrasonic motor. This type of ultrasonic motor has a spurious mode close to the operation frequency on its stator vibrator. The spurious vibration mode affects the oscillation frequency of a self-oscillation drive circuit. Hence the spurious vibration mode should be restrained or moved away from the neighborhood of the operation frequency. In this paper, we report that an inductor connected at an electrical control terminal provided on standby electrodes for the reverse rotation operation controls only the spurious vibration mode. The effect of an inductor connected at the control terminal was clarified by the simulation of an equivalent circuit and some experiments.

  8. Controlling the dynamical modes of the chiral magnetic structures by spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ronghua; Lim, Weng-Lee; Urazhdin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Recently, pure spin currents generated due to spin Hall effect have been proved as an efficient approach to reverse the magnetization, modify the dynamical relaxation rates, and excite magnetization oscillations in the heavy metal/ferromagnetic heterostructures. In addition, the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) can also induce chiral magnetization configurations and rich dynamics in these asymmetrical heterostructures . We controllably excited several distinct dynamical modes in spin Hall oscillator based on Pt/ [CoNi] magnetic multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy. At low current, a quasi-linear Slonczewski-like propagating spin wave mode was excited. This mode transforms to a localized soliton mode above a certain threshold current. At large fields, this mode can be identified as the spin wave `bullet' mode. At small fields, the localized mode is transformed to the topological structure of the `droplet' mode, which comes from the oscillations of the chiral domain walls forming the boundary of the bubble domain due to DMI. Our measurements demonstrate a straightforward route for emission of spin waves by nano-oscillators controlled either by current or by the applied magnetic field. This work was supported by the NSF grant ECCS-1218419.

  9. Progress in analytical methods to predict and control azimuthal combustion instability modes in annular chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerheim, M.; Nicoud, F.; Poinsot, T.

    2016-02-01

    Longitudinal low-frequency thermoacoustic unstable modes in combustion chambers have been intensively studied experimentally, numerically, and theoretically, leading to significant progress in both understanding and controlling these acoustic modes. However, modern annular gas turbines may also exhibit azimuthal modes, which are much less studied and feature specific mode structures and dynamic behaviors, leading to more complex situations. Moreover, dealing with 10-20 burners mounted in the same chamber limits the use of high fidelity simulations or annular experiments to investigate these modes because of their complexity and costs. Consequently, for such circumferential acoustic modes, theoretical tools have been developed to uncover underlying phenomena controlling their stability, nature, and dynamics. This review presents recent progress in this field. First, Galerkin and network models are described with their pros and cons in both the temporal and frequency framework. Then, key features of such acoustic modes are unveiled, focusing on their specificities such as symmetry breaking, non-linear modal coupling, forcing by turbulence. Finally, recent works on uncertainty quantifications, guided by theoretical studies and applied to annular combustors, are presented. The objective is to provide a global view of theoretical research on azimuthal modes to highlight their complexities and potential.

  10. Q-plates as higher order polarization controllers for orbital angular momentum modes of fiber.

    PubMed

    Gregg, P; Mirhosseini, M; Rubano, A; Marrucci, L; Karimi, E; Boyd, R W; Ramachandran, S

    2015-04-15

    We demonstrate that a |q|=1/2 plate, in conjunction with appropriate polarization optics, can selectively and switchably excite all linear combinations of the first radial mode order |l|=1 orbital angular momentum (OAM) fiber modes. This enables full mapping of free-space polarization states onto fiber vector modes, including the radially (TM) and azimuthally polarized (TE) modes. The setup requires few optical components and can yield mode purities as high as ∼30  dB. Additionally, just as a conventional fiber polarization controller creates arbitrary elliptical polarization states to counteract fiber birefringence and yield desired polarizations at the output of a single-mode fiber, q-plates disentangle degenerate state mixing effects between fiber OAM states to yield pure states, even after long-length fiber propagation. We thus demonstrate the ability to switch dynamically, potentially at ∼GHz rates, between OAM modes, or create desired linear combinations of them. We envision applications in fiber-based lasers employing vector or OAM mode outputs, as well as communications networking schemes exploiting spatial modes for higher dimensional encoding.

  11. On-line, adaptive state estimator for active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic characteristics of airframe structures are expected to vary as aircraft flight conditions change. Accurate knowledge of the changing dynamic characteristics is crucial to enhancing the performance of the active noise control system using feedback control. This research investigates the development of an adaptive, on-line state estimator using a neural network concept to conduct active noise control. In this research, an algorithm has been developed that can be used to estimate displacement and velocity responses at any locations on the structure from a limited number of acceleration measurements and input force information. The algorithm employs band-pass filters to extract from the measurement signal the frequency contents corresponding to a desired mode. The filtered signal is then used to train a neural network which consists of a linear neuron with three weights. The structure of the neural network is designed as simple as possible to increase the sampling frequency as much as possible. The weights obtained through neural network training are then used to construct the transfer function of a mode in z-domain and to identify modal properties of each mode. By using the identified transfer function and interpolating the mode shape obtained at sensor locations, the displacement and velocity responses are estimated with reasonable accuracy at any locations on the structure. The accuracy of the response estimates depends on the number of modes incorporated in the estimates and the number of sensors employed to conduct mode shape interpolation. Computer simulation demonstrates that the algorithm is capable of adapting to the varying dynamic characteristics of structural properties. Experimental implementation of the algorithm on a DSP (digital signal processing) board for a plate structure is underway. The algorithm is expected to reach the sampling frequency range of about 10 kHz to 20 kHz which needs to be maintained for a typical active noise control

  12. Modified independent modal space control method for active control of flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1987-01-01

    A modified independent modal space control (MIMSC) method is developed for designing active vibration control systems for large flexible structures. The method accounts for the interaction between the controlled and residual modes. It incorporates also optimal placement procedures for selecting the optimal locations of the actuators in the structure in order to minimize the structural vibrations as well as the actuation energy. The MIMSC method relies on an important feature which is based on time sharing of a small number of actuators, in the modal space, to control effectively a large number of modes. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the method to generic flexible systems. The results obtained suggest the potential of the devised method in designing efficient active control systems for large flexible structures.

  13. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to develop controls for inverter-based renewable and non-renewable distributed energy systems to provide local voltage, power and power quality support for loads and the power grid. The objectives are to (1) develop adaptive controls for inverter-based distributed energy (DE) systems when there are multiple inverters on the same feeder and (2) determine the impact of high penetration high seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) air conditioning (A/C) units on power systems during sub-transmission faults which can result in an A/C compressor motor stall and assess how inverter-based DE can help to mitigate the stall event. The Distributed Energy Communications & Controls Laboratory (DECC) is a unique facility for studying dynamic voltage, active power (P), non-active power (Q) and power factor control from inverter-based renewable distributed energy (DE) resources. Conventionally, inverter-based DE systems have been designed to provide constant, close to unity power factor and thus not provide any voltage support. The DECC Lab interfaces with the ORNL campus distribution system to provide actual power system testing of the controls approach. Using mathematical software tools and the DECC Lab environment, we are developing and testing local, autonomous and adaptive controls for local voltage control and P & Q control for inverter-based DE. We successfully tested our active and non-active power (P,Q) controls at the DECC laboratory along with voltage regulation controls. The new PQ control along with current limiter controls has been tested on our existing inverter test system. We have tested both non-adaptive and adaptive control modes for the PQ control. We have completed several technical papers on the approaches and results. Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is

  14. Adaptive Control of Linear Modal Systems Using Residual Mode Filters and a Simple Disturbance Estimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark; Frost, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Flexible structures containing a large number of modes can benefit from adaptive control techniques which are well suited to applications that have unknown modeling parameters and poorly known operating conditions. In this paper, we focus on a direct adaptive control approach that has been extended to handle adaptive rejection of persistent disturbances. We extend our adaptive control theory to accommodate troublesome modal subsystems of a plant that might inhibit the adaptive controller. In some cases the plant does not satisfy the requirements of Almost Strict Positive Realness. Instead, there maybe be a modal subsystem that inhibits this property. This section will present new results for our adaptive control theory. We will modify the adaptive controller with a Residual Mode Filter (RMF) to compensate for the troublesome modal subsystem, or the Q modes. Here we present the theory for adaptive controllers modified by RMFs, with attention to the issue of disturbances propagating through the Q modes. We apply the theoretical results to a flexible structure example to illustrate the behavior with and without the residual mode filter.

  15. Disturbance observer based sliding mode control of nonlinear mismatched uncertain systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginoya, Divyesh; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new design of multiple-surface sliding mode control for a class of nonlinear uncertain systems with mismatched uncertainties and disturbances. In the method of multiple-surface sliding mode control, it is required to compensate for the derivatives of the virtual inputs which gives rise to the so-called problem of 'explosion of terms'. In this paper a disturbance observer based multiple-surface sliding mode control is proposed to estimate the uncertainties as well as the derivative of the virtual inputs to overcome this problem. The practical stability of the overall system is proved. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy is illustrated via simulation of a benchmark problem and comparison with other control strategies. The proposed scheme is validated by implementing it on a serial flexible joint manipulator in the laboratory.

  16. A fuzzy logic sliding mode controlled electronic differential for a direct wheel drive EV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozkop, Emre; Altas, Ismail H.; Okumus, H. Ibrahim; Sharaf, Adel M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a direct wheel drive electric vehicle based on an electronic differential system with a fuzzy logic sliding mode controller (FLSMC) is studied. The conventional sliding surface is modified using a fuzzy rule base to obtain fuzzy dynamic sliding surfaces by changing its slopes using the global error and its derivative in a fuzzy logic inference system. The controller is compared with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and sliding mode controllers (SMCs), which are usually preferred to be used in industry. The proposed controller provides robustness and flexibility to direct wheel drive electric vehicles. The fuzzy logic sliding mode controller, electronic differential system and the overall electrical vehicle mechanism are modelled and digitally simulated by using the Matlab software. Simulation results show that the system with FLSMC has better efficiency and performance compared to those of PID and SMCs.

  17. Analysis and Synthesis of Memory-Based Fuzzy Sliding Mode Controllers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Lin, Yujuan; Feng, Gang

    2015-12-01

    This paper addresses the sliding mode control problem for a class of Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with matched uncertainties. Different from the conventional memoryless sliding surface, a memory-based sliding surface is proposed which consists of not only the current state but also the delayed state. Both robust and adaptive fuzzy sliding mode controllers are designed based on the proposed memory-based sliding surface. It is shown that the sliding surface can be reached and the closed-loop control system is asymptotically stable. Furthermore, to reduce the chattering, some continuous sliding mode controllers are also presented. Finally, the ball and beam system is used to illustrate the advantages and effectiveness of the proposed approaches. It can be seen that, with the proposed control approaches, not only can the stability be guaranteed, but also its transient performance can be improved significantly.

  18. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, John J.

    1988-01-01

    A method is developed that determines the placement of an active control surface for maximum effectiveness in suppressing flutter. No specific control law is required by this method which is based on the aerodynamic energy concept. It is argued that the spanwise placement of the active controls should coincide with the locations where maximum energy per unit span is fed into the system. The method enables one to determine the distribution, over the different surfaces of the aircraft, of the energy input into the system as a result of the unstable fluttering mode. The method is illustrated using three numerical examples.

  19. Development and Demonstration of Active Noise Control Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R.; Hu, Z.; Sommerfeldt, S.; Walker, B.; Hersh, A.; Luo, H.; Spencer, M.; Hallman, D.; Mitchell, C.; Sutliff, D.

    2000-01-01

    This report details design methods for and feasibility of an Active Noise Control (ANC) system using flush-wall-mounted sensors and actuators to reduce turbofan engine rotor-stator interaction noise. ANC concepts capable of suppressing discrete-tone spinning modes containing several cut-on radial mode were identified, developed analytically, and evaluated. Separate ANC systems that suppressed at least three radial modes in a cylindrical inlet duct and three radial modes in an exhaust annulus were developed. These designs resulted in inlet duct and exhaust duct tests that were performed at NASA on the 4-ft ANC Fan in the NASA Glenn AAPL facility. Effective suppression of 2-BPF spinning mode m = 2 tone noise was achieved over a range of fan speeds 1800 to 2450 rpm, where up to 4 radials were present. In the inlet duct, up to 12 dB reduction was obtained for 3 radial modes, and up to 4 dB was obtained with 4 radial modes. In the exhaust duct, up to 15 dB PWL reduction was obtained with either two or three radial modes present. Thus, the ability to suppress multiple radial modes for tones in both the inlet and exhaust ducts has been successfully demonstrated. Implications of ANC system design requirements on installation and system integration issues for ANC systems capable of suppressing higher order radial mode content when applied to a 767 using twin CF6 engines were evaluated analytically. The analytical results indicated an ANC system must be part of an integrated design to be effective.

  20. Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels using Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid passive/active noise control system utilizing constrained layer damping and model predictive feedback control is presented. This system is used to control the sound radiation of panels due to broadband disturbances. To facilitate the hybrid system design, a methodology for placement of constrained layer damping which targets selected modes based on their relative radiated sound power is developed. The placement methodology is utilized to determine two constrained layer damping configurations for experimental evaluation of a hybrid system. The first configuration targets the (4,1) panel mode which is not controllable by the piezoelectric control actuator, and the (2,3) and (5,2) panel modes. The second configuration targets the (1,1) and (3,1) modes. The experimental results demonstrate the improved reduction of radiated sound power using the hybrid passive/active control system as compared to the active control system alone.

  1. Output feedback sliding mode control for a linear multi-compartment lung mechanics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Saing Paul; Meskin, Nader; Haddad, Wassim M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we develop a sliding mode control architecture to control lung volume and minute ventilation in the presence of modelling system uncertainties. Since the applied input pressure to the lungs is, in general, nonnegative and cannot be arbitrarily large, as not to damage the lungs, a sliding mode control with bounded nonnegative control inputs is proposed. The controller only uses output information (i.e., the total volume of the lungs) and automatically adjusts the applied input pressure so that the system is able to track a given reference signal in the presence of parameter uncertainty (i.e., modelling uncertainty of the lung resistances and lung compliances) and system disturbances. Controllers for both matched and unmatched uncertainties are presented. Specifically, a Lyapunov-based approach is presented for the stability analysis of the system and the proposed control framework is applied to a two-compartment lung model to show the efficacy of the proposed control method.

  2. Raman gain induced mode evolution and on-demand coupling control in whispering-gallery-mode microcavities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Yilmaz, Huzeyfe; Lei, Fu-Chuan; Long, Gui-Lu; Yang, Lan

    2015-11-16

    Waveguide-coupled optical resonators have played an important role in a wide range of applications including optical communication, sensing, nonlinear optics, slow/fast light, and cavity QED. In such a system, the coupling regimes strongly affect the resonance feature in the light transmission spectra, and hence the performance and outcomes of the applications. Therefore it is crucial to control the coupling between the waveguide and the microresonator. In this work, we investigated a fiber-taper coupled whispering-gallery-mode microresonator system, in which the coupling regime is traditionally controlled by adjusting the distance between the resonator and the fiber-taper mechanically. We propose and experimentally demonstrate that by utilizing Raman gain one can achieve on-demand control of the coupling regime without any mechanical movement in the resonator system. Particularly, the application of Raman gain is accompanied by Q enhancement. We also show that with the help of Raman gain control, the transitions between various coupling regimes can affect the light transmission spectra so as to provide better resolvability and signal amplification. This all-optical approach is also suitable for monolithically integrated and packaged waveguide-resonator systems, whose coupling regime is fixed at the time of manufacturing. It provides an effective route to control the light transmission in a waveguide-couple resonator system without mechanically moving individual optical components.

  3. A new adjustable gains for second order sliding mode control of saturated DFIG-based wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounadja, E.; Djahbar, A.; Taleb, R.; Boudjema, Z.

    2017-02-01

    The control of Doubly-Fed induction generator (DFIG), used in wind energy conversion, has been given a great deal of interest. Frequently, this control has been dealt with ignoring the magnetic saturation effect in the DFIG model. The aim of the present work is twofold: firstly, the magnetic saturation effect is accounted in the control design model; secondly, a new second order sliding mode control scheme using adjustable-gains (AG-SOSMC) is proposed to control the DFIG via its rotor side converter. This scheme allows the independent control of the generated active and reactive power. Conventionally, the second order sliding mode control (SOSMC) applied to the DFIG, utilize the super-twisting algorithm with fixed gains. In the proposed AG-SOSMC, a simple means by which the controller can adjust its behavior is used. For that, a linear function is used to represent the variation in gain as a function of the absolute value of the discrepancy between the reference rotor current and its measured value. The transient DFIG speed response using the aforementioned characteristic is compared with the one determined by using the conventional SOSMC controller with fixed gains. Simulation results show, accurate dynamic performances, quicker transient response and more accurate control are achieved for different operating conditions.

  4. Global Sliding Mode Control for the Bank-to-Turn of Hypersonic Glide Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yu, Y. F.; Yan, P. P.; Fan, Y. H.; Guo, X. W.

    2017-03-01

    The technology of Bank-to-Turn has been recognized as an attractive direction due to their significance for the control of hypersonic glide vehicle. Strong coupling existing among pitch, yaw and roll channel was a great challenge for banking to turn, and thus a novel global sliding mode controller was designed for hypersonic glider in this paper. Considering the coupling among channels as interference, we can use invariance principle of sliding mode motion to realize the decoupling control. The global sliding mode control system could eliminate the stage of reaching, which can lead to the realization of whole systematic process decoupling control. When the global sliding mode factor was designed, a minimum norm pole assignment method of the sliding mode matrix was introduced to improve the robustness of the system. The method of continuity of symbolic function was adopted to overcome the chatter, which furtherly modify the transient performance of the system. The simulation results show that this method has good performance of three channel decoupling control and guidance command tracking. And it can meet the requirements of the dynamic performance of the system.

  5. Sliding mode control with self-tuning law for uncertain nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzu-Chun; Huang, Ying-Jeh; Chang, Shin-Hung

    2008-04-01

    A robust sliding mode control that follows a self-tuning law for nonlinear systems possessing uncertain parameters is proposed. The adjustable control gain and a bipolar sigmoid function are on-line tuned to force the tracking error to approach zero. Control system stability is ensured using the Lyapunov method. Both simulation and experimental application of a planetary gear type inverted pendulum control system verify the effectiveness of the developed approach.

  6. Fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification for an active pelvis orthosis: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kebin; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Wang, Long; Munih, Marko; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification method for an active pelvis orthosis. Locomotion information measured by the onboard hip joint angle sensors and the pressure insoles is used to classify five locomotion modes, including two static modes (sitting, standing still), and three dynamic modes (level-ground walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The proposed method classifies these two kinds of modes first by monitoring the variation of the relative hip joint angle between the two legs within a specific period. Static states are then classified by the time-based absolute hip joint angle. As for dynamic modes, a fuzzy-logic based method is proposed for the classification. Preliminary experimental results with three able-bodied subjects achieve an off-line classification accuracy higher than 99.49%.

  7. Flight Simulator Evaluation of Enhanced Propulsion Control Modes for Emergency Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan, S; Sowers, T.; Owen, A., Karl; Fulton, Christopher, E.; Chicatelli, Amy, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes piloted evaluation of enhanced propulsion control modes for emergency operation of aircraft. Fast Response and Overthrust modes were implemented to assess their ability to help avoid or mitigate potentially catastrophic situations, both on the ground and in flight. Tests were conducted to determine the reduction in takeoff distance achievable using the Overthrust mode. Also, improvements in Dutch roll damping, enabled by using yaw rate feedback to the engines to replace the function of a stuck rudder, were investigated. Finally, pilot workload and ability to handle the impaired aircraft on approach and landing were studied. The results showed that improvement in all aspects is possible with these enhanced propulsion control modes, but the way in which they are initiated and incorporated is important for pilot comfort and perceived benefit.

  8. Second-Order Consensus in Multiagent Systems via Distributed Sliding Mode Control.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenwu; Wang, He; Cheng, Fei; Yu, Xinghuo; Wen, Guanghui

    2016-11-22

    In this paper, the new decoupled distributed sliding-mode control (DSMC) is first proposed for second-order consensus in multiagent systems, which finally solves the fundamental unknown problem for sliding-mode control (SMC) design of coupled networked systems. A distributed full-order sliding-mode surface is designed based on the homogeneity with dilation for reaching second-order consensus in multiagent systems, under which the sliding-mode states are decoupled. Then, the SMC is applied to the decoupled sliding-mode states to reach their origin in finite time, which is the sliding-mode surface. The states of agents can first reach the designed sliding-mode surface in finite time and then move to the second-order consensus state along the surface in finite time as well. The DSMC designed in this paper can eliminate the influence of singularity problems and weaken the influence of chattering, which is still very difficult in the SMC systems. In addition, DSMC proposes a general decoupling framework for designing SMC in networked multiagent systems. Simulations are presented to verify the theoretical results in this paper.

  9. Adaptive sliding mode control of tethered satellite deployment with input limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Sun, Guanghui

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive sliding mode tension control method for the deployment of tethered satellite, where the input tension limitation is taken into account. The underactuated governing equations of the tethered satellites system are firstly derived based on Lagrangian mechanics theory. Considering the fact that the tether can only resist axial stretching, the tension input is modelled as input limitation. New adaptive sliding mode laws are addressed to guarantee the stability of the tethered satellite deployment with input disturbance, meanwhile to eliminate the effect of the limitation features of the tension input. Compared with the classic control strategy, the newly proposed adaptive sliding mode control law can deploy the satellite with smaller overshoot of the in-plane angle and implement the tension control reasonably and effectively in engineering practice. The numerical results validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  10. Design of sliding mode control for a class of uncertain switched systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yonghui; Jia, Tinggang; Niu, Yugang; Zou, Yuanyuan

    2015-04-01

    This paper considers the problem of sliding mode control for a class of uncertain switched systems with parameter uncertainties and external disturbances. A key feature of the controlled system is that each subsystem is not required to share the same input channel, which was usually assumed in some existing works. By means of a weighted sum of the input matrix, a common sliding surface is designed in this work. It is shown that the reachability of the sliding surface can be ensured by the present sliding mode controller. Moreover, the sliding motion on the specified sliding surface is asymptotically stable under the proposed switching signal dependent on the state and time. Additionally, the above results are further extended to the case that the system states are unavailable. Both the sliding surface and sliding mode controller are designed by utilising state-observer. Finally, numerical simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the present method.

  11. Default mode network activation and Transcendental Meditation practice: Focused Attention or Automatic Self-transcending?

    PubMed

    Travis, Frederick; Parim, Niyazi

    2017-02-01

    This study used subjective reports and eLORETA analysis to assess to what extent Transcendental Meditation (TM) might involve focused attention-voluntary control of mental content. Eighty-seven TM subjects with one month to five years TM experience participated in this study. Regression analysis of years TM practice and self-reported transcendental experiences (lack of time, space and body sense) during meditation practice was flat (r=.07). Those practicing Transcendental Meditation for 1month reported as much transcending as those with 5years of practice. The eLORETA comparison of eyes-closed rest/task and TM practice/task identified similar areas of activation: theta and alpha activation during rest and TM in the posterior cingulate and precuneus, part of the default mode network, and beta2 and beta3 activation during the task in anterior cingulate, ventral lateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, part of the central executive network. In addition, eLORETA comparison of rest and TM identified higher beta temporal activation during rest and higher theta orbitofrontal activation during TM. Thus, it does not seem accurate to include TM practice with meditations in the catgory of Focused Attention, which are characterized by gamma EEG and DMN deactivation. Mixing meditations with different procedures into a single study confounds exploration of meditation effects and confounds application of meditation practices to different subject populations.

  12. Analyses and tests of the B-1 aircraft structural mode control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wykes, J. H.; Byar, T. R.; Macmiller, C. J.; Greek, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Analyses and flight tests of the B-1 structural mode control system (SMCS) are presented. Improvements in the total dynamic response of a flexible aircraft and the benefits to ride qualities, handling qualities, crew efficiency, and reduced dynamic loads on the primary structures, were investigated. The effectiveness and the performance of the SMCS, which uses small aerodynamic surfaces at the vehicle nose to provide damping to the structural modes, were evaluated.

  13. Spatiotemporal control and synchronization of flute modes and drift waves in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, F.; Bonhomme, G.; Gravier, E.; Oldenbuerger, S.; Philipp, M.

    2006-05-15

    An open-loop spatiotemporal synchronization method is applied to flute modes in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. It is demonstrated that synchronization can be achieved only if the exciter signal rotates in the same direction as the propagating mode. Moreover, the efficiency of the synchronization is shown to depend on the radial properties of the instability under consideration. It is also demonstrated that the control disposition can alternatively be used to produce strongly developed turbulence of drift waves or flute instabilities.

  14. Controlled oscillations of a cylinder: forces and wake modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carberry, J.; Sheridan, J.; Rockwell, D.

    2005-08-01

    The wake states from a circular cylinder undergoing controlled sinusoidal oscillation transverse to the free stream are examined. As the frequency of oscillation passes through the natural Kármán frequency there is a transition between two distinctly different wake states: the low- and high-frequency states. The transition corresponds to a change in the structure of the near wake and is also characterized by a jump in the phase and amplitude of both the total and vortex lift. Over the range of flow and oscillation parameters studied the wake states exhibit a number of universal features. The phases of the vortex lift and drag forces have characteristic values for the low- and high-frequency states, which appear to be directly related to the phase of vortex shedding. A split force concept is employed, whereby instantaneous force traces and images allow discrimination between the actual loading and the physics, and their conventional time-averaged representations. The wake states for the forced oscillations show some remarkable similarities to the response branches of elastically mounted cylinders. The equivalence between forced and self-excited oscillations is addressed in detail using concepts of energy transfer.

  15. Application of Sliding Mode Methods to the Design of Reconfigurable Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Scott R.

    2002-01-01

    Observer-based sliding mode control is investigated for application to aircraft reconfigurable flight control. A comprehensive overview of reconfigurable flight control is given, including, a review of the current state-of-the-art within the subdisciplines of fault detection, parameter identification, adaptive control schemes, and dynamic control allocation. Of the adaptive control methods reviewed, sliding mode control (SMC) appears very promising due its property of invariance to matched uncertainty. An overview of sliding mode control is given and its remarkable properties are demonstrated by example. Sliding mode methods, however, are difficult to implement because unmodeled parasitic dynamics cause immediate and severe instability. This presents a challenge for all practical applications with limited bandwidth actuators. One method to deal with parasitic dynamics is the use of an asymptotic observer in the feedback path. Observer-based SMC is investigated, and a method for selecting observer gains is offered. An additional method for shaping the feedback loop using a filter is also developed. It is shown that this SMC prefilter is equivalent to a form of model reference hedging. A complete design procedure is given which takes advantage of the sliding mode boundary layer to recast the SMC as a linear control law. Frequency domain loop shaping is then used to design the sliding manifold. Finally, three aircraft applications are demonstrated. An F-18/HARV is used to demonstrate a SISO pitch rate tracking controller. It is also used to demonstrate a MIMO lateral-directional roll rate tracking controller. The last application is a full linear six degree-of-freedom advanced tailless fighter model. The observer-based SMC is seen to provide excellent tracking with superior robustness to parameter changes and actuator failures.

  16. Application of sliding mode methods to the design of reconfigurable flight control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Scott Russell

    Observer-based sliding mode control is investigated for application to aircraft reconfigurable flight control. A comprehensive overview of reconfigurable flight control is given, including a review of the current state-of-the-art within the subdisciplines of fault detection, parameter identification, adaptive control schemes, and dynamic control allocation. Of the adaptive control methods reviewed, sliding mode control (SMC) appears very promising due its property of invariance to matched uncertainty. An overview of sliding mode control is given and its remarkable properties are demonstrated by example. Sliding mode methods, however, are difficult to implement because unmodeled parasitic dynamics cause immediate and severe instability. This presents a challenge for all practical applications with limited bandwidth actuators. One method to deal with parasitic dynamics is the use of an asymptotic observer in the feedback path. Observer-based SMC is investigated, and a method for selecting observer gains is offered. An additional method for shaping the feedback loop using a filter is also developed. It is shown that this SMC prefilter is equivalent to a form of model reference hedging. A complete design procedure is given which takes advantage of the sliding mode boundary layer to recast the SMC as a linear control law. Frequency domain loop shaping is then used to design the sliding manifold. Finally, three aircraft applications are demonstrated. An F-18/HARV is used to demonstrate a SISO pitch rate tracking controller. It is also used to demonstrate a MIMO lateral-directional roll rate tracking controller. The last application is a full linear six degree-of-freedom advanced tailless fighter model. The observer-based SMC is seen to provide excellent tracking with superior robustness to parameter changes and actuator failures.

  17. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  18. Biomolecular implementation of a quasi sliding mode feedback controller based on DNA strand displacement reactions.

    PubMed

    Sawlekar, Rucha; Montefusco, Francesco; Kulkarni, Vishwesh; Bates, Declan G

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental aim of synthetic biology is to achieve the capability to design and implement robust embedded biomolecular feedback control circuits. An approach to realize this objective is to use abstract chemical reaction networks (CRNs) as a programming language for the design of complex circuits and networks. Here, we employ this approach to facilitate the implementation of a class of nonlinear feedback controllers based on sliding mode control theory. We show how a set of two-step irreversible reactions with ultrasensitive response dynamics can provide a biomolecular implementation of a nonlinear quasi sliding mode (QSM) controller. We implement our controller in closed-loop with a prototype of a biological pathway and demonstrate that the nonlinear QSM controller outperforms a traditional linear controller by facilitating faster tracking response dynamics without introducing overshoots in the transient response.

  19. Two distinct modes of control for object-directed action.

    PubMed

    Goodale, Melvyn A; Westwood, David A; Milner, A David

    2004-01-01

    There are multiple routes from vision to action that play a role in the production of visually guided reaching and grasping. What remain to be resolved, however, are the conditions under which these various routes are recruited in the generation of actions and the nature of the information they convey. We argue in this chapter that the production of real-time actions to visible targets depends on pathways that are separate from those mediating memory-driven actions. Furthermore, the transition from real-time to memory-driven control occurs as soon as the intended target is no longer visible. Real-time movements depend on pathways from the early visual areas through to relatively encapsulated visuomotor mechanisms in the dorsal stream. These dedicated visuomotor mechanisms, together with motor centers in the premotor cortex and brainstem, compute the absolute metrics of the target object and its position in the egocentric coordinates of the effector used to perform the action. Such real-time programming is essential for the production of accurate and efficient movements in a world where the location and disposition of a goal object with respect to the observer can change quickly and often unpredictably. In contrast, we argue that memory-driven actions make use of a perceptual representation of the target object generated by the ventral stream. Unlike the real-time visuomotor mechanisms, perception-based movement planning makes use of relational metrics and scene-based coordinates. Such computations make it possible, however, to plan and execute actions upon objects long after they have vanished from view.

  20. ACOSS Twelve (Active Control of Space Structures)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Analysis 10 1-VII Controller Robustness Investigation 12 I 1-VIII Robustness Definitions 12 1-lX Loop Transfer Recover on 2-Mode Example 15 I- X ...Results 2-V Correlation of Test and Analysis 67 2-VI Model Sensitivity 67 x 6. 1.0 ANALYTICAL RESEARCH FOR CONTROL METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT (TASK 1.0...include more modes than previously considered. The three I ’kA",PSD location Ix, V. 1I( ?.Is, 1 12 IV, Z) x * V. i Z is. 1 9. 9 (Y. 21 a I?. Iz 1

  1. Integral backstepping sliding mode control for underactuated systems: swing-up and stabilization of the Cart-Pendulum System.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Nabanita; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2013-11-01

    In this paper an integral backstepping sliding mode controller is proposed for controlling underactuated systems. A feedback control law is designed based on backstepping algorithm and a sliding surface is introduced in the final stage of the algorithm. The backstepping algorithm makes the controller immune to matched and mismatched uncertainties and the sliding mode control provides robustness. The proposed controller ensures asymptotic stability. The effectiveness of the proposed controller is compared against a coupled sliding mode controller for swing-up and stabilization of the Cart-Pendulum System. Simulation results show that the proposed integral backstepping sliding mode controller is able to reject both matched and mismatched uncertainties with a chattering free control law, while utilizing less control effort than the sliding mode controller.

  2. Analysis of the stability of an active mode-locking pulsed laser for ultra-short pulses generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracamontes Rodríguez, Y. E.; Beltrán Pérez, G.; Kuzin, Eugin; Castillo Mixcóatl, J.; Muñoz Aguirre, S.

    2013-11-01

    Pulsed lasers have become very important owing to the great amount of applications, from communications to diverse medicine areas. Many works have reported the development of these kinds of sources which uses quite complex cavity configurations and that present instabilities in the output signal. In this work the analysis of a pulsed laser that uses a ring cavity with a length of 16.5 m is presented. A phase modulator (LiNbO3) controlled by an RF generator operated at a frequency of 12.5108 MHz was used to perform the mode lock. The modulator input has a birrefringent fiber then the light polarization affects the mode lock. Therefore it was necessary to perform an analysis and characterization in the input and output signals of the modulator in order to obtain more stable output pulses without requiring a continuous adjustment. The laser implemented with 2 modes of operation, active mode-lock and passive mode-lock. The obtained pulses whit temporal width of 7 ns FWHM for the frequency fundamental 12.5108 MHz and 781 -261-120-116 ps for the harmonic 5-10-16-20 .The results for the passive mode-lock the obtained pulses whit temporal width 2 ps and average power 200 W.

  3. 2.6 W diode-pumped actively mode-locked Tm:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mužík, J.; Jelínek, M., Jr.; Vyhlídal, D.; Kubeček, V.

    2015-03-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated an actively mode-locked laser with a Tm3+-doped yttrium lithium fluoride crystal (YLF). A continuous mode-locked regime was achieved using an acousto-optic modulator and a stable train of pulses with 149.3 MHz repetition rate, 170 ps pulse width and 2.6 W average output power at 1.91 µm in a nearly diffraction-limited beam was obtained. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a diode-pumped actively mode-locked bulk thulium laser with a stable output.

  4. Inverse optimal sliding mode control of spacecraft with coupled translation and attitude dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukdeboon, Chutiphon

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes two robust inverse optimal control schemes for spacecraft with coupled translation and attitude dynamics in the presence of external disturbances. For the first controller, an inverse optimal control law is designed based on Sontag-type formula and the control Lyapunov function. Then a robust inverse optimal position and attitude controller is designed by using a new second-order integral sliding mode control method to combine a sliding mode control with the derived inverse optimal control. The global asymptotic stability of the proposed control law is proved by using the second method of Lyapunov. For the other control law, a nonlinear H∞ inverse optimal controller for spacecraft position and attitude tracking motion is developed to achieve the design conditions of controller gains that the control law becomes suboptimal H∞ state feedback control. The ultimate boundedness of system state is proved by using the Lyapunov stability theory. Both developed robust inverse optimal controllers can minimise a performance index and ensure the stability of the closed-loop system and external disturbance attenuation. An example of position and attitude tracking manoeuvres is presented and simulation results are included to show the performance of the proposed controllers.

  5. The Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance system operating in the coarse track pointing control mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittlesey, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Fine Guidance System has set new standards in pointing control capability for earth orbiting spacecraft. Two precision pointing control modes are implemented in the Fine Guidance System; one being a Coarse Track Mode which employs a pseudo-quadrature detector approach and the second being a Fine Mode which uses a two axis interferometer implementation. The Coarse Track Mode was designed to maintain FGS pointing error to within 20 milli-arc seconds (rms) when guiding on a 14.5 Mv star. The Fine Mode was designed to maintain FGS pointing error to less than 3 milli-arc seconds (rms). This paper addresses the HST FGS operating in the Coarse Track Mode. An overview of the implementation, the operation, and both the predicted and observed on orbit performance is presented. The discussion includes a review of the Fine Guidance System hardware which uses two beam steering Star Selector servos, four photon counting photomultiplier tube detectors, as well as a 24 bit microprocessor, which executes the control system firmware. Unanticipated spacecraft operational characteristics are discussed as they impact pointing performance. These include the influence of spherically aberrated star images as well as the mechanical shocks induced in the spacecraft during and following orbital day/night terminator crossings. Computer modeling of the Coarse Track Mode verifies the observed on orbit performance trends in the presence of these optical and mechanical disturbances. It is concluded that the coarse track pointing control function is performing as designed and is providing a robust pointing control capability for the Hubble Space Telescope.

  6. Shock Position Control for Mode Transition in a Turbine Based Combined Cycle Engine Inlet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    A dual flow-path inlet for a turbine based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion system is to be tested in order to evaluate methodologies for performing a controlled inlet mode transition. Prior to experimental testing, simulation models are used to test, debug, and validate potential control algorithms which are designed to maintain shock position during inlet disturbances. One simulation package being used for testing is the High Mach Transient Engine Cycle Code simulation, known as HiTECC. This paper discusses the development of a mode transition schedule for the HiTECC simulation that is analogous to the development of inlet performance maps. Inlet performance maps, derived through experimental means, describe the performance and operability of the inlet as the splitter closes, switching power production from the turbine engine to the Dual Mode Scram Jet. With knowledge of the operability and performance tradeoffs, a closed loop system can be designed to optimize the performance of the inlet. This paper demonstrates the design of the closed loop control system and benefit with the implementation of a Proportional-Integral controller, an H-Infinity based controller, and a disturbance observer based controller; all of which avoid inlet unstart during a mode transition with a simulated disturbance that would lead to inlet unstart without closed loop control.

  7. Tempo and Mode of Transposable Element Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Robert; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of transposable element (TE) insertions have been of continued interest since TE activity has important implications for genome evolution and adaptation. Here, we infer the transposition dynamics of TEs by comparing their abundance in natural D. melanogaster and D. simulans populations. Sequencing pools of more than 550 South African flies to at least 320-fold coverage, we determined the genome wide TE insertion frequencies in both species. We suggest that the predominance of low frequency insertions in the two species (>80% of the insertions have a frequency <0.2) is probably due to a high activity of more than 58 families in both species. We provide evidence for 50% of the TE families having temporally heterogenous transposition rates with different TE families being affected in the two species. While in D. melanogaster retrotransposons were more active, DNA transposons showed higher activity levels in D. simulans. Moreover, we suggest that LTR insertions are mostly of recent origin in both species, while DNA and non-LTR insertions are older and more frequently vertically transmitted since the split of D. melanogaster and D. simulans. We propose that the high TE activity is of recent origin in both species and a consequence of the demographic history, with habitat expansion triggering a period of rapid evolution. PMID:26186437

  8. A high repetition rate passively Q-switched microchip laser for controllable transverse laser modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; Bai, Sheng-Chuang; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Ueda, Ken-Ichi; Kaminskii, Alexander A.

    2016-05-01

    A Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 microchip laser for versatile controllable transverse laser modes has been demonstrated by adjusting the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal along the tilted pump beam direction. The pump beam diameter-dependent asymmetric saturated inversion population inside the Nd:YVO4 crystal governs the oscillation of various Laguerre-Gaussian, Ince-Gaussian and Hermite-Gaussian modes. Controllable transverse laser modes with repetition rates over 25 kHz and up to 183 kHz, depending on the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal, have been achieved. The controllable transverse laser beams with a nanosecond pulse width and peak power over hundreds of watts have been obtained for potential applications in optical trapping and quantum computation.

  9. Projective synchronization of nonidentical fractional-order neural networks based on sliding mode controller.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhixia; Shen, Yi

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates global projective synchronization of nonidentical fractional-order neural networks (FNNs) based on sliding mode control technique. We firstly construct a fractional-order integral sliding surface. Then, according to the sliding mode control theory, we design a sliding mode controller to guarantee the occurrence of the sliding motion. Based on fractional Lyapunov direct methods, system trajectories are driven to the proposed sliding surface and remain on it evermore, and some novel criteria are obtained to realize global projective synchronization of nonidentical FNNs. As the special cases, some sufficient conditions are given to ensure projective synchronization of identical FNNs, complete synchronization of nonidentical FNNs and anti-synchronization of nonidentical FNNs. Finally, one numerical example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  10. Discrete-time sliding mode control for uncertain systems with state and input delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Ming-Chang

    2010-12-01

    This article presents a discrete-time sliding mode control method for the robust stabilisation of linear uncertain multi-input discrete-time systems with state and input delays. The systems are assumed to have structured mismatched time-varying parameter uncertainties. A specified switching surface is proposed and a sliding mode controller is derived to ensure the existence of the quasi-sliding mode. Based on the improved Lyapunov function and linear matrix inequality technique, delay-independent sufficient conditions for the design of a stable switching surface are given and the stability of the overall closed-loop system is guaranteed. Neither chattering phenomenon will occur nor the knowledge of upper bound of uncertainties is required. Finally, simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed control methodology.

  11. A multi-mode manipulator display system for controlling remote robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massimino, Michael J.; Meschler, Michael F.; Rodriguez, Alberto A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective and contribution of the research presented in this paper is to provide a Multi-Mode Manipulator Display System (MMDS) to assist a human operator with the control of remote manipulator systems. Such systems include space based manipulators such as the space shuttle remote manipulator system (SRMS) and future ground controlled teleoperated and telescience space systems. The MMDS contains a number of display modes and submodes which display position control cues position data in graphical formats, based primarily on manipulator position and joint angle data. Therefore the MMDS is not dependent on visual information for input and can assist the operator especially when visual feedback is inadequate. This paper provides descriptions of the new modes and experiment results to date.

  12. Stabilization of a Quadrotor With Uncertain Suspended Load Using Sliding Mode Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Jiucai; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2016-08-21

    The stability and trajectory control of a quadrotor carrying a suspended load with a fixed known mass has been extensively studied in recent years. However, the load mass is not always known beforehand in practical applications. This mass uncertainty brings uncertain disturbances to the quadrotor system, causing existing controllers to have a worse performance or to be collapsed. To improve the quadrotor's stability in this situation, we investigate the impacts of the uncertain load mass on the quadrotor. By comparing the simulation results of two controllers -- the proportional-derivative (PD) controller and the sliding mode controller (SMC) driven by a sliding mode disturbance of observer (SMDO), the quadrotor's performance is verified to be worse as the uncertainty increases. The simulation results also show a controller with stronger robustness against disturbances is better for practical applications.

  13. Implementation of fuzzy-sliding mode based control of a grid connected photovoltaic system.

    PubMed

    Menadi, Abdelkrim; Abdeddaim, Sabrina; Ghamri, Ahmed; Betka, Achour

    2015-09-01

    The present work describes an optimal operation of a small scale photovoltaic system connected to a micro-grid, based on both sliding mode and fuzzy logic control. Real time implementation is done through a dSPACE 1104 single board, controlling a boost chopper on the PV array side and a voltage source inverter (VSI) on the grid side. The sliding mode controller tracks permanently the maximum power of the PV array regardless of atmospheric condition variations, while The fuzzy logic controller (FLC) regulates the DC-link voltage, and ensures via current control of the VSI a quasi-total transit of the extracted PV power to the grid under a unity power factor operation. Simulation results, carried out via Matlab-Simulink package were approved through experiment, showing the effectiveness of the proposed control techniques.

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Resistive Wall Mode Control In DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M. L.; Humphreys, D. A.; Jensen, T. H.; Leuer, J. A.; Nerem, A.; Strait, E. J.; Garofalo, A. M.

    2001-10-01

    Detailed dynamic response models have been developed for all relevant subsystems comprising the DIII-D resistive wall mode (RWM) closed loop control system. These include the switching power amplifiers (SPA), digital plasma control system (PCS), acquisition and control circuitry, and a fully toroidal model of plasma/vessel dynamics based on specification of the marginal wall position from stability codes such as GATO and DCON. These models have been validated with experimental data, including open-loop excitation of the SPA, PCS, and vacuum vessel dynamic responses, and measurement of the growth rate and mode structure of the unstable plasma. These models are incorporated into a closed-loop control simulation to investigate the control limitations which are due to realistic power supply responses. Consequences of and approaches to the intrinsically multivariable RWM control problem are also investigated.

  15. Adaptive uniform finite-/fixed-time convergent second-order sliding-mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basin, Michael; Bharath Panathula, Chandrasekhara; Shtessel, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an adaptive gain algorithm for second-order sliding-mode control (2-SMC), specifically a super-twisting (STW)-like controller, with uniform finite/fixed convergence time, that is robust to perturbations with unknown bounds. It is shown that a second-order sliding mode is established as exact finite-time convergence to the origin if the adaptive gain does not have the ability to get reduced and converge to a small vicinity of the origin if the adaptation algorithm does not overestimate the control gain. The estimate of fixed convergence time of the studied adaptive STW-like controller is derived based on the Lyapunov analysis. The efficacy of the proposed adaptive algorithm is illustrated in a tutorial example, where the adaptive STW-like controller with uniform finite/fixed convergence time is compared to the adaptive STW controller with non-uniform finite convergence time.

  16. Smith predictor based-sliding mode controller for integrating processes with elevated deadtime.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Oscar; De la Cruz, Francisco

    2004-04-01

    An approach to control integrating processes with elevated deadtime using a Smith predictor sliding mode controller is presented. A PID sliding surface and an integrating first-order plus deadtime model have been used to synthesize the controller. Since the performance of existing controllers with a Smith predictor decrease in the presence of modeling errors, this paper presents a simple approach to combining the Smith predictor with the sliding mode concept, which is a proven, simple, and robust procedure. The proposed scheme has a set of tuning equations as a function of the characteristic parameters of the model. For implementation of our proposed approach, computer based industrial controllers that execute PID algorithms can be used. The performance and robustness of the proposed controller are compared with the Matausek-Micić scheme for linear systems using simulations.

  17. Doubly active Q switching and mode locking of an all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Díez, Antonio; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous and independent active Q switching and active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated using all-fiber modulation techniques. A magnetostrictive rod attached to the output fiber Bragg grating modulates the Q factor of the Fabry-Perot cavity, whereas active mode locking is achieved by amplitude modulation with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic device. Fully modulated Q-switched mode-locked trains of optical pulses were obtained for a wide range of pump powers and repetition rates. For a Q-switched repetition rate of 500 Hz and a pump power of 100 mW, the laser generates trains of 12-14 mode-locked pulses of about 1 ns each, within an envelope of 550 ns, an overall energy of 0.65 microJ, and a peak power higher than 250 W for the central pulses of the train.

  18. Classical and higher-order sliding mode attitude control for launch vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, James Edward, Jr.

    In determining flight controls for launch vehicle systems, several things must be taken into account. Launch vehicle systems can be expendable or reusable, carry crew or cargo, etc. Each of these launch vehicles maneuvers through a wide range of flight conditions and different mission profiles. Crewed vehicles must adhere to human rating requirements which limit the angular rates. Reusable launch vehicle systems must take into account actuator saturation during entry. Wind disturbances and plant uncertainties are major perturbations to the nominal state of any launch vehicle. An ideal controller is one that is robust enough to handle these uncertainties and external disturbances with limited control authority. One major challenge that exists in the design of these vehicles is the updating of old autopilot technology to new robust designs while also taking into account the different type of launch vehicle system employed. Sliding mode control algorithms that are inherently robust to external disturbances and plant uncertainties are very good candidates for improving the robustness and accuracy of the flight control systems. This dissertation focuses on systematically studying and developing a 'toolbox' of classical and higher-order sliding mode attitude control algorithms for different types of launch vehicle systems operating in uncertain conditions, including model uncertainties, actuator malfunctions, and external perturbations such as wind gusts. The developed toolbox comprises of time-varying sliding variables, classical and higher-order sliding mode attitude control algorithms, and observer techniques that yield novel sliding mode attitude control architectures. The proposed control toolbox allows achieving even higher standards of performance, reliability, safety, operability, and cost for launch vehicles over the current state of the art. Case studies include controlling the X-33 and SLV-X Launch Vehicles studied under NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI

  19. Active Control of Fan Noise by Vane Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Alan R. D.

    1999-01-01

    An active noise control system for ducted fan noise was built that uses actuators located in stator vanes. The actuators were piezoelectric benders manufactured using the THUNDER technology and were custom designed for the application. The active noise control system was installed in the NASA ANCF rig. Four actuator array with a total of 168 actuators in 28 stator vanes were used. Simultaneous reductions of acoustic power in both the inlet and exhaust duct were demonstrated for a fan disturbance that contained two radial mode orders in both inlet and exhaust. Total power levels in the target modes were reduced by up to 9 dB in the inlet and total tone levels by over 6 dB while exhaust power levels were reduced by up to 3 dB. Far field sound pressure level reductions of up to 17 dB were observed. A simpler control system, matched to the location of the disturbance with two radial actuator arrays, was demonstrated to control total acoustic power in four disturbance modes simultaneously in inlet and exhaust. The vane actuator met the requirements given for the ANCF, although in practice the performance of the system was limited by the constraints of the power amplifiers and the presence of control spillover. The vane actuators were robust. None of the 168 vane actuators failed during the tests.

  20. The Use of a Gyroless Wheel-Tach Controller in SDO Safehold Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourkland, Kristin L.; Starin, Scott R.; Mangus, David J.; Starin, Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the progression of the Safehold mode design on the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. Safehold uses coarse Sun sensors and reaction wheel tachometers to keep the spacecraft in a thermally safe and power-positive attitude. The control algorithm is described, and simulation results shown. Specific control issues arose when the spacecraft entered eclipse, and a description of the trade study which added gyroscopes to the mode is included. The paper concludes with the results from the linear and nonlinear stability analysis.

  1. Fractional order sliding mode control for tethered satellite deployment with disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junjie; Zhu, Zheng H.; Wang, Wei; Li, Aijun; Wang, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a fractional order sliding mode control for the deployment of tethered space systems with the consideration of uncertainty of external disturbances and unmodeled system dynamics. The proposed fractional order sliding mode control consists of two sub-sliding manifolds that are defined separately for the actuated and unactuated states. This, in turn, generates a control scheme to make all states move toward to the desired states. The stability analysis of the proposed control law indicates not only all states converge to the desired states at equilibrium but also disturbances caused by the uncertainty can be suppressed satisfactorily. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the influences of fractional order and sub-sliding manifold of unactuated states on the performance of the proposed control law. The performance is compared with the sliding mode, PD and fractional order PD control laws for a baseline scenario of tether deployment. The proposed control law performs better than others in the settling time and the maximum pitch angle control in the presence of unwanted disturbances. Effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control law are demonstrated by computer simulations.

  2. Mode Q factor and lasing spectrum controls for deformed square resonator microlasers with circular sides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Hai-Zhong; Huang, Yong-Zhen; Yang, Yue-De; Ma, Xiu-Wen; Xiao, Jin-Long; Du, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Stable dual-mode lasing semiconductor lasers can be used as a seed source for photonic generation of optical frequency comb and terahertz carrier. Normal square resonator microlasers can support dual-mode lasing with frequency interval up to 100 GHz. Here we demonstrate ultrahigh Q deformed square resonators with the flat sides replaced by circular sides for further increasing transverse mode intervals. The stable condition of dual-mode lasing is verified based on nonlinear gain analysis. Furthermore, the beating signals of 0.43, 0.31, and 0.16 THz are obtained by the autocorrelation measurement, which indicate the deformed microlasers as an architecture for THz radiation generation. The deformed square resonators pave the way for controlling the lasing spectrum and serve as ultrahigh Q microresonators for photonic integrated circuits.

  3. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  4. The unrested resting brain: sleep deprivation alters activity within the default-mode network.

    PubMed

    Gujar, Ninad; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Hu, Peter; Walker, Matthew P

    2010-08-01

    The sleep-deprived brain has principally been characterized by examining dysfunction during cognitive task performance. However, far less attention has been afforded the possibility that sleep deprivation may be as, if not more, accurately characterized on the basis of abnormal resting-state brain activity. Here we report that one night of sleep deprivation significantly disrupts the canonical signature of task-related deactivation, resulting in a double dissociation within anterior as well as posterior midline regions of the default network. Indeed, deactivation within these regions alone discriminated sleep-deprived from sleep-control subjects with a 93% degree of sensitivity and 92% specificity. In addition, the relative balance of deactivation within these default nodes significantly correlated with the amount of prior sleep in the control group (and not extended time awake in the deprivation group). Therefore, the stability and the balance of task-related deactivation in key default-mode regions may be dependent on prior sleep, such that a lack thereof disrupts this signature pattern of brain activity, findings that may offer explanatory insights into conditions associated with sleep loss at both a clinical as well as societal level.

  5. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    PubMed Central

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents. PMID:27147409

  6. Robust two-mode-dependent controller design for networked control systems with random delays modelled by Markov chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Junmin

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the control problem of networked systems with Markovian delays existing on not only the feedback channel but also the forward channel. The resulting controller is thus two-mode dependent by making full use of the available delay information on both channels. Unlike the existing results by using the augmentation method for incorporating the two-channel Markovian delays into the closed-loop model, a prediction scheme is proposed to design a sequence of all possible two-mode dependent controller gains by efficiently solving the derived linear matrix inequalities and send them to the actuator. Depending on the actual delay on the forward channel, the appropriate controller gain will be implemented to drive the plant. Furthermore, the unavoidable uncertainties of the elements in the probability transition matrices are considered in the controller design. Simulation studies and comparisons demonstrate the effectiveness of efficiency of the proposed method.

  7. A fault-tolerant attitude control system for a satellite based on fuzzy global sliding mode control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinjin; Dong, Chaoyang; Wang, Qing

    2008-10-01

    The structures and missions of modern satellites are very complicated, so the reliability of satellites is becoming increasingly important. This paper proposed a fault-tolerant attitude control system for a satellite based on Fuzzy Global Sliding Mode Control (FGSMC) algorithm. We designed a controller for the nonlinear model of a satellite. By designing a global sliding surface, this controller can ensure that the response of the system has global robustness against the uncertainties of system and external disturbances. In this paper attitude control is performed by four reaction flywheels. The attitude control system distributed the three control torques to the four reaction flywheels according to the distribution matrix. We deduced the formula to calculate the distribution matrix. Paper proved the stability of the designed control law, and simulated the attitude control system. The simulation results show that the attitude control law has high accuracy and robustness.

  8. Advanced Techniques for Neoclassical Tearing Mode Control by Electron Cyclotron Current Drive in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F.

    2008-11-01

    Novel techniques have been developed in DIII-D for (1) control of rapidly rotating neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and (2) control of NTMs that have locked to a residual error field or the resistive wall. Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been successful at suppression of NTMs in present tokamaks, but will face new challenges in ITER where NTMs are expected to be more prone to locking. In order to avoid locking, rotating islands must be controlled at small widths that are expected to be narrower than the ECCD deposition. Under these conditions, modulated ECCD is predicted to stabilize more efficiently than continuous current drive. (1) A new technique developed at DIII-D detects the island using oblique electron cyclotron emission with a line of sight equivalent to that of the ECCD. This removes much of the uncertainty in mapping the island structure from the detector to the current drive location. This method was used both to measure the radial alignment between ECCD and the island, and to synchronize the modulation in phase with the island O-point, successfully stabilizing an NTM with mode numbers m/n=3/2. (2) If islands do grow large enough to lock, locked mode control will be necessary for recovery or avoiding disruption in ITER. A potential difficulty associated with locking is that the mode can lock in a position not necessarily accessible to ECCD. To obviate this problem, magnetic perturbations were used for the first time to unlock and reposition a locked m/n=2/1 mode in order to bring it in view of the gyrotron beam, leading to a significant reduction in island size. Once unlocked, magnetic perturbations were also used to sustain and control the mode rotation, which has the potential for easier ECCD modulation

  9. Controlling chaos based on a novel intelligent integral terminal sliding mode control in a rod-type plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, Khari; Zahra, Rahmani; Behrooz, Rezaie

    2016-05-01

    An integral terminal sliding mode controller is proposed in order to control chaos in a rod-type plasma torch system. In this method, a new sliding surface is defined based on a combination of the conventional sliding surface in terminal sliding mode control and a nonlinear function of the integral of the system states. It is assumed that the dynamics of a chaotic system are unknown and also the system is exposed to disturbance and unstructured uncertainty. To achieve a chattering-free and high-speed response for such an unknown system, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system is utilized in the next step to approximate the unknown part of the nonlinear dynamics. Then, the proposed integral terminal sliding mode controller stabilizes the approximated system based on Lyapunov’s stability theory. In addition, a Bee algorithm is used to select the coefficients of integral terminal sliding mode controller to improve the performance of the proposed method. Simulation results demonstrate the improvement in the response speed, chattering rejection, transient response, and robustness against uncertainties.

  10. Mode tuning of a simplified string instrument using time-dimensionless state-derivative control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benacchio, Simon; Chomette, Baptiste; Mamou-Mani, Adrien; Finel, Victor

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in smart structures, particularly in the field of musical acoustics. Control methods, initially developed to reduce vibration and damage, can be a good way to shift modal parameters of a structure in order to modify its dynamic response. This study focuses on smart musical instruments and aims to modify their radiated sound. This is achieved by controlling the modal parameters of the soundboard of a simplified string instrument. A method combining a pole placement algorithm and a time-dimensionless state-derivative control is used and quickly compared to a usual state control method. Then the effect of the mode tuning on the coupling between the string and the soundboard is experimentally studied. Controlling two vibration modes of the soundboard, its acoustic response and the damping of the third partial of the sound are modified. Finally these effects are listened in the radiated sound.

  11. Universal fuzzy integral sliding-mode controllers for stochastic nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qing; Liu, Lu; Feng, Gang; Wang, Yong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the universal integral sliding-mode controller problem for the general stochastic nonlinear systems modeled by Itô type stochastic differential equations is investigated. One of the main contributions is that a novel dynamic integral sliding mode control (DISMC) scheme is developed for stochastic nonlinear systems based on their stochastic T-S fuzzy approximation models. The key advantage of the proposed DISMC scheme is that two very restrictive assumptions in most existing ISMC approaches to stochastic fuzzy systems have been removed. Based on the stochastic Lyapunov theory, it is shown that the closed-loop control system trajectories are kept on the integral sliding surface almost surely since the initial time, and moreover, the stochastic stability of the sliding motion can be guaranteed in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Another main contribution is that the results of universal fuzzy integral sliding-mode controllers for two classes of stochastic nonlinear systems, along with constructive procedures to obtain the universal fuzzy integral sliding-mode controllers, are provided, respectively. Simulation results from an inverted pendulum example are presented to illustrate the advantages and effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  12. Design and pilot evaluation of the RAH-66 Comanche selectable control modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, Phillip J.; Dryfoos, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The RAH-66 Comanche helicopter has been designed to possess superior handling qualities over a wide range of flight conditions. The control laws have been tailored to satisfy the requirements of ADS-33C and the Weapon System Specification (WSS). This paper addresses the design of the Comanche Selectable Mode control laws (Velocity Stabilization/Hover Hold and Altitude Hold), which provide the additional stabilization and control augmentation needed when flying in a Degraded Visual Environment (DVE). An overview of the RAH-66 control laws is presented, including a detailed description of the Selectable Modes design. The primary focus of this paper is the results of piloted evaluation of these control laws in the Boeing motionbase simulator. These tests substantiate the detailed design of the Comanche Selectable Mode control laws. All tested DVE tasks (ADS-33C, sections 4.4 and 4.5) were rated Level 1. Other evaluation tasks confirmed the mission suitability of the control system. These control laws are ready for formal ADS-33C compliance testing in the Sikorsky Full Mission Simulator (FMS).

  13. Design of controlled rocking steel frames to limit higher mode effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andree Wiebe, Lydell Deighton

    Because conventional seismic force resisting systems rely on yielding of key structural members to limit seismic forces, structural damage is expected after a design-level earthquake. Repairing this damage can be very expensive, if it is possible at all. Researchers have been developing a new family of self-centring systems that avoid structural damage. One such system is a controlled rocking steel frame, which is the subject of this thesis. In a controlled rocking steel frame, the columns of a frame are permitted to uplift from the foundation, and the response is controlled by using a combination of post-tensioning and energy dissipation. Although previous studies have confirmed the viability of this system, they have also shown that rocking does not fully limit the peak seismic forces because of higher mode effects. If a structure is designed to account for these effects, it may be uneconomical, but if it is not designed to account for them, it may be unsafe. The purpose of this thesis is to develop recommendations for the design of controlled rocking steel frames, particularly with regard to higher mode effects. A theoretical framework for understanding higher mode effects is developed, and large-scale shake table testing is used to study the behaviour of a controlled rocking steel frame. Two mechanisms are proposed to mitigate the increase in structural forces due to higher mode effects, and these mechanisms are validated by shake table testing. Numerical modelling of controlled rocking steel frames is shown to become more reliable when higher mode mitigation mechanisms are used to limit the seismic response. In the final chapters, the thesis proposes and validates a new methodology for the limit states design of controlled rocking steel frames.

  14. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Thruster Control Mode Design and Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Oscar C.

    2010-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, MD, designed, built, tested, and launched the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on June 18, 2009. The LRO spacecraft is the first operational spacecraft designed to support NASA s return to the Moon, as part of the Vision for Space Exploration. LRO was launched aboard an Atlas V 401 launch vehicle into a direct insertion trajectory to the Moon. Twenty-four hours after separation the propulsion system was used to perform a mid-course correction maneuver. Four days after the mid-course correction a series of propulsion maneuvers were executed to insert LRO into its commissioning orbit. The commission period lasted eighty days and this followed by a second set of thruster maneuvers that inserted LRO into its mission orbit. To date, the spacecraft has been gathering invaluable data in support of human s future return to the moon. The LRO Attitude Control Systems (ACS) contains two thruster based control modes: Delta-H and Delta-V. The design of the two controllers are similar in that they are both used for 3-axis control of the spacecraft with the Delta-H controller used for momentum management and the Delta-V controller used for orbit adjust and maintenance maneuvers. In addition to the nominal purpose of the thruster modes, the Delta-H controller also has the added capability of performing a large angle slew maneuver. A suite of ACS components are used by the thruster based control modes, for both initialization and control. For initialization purposes, a star tracker or the Kalman Filter solution is used for providing attitude knowledge and upon entrance into the thruster based control modes attitude knowledge is provided via rate propagation using a inertial reference unit (IRU). Rate information for the controller is also supplied by the IRU. Three-axis control of the spacecraft in the thruster modes is provided by eight 5

  15. Longitudinal changes of amygdala and default mode activation in adolescents prenatally exposed to cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhihao; Coles, Claire D.; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Luo, Yuejia; Hu, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) is associated with long-term and negative effect on arousal regulation. Recent neuroimaging studies have examined brain mechanisms related to arousal dysregulation with cross-sectional experimental designs; but longitudinal changes in the brain, reflecting group differences in neurodevelopment, have never been directly examined. To directly assess the interaction of PCE and neurodevelopment, the present study used a longitudinal design to analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data collected from 33 adolescents (21 with PCE and 12 non-exposed controls) while they performed the same working memory task with emotional distracters at two points in time. The mean age of participants was 14.3 years at time_1 and 16.7 years at time_2. With confounding factors statistically controlled, the fMRI data revealed significant exposure-by-time interaction in the activations of the amygdala and default mode network (DMN). For the control adolescents, brain activations associated with emotional arousal (amygdala) and cognitive effort (DMN) were both reduced at time_2 as compared to that at time_1. However, these activation reductions were not observed in the PCE group, indicating persistently high levels of emotional arousal and cognitive effort. In addition, correlations between longitudinal changes in the brain and in behavior have shown that adolescents with persistently high emotional arousal were more likely in need of high cognitive effort; and their cognitive performance was more likely to be affected by distractive challenges. The present results complement and extend previous findings from cross-sectional studies with further evidence supporting the view of PCE associated long-term teratogenic effects on arousal regulation. PMID:26577285

  16. Thickness mode EMIS of constrained proof-mass piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamas, Tuncay; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Lin, Bin

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses theoretical and experimental work on thickness-mode electromechanical (E/M) impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) of proof-mass piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PMPWAS). The proof-mass (PM) concept was used to develop a new method for tuning the ultrasonic wave modes and for relatively high frequency local modal sensing by the PM affixed on PWAS. In order to develop the theoretical basis of the PMPWAS tuning concept, analytical analyses were conducted by applying the resonator theory to derive the EMIS of a PWAS constrained on one and both surfaces by isotropic elastic materials. The normalized thickness-mode shapes were obtained for the normal mode expansion (NME) method to eventually predict the thickness-mode EMIS using the correlation between PMPWAS and the structural dynamic properties of the substrate. Proof-masses of different sizes and materials were used to tune the system resonance towards an optimal frequency point. The results were verified by coupled-field finite element analyses (CF-FEA) and experimental results. An application of the tuning effect of PM on the standing wave modes was discussed as the increase in PM thickness shifts the excitation frequency of the wave mode toward the surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode.

  17. Actively controlled vehicle suspension with energy regeneration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar David, Sagiv; Zion Bobrovsky, Ben

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents an innovative dual purpose automotive suspension topology, combining for the first time the active damping qualities with mechanical vibrations power regeneration capabilities. The new configuration consists of a linear generator as an actuator, a power processing stage based on a gyrator operating under sliding mode control and dynamics controllers. The researched design is simple and energetically efficient, enables an accurate force-velocity suspension characteristic control as well as energy regeneration control, with no practical implementation constraints imposed over the theoretical design. Active damping is based on Skyhook suspension control scheme, which enables overcoming the passive damping tradeoff between high- and low-frequency performance, improving both body isolation and the tire's road grip. The system-level design includes configuration of three system operation modes: passive, semi-active or fully active damping, all using the same electro-mechanical infrastructure, and each focusing on different objective: dynamics improvement or power regeneration. Conclusively, the innovative hybrid suspension is theoretically researched, practically designed and analysed, and proven to be feasible as well as profitable in the aspects of power regeneration, vehicle dynamics improvement and human health risks reduction.

  18. Active vibration control of beams using filtered-velocity feedback controllers with moment pair actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Changjoo; Hong, Chinsuk; Jeong, Weui Bong

    2013-06-01

    In this study, filtered-velocity feedback (FVF) control is proposed to stabilize a control system with a non-collocated sensor/actuator configuration. This method is applied to actively control a clamped beam with a sensor/moment pair actuator. Since the sensor/moment pair actuator is a non-collocated configuration, the control system experiences structural instability at high frequencies. Due to the roll-off property of the FVF controller, the high frequency structural instability problem can be overcome. Due to the second-order filter characteristics of the FVF controller, similar to a low pass filter, multimode disturbances can be controlled at the modes below the cut-off frequency. To verify the performance of the controller, the FVF controller is tuned to around 2 kHz, and the structural responses are successfully reduced by numerical and experimental approaches.

  19. Modulation of western North Pacific tropical cyclone activity by the Atlantic Meridional Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Villarini, Gabriele; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Rosati, Anthony; Yang, Xiaosong; Jia, Liwei; Zeng, Fanrong

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the year-to-year modulation of the western North Pacific (WNP) tropical cyclones (TC) activity by the Atlantic Meridional Mode (AMM) using both observations and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Forecast-oriented Low Ocean Resolution Version of CM2.5 (FLOR) global coupled model. 1. The positive (negative) AMM phase suppresses (enhances) WNP TC activity in observations. The anomalous occurrence of WNP TCs results mainly from changes in TC genesis in the southeastern part of the WNP. 2. The observed responses of WNP TC activity to the AMM are connected to the anomalous zonal vertical wind shear (ZVWS) caused by AMM-induced changes to the Walker circulation. During the positive AMM phase, the warming in the North Atlantic induces strong descending flow in the tropical eastern and central Pacific, which intensifies the Walker cell in the WNP. The intensified Walker cell is responsible for the suppressed (enhanced) TC genesis in the eastern (western) part of the WNP by strengthening (weakening) ZVWS. 3. The observed WNPTC-AMM linkage is examined by the long-term control and idealized perturbations experiment with FLOR-FA. A suite of sensitivity experiments strongly corroborate the observed WNPTC-AMM linkage and underlying physical mechanisms.

  20. Actively mode-locked fiber ring laser by intermodal acousto-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Bello-Jiménez, M; Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Sáez-Rodríguez, D; Diez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2010-11-15

    We report an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser. A simple and low-insertion-loss acousto-optic modulator driven by standing flexural waves, which couples core-to-cladding modes in a standard single-mode optical fiber, is used as an active mechanism for mode locking. Among the remarkable features of the modulator, we mention its high modulation depth (72%), broad bandwidth (187 GHz), easy tunability in the optical wavelength, and low insertion losses (0.7 dB). The narrowest optical pulses obtained were of 95 ps time width, 21 mW peak power, repetition rate of 4.758 MHz, and 110 mW of pump power.

  1. Overview of Langley activities in active controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active controls technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. The activities of the Langley Research Center (laRC) in advancing active controls technology. Activities are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  2. Active flutter suppression - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency in the mathematical model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a roll maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  3. Postural Control during Upper Body Locomotor-Like Movements: Similar Synergies Based on Dissimilar Muscle Modes

    PubMed Central

    Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Shapkova, Elena Yu.; Shapkova, Alexandra L.; Degani, Adriana M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the organization of leg and trunk muscles into groups (M-modes) and co-variation of M-mode involvement (M-mode synergies) during whole-body tasks associated with large variations of the moment of force about the vertical body axis. Our major questions were: (1) Can muscle activation patterns during such tasks be described with a few M-modes common across tasks and subjects? (2) Do these modes form the basis for synergies stabilizing MZ time pattern? (3) Will this organization differ between an explicit body rotation task and a task associated with locomotor-like alternating arm movements? Healthy subjects stood barefoot on the force platform and performed two motor tasks while paced by the metronome at 0.7, 1.0, and 1.4 Hz: Cyclic rotation of the upper body about the vertical body axis (body rotation task), and alternating rhythmic arm movements imitating those during running or quick walking (arm movement task). Principal component analysis was used to identify three M-modes within the space of integrated indices of muscle activity. The M-mode vectors showed clustering neither across subjects nor across frequencies. Variance in the M-mode space across sway cycles was partitioned into two components, one that did not affect the average value of MZ shift ("good variance") and the other that did. An index was computed reflecting the relative amount of the "good variance"; positive values of this index have been interpreted as reflecting a multi-M-mode synergy stabilizing the MZ trajectory. On average, the index was positive for both tasks and across all frequencies studied. However, the magnitude of the index was smaller for the intermediate frequency (1 Hz). The results show that the organization of muscles into groups during relatively complex whole-body tasks can differ significantly across both task variations and subjects. Nevertheless, the central nervous system seems to be able to build MZ stabilizing synergies based on different sets of M-modes

  4. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes: Insecticidal activity, mammalian toxicity, and mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Horsham, M.A.; Palmer, C.J.; Cole, L.M.; Casida, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    4-Ethynyl- and 4-(prop-1-ynyl)phenylsilatranes (N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub 3}SiR, R = C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CH or C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CCH{sub 3}) are highly toxic to houseflies (pretreated with piperonyl butoxide) and milkweed bugs (topical LD{sub 50}s 3-14 {mu}g/g) and to mice (intraperitoneal LD{sub 50}s 0.4-0.9 mg/kg), and they are moderately potent inhibitors of the ({sup 35}S)-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate or TBPS binding site (GABA-gated chloride channel) of mouse brain membranes. Scatchard analysis indicates noncompetitive interaction of 4-ethynylphenylsilatrane with the TBPS binding site. Phenylsilatrane analogues with 4-substituents of H, CH{sub 3}, Cl, Br, and C{triple bond}CSi(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} are highly toxic to mice but have little or no activity in the insect and receptor assays. Radioligand binding studies with (4-{sup 3}H)phenylsilatrane failed to reveal a specific binding site in mouse brain. Silatranes with R = H, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}Cl, CH{double bond}CH{sub 2}, OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3} are of little or no activity in the insect and mouse toxicity and TBPS binding site assays as are the trithia and monocyclic analogues of phenylsilatrane. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes are new probes to examine the GABA receptor-ionophore complex of insects and mammals.

  5. Low-degree p-mode parameters evolution with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochard, J.; Boumier, P.

    We present updated results on the low-degree p-mode parameters changes with solar activity: frequency, spectral width, rotational splittings and spectral asymmetry. A particular attention is devoted to the l=2 splitting asymmetry. Comparaisons of our frequency shifts (derived from the GOLF observations) with predictions of Pr.Dziembowski (based on an extrapolation from intermediate degree modes observations from MDI), are discussed.

  6. Sliding mode control based impact angle control guidance considering the seeker׳s field-of-view constraint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingliang; Zhang, Youan; Wu, Huali

    2016-03-01

    The problem of impact angle control guidance for a field-of-view constrained missile against non-maneuvering or maneuvering targets is solved by using the sliding mode control theory. The existing impact angle control guidance laws with field-of-view constraint are only applicable against stationary targets and most of them suffer abrupt-jumping of guidance command due to the application of additional guidance mode switching logic. In this paper, the field-of-view constraint is handled without using any additional switching logic. In particular, a novel time-varying sliding surface is first designed to achieve zero miss distance and zero impact angle error without violating the field-of-view constraint during the sliding mode phase. Then a control integral barrier Lyapunov function is used to design the reaching law so that the sliding mode can be reached within finite time and the field-of-view constraint is not violated during the reaching phase as well. A nonlinear extended state observer is constructed to estimate the disturbance caused by unknown target maneuver, and the undesirable chattering is alleviated effectively by using the estimation as a compensation item in the guidance law. The performance of the proposed guidance law is illustrated with simulations.

  7. Modified Adaptive Control for Region 3 Operation in the Presence of Wind Turbine Structural Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan Alane; Balas, Mark J.; Wright, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Many challenges exist for the operation of wind turbines in an efficient manner that is reliable and avoids component fatigue and failure. Turbines operate in highly turbulent environments resulting in aerodynamic loads that can easily excite turbine structural modes, possibly causing component fatigue and failure. Wind turbine manufacturers are highly motivated to reduce component fatigue and failure that can lead to loss of revenue due to turbine down time and maintenance costs. The trend in wind turbine design is toward larger, more flexible turbines that are ideally suited to adaptive control methods due to the complexity and expense required to create accurate models of their dynamic characteristics. In this paper, we design an adaptive collective pitch controller for a high-fidelity simulation of a utility-scale, variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbine operating in Region 3. The objective of the adaptive pitch controller is to regulate generator speed, accommodate wind gusts, and reduce the excitation of structural modes in the wind turbine. The control objective is accomplished by collectively pitching the turbine blades. The adaptive collective pitch controller for Region 3 was compared in simulations with a baseline classical Proportional Integrator (PI) collective pitch controller. The adaptive controller will demonstrate the ability to regulate generator speed in Region 3, while accommodating gusts, and reducing the excitation of certain structural modes in the wind turbine.

  8. Resistive Wall Mode feedback on DIII-D using Linear Quadratic Gaussian control and a GPU powered control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, M. D.; Navratil, G. A.; Hanson, J. M.; Bialek, J.; Piglowski, D. A.; Penaflor, B. G.

    2015-11-01

    A Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) based control system has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak for Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) control similar to one implemented at the HBT-EP tokamak. DIII-D can excite RWMs, which are strong, locked or nearly locked kink modes whose rotation frequencies do not evolve quickly and are slow compared to their growth rates. Simulations have predicted that modern control techniques like Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control will perform better than classical control techniques when using control coils external to the vacuum vessel. An LQG control algorithm based on the VALEN model for the RWM has been developed and tested on this system. Early tests have shown the algorithm is able to track and suppress with external control coils the plasma response of an n=1 perturbation driven by internal control coils. An overview of the control hardware, VALEN model, control algorithm and initial results will be presented. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-04ER54761 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  9. String Pendulum Dynamics. Control in the Single-Axis Azimuth-Free Gyro Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, D. A.

    2014-03-01

    An implementation of a generalized Foucault pendulum, where the basic mechanical elements are a massive solid ball and two weightless strings, is considered. A two-dimensional electromechanical model of the gyro is constructed. Channels for inertial data acquisition and for vibration control are formed. The stability of the reference manifold for the chosen operation mode is shown.

  10. [Development and applications of the extracorporeal control point module on multi-mode medical images].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao-Qiu; Zhao, Feng-Ling; Zhu, Jian; Li, Wan-Hu; Fu, Zheng; Hu, Xu-Dong

    2008-07-01

    This paper introduces a display module which can be used on multi-mode medical images. The module has a small size and can be easily used for point-selecting puncture diagnosis and treatment, and registration for image fusion control points.

  11. Simultaneous Infrared Dry-Blanching and Dehydration of apple slices Controlled by Intermittent Heating Mode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared heating controlled by intermittent heating mode was found to be able to achieve simultaneous dry-blanching and dehydration of apple slices with a desirable quality. In order to better understand the performance of intermittent heating for simultaneous dry-blanching and dehydration (SIDBD),...

  12. Influence of Activity Mode on Feeling States of High School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, James C.; Pellet, Tracey L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in positive well-being, psychological distress, fatigue, and enjoyment vary as a function of physical activity mode. Fifty-five senior high school students participated in one of four fitness activities including two defined as traditional (running and step-aerobics) and two defined as…

  13. Sliding mode control of the space nuclear reactor system TOPAZ II

    SciTech Connect

    Shtessel, Y.B.; Wyant, F.J.

    1996-03-01

    The Automatic Control System (ACS) of the space nuclear reactor power system TOPAZ II that generates electricity from nuclear heat using in-core thermionic converters is considered. Sliding Mode Control Technique was applied to the reactor system controller design in order to provide the robust high accuracy following of a neutron (thermal) power reference profile in a start up regime and a payload electric power (current) reference profile following in an operation regime. Extensive simulations of the TOPAZ II reactor system with the designed sliding mode controllers showed improved accuracy and robustness of the reactor system performances in a start up regime and in an electric power supply regime as well. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Analysis and design of sliding mode controller gains for boost power factor corrector.

    PubMed

    Kessal, Abdelhalim; Rahmani, Lazhar

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a systematic procedure to compute the gains of sliding mode controller based on an optimization scheme. This controller is oriented to drive an AC-DC converter operating in continuous mode with power factor near unity, and in order to improve static and dynamic performances with large variations of reference voltage and load. This study shows the great influence of the controller gains on the global performances of the system. Hence, a methodology for choosing the gains is detailed. The sliding surface used in this study contains two state variables, input current and output voltage; the advantage of this surface is getting reactions against various disturbances-at the power source, the reference of the output, or the value of the load. The controller is experimentally confirmed for steady-state performance and transient response.

  15. Achievements and tasks for active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Jiri

    This short survey attempted to highlight some achievements of the latest active control applications. Except for the active control of a one-dimensional sound field in ducts and active headphones, the applications for active control technology are still being developed. Although the principles of active control are simple, their applications still require substantial research and modeling of the sound fields to find optimal solutions. There is no doubt that active control of sound field triggered extensive research of the fundamental properties of the sound field which goes beyond the textbook simplifications. Also, new hardware, particularly actuators, are under development. As more realism is brought into assessment of applicability of active control, we will see in the future increasing confidence of industry to adopt this new technology.

  16. TAE modes and MHD activity in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high power deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR have produced fusion a parameters similar to those expected on ITER. The achieved {beta}{sub {alpha}}/{beta} and the R{triangledown}{beta}{sub {alpha}} in TFRR D-T shots are 1/2 to 1/3 those predicted in the ITER EDA. Studies of the initial TFTR D-T plasmas find no evidence that the presence of the fast fusion {alpha} population has affected the stability of MHD, with the possible exception of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE`s). The initial TFTR DT plasmas had MHD activity similar to that commonly seen in deuterium plasmas. Operation of TFTR at plasma currents of 2.0--2.5 MA has greatly reduced the deleterious effects of MHD commonly observed at lower currents. Even at these higher currents, the performance of TFTR is limited by {beta}-limit disruptions. The effects of MHD on D-T fusion {alpha}`s was similar to effects observed on other fusion products in D only plasmas.

  17. Active shear flow control for improved combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Schadow, K. C.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustical and fluid dynamic facets of an excited premixed flame were studied experimentally to evaluate possibilities for development of a stabilizing closed-loop control system. The flame was analyzed as a nonlinear system which includes different subcomponents: acoustics, fluid dynamics, and chemical reaction. Identification of the acoustical and fluid dynamics subsystems is done by analyzing the transfer function, which was obtained by driving the system with both white-noise and a frequency-sweeping sine-wave. The features obtained by this analysis are compared to results of flow visualization and hot-wire flow-field and spectral measurements. The acoustical subsystem is determined by the resonant acoustic modes of the settling chamber. These modes are subsequently filtered and amplified by the flow shear layer, whose instability characteristics are dominated by the preferred mode frequency.

  18. Characterization of MHD instabilities, plasma rotation alteration, and RWM control analysis in the expanded H-mode operation of KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Berkery, J. W.; Bialek, J. M.; Bak, J. G.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, S. G.; Jeon, Y. M.; Hahn, S. H.; You, K.-I.; Lee, K. D.; Park, J. K.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.

    2012-10-01

    The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) has expanded its H-mode operational space to higher beta and lower internal inductance, moving toward design target operation. Plasmas have reached normalized beta of 1.9, stored energy of 340 kJ, and energy confinement time of 171ms evaluated by EFIT reconstructions. Advances from the fall run campaign will be reported. Rotating modes having n = 1, 2 tearing parities are observed by internal and external measurements and their characteristics and stability dependence on plasma rotation profile are analyzed and compared to initial observations. Initial alteration of the plasma rotation profile by applied non-axisymmetric fields is investigated and has characteristics of non-resonant braking. Computation of active RWM control using the VALEN code examines the impact of available sensors for control. Both off-axis and midplane sensors are analyzed, and with off-axis sensors the mode can be stabilized up to normalized beta of 4.5 (C/beta = 86/) and up to 3.6 (44&%slash;) with and without compensation of the prompt applied field of the control coils from the sensors, respectively. Power and bandwidth requirements for RWM stabilization are also calculated by including sensor noise and power supply time delay.

  19. Resistive wall mode feedback control in EXTRAP T2R with improved steady-state error and transient response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    Experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] on feedback control of m =1 resistive wall modes (RWMs) are compared with simulations using the cylindrical linear magnetohydrodynamic model, including the dynamics of the active coils and power amplifiers. Stabilization of the main RWMs (n=-11,-10,-9,-8,+5,+6) is shown using modest loop gains of the order G ˜1. However, other marginally unstable RWMs (n=-2,-1,+1,+2) driven by external field errors are only partially canceled at these gains. The experimental system stability limit is confirmed by simulations showing that the latency of the digital controller ˜50μs is degrading the system gain margin. The transient response is improved with a proportional-plus-derivative controller, and steady-state error is improved with a proportional-plus-integral controller. Suppression of all modes is obtained at high gain G ˜10 using a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controller.

  20. Tools for active control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.; Newsom, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Efficient control law analysis and design tools which properly account for the interaction of flexible structures, unsteady aerodynamics and active controls are developed. Development, application, validation and documentation of efficient multidisciplinary computer programs for analysis and design of active control laws are also discussed.

  1. Development of the HIDEC inlet integration mode. [Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chisholm, J. D.; Nobbs, S. G.; Stewart, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    The Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) development program conducted at NASA-Ames/Dryden will use an F-15 test aircraft for flight demonstration. An account is presently given of the HIDEC Inlet Integration mode's design concept, control law, and test aircraft implementation, with a view to its performance benefits. The enhancement of performance is a function of the use of Digital Electronic Engine Control corrected engine airflow computations to improve the scheduling of inlet ramp positions in real time; excess thrust can thereby be increased by 13 percent at Mach 2.3 and 40,000 ft. Aircraft supportability is also improved through the obviation of inlet controllers.

  2. Model-based Sliding Mode Controller of Anti-lock Braking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Luo, Yue-Gang; Kang, Jing; Shi, Zhan-Qun

    2016-05-01

    The anti-lock braking system (ABS) used in automobiles is used to prevent wheel from lockup and to maintain the steering ability and stability. The sliding mode controller is able to control nonlinear system steadily. In this research, a one-wheel dynamic model with ABS control is built up using model-based method. Using the sliding model controller, the simulation results by using Matlab/Simulink show qualified data compared with optimal slip rate. By using this method, the ABS brake efficiency is improved efficiently.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet diagnostic upgrades for kink mode control on the HBT-EP tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, J. P.; Brooks, J. W.; Desanto, S.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Page, J. W.; Hansen, C. J.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.

    2016-10-01

    Optical diagnostics can provide non-invasive measurements of tokamak equilibria and the internal characteristics of MHD mode activity. We present research plans and ongoing progress on upgrading extreme ultraviolet (EUV) diagnostics in the HBT-EP tokamak. Four sets of 16 poloidal views will allow tomographic reconstruction of plasma emissivity and internal kink mode structure. Emission characteristics of naturally-occurring m/n = 2/1, 3/2, and 3/1 tearing and kink modes will be compared with expectations from a synthetic diagnostic. Coupling between internal and external modes leading up to disruptions is studied. The internal plasma response to external magnetic perturbations is investigated, and compared with magnetic response measurements. Correlation between internal emissivity and external magnetic measurements provides a global picture of long-wavelength MHD instabilities. Measurements are input to HBT-EP's GPU-based feedback system, allowing active feedback for kink modes using only optical sensors and both magnetic and edge current actuators. A separate two-color, 16-chord tangential system will be installed next year to allow reconstruction of temperature profiles and their fluctuations versus time. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  4. Robust dynamic sliding-mode control using adaptive RENN for magnetic levitation system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Faa-Jeng; Chen, Syuan-Yi; Shyu, Kuo-Kai

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, a robust dynamic sliding mode control system (RDSMC) using a recurrent Elman neural network (RENN) is proposed to control the position of a levitated object of a magnetic levitation system considering the uncertainties. First, a dynamic model of the magnetic levitation system is derived. Then, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-type sliding-mode control system (SMC) is adopted for tracking of the reference trajectories. Moreover, a new PID-type dynamic sliding-mode control system (DSMC) is proposed to reduce the chattering phenomenon. However, due to the hardware being limited and the uncertainty bound being unknown of the switching function for the DSMC, an RDSMC is proposed to improve the control performance and further increase the robustness of the magnetic levitation system. In the RDSMC, an RENN estimator is used to estimate an unknown nonlinear function of lumped uncertainty online and replace the switching function in the hitting control of the DSMC directly. The adaptive learning algorithms that trained the parameters of the RENN online are derived using Lyapunov stability theorem. Furthermore, a robust compensator is proposed to confront the uncertainties including approximation error, optimal parameter vectors, and higher order terms in Taylor series. Finally, some experimental results of tracking the various periodic trajectories demonstrate the validity of the proposed RDSMC for practical applications.

  5. Application of nonlinear sliding mode control to ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Carroll, James M; Lauderbaugh, Leal K; Calvisi, Michael L

    2013-07-01

    A sliding mode control system is developed and applied to a spherical model of a contrast agent microbubble that simulates its radial response to ultrasound. The model uses a compressible form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation combined with a thin-shell model. A nonlinear control law for the second-order model is derived and used to design and simulate the controller. The effect of the controller on the contrast agent response is investigated for various control scenarios. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using a nonlinear control system to modulate the dynamic response of ultrasound contrast agents, but highlights the need for improved feedback mechanisms and control input methods. Possible applications of the nonlinear control system to contrast agents illustrated in this work include radius stabilization in the presence of an acoustic wave, radial growth and subsequent collapse, and generation of periodic radial oscillations while a contrast agent is within an acoustic forcing regime known to cause a chaotic response.

  6. Robust fuzzy neural network sliding mode control scheme for IPMSM drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, V. Q.; Mwasilu, F.; Choi, H. H.; Lee, J.; Jung, J. W.

    2014-07-01

    This article proposes a robust fuzzy neural network sliding mode control (FNNSMC) law for interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) drives. The proposed control strategy not only guarantees accurate and fast command speed tracking but also it ensures the robustness to system uncertainties and sudden speed and load changes. The proposed speed controller encompasses three control terms: a decoupling control term which compensates for nonlinear coupling factors using nominal parameters, a fuzzy neural network (FNN) control term which approximates the ideal control components and a sliding mode control (SMC) term which is proposed to compensate for the errors of that approximation. Next, an online FNN training methodology, which is developed using the Lyapunov stability theorem and the gradient descent method, is proposed to enhance the learning capability of the FNN. Moreover, the maximum torque per ampere (MTPA) control is incorporated to maximise the torque generation in the constant torque region and increase the efficiency of the IPMSM drives. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed robust FNNSMC, simulations and experiments are performed by using MATLAB/Simulink platform and a TI TMS320F28335 DSP on a prototype IPMSM drive setup, respectively. Finally, the simulated and experimental results indicate that the proposed design scheme can achieve much better control performances (e.g. more rapid transient response and smaller steady-state error) when compared to the conventional SMC method, especially in the case that there exist system uncertainties.

  7. Sliding-mode control of single input multiple output DC-DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Libo; Sun, Yihan; Luo, Tiejian; Wan, Qiyang

    2016-10-01

    Various voltage levels are required in the vehicle mounted power system. A conventional solution is to utilize an independent multiple output DC-DC converter whose cost is high and control scheme is complicated. In this paper, we design a novel SIMO DC-DC converter with sliding mode controller. The proposed converter can boost the voltage of a low-voltage input power source to a controllable high-voltage DC bus and middle-voltage output terminals, which endow the converter with characteristics of simple structure, low cost, and convenient control. In addition, the sliding mode control (SMC) technique applied in our converter can enhance the performances of a certain SIMO DC-DC converter topology. The high-voltage DC bus can be regarded as the main power source to the high-voltage facility of the vehicle mounted power system, and the middle-voltage output terminals can supply power to the low-voltage equipment on an automobile. In the respect of control algorithm, it is the first time to propose the SMC-PID (Proportion Integration Differentiation) control algorithm, in which the SMC algorithm is utilized and the PID control is attended to the conventional SMC algorithm. The PID control increases the dynamic ability of the SMC algorithm by establishing the corresponding SMC surface and introducing the attached integral of voltage error, which endow the sliding-control system with excellent dynamic performance. At last, we established the MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation model, tested performance of the system, and built the hardware prototype based on Digital Signal Processor (DSP). Results show that the sliding mode control is able to track a required trajectory, which has robustness against the uncertainties and disturbances.

  8. Sliding-mode control of single input multiple output DC-DC converter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libo; Sun, Yihan; Luo, Tiejian; Wan, Qiyang

    2016-10-01

    Various voltage levels are required in the vehicle mounted power system. A conventional solution is to utilize an independent multiple output DC-DC converter whose cost is high and control scheme is complicated. In this paper, we design a novel SIMO DC-DC converter with sliding mode controller. The proposed converter can boost the voltage of a low-voltage input power source to a controllable high-voltage DC bus and middle-voltage output terminals, which endow the converter with characteristics of simple structure, low cost, and convenient control. In addition, the sliding mode control (SMC) technique applied in our converter can enhance the performances of a certain SIMO DC-DC converter topology. The high-voltage DC bus can be regarded as the main power source to the high-voltage facility of the vehicle mounted power system, and the middle-voltage output terminals can supply power to the low-voltage equipment on an automobile. In the respect of control algorithm, it is the first time to propose the SMC-PID (Proportion Integration Differentiation) control algorithm, in which the SMC algorithm is utilized and the PID control is attended to the conventional SMC algorithm. The PID control increases the dynamic ability of the SMC algorithm by establishing the corresponding SMC surface and introducing the attached integral of voltage error, which endow the sliding-control system with excellent dynamic performance. At last, we established the MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation model, tested performance of the system, and built the hardware prototype based on Digital Signal Processor (DSP). Results show that the sliding mode control is able to track a required trajectory, which has robustness against the uncertainties and disturbances.

  9. Evaluation of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Lattime, Scott B.; Taylor, Shawn; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Oswald, Jay; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2005-01-01

    Reducing blade tip clearances through active tip clearance control in the high pressure turbine can lead to significant reductions in emissions and specific fuel consumption as well as dramatic improvements in operating efficiency and increased service life. Current engines employ scheduled cooling of the outer case flanges to reduce high pressure turbine tip clearances during cruise conditions. These systems have relatively slow response and do not use clearance measurement, thereby forcing cold build clearances to set the minimum clearances at extreme operating conditions (e.g., takeoff, reburst) and not allowing cruise clearances to be minimized due to the possibility of throttle transients (e.g., step change in altitude). In an effort to improve upon current thermal methods, a first generation mechanically-actuated active clearance control (ACC) system has been designed and fabricated. The system utilizes independent actuators, a segmented shroud structure, and clearance measurement feedback to provide fast and precise active clearance control throughout engine operation. Ambient temperature performance tests of this first generation ACC system assessed individual seal component leakage rates and both static and dynamic overall system leakage rates. The ability of the nine electric stepper motors to control the position of the seal carriers in both open- and closed-loop control modes for single and multiple cycles was investigated. The ability of the system to follow simulated engine clearance transients in closed-loop mode showed the system was able to track clearances to within a tight tolerance ( 0.001 in. error).

  10. Evaluation of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Lattime, Scott B.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Oswald, Jay; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2005-01-01

    Reducing blade tip clearances through active tip clearance control in the high pressure turbine can lead to significant reductions in emissions and specific fuel consumption as well as dramatic improvements in operating efficiency and increased service life. Current engines employ scheduled cooling of the outer case flanges to reduce high pressure turbine tip clearances during cruise conditions. These systems have relatively slow response and do not use clearance measurement, thereby forcing cold build clearances to set the minimum clearances at extreme operating conditions (e.g., takeoff, reburst) and not allowing cruise clearances to be minimized due to the possibility of throttle transients (e.g., step change in altitude). In an effort to improve upon current thermal methods, a first generation mechanically-actuated active clearance control (ACC) system has been designed and fabricated. The system utilizes independent actuators, a segmented shroud structure, and clearance measurement feedback to provide fast and precise active clearance control throughout engine operation. Ambient temperature performance tests of this first generation ACC system assessed individual seal component leakage rates and both static and dynamic overall system leakage rates. The ability of the nine electric stepper motors to control the position of the seal carriers in both open- and closed-loop control modes for single and multiple cycles was investigated. The ability of the system to follow simulated engine clearance transients in closed-loop mode showed the system was able to track clearances to within a tight tolerance (0.001 in. error).

  11. Optimization of new magnetorheological fluid mount for vibration control of start/stop engine mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jye Ung; Phu, Do Xuan; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    The technologies related to saving energy/or green vehicles are actively researched. In this tendency, the problem for reducing exhausted gas is in development with various ways. Those efforts are directly related to the operation of engine which emits exhausted gas. The auto start/stop of vehicle engine when a vehicle stop at road is currently as a main stream of vehicle industry resulting in reducing exhausted gas. However, this technology automatically turns on and off engine frequently. This motion induces vehicle engine to transmit vibration of engine which has large displacement, and torsional impact to chassis. These vibrations causing uncomfortable feeling to passengers are transmitted through the steering wheel and the gear knob. In this work, in order to resolve this vibration issue, a new proposed magnetorheological (MR) fluid based engine mount (MR mount in short) is presented. The proposed MR mount is designed to satisfy large damping force in various frequency ranges. It is shown that the proposed mount can have large damping force and large force ratio which is enough to control unwanted vibrations of engine start/stop mode.

  12. An Optimization System with Parallel Processing for Reducing Common-Mode Current on Electronic Control Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Yuji; Uno, Takanori; Asai, Hideki

    In this paper, we propose an optimization system with parallel processing for reducing electromagnetic interference (EMI) on electronic control unit (ECU). We adopt simulated annealing (SA), genetic algorithm (GA) and taboo search (TS) to seek optimal solutions, and a Spice-like circuit simulator to analyze common-mode current. Therefore, the proposed system can determine the adequate combinations of the parasitic inductance and capacitance values on printed circuit board (PCB) efficiently and practically, to reduce EMI caused by the common-mode current. Finally, we apply the proposed system to an example circuit to verify the validity and efficiency of the system.

  13. Control of polarization and mode mapping of small volume high Q micropillars

    SciTech Connect

    Daraei, A.; Sanvitto, D.; Timpson, J. A.; Fox, A. M.; Whittaker, D. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Guimaraes, P. S. S.; Vinck, H.; Tahraoui, A.; Fry, P. W.; Liew, S. L.; Hopkinson, M.

    2007-08-15

    We show that the polarization of the emission of a single quantum dot embedded within a microcavity pillar of elliptical cross section can be completely controlled and even switched between two orthogonal linear polarizations by changing the coupling of the dot emission with the polarized photonic modes. We also measure the spatial profile of the emission of a series of pillars with different ellipticities and show that the results can be well described by simple theoretical modeling of the modes of an infinite length elliptical cylinder.

  14. Polarization mode control of long-wavelength VCSELs by intracavity patterning

    DOE PAGES

    Long, Christopher Michael; Mickovic, Zlatko; Dwir, Benjamin; ...

    2016-04-26

    Polarization mode control is enhanced in wafer-fused vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers emitting at 1310 nm wavelength by etching two symmetrically arranged arcs above the gain structure within the laser cavity. The intracavity patterning introduces birefringence and dichroism, which discriminates between the two polarization states of the fundamental transverse modes. We find that the cavity modifications define the polarization angle at threshold with respect to the crystal axes, and increase the gain anisotropy and birefringence on average, leading to an increase in the polarization switching current. As a result, experimental measurements are explained using the spin-flip model of VCSEL polarization dynamics.

  15. A multi-mode sensing system for corrosion detection using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Pollock, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    As an emerging technology for in-situ damage detection and nondestructive evaluation, structural health monitoring with active sensors (active SHM) plays as a promising candidate for the pipeline inspection and diagnosis. Piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS), as an active sensing device, can be permanently attached to the structure to interrogate it at will and can operate in propagating wave mode or electromechanical impedance mode. Its small size and low cost (about $10 each) make itself a potential and unique technology for in-situ SHM application. The objective of the research in this paper is to develop a permanently installed in-situ "multi-mode" sensing system for the corrosion monitoring and prediction of critical pipeline systems. Such a system is used during in-service period, recording and monitoring the changes of the pipelines over time, such as corrosion, wall thickness, etc. Having the real-time data available, maintenance strategies based on these data can then be developed to ensure a safe and less expensive operation of the pipeline systems. After a detailed review of PWAS SHM methods, including ultrasonic, impedance, and thickness measurement, we introduce the concept of PWAS-based multi-mode sensing approach for corrosion detection in pipelines. Particularly, we investigate the potential for using PWAS waves for in thickness mode experimentally. Finally, experiments are conducted to verify the corrosion detection ability of the PWAS network in both metallic plate and pipe in a laboratory setting. Results show successful corrosion localization in both tests.

  16. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  17. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint.

  18. Control of ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in reversed field pinches with a resistive wall

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, A. S.; Finn, J. M.; Delzanno, G. L.

    2010-11-15

    Numerical studies of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities with feedback control in reversed field pinches (RFPs) are presented. Specifically, investigations are performed of the stability of m=1 modes in RFPs with control based on sensing the normal and tangential magnetic fields at the resistive wall and applying two-parameter feedback proportional to these fields. The control scheme is based on that of [J. M. Finn, Phys. Plasmas 13, 082504 (2006)], which is here modified to use a more realistic plasma model. The plasma model now uses full resistive MHD rather than reduced MHD, and it uses three realistic classes of equilibrium parallel current density profiles appropriate to RFPs. Results with these modifications are in qualitative agreement with [J. M. Finn, Phys. Plasmas 13, 082504 (2006)]: the feedback can stabilize tearing modes (with resistive or ideal-wall) and resistive wall ideal modes. The limit for stabilization is again found to be near the threshold for ideal modes with an ideal-wall. In addition to confirming these predictions, the nature of the instabilities limiting the range of feedback stabilization near the ideal-wall ideal-plasma threshold are studied, and the effects of viscosity, resistive wall time, and plasma resistivity are reported.

  19. ENSO controls interannual fire activity in southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, M.; Fletcher, M.-S.; Holz, A.; Nyman, P.

    2016-10-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the main mode controlling the variability in the ocean-atmosphere system in the South Pacific. While the ENSO influence on rainfall regimes in the South Pacific is well documented, its role in driving spatiotemporal trends in fire activity in this region has not been rigorously investigated. This is particularly the case for the highly flammable and densely populated southeast Australian sector, where ENSO is a major control over climatic variability. Here we conduct the first region-wide analysis of how ENSO controls fire activity in southeast Australia. We identify a significant relationship between ENSO and both fire frequency and area burnt. Critically, wavelet analyses reveal that despite substantial temporal variability in the ENSO system, ENSO exerts a persistent and significant influence on southeast Australian fire activity. Our analysis has direct application for developing robust predictive capacity for the increasingly important efforts at fire management.

  20. Orbiter active thermal control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbiter Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) including (1) major functional requirements of heat load, temperature control and heat sink utilization, (2) the overall system arrangement, and (3) detailed description of the elements of the ATCS.

  1. Autoresonant control of nonlinear mode in ultrasonic transducer for machining applications.

    PubMed

    Babitsky, V I; Astashev, V K; Kalashnikov, A N

    2004-04-01

    Experiments conducted in several countries have shown that the improvement of machining quality can be promoted through conversion of the cutting process into one involving controllable high-frequency vibration at the cutting zone. This is achieved through the generation and maintenance of ultrasonic vibration of the cutting tool to alter the fracture process of work-piece material cutting to one in which loading of the materials at the tool tip is incremental, repetitive and controlled. It was shown that excitation of the high-frequency vibro-impact mode of the tool-workpiece interaction is the most effective way of ultrasonic influence on the dynamic characteristics of machining. The exploitation of this nonlinear mode needs a new method of adaptive control for excitation and stabilisation of ultrasonic vibration known as autoresonance. An approach has been developed to design an autoresonant ultrasonic cutting unit as an oscillating system with an intelligent electronic feedback controlling self-excitation in the entire mechatronic system. The feedback produces the exciting force by means of transformation and amplification of the motion signal. This allows realisation for robust control of fine resonant tuning to bring the nonlinear high Q-factor systems into technological application. The autoresonant control provides the possibility of self-tuning and self-adaptation mechanisms for the system to keep the nonlinear resonant mode of oscillation under unpredictable variation of load, structure and parameters. This allows simple regulation of intensity of the process whilst keeping maximum efficiency at all times. An autoresonant system with supervisory computer control was developed, tested and used for the control of the piezoelectric transducer during ultrasonically assisted cutting. The system has been developed as combined analog-digital, where analog devices process the control signal, and parameters of the devices are controlled digitally by computer. The

  2. Active Control of Open Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    UKeiley, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Open loop edge blowing was demonstrated as an effective method for reducing the broad band and tonal components of the fluctuating surface pressure in open cavities. Closed loop has been successfully applied to low Mach number open cavities. Need to push actuators that are viable for closed loop control in bandwidth and output. Need a better understanding of the effects of control on the flow through detailed measurements so better actuation strategies can be developed.

  3. All-optical switch using optically controlled two mode interference coupler.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Partha Pratim

    2012-05-10

    In this paper, we have introduced optically controlled two-mode interference (OTMI) coupler having silicon core and GaAsInP cladding as an all-optical switch. By taking advantage of refractive index modulation by launching optical pulse into cladding region of TMI waveguide, we have shown optically controlled switching operation. We have studied optical pulse-controlled coupling characteristics of the proposed device by using a simple mathematical model on the basis of sinusoidal modes. The device length is less than that of previous work. It is also seen that the cross talk of the OTMI switch is not significantly increased with fabrication tolerances (±δw) in comparison with previous work.

  4. Implementation of model predictive control for resistive wall mode stabilization on EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.

    2015-10-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) method for stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch is presented. The system identification technique is used to obtain a linearized empirical model of EXTRAP T2R. MPC employs the model for prediction and computes optimal control inputs that satisfy performance criterion. The use of a linearized form of the model allows for compact formulation of MPC, implemented on a millisecond timescale, that can be used for real-time control. The design allows the user to arbitrarily suppress any selected Fourier mode. The experimental results from EXTRAP T2R show that the designed and implemented MPC successfully stabilizes the RWM.

  5. Smooth sliding mode control with a disturbance observer for a virtual axis parallel mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Daogen; Wang, Zhenhua; Wang, Zhenqi; Zhang, Xiaotong

    2013-10-01

    The control charactics of the virtual axis parallel mechanism is nonlinear and strong coupling as well as uncertainty. To achieve the goal of decoupling and inhibition of various uncertaities, this paper proposes the algorithm of smooth sliding mode control with a disturbance observer.In order to decline the inherent trembling of the sliding mode control, the paper uses the nonlinear power function such as fal(s,α , δ) in the approaching law decision. Also it uses the PVT interpolation strategy in the joint-space trajectory planning to ensure the stability of the mechanism movement, which is based on the mechnical kinematics models. Simulation of the trajectory tracing shows that the algorithm can improve the robust performance of the parameter perturbation and certain interferance, which achives the aim of the accurate steady-state performance and the good dynamic tracing performance.

  6. Using speech for mode selection in control of multifunctional myoelectric prostheses.

    PubMed

    Fang, Peng; Wei, Zheng; Geng, Yanjuan; Yao, Fuan; Li, Guanglin

    2013-01-01

    Electromyogram (EMG) recorded from residual muscles of limbs is considered as suitable control information for motorized prostheses. However, in case of high-level amputations, the residual muscles are usually limited, which may not provide enough EMG for flexible control of myoelectric prostheses with multiple degrees of freedom of movements. Here, we proposed a control strategy, where the speech signals were used as additional information and combined with the EMG signals to realize more flexible control of multifunctional prostheses. By replacing the traditional "sequential mode-switching (joint-switching)", the speech signals were used to select a mode (joint) of the prosthetic arm, and then the EMG signals were applied to determine a motion class involved in the selected joint and to execute the motion. Preliminary results from three able-bodied subjects and one transhumeral amputee demonstrated the proposed strategy could achieve a high mode-selection rate and enhance the operation efficiency, suggesting the strategy may improve the control performance of commercial myoelectric prostheses.

  7. Polarization-based control of spin-orbit vector modes of light in biphoton interference.

    PubMed

    Leary, C C; Lankford, Maggie; Sundarraman, Deepika

    2016-06-27

    We report the experimental generation of a class of spin-orbit vector modes of light via an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer, obtained from an input beam prepared in a product state of its spin and orbital degrees of freedom. These modes contain a spatially varying polarization structure which may be controllably propagated about the beam axis by varying the retardance between the vertical and horizontal polarization components of the light. Additionally, their transverse spatial intensity distributions may be continuously manipulated by tuning the input polarization parameters. In the case of an analogous biphoton input, we predict that this device will exhibit biphoton (Hong-Ou-Mandel) interference in conjunction with the aforementioned tunable mode transformations.

  8. Controllable Bistability and Normal Mode Splitting in an Optomechanical System Assisted by an Atomic Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Hu, Yao-Hua; Ma, Peng-Cheng

    2017-02-01

    We consider a system consisting of a standard optomechanical cavity and a trapped atomic ensemble. In such a system, we mainly focus on the features of optomechanical bistability and normal mode splitting with the presence of atomic ensemble. The results show that the energy of laser directly coupling the atomic ensemble can be enhanced effectively, and using this laser is more convenient and easier to realize the bistability and normal mode splitting than the traditional means. Besides, we find that atom-cavity field detuning also has a significant impact on optomechanical bistability, which offers us an important method to adjust and control the cavity mean photon number. At last, the numerical results show that atom-cavity field detuning and atom-cavity field coupling strength have an opposite effect on the normal mode splitting because they have different contributions to the effective cavity field decay rate.

  9. Global fast dynamic terminal sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Bao

    2017-01-01

    A control method based on global fast dynamic terminal sliding mode control (TSMC) technique is proposed to design the flight controller for performing the finite-time position and attitude tracking control of a small quadrotor UAV. Firstly, the dynamic model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. Secondly, the dynamic flight controllers of the quadrotor are formulated based on global fast dynamic TSMC, which is able to guarantee that the position and velocity tracking errors of all system state variables converge to zero in finite-time. Moreover, the global fast dynamic TSMC is also able to eliminate the chattering phenomenon caused by the switching control action and realize the high precision performance. In addition, the stabilities of two subsystems are demonstrated by Lyapunov theory, respectively. Lastly, the simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control method in the presence of external disturbances.

  10. Continuous high order sliding mode controller design for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Zong, Qun; Su, Rui; Tian, Bailing

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the problem of tracking control with uncertainties for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV). In order to overcome the analytical intractability of this model, an Input-Output linearization model is constructed for the purpose of feedback control design. Then, the continuous finite time convergence high order sliding mode controller is designed for the Input-Output linearization model without uncertainties. In addition, a nonlinear disturbance observer is applied to estimate the uncertainties in order to compensate the controller and disturbance suppression, where disturbance observer and controller synthesis design is obtained. Finally, the synthesis of controller and disturbance observer is used to achieve the tracking for the velocity and altitude of the FAHV and simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategies.

  11. Low-Frequency Mode Activity of Heme: Femtosecond Coherence Spectroscopy of Iron Porphine Halides and Nitrophorin

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Minoru; Gruia, Flaviu; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Montfort, William R.; Maes, Estelle M.; Champion, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    The low-frequency mode activity of metalloporphyrins has been studied for iron porphine-halides (Fe(P)(X), X = Cl, Br) and nitrophorin 4 (NP4) using femtosecond coherence spectroscopy (FCS) in combination with polarized resonance Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). It is confirmed that the mode symmetry selection rules for FCS are the same as for Raman scattering and that both Franck-Condon and Jahn-Teller mode activities are observed for Fe(P)(X) under Soret resonance conditions. The DFT-calculated low-frequency (20-400 cm-1) modes, and their frequency shifts upon halide substitution, are in good agreement with experimental Raman and coherence data, so that mode assignments can be made. The doming mode is located at ~80 cm-1 for Fe(P)(Cl) and at ~60 cm-1 for Fe(P)(Br). NP4 is also studied with coherence techniques, and the NO-bound species of ferric and ferrous NP4 display a mode at ~30-40 cm-1 that is associated with transient heme doming motion following NO photolysis. The coherence spectra of three ferric derivatives of NP4 with different degrees of heme ruffling distortion are also investigated. We find a mode at ~60 cm-1 whose relative intensity in the coherence spectra depends quadratically on the magnitude of the ruffling distortion. To quantitatively account for this correlation, a new “distortion-induced” Raman enhancement mechanism is presented. This mechanism is unique to low-frequency “soft modes” of the molecular framework that can be distorted by environmental forces. These results demonstrate the potential of FCS as a sensitive probe of dynamic and functionally important nonplanar heme vibrational excitations that are induced by the protein environmental forces or by the chemical reactions in the aqueous phase. PMID:18597456

  12. Experimental results using active control of traveling wave power flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Active structural control experiments conducted on a 24-ft pinned-free beam derived feedback compensators on the basis of a traveling-wave approach. A compensator is thus obtained which eliminates resonant behavior by absorbing all impinging power. A causal solution is derived for this noncausal compensator which mimics its behavior in a given frequency range, using the Wiener-Hopf. This optimal Wiener-Hopf compensator's structure-damping performance is found to exceed any obtainable by means of rate feedback. Performance limitations encompassed the discovery of frequencies above which the sensor and actuator were no longer dual and an inadvertent coupling of the control hardware to unmodeled structure torsion modes.

  13. High-wavenumber solar f-mode strengthening prior to active region formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant; Raichur, Harsha; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic strengthening of the local solar surface mode, i.e. the f-mode, 1-2 days prior to the emergence of an active region (AR) in the same (corotating) location while no indication can yet be seen in the magnetograms. Our study is motivated by earlier numerical findings of Singh et al. (2014) which showed that, in the presence of a nonuniform magnetic field that is concentrated a few scale heights below the surface, the f-mode fans out in the diagnostic kΩ diagram at high wavenumbers. Here we explore this possibility using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and show for four ARs 11130, 11158, 11768, and 12051, that at large latitudinal wavenumbers (corresponding to horizontal scales of around 3000 km), the f-mode displays strengthening about two days prior to AR formation and thus provides a new precursor for AR formation. The idea that the f-mode is perturbed days before any visible magnetic activity occurs on the surface can be important in constraining dynamo models aimed at understanding the global magnetic activity of the Sun.

  14. Sustained activity within the default mode network during an implicit memory task

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiongjiong; Weng, Xuchu; Zang, Yufeng; Xu, Mingwei; Xu, Xiaohong

    2009-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that several brain regions -- namely, the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and the bilateral angular gyrus -- are more active during resting states than during cognitive tasks (i.e., default mode network). Although there is evidence showing that the default mode network is associated with unconscious state, it is unclear whether this network is associated with unconscious processing when normal human subjects perform tasks without awareness. We manipulated the level of conscious processing in normal subjects by asking them to perform an implicit and an explicit memory task, and analyzed signal changes in the default mode network for the stimuli versus baseline in both tasks. The fMRI analysis showed that the level of activation in regions within this network during the implicit task was not significantly different from that during the baseline, except in the left angular gyrus and the insula. There was strong deactivation for the explicit task when compared with the implicit task in the default mode regions, except in the left angular gyrus and the left middle temporal gyrus. These data suggest that the activity in the default network is sustained and less disrupted when an implicit memory task is performed, but is suspended when explicit retrieval is required. These results provide evidence that the default mode network is associated with unconscious processing when human subjects perform an implicit memory task. PMID:19552900

  15. Sliding mode based fault detection, reconstruction and fault tolerant control scheme for motor systems.

    PubMed

    Mekki, Hemza; Benzineb, Omar; Boukhetala, Djamel; Tadjine, Mohamed; Benbouzid, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    The fault-tolerant control problem belongs to the domain of complex control systems in which inter-control-disciplinary information and expertise are required. This paper proposes an improved faults detection, reconstruction and fault-tolerant control (FTC) scheme for motor systems (MS) with typical faults. For this purpose, a sliding mode controller (SMC) with an integral sliding surface is adopted. This controller can make the output of system to track the desired position reference signal in finite-time and obtain a better dynamic response and anti-disturbance performance. But this controller cannot deal directly with total system failures. However an appropriate combination of the adopted SMC and sliding mode observer (SMO), later it is designed to on-line detect and reconstruct the faults and also to give a sensorless control strategy which can achieve tolerance to a wide class of total additive failures. The closed-loop stability is proved, using the Lyapunov stability theory. Simulation results in healthy and faulty conditions confirm the reliability of the suggested framework.

  16. Sliding mode control for a three phase multicellular inverter dedicated to renewable energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemici, K.; Zegaoui, A.; Djahbar, A.; Bokhtache, A. Aissa; Kessaissia, F. Z.; Allouache, H.; Mahmoudi, M. O.; Aillerie, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, Sliding Mode controller has been sized to control multi-cell converters configured as a three-phase multicellular inverter. Unlike traditional inverters, multicellular inverters have the following advantages: lower switching frequency, high number of output levels, and less voltage constraints on the power switch. Significant performances are provided with this structure, which is constituted with flying capacitors. The main purpose of this paper is to present the model and generate commutation sliding-surfaces based on a Lyapunov function. The performed simulations point the efficiency of the proposed strategy with a three-phase multicellular inverters and allow to assess the performances and the robustness of the synthesized controller.

  17. A modified integral sliding mode control to lateral stabilisation of 4-wheel independent drive electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Hasan; Bagher Bannae Sharifian, Mohammad; Sabahi, Mehran

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a novel sliding mode controller (SMC) and its application in the lateral stability control of a 4-wheel independent drive electric vehicle. The structure of the SMC is modified and online-tuned to ensure vehicle system stability, and to track the desired vehicle motion references when an in-wheel motor fault happens. The proposed controller is faster, more accurate, more robust, and with smaller chattering than common SMCs chatter. The effectiveness of the introduced approach is investigated through conducted simulations in the CARSIM and MATLAB software environments.

  18. Nonlinear H ∞ control of a Quadrotor (UAV), using high order sliding mode disturbance estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerma, Mokhtar; Mokhtari, Abdellah; Abdelaziz, Benallegue; Orlov, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    A nonlinear H ∞ output feedback controller is proposed and coupled to a high-order sliding mode estimator to regulate an UAV in the presence of the unmatched perturbations. The plant to be controlled is a Quadrotor helicopter described by nonlinear dynamics with plant uncertainties due to the variations of inertia moments and payload operation. A robust state estimation is considered under model uncertainties as well as external/measurement disturbances. Performance issues of the controller are illustrated in a simulation study made for an UAV prototype.

  19. Drag-based composite super-twisting sliding mode control law design for Mars entry guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhenhua; Yang, Jun; Li, Shihua; Guo, Lei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the drag-based trajectory tracking guidance problem is investigated for Mars entry vehicle subject to uncertainties. A composite super twisting sliding mode control method based on finite-time disturbance observer is proposed for guidance law design. The proposed controller not only eliminates the effects of matched and mismatched disturbances due to uncertainties of atmospheric models and vehicle aerodynamics but also guarantees the continuity of control action. Numerical simulations are carried out on the basis of Mars Science Laboratory mission, where the results show that the proposed methods can improve the Mars entry guidance precision as compared with some existing guidance methods including PID and ADRC.

  20. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control the flexural oscillations of large structures in space is investigated. Flexural oscillations are excited by impulsive loads. The vibratory response can degrade the pointing accuracy of cameras and antennae, and can cause high stresses at structural node points. Piezoelectric actuators have the advantage of exerting localized bending moments. In this way, vibration is controlled without exciting rigid body modes. The actuators are used in collocated sensor/driver pairs to form a feedback control system. The sensor produces a voltage that is proportional to the dynamic stress at the sensor location, and the driver produces a force that is proportional to the voltage applied to it. The analog control system amplifies and phase shifts the sensor signal to produce the voltage signal that is applied to the driver. The feedback control is demonstrated to increase the first mode damping in a cantilever beam by up to 100 percent, depending on the amplifier gain. The damping efficiency of the control system when the piezoelectrics are not optimally positioned at points of high stress in the beam is evaluated.

  1. Robust sliding mode control for fractional-order chaotic economical system with parameter uncertainty and external disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ke; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Gao, Li-Ke; Sun, Yue; Ma, Tie-Dong

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a modified sliding mode control for fractional-order chaotic economical systems with parameter uncertainty and external disturbance. By constructing the suitable sliding mode surface with fractional-order integral, the effective sliding mode controller is designed to realize the asymptotical stability of fractional-order chaotic economical systems. Comparing with the existing results, the main results in this paper are more practical and rigorous. Simulation results show the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed sliding mode control method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51207173 and 51277192).

  2. Wigner spectrum and coherent feedback control of continuous-mode single-photon Fock states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhiyuan; Cui, Lei; Zhang, Guofeng; Fu, Hongchen

    2016-10-01

    Single photons are very useful resources in quantum information science. In real applications it is often required that the photons have a well-defined spectral (or equivalently temporal) modal structure. For example, a rising exponential pulse is able to fully excite a two-level atom while a Gaussian pulse cannot. This motivates the study of continuous-mode single-photon Fock states. Such states are characterized by a spectral (or temporal) pulse shape. In this paper we investigate the statistical property of continuous-mode single-photon Fock states. Instead of the commonly used normal ordering (Wick order), the tool we proposed is the Wigner spectrum. The Wigner spectrum has two advantages: (1) it allows to study continuous-mode single-photon Fock states in the time domain and frequency domain simultaneously; (2) because it can deal with the Dirac delta function directly, it has the potential to provide more information than the normal ordering where the Dirac delta function is always discarded. We also show how various control methods in particular coherent feedback control can be used to manipulate the pulse shapes of continuous-mode single-photon Fock states.

  3. TRMM Re-Entry Planning: Attitude Determination and Control During Thruster Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWeese, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft has been undergoing design for a controlled re-entry to Earth. During simulation of the re-entry plan, there was evidence of errors in the attitude determination algorithms during thruster modes. These errors affected the bum efficiency, and thus planning, during re-entry. During thruster modes, the spacecraft attitude is controlled off of integrated Gyro Error Angles that were designed to closely follow the nominal spacecraft pointing frame (Tip Frame). These angles, however, were not exactly mapped to the Tip Frame from the Body Frame. Additionally, in the initial formulation of the thruster mode attitude determination algorithms, several assumptions and approximations were made to conserve processor speed. These errors became noticeable and significant when simulating bums of much longer duration (-10 times) than had been produced in flight. A solution is proposed that uses attitude determination information from a propagated extended Kalman filter that already exists in the TRMM thruster modes. This attitude information is then used to rotate the Gyro Error Angles into the Tip Frame. An error analysis is presented that compares the two formulations. The new algorithm is tested using the TRMM High-Fidelity Simulator and verified with the TRMM Software Testing and Training Facility. Simulation results for both configurations are also presented.

  4. Dual mode adaptive fractional order PI controller with feedforward controller based on variable parameter model for quadruple tank process.

    PubMed

    Roy, Prasanta; Roy, Binoy Krishna

    2016-07-01

    The Quadruple Tank Process (QTP) is a well-known benchmark of a nonlinear coupled complex MIMO process having both minimum and nonminimum phase characteristics. This paper presents a novel self tuning type Dual Mode Adaptive Fractional Order PI controller along with an Adaptive Feedforward controller for the QTP. The controllers are designed based on a novel Variable Parameter Transfer Function model. The effectiveness of the proposed model and controllers is tested through numerical simulation and experimentation. Results reveal that the proposed controllers work successfully to track the reference signals in all ranges of output. A brief comparison with some of the earlier reported similar works is presented to show that the proposed control scheme has some advantages and better performances than several other similar works.

  5. Performance experiments with alternative advanced teleoperator control modes for a simulated solar maximum satellite repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, H.; Zak, H.; Kim, W. S.; Bejczy, A. K.; Schenker, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which were conducted at the JPL Advanced Teleoperator Lab to demonstrate and evaluate the effectiveness of various teleoperator control modes in the performance of a simulated Solar Max Satellite Repair (SMSR) task. THe SMSR was selected as a test because it is very rich in performance capability requirements and it actually has been performed by two EVA astronauts in the Space Shuttle Bay in 1984. The main subtasks are: thermal blanket removal; installation of a hinge attachment for electrical panel opening; opening of electrical panel; removal of electrical connectors; relining of cable bundles; replacement of electrical panel; securing parts and cables; re-mate electrical connectors; closing of electrical panel; and reinstating thermal blanket. The current performance experiments are limited to thermal blanket cutting, electrical panel unbolting and handling electrical bundles and connectors. In one formal experiment even different control modes were applied to the unbolting and reinsertion of electrical panel screws subtasks. The seven control modes are alternative combinations of manual position and rate control with force feedback and remote compliance referenced to force-torque sensor information. Force-torque sensor and end effector position data and task completion times were recorded for analysis and quantification of operator performance.

  6. Sliding mode disturbance observer-based adaptive integral backstepping control of a piezoelectric nano-manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yangming; Yan, Peng

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates a systematic modeling and control methodology for a multi-axis PZT (piezoelectric transducer) actuated servo stage supporting nano-manipulations. A sliding mode disturbance observer-based adaptive integral backstepping control method with an estimated inverse model compensation scheme is proposed to achieve ultra high precision tracking in the presence of the hysteresis nonlinearities, model uncertainties, and external disturbances. By introducing a time rate of the input signal, an enhanced rate-dependent Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is developed to describe the hysteresis behaviors, and its inverse is also constructed to mitigate their adverse effects. In particular, the corresponding inverse compensation error is analyzed and its boundedness is proven. Subsequently, the sliding mode disturbance observer-based adaptive integral backstepping controller is designed to guarantee the convergence of the tracking error, where the sliding mode disturbance observer can track the total disturbances in a finite time, while the integral action is incorporated into the adaptive backstepping design to improve the steady-state control accuracy. Finally, real time implementations of the proposed algorithm are applied on the PZT actuated servo system, where excellent tracking performance with tracking precision error around 6‰ for circular contour tracking is achieved in the experimental results.

  7. Decentralized adaptive robust control based on sliding mode and nonlinear compensator for the control of ankle movement using functional electrical stimulation of agonist-antagonist muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobravi, Hamid-Reza; Erfanian, Abbas

    2009-08-01

    A decentralized control methodology is designed for the control of ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion in paraplegic subjects with electrical stimulation of tibialis anterior and calf muscles. Each muscle joint is considered as a subsystem and individual controllers are designed for each subsystem. Each controller operates solely on its associated subsystem, with no exchange of information between the subsystems. The interactions between the subsystems are taken as external disturbances for each isolated subsystem. In order to achieve robustness with respect to external disturbances, unmodeled dynamics, model uncertainty and time-varying properties of muscle-joint dynamics, a robust control framework is proposed which is based on the synergistic combination of an adaptive nonlinear compensator with a sliding mode control and is referred to as an adaptive robust control. Extensive simulations and experiments on healthy and paraplegic subjects were performed to demonstrate the robustness against the time-varying properties of muscle-joint dynamics, day-to-day variations, subject-to-subject variations, fast convergence, stability and tracking accuracy of the proposed method. The results indicate that the decentralized robust control provides excellent tracking control for different reference trajectories and can generate control signals to compensate the muscle fatigue and reject the external disturbance. Moreover, the controller is able to automatically regulate the interaction between agonist and antagonist muscles under different conditions of operating without any preprogrammed antagonist activities.

  8. Student Activity Funds: Procedures & Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    Student activity funds may create educational opportunities for students, but they frequently create problems for business administrators. The first part of this work reviews the types of organizational issues and transactions an organized student group is likely to encounter, including establishing a constitution, participant roles,…

  9. Advanced Shock Position Control for Mode Transition in a Turbine Based Combined Cycle Engine Inlet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    A dual flow-path inlet system is being tested to evaluate methodologies for a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system to perform a controlled inlet mode transition. Prior to experimental testing, simulation models are used to test, debug, and validate potential control algorithms. One simulation package being used for testing is the High Mach Transient Engine Cycle Code simulation, known as HiTECC. This paper discusses the closed loop control system, which utilizes a shock location sensor to improve inlet performance and operability. Even though the shock location feedback has a coarse resolution, the feedback allows for a reduction in steady state error and, in some cases, better performance than with previous proposed pressure ratio based methods. This paper demonstrates the design and benefit with the implementation of a proportional-integral controller, an H-Infinity based controller, and a disturbance observer based controller.

  10. Active control for stabilization of neoclassical tearing modesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Ferron, J. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Welander, A. S.

    2006-05-01

    This work describes active control algorithms used by DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] to stabilize and maintain suppression of 3/2 or 2/1 neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by application of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational q surface. The DIII-D NTM control system can determine the correct q-surface/ECCD alignment and stabilize existing modes within 100-500ms of activation, or prevent mode growth with preemptive application of ECCD, in both cases enabling stable operation at normalized beta values above 3.5. Because NTMs can limit performance or cause plasma-terminating disruptions in tokamaks, their stabilization is essential to the high performance operation of ITER [R. Aymar et al., ITER Joint Central Team, ITER Home Teams, Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The DIII-D NTM control system has demonstrated many elements of an eventual ITER solution, including general algorithms for robust detection of q-surface/ECCD alignment and for real-time maintenance of alignment following the disappearance of the mode. This latter capability, unique to DIII-D, is based on real-time reconstruction of q-surface geometry by a Grad-Shafranov solver using external magnetics and internal motional Stark effect measurements. Alignment is achieved by varying either the plasma major radius (and the rational q surface) or the toroidal field (and the deposition location). The requirement to achieve and maintain q-surface/ECCD alignment with accuracy on the order of 1cm is routinely met by the DIII-D Plasma Control System and these algorithms. We discuss the integrated plasma control design process used for developing these and other general control algorithms, which includes physics-based modeling and testing of the algorithm implementation against simulations of actuator and plasma responses. This systematic design/test method and modeling environment enabled successful mode suppression by the NTM control system upon first-time use in an experimental

  11. Fuzzy fast terminal sliding mode vibration control of a two-connected flexible plate using laser sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Si-ma

    2016-10-01

    A kind of non-contact vibration measurement method for a two-connected flexible piezoelectric plate using laser sensors is proposed. Decoupling of the bending and torsional vibration on measurement and driving control is carried out via using two laser displacement sensors and piezoelectric actuators. The fuzzy fast terminal sliding mode controller (FFTSMC) is investigated to suppress both the larger and the smaller amplitude vibrations quickly. In order to alleviate the chattering phenomenon and enhance the control effect, the fuzzy logic adaptive algorithm is used to adjust the switching control gain for softening the signum function adaptively. To verify the non-contact measurement method and the designed controller, the experimental setup is built up. Experiments on active vibration control using the designed FFTSMC are conducted, compared with the classical proportional derivative (PD) control algorithm. The experimental identification results demonstrate that the laser displacement sensors can detect the low-frequency bending and torsional vibration effectively, after using the decoupling method. Furthermore, the designed FFTSMC can suppress both bending and torsional vibration more quickly than the designed PD controller owing to the adjustment of the switching control gains and the softening factors, especially for the small amplitude residual vibrations.

  12. SAMPEX special pointing mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Flatley, Thomas W.; Leoutsakos, Theodore

    1995-01-01

    A new pointing mode has been developed for the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) spacecraft. This pointing mode orients the instrument boresights perpendicular to the field lines of the Earth's magnetic field in regions of low field strength and parallel to the field lines in regions of high field strength, to allow better characterization of heavy ions trapped by the field. The new mode uses magnetometer signals and is algorithmically simpler than the previous control mode, but it requires increased momentum wheel activity. It was conceived, designed, tested, coded, uplinked to the spacecraft, and activated in less than seven months.

  13. Control algorithm of electric vehicle in coasting mode based on driving feeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Daxu; Lan, Fengchong; Zhou, Yunjiao; Chen, Jiqing

    2015-05-01

    Coasting in gear is a common driving mode for the conventional vehicle equipped with the internal combustion engine (ICE), and the assistant braking function of ICE is utilized to decelerate the vehicle in this mode. However, the electric vehicle (EV) does not have this feature in the coasting mode due to the relatively small inertia of the driving motor, so it will cause the driver cannot obtain the similar driving feeling to that of the conventional vehicle, and even a traffic accident may occur if the driver cannot immediately adapt to the changes. In this paper, the coasting control for EV is researched based on the driving feeling. A conventional vehicle equipped with continuously variable transmission (CVT) is taken as the reference vehicle, and the combined simulation model of EV is established based on AVL CRUISE and MATLAB/Simulink. The torque characteristic of the CVT output shaft is measured in coasting mode, and the data are smoothed and fitted to a polynomial curve. For the EV in coasting mode, if the state of charge (SOC) of the battery is below 95%, the polynomial curve is used as the control target for the torque characteristic of the driving motor, otherwise, the required torque is replaced by hydraulic braking torque to keep the same deceleration. The co-simulation of Matlab/Simulink/Stateflow and AVL CRUISE, as well as the hardware-in-loop experiment combined with dSPACE are carried out to verify the effectiveness and the real-time performance of the control algorithm. The results show that the EV with coasting braking control system has similar driving feeling to that of the reference vehicle, meanwhile, the battery SOC can be increased by 0.036% and 0.021% in the initial speed of 100 km/h and 50 km/h, respectively. The proposed control algorithm for EV is beneficial to improve the driving feeling in coasting mode, and it also makes the EV has the assistant braking function.

  14. Experimental investigation of elastic mode control on a model of a transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramovitz, M.; Heimbaugh, R. M.; Nomura, J. K.; Pearson, R. M.; Shirley, W. A.; Stringham, R. H.; Tescher, E. L.; Zoock, I. E.

    1981-01-01

    A 4.5 percent DC-10 derivative flexible model with active controls is fabricated, developed, and tested to investigate the ability to suppress flutter and reduce gust loads with active controlled surfaces. The model is analyzed and tested in both semispan and complete model configuration. Analytical methods are refined and control laws are developed and successfully tested on both versions of the model. A 15 to 25 percent increase in flutter speed due to the active system is demonstrated. The capability of an active control system to significantly reduce wing bending moments due to turbulence is demonstrated. Good correlation is obtained between test and analytical prediction.

  15. Active structural vibration control: Robust to temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vivek; Sharma, Manu; Thakur, Nagesh

    2012-11-01

    d-form augmented piezoelectric constitutive equations which take into account temperature dependence of piezoelectric strain coefficient (d31) and permittivity (∈33), are converted into e-form. Using e-form constitutive equations, a finite element model of a smart two dimensional plate instrumented with piezoelectric patches is derived. Equations of motion are derived using Hamilton's variational principle. Coupled equations of motion are uncoupled using modal analysis. Modal state vectors are estimated using the Kalman observer. The first mode of smart cantilevered plate is actively controlled using negative first modal velocity feedback at various temperatures. Total control effort required to do so is calculated using the electro-mechanical impedance method. The temperature dependence of sensor voltage, control voltage, control effort and Kalman observer equations is shown analytically. Simulation results are presented using MATLAB. Variations in (i) peak sensor voltage, (ii) actual and estimated first modal velocities, (iii) peak control voltage, (iv) total control effort and (v) settling time with respect to temperature are presented. Active vibration control performance is not maintained at temperature away from reference temperature when the temperature dependence of piezoelectric stress coefficient ‘e31' and permittivity ‘∈33' is not included in piezoelectric constitutive equations. Active control of vibrations becomes robust to temperature variations when the temperature dependence of ‘e31' and ‘∈33' is included in piezoelectric constitutive equations.

  16. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Actively controlled mechanical seals have recently been developed for industrial use. This study investigates the feasibility of using such seals for aerospace applications. In a noncontacting mechanical seal, the film thickness depends on the geometry of the seal interface. The amount of coning, which is a measure of the radial convergence or divergence of the seal interface, has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the coning with a piezoelectric material. A mathematical model has been formulated to predict the performance of an actively controlled mechanical seal.

  17. Independent component model of the default-mode brain function: Assessing the impact of active thinking.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Fabrizio; Bertolino, Alessandro; Scarabino, Tommaso; Latorre, Valeria; Blasi, Giuseppe; Popolizio, Teresa; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Cirillo, Sossio; Goebel, Rainer; Di Salle, Francesco

    2006-10-16

    The "default-mode" network is an ensemble of cortical regions, which are typically deactivated during demanding cognitive tasks in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Using functional connectivity, this network can be conceptualized and studied as a "stand-alone" function or system. Regardless of the task, independent component analysis (ICA) produces a picture of the "default-mode" function even when the subject is performing a simple sensori-motor task or just resting in the scanner. This has boosted the use of default-mode fMRI for non-invasive research in brain disorders. Here, we studied the effect of cognitive load modulation of fMRI responses on the ICA-based pictures of the default-mode function. In a standard graded working memory study based on the n-back task, we used group-level ICA to explore the variability of the default-mode network related to the engagement in the task, in 10 healthy volunteers. The analysis of the default-mode components highlighted similarities and differences in the layout under three different cognitive loads. We found a load-related general increase of deactivation in the cortical network. Nonetheless, a variable recruitment of the cingulate regions was evident, with greater extension of the anterior and lesser extension of the posterior clusters when switching from lower to higher working memory loads. A co-activation of the hippocampus was only found under no working memory load. As a generalization of our results, the variability of the default-mode pattern may link the default-mode system as a whole to cognition and may more directly support use of the ICA model for evaluating cognitive decline in brain disorders.

  18. Fault-tolerant control of electric vehicles with in-wheel motors using actuator-grouping sliding mode controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Boyuan; Du, Haiping; Li, Weihua

    2016-05-01

    Although electric vehicles with in-wheel motors have been regarded as one of the promising vehicle architectures in recent years, the probability of in-wheel motor fault is still a crucial issue due to the system complexity and large number of control actuators. In this study, a modified sliding mode control (SMC) is applied to achieve fault-tolerant control of electric vehicles with four-wheel-independent-steering (4WIS) and four-wheel-independent-driving (4WID). Unlike in traditional SMC, in this approach the steering geometry is re-arranged according to the location of faulty wheels in the modified SMC. Three SMC control laws for longitudinal velocity control, lateral velocity control and yaw rate control are designed based on specific vehicle motion scenarios. In addition the actuator-grouping SMC method is proposed so that driving actuators are grouped and each group of actuators can be used to achieve the specific control target, which avoids the strong coupling effect between each control target. Simulation results prove that the proposed modified SMC can achieve good vehicle dynamics control performance in normal driving and large steering angle turning scenarios. In addition, the proposed actuator-grouping SMC can solve the coupling effect of different control targets and the control performance is improved.

  19. Position synchronised control of multiple robotic manipulators based on integral sliding mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongya; Zhu, Quanmin

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a new position synchronised control algorithm is developed for multiple robotic manipulator systems. In the merit of system synchronisation and integral sliding mode control, the proposed approach can stabilise position tracking of each robotic manipulator while coordinating its motion with the other manipulators. With the integral sliding mode, the proposed approach has insensitiveness against the lumped system uncertainty within the entire process of operation. Further, a perturbation estimator is proposed to reduce chattering effect. The corresponding stability analysis is presented to lay a foundation for theoretical understanding to the underlying issues as well as safely operating real systems. An illustrative example is bench tested to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. Control strategies and mechanisms for active control of sound transmission into a vibro-acoustic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guoyong; Feng, Na; Yang, Tiejun

    2011-06-01

    An analytical study was presented on active control of sound transmission into a vibro-acoustic enclosure comprising two flexible plates. Two types of actuators were used, i.e. acoustic actuator and distributed lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric (PZT) actuator instead of point force actuator. Using the modal acoustic transfer impedance-mobility matrices, the excitation and interaction in the coupled sound transmission system can be described with clear physical significance. With the control system designed to globally reduce the sound field, different control system configurations were considered, including the structural actuator on the incident plate, actuator on the receiving plate, acoustic actuator on the cavity, and their combinations. The effectiveness and performance of the control strategy corresponding to each system configuration were compared and discussed. The role and control mechanism of each type of actuator were of particular interest. It was shown that the incident plate actuator is effective in controlling the cavity-dominated modes and the structural modes dominated by the incident plate and receiving plate. Two main control mechanisms are involved in this control configuration, i.e., modal suppressing and modal rearrangement. For control system configuration with only acoustic actuator in the enclosure, the mechanism involved in this arrangement is purely modal suppression. Desirable placements of structural actuators in terms of total potential energy reduction were also discussed.

  1. Modes of Engagement in Foreign Language Writing: An Activity Theoretical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haneda, Mari

    2007-01-01

    This article makes the case for using activity theory to explore the learning and teaching of writing in a foreign language. I illustrate my argument by bringing this theory to bear on a re-examination of the different modes of engagement in writing by university-level students of Japanese as a foreign language that I identified in an earlier…

  2. Active mode locking of a p-Ge hot hole laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hovenier, J.N.; Muravjov, A.V.; Pavlov, S.G.; Shastin, V.N.; Strijbos, R.C.; Wenckebach, W.T.

    1997-07-01

    The generation of 200 picosecond pulses of far-infrared radiation from a p-Ge hot hole laser (50{endash}140 cm{sup {minus}1}) was achieved due to active mode locking by electrical intracavity modulation of the gain. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Fitness and ERP Indices of Cognitive Control Mode during Task Preparation in Preadolescent Children

    PubMed Central

    Kamijo, Keita; Masaki, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of studies conducted over the past decade have demonstrated that greater aerobic fitness is associated with superior cognitive control in preadolescent children. Several studies have suggested that the relationship between fitness and cognitive control may be attributed to differential reliance on proactive vs. reactive cognitive control modes. However, this contention has remained speculative, and further studies are needed to better elucidate this relationship. We designed the present study to test the hypothesis that use of cognitive control modes would differ as a function of childhood fitness. We compared performance of lower-fit and higher-fit children on a modified AX-continuous performance task, commonly used to examine shifts in the use of proactive and reactive control, along with cue-P3 and contingent negative variation (CNV) of event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Results indicated that higher-fit children exhibited greater response accuracy for BX (non-target cue – target probe) relative to AY (target cue – non-target probe) trials, whereas lower-fit children had comparable response accuracies for AY and BX trials. Because enhanced BX performance and impaired AY performance may be attributed to the proactive use of context information, these results suggest that greater childhood fitness is associated with more effective utilization of proactive control. Higher-fit children also exhibited larger cue-P3 amplitude and smaller CNV amplitude for BX relative to AY trials, with no such effect of trial type in lower-fit children. These ERP results suggest that greater fitness is associated with more effective utilization of cue information and response preparation more appropriate to trial type, supporting the behavioral findings. The present study provides novel insights into the relationship between fitness and cognition from the perspective of cognitive control mode during task preparation. PMID:27625604

  4. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 3; Active Fan Noise Cancellation in the NASA Lewis Active Noise Control Fan Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G.; Hu, Ziqiang; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's (LERC) 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF). The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for global active noise cancellation of fan tones. The GE ANC system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is canceled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. Inputs to the controller are signals from a shaft encoder and from a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The key results are that the (6,0) was completely eliminated at the 920 Hz design frequency and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 6.8 dB (out of a possible 9.8 dB). Farfield reductions of 15 dB (SPL) were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB PWL decrease. The results indicate that global attenuation of PWL at the target frequency was obtained in the aft quadrant using an ANC actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct. The quality of the results depended on precise mode generation. High spillover into spurious modes generated by the ANC actuator array caused less than optimum levels of PWL reduction. The variation in spillover is believed to be due to calibration procedure, but must be confirmed in subsequent tests.

  5. X-mode reflectometry for magnetohydrodynamic activity associated with q=1 surface measurements on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Vermare, L.; Clairet, F.; Gabillet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    2004-10-01

    Tore Supra is equipped with two 20 {mu}s fast sweep X-mode reflectometers operating between 50-110 GHz dedicated to density profile determination and an X-mode fixed frequency reflectometer operating between 105-155 GHz for density fluctuation measurements. Heterodyne and sine-cosine detection provide measurements of the reflected signal with high sensitivity. Operating profile reflectometer in burst mode (5 {mu}s dead time between two consecutive sweeps) allows quasi-simultaneous measurements at fixed frequency over a broad frequency band. Thus, information on plasma fluctuations, such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity, up to 20 kHz as well as a radial localization of the modes is accessible. The temporal evolution of the q=1 rational surface during sawtooth crash activity has been recorded in the plasma center with high spatial resolution. In addition, a direct comparison between signals associated with a central MHD mode from both profile and fluctuation reflectometers, positioned at different toroidal angles, allows one to determine the plasma toroidal velocity.

  6. Different pulse pattern generation by frequency detuning in pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Si, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Zong-Fu

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our recent experimental investigation of the modulation frequency detuning effect on the output pulse dynamics in a pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser. The experimental study shows the existence of five different mode-locking states that mainly depend on the modulation frequency detuning, which are: (a) amplitude-even harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (b) Q-switched harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (c) sinusoidal wave modulation mode, (d) pulses bundle state, and (e) noise-like state. A detailed experimental characterization of the output pulses dynamics in each operating mode is presented.

  7. Lunar Module ECS (Environmental Control System) - Design Considerations and Failure Modes. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Design considerations and failure modes for the Lunar Module (LM) Environmental Control System (ECS) are described. An overview of the the oxygen supply and cabin pressurization, atmosphere revitalization, water management and heat transport systems are provided. Design considerations including reliability, flight instrumentation, modularization and the change to the use of batteries instead of fuel cells are discussed. A summary is provided for the LM ECS general testing regime.

  8. Controlled Fusion with Hot-ion Mode in a Degenerate Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S. Son and N.J. Fisch

    2005-12-01

    n a Fermi-degenerate plasma, the rate of electron physical processes is much reduced from the classical prediction, possibly enabling new regimes for controlled nuclear fusion, including the hot-ion mode, a regime in which the ion temperature exceeds the electron temperature. Previous calculations of these processes in dense plasmas are now corrected for partial degeneracy and relativistic effects, leading to an expanded regime of self-sustained fusion.

  9. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1994-01-01

    A three-channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and the high-pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provide blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. To minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three-channel controller by up to 16 dB over a +/- 30-deg angle about the engine axis. A single-channel controller could produce reduction over a +/- 15-deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Outside of the areas contolled, the levels of the tone actually increased due to the generation of radial modes by the control sources. Simultaneous control of two tones is achieved with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high-pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  10. Blink-related momentary activation of the default mode network while viewing videos.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tamami; Kato, Makoto; Morito, Yusuke; Itoi, Seishi; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2013-01-08

    It remains unknown why we generate spontaneous eyeblinks every few seconds, more often than necessary for ocular lubrication. Because eyeblinks tend to occur at implicit breakpoints while viewing videos, we hypothesized that eyeblinks are actively involved in the release of attention. We show that while viewing videos, cortical activity momentarily decreases in the dorsal attention network after blink onset but increases in the default-mode network implicated in internal processing. In contrast, physical blackouts of the video do not elicit such reciprocal changes in brain networks. The results suggest that eyeblinks are actively involved in the process of attentional disengagement during a cognitive behavior by momentarily activating the default-mode network while deactivating the dorsal attention network.

  11. Activated vibrational modes and Fermi resonance in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengtao; Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-02-01

    Using p-aminothiophenol (PATP) molecules on a gold substrate and high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS), we show that the vibrational spectra of these molecules are distinctly different from those in typical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Detailed first-principles calculations help to assign the Raman peaks in the TERS measurements as Raman-active and IR-active vibrational modes of dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), providing strong spectroscopic evidence for the dimerization of PATP molecules to DMAB under the TERS setup. The activation of the IR-active modes is due to enhanced electromagnetic field gradient effects within the gap region of the highly asymmetric tip-surface geometry. Fermi resonances are also observed in HV-TERS. These findings help to broaden the versatility of TERS as a promising technique for ultrasensitive molecular spectroscopy.

  12. Second-order sliding mode control for DFIG-based wind turbines fault ride-through capability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Benbouzid, Mohamed; Beltran, Brice; Amirat, Yassine; Yao, Gang; Han, Jingang; Mangel, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the fault ride-through capability assessment of a doubly fed induction generator-based wind turbine using a high-order sliding mode control. Indeed, it has been recently suggested that sliding mode control is a solution of choice to the fault ride-through problem. In this context, this paper proposes a second-order sliding mode as an improved solution that handle the classical sliding mode chattering problem. Indeed, the main and attractive features of high-order sliding modes are robustness against external disturbances, the grids faults in particular, and chattering-free behavior (no extra mechanical stress on the wind turbine drive train). Simulations using the NREL FAST code on a 1.5-MW wind turbine are carried out to evaluate ride-through performance of the proposed high-order sliding mode control strategy in case of grid frequency variations and unbalanced voltage sags.

  13. Tracking Control of a Magnetic Shape Memory Actuator Using an Inverse Preisach Model with Modified Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jhih-Hong; Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys are a new class of smart materials with extraordinary strains up to 12% and frequencies in the range of 1 to 2 kHz. The MSM actuator is a potential device which can achieve high performance electromagnetic actuation by using the properties of MSM alloys. However, significant non-linear hysteresis behavior is a significant barrier to control the MSM actuator. In this paper, the Preisach model was used, by capturing experiments from different input signals and output responses, to model the hysteresis of MSM actuator, and the inverse Preisach model, as a feedforward control, provided compensational signals to the MSM actuator to linearize the hysteresis non-linearity. The control strategy for path tracking combined the hysteresis compensator and the modified fuzzy sliding mode control (MFSMC) which served as a path controller. Based on the experimental results, it was verified that a tracking error in the order of micrometers was achieved. PMID:27571081

  14. Tracking Control of a Magnetic Shape Memory Actuator Using an Inverse Preisach Model with Modified Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Hong; Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2016-08-25

    Magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys are a new class of smart materials with extraordinary strains up to 12% and frequencies in the range of 1 to 2 kHz. The MSM actuator is a potential device which can achieve high performance electromagnetic actuation by using the properties of MSM alloys. However, significant non-linear hysteresis behavior is a significant barrier to control the MSM actuator. In this paper, the Preisach model was used, by capturing experiments from different input signals and output responses, to model the hysteresis of MSM actuator, and the inverse Preisach model, as a feedforward control, provided compensational signals to the MSM actuator to linearize the hysteresis non-linearity. The control strategy for path tracking combined the hysteresis compensator and the modified fuzzy sliding mode control (MFSMC) which served as a path controller. Based on the experimental results, it was verified that a tracking error in the order of micrometers was achieved.

  15. An automatic and user-driven training method for locomotion mode recognition for artificial leg control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaorong; Wang, Ding; Yang, Qing; Huang, He

    2012-01-01

    Our previously developed locomotion-mode-recognition (LMR) system has provided a great promise to intuitive control of powered artificial legs. However, the lack of fast, practical training methods is a barrier for clinical use of our LMR system for prosthetic legs. This paper aims to design a new, automatic, and user-driven training method for practical use of LMR system. In this method, a wearable terrain detection interface based on a portable laser distance sensor and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is applied to detect the terrain change in front of the prosthesis user. The mechanical measurement from the prosthetic pylon is used to detect gait phase. These two streams of information are used to automatically identify the transitions among various locomotion modes, switch the prosthesis control mode, and label the training data with movement class and gait phase in real-time. No external device is required in this training system. In addition, the prosthesis user without assistance from any other experts can do the whole training procedure. The pilot experimental results on an able-bodied subject have demonstrated that our developed new method is accurate and user-friendly, and can significantly simplify the LMR training system and training procedure without sacrificing the system performance. The novel design paves the way for clinical use of our designed LMR system for powered lower limb prosthesis control.

  16. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  17. Active vibration control of structure by Active Mass Damper and Multi-Modal Negative Acceleration Feedback control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Don-Ho; Shin, Ji-Hwan; Lee, HyunWook; Kim, Seoug-Ki; Kwak, Moon K.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an Active Mass Damper (AMD) consisting of an AC servo motor, a movable mass connected to the AC servo motor by a ball-screw mechanism, and an accelerometer as a sensor for vibration measurement were considered. Considering the capability of the AC servo motor which can follow the desired displacement accurately, the Negative Acceleration Feedback (NAF) control algorithm which uses the acceleration signal directly and produces the desired displacement for the active mass was proposed. The effectiveness of the NAF control was proved theoretically using a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system. It was found that the stability condition for the NAF control is static and it can effectively increase the damping of the target natural mode without causing instability in the low frequency region. Based on the theoretical results of the SDOF system, the Multi-Modal NAF (MMNAF) control is proposed to suppress the many natural modes of multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems using a single AMD. It was proved both theoretically and experimentally that the MMNAF control can suppress vibrations of the MDOF system.

  18. Study of fuzzy adaptive PID controller on thermal frequency stabilizing laser with double longitudinal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Qingkai; Zhang, Tao; Yan, Yining

    2016-10-01

    There are contradictions among speediness, anti-disturbance performance, and steady-state accuracy caused by traditional PID controller in the existing light source systems of thermal frequency stabilizing laser with double longitudinal modes. In this paper, a new kind of fuzzy adaptive PID controller was designed by combining fuzzy PID control technology and expert system to make frequency stabilizing system obtain the optimal performance. The experiments show that the frequency stability of the designed PID controller is similar to the existing PID controller (the magnitude of frequency stability is less than 10-9 in constant temperature and 10-7 in open air). But the preheating time is shortened obviously (from 10 minutes to 5 minutes) and the anti-disturbance capability is improved significantly (the recovery time needed after strong interference is reduced from 1 minute to 10 seconds).

  19. Sliding mode attitude control with L 2-gain performance and vibration reduction of flexible spacecraft with actuator dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qinglei

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a dual-stage control system design method for the rotational maneuver control and vibration stabilization of a flexible spacecraft. In this design approach, the sub-systems of attitude control and vibration suppression are designed separately using the low order model. Based on the sliding mode control (SMC) theory, a discontinuous attitude control law in the form of the input voltage of the reaction wheel is derived to control the orientation of the spacecraft, incorporating the L 2-gain performance criterion constraint. The resulting closed-loop system is proven to be uniformly ultimately bounded stability and the effect of the external disturbance on both attitude quaternion and angular velocity can be attenuated to the prescribed level as well. In addition, an adaptive version of the control law is designed for adapting the unknown upper bounds of the lumped disturbance such that the limitation of knowing the bound of the disturbance in advance is released. For actively suppressing the induced vibration, strain rate feedback control method is also investigated by using piezoelectric materials as additional sensors and actuators bonded on the surface of the flexible appendages. Numerical simulations are performed to show that rotational maneuver and vibration suppression are accomplished in spite of the presence of disturbance and uncertainty.

  20. Wiener sliding-mode control for artificial pancreas: a new nonlinear approach to glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rmileh, Amjad; Garcia-Gabin, Winston

    2012-08-01

    Type 1 diabetic patients need insulin therapy to keep their blood glucose close to normal. In this paper an attempt is made to show how nonlinear control-oriented model may be used to improve the performance of closed-loop control of blood glucose in diabetic patients. The nonlinear Wiener model is used as a novel modeling approach to be applied to the glucose control problem. The identified Wiener model is used in the design of a robust nonlinear sliding mode control strategy. Two configurations of the nonlinear controller are tested and compared to a controller designed with a linear model. The controllers are designed in a Smith predictor structure to reduce the effect of system time delay. To improve the meal compensation features, the controllers are provided with a simple feedforward controller to inject an insulin bolus at meal time. Different simulation scenarios have been used to evaluate the proposed controllers. The obtained results show that the new approach outperforms the linear control scheme, and regulates the glucose level within safe limits in the presence of measurement and modeling errors, meal uncertainty and patient variations.

  1. Bias-controlled selective excitation of vibrational modes in molecular junctions: a route towards mode-selective chemistry.

    PubMed

    Volkovich, Roie; Härtle, Rainer; Thoss, Michael; Peskin, Uri

    2011-08-28

    We show that individual vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions with asymmetric molecule-lead coupling can be selectively excited by applying an external bias voltage. Thereby, a non-statistical distribution of vibrational energy can be generated, that is, a mode with a higher frequency can be stronger excited than a mode with a lower frequency. This is of particular interest in the context of mode-selective chemistry, where one aims to break specific (not necessarily the weakest) chemical bond in a molecule. Such mode-selective vibrational excitation is demonstrated for two generic model systems representing asymmetric molecular junctions and/or scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. To this end, we employ two complementary theoretical approaches, a nonequilibrium Green's function approach and a master equation approach. The comparison of both methods reveals good agreement in describing resonant electron transport through a single-molecule contact, where differences between the approaches highlight the role of non-resonant transport processes, in particular co-tunneling and off-resonant electron-hole pair creation processes.

  2. The implementation of STOVL task-tailored control modes in a fighter cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whatley, David W.; Virnig, John C.; Bodden, David S.

    1990-01-01

    The implementation of Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) specific task tailored control modes in a supersonic fighter/attack aircraft cockpit is investigated. A detailed linear model exhibiting STOVL Level 1 handling qualities is implemented in a real time engineering workstation environment with an F-16 cockpit mock-up. Conventional F-16 control inceptors are utilized to achieve effective STOVL operation and reduced pilot workload throughout the transition to hover flight region. Favorable pilot comments indicate the existing F-16 cockpit configuration with a force sidestick is adaptable to STOVL operation.

  3. Validation of an Integrated Airframe and Turbofan Engine Simulation for Evaluation of Propulsion Control Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T Shane; Liu, Yuan; Owen, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed independent airframe and engine models that have been integrated into a single real-time aircraft simulation for piloted evaluation of propulsion control algorithms. In order to have confidence in the results of these evaluations, the integrated simulation must be validated to demonstrate that its behavior is realistic and that it meets the appropriate Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification requirements for aircraft. The paper describes the test procedures and results, demonstrating that the integrated simulation generally meets the FAA requirements and is thus a valid testbed for evaluation of propulsion control modes.

  4. Wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as mode locker and tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenping; Chan, K. T.

    1999-07-01

    A wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium fiber ring laser was demonstrated using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as an intensity mode locker and a tunable optical filter. Very stable optical pulse trains at gigabit repetition rates were generated using harmonica mode locking. The supermode noise was suppressed to 60 dB below the signal level and the root-mean-square timing jitter (0.45 kHz-1 MHz) was found to be about 1% of the pulse duration. A continuous wavelength tuning range of 1.8 nm was achieved by changing the semiconductor laser temperature from 11.4 to 30 °C.

  5. Symmetrical dynamics of peak current-mode and valley current-mode controlled switching dc-dc converters with ramp compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guo-Hua; Xu, Jian-Ping; Bao, Bo-Cheng; Jin, Yan-Yan

    2010-06-01

    The discrete iterative map models of peak current-mode (PCM) and valley current-mode (VCM) controlled buck converters, boost converters, and buck-boost converters with ramp compensation are established and their dynamical behaviours are investigated by using the operation region, parameter space map, bifurcation diagram, and Lyapunov exponent spectrum. The research results indicate that ramp compensation extends the stable operation range of the PCM controlled switching dc-dc converter to D > 0.5 and that of the VCM controlled switching dc-dc converter to D < 0.5. Compared with PCM controlled switching dc-dc converters with ramp compensation, VCM controlled switching dc-dc converters with ramp compensation exhibit interesting symmetrical dynamics. Experimental results are given to verify the analysis results in this paper.

  6. Robustness and Actuator Bandwidth of MRP-Based Sliding Mode Control for Spacecraft Attitude Control Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, Jung-Hoon; Ra, Sung-Woong

    2009-12-01

    Nonlinear sliding surface design in variable structure systems for spacecraft attitude control problems is studied. A robustness analysis is performed for regular form of system, and calculation of actuator bandwidth is presented by reviewing sliding surface dynamics. To achieve non-singular attitude description and minimal parameterization, spacecraft attitude control problems are considered based on modified Rodrigues parameters (MRP). It is shown that the derived controller ensures the sliding motion in pre-determined region irrespective of unmodeled effects and disturbances.

  7. Active Control of Transition and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1987-01-01

    Two active means of manipulating boundary-layer flow developed, one controlling laminar-to-turbulent transition, other controlling amplitude of turbulent fluctuation. Purpose to control skin-friction drag over surfaces inside inlets and ducts. Resulting turbulence downstream has lower skin-friction drag than equivalent flow developing over same surfaces in absence of intervention. Heating strips trigger turbulence while transition amplitude and bandwidth controlled by acoustic signal.

  8. Synchronization analysis and control of three eccentric rotors in a vibrating system using adaptive sliding mode control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxi; Zhang, Xueliang; Chen, Xiaozhe; Wen, Bangchun; Wang, Bo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, self- and controlled synchronizations of three eccentric rotors (ERs) in line driven by induction motors rotating in the same direction in a vibrating system are investigated. The vibrating system is a typical underactuated mechanical-electromagnetic coupling system. The analysis and control of the vibrating system convert to the synchronization motion problem of three ERs. Firstly, the self-synchronization motion of three ERs is analyzed according to self-synchronization theory. The criterions of synchronization and stability of self-synchronous state are obtained by using a modified average perturbation method. The significant synchronization motion of three ERs with zero phase differences cannot be implemented according to self-synchronization theory through analysis and simulations. To implement the synchronization motion of three ERs with zero phase differences, an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) algorithm based on a modified master-slave control strategy is employed to design the controllers. The stability of the controllers is verified by using Lyapunov theorem. The performances of the controlled synchronization system are presented by simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of controllers. Finally, the effects of reference speed and non-zero phase differences on the controlled system are discussed to show the strong robustness of the proposed controllers. Additionally, the dynamic responses of the vibrating system in different synchronous states are analyzed.

  9. Integrated Flight/Structural Mode Control for Very Flexible Aircraft Using L1 Adaptive Output Feedback Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Che, Jiaxing; Cao, Chengyu; Gregory, Irene M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores application of adaptive control architecture to a light, high-aspect ratio, flexible aircraft configuration that exhibits strong rigid body/flexible mode coupling. Specifically, an L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is developed for a semi-span wind tunnel model capable of motion. The wind tunnel mount allows the semi-span model to translate vertically and pitch at the wing root, resulting in better simulation of an aircraft s rigid body motion. The control objective is to design a pitch control with altitude hold while suppressing body freedom flutter. The controller is an output feedback nominal controller (LQG) augmented by an L(sub 1) adaptive loop. A modification to the L(sub 1) output feedback is proposed to make it more suitable for flexible structures. The new control law relaxes the required bounds on the unmatched uncertainty and allows dependence on the state as well as time, i.e. a more general unmatched nonlinearity. The paper presents controller development and simulated performance responses. Simulation is conducted by using full state flexible wing models derived from test data at 10 different dynamic pressure conditions. An L(sub 1) adaptive output feedback controller is designed for a single test point and is then applied to all the test cases. The simulation results show that the L(sub 1) augmented controller can stabilize and meet the performance requirements for all 10 test conditions ranging from 30 psf to 130 psf dynamic pressure.

  10. Active control of radiated pressure of a submarine hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xia; Tso, Yan; Juniper, Ross

    2008-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of the active control of low-frequency radiated pressure from submarine hulls is presented. Two typical hull models are examined in this paper. Each model consists of a water-loaded cylindrical shell with a hemispherical shell at one end and conical shell at the other end, which forms a simple model of a submarine hull. The conical end is excited by an axial force to simulate propeller excitations while the other end is free. The control action is implemented through a Tee-sectioned circumferential stiffener driven by pairs of PZT stack actuators. These actuators are located under the flange of the stiffener and driven out of phase to produce a control moment. A number of cost functions for minimizing the radiated pressure are examined. In general, it was found that the control system was capable of reducing more than half of the total radiated pressure from each of the submarine hull for the first three axial modes.

  11. A sliding mode-based starling-like controller for implantable rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Bakouri, Mohsen A; Salamonsen, Robert F; Savkin, Andrey V; AlOmari, Abdul-Hakeem H; Lim, Einly; Lovell, Nigel H

    2014-07-01

    Clinically adequate implementation of physiological control of a rotary left ventricular assist device requires a sophisticated technique such as the recently proposed method based on the Frank-Starling mechanism. In this mechanism, the stroke volume of the heart increases in response to an increase in the volume of blood filling the left ventricle at the end of diastole. To emulate this process, changes in pump speed need to automatically regulate pump flow to ensure that the combined output of the left ventricle and pump match the output of the right ventricle across changing cardiovascular states. In this approach, we exploit the linear relationship between estimated mean pump flow (Q ̅ est) and pump flow pulsatility (PIQp) in a tracking control algorithm based on sliding mode control. The immediate response of the controller was assessed using a lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) and pump from which could be extracted both Q ̅ est and PIQp. Two different perturbations from the resting state in the presence of left ventricular failure were tested. The first was blood loss requiring a reduction in pump flow to match the reduced output from the right ventricle and to avoid the complication of ventricular suction. The second was exercise, requiring an increase in pump flow. The sliding mode controller induced the required changes in Qp within approximately five heart beats in the blood loss simulation and eight heart beats in the exercise simulation without clinically significant transients or steady-state errors.

  12. An adaptive sliding mode backstepping control for the mobile manipulator with nonholonomic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Naijian; Song, Fangzhen; Li, Guoping; Sun, Xuan; Ai, Changsheng

    2013-10-01

    To solve disturbances, nonlinearity, nonholonomic constraints and dynamic coupling between the platform and its mounted robot manipulator, an adaptive sliding mode controller based on the backstepping method applied to the robust trajectory tracking of the wheeled mobile manipulator is described in this article. The control algorithm rests on adopting the backstepping method to improve the global ultimate asymptotic stability and applying the sliding mode control to obtain high response and invariability to uncertainties. According to the Lyapunov stability criterion, the wheeled mobile manipulator is divided into several stabilizing subsystems, and an adaptive law is designed to estimate the general nondeterminacy, which make the controller be capable to drive the trajectory tracking error of the mobile manipulator to converge to zero even in the presence of perturbations and mathematical model errors. We compare our controller with the robust neural network based algorithm in nonholonomic constraints and uncertainties, and simulation results prove the effectivity and feasibility of the proposed method in the trajectory tracking of the wheeled mobile manipulator.

  13. Two modified discrete PID-based sliding mode controllers for piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y.; Chen, X. B.

    2014-01-01

    Hysteresis is a nonlinear effect that can result in the degraded performance of piezoelectric actuators (PEAs). To counteract the effect, several control methods have been developed and reported in the literature. One promising method for compensation is the use of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID)-based sliding mode control (SMC), in which the PEA hysteresis is treated as an unknown disturbance to the PEA input. If the hysteresis can be modelled or partially modelled, the integration of the hysteresis models into the control schemes may lead to further improved performance. On this philosophy, this paper presents the development of two modified discrete PID-based sliding mode controllers (PID-SMCs) for the PEAs, namely an inversion-based PID-SMC and a disturbance-observer (DOB)-based PID-SMC, in which the PEA hysteresis is predicted or partially predicted through the use of existing models for the PEA hysteresis. Experiments were performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed control schemes. The results were compared to those of the nominal PID-SMC. By employing the inversion hysteresis and the DOB, the PEA performance was greatly improved.

  14. Real-Time Detection for Magnetic Island of Neoclassical Tearing Mode in EAST Plasma Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shaoyong; Xiao, Bingjia; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Linfang; Yuan, Qiping; Luo, Zhengping; Shi, Tonghui; Ti, Ang

    2016-02-01

    Accurate detection of a magnetic island in real time is one of the important issues for the tearing mode (TM) and neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) control. This paper presents a real-time detection system for the magnetic island of NTM control in the EAST Plasma Control System (PCS). Diagnosis is based on magnetic periodic perturbation and electron temperature fluctuation caused by the magnetic island. Therefore, a Mirnov measurement has been selected to calculate the island's parameters, such as island width, frequency of island rotation, and toroidal number. The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) system can detect the island position, which is calculated by two fast detection algorithms called correlation analysis and Hilbert transform. For future NTM control, real-time equilibrium reconstruction (rt-EFIT) is needed to locate the rational q-surface where the island is detected. This fast detection system is able to detect an island within 3 ms. It can be integrated into PCS to provide effective parameters of the island for NTM control by using EC resonance heating (ECRH) in the next experiment of EAST. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2014GB103000, 2012GB103000, and 2012GB103002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11205200)

  15. Challenges and implementation aspects of switched-mode power supplies with digital control for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenzer-Hohmuth, Samuel; Rosahl, Thoralf; Ritzmann, Steffen; Wicht, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Switched-mode power supplies (SMPS) convert an input DC-voltage into a higher or lower output voltage. In automotive, analog control is mostly used in order to keep the required output voltages constant and resistant to disturbances. The design of robust analog control for SMPS faces parameter variations of integrated and external passive components. Using digital control, parameter variations can be eliminated and the required area for the integrated circuit can be reduced at the same time. Digital control design bears challenges like the prevention of limit cycle oscillations and controller-wind-up. This paper reviews how to prevent these effects. Digital control loops introduce new sources for dead times in the control loop, for example the latency of the analog-to-digital-converter (ADC). Dead times have negative influence on the stability of the control loop, because they lead to phase delays. Consequently, low latency is one of the key requirements for analog-to-digital-converters in digitally controlled SMPS. Exploiting the example of a 500 kHz-buck converter with a crossover frequency of 70 kHz, this paper shows that the 5 µs-latency of a ΔΣ-analog-to-digital-converter leads to a reduction in phase margin of 126°. The latency is less critical for boost converters because of their inherent lower crossover frequencies. Finally, the paper shows a comparison between analog and digital control of SMPS with regard to chip area and test costs.

  16. Reliable and Affordable Control Systems Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Bob; Tomondi, Chris; McGinley, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Active, closed-loop control of combustor pattern factor is a cooperative effort between Honeywell (formerly AlliedSignal) Engines and Systems and the NASA Glenn Research Center to reduce emissions and turbine-stator vane temperature variations, thereby enhancing engine performance and life, and reducing direct operating costs. Total fuel flow supplied to the engine is established by the speed/power control, but the distribution to individual atomizers will be controlled by the Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control (ACPFC). This system consist of three major components: multiple, thin-film sensors located on the turbine-stator vanes; fuel-flow modulators for individual atomizers; and control logic and algorithms within the electronic control.

  17. Simulation of Controller Pilot Data Link Communications over VHF Digital Link Mode 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretmersky, Steven C.; Murawski, Robert; Nguyen, Thanh C.; Raghavan, Rajesh S.

    2004-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has established an operational plan for the future Air Traffic Management (ATM) system, in which the Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) is envisioned to evolve into digital messaging that will take on an ever increasing role in controller to pilot communications, significantly changing the way the National Airspace System (NAS) is operating. According to FAA, CPDLC represents the first phase of the transition from the current analog voice system to an International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) compliant system in which digital communication becomes the alternate and perhaps primary method of routine communication. The CPDLC application is an Air Traffic Service (ATS) application in which pilots and controllers exchange messages via an addressed data link. CPDLC includes a set of clearance, information, and request message elements that correspond to existing phraseology employed by current Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures. These message elements encompass altitude assignments, crossing constraints, lateral deviations, route changes and clearances, speed assignments, radio frequency assignments, and various requests for information. The pilot is provided with the capability to respond to messages, to request clearances and information, to report information, and to declare/rescind an emergency. A 'free text' capability is also provided to exchange information not conforming to defined formats. This paper presents simulated results of the aeronautical telecommunication application Controller Pilot Data Link Communications over VHF Digital Link Mode 3 (VDL Mode 3). The objective of this simulation study was to determine the impact of CPDLC traffic loads, in terms of timely message delivery and capacity of the VDL Mode 3 subnetwork. The traffic model is based on and is used for generating air/ground messages with different priorities. Communication is modeled for the en route domain of the Cleveland

  18. Tracking Control of a 2-DOF Arm Actuated by Pneumatic Muscle Actuators Using Adaptive Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming-Kun; Wu, Jui-Chi

    Pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) have the highest power/weight ratio and power/volume ratio of any actuator. Therefore, they can be used not only in the rehabilitation engineering, but also as an actuator in robots, including industrial robots and therapy robots. It is difficult to achieve excellent tracking performance using classical control methods because the compressibility of gas and the nonlinear elasticity of bladder container causes parameter variations. An adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control is developed in this study. The fuzzy sliding surface can be used to reduce fuzzy rule numbers, and the adaptive control law is used to modify fuzzy rules on-line. A model matching technique is then adopted to adjust scaling factors. The experimental results show that this control strategy can attain excellent tracking performance.

  19. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

  20. Active sources in the cutoff of centrifugal fans to reduce the blade tones at higher-order duct mode frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neise, W.; Koopmann, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    A previously developed (e.g., Neise and Koopmann, 1984; Koopmann et al., 1988) active noise control technique in which the unwanted acoustic signals from centrifugal fans are suppressed by placing two externally driven sources near the cutoff of the casing was applied to the frequency region where not only plane sound waves are propagational in the fan ducts but also higher-order acoustic modes. Using a specially designed fan noise testing facility, the performance of two fans (280-mm impeller diam and 508 mm diam) was monitored with static pressure taps mounted peripherally around the inlet nozzle. Experimental results show that the aerodynamically generated source pressure field around the cutoff is too complex to be successfully counterimaged by only two active sources introduced in this region. It is suggested that, for an efficient application of this noise control technique in the higher-order mode frequency regime, it is neccessary to use an active source involving larger number of individually driven loudspeakers.