Science.gov

Sample records for active mode measurements

  1. X-mode reflectometry for magnetohydrodynamic activity associated with q=1 surface measurements on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Vermare, L.; Clairet, F.; Gabillet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    2004-10-01

    Tore Supra is equipped with two 20 {mu}s fast sweep X-mode reflectometers operating between 50-110 GHz dedicated to density profile determination and an X-mode fixed frequency reflectometer operating between 105-155 GHz for density fluctuation measurements. Heterodyne and sine-cosine detection provide measurements of the reflected signal with high sensitivity. Operating profile reflectometer in burst mode (5 {mu}s dead time between two consecutive sweeps) allows quasi-simultaneous measurements at fixed frequency over a broad frequency band. Thus, information on plasma fluctuations, such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity, up to 20 kHz as well as a radial localization of the modes is accessible. The temporal evolution of the q=1 rational surface during sawtooth crash activity has been recorded in the plasma center with high spatial resolution. In addition, a direct comparison between signals associated with a central MHD mode from both profile and fluctuation reflectometers, positioned at different toroidal angles, allows one to determine the plasma toroidal velocity.

  2. X-mode reflectometry for magnetohydrodynamic activity associated with q=1 surface measurements on Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermare, L.; Clairet, F.; Gabillet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    2004-10-01

    Tore Supra is equipped with two 20 μs fast sweep X-mode reflectometers operating between 50-110 GHz dedicated to density profile determination and an X-mode fixed frequency reflectometer operating between 105-155 GHz for density fluctuation measurements. Heterodyne and sine-cosine detection provide measurements of the reflected signal with high sensitivity. Operating profile reflectometer in burst mode (5 μs dead time between two consecutive sweeps) allows quasi-simultaneous measurements at fixed frequency over a broad frequency band. Thus, information on plasma fluctuations, such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity, up to 20 kHz as well as a radial localization of the modes is accessible. The temporal evolution of the q=1 rational surface during sawtooth crash activity has been recorded in the plasma center with high spatial resolution. In addition, a direct comparison between signals associated with a central MHD mode from both profile and fluctuation reflectometers, positioned at different toroidal angles, allows one to determine the plasma toroidal velocity.

  3. Heat Transfer Measurements with Surface Mounted Foil-Sensors in an Active Mode: A Comprehensive Review and a New Design

    PubMed Central

    Mocikat, Horst; Herwig, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive review of film-sensors shows that they are primarily operated in a passive mode, i.e. without being actively heated to an extent, whereby they create a heat transfer situation on their own. Only when these sensors are used for wall shear stress measurements, the detection of laminar/turbulent transition, or the measurement of certain flow velocities, they are operated in an active mode, i.e. heated by an electrical current (after an appropriate calibration). In our study we demonstrate how these R(T)-based sensors (temperature dependence of the electrical resistance R) can also be applied in an active mode for heat transfer measurements. These measurements can be made on cold, unheated bodies, provided certain requirements with respect to the flow field are fulfilled. Our new sensors are laminated nickel- and polyimide-foils manufactured with a special technology, which is also described in detail. PMID:22574060

  4. BrainModes: a principled approach to modeling and measuring large-scale neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Breakspear, Michael J; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Ritter, Petra

    2009-09-30

    Complex systems, such as the brain, exhibit multiple levels of organization due to processes which support the separation of scales across time and/or space. That is, cooperative phenomena--or "modes" of activity--occurring at one scale give rise to coherent spatiotemporal structures at a coarser scale. In turn, structures at the coarser scale constrain--and hence influence--emerging activity at a finer scale. BrainModes is an annual scientific summit which seeks to bring together experimental, computational and theoretical neuroscientists engaged at different levels of organization, with the goal of advancing a principled approach to understanding brain function based on the concept of cooperative phenomena in complex systems. Phenomena of particular interest include synchronization, stochastic influences, and spatiotemporal processes in both healthy and pathological states such as seizures. This Special Issue reports the 2008 BrainModes Workshop, held in Amsterdam (December 2008) which focused on the application of this framework to the analysis of brain oscillations and synchronization phenomena across time scales. PMID:19607859

  5. Active Pneumatic Vibration Control by Using Pressure and Velocity Measurements and Adaptive Fuzzy Sliding-Mode Controller

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Yi; Liang, Jin-Wei; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an intelligent control strategy to overcome nonlinear and time-varying characteristics of a diaphragm-type pneumatic vibration isolator (PVI) system. By combining an adaptive rule with fuzzy and sliding-mode control, the method has online learning ability when it faces the system's nonlinear and time-varying behaviors during an active vibration control process. Since the proposed scheme has a simple structure, it is easy to implement. To validate the proposed scheme, a composite control which adopts both chamber pressure and payload velocity as feedback signal is implemented. During experimental investigations, sinusoidal excitation at resonance and random-like signal are input on a floor base to simulate ground vibration. Performances obtained from the proposed scheme are compared with those obtained from passive system and PID scheme to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed intelligent control. PMID:23820746

  6. Actively mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.E.; Morton, P.A.; Mar, A.; Corzine, S.W.

    1989-06-01

    Measurements of actively mode-locked semiconductor lasers are described and compared to calculations of the mode-locking process using three coupled traveling wave rate equations for the electron and photon densities. The dependence of pulse width on the modulation current and frequency are described. A limitation to minimum achievable pulse widths in mode-locked semiconductor lasers is shown to be dynamic detuning due to gain saturation. Techniques to achieve subpicosecond pulses are described, together with ways to reduce multiple pulse outputs. The amplitude and phase noise of linear and ring cavity semiconductor lasers were measured and found to be tens of dB smaller than YAG and argon lasers and limited by the noise from the microwave oscillator. High-frequency phase noise is only measurable in detuned cavities, and is below -110 dBc (1 Hz) in optimally tuned cavities. The prospects for novel ways to achieve even shorter pulses are discussed.

  7. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 2. Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT)-Based, Mixed-Mode (Electron Transfer (ET)/HAT), and Lipid Peroxidation Assays.

    PubMed

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    Measuring the antioxidant activity/capacity levels of food extracts and biological fluids is useful for determining the nutritional value of foodstuffs and for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of numerous oxidative stress-related diseases. Biologically, antioxidants play their health-beneficial roles via transferring a hydrogen (H) atom or an electron (e(-)) to reactive species, thereby deactivating them. Antioxidant activity assays imitate this action; that is, antioxidants are measured by their H atom transfer (HAT) or e(-) transfer (ET) to probe molecules. Antioxidant activity/capacity can be monitored by a wide variety of assays with different mechanisms, including HAT, ET, and mixed-mode (ET/HAT) assays, generally without distinct boundaries between them. Understanding the principal mechanisms, advantages, and disadvantages of the measurement assays is important for proper selection of method for valid evaluation of antioxidant properties in desired applications. This work provides a general and up-to-date overview of HAT-based, mixed-mode (ET/HAT), and lipid peroxidation assays available for measuring antioxidant activity/capacity and the chemistry behind them, including a critical evaluation of their advantages and drawbacks. PMID:26805392

  8. Ultrasensitive detection of mode splitting in active optical microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lina; Oezdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhu Jiangang; Yang Lan

    2010-11-15

    Scattering-induced mode splitting in active microcavities is demonstrated. Below the lasing threshold, quality factor enhancement by optical gain allows resolving, in the wavelength-scanning transmission spectrum, of resonance dips of the split modes which otherwise would not be detected in a passive resonator. In the lasing regime, mode splitting manifests itself as two lasing modes with extremely narrow linewidths. Mixing these lasing modes in a detector leads to a heterodyne beat signal whose frequency corresponds to the mode-splitting amount. Lasing regime not only allows ultra-high sensitivity for mode-splitting measurements but also provides an easily accessible scheme by eliminating the need for wavelength scanning around resonant modes. Mode splitting in active microcavities has an immediate impact in enhancing the sensitivity of subwavelength scatterer detection and in studying light-matter interactions in a strong-coupling regime.

  9. Rotating Microphone Rake Measures Spinning Acoustic Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Kevin E.; Hausmann, Clifford R.

    1996-01-01

    Rotating rake of pressure transducers developed for use in experimental studies of sources and propagation of noise generated by subsonic fan engines. Pressure transducers used as microphones to measure acoustic modes generated by, and spin with, fans. Versatility of control software used in rake-drive system enables measurements of acoustic modes on wide range of test-engine configurations. Rake-drive hardware easily adapted to different engines because not mechanically coupled to engine under test.

  10. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking. PMID:26367642

  11. New Measurements of Radial Mode Eigenfrequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, G.; Masters, G.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    Radial mode eigenfrequencies are commonly thought to be measured with great ease and precision. The reason for this is that these modes have no geographic pattern so one should be able to measure frequencies from a spectrum observed at any station in the world. Yet, radial modes often seem inconsistent with spherical Earth models that fit all other mode frequencies. It turns out that radial modes are sometimes strongly coupled. The strongest coupling is predicted to be with l=2 modes which is caused by the Earth's hydrostatic ellipticity and aspherical structure of harmonic degree 2. In such cases, mode-coupling due to ellipticity alone can cause a frequency shift for the radial modes by more than 4 microHz. Given that mode frequencies can be measured to within 0.1 microHz, this shift is significant, and some singlets of l=2 modes have indeed been misidentified as the radial mode in the past. Including the spectra of the June 23, 2001 Southern Peru Earthquake we have re-analyzed radial mode eigenfrequencies and present a mode dataset that is internally more consistent than previous ones. We construct spherical Earth models that are consistent with our new data, the Earth's mass and moment of inertia and the current best estimates of ``Reference Normal Mode Data'' (available on the Reference Earth Model web site: //mahi.ucsd.edu/Gabi/rem.html). We seek the smallest perturbation to PREM but update the Q-structure as well as the depths of the upper mantle discontinuities (418~km and 660~km as first order discontinuities; 520~km as change in gradient). The best fitting 1D model is transversely isotropic but we also show isotropic models that fit the data to within their errors. We show that the 220~km discontinuity is not required in the isotropic model but that there exists a trade-off between high shear-velocities in the lid and a low-density zone beneath it. We also investigate ways of truncating transverse isotropy without the 220.

  12. Link of local micro-morphology diversity with variability of the DAN active mode measurements along the rover Curiosity traverse in the Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Ruslan

    2014-05-01

    The rover Curiosity traverse from the Yellowknife Bay (YKB) up to the Darwin outcrop area (DOA) crossed mainly the Smooth Hummocky unit and in places - the Rugged unit spots. Whereas the Smooth Hummocky unit is characterized by low surface roughness and uniform tone, the Rugged unit is typically represented by outcrops with rougher surface texture. As it well seen based on Navcam and Mastcam images, the modern dominant micro-morphology of the landing site area is characteristic of surface shaped by strong aeolian deflation processes. Blowout shallow depressions and wind erosion remnants (in forms of mounds and ridges) are widespread along the rover traverse. As result, in most cases the surface texture of the regolith in the traverse area represents a desert pavement - a surface of tightly packed gravels and pebbles that armor lower more fine material below. Conglomerate outcrops are also exposed within both the Smooth Hummocky unit and the Rugged unit spots and aeolian accumulation features (aeolian drifts, small dunes and ripples) are relatively rare occurring mainly on local leeward slopes of mounds and ridges. During the traverse from the YKB to DOA the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument conducted 140 local active mode measurements of the thermal and epithermal neutrons counts in the top ~60 cm of the Martian subsurface with horizontal sensing "footprint" of about 3 m. Based on the active mode of the DAN measurements it was found that the thermal and epithermal neutron counts measured along the rover traverse show distinct variability from one rover location to another. It was found that a water equivalent of H (WEH) distribution in 60-cm subsurface layer along the rover traverse are fit by a two-layers model, where the top layer (with varied thickness) has less WEH ("dry") than the bottom layer ("wet"). It is distinct that spatial distribution of WEH within the top layer (1-2.5 wt. %) are chiefly homogeneous along the traverse, whereas the range of

  13. Evidences of correlation between the DAN active mode measurements variability and local surface micro-morphology diversity along the rover Curiosity traverse in the Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Ruslan

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument has been operational second year since almost immediately after the landing of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) on August 6, 2012 at the bottom of Gale Crater. In the report we present the result of the DAN measurement analysis, accumulated during 297-398 sols along the MSL rover Curiosity traverse from Yellowknife Bay (YKB) up to Darwin outcrop area (DOA). Along the part of the rover traverse the DAN instrument conducted 140 local active mode measurements of the thermal and epithermal neutrons counts in the top ~60 cm of the Martian subsurface with horizontal sensing “footprint” of about 3 m. As it well seen based on Navcam and Mastcam images, the modern dominant micro-morphology of the rover traverse area is characteristic of surface shaped by strong aeolian deflation processes. It was found that the thermal and epithermal neutron counts measured along the rover traverse show distinct variability from one rover location to another. At that, a water equivalent of H (WEH) distribution in 60-cm subsurface layer along the rover traverse are fit by a two-layers model, where the top layer (with varied thickness) has less WEH (“dry”) than the bottom layer (“wet”). It is notably that two-layer model of the water distribution in the subsurface layer corresponds well to both outcrops spots and deflated surfaces with variable top layer thickness, that is composed of finely granulated and coarse, rocky soil. This suggests that the boundary between the top and bottom layer may not represent a lithological difference but rather it is related with a level of surface regolith desiccation at the modern climatic conditions in the Gale crater area. In places where the surface regolith has been exposed for a longer period of time, the contrast in WEH between the top and bottom layers is essentially lower than in the cases of more recent surface regolith exposure by an aeolian erosion.

  14. Rotating Rake Turbofan Duct Mode Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental measurement system was developed and implemented by the NASA Glenn Research Center in the 1990s to measure turbofan duct acoustic modes. The system is a continuously rotating radial microphone rake that is inserted into the duct. This Rotating Rake provides a complete map of the acoustic duct modes present in a ducted fan and has been used on a variety of test articles: from a low-speed, concept test rig, to a full-scale production turbofan engine. The Rotating Rake has been critical in developing and evaluating a number of noise reduction concepts as well as providing experimental databases for verification of several aero-acoustic codes. More detailed derivation of the unique Rotating Rake equations are presented in the appendix.

  15. Measurement of peeling mode edge current profile dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bongard, M W; Fonck, R J; Hegna, C C; Redd, A J; Schlossberg, D J

    2011-07-15

    Peeling modes, an instability mechanism underlying deleterious edge localized mode (ELM) activity in fusion-grade plasmas, are observed at the edge of limited plasmas in a low aspect ratio tokamak under conditions of high edge current density (J(edge) ∼ 0.1  MA/m2) and low magnetic field (B ∼ 0.1  T). They generate edge-localized, electromagnetic activity with low toroidal mode numbers n≤3 and amplitudes that scale strongly with measured J(edge)/B instability drive, consistent with theory. ELM-like field-aligned, current-carrying filaments form from an initial current-hole J(edge) perturbation that detach and propagate outward. PMID:21838369

  16. Dual-Mode Scramjet Flameholding Operability Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Flameholding measurements were made in two different direct connect combustor facilities that were designed to simulate a cavity flameholder in the flowfield of a hydrocarbon fueled dual-mode scramjet combustor. The presence of a shocktrain upstream of the flameholder has a significant impact on the inlet flow to the combustor and on the flameholding limits. A throttle was installed in the downstream end of the test rigs to provide the needed back-pressurization and decouple the operation of the flameholder from the backpressure formed by heat release and thermal choking, as in a flight engine. Measurements were made primarily with ethylene fuel but a limited number of tests were also performed with heated gaseous JP-7 fuel injection. The flameholding limits were measured by ramping inlet air temperature down until blowout was observed. The tests performed in the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) facility used a hydrogen fueled vitiated air heater, Mach 2.2 and 3.3 inlet nozzles, a scramjet combustor rig with a 1.666 by 6 inch inlet and a 0.65 inch deep cavity. Mean blowout temperature measured at the baseline condition with ethylene fuel, the Mach 2.2 inlet and a cavity pressure of 21 psia was 1502 oR. Flameholding sensitivity to a variety of parameters was assessed. Blowout temperature was found to be most sensitive to fuel injection location and fuel flowrates and surprisingly insensitive to operating pressure (by varying both back-pressurization and inlet flowrate) and inlet Mach number. Video imaging through both the bottom and side wall windows was collected simultaneously and showed that the flame structure was quite unsteady with significant lateral movements as well as movement upstream of the flameholder. Experiments in the University of Virginia (UVa) test facility used a Mach 2 inlet nozzle with a 1 inch by 1.5 inch exit cross section, an aspect ratio of 1.5 versus 3.6 in the UTRC facility. The UVa facility tests were designed to measure the

  17. Dispersion measurements of mode-locked fiber laser components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louthain, James A.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Erdmann, Reinhard K.

    2000-07-01

    Precise control of the dispersion within mode-locked laser cavities can lead to optical pulse compression and reduced timing jitter of mode-locked lasers. Two simple measurement techniques are used to provide a complete picture of the dispersion within an erbium doped mode-locked fiber laser cavity. We measured the optical dispersion of erbium-doped fiber, standard single mode fiber, and chirped Bragg gratings. We built a Michelson interferometer with a wideband LED source to measure the dispersion of fiber lengths of less than 1 meter. Next, we measured the dispersion of chirped Bragg gratings using a network analyzer and a tunable laser in a differential phase measurement technique.

  18. Drift mode accelerometry for spaceborne gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, John W.

    2015-11-01

    A drift mode accelerometer is a precision instrument for spacecraft that overcomes much of the acceleration noise and readout dynamic range limitations of traditional electrostatic accelerometers. It has the potential of achieving acceleration noise performance similar to that of drag-free systems over a restricted frequency band without the need for external drag-free control or continuous spacecraft propulsion. Like traditional accelerometers, the drift mode accelerometer contains a high-density test mass surrounded by an electrode housing, which can control and sense all six degrees of freedom of the test mass. Unlike traditional accelerometers, the suspension system is operated with a low duty cycle so that the limiting suspension force noise only acts over brief, known time intervals, which can be neglected in the data analysis. The readout is performed using a laser interferometer which is immune to the dynamic range limitations of even the best voltage references typically used to determine the inertial acceleration of electrostatic accelerometers. The drift mode accelerometer is a novel offshoot of the like-named operational mode of the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft, in which its test mass suspension system is cycled on and off to estimate the acceleration noise associated with the front-end electronics. This paper presents the concept of a drift mode accelerometer, describes the operation of such a device, develops models for its performance with respect to non-drag-free satellite geodesy and gravitational wave missions, and discusses plans for testing the performance of a prototype sensor in the laboratory using torsion pendula.

  19. Further Development of Rotating Rake Mode Measurement Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Hixon, Ray; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The Rotating Rake mode measurement system was designed to measure acoustic duct modes generated by a fan stage. After analysis of the measured data, the mode amplitudes and phases were quantified. For low-speed fans within axisymmetric ducts, mode power levels computed from rotating rake measured data would agree with the far-field power levels on a tone by tone basis. However, this agreement required that the sound from the noise sources within the duct propagated outward from the duct exit without reflection at the exit and previous studies suggested conditions could exist where significant reflections could occur. To directly measure the modes propagating in both directions within a duct, a second rake was mounted to the rotating system with an offset in both the axial and the azimuthal directions. The rotating rake data analysis technique was extended to include the data measured by the second rake. The analysis resulted in a set of circumferential mode levels at each of the two rake microphone locations. Radial basis functions were then least-squares fit to this data to obtain the radial mode amplitudes for the modes propagating in both directions within the duct. The fit equations were also modified to allow evanescent mode amplitudes to be computed. This extension of the rotating rake data analysis technique was tested using simulated data, numerical code produced data, and preliminary in-duct measured data.

  20. Drift Mode Accelerometry for Spaceborne Gravity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, J. W.; Shelley, R.; Chilton, A.; Olatunde, T.; Ciani, G.; Mueller, G.

    2014-12-01

    A drift mode accelerometer is a precision instrument for spacecraft that overcomes much of the acceleration noise and readout dynamic range limitations of traditional electrostatic accelerometers. It has the potential of achieving acceleration noise performance similar to that of drag-free systems over a restricted frequency band without the need for external drag-free control or continuous spacecraft propulsion. Like traditional accelerometers, the drift mode accelerometer contains a high-density test mass surrounded by an electrode housing, which can control and sense all six degrees of freedom of the test mass. Unlike traditional accelerometers, the suspension system is operated with a low duty cycle so that the limiting suspension force noise only acts over brief, known time intervals, which can be accounted for in the data analysis. The readout is performed using a laser interferometer which is immune to the dynamic range limitations of even the best voltage references typically used to determine the inertial acceleration of electrostatic accelerometers. This presentation describes operation and performance modeling for such a device with respect to a low Earth orbiting satellite geodesy mission. Methods for testing the drift mode accelerometer with the University of Florida precision torsion pendulum will also be discussed.

  1. Mode error analysis of impedance measurement using twin wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Yoshiro, Irie; Liu, Yu-Dong; Wang, Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Both longitudinal and transverse coupling impedance for some critical components need to be measured for accelerator design. The twin wires method is widely used to measure longitudinal and transverse impedance on the bench. A mode error is induced when the twin wires method is used with a two-port network analyzer. Here, the mode error is analyzed theoretically and an example analysis is given. Moreover, the mode error in the measurement is a few percent when a hybrid with no less than 25 dB isolation and a splitter with no less than 20 dB magnitude error are used. Supported by Natural Science Foundation of China (11175193, 11275221)

  2. HBT-EP Program: Active MHD Mode Dynamics and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, G. A.; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Byrne, P. J.; Donald, G. V.; Hughes, P. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.; Hansen, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    The HBT-EP active mode control research program aims to: (i) quantify external kink dynamics and multimode response to magnetic perturbations, (ii) understand the relationship between control coil configuration, conducting and ferritic wall effects, and active feedback control, and (iii) explore advanced feedback algorithms. Biorthogonal decomposition is used to observe multiple simultaneous resistive wall modes (RWM). A 512 core GPU-based low latency (14 μs) MIMO control system uses 96 inputs and 64 outputs for Adaptive Control of RWMs. An in-vessel adjustable ferritic wall is used to study ferritic RWMs with increased growth rates, RMP response, and disruptivity. A biased electrode in the plasma is used to control the rotation of external kinks and evaluate error fields. A Thomson scattering diagnostic measures Te and ne at 3 spatial points, soon to be extended to 10 points. A quasi-linear sharp-boundary model of the plasma's multimode response to error fields is developed to determine harmful error field structures and associated NTV and resonant torques. Upcoming machine upgrades will allow measurements and control of scrape-off-layer currents, and control of kink modes using optical diagnostics. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  3. Measuring Physical Activity Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sallis, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity is usually done in specific types of places, referred to as physical activity environments. These often include parks, trails, fitness centers, schools, and streets. In recent years, scientific interest has increased notably in measuring physical activity environments. The present paper provides an historical overview of the contributions of the health, planning, and leisure studies fields to the development of contemporary measures. The emphasis is on attributes of the built environment that can be affected by policies to contribute to the promotion of physical activity. Researchers from health fields assessed a wide variety of built environment variables expected to be related to recreational physical activity. Settings of interest were schools, workplaces, and recreation facilities, and most early measures used direct observation methods with demonstrated inter-observer reliability. Investigators from the city planning field evaluated aspects of community design expected to be related to people’s ability to walk from homes to destinations. GIS was used to assess walkability defined by the 3Ds of residential density, land-use diversity, and pedestrian-oriented designs. Evaluating measures for reliability or validity was rarely done in the planning-related fields. Researchers in the leisure studies and recreation fields studied mainly people’s use of leisure time rather than physical characteristics of parks and other recreation facilities. Although few measures of physical activity environments were developed, measures of aesthetic qualities are available. Each of these fields made unique contributions to the contemporary methods used to assess physical activity environments. PMID:19285214

  4. High Precision Superconducting Cavity Diagnostics With Higher Order Mode Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, S.; Frisch, J.; McCormick, D.; May, J.; Ross, M.; Smith, T.; Baboi, N.; Hensler, O.; Petrosian, L.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.C.; Simon, C.; Eddy, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-02-12

    Experiments at the FLASH facility at DESY have demonstrated that the higher order modes induced in superconducting cavities can be used to provide a variety of beam and cavity diagnostics. The axes of the modes can be determined from the beam orbit that produces minimum power in the dipole HOM modes. The phase and amplitude of the dipole modes can be used to obtain high resolution beam position information, and the phase of the monopole modes to measure the beam phase relative to the accelerator rf. For most superconducting accelerators, the existing higher order mode couplers provide the necessary signals, and the downmix and digitizing electronics are straightforward, similar to those for a conventional beam position monitor.

  5. Study on actuating mode shapes of electro-active paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Mannur; Park, Yongkun; Craft, William J.; Sankar, Jag; Kim, Jaehwan

    2006-03-01

    This paper focuses on actuating mode shapes of cellulose-based electro-active paper (EAPap) in order to investigate its suitability as actuators. Firstly, actuating mechanism of EAPap is addressed based on intrinsic characteristics of cellulose structures under electric fields. EAPap actuator is then fabricated by embedding gold as electrodes into both sides of cellophane sheets. Actuating mode shapes under electric fields are phenomenological measured via laser scanning vibrometer at different exciting frequencies as well as relative humidity. Various actuating performances with large deformations are obtained by applying low electric fields, which can produce a suitable deformation capability with light weight, low power consumption and simple fabrication. Experimental results provide that EAPap can be used as a potential actuating candidate for shape control of smart structures, along with bio-inspired actuator materials.

  6. Inferring Flare Loop Parameters with Measurements of Standing Sausage Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Standing fast sausage modes in flare loops were suggested to account for a considerable number of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the light curves of solar flares. This study continues our investigation into the possibility of inverting the measured periods P and damping times τ of sausage modes to deduce the transverse Alfvén time R/v_{Ai}, density contrast ρi/ρe, and the steepness of the density distribution transverse to flare loops. A generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage modes is derived for pressureless cylinders where density inhomogeneity of arbitrary form takes place within the cylinder. We show that in general the inversion problem is under-determined for QPP events where only a single sausage mode exists, whether the measurements are spatially resolved or unresolved. While R/v_{Ai} can be inferred to some extent, the range of possible steepness parameters may be too broad to be useful. However, for spatially resolved measurements where an additional mode is present, it is possible to deduce self-consistently ρi/ρe, the profile steepness, and the internal Alfvén speed v_{Ai}. We show that at least for a recent QPP event that involves a fundamental kink mode in addition to a sausage one, flare loop parameters are well constrained even if the specific form of the transverse density distribution remains unknown. We conclude that spatially resolved, multi-mode QPP measurements need to be pursued to infer flare loop parameters.

  7. Diagnostic for two-mode variable valve activation device

    SciTech Connect

    Fedewa, Andrew M

    2014-01-07

    A method is provided for diagnosing a multi-mode valve train device which selectively provides high lift and low lift to a combustion valve of an internal combustion engine having a camshaft phaser actuated by an electric motor. The method includes applying a variable electric current to the electric motor to achieve a desired camshaft phaser operational mode and commanding the multi-mode valve train device to a desired valve train device operational mode selected from a high lift mode and a low lift mode. The method also includes monitoring the variable electric current and calculating a first characteristic of the parameter. The method also includes comparing the calculated first characteristic against a predetermined value of the first characteristic measured when the multi-mode valve train device is known to be in the desired valve train device operational mode.

  8. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S. Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-15

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable β{sub N} close to the ideal with-wall limit, β{sub N}{sup wall}, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at β{sub N} up to 86% of β{sub N}{sup wall} but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of β{sub N}{sup wall} without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  9. Airborne Measurements of Coarse Mode Aerosol Composition and Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Brock, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Wilson, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse aerosol particles impact the earth's radiative balance by direct scattering and absorption of light and by promoting cloud formation. Modeling studies suggest that coarse mode mineral dust and sea salt aerosol are the dominant contributors to aerosol optical depth throughout much of the globe. Lab and field studies indicate that larger aerosol particles tend to be more efficient ice nuclei, and recent airborne measurements confirm the dominant role of mineral dust on cirrus cloud formation. However, our ability to simulate coarse mode particle abundance in large scale models is limited by a lack of validating measurements above the earth's surface. We present airborne measurements of coarse mode aerosol abundance and composition over several mid-latitude, sub-tropical, and tropical regions from the boundary layer to the stratosphere. In the free troposphere the coarse mode constitutes 10-50% of the total particulate mass over a wide range of environments. Above North America mineral dust typically dominates the coarse mode, but biomass burning particles and sea salt also contribute. In remote environments coarse mode aerosol mainly consists of internally mixed sulfate-organic particles. Both continental and marine convection can enhance coarse aerosol mass through direct lofting of primary particles and by secondary accumulation of aerosol material through cloud processing.

  10. Measurement of mode coupling distribution along a few-mode fiber using a synchronous multi-channel OTDR.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masataka; Yoshida, Masato; Hirooka, Toshihiko

    2014-12-15

    We describe the nondestructive measurement of mode coupling along a few-mode fiber using a synchronous multi-channel optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR). By installing a few-mode fiber (FMF) coupler made with a phase mask method, we excite the LP01 mode in an FMF under the test as an input mode, and then we detect backward Rayleigh scattered LP11a or LP11b modes, which were generated as a result of the mode coupling through the coupler. The mode coupling distribution between the LP01 and LP11a,b modes along the test FMF was successfully measured with a 10-m spatial resolution by obtaining the ratio between the backscattered LP01 mode and LP11a or LP11b. The value of the mode coupling obtained with the present method agreed well with that obtained with the conventional transmission method. PMID:25607078

  11. Travel Mode and Physical Activity at Sydney University

    PubMed Central

    Rissel, Chris; Mulley, Corinne; Ding, Ding

    2013-01-01

    How staff and students travel to university can impact their physical activity level. An online survey of physical activity and travel behaviour was conducted in early November 2012 to inform planning of physical activity and active travel promotion programs at the University of Sydney, Australia as part of the “Sit Less, Move More” sub-committee of the Healthy University Initiative, and as baseline data for evaluation. There were 3,737 useable responses, 60% of which were from students. Four out of five respondents travelled to the University on the day of interest (Tuesday, November 30, 2012). The most frequently used travel modes were train (32%), car as driver (22%), bus (17%), walking (17%) and cycling (6%). Staff were twice as likely to drive as students, and also slightly more likely to use active transport, defined as walking and cycling (26% versus 22%). Overall, 41% of respondents were sufficiently active (defined by meeting physical activity recommendations of 150 min per week). Participants were more likely to meet physical activity recommendations if they travelled actively to the University. With a high proportion of respondents using active travel modes or public transport already, increasing the physical activity levels and increasing the use of sustainable travel modes would mean a mode shift from public transport to walking and cycling for students is needed and a mode shift from driving to public transport or active travel for University staff. Strategies to achieve this are discussed. PMID:23939390

  12. Active control for stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D.A.; Ferron, J.R.; La Haye, R.J.; Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.; Prater, R.; Welander, A.S.

    2006-05-15

    This work describes active control algorithms used by DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] to stabilize and maintain suppression of 3/2 or 2/1 neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by application of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational q surface. The DIII-D NTM control system can determine the correct q-surface/ECCD alignment and stabilize existing modes within 100-500 ms of activation, or prevent mode growth with preemptive application of ECCD, in both cases enabling stable operation at normalized beta values above 3.5. Because NTMs can limit performance or cause plasma-terminating disruptions in tokamaks, their stabilization is essential to the high performance operation of ITER [R. Aymar et al., ITER Joint Central Team, ITER Home Teams, Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The DIII-D NTM control system has demonstrated many elements of an eventual ITER solution, including general algorithms for robust detection of q-surface/ECCD alignment and for real-time maintenance of alignment following the disappearance of the mode. This latter capability, unique to DIII-D, is based on real-time reconstruction of q-surface geometry by a Grad-Shafranov solver using external magnetics and internal motional Stark effect measurements. Alignment is achieved by varying either the plasma major radius (and the rational q surface) or the toroidal field (and the deposition location). The requirement to achieve and maintain q-surface/ECCD alignment with accuracy on the order of 1 cm is routinely met by the DIII-D Plasma Control System and these algorithms. We discuss the integrated plasma control design process used for developing these and other general control algorithms, which includes physics-based modeling and testing of the algorithm implementation against simulations of actuator and plasma responses. This systematic design/test method and modeling environment enabled successful mode suppression by the NTM control system upon first-time use in an

  13. Epsilon-near-zero mode for active optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Vassant, S; Archambault, A; Marquier, F; Pardo, F; Gennser, U; Cavanna, A; Pelouard, J L; Greffet, J J

    2012-12-01

    The electromagnetic modes of a GaAs quantum well between two AlGaAs barriers are studied. At the longitudinal optical phonon frequency, the system supports a phonon polariton mode confined in the thickness of the quantum well that we call epsilon-near-zero mode. This epsilon-near-zero mode can be resonantly excited through a grating resulting in a very large absorption localized in the single quantum well. We show that the reflectivity can be modulated by applying a voltage. This paves the way to a new class of active optoelectronic devices working in the midinfrared and far infrared at ambient temperature. PMID:23368264

  14. Subpicosecond solitons in an actively mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. J.; Haus, H. A.; Ippen, E. P.

    1996-11-01

    Experimental results are presented for a study of the stability regime of an actively mode-locked polarization-maintaining fiber ring laser used as a memory. Observations indicate that the pulse widths in the memory can be reduced (by soliton effects) by a factor of approximately 4.4 below the pulse widths predicted by standard active mode-locking theory. Stability regions for the solitons are mapped and compared with theoretical predictions.

  15. Expansion and orthogonalization of measured modes for structure identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Suzanne Weaver

    1989-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate a new simultaneous expansion/orthogonalization method in comparison with two previously published expansion methods and a widely used orthogonalization technique. Each expansion method uses data from an analytical model of the structure to complete the estimate of the mode shape vectors. Berman and Nagy used Guyan expansion in their work with improving analytical models. In this method, modes are expanded one at a time, producing a set not orthogonal with respect to the mass matrix. Baruch and Bar Itzhack's optimal orthogonalization procedure was used to subsequently adjust the expanded modes. A second expansion technique was presented by O'Callahan, Avitabile, and Reimer and separately by Kammer. Again, modes are expanded individually and orthogonalized after expansion with the same optimal technique as above. Finally, a simultaneous expansion/orthogonalization method was developed from the orthogonal Procrustes problem of computational mathematics. In this method modes are optimally expanded as a set and orthogonal with respect to the mass matrix as a result. Two demonstation problems were selected for the comparison of the methods described. The first problem is an 8 degree of freedom spring-mass problem first presented by Kabe. Several conditions were examined for expansion method including the presence of errors in the measured data and in the analysis models. As a second demonstration problem, data from tests of laboratory scale model truss structures was expanded for system identification. Tests with a complete structure produced a correlated analysis model and the stiffness and mass matrices. Tests of various damaged configurations produced measured data for 6 modes at 14 dof locations.

  16. Active Suppression of the Transonic Flutter Using Sliding Mode Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degaki, Takanori; Suzuki, Shinji

    This paper describes two-dimensional active flutter suppression to cope with the transonic dip using the sliding mode control. The airfoil model has plunge and pitch degrees of freedom with leading and trailing edge control surfaces. The aerodynamic forces acting on the airfoil, lift and pitching moment, are calculated by solving Euler's equations using computational fluid dynamics. At a specific altitude, flutter occurs between Mach number of 0.7 and 0.88, which corresponds to the transonic dip. The sliding mode control makes the airfoil to be stable all through the Mach number including the transonic dip. The sliding mode controller gives wider flutter margin than a linear quadratic regulator. These characteristics indicate that the sliding mode control is useful for active flutter suppression in the transonic flight.

  17. Preliminary mode distortion measurements on the Jefferson Lab IRFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen V. Benson; Joe Gubeli; Michelle D. Shinn

    2001-08-01

    We previously reported analytical calculations of mirror distortion in a high power FEL with a near-concentric cavity. Naive assumptions about the FEL power vs. distortion led us to believe that mirror losses were much lower than expected. Recently we have directly measured the mode size and beam quality as a function of power using a resonator with a center wavelength of 5 microns. The resonator mirrors were calcium fluoride. This material exhibits a large amount of distortion for a given power but, due to the negative slope of refractive index v temperature, adds almost no optical phase distortion on the laser output. The mode in the cavity can thus be directly calculated from the measurements at the resonator output. The presence of angular jitter produced results inconsistent with cold cavity expectations. Removing the effects of the angular jitter produces results in reasonable agreement with analytical models assuming mirror losses comparable to the original expectations.

  18. Mode crosstalk matrix measurement of a 1  km elliptical core few-mode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Milione, Giovanni; Ip, Ezra; Li, Ming-Jun; Stone, Jefferey; Peng, Gaozhu; Wang, Ting

    2016-06-15

    The spatial modes of a 1 km elliptical core few-mode optical fiber (6 spatial modes) are analyzed by using liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators to measure the fiber's mode crosstalk matrix in Hermite-Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian, and linearly polarized spatial mode bases. It is shown that the fiber's spatial modes can be described by Hermite-Gaussian modes, which can propagate 1 km over the optical fiber with <-20  dB (1%) average mode crosstalk even when the fiber has multiple 1 cm diameter bends. The use of elliptical core few-mode optical fibers for space division multiplexing in data centers is discussed. PMID:27304281

  19. First retrieval results of the GLORIA chemistry mode measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumińska-Ebersoldt, Olga

    2013-04-01

    GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere) is a new airborne imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer developed at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and Research Center Jülich, Germany. Depending on the scientific aims, the instrument enables measurements in limb and nadir geometry with high spectral resolution and low spatial coverage (chemistry mode) or high spatial coverage and lower spectral resolution (dynamic mode). Up to now, GLORIA successfully accomplished three scientific measurement campaigns with flights carried out under various atmospheric conditions and at wide range of latitudes and seasons (ESSENCE in December 2011, TACTS and ESMVAL in summer 2012) and provided huge amount of data enabling extensive research on transport and mixing in the extratropical UTLS region, biomass burning emissions, stratospheric polar ozone chemistry and the interaction between the Indian monsoon and the changing climate. Here, we describe shortly the GLORIA data processing developed at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and present the first profiles and spatial distribution cross sections of atmospheric constituents retrieved from GLORIA chemistry mode measurements. To illustrate the GLORIA performance, an intercomparison of in-situ, remote sensing and GLORIA observations of temperature and chosen gases is introduced.

  20. Fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification for an active pelvis orthosis: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kebin; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Wang, Long; Munih, Marko; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification method for an active pelvis orthosis. Locomotion information measured by the onboard hip joint angle sensors and the pressure insoles is used to classify five locomotion modes, including two static modes (sitting, standing still), and three dynamic modes (level-ground walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The proposed method classifies these two kinds of modes first by monitoring the variation of the relative hip joint angle between the two legs within a specific period. Static states are then classified by the time-based absolute hip joint angle. As for dynamic modes, a fuzzy-logic based method is proposed for the classification. Preliminary experimental results with three able-bodied subjects achieve an off-line classification accuracy higher than 99.49%. PMID:26737144

  1. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  2. An Analysis of Fundamental Mode Surface Wave Amplitude Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schardong, L.; Ferreira, A. M.; van Heijst, H. J.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic tomography is a powerful tool to decipher the Earth's interior structure at various scales. Traveltimes of seismic waves are widely used to build velocity models, whereas amplitudes are still only seldomly accounted for. This mainly results from our limited ability to separate the various physical effects responsible for observed amplitude variations, such as focussing/defocussing, scattering and source effects. We present new measurements from 50 global earthquakes of fundamental-mode Rayleigh and Love wave amplitude anomalies measured in the period range 35-275 seconds using two different schemes: (i) a standard time-domain amplitude power ratio technique; and (ii) a mode-branch stripping scheme. For minor-arc data, we observe amplitude anomalies with respect to PREM in the range of 0-4, for which the two measurement techniques show a very good overall agreement. We present here a statistical analysis and comparison of these datasets, as well as comparisons with theoretical calculations for a variety of 3-D Earth models. We assess the geographical coherency of the measurements, and investigate the impact of source, path and receiver effects on surface wave amplitudes, as well as their variations with frequency in a wider range than previously studied.

  3. Multi-mode multistatics for passive/active airborne surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrodnik, Robert F.

    1986-07-01

    The increasing performance demands for air surveillance assets, as well as the necessity for continued surveillance operations in the presence of enemy jamming anti-radiation missile (ARM) attacks, have increased interest in passive surveillance, in particular multi-mode passive/active multistatic sensing. The use of noncooperative radiation as illuminators of opportunity combined with passive surveillance electromagnetic support measurement (ESM) sensors opens new horizons to multistatic surveillance from a passive airborne platform. Research and field tests have been conducted on ESM augmented bistatics as well as noncooperative multistatics which support the development of airborne multi-mode passive surveillance technology. This work has been conducted under such programs as the Bistatic Enhanced Altimeter Detection (BEAD) and the noncooperative multistatic Passive Coherent Location (PCL). Both BEAD and PCL technology directly support the receiver, signal processing and target location/tracking operations necessary for passive surveillance. The demonstrated technologies for EM interference rejection and multistatic multi-target tracking and location under PCL provide a promising performance bench mark for passive surveillance in the presence of a complex electromagnetic environment. Passive receiver intercept performance under BEAD has provided a receiver design baseline for both look-down and look-up surveillance applications. The technologies under development in BEAD and PCL are presented along with the field test results and the sensor concepts. In particular, spin-off data such as bistatic look-down clutter, noise-floor limitation of noncooperative multistatics and sensitivity limitations set by passive surveillance using signal intercept techniques and illuminators of opportunity are provided.

  4. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  5. [Intravesical active prostate bleeding diagnosed in B-mode ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Kirchgesner, T; Danse, E; Tombal, B

    2013-09-01

    Hematuria is one of the most frequent minor complications after prostatic biopsy. We would like to report the case of a 68-year-old patient with massive hematuria after prostatic biopsy and intravesical active prostate bleeding diagnosed in B-mode ultrasonography. PMID:24034804

  6. Engaging in activities involving information technology: dimensions, modes, and flow.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Henry; Sharafi, Parvaneh; Hedman, Leif R

    2004-01-01

    An engagement mode involves a subject (e.g., a user of information technology, or IT) who is engaged in an activity with an object in a certain manner (the mode). The purpose of this study is to develop a general model of engagement modes that may be used for understanding how IT-related activities are shaped by properties of the user and the IT object. A questionnaire involving items on IT engagement and the experience of flow was administered to 300 participants. The results supported an engagement mode (EM) model involving 5 different engagement modes (enjoying/acceptance, ambition/curiosity, avoidance/hesitation, frustration/ anxiety, and efficiency/productivity) characterized on 3 dimensions (evaluation of object, locus of control between subject and object, and intrinsic or extrinsic focus of motivation). The flow experience follows from a balance between enjoying/ acceptance and efficiency/productivity propelled by ambition/curiosity. The EM model could provide a platform for considering how IT users, IT applications, and IT environments should work together to yield both enjoyment and efficiency. Actual or potential applications of this research include designing IT training programs on different levels of specificity. PMID:15359681

  7. Measuring atmospheric dispersion with WLRS in multiple wavelength mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Haufe, K. H.; Dassing, Reiner

    1993-01-01

    The WLRS (Wettzell Laser Ranging System) allows the simultaneous tracking of satellites on two different wavelengths. These are the fundamental frequency of Nd:YAG at 1.064 microns and the second harmonic at 532 nm. Range measurements to the satellite LAGEOS were carried out with different experimental set-ups, after developing a detector unit based on a silicon avalanche photodiode in Geiger mode, which is sufficiently sensitive in the infrared domain. An approach towards a quantitative interpretation of the data is suggested and discussed briefly.

  8. Picosecond Measurements with Mode-Locked CW Lasers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosaad, Neamat Roushdy M.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The characteristics of output pulses from a synchronously and hybridly mode-locked CW Rhodamine 6G dye laser were studied in detail by both spectral and temporal measurements. In a synchronous system, the observed spectrum was found to change from deeply channelled to nearly smooth according to the position of the birefringent filter. The output pulses were nearly transform-limited and believed to have a single-sided exponential shape. Hybridly CW mode-locked dye laser was a more reliable source for generating broadly tunable subpicosecond pulses, compared to a synchronously mode-locked laser. With carefull adjustment of the dye laser and the saturable absorber concentration (DQOCI) mixed with R6G in a single dye jet stream, pulses as short as 0.21 ps have been obtained with a compression factor of 5. The observed spectrum showed asymmetric broadening at the long-wavelength side alone. The SHG autocorrelation traces showed broad wings with exponential-like shape. The time-bandwidth product for these pulses were about three to seven times larger than that for the transform-limited pulse with single-sided exponential shape. This suggest that the pulse is largely frequency-chirped which can consistently be explained by taking into account the nonlinear process of self-phase modulation due to optical Kerr effect in a mixed dye jet stream. The timing pulse jitter was reduced by a factor of 2.4 due to mode-locking stabilization. Optical pulse compression utilizing nonlinear propagation in single-mode fibres was studied. The propagation in the fibre broadens and chirps the pulse due to the combined action of group velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. The channelled spectrum disappeared completely and a smooth Gaussian shape was observed with the same overall width. The pulse can then be compressed by passage through a suitable dispersive delay line. Short pulses were obtained with a

  9. Immersion mode ice nucleation measurements with the new Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber (PIMCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Monika; Lohmann, Ulrike; Welti, André; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2016-05-01

    The new Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber (PIMCA) has been developed for online immersion freezing of single-immersed aerosol particles. PIMCA is a vertical extension of the established Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC). PIMCA immerses aerosol particles into cloud droplets before they enter PINC. Immersion freezing experiments on cloud droplets with a radius of 5-7 μm at a prescribed supercooled temperature (T) and water saturation can be conducted, while other ice nucleation mechanisms (deposition, condensation, and contact mode) are excluded. Validation experiments on reference aerosol (kaolinite, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate) showed good agreement with theory and literature. The PIMCA-PINC setup was tested in the field during the Zurich AMBient Immersion freezing Study (ZAMBIS) in spring 2014 in Zurich, Switzerland. Significant concentrations of submicron ambient aerosol triggering immersion freezing at T > 236 K were rare. The mean frozen cloud droplet number concentration was estimated to be 7.22·105 L-1 for T < 238 K and determined from the measured frozen fraction and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations predicted for the site at a typical supersaturation of SS = 0.3%. This value should be considered as an upper limit of cloud droplet freezing via immersion and homogeneous freezing processes. The predicted ice nucleating particle (INP) concentration based on measured total aerosol larger than 0.5 μm and the parameterization by DeMott et al. (2010) at T = 238 K is INPD10=54 ± 39 L-1. This is a lower limit as supermicron particles were not sampled with PIMCA-PINC during ZAMBIS.

  10. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2015-09-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest, despite other studies having reported differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, in this study we compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate the findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation, beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies had used small groups, whereas in the present study we tested these hypotheses in a larger group. The results indicated that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network, relative to an active task, for meditators as compared to controls. Regions of the default mode network showing a Group × Task interaction included the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that the suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and they suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task. PMID:25904238

  11. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Kathleen A.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R. Todd; Brewer, Judson A.

    2015-01-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest despite other studies reporting differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, this study compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity, and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies have used small groups, whereas the current study tested these hypotheses in a larger group. Results indicate that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network relative to an active task in meditators compared to controls. Regions of the default mode showing a group by task interaction include the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task. PMID:25904238

  12. Investigation of continuously traversing microphone system for mode measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicon, D. E.; Sofrin, T. G.; Mathews, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The continuously Traversing Microphone System consists of a data acquisition and processing method for obtaining the modal coefficients of the discrete, coherent acoustic field in a fan inlet duct. The system would be used in fan rigs or full scale engine installations where present measurement methods, because of the excessive number of microphones and long test times required, are not feasible. The purpose of the investigation reported here was to develop a method for defining modal structure by means of a continuously traversing microphone system and to perform an evaluation of the method, based upon analytical studies and computer simulated tests. A variety of system parameters were examined, and the effects of deviations from ideal were explored. Effects of traverse speed, digitizing rate, run time, roundoff error, calibration errors, and random noise background level were determined. For constant fan operating speed, the sensitivity of the method to normal errors and deviations was determined to be acceptable. Good recovery of mode coefficients was attainable. Fluctuating fan speed conditions received special attention, and it was concluded that by employing suitable time delay procedures, satisfactory information on mode coefficients can be obtained under realistic conditions. A plan for further development involving fan rig tests was prepared.

  13. Coarse mode aerosol measurement using a Low Turbulence Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, J.; Bart, M.; Trembath, J.; McQuaid, J. B.; Brooks, B. J.; Osborne, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Sahara desert is a major natural source of global mineral dust emissions (Forster et al., 2007) through the mobilisation and lifting of dust particles into the atmosphere from dust storms. A significant fraction of this dust is in the aerosol coarse mode (Weinzierl et al., 2009). It is highlighted of the difficulty in making accurate and reliable measurements from an aircraft platform, particularly that of coarse mode aerosol (Wendisch et al., 2004). To achieve the measurement of a representative aerosol sample an aerosol inlet, on an aircraft, is required for the delivery of the sample to the instruments making the measurements. Inlet design can modify aerosol size distribution through either underestimating due to aerosol losses or overestimation due to enhancements. The Low Turbulence Inlet (LTI) was designed to improve inlet efficiency. This is achieved by reducing turbulence flow within the tip of the inlet, reducing impaction of particles to the walls of the inlet (Wilson et al., 2004). The LTI further maintains isokinetic sampling flow (free stream velocity, U0 and sampling velocity, U are equal to 1). Dust aerosol over the Sahara desert provides an excellent environment to test and quantify the capabilities of the LTI on the FAAM BAe 146, whilst enabling in-situ dust measurement. The LTI was operated during the Fennec field campaign in June 2011 with 11 flights during the campaign over Mauritania and Mali. We are using the LTI to provide critical information on the sampling characteristics of the inlet used by nearly all aerosol instruments inside the aircraft (AMS, Nephelometer, PSAP, and CCN). Inlet experiments were performed with identical Optical Particle Counters (OPC) connected to the rosemount and LTI with size distribution for each inlet measured and Rosemount enhancements determined. Rosemount inlet enhancements were determined to be 2 to 4 times for particles up to 2.5 µm. A key parameter in aerosol measurement is size distribution, in which

  14. Magnetocardiogram measured by fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karo, Hikaru; Sasada, Ichiro

    2015-05-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) of healthy volunteers has been measured by using a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer array of 32 channels in a magnetic shielded room (MSR). Sensor heads, which are employed, consist of a 45 mm long U-shaped amorphous wire core and a 1000-turn solenoid pick-up coil of 30 mm in length and 3 mm in outer diameter. The excitation current of 100 kHz with large dc bias current is fed directly into wire cores, which are connected in series, whereas the signal detection circuit is provided to each of the sensor heads. A special technique to avoid mutual interaction between sensor heads is implemented, where all the sensor heads are excited synchronously by using a single ac source. A 2-D array having 32 sensors with 4 cm grid spacing was used to measure MCG signals inside an MSR. Measured data from each channel were first filtered (0.16-100 Hz pass band), then averaged for 2 min synchronously with electrocardiogram's peaks taken from both hands. Noise remaining after the average is about 1.8 pTrms for the band-width of 0.16-100 Hz. The QRS complex and the T-wave are clearly detected.

  15. Microwave Reflectometry Measurements of Mode Transitions in Helicon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Robert; Boivin, Robert; Balkey, Matthew; Scime, Earl

    1999-10-01

    Considerable research effort has been devoted to developing probe techniques for measurements of electron temperatures and densities in rf plasmas. However, the densities (n > 10E13 cm-3) and electron temperatures (T > 3 eV) found in steady-state helicon plasmas make probe measurements problematic, particularly in helium plasmas as they have significantly higher electron temperatures. We have designed and built a microwave density diagnostic for a steady-state helicon plasma. The cornerstone of the diagnostic is a 20 - 40 GHz variable frequency microwave source. The microwave horns located inside the vacuum chamber are configured so that the system operates in the far-field diffraction regime. The diagnostic can be operated in two different configurations: 1) Simple interferometry, where at a fixed microwave frequency the average electron density is obtained by measuring either the phase shift of the attenuation of the microwave beam; 2) Differential interferometery where the Fourier transform of the plasma phase shift response to a slightly non-linear frequency ramp yields the average density. The change in peak plasma density is reported for transitions into the helicon mode for both helium and argon plasmas. The transitions occur as a function of rf power, magnetic field, and rf frequency.

  16. Small-displacement measurements using high-order Hermite-Gauss modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hengxin; Liu, Kui; Liu, Zunlong; Guo, Pengliang; Zhang, Junxiang; Gao, Jiangrui

    2014-03-24

    We present a scheme for small-displacement measurements using high-order Hermite-Gauss modes and balanced homodyne detection. We demonstrate its use with experimental results of displacement measurements using fundamental transverse mode TEM{sub 00} and first order transverse mode TEM{sub 10} as signal modes. The results show a factor of 1.41 improvement in measurement precision with the TEM{sub 10} mode compared with that with the TEM{sub 00} mode. This scheme has potential applications in precision metrology, atomic force microscopy, and optical imaging.

  17. Measuring a Fiber-Optic Delay Line Using a Mode-Locked Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Meirong; McKee, Michael R.; Pak, Kyung S.; Yu, Nan

    2010-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts a laboratory setup for determining the optical length of a fiber-optic delay line at a precision greater than that obtainable by use of optical time-domain reflectometry or of mechanical measurement of length during the delay-line-winding process. In this setup, the delay line becomes part of the resonant optical cavity that governs the frequency of oscillation of a mode-locked laser. The length can then be determined from frequency-domain measurements, as described below. The laboratory setup is basically an all-fiber ring laser in which the delay line constitutes part of the ring. Another part of the ring - the laser gain medium - is an erbium-doped fiber amplifier pumped by a diode laser at a wavelength of 980 nm. The loop also includes an optical isolator, two polarization controllers, and a polarizing beam splitter. The optical isolator enforces unidirectional lasing. The polarization beam splitter allows light in only one polarization mode to pass through the ring; light in the orthogonal polarization mode is rejected from the ring and utilized as a diagnostic output, which is fed to an optical spectrum analyzer and a photodetector. The photodetector output is fed to a radio-frequency spectrum analyzer and an oscilloscope. The fiber ring laser can generate continuous-wave radiation in non-mode-locked operation or ultrashort optical pulses in mode-locked operation. The mode-locked operation exhibited by this ring is said to be passive in the sense that no electro-optical modulator or other active optical component is used to achieve it. Passive mode locking is achieved by exploiting optical nonlinearity of passive components in such a manner as to obtain ultra-short optical pulses. In this setup, the particular nonlinear optical property exploited to achieve passive mode locking is nonlinear polarization rotation. This or any ring laser can support oscillation in multiple modes as long as sufficient gain is present to overcome

  18. Active/passive mode-locked laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Fountain, William D.; Johnson, Bertram C.

    1977-01-01

    A Q-switched/mode-locked Nd:YAG laser oscillator employing simultaneous active (electro-optic) and passive (saturable absorber) loss modulation within the optical cavity is described. This "dual modulation" oscillator can produce transform-limited pulses of duration ranging from about 30 psec to about 5 nsec with greatly improved stability compared to other mode-locked systems. The pulses produced by this system lack intrapulse frequency or amplitude modulation, and hence are idealy suited for amplification to high energies and for other applications where well-defined pulses are required. Also, the pulses of this system have excellent interpulse characteristics, wherein the optical noise between the individual pulses of the pulse train has a power level well below the power of the peak pulse of the train.

  19. Measurement of Resonant Frequencies and Modes of Freestanding Nanoparticle Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Lin, Xiao-Min; Jaeger, Heinrich; Guest, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    We recently showed that freestanding membranes of ligated nanoparticles can be assembled in a one-step drying-mediated process [1]. These 10nm thin membranes can stretch over holes up to 100 microns in diameter and are supported by a substrate only along their outer edge, thereby freely suspending of the order of 100 million close-packed particles [2]. Previous work has focused on quasi-static mechanical properties [1-3]. Here we present the first investigation of the full dynamic response of freely suspended nanoparticle membranes, utilizing a high frequency laser interferometer with picometer sensitivity. This instrument allows us to rapidly measure the dynamical properties of freestanding nanoparticle monolayers for the first time including resonant frequencies, quality factors, and images of different modes.[4pt] [1] Klara E. Mueggenburg et al., ``Elastic membranes of close-packed nanoparticle arrays,'' Nature Materials 6, 656-660 (2007). [0pt] [2] Jinbo He et al., ``Fabrication and Mechanical properties of large-scale freestanding nanoparticle membranes,'' Small 6, 1449-1456 (2010).[0pt] [3] Pongsakorn Kanjanaboos et al., ``Strain Patterning and Direct Measurement of Poisson's Ratio in Nanoparticle Monolayer Sheets,'' Nano Letters 11, 2567-2571 (2011).

  20. Comparison of density fluctuation measurements between O-mode and X-mode reflectometry on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbaud, T.; Clairet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.; Vermare, L.

    2006-10-15

    Reflectometry is a versatile diagnostic which allows both electronic density profile and density fluctuation measurements. Fast sweep heterodyne technique is particularly suitable for precise measurement of the phase of the reflected signal, which records the story of the wave propagation through the plasma up to the cutoff layer, including the density fluctuations. The present article exhibits a comparison of the density fluctuation radial profile measurements between fast sweep frequency technique, both using O-mode and X-mode polarizations, and fixed frequency technique. The correct agreement between all measurements of the relative values of the density fluctuation profiles reinforces the validity of the approximations used.

  1. A multi-mode sensing system for corrosion detection using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Pollock, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    As an emerging technology for in-situ damage detection and nondestructive evaluation, structural health monitoring with active sensors (active SHM) plays as a promising candidate for the pipeline inspection and diagnosis. Piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS), as an active sensing device, can be permanently attached to the structure to interrogate it at will and can operate in propagating wave mode or electromechanical impedance mode. Its small size and low cost (about $10 each) make itself a potential and unique technology for in-situ SHM application. The objective of the research in this paper is to develop a permanently installed in-situ "multi-mode" sensing system for the corrosion monitoring and prediction of critical pipeline systems. Such a system is used during in-service period, recording and monitoring the changes of the pipelines over time, such as corrosion, wall thickness, etc. Having the real-time data available, maintenance strategies based on these data can then be developed to ensure a safe and less expensive operation of the pipeline systems. After a detailed review of PWAS SHM methods, including ultrasonic, impedance, and thickness measurement, we introduce the concept of PWAS-based multi-mode sensing approach for corrosion detection in pipelines. Particularly, we investigate the potential for using PWAS waves for in thickness mode experimentally. Finally, experiments are conducted to verify the corrosion detection ability of the PWAS network in both metallic plate and pipe in a laboratory setting. Results show successful corrosion localization in both tests.

  2. Coupling of Low Speed Fan Stator Vane Unsteady Pressures to Duct Modes: Measured versus Predicted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Envia, Edmane

    1999-01-01

    Uniform-flow annular-duct Green's functions are the essential elements of the classical acoustic analogy approach to the problem of computing the noise generated by rotor-stator interaction inside the fan duct. This paper investigates the accuracy of this class of Green's functions for predicting the duct noise levels when measured stator vane unsteady surface pressures are used as input to the theoretical formulation. The accuracy of the method is evaluated by comparing the predicted and measured acoustic power levels for the NASA 48 inch low speed Active Noise Control Fan. The unsteady surface pressures are measured,by an array of microphones imbedded in the suction and pressure sides of a single vane, while the duct mode levels are measured using a rotating rake system installed in the inlet and exhaust sections of the fan duct. The predicted levels are computed using properly weighted integrals of measured surface pressure distribution. The data-theory comparisons are generally quite good particularly when the mode cut-off criterion is carefully interpreted. This suggests that, at least for low speed fans, the uniform-flow annular-duct Green's function theory can be reliably used for prediction of duct mode levels if the cascade surface pressure distribution is accurately known.

  3. Mechanisms for multiple activity modes of VTA dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Andrew; Faure, Philippe; Gutkin, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Midbrain ventral segmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons send numerous projections to cortical and sub-cortical areas, and diffusely release dopamine (DA) to their targets. DA neurons display a range of activity modes that vary in frequency and degree of burst firing. Importantly, DA neuronal bursting is associated with a significantly greater degree of DA release than an equivalent tonic activity pattern. Here, we introduce a single compartmental, conductance-based computational model for DA cell activity that captures the behavior of DA neuronal dynamics and examine the multiple factors that underlie DA firing modes: the strength of the SK conductance, the amount of drive, and GABA inhibition. Our results suggest that neurons with low SK conductance fire in a fast firing mode, are correlated with burst firing, and require higher levels of applied current before undergoing depolarization block. We go on to consider the role of GABAergic inhibition on an ensemble of dynamical classes of DA neurons and find that strong GABA inhibition suppresses burst firing. Our studies suggest differences in the distribution of the SK conductance and GABA inhibition levels may indicate subclasses of DA neurons within the VTA. We further identify, that by considering alternate potassium dynamics, the dynamics display burst patterns that terminate via depolarization block, akin to those observed in vivo in VTA DA neurons and in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) DA cell preparations under apamin application. In addition, we consider the generation of transient burst firing events that are NMDA-initiated or elicited by a sudden decrease of GABA inhibition, that is, disinhibition. PMID:26283955

  4. Active control of the resistive wall mode with power saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Liu Yue; Liu Yueqiang

    2012-01-15

    An analytic model of non-linear feedback stabilization of the resistive wall mode is presented. The non-linearity comes from either the current or the voltage saturation of the control coil power supply. For the so-called flux-to-current control, the current saturation of active coils always results in the loss of control. On the contrary, the flux-to-voltage control scheme tolerates certain degree of the voltage saturation. The minimal voltage limit is calculated, below which the control will be lost.

  5. ACTIVITIES: Centimeter and Millimeter Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolster, L. Carey

    1974-01-01

    An activity is suggested which will give junior high school students practice in estimating and measuring in centimeters and millimeters. Three worksheets are given, one of which is a model for making a metric caliper. (LS)

  6. High Precision SC Cavity alignment Measurements with Higher Order Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, Stephen; Frisch, Josef; Hendrickson, Linda; McCormick, Douglas; May, Justin; Ross, Marc; Smith, Tonee; Eddy, Nathan; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Baboi, Nicoleta; Hensler, Olaf; Petrosyan, Lyudvig; Napoly, Olivier; Paparella, Rita; Simon, Claire; /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2007-06-14

    Experiments at the FLASH linac at DESY have demonstrated that the higher order modes (HOMs) induced in superconducting cavities can be used to provide a variety of beam and cavity diagnostics. The centers of the cavities can be determined from the beam orbit which produces minimum power in the dipole HOM modes. The phase and amplitude of the dipole modes can be used as a high resolution beam position monitor. For most superconducting accelerators, the existing HOM couplers provide the necessary signals, and the downmix and digitizing electronics are straightforward, similar to those for a conventional BPM.

  7. Measuring the Built Environment for Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Brownson, Ross C.; Hoehner, Christine M.; Day, Kristen; Forsyth, Ann; Sallis, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the most important public health issues in the U.S. and internationally. Increasingly, links are being identified between various elements of the physical—or built—environment and physical activity. To understand the impact of the built environment on physical activity, the development of high-quality measures is essential. Three categories of built environment data are being used: (1) perceived measures obtained by telephone interview or self-administered questionnaires; (2) observational measures obtained using systematic observational methods (audits); and (3) archival data sets that are often layered and analyzed with GIS. This review provides a critical assessment of these three types of built-environment measures relevant to the study of physical activity. Among perceived measures, 19 questionnaires were reviewed, ranging in length from 7 to 68 questions. Twenty audit tools were reviewed that cover community environments (i.e., neighborhoods, cities), parks, and trails. For GIS-derived measures, more than 50 studies were reviewed. A large degree of variability was found in the operationalization of common GIS measures, which include population density, land-use mix, access to recreational facilities, and street pattern. This first comprehensive examination of built-environment measures demonstrates considerable progress over the past decade, showing diverse environmental variables available that use multiple modes of assessment. Most can be considered first-generation measures, so further development is needed. In particular, further research is needed to improve the technical quality of measures, understand the relevance to various population groups, and understand the utility of measures for science and public health. PMID:19285216

  8. Rotating rake design for unique measurement of fan-generated spinning acoustic modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Kevin E.; Hausmann, Clifford R.

    1993-01-01

    In light of the current emphasis on noise reduction in subsonic aircraft design, NASA has been actively studying the source of and propagation of noise generated by subsonic fan engines. NASA/LeRC has developed and tested a unique method of accurately measuring these spinning acoustic modes generated by an experimental fan. This mode measuring method is based on the use of a rotating microphone rake. Testing was conducted in the 9 x 15 Low-speed Wind Tunnel. The rotating rake was tested with the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. This memorandum discusses the design and performance of the motor/drive system for the fan-synchronized rotating acoustic rake. This novel motor/drive design approach is now being adapted for additional acoustic mode studies in new test rigs as baseline data for the future design of active noise control for subsonic fan engines. Included in this memorandum are the research requirements, motor/drive specifications, test performance results, and a description of the controls and software involved.

  9. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  10. Development of a multiport-hybrid-mode exciter for use in antennas for polarimetric field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocher, E.

    1987-12-01

    A multiport hybrid mode exciter with axial mode feed, generating each of the two orthogonally polarized sum and difference radiation patterns was developed. The modes TE11, TE11*, TE01, TM01 excited by mode couplers in different sections of the circular main waveguide are transferred using a conical corrugated transition to hybrid modes HE11, HE11* and to the classical modes of the TE01 and the TM02 type in the next cylindrical corrugated waveguide section. These modes are radiated by a conical corrugated horn. The principles applied for the design of mode couplers and feed networks are illustrated. Using theoretical results, the dimensioning of the corrugated waveguide components with reduced disturbing modes is explained. The measured radiation patterns show good rotational symmetry, low sidelobes and very small cross polarization levels.

  11. An actively mode-locked Ho: YAG solid laser pumped by a Tm: YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. Q.; Cui, Z.; Wang, J.; Duan, X. M.; Dai, T. Y.; Du, Y. Q.; Yuan, J. H.; Liu, W.

    2015-02-01

    A continuous wave mode-locked (CWML) Ho: YAG laser based on an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) pumped by a 1.9 μm Tm: YLF laser is demonstrated. This is the first time a report on an active CWML Ho: YAG laser has been published. A maximum output power of 1.04 W at 2097.25 nm in the CWML regime is obtained at a pump power of 13.2 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 13.3%. The mode-locked pulse repetition frequency is 82.76 MHz and the single pulse energy is 12.57 nJ. The mode-locked pulse width is 102 ps measured through a no-background second harmonic autocorrelation with KTP as the nonlinear crystal. Furthermore, the M2 factor is calculated to be 1.146.

  12. Actively mode-locked all fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Xu, Lixin; Li, Feng; Chung, Dick; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser that emits a cylindrical vector beam. An intra-cavity few-mode fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a short section of four-mode fiber is employed to provide mode selection and spectrum filtering functions. Mode coupling is achieved by offset splicing between the single-mode fiber and the four-mode fiber in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode-locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547 nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have a duration of 2 ns and repetition of 12.06 MHz. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity. PMID:26907420

  13. Quantitative measurements of vibration amplitude using a contact-mode freestanding triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sihong; Niu, Simiao; Yang, Jin; Lin, Long; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-12-23

    A vibration sensor is usually designed to measure the vibration frequency but disregard the vibration amplitude, which is rather challenging to be quantified due to the requirement of linear response. Here, we show the application of triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) as a self-powered tool for quantitative measurement of vibration amplitude based on an operation mode, the contact-mode freestanding triboelectric nanogenerator (CF-TENG). In this mode, the triboelectrically charged resonator can be agitated to vibrate between two stacked stationary electrodes. Under the working principle with a constant capacitance between two electrodes, the amplitudes of the electric signals are proportional to the vibration amplitude of the resonator (provided that the resonator plate is charged to saturation), which has been illuminated both theoretically and experimentally. Together with its capability in monitoring the vibration frequency, the CF-TENG appears as the triboelectrification-based active sensor that can give full quantitative information about a vibration. In addition, the CF-TENG is also demonstrated as a power source for electronic devices. PMID:25386799

  14. Higher-order mode absorption measurement of X-band choke-mode cavities in a radial line structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Shi, Jiaru; Wu, Xiaowei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-04-01

    An experiment is presented to study the higher-order mode (HOM) suppression of X-band choke-mode structures with a vector network analyzer (VNA). Specific radial line disks were built to test the reflection from the corresponding damping load and different choke geometries. The mismatch between the radial lines and the VNA was calibrated through a special multi-short-load calibration method. The measured reflections of different choke geometries showed good agreement with the theoretical calculations and verified the HOM absorption feature of each geometric design.

  15. Electromechanical Mode Shape Estimation Based on Transfer Function Identification Using PMU Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Dosiek, Luke; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Pierre, John W.

    2009-07-30

    Power system mode shapes are key indication of how dynamic components participate in low-frequency oscillations. Traditionally, mode shapes are calculated from a linearized dynamic model. For large-scale power systems, obtaining accu-rate dynamic models is very difficult. Therefore, measurement-based mode shape estimation methods have certain advantages, especially for the application of real-time small signal stability monitoring. In this paper, a measurement-based mode shape iden-tification method is proposed. The general relationship between transfer function (TF) and mode shape is derived. As an example, a least square (LS) method is implemented to estimate mode shape using an autoregressive exogenous (ARX) model. The per-formance of the proposed method is evaluated by Monte-Carlo studies using simulation data from a 17-machine model. The re-sults indicate the validity of the proposed method in estimating mode shapes with reasonably good accuracy

  16. X-mode heterodyne reflectometer for edge density profile measurements on Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clairet, F.; Sabot, R.; Bottereau, Ch.; Chareau, J. M.; Paume, M.; Heuraux, S.; Colin, M.; Hacquin, S.; Leclert, G.

    2001-01-01

    A new broadband reflectometer operating in the frequency range 50-75 GHz in extraordinary mode polarization has been developed and tested on Tore Supra to measure edge density profiles. Using solid state source and active frequency multipliers, it performs routine measurements in 20 μs. Modulation of the source frequency is the clue to heterodyne detection in order to ensure a high dynamic sensitivity without any phase locking system. The reflectometer can achieve a repetition rate of 5 μs between sweeps, so the dynamic behavior of fast plasma events can be followed. The profile is reconstructed fully automatically from raw data and initialization is given by detection of the first cutoff. The profiles are part of the public database of Tore Supra. High reliability of the measurements for various plasma conditions makes this diagnostic an ideal tool to study the plasma-surface interaction physics and rf antenna coupling processes.

  17. Highly sensitive beam quality measurements on large-mode-area fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weßels, Peter; Fallnich, Carsten

    2003-12-01

    The beam quality of large-mode-area fiber amplifiers was investigated at the 10 W power level using a tunable ring cavity, that is also used in the laboratory system of GEO600 as a pre-mode-cleaner for mode filtering. More than 98% of the overall output power were contained within the polarized (200:1) TEM00 mode with an appropriate choice of coiling diameter. With the high sensitivity ring cavity analysis, the beam quality improvement caused by decreasing the coiling diameter was verified, while this could not be seen within conventional M2-measurements. The results are compared with the properties of single-mode fibers.

  18. Highly sensitive beam quality measurements on large-mode-area fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Weßels, Peter; Fallnich, Carsten

    2003-12-15

    The beam quality of large-mode-area fiber amplifiers was investigated at the 10 W power level using a tunable ring cavity, that is also used in the laboratory system of GEO600 as a pre-mode-cleaner for mode filtering. More than 98% of the overall output power were contained within the polarized (200:1) TEM00 mode with an appropriate choice of coiling diameter. With the high sensitivity ring cavity analysis, the beam quality improvement caused by decreasing the coiling diameter was verified, while this could not be seen within conventional M2-measurements. The results are compared with the properties of single-mode fibers. PMID:19471464

  19. Local measurements of tearing mode flows and the magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, D. A.; Gangadhara, S.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Fiksel, G.; Prager, S. C.; Craig, D.; Anderson, J. K.

    2010-08-15

    The first localized measurements of tearing mode flows in the core of a hot plasma are presented using nonperturbing measurements of the impurity ion flow. Emission from charge exchange recombination is collected by a novel high optical throughput duo spectrometer providing localized ({+-}1 cm) measurements of C{sup +6} impurity ion velocities resolved to <500 m/s with high bandwidth (100 kHz). Poloidal tearing mode flows in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch are observed to be localized to the mode resonant surface with a radial extent much broader than predicted by linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory but comparable to the magnetic island width. The relative poloidal flow amplitudes among the dominant core modes do not reflect the proportions of the magnetic amplitudes. The largest correlated flows are associated with modes having smaller magnetic amplitudes resonant near the midradius. The MHD dynamo due to these flows on the magnetic axis is measured to be adequate to balance the mean Ohm's law during reduced tearing activity and is significant but does not exclude other dynamo mechanisms from contributing during a surge in reconnection activity.

  20. Herbicide activity of monosulfuron and its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhi-Jin; Ai, Ying-Wei; Qian, Chuan-Fan; Li, Zheng-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Monosulfuron was developed for weed control in the field of wheat (Triticum, aestivum L.) and millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) with the application rate ranging from 15 to 60 g ai/hm2. Herbicidal activity of monosulfuron was evaluated systematically by bioassay using maize (Zea mays L.) taproot as indicator and weed fresh weight of Acalypha australis L. and Echinochloa phyllopogon. Maize CAU 3138 was the most tolerant cultivars to monosulfuron with IC50 (concentration of 50% inhibition) of 85 microg/kg, Yedan 13 was one of the most sensitive cultivars to monosulfuron with IC50 of 6.4 microg/kg. Monosulfuron inhibited the growth of Acalypha australis L. strongly comparing with that of Echinochloa phyllopogon. Monosulfuron was a good acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor in vitro, the I50 (50% of inhibition) of monosulfuron, chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and nicosulfuron for CAU 3138 were 32, 2, 19 and 26 nmol/L respectively, for Yedan 13 the I50 were 15, 3, 17 and 65 nmol/L respectively. In vivo ALS inhibition occurred only in higher concentration of 4 sulfonylurea herbicide tested. Comparison study of this test indicated that the mode of action of monosulfuron was the same as that of other sulfonylurea herbicides such as chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and nicosulfuron, they were all inhibitors targeted at the ALS. PMID:16083111

  1. Phase stabilization of an actively mode-locked ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Nagano, Shigenori

    2015-03-01

    A phase-resolved system based on swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) has to incorporate a phase-stabilized wavelength-swept light source. The phase variation is induced by fluctuation of a beginning swept frequency. The conventional phase-sensitive SS-OCTs use a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in order to avoid A-scan trigger fluctuations. However this method does not always solve the trigger fluctuation problem. In actively mode-locked ring lasers (AMLLs), the beginning swept frequency fluctuates by abrupt frequency change between the end of a sweep and the beginning of the subsequent one. To overcome this issue, we proposes a new phase stabilization method. By employing the method with an auxiliary reference configuration, the sweeping phase has successfully stabilized because the timing jitter is calculated by interference signals from the auxiliary reference path. In this research, we have proposed the phase stabilization method that has nanometer sensitivity with millisecond response. In addition, the method has successfully suppressed the depth dependence of phase instability.

  2. Noninvasive ambulatory measurement system of cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban J; Chavez, Javier A P; Aqueveque, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    This work implements a noninvasive system that measures the movements caused by cardiac activity. It uses unobtrusive Electro-Mechanical Films (EMFi) on the seat and on the backrest of a regular chair. The system detects ballistocardiogram (BCG) and respiration movements. Real data was obtained from 54 volunteers. 19 of them were measured in the laboratory and 35 in a hospital waiting room. Using a BIOPAC acquisition system, the ECG was measured simultaneously to the BCG for comparison. Wavelet Transform (WT) is a better option than Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) for signal extraction and produces higher effective measurement time. In the laboratory, the best results are obtained on the seat. The correlation index was 0.9800 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were 0.7136 ± 4.3673 [BPM]. In the hospital waiting room, the best results are also from the seat sensor. The correlation index was 0.9840, and the limits of agreement were 0.4386 ± 3.5884 [BPM]. The system is able to measure BCG in an unobtrusive way and determine the cardiac frequency with high precision. It is simple to use, which means the system can easily be used in non-standard settings: resting in a chair or couch, at the gym, schools or in a hospital waiting room, as shown. PMID:26738057

  3. Measuring activity in ant colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, C.; Fernández, J.; Pérez-Penichet, C.; Altshuler, E.

    2006-12-01

    Ants, as paradigm of social insects, have become a recurrent example of efficient problem solvers via self-organization. In spite of the simple behavior of each individual, the colony as a whole displays "swarm intelligence:" the organization of ant trails for foraging is a typical output of it. But conventional techniques of observation can hardly record the amount of data needed to get a detailed understanding of self-organization of ant swarms in the wild. Here we are presenting a measurement system intended to monitor ant activity in the field comprising massive data acquisition and high sensitivity. A central role is played by an infrared sensor devised specifically to monitor relevant parameters to the activity of ants through the exits of the nest, although other sensors detecting temperature and luminosity are added to the system. We study the characteristics of the activity sensor and its performance in the field. Finally, we present massive data measured at one exit of a nest of Atta insularis, an ant endemic to Cuba, to illustrate the potential of our system.

  4. Probe Measurements in the H-mode Pedestal Region in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Thome, K. E.; Thompson, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    In near-unity aspect ratio Pegasus discharges, Ohmic heating and high-field-side fueling together trigger an L-H mode transition in both limited and diverted configurations. H-mode plasmas are predicted to exhibit pedestals in both the pressure and current density profiles. Operation at A ~ 1 allows for the use of local magnetic and Langmuir probes in the pedestal region. A current pedestal is routinely observed in Pegasus H-mode plasmas, but not in L-mode plasmas or during ELMs. Conventionally, edge pedestal measurements are observed in the edge pressure profile. A triple Langmuir probe has recently been installed in order to investigate the structure of the edge pressure pedestal in Pegasus H-mode discharges and complement the current density profile measurements. Local density and temperature measurements will be collected using the triple Langmuir probe at varying spatial locations to identify edge pressure profiles. These pressure profiles will be measured in both the L-mode and H-mode regimes. The triple probe will additionally be used to observe the turbulence levels before, during, and after the L-H mode transition. Complete density and temperature profiles including the pedestal will be obtained using a combination of Langmuir probe and Thomson scattering measurements. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  5. Effect of Observation Mode on Measures of Secondary Mathematics Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Gitomer, Drew H.; Bell, Courtney A.; Hamre, Bridget K.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Classroom observation of teachers is a significant part of educational measurement; measurements of teacher practice are being used in teacher evaluation systems across the country. This research investigated whether observations made live in the classroom and from video recording of the same lessons yielded similar inferences about teaching.…

  6. Synchronization of active/passive mode-locked erbium fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaechele, Walter; Haus, Joseph W.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Erdmann, Reinhard K.; Teegarden, Kenneth J.

    1997-07-01

    Injection seeding of a passively mode-locked fiber laser by an actively mode-locked fiber laser source is described. The passively mode-locked laser employs a multiple quantum well saturable absorber to establish pulsed operation. Mode-locked synchronized operation was maintained with average injection powers as low as 1.3 mW. Stable synchronized pulses were observed with pulse widths as narrow as 10 ps.

  7. Measuring spatial accessibility to healthcare for populations with multiple transportation modes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liang; Nekorchuk, Dawn

    2013-11-01

    Few measures of healthcare accessibility have considered multiple transportation modes when people seek healthcare. Based on the framework of the 2 Step Floating Catchment Area Method (2SFCAM), we proposed an innovative method to incorporate transportation modes into the accessibility estimation. Taking Florida, USA, as a study area, we illustrated the implementation of the multi-mode 2SFCAM, and compared the accessibility estimates with those from the traditional single-mode 2SFCAM. The results suggest that the multi-modal method, by accounting for heterogeneity in populations, provides more realistic accessibility estimations, and thus offers a better guidance for policy makers to mitigate health inequity issues. PMID:24077335

  8. Mode profile imaging and loss measurement for uniform and tapered single-mode 3D waveguides in diffusive photopolymer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunfang; Kamysiak, Keith T; Sullivan, Amy C; McLeod, Robert R

    2012-03-12

    We demonstrate single-mode uniform and parabolically tapered three-dimensional waveguides fabricated via direct-write lithography in diffusion-based photopolymers. Modulation of the writing power is shown to compensate Beer-Lambert absorption in the single-photon initiator and to provide precise control of modal tapers. A laminated sample preparation is introduced to enable full 3D characterization of these modal tapers without the need for sample polishing which is difficult for this class of polymer. The accuracy and repeatability of this modal characterization is shown to allow precise measurement of propagation loss from single samples. These testing procedures are used to demonstrate single-mode waveguides with 0.147 dB/cm excess propagation loss and symmetrical tapers up to 1:2.5 using 1.5 microwatts of continuous write power. PMID:22418540

  9. Automatic Measurement of Venous Pressure Using B-Mode Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Crimi, Alessandro; Makhinya, Maxim; Baumann, Ulrich; Thalhammer, Christoph; Szekely, Gabor; Goksel, Orcun

    2016-02-01

    Central venous pressure (CVP) information is crucial in clinical situations, such as cardiac failure, intravascular volume overload, and sepsis. The measurement of CVP, however, requires the catheterization of vena cava through the subclavian or internal jugular veins, which is an impractical and costly procedure with related risk of complications. Peripheral venous pressure (PVP), which correlates with CVP under certain patient positioning, can be measured noninvasively using ultrasound via controlled compressions of a superficial vein. This paper presents an automatic system for acquiring such noninvasive measurements. Robust signal and image processing techniques developed for this purpose are introduced in this paper. The proposed standalone mobile platform collects images in real time from the display output of any ultrasound machine, meanwhile measuring the pressure on the skin underneath the ultrasound transducer via a liquid-filled pouch. The image and pressure data are synchronized through an automated temporal calibration procedure. During forearm compressions, blood vessels are detected and tracked in the images using robust geometric (ellipse) models, the parameters of which are used further in the model-based estimation of PVP. The proposed system was tested in 56 image sequences on 14 healthy volunteers, and was shown to achieve measurements with errors comparable to or lower than the interoperator variability of expert manual assessments. PMID:26186764

  10. Ozone Modes and Differences in the Variability of Measured and Simulated Tropospheric Ozone Mixing Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockwell, W. R.; Fitzgerald, R. M.; Lu, D.

    2013-12-01

    Modes are found in measured and modeled aerosol distributions and they illuminate processes affecting aerosol properties but there has been much less examination of modes in tropospheric ozone distributions. The Paso del Norte region was used as a test-bed because of the availability of ozone measurements and because of its relative isolation. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAM-X) was used to perform wintertime ozone simulations with two versions of the Carbon Bond mechanism. The objective of this study is to examine differences by modes in the measured and simulated ozone distributions. Although there are differences in the error and bias of the simulated ozone mixing ratios due to the choice of mechanism, the boundary conditions, emissions and other factors should have had a much lower affect on the simulated ozone variability, distribution and modes. The simulations made with two versions of the Carbon Bond mechanism showed large differences in their calculated ozone distributions. While the measured distribution and the Carbon Bond mechanism, version 4 showed three modes the more recent version 5 was very different with only two modes. Furthermore the distributions show that the probability of low ozone mixing ratios is much greater in the measurements than in the simulated ozone. These differences may show systematic problems in the chemical mechanisms for urban and regional air quality models and it illustrates the potential utility of the examination modes in ozone data for the evaluation of air quality models.

  11. Effect of Observation Mode on Measures of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Casabianca, Jodi M.

    2013-01-01

    As the education reform movement increasingly focuses on teachers and teaching, educators, policy-makers, and researchers need valid and reliable measures that can be used to evaluate individual teachers, provide guidance for improving teaching performance, and support research in ways that advance instruction and classroom dialog and practice. A…

  12. Actively mode-locked Tm(3+)-doped silica fiber laser with wavelength-tunable, high average output power.

    PubMed

    Kneis, Christian; Donelan, Brenda; Berrou, Antoine; Manek-Hönninger, Inka; Robin, Thierry; Cadier, Benoît; Eichhorn, Marc; Kieleck, Christelle

    2015-04-01

    A diode-pumped, actively mode-locked high-power thulium (Tm3+)-doped double-clad silica fiber laser is demonstrated, providing an average output power in mode-locked (continuous wave) operation of 53 W (72 W) with a slope efficiency of 34% (38%). Mode-locking in the 6th-harmonic order was obtained by an acousto-optic modulator driven at 66 MHz without dispersion compensation. The shortest measured output pulse width was 200 ps. Owing to a diffraction grating as cavity end mirror, the central wavelength could be tuned from 1.95 to 2.13 μm. The measured beam quality in mode-locked and continuous wave operation has been close to the diffraction limit. PMID:25831360

  13. H-mode Edge Turbulence and Pedestal Measurements in Pegasus Plasmas using Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriete, D. M.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Thome, K. E.; Thompson, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    In Pegasus discharges, L-H mode transitions are induced using Ohmic heating and high-field-side fueling. H-mode plasmas have energy confinement consistent with the ITER98pb(y,2) scaling law, indications of increased electron and ion temperature, and an increase in core rotation compared to L-mode plasmas. Electron density and temperature profiles have been measured in the edge region using a scannable triple Langmuir probe on a shot-by-shot basis. In H-mode, a pressure pedestal that has a hyperbolic tangent shape and a ~ 2 cm ∇pe scale length is observed, in contrast to a linear shape in L-mode. Autopower spectra of the collected ion saturation current in H-mode discharges show a factor of ~ 3 reduction in fluctuations in the 50-200 kHz band with respect to L-mode. Two Langmuir probes with 8 cm poloidal separation have been installed on Pegasus. The turbulence correlation length in the edge will be measured by radially scanning the probes. Knowledge of the correlation length will be used to inform the design of a future 8-channel radial multiprobe array. This system will simultaneously measure the dynamic ne (R , t) , Te (R , t) , and Φ (R , t) profiles and fluctuations across the L-H mode transition and be used to investigate nonlinear ELM dynamics. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  14. Rapid Detection of Microorganisms Based on Active and Passive Modes of QCM

    PubMed Central

    Farka, Zdeněk; Kovář, David; Skládal, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Label-free immunosensors are well suited for detection of microorganisms because of their fast response and reasonable sensitivity comparable to infection doses of common pathogens. Active (lever oscillator and frequency counter) and passive (impedance analyzer) modes of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) were used and compared for rapid detection of three strains of E. coli. Different approaches for antibody immobilization were compared, the immobilization of reduced antibody using Sulfo‐SMCC was most effective achieving the limit of detection (LOD) 8 × 104 CFU·mL−1 in 10 min. For the passive mode, software evaluating impedance characteristics in real-time was developed and used. Almost the same results were achieved using both active and passive modes confirming that the sensor properties are not limited by the frequency evaluation method but mainly by affinity of the antibody. Furthermore, reference measurements were done using surface plasmon resonance. Effect of condition of cells on signal was observed showing that cells ruptured by ultrasonication provided slightly higher signal changes than intact microbes. PMID:25545267

  15. Rotating Rake Mode Measurements Over Passive Treatment in a Ducted Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center s Rotating Rake mode measurement system has been successful in measuring the modal content propagating in hardwall ducts. This paper proposes an extension of the Rotating Rake measurement and analysis technique to treated sections by developing basis functions based on wall impedance boundary conditions for flow conditions (i.e., constant duct area and Mach number) where the closed form analytical solution exists. Analytical equations developed to estimate mode power are incorporated. This method is verified by decomposing and analyzing radial pressure profiles generated numerically by the Eversman propagation code. Several modes, frequencies and impedances are evaluated. Data from a low-speed ducted fan with several different impedance conditions was acquired and reduced to determine the best fit to the data. Using the impedance boundary conditions result in better mode measurement solutions.

  16. Measurements of mixed-mode crack surface displacements and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altiero, N. J., Jr.; Sharpe, W. N., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical and an experimental technique is used to determine crack surface displacements under mixed-mode conditions. Crack surface displacements proved to be quite useful in mode 1 fracture analysis in that they are directly related to strain energy release rate and stress intensity factor. It is felt that similar relationships can be developed for the mixed-mode case. A boundary-integral method was developed for application to two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems. This technique was applied to the mixed-mode problem. A laser interferometry technique, for measurement of crack surface displacements under mixed-mode conditions, is presented. The experimental measurements are reported and the results of the two approaches are compared and discussed.

  17. Improved orthogonality check for measured modes. [from ground vibration testing of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method is proposed for performing an orthogonality check for normal modes derived from ground vibration testing. The method utilizes partitioned mass and stiffness matrices for a linear undamped representation of a structure. The normalization of the modes by the proposed method inherently includes the effects of significant displacements which were not measured; and the method may allow the use of fewer measurement points than would be necessary with the conventional method.

  18. Direct Estimation of Fine and Coarse Mode Particle Parameters from Multiwavelength Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolgotin, Alexei; Korenskiy, Mikhail; Veselovskii, Igor; Whiteman, David N.

    2016-06-01

    An approach for the direct estimation (DE) of particle parameters in the fine and coarse mode from multiwavelength lidar measurements is presented. Particle size distributions in both modes are approximated by rectangular functions, so the particle density is estimated directly without solving the inverse problem. The numerical simulation demonstrates that the particle volume in both modes can be estimated from 3β+2α lidar measurements with uncertainty of ~25% for a wide range of size distributions. The technique developed was applied to the observations of NASA GSFC Raman lidar. Comparison of the results obtained with DE and regularization approach applied to the same set of data demonstrates agreement between these two techniques.

  19. Duct Mode Measurements on the TFE731-60 Full Scale Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Konno, Kevin E.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    2002-01-01

    A continuously rotating rake with radial microphones was developed to measure the inlet and exhaust duct modes on a TFE731-60 turbofan engine. This was the first time the rotating rake technology was used on a production engine. The modal signature for the first three fan harmonics was obtained in the inlet and exhaust. Rotor-stator and rotor-strut interaction modes were measured. Total harmonic power was calculated over a range of fan speeds. Above sonic tip speed, the rotor locked mode was not strong enough to be identified, but the 'buzz-saw' noise at fan sub-harmonics was identified.

  20. Actively mode-locked GaInAsP laser with subpicosecond output

    SciTech Connect

    Corzine, S.W.; Bowers, J.E.; Przybylek, G.; Koren, U.; Miller, B.I.; Soccolich, C.E.

    1988-02-01

    We actively mode lock a high-frequency GaInAsP laser at a rate of 16 GHz to obtain nearly transform-limited hyperbolic secant pulses with a pulse width of 0.58 ps. This is the shortest pulse width yet demonstrated for either passively or actively mode-locked semiconductor lasers.

  1. Mode Content Determination of Terahertz Corrugated Waveguides Using Experimentally Measured Radiated Field Patterns.

    PubMed

    Jawla, Sudheer K; Nanni, Emilio A; Shapiro, Michael A; Woskov, Paul P; Temkin, Richard J

    2012-06-01

    This work focuses on the accuracy of the mode content measurements in an overmoded corrugated waveguide using measured radiated field patterns. Experimental results were obtained at 250 GHz using a vector network analyzer with over 70 dB of dynamic range. The intensity and phase profiles of the fields radiated from the end of the 19 mm diameter helically tapped brass waveguide were measured on planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm from the waveguide end. The measured fields were back propagated to the waveguide aperture to provide three independent estimates of the field at the waveguide exit aperture. Projecting that field onto the modes of the guide determined the waveguide mode content. The three independent mode content estimates were found to agree with one another to an accuracy of better than ±0.3%. These direct determinations of the mode content were compared with indirect measurements using the experimentally measured amplitude in three planes, with the phase determined by a phase retrieval algorithm. The phase retrieval technique using the planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm yielded a mode content estimate in excellent agreement, within 0.3%, of the direct measurements. Phase retrieval results using planes at 10, 20, and 30 cm were less accurate due to truncation of the measurement in the transverse plane. The reported measurements benefited greatly from a precise mechanical alignment of the scanner with respect to the waveguide axis. These results will help to understand the accuracy of mode content measurements made directly in cold test and indirectly in hot test using the phase retrieval technique. PMID:25264391

  2. Mode Content Determination of Terahertz Corrugated Waveguides Using Experimentally Measured Radiated Field Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer K.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on the accuracy of the mode content measurements in an overmoded corrugated waveguide using measured radiated field patterns. Experimental results were obtained at 250 GHz using a vector network analyzer with over 70 dB of dynamic range. The intensity and phase profiles of the fields radiated from the end of the 19 mm diameter helically tapped brass waveguide were measured on planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm from the waveguide end. The measured fields were back propagated to the waveguide aperture to provide three independent estimates of the field at the waveguide exit aperture. Projecting that field onto the modes of the guide determined the waveguide mode content. The three independent mode content estimates were found to agree with one another to an accuracy of better than ±0.3%. These direct determinations of the mode content were compared with indirect measurements using the experimentally measured amplitude in three planes, with the phase determined by a phase retrieval algorithm. The phase retrieval technique using the planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm yielded a mode content estimate in excellent agreement, within 0.3%, of the direct measurements. Phase retrieval results using planes at 10, 20, and 30 cm were less accurate due to truncation of the measurement in the transverse plane. The reported measurements benefited greatly from a precise mechanical alignment of the scanner with respect to the waveguide axis. These results will help to understand the accuracy of mode content measurements made directly in cold test and indirectly in hot test using the phase retrieval technique. PMID:25264391

  3. Sliding mode-based lateral vehicle dynamics control using tyre force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnappillil Madhusudhanan, Anil; Corno, Matteo; Holweg, Edward

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a lateral vehicle dynamics control based on tyre force measurements is proposed. Most of the lateral vehicle dynamics control schemes are based on yaw rate whereas tyre forces are the most important variables in vehicle dynamics as tyres are the only contact points between the vehicle and road. In the proposed method, active front steering is employed to uniformly distribute the required lateral force among the front left and right tyres. The force distribution is quantified through the tyre utilisation coefficients. In order to address the nonlinearities and uncertainties of the vehicle model, a gain scheduling sliding-mode control technique is used. In addition to stabilising the lateral dynamics, the proposed controller is able to maintain maximum lateral acceleration. The proposed method is tested and validated on a multi-body vehicle simulator.

  4. Active following fuzzy output feedback sliding mode control of real-vehicle semi-active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Nonami, K.; Hagiwara, T.

    2008-07-01

    Many semi-active suspension systems have been investigated in various literatures in order to achieve lower energy consumption and as good performance as full-active suspension systems. Full-active suspension systems can achieve a good ride quality by actuators; however, their implementation equipments are expensive. The full-active suspensions are perfect from the point of view of control; hence, semi-active control laws with performance similar to full-active controls have attracted the engineering community for their ease and lower cost of implementation. This paper presents a new active following fuzzy output feedback sliding mode control for a real-vehicle semi-active suspension system. The performance of the proposed controller has been verified by comparing it with passive control and also with the full-active target semi-active approximation control method. In the experiment, it was shown that the proposed method has the effectiveness in stabilizing heave, roll and pitch movement of the car body.

  5. Transmission (forward) mode, transcranial, noninvasive optoacoustic measurements for brain monitoring, imaging, and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Richardson, C. Joan; Fonseca, Rafael A.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Asokan, C. Vasantha; Agbor, Adaeze; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2016-03-01

    We proposed to use transmission (forward) mode for cerebral, noninvasive, transcranial optoacoustic monitoring, imaging, and sensing in humans. In the transmission mode, the irradiation of the tissue of interest and detection of optoacoustic signals are performed from opposite hemispheres, while in the reflection (backward) mode the irradiation of the tissue of interest and detection of optoacoustic signals are performed from the same hemisphere. Recently, we developed new, transmission-mode optoacoustic probes for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and for neonatal patients. The transmission mode probes have two major parts: a fiber-optic delivery system and an acoustic transducer (sensor). To obtain optoacoustic signals in the transmission mode, in this study we placed the sensor on the forehead, while light was delivered to the opposite side of the head. Using a medical grade, multi-wavelength, OPObased optoacoustic system tunable in the near infrared spectral range (680-950 nm) and a novel, compact, fiber-coupled, multi-wavelength, pulsed laser diode-based system, we recorded optoacoustic signals generated in the posterior part of the head of adults with TBI and neonates. The optoacoustic signals had two distinct peaks: the first peak from the intracranial space and the second peak from the scalp. The first peak generated by cerebral blood was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation. Moreover, the transmission mode measurements provided detection of intracranial hematomas in the TBI patients. The obtained results suggest that the transmission mode can be used for optoacoustic brain imaging, tomography, and mapping in humans.

  6. Coordinate measuring method with two operation modes based on the adjustable articulated arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lianqing; Li, Weixian; Pan, Zhikang; Guo, Yangkuan; Chen, Qingshan

    2014-12-01

    A coordinate measuring method with two operation modes, based on the adjustable articulated arms, is proposed to keep measurement capability in global space and improve the measurement precision in local space. The adjustable articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM) with an electromagnetic locking device can automatically switch between the all-free articulated arms operation mode and the partially bound articulated arms operation mode. In the former mode, three arms and six articulations can freely move and measure the coordinates of any point in global space. In the latter mode, the front two articulations are locked to improve the measurement precision by decreasing the importation of angle errors in the local space. A prototype of the adjustable AACMM has also been designed and developed. A mathematical model for the adjustable AACMM has been built. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that the partially bound AACMM performed much better than the all-free AACMM in single point repeatability and length measurement precision in the local space. Therefore, the proposed coordinate measuring method based on the adjustable articulated arms is verified as being effective.

  7. Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136. Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting Mode and Searching for Majoron-Emitting Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Herrin, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Observations of neutrino flavor oscillations have demonstrated that neutrinos have mass. Since the discovery of these oscillations, much progress has been made at mea- suring the neutrino mass-squared differences and lepton mixing angles that character- ize them. However, the origin and absolute scale of neutrino masses remain unknown. Unique among fermions, neutrinos can be Majorana particles, which could provide an explanation for neutrino masses. Discovery of a hypothetical process known as neutrinoless double beta decay would show that neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine the mass scale for neutrinos. The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) is a series of experiments searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The first experiment, EXO-200, began operation in 2011 and makes use of 200 kg of xenon enriched to 80.6% in 136Xe. The analysis presented here makes use of data from EXO-200 to obtain a more precise measurement of the half-life for the two-neutrino-emitting mode of double beta decay than previously reported. The analysis also sets limits on the half-lives for exotic, Majoron-emitting modes of neutrinoless double beta decay. Data from EXO-200 is also used to produce a measurement of the cosmic muon flux at the WIPP under- ground site where EXO-200 is located.

  8. Active multi-mode-interferometer broadband superluminescent diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feifei, Wang; Peng, Jin; Ju, Wu; Yanhua, Wu; Fajie, Hu; Zhanguo, Wang

    2016-01-01

    We report a new quantum dot superluminescent diode with a new device structure. In this device, a multi-mode-interferometer configuration and a J-bend structure were monolithically integrated. Owing to the multi-mode-interferometer structure, the superluminescent diode exhibits 60% increase in output power and 43% reduction in the differential resistance compared with the uniform waveguide width superluminescent diode fabricated from the same wafer. Our device produces an emission spectrum as wide as 103.7 nm with an output power of 2.5 mW at 600 mA continue-wave injection current. This broadband emission spectrum makes the axial resolution of the optical coherence tomography system employing the superluminescent diode to 6 μm in theory, which is high enough for most tissue imaging. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61274072) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2013AA014201).

  9. Measured improvement of global magnetohydrodynamic mode stability at high-beta, and in reduced collisionality spherical torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Balbaky, A.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Manickam, J.; Menard, J. E.; Podestà, M.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Global mode stability is studied in high-β National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas to avoid disruptions. Dedicated experiments in NSTX using low frequency active magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy of applied rotating n = 1 magnetic fields revealed key dependencies of stability on plasma parameters. Observations from previous NSTX resistive wall mode (RWM) active control experiments and the wider NSTX disruption database indicated that the highest β{sub N} plasmas were not the least stable. Significantly, here, stability was measured to increase at β{sub N}∕l{sub i} higher than the point where disruptions were found. This favorable behavior is shown to correlate with kinetic stability rotational resonances, and an experimentally determined range of measured E × B frequency with improved stability is identified. Stable plasmas appear to benefit further from reduced collisionality, in agreement with expectation from kinetic RWM stabilization theory, but low collisionality plasmas are also susceptible to sudden instability when kinetic profiles change.

  10. Comparison between elementary flux modes analysis and 13C-metabolic fluxes measured in bacterial and plant cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 13C metabolic flux analysis is one of the pertinent ways to compare two or more physiological states. From a more theoretical standpoint, the structural properties of metabolic networks can be analysed to explore feasible metabolic behaviours and to define the boundaries of steady state flux distributions. Elementary flux mode analysis is one of the most efficient methods for performing this analysis. In this context, recent approaches have tended to compare experimental flux measurements with topological network analysis. Results Metabolic networks describing the main pathways of central carbon metabolism were set up for a bacteria species (Corynebacterium glutamicum) and a plant species (Brassica napus) for which experimental flux maps were available. The structural properties of each network were then studied using the concept of elementary flux modes. To do this, coefficients of flux efficiency were calculated for each reaction within the networks by using selected sets of elementary flux modes. Then the relative differences - reflecting the change of substrate i.e. a sugar source for C. glutamicum and a nitrogen source for B. napus - of both flux efficiency and flux measured experimentally were compared. For both organisms, there is a clear relationship between these parameters, thus indicating that the network structure described by the elementary flux modes had captured a significant part of the metabolic activity in both biological systems. In B. napus, the extension of the elementary flux mode analysis to an enlarged metabolic network still resulted in a clear relationship between the change in the coefficients and that of the measured fluxes. Nevertheless, the limitations of the method to fit some particular fluxes are discussed. Conclusion This consistency between EFM analysis and experimental flux measurements, validated on two metabolic systems allows us to conclude that elementary flux mode analysis could be a useful tool to complement 13C

  11. Dynamic Multiscale Modes of Resting State Brain Activity Detected by Entropy Field Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Frank, Lawrence R; Galinsky, Vitaly L

    2016-09-01

    The ability of functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) to noninvasively measure fluctuations in brain activity in the absence of an applied stimulus offers the possibility of discerning functional networks in the resting state of the brain. However, the reconstruction of brain networks from these signal fluctuations poses a significant challenge because they are generally nonlinear and nongaussian and can overlap in both their spatial and temporal extent. Moreover, because there is no explicit input stimulus, there is no signal model with which to compare the brain responses. A variety of techniques have been devised to address this problem, but the predominant approaches are based on the presupposition of statistical properties of complex brain signal parameters, which are unprovable but facilitate the analysis. In this article, we address this problem with a new method, entropy field decomposition, for estimating structure within spatiotemporal data. This method is based on a general information field-theoretic formulation of Bayesian probability theory incorporating prior coupling information that allows the enumeration of the most probable parameter configurations without the need for unjustified statistical assumptions. This approach facilitates the construction of brain activation modes directly from the spatial-temporal correlation structure of the data. These modes and their associated spatial-temporal correlation structure can then be used to generate space-time activity probability trajectories, called functional connectivity pathways, which provide a characterization of functional brain networks. PMID:27391678

  12. Using online computer tailoring to promote physical activity: a randomized trial of text, video, and combined intervention delivery modes.

    PubMed

    Soetens, Katja C M; Vandelanotte, Corneel; de Vries, Hein; Mummery, Kerry W

    2014-12-01

    Website-delivered interventions are increasingly used to deliver physical activity interventions, yet problems with engagement and retention result in reduced effectiveness. Hence, alternative modes of online intervention delivery need to be explored. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a computer-tailored physical activity intervention delivered on the Internet in 3 delivery modes: video, text, or both. Australian adults (N = 803), recruited through e-mail, were randomized into the three delivery modes and received personal physical activity advice. Intervention content was identical across groups. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to compare the three groups regarding acceptability, website usability, and physical activity. Participants in the video group accepted the content of the physical activity advice significantly better (F = 5.59; p < .01), and spent significantly more time on the website (F = 21.19; p < .001) compared with the text and combination groups. Total physical activity improved significantly over time in all groups (F = 3.95; p < .01). Although the combination group increased physical activity the most, few significant differences between groups were observed. Providing video-tailored feedback has advantages over the conventional text-tailored interventions; however, this study revealed few behavioral differences. More studies, examining alternative delivery modes, that can overcome the limitations of the present study, are needed. PMID:24749983

  13. External kink modes as a model for MHD activity associated with ELMs

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1992-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas in the high confinement mode of operation are known to exhibit edge localized activity referred to as ELMs. A model is proposed for the underlying cause in terms of the external kink mode. The build up of the current density near the plasma edge is shown to decrease the shear in the safety-factor, q, profile and lead to destabilization of the kink mode. The role of the plasma geometry and equilibrium profiles is discussed.

  14. Measurements and computations of second-mode instability waves in three hypersonic wind tunnels.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Daniel R.; Alba, Christopher R.; Rufer, Shann J.; Beresh, Steven Jay; Casper, Katya M.; Berridge, Dennis C.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2010-06-01

    High-frequency pressure-fluctuation measurements were made in AEDC Tunnel 9 at Mach 10 and the NASA Langley 15-Inch Mach 6 and 31-Inch Mach 10 tunnels. Measurements were made on a 7{sup o}-half-angle cone model. Pitot measurements of freestream pressure fluctuations were also made in Tunnel 9 and the Langley Mach-6 tunnel. For the first time, second-mode waves were measured in all of these tunnels, using 1-MHz-response pressure sensors. In Tunnel 9, second-mode waves could be seen in power spectra computed from records as short as 80 {micro}s. The second-mode wave amplitudes were observed to saturate and then begin to decrease in the Langley tunnels, indicating wave breakdown. Breakdown was estimated to occur near N {approx} 5 in the Langley Mach-10 tunnel. The unit-Reynolds-number variations in the data from Tunnel 9 were too large to see the same processes.

  15. Torsional mode ultrasonic helical waveguide sensor for re-configurable temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periyannan, Suresh; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces an ultrasonic torsional mode based technique, configured in the form of a helical "spring-like" waveguide, for multi-level temperature measurement. The multiple sensing levels can be repositioned by stretching or collapsing the spring to provide simultaneous measurements at different desired spacing in a given area/volume. The transduction is performed using piezo-electric crystals that generate and receive T(0,1) mode in a pulse echo mode. The gage lengths and positions of measurements are based on machining multiple reflector notches in the waveguide at required positions. The time of fight (TOF) measurements between the reflected signals from the notches provide local temperatures that compare well with co-located thermocouples.

  16. Mode-locking external-cavity laser-diode sensor for displacement measurements of technical surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Czarske, Juergen; Moebius, Jasper; Moldenhauer, Karsten

    2005-09-01

    A novel laser sensor for position measurements of technical solid-state surfaces is proposed. An external Fabry-Perot laser cavity is assembled by use of an antireflection-coated laser diode together with the technical surface. Mode locking results from pumping the laser diode synchronously to the mode spacing of the cavity. The laser cavity length, i.e., the distance to the measurement object, is determined by evaluation of the modulation transfer function of the cavity by means of a phase-locked loop. The mode-locking external-cavity laser sensor incorporates a resonance effect that results in highly resolving position and displacement measurements. More than a factor-of-10 higher resolution than with conventional nonresonant sensing principles is achieved. Results of the displacement measurements of various technical surfaces are reported. Experimental and theoretical investigations are in good agreement.

  17. Measurement and reliability issues in resonant mode cantilever for bio-sensing application in fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathel, G.; Shajahan, M. S.; Bhadra, P.; Prabhakar, A.; Chadha, A.; Bhattacharya, E.

    2016-09-01

    Cantilevers immersed in liquid experience viscous damping and hydrodynamic loading. We report on the use of such cantilevers, operating in the dynamic mode with, (i) frequency sweeping and (ii) phase locked loop methods. The solution to reliability issues such as random drift in the resonant peak values, and interference of spurious modes in the resonance frequency spectrum, are explained based on the actuation signal provided and laser spot size. The laser beam spot size and its position on the cantilever were found to have an important role, on the output signal and resonance frequency. We describe a method to distinguish the normal modes from the spurious modes for a cantilever. Uncertainties in the measurements define the lower limit of mass detection (m min). The minimum detection limits of the two measurement methods are investigated by measuring salt adsorption from phosphate buffer solution, as an example, a mass of 14 pg was measured using the 14th transverse mode of a 500~μ m  ×  100 μm  ×  1 μm silicon cantilever. The optimized measurement was used to study the interaction between antibody and antigen.

  18. Disease Activity Measures in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Nadia J.; Feldman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Disease activity refers to potentially reversible aspects of a disease. Measurement of disease activity in paediatric rheumatic diseases is a critical component of patient care and clinical research. Disease activity measures are developed systematically, often involving consensus methods. To be useful, a disease activity measure must be feasible, valid, and interpretable. There are several challenges in quantifying disease activity in paediatric rheumatology; namely, the conditions are multidimensional, the level of activity must be valuated in the context of treatment being received, there is no gold standard for disease activity, and it is often difficult to incorporate the patient's perspective of their disease activity. To date, core sets of response variables are defined for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis, as well as definitions for improvement in response to therapy. Several specific absolute disease activity measures also exist for each condition. Further work is required to determine the optimal disease activity measures in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24089617

  19. Variability of M-Mode Versus Two-Dimensional Echocardiography Measurements in Children With Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Margossian, Renee; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Canter, Charles E.; Chen, Shan; Tani, Lloyd Y.; Shirali, Girish; Szwast, Anita; Tierney, Elif Seda Selamet; Campbell, M. Jay; Golding, Fraser; Wang, Yanli; Altmann, Karen; Colan, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    M-mode and 2-dimensional (2D) echocardio-graphic imaging are routinely used to quantify left-ventricular (LV) size and function in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The reproducibility of and correlation between these techniques are unknown. This analysis sought to compare interreader, intrareader, and interacquisition reproducibility of M-mode versus 2D measurements in pediatric DCM patients. The Ventricular Volume Variability study of the Pediatric Heart Network is a multicenter, prospective, observational study assessing the course of chronic DCM in children. Two sonographers performed baseline image acquisitions locally, and two readers performed measurements at the echocardiographic core laboratory. One reader repeated measurements 1 month later. These data were used to assess reproducibility and agreement between M-mode and 2D measurements. One hundred sixty-nine subjects were enrolled. M-mode had similar or greater reproducibility in both intrareader and interreader settings for LV dimensions, shortening fraction (SF), and most wall thicknesses. In contrast, 2D reproducibility was similar or better for nearly all variables in the interacquisition setting but not for SF. Interacquisition variability was approximately twice the intrareader variability. LV dimensions by either modality consistently had high reproducibility and had the highest agreement between modalities. In pediatric DCM patients, variability of linear echocardiographic assessment could be minimized by relying on a single reader and using a consistent method (M-mode or 2D) for serial measurements, preferably M-mode when SF is the primary variable of interest. Except for LV dimensions, M-mode and 2D values should not be used interchangeably due to poor agreement. PMID:24265000

  20. Variability of M-mode versus two-dimensional echocardiography measurements in children with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Caroline K; Margossian, Renee; Sleeper, Lynn A; Canter, Charles E; Chen, Shan; Tani, Lloyd Y; Shirali, Girish; Szwast, Anita; Tierney, Elif Seda Selamet; Campbell, M Jay; Golding, Fraser; Wang, Yanli; Altmann, Karen; Colan, Steven D

    2014-04-01

    M-mode and 2-dimensional (2D) echocardiographic imaging are routinely used to quantify left-ventricular (LV) size and function in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The reproducibility of and correlation between these techniques are unknown. This analysis sought to compare interreader, intrareader, and interacquisition reproducibility of M-mode versus 2D measurements in pediatric DCM patients. The Ventricular Volume Variability study of the Pediatric Heart Network is a multicenter, prospective, observational study assessing the course of chronic DCM in children. Two sonographers performed baseline image acquisitions locally, and two readers performed measurements at the echocardiographic core laboratory. One reader repeated measurements 1 month later. These data were used to assess reproducibility and agreement between M-mode and 2D measurements. One hundred sixty-nine subjects were enrolled. M-mode had similar or greater reproducibility in both intrareader and interreader settings for LV dimensions, shortening fraction (SF), and most wall thicknesses. In contrast, 2D reproducibility was similar or better for nearly all variables in the interacquisition setting but not for SF. Interacquisition variability was approximately twice the intrareader variability. LV dimensions by either modality consistently had high reproducibility and had the highest agreement between modalities. In pediatric DCM patients, variability of linear echocardiographic assessment could be minimized by relying on a single reader and using a consistent method (M-mode or 2D) for serial measurements, preferably M-mode when SF is the primary variable of interest. Except for LV dimensions, M-mode and 2D values should not be used interchangeably due to poor agreement. PMID:24265000

  1. Visualization of local electrochemical activity and local nickel ion release on laser-welded NiTi/steel joints using combined alternating current mode and stripping mode SECM.

    PubMed

    Ruhlig, D; Gugel, H; Schulte, A; Theisen, W; Schuhmann, W

    2008-12-01

    Smoothly polished cross-sections of laser-fabricated welds between NiTi shape memory alloy and stainless steel (SS) microwires of approximately the same diameter and, for comparison, between identical stainless steel or NiTi wires have been subjected to local chemical activity and nickel release measurements using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). In the alternating current mode (AC-SECM), the measurements detected clear differences in the local interfacial chemical activity of the passivated weld and the base metals only for the heterogeneous joints of the type NiTi-SS. In this case the local electrochemical acvtivity was lower above the weld material. Subjecting cross-sections of NiTi-SS to stripping mode SECM (SM-SECM), higher Ni(2+) concentrations were measured above the regions of the parental NiTi wire, which correlates well with the results from AC-SECM imaging which showed this region as being less passivated. An energy-dispersive elemental analysis of the specimen in a scanning electron microscope revealed the coexistence of Ti and Cr in the weld mass. Possibly, a joint action of these two metals in terms of protective oxide formation is better for passivation of the weld region than the individual action of one or the other element for passivating the original wires. Better passivation of course led to decreased electrochemical activity of the weld surface. Apparently, AC- and SM-mode SECM imaging were sufficiently sensitive to detect and visualize the impact of the changed surface passivation upon laser welding. PMID:19082072

  2. Theoretical study of mode evolution in active long tapered multimode fiber.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun; Lu, Qisheng

    2016-08-22

    A concise and effective model based on coupled mode theory to describe mode evolution in long tapered active fiber is presented in this manuscript. The mode coupling due to variation of core radius and slight perturbation have been analyzed and local gain with transverse spatial hole burning (TSHB) effect, loss and curvature have been taken into consideration in our model. On the base of this model, the mode evolution behaviors under different factors have been numerically investigated. Our model and results can provide instructive suggestions when designing long tapered fiber based laser and amplifiers. PMID:27557225

  3. [Ecological demonstration activity and eco-civilization construction mode: review and prospects].

    PubMed

    Mao, Hui-ping; He, Xuan; He, Jia; Niu, Dong-jie; Bao, Cun-kuan

    2013-04-01

    Ecological civilization is to normalize human development behaviors to harmonize the relationships between social and ecological development and eco-environment protection. In this paper, a comparative analysis was made on the ecological demonstration activities of ecological demonstration areas led by the Ministry of Environmental Protection, exemplar cities of national environmental protection, and ecological provinces, cities, and counties. It was considered that all the ecological demonstration activities had the problems of lacking pertinence of construction goals, disordered construction subjects, inefficient construction processes, and lacking continuous incentive mechanisms of assessment. In the meantime, through the analysis of the connotations of eco-civilization, the relationships between eco-civilization and eco-demonstration constructions were approached, and the eco-civilization construction mode was put forward in terms of construction goal, construction subject, and construction processes and assessment. The construction mode included the construction goal based on regional characteristics; the synergistic cooperation of construction subjects, the expanding ways of public participation, and the establishment of evaluation system for comprehensively measuring the 'actions and results'. PMID:23898681

  4. Measuring acetic acid dimer modes by ultrafast time-domain Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Heisler, Ismael A; Mazur, Kamila; Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Tominaga, Keisuke; Meech, Stephen R

    2011-09-14

    Acetic acid is capable of forming strong multiple hydrogen bonds and therefore different dimeric H-bonded structures in neat liquid phase and in solutions. The low frequency Raman spectra of acetic acid (neat, in aqueous solution and as a function of temperature) were obtained by ultrafast time and polarization resolved optical Kerr effect (OKE) measurements. Isotropic OKE measurements clearly reveal a specific totally symmetric mode related to the dimeric structure H-bond stretching mode. The effects of isotope substitution, water dilution and temperature on this mode were investigated. These results together with anisotropic OKE measurements and density functional theory calculations for a number of possible dimers provide strong evidence for the cyclic dimer structure being the main structure in liquid phase persisting down to acetic acid concentrations of 10 M. Some information about the dimer structure and concentration dependence was inferred. PMID:21625711

  5. Identification of Alfvén mode location via multichannel interferometer measurements (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Park, H.; Nazikian, R.; Budny, R. V.; Wong, K. L.; McGuire, K. M.; TFTR Group

    1997-01-01

    Quasicoherent magnetohydrodynamics modes with an Alfvén frequency scaling are seen routinely in TFTR neutral beam heated plasmas as well as some Ohmic plasmas. So far, they are only observed in external magnetic fluctuation measurement (Mirnov coils). A close correlation is observed between the changes in the mode frequency and electron density measured by the multichannel infrared interferometer. This correlation allows us to determine the location of the Alfvén modes. The result shows that they are near the plasma edge, r/a>0.85. This method is also used to identify the location of the toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode driven by fast ions in a radiowave heating experiment. The result is consistent with the location determined by the reflectometer measurement.

  6. Active and passive mode calibration of the Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J. M.

    2002-06-01

    The Combined Thermal/Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) non-destructive assay (NDA) system was designed to assay transuranic waste by employing an induced active neutron interrogation and/or a spontaneous passive neutron measurement. This is the second of two papers, and focuses on the passive mode, relating the net double neutron coincidence measurement to the plutonium mass via the calibration constant. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) calibration standards were used and the results verified with NIST-traceable verification standards. Performance demonstration program (PDP) 'empty' 208-L matrix drum was used for the calibration. The experimentally derived calibration constant was found to be 0.0735 {+-} 0.0059 g {sup 240}Pu effective per unit response. Using this calibration constant, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) criteria was satisfied with five minute waste assays in the range from 3 to 177g Pu. CTEN also participated in the PDP Cycle 8A blind assay with organic sludge and metal matrices and passed the criteria for accuracy and precision in both assay modes. The WIPP and EPA audit was completed March 1, 2002 and full certification is awaiting the closeout of one finding during the audit. With the successful closeout of the audit, the CTEN system will have shown that it can provide very fast assays (five minutes or less) of waste in the range from the minimum detection limit (about 2 mg Pu) to 177 g Pu.

  7. Two modes of motion of the alligator lizard cochlea: Measurements and model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranyosi, A. J.; Freeman, Dennis M.

    2005-09-01

    Measurements of motion of an in vitro preparation of the alligator lizard basilar papilla in response to sound demonstrate elliptical trajectories. These trajectories are consistent with the presence of both a translational and rotational mode of motion. The translational mode is independent of frequency, and the rotational mode has a displacement peak near 5 kHz. These measurements can be explained by a simple mechanical system in which the basilar papilla is supported asymmetrically on the basilar membrane. In a quantitative model, the translational admittance is compliant while the rotational admittance is second order. Best-fit model parameters are consistent with estimates based on anatomy and predict that fluid flow across hair bundles is a primary source of viscous damping. The model predicts that the rotational mode contributes to the high-frequency slopes of auditory nerve fiber tuning curves, providing a physical explanation for a low-pass filter required in models of this cochlea. The combination of modes makes the sensitivity of hair bundles more uniform with radial position than that which would result from pure rotation. A mechanical analogy with the organ of Corti suggests that these two modes of motion may also be present in the mammalian cochlea.

  8. Formation of a hybrid plasmonic waveguide mode probed by dispersion measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.; Kurata, H.

    2015-04-07

    Hybrid waveguides, i.e., dielectric waveguides combined with plasmonic waveguides, have great potential for concomitantly exhibiting subwavelength confinement and long range propagation, enabling a highly integrated photonic circuit. We report the characterization of hybrid waveguide modes excited in Si/SiO{sub 2}/Al films, by dispersion measurement using angle-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy. This experiment directly verifies the formation of the hybrid waveguide mode with a strongly localized electromagnetic field in a 6-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer. The results clearly describe the characteristic behavior of the hybrid waveguide mode, which depends on the effective index of the constituent dielectric waveguide and the surface plasmon-polariton modes.

  9. Projective measurement of a single nuclear spin qubit by using two-mode cavity QED.

    PubMed

    Eto, Yujiro; Noguchi, Atsushi; Zhang, Peng; Ueda, Masahito; Kozuma, Mikio

    2011-04-22

    We report the implementation of projective measurement on a single 1/2 nuclear spin of the (171)Yb atom by measuring the polarization of cavity-enhanced fluorescence. To obtain cavity-enhanced fluorescence having a nuclear-spin-dependent polarization, we construct a two-mode cavity QED system, in which two cyclic transitions are independently coupled to each of the orthogonally polarized cavity modes, by manipulating the energy level of (171)Yb. This system can associate the nuclear spin degrees of freedom with the polarization of photons, which will facilitate the development of hybrid quantum systems. PMID:21599343

  10. Electron Gyro-scale Fluctuation Measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D R; Lee, W; Mazzucato, E; Park, H K; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Levinton, F M; Luhmann, N C; Menard, J E

    2009-08-10

    A collective scattering system has measured electron gyro-scale fluctuations in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-mode plasmas to investigate electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. Observations and results pertaining to fluctuation measurements in ETGstable regimes, the toroidal field scaling of fluctuation amplitudes, the relation between between fluctuation amplitudes and transport quantities, and fluctuation magnitudes and k-spectra are presented. Collectively, the measurements provide insight and guidance for understanding ETG turbulence and anomalous electron thermal transport.

  11. Gaussian measures of entanglement versus negativities: Ordering of two-mode Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2005-09-15

    We study the entanglement of general (pure or mixed) two-mode Gaussian states of continuous-variable systems by comparing the two available classes of computable measures of entanglement: entropy-inspired Gaussian convex-roof measures and positive partial transposition-inspired measures (negativity and logarithmic negativity). We first review the formalism of Gaussian measures of entanglement, adopting the framework introduced in M. M. Wolf et al., Phys. Rev. A 69, 052320 (2004), where the Gaussian entanglement of formation was defined. We compute explicitly Gaussian measures of entanglement for two important families of nonsymmetric two-mode Gaussian state: namely, the states of extremal (maximal and minimal) negativities at fixed global and local purities, introduced in G. Adesso et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 087901 (2004). This analysis allows us to compare the different orderings induced on the set of entangled two-mode Gaussian states by the negativities and by the Gaussian measures of entanglement. We find that in a certain range of values of the global and local purities (characterizing the covariance matrix of the corresponding extremal states), states of minimum negativity can have more Gaussian entanglement of formation than states of maximum negativity. Consequently, Gaussian measures and negativities are definitely inequivalent measures of entanglement on nonsymmetric two-mode Gaussian states, even when restricted to a class of extremal states. On the other hand, the two families of entanglement measures are completely equivalent on symmetric states, for which the Gaussian entanglement of formation coincides with the true entanglement of formation. Finally, we show that the inequivalence between the two families of continuous-variable entanglement measures is somehow limited. Namely, we rigorously prove that, at fixed negativities, the Gaussian measures of entanglement are bounded from below. Moreover, we provide some strong evidence suggesting that they

  12. Semi-active sliding mode control of vehicle suspension with magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Enrong; Zhang, Ning; Min, Fuhong; Subash, Rakheja; Su, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    The vehicle semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological damper(MRD) has been a hot topic since this decade, in which the robust control synthesis considering load variation is a challenging task. In this paper, a new semi-active controller based upon the inverse model and sliding mode control (SMC) strategies is proposed for the quarter-vehicle suspension with the magneto-rheological (MR) damper, wherein an ideal skyhook suspension is employed as the control reference model and the vehicle sprung mass is considered as an uncertain parameter. According to the asymptotical stability of SMC, the dynamic errors between the plant and reference systems are used to derive the control damping force acquired by the MR quarter-vehicle suspension system. The proposed modified Bouc-wen hysteretic force-velocity ( F- v) model and its inverse model of MR damper, as well as the proposed continuous modulation (CM) filtering algorithm without phase shift are employed to convert the control damping force into the direct drive current of the MR damper. Moreover, the proposed semi-active sliding mode controller (SSMC)-based MR quarter-vehicle suspension is systematically evaluated through comparing the time and frequency domain responses of the sprung and unsprung mass displacement accelerations, suspension travel and the tire dynamic force with those of the passive quarter-vehicle suspension, under three kinds of varied amplitude harmonic, rounded pulse and real-road measured random excitations. The evaluation results illustrate that the proposed SSMC can greatly suppress the vehicle suspension vibration due to uncertainty of the load, and thus improve the ride comfort and handling safety. The study establishes a solid theoretical foundation as the universal control scheme for the adaptive semi-active control of the MR full-vehicle suspension decoupled into four MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension systems.

  13. School travel mode, parenting practices and physical activity among UK Year 5 and 6 children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background School travel mode and parenting practices have been associated with children’s physical activity (PA). The current study sought to examine whether PA parenting practices differ by school travel mode and whether school travel mode and PA parenting practices are associated with PA. Methods 469 children (aged 9-11) wore accelerometers from which mean weekday and after-school (3.30 to 8.30 pm) minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) and counts per minute (CPM) were derived. Mode of travel to and from school (passive vs. active) and PA parenting practices (maternal and paternal logistic support and modelling behaviour) were child-reported. Results Children engaged in an average of 59.7 minutes of MVPA per weekday. Active travel to school by girls was associated with 5.9 more minutes of MVPA per day compared with those who travelled to school passively (p = 0.004). After-school CPM and MVPA did not differ by school travel mode. There was no evidence that physical activity parenting practices were associated with school travel mode. Conclusions For girls, encouraging active travel to school is likely to be important for overall PA. Further formative research may be warranted to understand how both parental logistic support and active travel decisions are operationalized in families as a means of understanding how to promote increased PA among pre-adolescent children. PMID:24739338

  14. Tempo and Mode of Transposable Element Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Robert; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of transposable element (TE) insertions have been of continued interest since TE activity has important implications for genome evolution and adaptation. Here, we infer the transposition dynamics of TEs by comparing their abundance in natural D. melanogaster and D. simulans populations. Sequencing pools of more than 550 South African flies to at least 320-fold coverage, we determined the genome wide TE insertion frequencies in both species. We suggest that the predominance of low frequency insertions in the two species (>80% of the insertions have a frequency <0.2) is probably due to a high activity of more than 58 families in both species. We provide evidence for 50% of the TE families having temporally heterogenous transposition rates with different TE families being affected in the two species. While in D. melanogaster retrotransposons were more active, DNA transposons showed higher activity levels in D. simulans. Moreover, we suggest that LTR insertions are mostly of recent origin in both species, while DNA and non-LTR insertions are older and more frequently vertically transmitted since the split of D. melanogaster and D. simulans. We propose that the high TE activity is of recent origin in both species and a consequence of the demographic history, with habitat expansion triggering a period of rapid evolution. PMID:26186437

  15. Activation energy measurements of cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature sweeps of cheeses using small amplitude oscillatory shear tests produced values for activation energy of flow (Ea) between 30 and 44 deg C. Soft goat cheese and Queso Fresco, which are high-moisture cheeses and do not flow when heated, exhibited Ea values between 30 and 60 kJ/mol. The ...

  16. Algorithm Summary and Evaluation: Automatic Implementation of Ringdown Analysis for Electromechanical Mode Identification from Phasor Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Tuffner, Francis K.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Lin, Jenglung; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2010-02-28

    Small signal stability problems are one of the major threats to grid stability and reliability. Prony analysis has been successfully applied on ringdown data to monitor electromechanical modes of a power system using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. To facilitate an on-line application of mode estimation, this paper develops a recursive algorithm for implementing Prony analysis and proposed an oscillation detection method to detect ringdown data in real time. By automatically detecting ringdown data, the proposed method helps guarantee that Prony analysis is applied properly and timely on the ringdown data. Thus, the mode estimation results can be performed reliably and timely. The proposed method is tested using Monte Carlo simulations based on a 17-machine model and is shown to be able to properly identify the oscillation data for on-line application of Prony analysis. In addition, the proposed method is applied to field measurement data from WECC to show the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Measurement of Field Aligned Electron and Ion Densities and Ducts from the Whistler and Z Mode Radio Sounding from IMAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Hazra, S.; Mayank, K.; Reddy, A.; Liu, Y.; Carpenter, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present recent results from the application of whistler mode (WM) and Z mode (ZM) radio sounding experiments from the IMAGE satellite to the magnetospheric plasma diagnostics. A recently developed WM radio sounding method [Sonwalkar et al., JGR, 116, A11210, doi:10.1029/2011JA016759, 2011] was applied to 200 cases of WM echoes observed within the plasmasphere to measure field aligned electron density (Ne) and ion densities (NH+, NHe+, NO+) for L~1.6 -4, altitude <5000 km, Kp ~1-7, and F10.7 ~ 72-110 (low solar activity). The measured plasma parameters are in general consistent with the past space borne (e.g. CHAMP, DMSP, Alouette, ISIS, AE) and ground (e.g. ionosonde) measurements, but show significant differences from those predicted by IRI-2012 and GCPM models. We believe our measurements will lead to an improved model of electron and ion densities at <5000 km within the plasmasphere. The WM radio sounding method was applied to a case study of the variation of plasma parameters at L~2 during the development of a major storm, from quiet conditions and subsequent recovery, followed by a moderate and minor storm. Our study showed that relative to the preceding quiet time: (1) There was depletion in electron density, H+, He+ and enhancement in O+ ions leading to increase in O+-H+ transition height; (2) The recovery period of electrons and individual ions was different; (3) A similar trend in the variation of electron density, H+, O+ was observed after the moderate storm and the minor storm but He+ was not affected. Following a ray tracing technique originally developed for whistler mode sounding, we analyzed the fast nonducted and ducted Z mode echoes to obtain field aligned electron density and duct parameters (duct width and enhancement) from the measured dispersion of Z mode echoes. With the help of two case studies, we illustrate that fast Z mode echoes provide measurement of electron density at altitudes <10,000 km and duct width and enhancement within an

  18. How different modes of child delivery influence abdominal muscle activities in the active straight leg raise.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yu-Jeong; Hyung, Eun-Ju; Yang, Kyung-Hye; Lee, Hyun-Ok

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the activities of the abdominal muscles of women who had experienced vaginal delivery in comparison with those who had experienced Cesarean childbirth. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 14 subjects (7 vaginal delivery, 7 Cesarean section) performed an active straight leg raise to 20 cm above the ground, and we measured the activities of the internal oblique abdominal muscle, the external oblique abdominal muscle, and the rectus abdominal muscle on both sides using electromyography. The effort required to raise the leg was scored on a Likert scale. Then, the subjects conducted maximum isometric contraction for hip joint flexion with the leg raised at 20 cm, and maximum torque and abdominal muscle activities were measured using electromyography. [Results] During the active straight leg raise, abdominal muscle activities were higher in the Cesarean section subjects. The Likert scale did not show a significant difference. The activities of the abdominal muscles and the maximum torque of the hip joint flexion at maximum isometric contraction were higher in the vaginal delivery subjects. [Conclusion] The abdominal muscles of Cesarean section subjects showed greater recruitment for maintaining pelvic stability during the active straight leg raising, but were relatively weaker when powerful force was required. Therefore, we consider that more abdominal muscle training is necessary for maintaining pelvic stability of Cesarean section subjects. PMID:25202194

  19. Default Mode Network Activity Predicts Early Memory Decline in Healthy Young Adults Aged 18-31.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Steven M; Savalia, Neil K; Fishell, Andrew K; Gilmore, Adrian W; Zou, Fan; Balota, David A; McDermott, Kathleen B

    2016-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research conducted in healthy young adults is typically done with the assumption that this sample is largely homogeneous. However, studies from cognitive psychology suggest that long-term memory and attentional control begin to diminish in the third decade of life. Here, 100 participants between the ages of 18 and 31 learned Lithuanian translations of English words in an individual differences study using fMRI. Long-term memory ability was operationalized for each participant by deriving a memory score from 3 convergent measures. Age of participant predicted memory score in this cohort. In addition, degree of deactivation during initial encoding in a set of regions occurring largely in the default mode network (DMN) predicted both age and memory score. The current study demonstrates that early memory decline may partially be accounted for by failure to modulate activity in the DMN. PMID:26209847

  20. Doubly active Q switching and mode locking of an all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Díez, Antonio; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous and independent active Q switching and active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated using all-fiber modulation techniques. A magnetostrictive rod attached to the output fiber Bragg grating modulates the Q factor of the Fabry-Perot cavity, whereas active mode locking is achieved by amplitude modulation with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic device. Fully modulated Q-switched mode-locked trains of optical pulses were obtained for a wide range of pump powers and repetition rates. For a Q-switched repetition rate of 500 Hz and a pump power of 100 mW, the laser generates trains of 12-14 mode-locked pulses of about 1 ns each, within an envelope of 550 ns, an overall energy of 0.65 microJ, and a peak power higher than 250 W for the central pulses of the train. PMID:19756079

  1. Real-Time Quadrature Measurement of a Single-Photon Wave Packet with Continuous Temporal-Mode Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Hisashi; Ohdan, Hideaki; Miyata, Kazunori; Taguchi, Masahiro; Makino, Kenzo; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Yoshikawa, Jun-ichi; Furusawa, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Real-time controls based on quantum measurements are powerful tools for various quantum protocols. However, their experimental realization has been limited by mode mismatch between the temporal mode of quadrature measurement and that heralded by photon detection. Here, we demonstrate real-time quadrature measurement of a single-photon wave packet induced by photon detection by utilizing continuous temporal-mode matching between homodyne detection and an exponentially rising temporal mode. Single photons in exponentially rising modes are also expected to be useful resources for interactions with other quantum systems.

  2. Automation of Mode Locking in a Nonlinear Polarization Rotation Fiber Laser through Output Polarization Measurements.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Michel; Gagnon, Marc-Daniel; Habel, Joé

    2016-01-01

    When a laser is mode-locked, it emits a train of ultra-short pulses at a repetition rate determined by the laser cavity length. This article outlines a new and inexpensive procedure to force mode locking in a pre-adjusted nonlinear polarization rotation fiber laser. This procedure is based on the detection of a sudden change in the output polarization state when mode locking occurs. This change is used to command the alignment of the intra-cavity polarization controller in order to find mode-locking conditions. More specifically, the value of the first Stokes parameter varies when the angle of the polarization controller is swept and, moreover, it undergoes an abrupt variation when the laser enters the mode-locked state. Monitoring this abrupt variation provides a practical easy-to-detect signal that can be used to command the alignment of the polarization controller and drive the laser towards mode locking. This monitoring is achieved by feeding a small portion of the signal to a polarization analyzer measuring the first Stokes parameter. A sudden change in the read out of this parameter from the analyzer will occur when the laser enters the mode-locked state. At this moment, the required angle of the polarization controller is kept fixed. The alignment is completed. This procedure provides an alternate way to existing automating procedures that use equipment such as an optical spectrum analyzer, an RF spectrum analyzer, a photodiode connected to an electronic pulse-counter or a nonlinear detecting scheme based on two-photon absorption or second harmonic generation. It is suitable for lasers mode locked by nonlinear polarization rotation. It is relatively easy to implement, it requires inexpensive means, especially at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and it lowers the production and operation costs incurred in comparison to the above-mentioned techniques. PMID:26967924

  3. Noise amplitude measurements of single-mode CW lasers at radio frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.; Hillard, M. E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This letter presents the results of noise measurements for a variety of single-longitudinal-mode CW lasers (Ar/+/, standing-wave-dye, and ring-dye) that are commercially available. A quantitative comparison of the total output power fluctuations detected over the 7-300 MHz region (3 dB points) is presented.

  4. MULTI-SITE FIELD EVALUATION OF CANDIDATE SAMPLERS FOR MEASURING COARSE-MODE PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to expected changes to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter, comprehensive field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring coarse mode aerosols (i.e. PMc). Five separate PMc sampling approaches w...

  5. A measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the G0 experiment in forward mode

    SciTech Connect

    Silviu Doru Covrig

    2004-09-28

    The G0 experiment in Hall C at Jefferson Lab measures the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron scattering off hydrogen and quasielastic electron scattering off deuterium in the Q^2 range from 0.1 to 1 (GeV)^2 in both forward and backward running modes by using a longitudinally polarized electron beam on unpolarized liquid targets. By measuring three independent asymmetries, one in forward running mode off liquid hydrogen and two in backward running mode, one off liquid hydrogen and one off liquid deuterium, the experiment aims to perform for the first time a complete separation and mapping of the strange vector form factors of the nucleon (G_M^s, G_E^s) and the isovector axial form factor (G_A^e(T=1)) in three Q^2 bins over the Q^2 range from 0.1 to 1 (GeV/c)^2. To complete the physics program in both forward and backward modes it will take about five years. To accomplish the forward running mode program some 100 C of data are needed. This thesis is based on 9 C of physics data taken during the first chekout of the G^0 apparatus during October 2002 - January 2003.

  6. Artemisinin Inhibits Chloroplast Electron Transport Activity: Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Bharati, Adyasha; Kar, Monaranjan; Sabat, Surendra Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo), behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the QB; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth. PMID:22719995

  7. Enzyme activation and catalysis: characterisation of the vibrational modes of substrate and product in protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Sytina, Olga A; Alexandre, Maxime T; Heyes, Derren J; Hunter, C Neil; Robert, Bruno; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-02-14

    The light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide, a key step in the synthesis of chlorophyll, is catalyzed by the enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) and requires two photons (O. A. Sytina et al., Nature, 2008, 456, 1001-1008). The first photon activates the enzyme-substrate complex, a subsequent second photon initiates the photochemistry by triggering the formation of a catalytic intermediate. These two events are characterized by different spectral changes in the infra-red spectral region. Here, we investigate the vibrational frequencies of the POR-bound and unbound substrate, and product, and thus provide a detailed assignment of the spectral changes in the 1800-1250 cm(-1) region associated with the catalytic conversion of PChlide:NADPH:TyrOH into Chlide:NADP(+):TyrO(-). Fluorescence line narrowed spectra of the POR-bound Pchlide reveal a C=O keto group downshifted by more than 20 cm(-1) to a relatively low vibrational frequency of 1653 cm(-1), as compared to the unbound Pchlide, indicating that binding of the chromophore to the protein occurs via strong hydrogen bond(s). The frequencies of the C=C vibrational modes are consistent with a six-coordinated state of the POR-bound Pchlide, suggesting that there are two coordination interactions between the central Mg atom of the chromophore and protein residues, and/or a water molecule. The frequencies of the C=C vibrational modes of Chlide are consistent with a five-coordinated state, indicating a single interaction between the central Mg atom of the chromophore and a water molecule. Rapid-scan FTIR measurements on the Pchlide:POR:NADPH complex at 4 cm(-1) spectral resolution reveal a new band in the 1670 cm(-1) region. The FTIR spectra of the enzyme activation phase indicate involvement of a nucleotide-binding structural motif, and an increased exposure of the protein to solvent after activation. PMID:21103538

  8. Design and control of a prosthetic leg for above-knee amputees operated in semi-active and active modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Yoon, Gun-Ha; Kang, Je-Won; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new prosthesis operated in two different modes; the semi-active and active modes. The semi-active mode is achieved from a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper, while the active mode is obtained from an electronically commutated (EC) motor. The knee joint part of the above knee prosthesis is equipped with the MR damper and EC motor. The MR damper generates reaction force by controlling the field-dependent yield stress of the MR fluid, while the EC motor actively controls the knee joint angle during gait cycle. In this work, the MR damper is designed as a two-end type flow mode mechanism without air chamber for compact size. On other hand, in order to predict desired knee joint angle to be controlled by EC motor, a polynomial prediction function using a statistical method is used. A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller integrated with the computed torque method is then designed and applied to both MR damper and EC motor to control the knee joint angle. It is demonstrated that the desired knee joint angle is well achieved in different walking velocities on the ground ground.

  9. Youth Physical Activity Resources Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, Andréa L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether utilization of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods 111 adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported utilization of a physical activity resource (none/1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily 1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and 2) vigorous physical activity. Results Utilizing a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African-Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources. PMID:21204684

  10. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Revin, D G; Hemingway, M; Wang, Y; Cockburn, J W; Belyanin, A

    2016-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents. PMID:27147409

  11. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-05-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents.

  12. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    PubMed Central

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents. PMID:27147409

  13. Three dimensional measurements of Geodesic Acoustic Mode with correlation Doppler reflectometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, W. L.; Shi, Z. B.; Xu, Y.; Zou, X. L.; Duan, X. R.; Chen, W.; Jiang, M.; Yang, Z. C.; Zhang, B. Y.; Shi, P. W.; Liu, Z. T.; Xu, M.; Song, X. M.; Cheng, J.; Ke, R.; Nie, L.; Cui, Z. Y.; Fu, B. Z.; Ding, X. T.; Dong, J. Q.; Liu, Yi.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Liu, Yong; the HL-2A Team

    2015-10-01

    Correlation Doppler reflectometers have been newly developed in the HL-2A Tokamak. Owing to the flexibility of the diagnostic arrangements, the multi-channel systems allow us to study, simultaneously, the radial properties of edge turbulence and its long-range correlation in both the poloidal and toroidal direction. With these reflectometers, three-dimensional spatial structure of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) is surveyed, including the symmetric feature of Er fluctuations in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and the radial propagation of GAMs. The bi-coherence analysis for the Er fluctuations suggests that the three-wave nonlinear interaction could be the mechanism for the generation of GAM. The temporal evolution of GAM during the plasma density modulation experiments has been studied. The results show that the collisional damping plays a role in suppressing the GAM magnitudes, and hence, weakening the regulating effects of GAM on ambient turbulence. Three dimensional correlation Doppler measurements of GAM activity demonstrate that the newly developed correlation Doppler reflectometers in HL-2A are powerful tools for edge turbulence studies with high reliability. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: ``1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics''.

  14. Study of few-mode fiber based SMS sensor for simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuhide; Sakamoto, Taiji; Goto, Yukihiro; Fukai, Chisato; Matsui, Takashi; Yamamoto, Fumihiko; Kurashima, Toshio

    2015-09-01

    The applicability of few-mode fiber (FMF) as a single-multi-single (SMS) sensor is investigated. We examine experimentally the wavelength shift and/or visibility characteristics in an FMF based SMS sensor by changing the external temperature and longitudinal strain individually. We investigate numerically the temperature sensitivity of the fabricated sensor by considering the temperature dependence of the effective refractive index difference. Our results show that an FMF based SMS sensor can be used to measure the relative variation in temperature and strain simultaneously, and whose sensitivity can be tailored easily by designing two LP modes in an FMF.

  15. Target tracking using range-only measurements: application to ISAR mode of Ingara radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, Branko; Arulampalam, Sanjeev; McCarthy, James

    2001-11-01

    The problem is on-line target state estimation from range and range-rate measurements. The motivation for this work comes from the need to track a target in the ISAR mode of the DSTO Ingara Multi-Mode Radar during an extended data collection. The paper makes three main contributions. First, the theoretical Cramér-Rao bound for the performance of an unbiased range-only tracking algorithm is derived. Second, three algorithms are developed and compared to the theoretical bounds of performance. Third, the developed techniques are applied to real data collected in the recent trials with the Ingara radar.

  16. Mode-shape measurement of piezoelectric plate using temporal speckle pattern interferometry and temporal standard deviation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Yuan; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2011-11-01

    This study proposes an image processing method to improve the quality of interference fringes in mode-shape measurement using temporal speckle pattern interferometry. A vibrating piezoelectric plate at resonance was investigated, and the full-field optical information was saved as a sequence of images. According to derived statistical properties, an algorithm was developed to remove noise from both the background and disturbance, resulting in high-resolution images of excellent quality. In addition, the resonant frequency and mode shape obtained using the proposed algorithm demonstrate excellent agreement with theoretical results obtained by the finite element method. PMID:22048391

  17. Using X-mode L, R and O-mode reflectometry cutoffs to measure scrape-off-layer density profiles for upgraded ORNL reflectometer on NSTX-U.

    PubMed

    Lau, C; Wilgen, J B; Caughman, J B; Hanson, G R; Hosea, J; Perkins, R; Ryan, P M; Taylor, G

    2014-11-01

    The pre-existing ORNL scrape-off-layer (SOL) reflectometer that operated with the X-mode R-cutoff at 6-27 GHz to measure SOL density profiles on NSTX is being upgraded to be functional at the increased magnetic fields on NSTX-U spherical tokamak. Rather than increasing the operating frequencies to measure the higher X-mode R-cutoff frequencies on NSTX-U, it will be shown that the combined use of the X-mode R, L and O-mode cutoffs at 6-27 GHz can obtain the desired SOL density profiles. The potential capabilities and obstacles of this technique to measure SOL density profiles and possibly SOL magnetic field profiles on NSTX-U will be discussed. PMID:25430228

  18. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes: Insecticidal activity, mammalian toxicity, and mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Horsham, M.A.; Palmer, C.J.; Cole, L.M.; Casida, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    4-Ethynyl- and 4-(prop-1-ynyl)phenylsilatranes (N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub 3}SiR, R = C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CH or C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CCH{sub 3}) are highly toxic to houseflies (pretreated with piperonyl butoxide) and milkweed bugs (topical LD{sub 50}s 3-14 {mu}g/g) and to mice (intraperitoneal LD{sub 50}s 0.4-0.9 mg/kg), and they are moderately potent inhibitors of the ({sup 35}S)-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate or TBPS binding site (GABA-gated chloride channel) of mouse brain membranes. Scatchard analysis indicates noncompetitive interaction of 4-ethynylphenylsilatrane with the TBPS binding site. Phenylsilatrane analogues with 4-substituents of H, CH{sub 3}, Cl, Br, and C{triple bond}CSi(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} are highly toxic to mice but have little or no activity in the insect and receptor assays. Radioligand binding studies with (4-{sup 3}H)phenylsilatrane failed to reveal a specific binding site in mouse brain. Silatranes with R = H, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}Cl, CH{double bond}CH{sub 2}, OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3} are of little or no activity in the insect and mouse toxicity and TBPS binding site assays as are the trithia and monocyclic analogues of phenylsilatrane. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes are new probes to examine the GABA receptor-ionophore complex of insects and mammals.

  19. Mode S and ADS-B as a Source of Clear-Air Turbulence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeć, Jacek; Kwiatkowski, Kamil; de Haan, Siebren; Malinowski, Szymon

    2016-04-01

    Clear-Air Turbulence (CAT) beside being the most common cause for commercial aircraft incidents in the cruise phase is a complex physical phenomenon. CAT is an effect of various underlying physical mechanisms such as different kinds of hydrodynamic instabilities or large scale forcing. In order to properly understand and correctly forecast it one needs a significant amount of observation data. Up to date the best available observations are the in-situ EDR (from eddy dissipation rate - a measure of turbulence intensity). Those observations are reported every ~1 min of flight (roughly every 15 km). Yet their availability is limited by the willingness of the airlines to cooperate in adjusting on-board software. However there is a class of data that can be accessed more freely. In this communication we present and discuss a feasibility analysis of the three methods of processing Mode S/ADS-B messages into viable turbulence measurements. The Mode S/ADS-B messages are unrestricted navigational data broadcast by most of the commercial aircraft. The unique characteristic of this data is a very high temporal resolution. This allows to employ processing which results in obtaining turbulence information characterized by spatial resolution comparable with the best available data sources. Moreover due to using Mode-S/ASS-B data, the number of aircraft that are providing observations increases significantly. The methods are either using simple positioning information available in the ADS-B or high-resolution wind information from the Mode S. The paper is largely based on the results of the methods application to the data originating from DELICAT flight campaign that took place in 2013. The flight campaign was conducted using NLR operated Cessna Citation II. The reference Mode-S/ADS-B data partly overlapping with the research flights were supplied by the KNMI. Analysis shows very significant potential of the Mode-S wind based methods. J. M. Kopeć, K. Kwiatkowski, S. de Haan, and

  20. Thickness mode EMIS of constrained proof-mass piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamas, Tuncay; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Lin, Bin

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses theoretical and experimental work on thickness-mode electromechanical (E/M) impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) of proof-mass piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PMPWAS). The proof-mass (PM) concept was used to develop a new method for tuning the ultrasonic wave modes and for relatively high frequency local modal sensing by the PM affixed on PWAS. In order to develop the theoretical basis of the PMPWAS tuning concept, analytical analyses were conducted by applying the resonator theory to derive the EMIS of a PWAS constrained on one and both surfaces by isotropic elastic materials. The normalized thickness-mode shapes were obtained for the normal mode expansion (NME) method to eventually predict the thickness-mode EMIS using the correlation between PMPWAS and the structural dynamic properties of the substrate. Proof-masses of different sizes and materials were used to tune the system resonance towards an optimal frequency point. The results were verified by coupled-field finite element analyses (CF-FEA) and experimental results. An application of the tuning effect of PM on the standing wave modes was discussed as the increase in PM thickness shifts the excitation frequency of the wave mode toward the surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode.

  1. Actively mode-locked fiber ring laser by intermodal acousto-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Bello-Jiménez, M; Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Sáez-Rodríguez, D; Diez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2010-11-15

    We report an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser. A simple and low-insertion-loss acousto-optic modulator driven by standing flexural waves, which couples core-to-cladding modes in a standard single-mode optical fiber, is used as an active mechanism for mode locking. Among the remarkable features of the modulator, we mention its high modulation depth (72%), broad bandwidth (187 GHz), easy tunability in the optical wavelength, and low insertion losses (0.7 dB). The narrowest optical pulses obtained were of 95 ps time width, 21 mW peak power, repetition rate of 4.758 MHz, and 110 mW of pump power. PMID:21081995

  2. Comparison of experimental measurements of power MOSFET SEBs in dynamic and static modes

    SciTech Connect

    Calvel, P.; Peyrotte, C.; Baiget, A. ); Stassinopoulos, E.G. )

    1991-12-01

    In this paper a study to determine the Single Event Burnout (SEB) sensitivity for burnout of IRF-150 Power MOSFETs in both static and dynamic modes in terms of LET threshold and cross section is described. The dynamic tests were conducted with a power converter which was designed for actual space application. The results were compared with static measurements which were made during the exposure to the heavy ions. The data showed that the dynamic mode was less sensitive than the static by two orders of magnitude in cross section. It was also observed that ions with a range less than 30 microns did not produce destructive burnout in the dynamic mode even when their LET exceeded the threshold value. The extent of physical MOSFET damage in the destructive, dynamic tests appeared to correlate with the ion LET and source-drain voltage.

  3. The influence of thoron on instruments measuring radon activity concentration.

    PubMed

    Michielsen, N; Bondiguel, S

    2015-11-01

    Thoron, the isotope 220 of radon, is a radionuclide whose concentration may influence the measurement of the activity concentration of (222)Rn in the air. If in the case of continuous and active sampling measuring instruments, using a pump for example, the influence of thoron on radon measurement is obvious and is taken into account in the apparatus, it is often assumed that in the case of a passive sampling, by diffusion through a filter for example, this thoron influence is negligible. This is due to the very short radioactive half-life of thoron, 55.6 s (3.82 d for (222)Rn), and the assumption that the diffusion time of thoron in the detection chamber is long enough beside that of the thoron half-life. The objective of this study is to check whether this assumption is true or not for different kinds of commercial electronic apparatus used to measure radon activity concentration from soil to dwellings. First of all, the devices were calibrated in activity concentration of radon, and then they were exposed to a controlled thoron atmosphere. The experiments concerning the thoron aimed to investigate the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode of the apparatus. Results of these experiments show that all devices have a very quick answer to thoron atmosphere, even though the sensitivities vary from one instrument to another. Results clearly show that this influence on radon measurement due to the thoron is observed also after the exposition because of the decay of (212)Pb and its progenies. In conclusion, the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode depends strongly on the type of instruments. The results of the present investigation show that for some apparatus, the influence of thoron cannot be disregarded especially when measuring radon in soil. PMID:25953787

  4. TAE modes and MHD activity in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high power deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR have produced fusion a parameters similar to those expected on ITER. The achieved {beta}{sub {alpha}}/{beta} and the R{triangledown}{beta}{sub {alpha}} in TFRR D-T shots are 1/2 to 1/3 those predicted in the ITER EDA. Studies of the initial TFTR D-T plasmas find no evidence that the presence of the fast fusion {alpha} population has affected the stability of MHD, with the possible exception of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE`s). The initial TFTR DT plasmas had MHD activity similar to that commonly seen in deuterium plasmas. Operation of TFTR at plasma currents of 2.0--2.5 MA has greatly reduced the deleterious effects of MHD commonly observed at lower currents. Even at these higher currents, the performance of TFTR is limited by {beta}-limit disruptions. The effects of MHD on D-T fusion {alpha}`s was similar to effects observed on other fusion products in D only plasmas.

  5. Influence of Activity Mode on Feeling States of High School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, James C.; Pellet, Tracey L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in positive well-being, psychological distress, fatigue, and enjoyment vary as a function of physical activity mode. Fifty-five senior high school students participated in one of four fitness activities including two defined as traditional (running and step-aerobics) and two defined as…

  6. Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Absolute Activity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loidl, M.; Leblanc, E.; Rodrigues, M.; Bouchard, J.; Censier, B.; Branger, T.; Lacour, D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a prototype of metallic magnetic calorimeters that we are developing for absolute activity measurements of low energy emitting radionuclides. We give a detailed description of the realization of the prototype, containing an 55Fe source inside the detector absorber. We present the analysis of first data taken with this detector and compare the result of activity measurement with liquid scintillation counting. We also propose some ways for reducing the uncertainty on the activity determination with this new technique.

  7. Distance measurement using frequency scanning interferometry with mode-hoped laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M.; Sobee, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Terra, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, frequency scanning interferometry is implemented to measure distances up to 5 m absolutely. The setup consists of a Michelson interferometer, an external cavity tunable diode laser, and an ultra-low expansion (ULE) Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity to measure the frequency scanning range. The distance is measured by acquiring simultaneously the interference fringes from, the Michelson and the FP interferometers, while scanning the laser frequency. An online fringe processing technique is developed to calculate the distance from the fringe ratio while removing the parts result from the laser mode-hops without significantly affecting the measurement accuracy. This fringe processing method enables accurate distance measurements up to 5 m with measurements repeatability ±3.9×10-6 L. An accurate translation stage is used to find the FP cavity free-spectral-range and therefore allow accurate measurement. Finally, the setup is applied for the short distance calibration of a laser distance meter (LDM).

  8. Measurements of the ponderomotive force including sideband mode coupling effects and damping rates

    SciTech Connect

    Meassick, S.; Intrator, T.; Hershkowitz, N.; Browning, J.; Majeski, R.

    1989-05-01

    Measurements of the interactions of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) with flute interchange modes are presented. Interactions between the applied l = 1 radio frequency (rf) wave and an m = -1 flute mode give rise to sidebands above and below the rf frequency with mode numbers of l = 0 and l = +2, respectively. The contribution of the sideband terms to stability are shown to cancel 40% of the direct ponderomotive contribution. This is less than the 90% predicted by theory (Phys. Fluids 30, 148 (1987)) for an applied l = +1 rf wave above the ion cyclotron frequency with a large separation between the plasma and the vacuum vessel. Measurements of the linear growth and damping rate of the flute instability in the presence of rf are in good agreement with that calculated by considering only the curvature-driven instability and the ponderomotive force. The growth rate of the magnetohydrodynamic mode is consistent with the primary force acting on the plasma being the curvature force. This method allows a determination of the net stabilizing force on the plasma.

  9. Accurate measurement of guided modes in a plate using a bidirectional approach.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Ludovic; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Foiret, Josquin; Bossy, Emmanuel; Talmant, Maryline; Laugier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Measuring guided wave propagation in long bones is of interest to the medical community. When an inclination exists between the probe and the tested specimen surface, a bias is introduced on the guided mode wavenumbers. The aim of this study was to generalize the bidirectional axial transmission technique initially developed for the first arriving signal. Validation tests were performed on academic materials such a bone-mimicking plate covered with either a silicon or fat-mimicking layer. For any inclination, the wavenumbers measured with the probe parallel to the waveguide surface can be obtained by averaging the wavenumbers measured in two opposite directions. PMID:24437851

  10. Multiple dynamo modes as a mechanism for long-term solar activity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, M. J.; Käpylä, P. J.; Olspert, N.; Brandenburg, A.; Warnecke, J.; Karak, B. B.; Pelt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Solar magnetic activity shows both smooth secular changes, such as the modern Grand Maximum, and quite abrupt drops that are denoted as grand minima, such as the Maunder Minimum. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of convection-driven dynamos offer one way of examining the mechanisms behind these events. Aims: In this work, we analyze a solution of a solar-like DNS that was evolved for roughly 80 magnetic cycles of 4.9 years and where epochs of irregular behavior are detected. The emphasis of our analysis is to find physical causes for such behavior. Methods: The DNS employed is a semi-global (wedge-shaped) magnetoconvection model. For the data analysis tasks we use Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition and phase dispersion methods, as they are well suited for analyzing cyclic (non-periodic) signals. Results: A special property of the DNS is the existence of multiple dynamo modes at different depths and latitudes. The dominant mode is solar-like (equatorward migration at low latitudes and poleward at high latitudes). This mode is accompanied by a higher frequency mode near the surface and at low latitudes, showing poleward migration, and a low-frequency mode at the bottom of the convection zone. The low-frequency mode is almost purely antisymmetric with respect to the equator, while the dominant mode has strongly fluctuating mixed parity. The overall behavior of the dynamo solution is extremely complex, exhibiting variable cycle lengths, epochs of disturbed and even ceased surface activity, and strong short-term hemispherical asymmetries. Surprisingly, the most prominent suppressed surface activity epoch is actually a global magnetic energy maximum; during this epoch the bottom toroidal magnetic field obtains a maximum, demonstrating that the interpretation of grand minima-type events is non-trivial. The hemispherical asymmetries are seen only in the magnetic field, while the velocity field exhibits considerably weaker asymmetry. Conclusions: We interpret

  11. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Libo; Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Tongdong; Ding, Jianjun; Liu, Xixiang; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-01-01

    Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m3 to 900 kg/m3 and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail. PMID:27275823

  12. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Libo; Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Tongdong; Ding, Jianjun; Liu, Xixiang; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-01-01

    Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m³ to 900 kg/m³ and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail. PMID:27275823

  13. Kalman filter methods for real-time frequency and mode number estimation of MHD activity in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, D.; Coelho, R.; JET EFDA contributors, the

    2013-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in magnetically confined fusion experiments is often associated with detrimental effects such as increased radial transport and consequent loss of confinement. In particular, the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode (NTM), when proceeding to mode-locking, is a potentially disruptive instability hence with the potential to compromise the mechanical integrity of the machine. It is therefore quite significant to be able to characterize in real-time the most virulent and performance limiting instabilities such that adequate mitigation or complete stabilization using feedback control methods are employed during the plasma discharge. This work proposes a Kalman filter (KF) based mechanism for providing, in real-time, the amplitude and phase evolution of instabilities within a predefined set of mode numbers. The method relies on two KF implementations: a non-linear KF isolating the non-stationary dominant signal component of a sensor measurement and subsequently a linear KF which projects the former, for a collection of sensors, onto a predefined set of mode numbers. A basic overview of algorithms commonly used for real-time mode number analysis is also presented along with applications of the proposed algorithm to recently recorded data of the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak.

  14. The Properties of Large Amplitude Whistler Mode Waves in the Magnetosphere: Propagation and Relationship with Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Goetz, K.; Breneman, A.; Kersten, K.

    2011-01-01

    Wepresent resultsof a studyof the characteristicsof very large amplitude whistler mode waves inside the terrestrial magnetosphere at radial distances of less than 15 RE using waveform capture data from the Wind spacecraft. We observed 247 whistler mode waves with at least one electric field component (105/247 had !80 mV/m peak!to!peak amplitudes) and 66 whistler mode waves with at least one search coil magnetic field component (38/66 had !0.8 nT peak!to!peak amplitudes). Wave vectors determined from events with three magnetic field components indicate that 30/46 propagate within 20 of the ambient magnetic field, though some are more oblique (up to "50 ). No relationship was observed between wave normal angle and GSM latitude. 162/247 of the large amplitude whistler mode waves were observed during magnetically active periods (AE > 200 nT). 217 out of 247 total whistler mode waves examined were observed inside the radiation belts. We present a waveform capture with the largest whistler wave magnetic field amplitude (^8 nT peak!to!peak) ever reported in the radiation belts. The estimated Poynting flux magnitude associated with this wave is ^300 mW/m2, roughly four orders of magnitude above estimates from previous satellite measurements. Such large Poynting flux values are consistent with rapid energization of electrons.

  15. Youth Physical Activity Resource Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslow, Andra L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether use of physical activity resources (e.g., parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods: One hundred eleven adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported use of a physical activity resource (none /1 resources). The main…

  16. Optical impedance spectroscopy with single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Mendes, Sergio B

    2014-02-01

    An optical impedance spectroscopy (OIS) technique based on a single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguide (EA-IOW) was developed to investigate electron-transfer processes of redox adsorbates. A highly sensitive single-mode EA-IOW device was used to optically follow the time-dependent faradaic current originated from a submonolayer of cytochrome c undergoing redox exchanges driven by a harmonic modulation of the electric potential at several dc bias potentials and at several frequencies. To properly retrieve the faradaic current density from the ac-modulated optical signal, we introduce here a mathematical formalism that (i) accounts for intrinsic changes that invariably occur in the optical baseline of the EA-IOW device during potential modulation and (ii) provides accurate results for the electro-chemical parameters. We are able to optically reconstruct the faradaic current density profile against the dc bias potential in the working electrode, identify the formal potential, and determine the energy-width of the electron-transfer process. In addition, by combining the optically reconstructed faradaic signal with simple electrical measurements of impedance across the whole electrochemical cell and the capacitance of the electric double-layer, we are able to determine the time-constant connected to the redox reaction of the adsorbed protein assembly. For cytochrome c directly immobilized onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, we measured a reaction rate constant of 26.5 s(-1). Finally, we calculate the charge-transfer resistance and pseudocapacitance associated with the electron-transfer process and show that the frequency dependence of the redox reaction of the protein submonolayer follows as expected the electrical equivalent of an RC-series admittance diagram. Above all, we show here that OIS with single-mode EA-IOW's provide strong analytical signals that can be readily monitored even for small surface-densities of species involved in the redox

  17. Optical Impedance Spectroscopy with Single-Mode Electro-Active-Integrated Optical Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An optical impedance spectroscopy (OIS) technique based on a single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguide (EA-IOW) was developed to investigate electron-transfer processes of redox adsorbates. A highly sensitive single-mode EA-IOW device was used to optically follow the time-dependent faradaic current originated from a submonolayer of cytochrome c undergoing redox exchanges driven by a harmonic modulation of the electric potential at several dc bias potentials and at several frequencies. To properly retrieve the faradaic current density from the ac-modulated optical signal, we introduce here a mathematical formalism that (i) accounts for intrinsic changes that invariably occur in the optical baseline of the EA-IOW device during potential modulation and (ii) provides accurate results for the electro-chemical parameters. We are able to optically reconstruct the faradaic current density profile against the dc bias potential in the working electrode, identify the formal potential, and determine the energy-width of the electron-transfer process. In addition, by combining the optically reconstructed faradaic signal with simple electrical measurements of impedance across the whole electrochemical cell and the capacitance of the electric double-layer, we are able to determine the time-constant connected to the redox reaction of the adsorbed protein assembly. For cytochrome c directly immobilized onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, we measured a reaction rate constant of 26.5 s–1. Finally, we calculate the charge-transfer resistance and pseudocapacitance associated with the electron-transfer process and show that the frequency dependence of the redox reaction of the protein submonolayer follows as expected the electrical equivalent of an RC-series admittance diagram. Above all, we show here that OIS with single-mode EA-IOW’s provide strong analytical signals that can be readily monitored even for small surface-densities of species involved in the redox

  18. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10−8 for a distance of 50 m. PMID:26419282

  19. Measurement of mode-locked laser timing jitter by use of phase-encoded optical sampling.

    PubMed

    Juodawlkis, P W; Twichell, J C; Wasserman, J L; Betts, G E; Williamson, R C

    2001-03-01

    The phase-noise characteristics of a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser are investigated with a new measurement technique called phase-encoded optical sampling. A polarization-maintaining ring laser is mode locked by use of the short-pulse electrical output of a resonant-tunneling diode oscillator, enabling it to produce 30-ps pulses at a 208-MHz repetition rate. The interferometric phase-encoded sampling technique provides 60-dB suppression of amplitude-jitter noise and allows supermode phase noise to be observed and quantified. The white-noise pulse-to-pulse timing jitter and the rms supermode timing jitter of the laser are measured to be less than 50 and 70 fs, respectively. PMID:18040304

  20. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode.

    PubMed

    Poehlmann, Flavio R; Cappelli, Mark A; Rieker, Gregory B

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively. PMID:21267082

  1. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-09-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10-8 for a distance of 50 m.

  2. Measuring mode indices of a partially coherent vortex beam with Hanbury Brown and Twiss type experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Wang, Feiran; Chen, Dongxu; Wang, Yunlong; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Pei; Li, Fuli

    2016-02-01

    It is known that the cross-correlation function (CCF) of a partially coherent vortex (PCV) beam shows a robust link with the radial and azimuthal mode indices. However, the previous proposals are difficult to measure the CCF in practical systems, especially in the case of astronomical objects. In this letter, we demonstrate experimentally that the Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect can be used to measure the mode indices of the original vortex beam and investigate the relationship between the spatial coherent width and the characterization of CCF of the PCV beam. The technique we exploit is quite efficient and robust, and it may be useful in the field of free space communication and astronomy which are related to the photon's orbital angular momentum.

  3. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Steven A; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10(-8) for a distance of 50 m. PMID:26419282

  4. Microwave measurements of energy lost to longitudinal modes by single electron bunches traversing periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.; Weaver, J.N.; Wilson, P.B.

    1981-10-01

    In the design of future linear colliders, it will be important to minimize the loss of beam energy due to the excitation of higher-order modes in the accelerator structure by single bunches of electrons or positrons. This loss is not only detrimental in itself but also gives rise to energy spectrum widening and transverse emittance growth. Microwave measurements made on disk-loaded and alternating-spoke structures to determine the loss to the longitudinal modes are described. In these measurements the Gaussian bunch is simulated by a current pulse of the same shape transmitted through the structure on an axial center conductor. Results to date are presented for the total longitudinal loss parameter per period K in volts per picocoulomb.

  5. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  6. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    PubMed Central

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively. PMID:21267082

  7. LLNL Measurements of Graded-Index Multi-Mode Fiber (ITF 47)

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.T.

    2000-05-01

    The Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All Russian Research Institute of Technical Physics, located in the Nuclear City of Snezhinsk, east of the Ural mountains and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories have been investigating the possibility of establishing a commercial optical fiber manufacturing facility. These discussions began in the summer of 1998. At that time three samples (single mode and multi-mode) of optical fiber were left at the Sandia National Laboratory. Sandia measured two of the segments and sent them to LLNL. The optical loss at 1550 nm and 1300 nm were higher than commercially available fiber. The measurements were complicated because the geometry of the fibers also did not meet specification. Since the core was not adequately centered coupling of optical energy into the fiber being tested varied widely depending on which end of the fiber was used for insertion. The results of these measurements were summarized in the informal report dated June 11, 1999, which was hand carried by Dr. Paul Herman during his July 1999 visit. During the July visit a 1.2-km long section of graded-index multimode fiber, ITF 47, was given to Herman. We had requested samples longer than the earlier ones (which were {approx}0.1 km long) in order that a cutback method could be used for the transmission measurements. The optical loss using the cutback technique and the transmission spectral measurements in the 600-1700 mn region are reported. Also physical measurements are reported of the fiber's diameter, concentricity, ellipticity and tensile strength (proof test). The test results are summarized in Table 1, ''Comparative Data for Multi-mode Optical Fiber.'' The table includes the values from the Industrial specification TIA/EIA 402AAAB, the commercial specification for Corning's 50/125 CPC6, the values measured on ITF-47 and provided by C-70, and LLNL's values for ITF-47 as well as the multimode values from the June 1999 samples.

  8. Measurements and Computations of Second-Mode Instability Waves in Three Hypersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berridge, Dennis C.; Casper, Katya M.; Rufer, Shann J.; Alba, Christopher R.; Lewis, Daniel R.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency pressure-fluctuation measurements were made in AEDC Tunnel 9 at Mach 10 and the NASA Langley 15-Inch Mach 6 and 31-Inch Mach 10 tunnels. Measurements were made on a 7deg-half-angle cone model. Pitot measurements of freestream pressure fluctuations were also made in Tunnel 9 and the Langley Mach-6 tunnel. For the first time, second-mode waves were measured in all of these tunnels, using 1-MHz-response pressure sensors. In Tunnel 9, second-mode waves could be seen in power spectra computed from records as short as 80 micro-s. The second-mode wave amplitudes were observed to saturate and then begin to decrease in the Langley tunnels, indicating wave breakdown. Breakdown was estimated to occur near N approx. equals 5 in the Langley Mach-10 tunnel. The unit-Reynolds-number variations in the data from Tunnel 9 were too large to see the same processes. In Tunnel 9, the measured transition locations were found to be at N = 4.5 using thermocouples, and N = 5.3 using 50-kHz-response pressure sensors. What appears to be a very long transitional region was observed at a unit Reynolds number of 13.5 million per meter in Tunnel 9. These results were consistent with the high-frequency pressure fluctuation measurements. High-frequency pressure fluctuation measurements indicated that transition did occur in the Langley Mach-6 tunnel, but the location of transition was not precisely determined. Unit Reynolds numbers in the Langley Mach-10 tunnel were too low to observe transition. More analysis of this data set is expected in the future.

  9. Inverse method predicting spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field measurements.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Serge

    2005-02-01

    In the study the inverse problem of deducing the modal structure of the acoustic field generated by a ducted turbofan is addressed using conventional farfield directivity measurements. The final objective is to make input data available for predicting noise radiation in other configurations that would not have been tested. The present paper is devoted to the analytical part of that study. The proposed method is based on the equations governing ducted sound propagation and free-field radiation. It leads to fast computations checked on Rolls-Royce tests made in the framework of previous European projects. Results seem to be reliable although the system of equations to be solved is generally underdetermined (more propagating modes than acoustic measurements). A limited number of modes are thus selected according to any a priori knowledge of the sources. A first guess of the source amplitudes is obtained by adjusting the calculated maximum of radiation of each mode to the measured sound pressure level at the same angle. A least squares fitting gives the final solution. A simple correction can be made to take account of the mean flow velocity inside the nacelle which shifts the directivity patterns. It consists of modifying the actual frequency to keep the cut-off ratios unchanged. PMID:15759694

  10. Inverse method predicting spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, Serge

    2005-02-01

    In the study the inverse problem of deducing the modal structure of the acoustic field generated by a ducted turbofan is addressed using conventional farfield directivity measurements. The final objective is to make input data available for predicting noise radiation in other configurations that would not have been tested. The present paper is devoted to the analytical part of that study. The proposed method is based on the equations governing ducted sound propagation and free-field radiation. It leads to fast computations checked on Rolls-Royce tests made in the framework of previous European projects. Results seem to be reliable although the system of equations to be solved is generally underdetermined (more propagating modes than acoustic measurements). A limited number of modes are thus selected according to any a priori knowledge of the sources. A first guess of the source amplitudes is obtained by adjusting the calculated maximum of radiation of each mode to the measured sound pressure level at the same angle. A least squares fitting gives the final solution. A simple correction can be made to take account of the mean flow velocity inside the nacelle which shifts the directivity patterns. It consists of modifying the actual frequency to keep the cut-off ratios unchanged. .

  11. Study of Optical Mode Scrambling of Fiber Optics for High Precision Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassette, Anthony; Ge, Jian; Jeram, Sarik; Klanot, Khaya; Ma, Bo; Varosi, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Optical Fibers have been used throughout Astronomy for spectroscopy with spectrographs located some distance away from the telescope. This fiber-fed design has greatly increased precision for radial velocity (RV) measurements. However, due to the incomplete fiber illumination mode scrambling in the radial direction, high resolution spectrographs with regular circular fibers have suffered RV uncertainties on the order of a few to tens of m/s with stellar observations, which largely limited their sensitivity in detecting and characterizing low mass planets around stars. At the University of Florida, we studied mode scrambling gain of a few different optical devices, such as three-lens optical double scramblers, octagonal fibers and low numerical aperture fibers with a goal to find an optimal mode scrambling solution for the TOU optical very high resolution spectrograph (R=100,000, 0.38-0.9 microns) and FIRST near infrared high resolution spectrograph (R=60,000, 0.9-1.8 microns) for the on-going Dharma Planet Survey. This presentation will report our lab measurement results and also stellar RV measurements at the observatories.

  12. Dual-Pump CARS Measurements in the University of Virginia's Dual-Mode Scramjet: Configuration "C"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cantu, Luca; Gallo, Emanuela; Danehy, Paul M.; Rockwell, Robert; Goyne, Christopher; McDaniel, James

    2013-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted at the University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility in configuration C of the dual-mode scramjet. This is a continuation of previously published works on configuration A. The scramjet is hydrogen fueled and operated at two equivalence ratios, one representative of the scram mode and the other of the ram mode. Dual-pump CARS was used to acquire the mole fractions of the major species as well as the rotational and vibrational temperatures of N2. Developments in methods and uncertainties in fitting CARS spectra for vibrational temperature are discussed. Mean quantities and the standard deviation of the turbulent fluctuations at multiple planes in the flow path are presented. In the scram case the combustion of fuel is completed before the end of the measurement domain, while for the ram case the measurement domain extends into the region where the flow is accelerating and combustion is almost completed. Higher vibrational than rotational temperature is observed in those parts of the hot combustion plume where there is substantial H2 (and hence chemical reaction) present.

  13. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants ( Kb) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH 2 (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  14. Measurement of Larval Activity in the Drosophila Activity Monitor

    PubMed Central

    McParland, Aidan L.; Follansbee, Taylor L.; Ganter, Geoffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila larvae are used in many behavioral studies, yet a simple device for measuring basic parameters of larval activity has not been available. This protocol repurposes an instrument often used to measure adult activity, the TriKinetics Drosophila activity monitor (MB5 Multi-Beam Activity Monitor) to study larval activity. The instrument can monitor the movements of animals in 16 individual 8 cm glass assay tubes, using 17 infrared detection beams per tube. Logging software automatically saves data to a computer, recording parameters such as number of moves, times sensors were triggered, and animals’ positions within the tubes. The data can then be analyzed to represent overall locomotion and/or position preference as well as other measurements. All data are easily accessible and compatible with basic graphing and data manipulation software. This protocol will discuss how to use the apparatus, how to operate the software and how to run a larval activity assay from start to finish. PMID:25993121

  15. Measurement of magnetic turbulence structure and nonlinear mode coupling of tearing fluctuations in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch edge

    SciTech Connect

    Assadi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of current-driven modes are studied in the MST reversed field pinch. Measured low frequency (f < 35 kHz) magnetic fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 35 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized and externally resonant. Discrete dynamo events, ``sawtooth oscillations,`` have been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas. This phenomenon causes the plasma to become unstable to m = 1 tearing modes. The modes that may be important in different phases of these oscillations are identified. These results then assist in nonlinear studies and also help to interpret the spectral broadening of the measured data during a discrete dynamo event. Three-wave nonlinear coupling of spectral Fourier modes is measured in the MST by applying bispectral analysis to magnetic fluctuations measured at the plasma edge at 64 toroidal locations and 16 poloidal locations, permitting observation of coupling over 8 poloidal and 32 toroidal modes. Comparison to bispectra predicted by resistive MHD computation indicates reasonably good agreement. However, during the crash phase of the sawtooth oscillation the nonlinear coupling is strongly enhanced, concomitant with a broadened k-spectrum. During the sawtooth formation the plasma is undergoing a pure diffusive process. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. High frequency activity prior to a sawtooth crash is caused by nonlinear frequency (small-scale) mode coupling. Growth rate and coupling coefficients of toroidal mode spectra are calculated by statistical modeling. Temporal evolution of edge toroidal mode spectra has been predicted by transfer function analysis. The driving sources of electrostatic fields are different than for the magnetic fields. The characteristics of tearing modes can be altered by external field errors and addition of impurities to the plasma.

  16. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  17. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  18. High-wavenumber solar f-mode strengthening prior to active region formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant; Raichur, Harsha; Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic strengthening of the local solar surface mode, i.e. the f-mode, 1-2 days prior to the emergence of an active region (AR) in the same (corotating) location while no indication can yet be seen in the magnetograms. Our study is motivated by earlier numerical findings of Singh et al. (2014) which showed that, in the presence of a nonuniform magnetic field that is concentrated a few scale heights below the surface, the f-mode fans out in the diagnostic kΩ diagram at high wavenumbers. Here we explore this possibility using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and show for four ARs 11130, 11158, 11768, and 12051, that at large latitudinal wavenumbers (corresponding to horizontal scales of around 3000 km), the f-mode displays strengthening about two days prior to AR formation and thus provides a new precursor for AR formation. The idea that the f-mode is perturbed days before any visible magnetic activity occurs on the surface can be important in constraining dynamo models aimed at understanding the global magnetic activity of the Sun.

  19. Modulation of activation-loop phosphorylation by JAK inhibitors is binding mode dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Débora; Rubert, Joëlle; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Scheufler, Clemens; Marque, Fanny; Régnier, Catherine H.; De Pover, Alain; Ryckelynck, Hugues; Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Goel, Aviva; Wyder, Lorenza; Tavares, Gisele; Baffert, Fabienne; Pissot-Soldermann, Carole; Manley, Paul W.; Gaul, Christoph; Voshol, Hans; Levine, Ross L.; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Radimerski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    JAK inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemias. Most of these drugs target the ATP-binding pocket and stabilize the active conformation of the JAK kinases. This type-I binding mode leads to an increase in JAK activation-loop phosphorylation, despite blockade of kinase function. Here we report that stabilizing the inactive state via type-II inhibition acts in the opposite manner, leading to a loss of activation-loop phosphorylation. We used X-ray crystallography to corroborate the binding mode and report for the first time the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain in an inactive conformation. Importantly, JAK inhibitor-induced activation-loop phosphorylation requires receptor interaction, as well as intact kinase and pseudokinase domains. Hence, depending on the respective conformation stabilized by a JAK inhibitor, hyperphosphorylation of the activation-loop may or may not be elicited. PMID:22684457

  20. Constant Q measurements of collective modes in Mg{sub 70}Zn{sub 30} glass

    SciTech Connect

    Benmore, C.J. |; Sweeney, S. |; Robinson, R.A.; Egelstaff, P.A.; Suck, J.B.

    1997-11-01

    In this study the Neutron Brillouin Scattering technique has been used to measure longitudinal excitations in a magnesium-zinc glass at momentum transfers within the first pseudo-Brillouin zone. The measurements were performed at room temperature and constant momentum transfer, which enables the data to be readily and reliably compared with theory. The experimental results taken down to Q = 6.2 nm{sup {minus}1} and E = 27 meV show a 5 meV downward shift in the dispersion energy of the longitudinal optic mode of the glass when compared to theoretical predictions.

  1. Diameter measurement of single-mode fiber by using interferometric and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Joenathan, C; Bunch, R M

    1993-10-20

    Two methods to measure the cladding diameter of single-mode fibers are presented. The first method is based on an interference fringe measurement technique. Interference fringe spacing at two different planes is measured to determine the cladding diameter of the fiber. The theory of the fringe formation in the interferometeric arrangement using single-mode fibers is discussed. It is theoretically shown that the far-field overlapping Gaussian field distribution from the fibers shifts the position of the fringe maxima and minima. As a special case of unit fringe visibility the minima positions do not shift, whereasthe maxima positions are shifted. In the case of a Lloyd mirror arrangement it is shown that fringes can be obtained from a rough surface as well. A lens is used in the second method to image the two identical point sources that cause the interference. Through the use of the magnification and spacing of the images, the cladding diameter is estimated. It is shown that the accuracy of the fiber cladding-diameter measurement can be enhanced by generating multiple point sources. Consistent results of the fiber cladding diameter have been obtained with the proposed methods. Fiber cladding-diameter measurements with a standard error of less than 0.15 µm can be achieved. PMID:20856425

  2. Material property measurement using the quasi-Scholte mode-A waveguide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, F. B.; Cawley, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2005-03-01

    In the food industry and other industries, rheological measurements and determination of particle sizes in suspensions and emulsions is of great importance for process and quality control. Current test cell based ultrasonic methods exist but are often inconvenient. An attractive alternative could be to insert a simple measurement ``dipstick'' into the fluid; this paper presents an initial study of the feasibility of using measurements of the velocity and attenuation of the quasi-Scholte mode on a plate to obtain the longitudinal velocity and attenuation of an embedding medium. The attenuation of the quasi-Scholte mode is caused by two mechanisms: shear leakage and attenuation due to the bulk longitudinal attenuation of the embedding material. In a calibration test the bulk longitudinal velocity and viscosity of glycerol were determined experimentally. Measurements agreed well with results from conventional methods and literature data. Quantitative results and an independent validation for honey, a very viscous fluid, are also presented. For Newtonian liquids like glycerol and honey, the shear leakage and longitudinal bulk attenuation are both related to viscosity. To demonstrate the sensitivity to nonviscous attenuation mechanisms, qualitative measurement results on fluids that mainly exhibit attenuation due to scattering are presented. .

  3. Measuring Homework Completion in Behavioral Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Andrew M.; Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Kalibatseva, Zornitsa; Miller, Ivan W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an observer-based coding system for the characterization and completion of homework assignments during Behavioral Activation (BA). Existing measures of homework completion are generally unsophisticated, and there is no current measure of homework completion designed to capture the particularities…

  4. Measurement of nonlinear normal modes using multi-harmonic stepped force appropriation and free decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, David A.; Allen, Matthew S.

    2016-08-01

    Nonlinear Normal Modes (NNMs) offer tremendous insight into the dynamic behavior of a nonlinear system, extending many concepts that are familiar in linear modal analysis. Hence there is interest in developing methods to experimentally and numerically determine a system's NNMs for model updating or simply to characterize its dynamic response. Previous experimental work has shown that a mono-harmonic excitation can be used to isolate a system's dynamic response in the neighborhood of a NNM along the main backbones of a system. This work shows that a multi-harmonic excitation is needed to isolate a NNM when well separated linear modes of a structure couple to produce an internal resonance. It is shown that one can tune the multiple harmonics of the input excitation using a plot of the input force versus the response velocity until the area enclosed by the force-velocity curve is minimized. Once an appropriated NNM is measured, one can increase the force level and retune the frequency to obtain a NNM at a higher amplitude or remove the excitation and measure the structure's decay down a NNM backbone. This work explores both methods using simulations and measurements of a nominally-flat clamped-clamped beam excited at a single point with a magnetic force. Numerical simulations are used to validate the method in a well defined environment and to provide comparison with the experimentally measured NNMs. The experimental results seem to produce a good estimate of two NNMs along their backbone and part of an internal resonance branch. Full-field measurements are then used to further explore the couplings between the underlying linear modes along the identified NNMs.

  5. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A.

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  6. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields. PMID:24784614

  7. Resting spontaneous activity in the default mode network predicts performance decline during prolonged attention workload.

    PubMed

    Gui, Danyang; Xu, Sihua; Zhu, Senhua; Fang, Zhuo; Spaeth, Andrea M; Xin, Yuanyuan; Feng, Tingyong; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-10-15

    After continuous and prolonged cognitive workload, people typically show reduced behavioral performance and increased feelings of fatigue, which are known as "time-on-task (TOT) effects". Although TOT effects are pervasive in modern life, their underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we induced TOT effects by administering a 20-min continuous psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) to a group of 16 healthy adults and used resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine spontaneous brain activity changes associated with fatigue and performance. Behaviorally, subjects displayed robust TOT effects, as reflected by increasingly slower reaction times as the test progressed and higher self-reported mental fatigue ratings after the 20-min PVT. Compared to pre-test measurements, subjects exhibited reduced amplitudes of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) in the default mode network (DMN) and increased ALFF in the thalamus after the test. Subjects also exhibited reduced anti-correlations between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and right middle prefrontal cortex after the test. Moreover, pre-test resting ALFF in the PCC and medial prefrontal cortex (MePFC) predicted subjects' subsequent performance decline; individuals with higher ALFF in these regions exhibited more stable reaction times throughout the 20-min PVT. These results support the important role of both task-positive and task-negative networks in mediating TOT effects and suggest that spontaneous activity measured by resting-state BOLD fMRI may be a marker of mental fatigue. PMID:26196666

  8. Real-time reflectometry measurement validation in H-mode regimes for plasma position control.

    PubMed

    Santos, J; Guimarais, L; Manso, M

    2010-10-01

    It has been shown that in H-mode regimes, reflectometry electron density profiles and an estimate for the density at the separatrix can be jointly used to track the separatrix within the precision required for plasma position control on ITER. We present a method to automatically remove, from the position estimation procedure, measurements performed during collapse and recovery phases of edge localized modes (ELMs). Based on the rejection mechanism, the method also produces an estimate confidence value to be fed to the position feedback controller. Preliminary results show that the method improves the real-time experimental separatrix tracking capabilities and has the potential to eliminate the need for an external online source of ELM event signaling during control feedback operation. PMID:21061481

  9. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2000-10-01

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results.

  10. 78 FR 7939 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens (Active Mode)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    .... 75 FR 42579, 42581. In addition, in comments received in response to a separate test procedure notice... referred to as the June 2012 NODA). 77 FR 33106. In the June 2012 NODA, DOE presented test results from... single compartment. 78 FR 4015, 4018 (Jan. 18, 2013). For the purpose of this active mode test...

  11. Modes of Engagement in Foreign Language Writing: An Activity Theoretical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haneda, Mari

    2007-01-01

    This article makes the case for using activity theory to explore the learning and teaching of writing in a foreign language. I illustrate my argument by bringing this theory to bear on a re-examination of the different modes of engagement in writing by university-level students of Japanese as a foreign language that I identified in an earlier…

  12. A new resonant based measurement method for squeeze mode yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Shah, Kruti; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-10-01

    A new approach to measure the field-dependent yield stress of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in squeeze mode using the resonance concept is proposed. The measurement system is designed using the piezolaminated cantilever beam coupled with an electromagnetic coil based MR fluid squeezing setup. The cantilever beam is maintained at resonance using simple closed-loop electronics. The magnetic field produced by the coil changes the viscosity of MR fluids and produces an additional stiffness to the resonating cantilever beam. The shift in resonant frequency due to the change in viscosity of the MR fluid is measured, and the shift in frequency is analytically related to the yield stress. Two types of MR fluids based on sphere and plate iron particles are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed measurement system.

  13. Measurements of E-Mode Polarization and Temperature-E-Mode Correlation in the Cosmic Microwave Background from 100 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, A. T.; Henning, J. W.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A.; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Cho, H.-M.; Citron, R.; Crawford, T. M.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Everett, W.; Gallicchio, J.; Gao, J.; George, E. M.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Hanson, D.; Harrington, N.; Hilton, G. C.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, D.; Liang, C.; Luong-Van, D.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Montroy, T. E.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Smecher, G.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Zahn, O.

    2015-05-01

    We present measurements of E-mode polarization and temperature-E-mode correlation in the cosmic microwave background using data from the first season of observations with SPTpol, the polarization-sensitive receiver currently installed on the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The observations used in this work cover 100 {{deg }2} of sky with arcminute resolution at 150 GHz. We report the E-mode angular auto-power spectrum (EE) and the temperature-E-mode angular cross-power spectrum (TE) over the multipole range 500 < ℓ ≤ 5000. These power spectra improve on previous measurements in the high-ℓ (small-scale) regime. We fit the combination of the SPTpol power spectra, data from Planck, and previous SPT measurements with a six-parameter ΛCDM cosmological model. We find that the best-fit parameters are consistent with previous results. The improvement in high-ℓ sensitivity over previous measurements leads to a significant improvement in the limit on polarized point-source power: after masking sources brighter than 50 mJy in unpolarized flux at 150 GHz, we find a 95% confidence upper limit on unclustered point-source power in the EE spectrum of {{D}\\ell }=\\ell (\\ell +1){{C}\\ell }/2π \\lt 0.40 μ {{K}2} at \\ell =3000, indicating that future EE measurements will not be limited by power from unclustered point sources in the multipole range \\ell \\lt 3600, and possibly much higher in \\ell .

  14. Alternative Modes of Measuring Self-Reports on HIV-Related Behaviors among College Students: Web-Delivered Mode versus Paper-Pencil Mode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Su-I

    2007-01-01

    HIV-related behaviors, self-reported using Web-delivered or paper-pencil modes, were collected from two convenience samples of college students at a major university in the southeastern U.S. To enhance the equivalence of the comparisons, a subset pool of participants from each group, proportionally matched on key demographic variables including…

  15. Different pulse pattern generation by frequency detuning in pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Si, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Zong-Fu

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our recent experimental investigation of the modulation frequency detuning effect on the output pulse dynamics in a pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser. The experimental study shows the existence of five different mode-locking states that mainly depend on the modulation frequency detuning, which are: (a) amplitude-even harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (b) Q-switched harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (c) sinusoidal wave modulation mode, (d) pulses bundle state, and (e) noise-like state. A detailed experimental characterization of the output pulses dynamics in each operating mode is presented.

  16. Two Novel Measurements for the Drive-Mode Resonant Frequency of a Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ancheng; Hu, Xiaoping; Luo, Bing; Jiang, Mingming; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the drive-mode resonance frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope (MVG), one needs to measure it accurately and efficiently. The conventional approach to measure the resonant frequency is by performing a sweep frequency test and spectrum analysis. The method is time-consuming and inconvenient because of the requirements of many test points, a lot of data storage and off-line analyses. In this paper, we propose two novel measurement methods, the search method and track method, respectively. The former is based on the magnitude-frequency characteristics of the drive mode, utilizing a one-dimensional search technique. The latter is based on the phase-frequency characteristics, applying a feedback control loop. Their performances in precision, noise resistivity and efficiency are analyzed through detailed simulations. A test system is implemented based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and experiments are carried out. By comparing with the common approach, feasibility and superiorities of the proposed methods are validated. In particular, significant efficiency improvements are achieved whereby the conventional frequency method consumes nearly 5,000 s to finish a measurement, while only 5 s is needed for the track method and 1 s for the search method. PMID:24256977

  17. Unsteady Heat-Flux Measurements of Second-Mode Instability Waves in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kergerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat- flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet-wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was developed to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  18. Detection of Telomerase Activity Using Capacitance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bong Keun; Lee, Ri Mi; Choi, Ahmi; Jung, Hyo-Il; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2007-03-01

    Telomerase activity has been found in about 85% cancer cells, while no activity observed in normal cells, so that telomerase has been proposed as a marker for cancer detection. Here, we describe electrical detection of telomerase activity using capacitance measurements. We have investigated the length dependence of capacitance on DNA solutions and found that the capacitance of DNA solutions were dependent on the DNA length. In addition, upon adding telomerase into the solution of telomeric substrate primer, the capacitance was observed to change as a function of time due to the telomeric elongation. These results suggest that this novel nanosensor may be used for rapid detection of telomerase activity.

  19. Active Noise Control of Low Speed Fan Rotor-Stator Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hu, Ziqiang; Pla, Frederic G.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for active noise cancellation of fan tones. The control system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is cancelled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. Controller inputs are signals from a shaft encoder and a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. The key results are that the (6,0) mode was completely eliminated at 920 Hz and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 9.4 dB. Farfield 2BPF SPL reductions of 13 dB were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB modal PWL decrease. Global attenuation of PWL was obtained using an actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct.

  20. Wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as mode locker and tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenping; Chan, K. T.

    1999-07-01

    A wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium fiber ring laser was demonstrated using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as an intensity mode locker and a tunable optical filter. Very stable optical pulse trains at gigabit repetition rates were generated using harmonica mode locking. The supermode noise was suppressed to 60 dB below the signal level and the root-mean-square timing jitter (0.45 kHz-1 MHz) was found to be about 1% of the pulse duration. A continuous wavelength tuning range of 1.8 nm was achieved by changing the semiconductor laser temperature from 11.4 to 30 °C.

  1. High power modal instability measurements of very large mode area (VLMA) step index fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engin, Doruk; Lu, Wei; Verdun, Horacio; Gupta, Shantanu

    2013-05-01

    High power (<0.5kW) experiments using low NA (~0.07), very large mode area (VLMA) step index fibers (SI) (with core/clad diameters: 45/375, 60/500um) and gain tailored step index (GT-SI) fibers (with doped-core/core/clad diameters: 38/60/400, 50/80/533um) are presented. In fiber amplifier experiments with multi-moded beam (M2 1.5- 3) outputs, Stimulated Thermal Rayleigh scattering (STRS) threshold is determined by comparing gain dependence of output mode quality between high power (<200W) and low power (<100W) experiments for a given fiber layout. Beam quality degradation with signal power is characterized well above the instability threshold where a saturation of the phenomena is observed. For SI fibers degree of beam quality degradation is found to be significantly worse for tighter fiber coil diameters. GT-SI fibers exhibit significantly less modal degradation compared to SI fibers. STRS instability threshold is further verified with signal power dependent multi-path interference spectrum (MPI) measurements which exhibited exponential broadening above the threshold. Strength of STRS nonlinear coupling coefficients are estimated from experimental data using a comprehensive 3-dimensional transverse spatial hole burning (TSHB) fiber MOPA numerical model, phenomenologicaly extended to include STRS.

  2. Guided-mode-resonance-coupled plasmonic-active SiO2 nanotubes for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaobin; Hasan, Dihan; Wang, Lei; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Chen, Ray T.; Fan, D. L.; Wang, Alan X.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate by integrating plasmonic-active SiO2 nanotubes into Si3N4 gratings. First, the dielectric grating that is working under guided mode resonance (GMR) provides enhanced electric field for localized surface plasmon polaritons on the surface of metallic nanoparticles. Second, we use SiO2 nanotubes with densely assembled silver nanoparticles to provide a large amount of “hot spots” without significantly damping the GMR mode of the grating. Experimental measurement on Rhodamine-6G shows a constant enhancement factor of 8 ∼ 10 in addition to the existing SERS effect across the entire surface of the SiO2 nanotubes. PMID:22685345

  3. Ultralow noise and supermode suppression in an actively mode-locked external-cavity semiconductor diode ring laser.

    PubMed

    Depriest, C M; Yilmaz, T; Delfyett, P J; Etemad, S; Braun, A; Abeles, J

    2002-05-01

    We report what is to our knowledge the lowest phase and amplitude noise characteristics achieved to date in a 10-GHz pulse train produced by the active harmonic mode locking of an external-cavity semiconductor diode laser. Supermode noise has also been suppressed below -140 dBc/Hz by use of a high-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot etalon as an intracavity filter. Novel noise sideband measurements that extend to the Nyquist offset frequency suggest a significant advantage in using harmonic (rather than fundamental) mode locking to produce ultralow-noise pulse trains, owing to the relationship between the noise roll-off frequency and the fundamental cavity frequency. PMID:18007910

  4. Automatic computation of 2D cardiac measurements from B-mode echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, JinHyeong; Feng, Shaolei; Zhou, S. Kevin

    2012-03-01

    We propose a robust and fully automatic algorithm which computes the 2D echocardiography measurements recommended by America Society of Echocardiography. The algorithm employs knowledge-based imaging technologies which can learn the expert's knowledge from the training images and expert's annotation. Based on the models constructed from the learning stage, the algorithm searches initial location of the landmark points for the measurements by utilizing heart structure of left ventricle including mitral valve aortic valve. It employs the pseudo anatomic M-mode image generated by accumulating the line images in 2D parasternal long axis view along the time to refine the measurement landmark points. The experiment results with large volume of data show that the algorithm runs fast and is robust comparable to expert.

  5. Application of range imaging lidar for measurement of mechanical vibration and frequency mode distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua A.; Zhu, Yonghao; He, Yun

    1993-05-01

    This article reports the application of laser range imaging radar in the measurement of mechanical vibration frequency and the mode distribution, and the periodic motion of the mechanical parts such as a piston rod. The principle of the laser range imaging radar is based on the phase shift of the reflected amplitude modulated laser beam. The mechanical vibration frequency up to 20 KHZ and the minimal retrieved amplitude (or the motion displacement) of 0.5 mm have been achieved with the laser modulating frequency of 40 MHZ. With appropriate modulating frequency, this laser range system can measure the mechanical vibration amplitude, or the moving displacement, from 10-1 mm up to 102 mm, or even higher to the order of meters, which will be useful to measure the vibration and the periodic motion of machines and their parts for field test.

  6. Local mode excitation and direct unimolecular reaction rate measurements in tetramethyldioxetane

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, B.D.; Crim, F.F.

    1981-08-15

    Direct excitation of overtone vibrations combined with time-resolved detection of product chemiluminescence produces both overtone vibration excitation spectra and directly measured unimolecular decay rates of tetramethyldioxetane. The spectra show increasingly pure local mode character in higher vibrational levels and exhibit splittings which arise from nonequivalent sites occupied by methyl hydrogens. The temporal evolution of the signal reflects the unimolecular decomposition rate of the highly vibrationally excited molecule, and comparing the observed behavior to Rice--Ramsperger--Kassel--Marcus theory calculations shows that they adequately describe the decomposition if properly averaged over the thermal vibrational energy content of the molecule.

  7. LLNL Measurements of Graded-Index Multi-Mode Optical Fiber (ITF 47)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, T. T.

    2000-05-01

    The Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All Russian Research Institute of Technical Physics, located in the Nuclear City of Snezhinsk, east of the Ural mountains and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories have been investigating the possibility of establishing a commercial optical fiber manufacturing facility. These discussions began in the summer of 1998. At that time three samples (single mode and multi-mode) of optical fiber were left at the Sandia National Laboratory. Sandia measured two of the segments and sent them to LLNL. The optical loss at 1550 nm and 1300 nm were higher than commercially available fiber. The measurements were complicated because the geometry of the fibers also did not meet specification. Since the core was not adequately centered coupling of optical energy into the fiber being tested varied widely depending on which end of the fiber was used for insertion. The results of these measurements were summarized in the informal report dated June 11, 1999, which was hand carried by Dr. Paul Herman during his July 1999 visit. During the July visit a 1.2-km long section of graded-index multimode fiber, ITF 47, was given to Herman. We had requested samples longer than the earlier ones (which were (approx) 0.1 km long) in order that a cutback method could be used for the transmission measurements. The optical loss using the cutback technique and the transmission spectral measurements in the 600-1700 mn region are reported. Also physical measurements are reported of the fiber's diameter, concentricity, ellipticity and tensile strength (proof test).

  8. Stored-fluorography mode reduces radiation dose during cardiac catheterization measured with OSLD dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Tang, Kuo-Ting; Liu, Wei-Chung; Lin, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2015-12-01

    Coronary angiogram is an imperative tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases, in which cine-angiography is a commonly used method. Although the angiography proceeds under radiation, the potential risk of radiation exposure for both the patients and the operators was seldom noticed. In this study, the absorbed radiation dose in stored-fluorography mode was compared with that in cine-angiography mode by using optically simulated luminescent dosimeters to realize their effects on radiation dose. Patients received coronary angiogram via radial artery approach were randomized into the stored-fluorography group (N=30) or the cine-angiography group (N=30). The excluded criteria were: 1. women at pregnancy or on breast feeding, 2. chronic kidney diseases with glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min. During the coronary angiogram, absorbed dose of the patients and the operator radiation exposure was measured with optically simulated luminescent dosimeter (OSLD). The absorbed dose of the patients in the stored-fluorography group (3.13±0.25 mGy) was apparently lower than that in the cine-angiography group (65.57±5.37 mGy; P<0.001). For the operator, a statistical difference (P<0.001) was also found between the stored-fluorography group (0.09163 μGy) and the cine-angiography (0.6519μGy). Compared with traditional cine-angiography mode, the stored-fluorography mode can apparently reduce radiation exposure of the patients and the operator in coronary angiogram.

  9. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased. PMID:27003366

  10. Protein dynamics from structural ensembles: Diffusive and activated contributions in a linear mode description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperman, Jeremy; Guenza, Marina

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a coarse-grained linear Langevin equation for protein dynamics, which describes proteins as semiflexible objects collapsed into the free energy well representing the folded state of the protein. Fundamental to this approach is the inclusion of internal dissipation, absent in any rigid-body hydrodynamical modeling scheme. The normal mode analytical solution naturally separates into global modes describing the anisotropic tumbling of the object, and internal modes which contain both diffusive and activated glass-like contributions. We show how cooperativity in the dynamical modes is related to the energy barriers to mode diffusion. While molecular dynamic simulations generate the most accurate structural ensembles, we show how sets of NMR conformers can be used to generate the structural ensemble needed as input to the theory, making the approach truly predictive in nature. Results are in good agreement when compared with both nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation, and time correlation functions calculated from molecular dynamic simulations. This material is based upon work partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CHE-1362500.

  11. High-average-power actively-mode-locked Tm3+ fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerle, Michael; Kieleck, Christelle; Hübner, Philipp; Świderski, Jacek; Jackson, Stuart D.; Mazé, Gwenael; Eichhorn, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Fiber lasers emitting in the 2 μm wavelength range doped with thulium ions can be used as highly efficient pump sources for nonlinear converters to generate mid-infrared radiation. For spectroscopic purposes, illumination and countermeasures, a broad mid-infrared emission spectrum is advantageous. This can be reached by supercontinuum generation in fibers, e.g. fluoride fibers, which up to now has, however, only been presented with either low average power, complex Raman-shifted 1.55 μm pump sources or multi-stage amplifier pump schemes. Here we present recent results of a new actively-mode-locked single-oscillator scheme that can provide the high-repetition rate sub-ns pump pulses needed for pumping supercontinuum generators. A thulium-doped silica fiber laser is presented that provides > 11 W of average power CW-mode-locked pulses at 38 MHz repetition rate at ~ 38 ps pulse width. Upgrading the setup to allow Q-switched mode-locked operation yields mode-locked 40 MHz pulses arranged in 60 kHz bunched Q-switch envelopes and thus increases further the available peak power. In this Q-switched mode-locked regime over 5 W of average power has been achieved.

  12. Measurement of Liquid Viscosity and Density Using Single Piezoelectric Resonator with Two Vibration Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarada, Jun; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi; Yamamoto, Ken

    2012-07-01

    We report the results of an experiment on measuring the viscosities and densities of several liquids using a single piezoelectric sensor, since only the numerical results obtained by finite element analysis were reported in our previous paper. The novelty of the sensor is that the viscosity and density can be inferred simply by measuring resonance frequencies in liquid for the vibration in the tangential and normal directions with respect to the contact surface between the sensor and the liquid, while the method suggested as reference requires measurements of resonance frequency and damping of a single vibration mode. By comparing the viscosities and densities measured by the proposed and conventional methods using food oil, the densities were found to correspond to the values measured using a weight meter with an error within 1% and the viscosity was evaluated to be higher than that measured using a viscometer with an error within 10%. The results suggest the possibility of measuring liquid density and viscosity by the proposed method.

  13. 10 CFR 431.324 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... efficiency and standby mode energy consumption of metal halide lamp ballasts. 431.324 Section 431.324 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL... measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption of metal halide lamp ballasts. (a)......

  14. 10 CFR 431.324 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... efficiency and standby mode energy consumption of metal halide lamp ballasts. 431.324 Section 431.324 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL... measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption of metal halide lamp ballasts. (a)......

  15. 10 CFR 431.324 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... efficiency and standby mode energy consumption of metal halide lamp ballasts. 431.324 Section 431.324 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL... measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption of metal halide lamp ballasts. (a)......

  16. 10 CFR 431.324 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... efficiency and standby mode energy consumption of metal halide lamp ballasts. 431.324 Section 431.324 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL... measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption of metal halide lamp ballasts. (a)......

  17. The salience network causally influences default mode network activity during moral reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Stephen M.; D’Esposito, Mark; Kayser, Andrew S.; Grossman, Scott N.; Poorzand, Pardis; Seeley, William W.; Miller, Bruce L.; Rankin, Katherine P.

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale brain networks are integral to the coordination of human behaviour, and their anatomy provides insights into the clinical presentation and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease, which targets the default mode network, and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, which targets a more anterior salience network. Although the default mode network is recruited when healthy subjects deliberate about ‘personal’ moral dilemmas, patients with Alzheimer’s disease give normal responses to these dilemmas whereas patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia give abnormal responses to these dilemmas. We hypothesized that this apparent discrepancy between activation- and patient-based studies of moral reasoning might reflect a modulatory role for the salience network in regulating default mode network activation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging to characterize network activity of patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and healthy control subjects, we present four converging lines of evidence supporting a causal influence from the salience network to the default mode network during moral reasoning. First, as previously reported, the default mode network is recruited when healthy subjects deliberate about ‘personal’ moral dilemmas, but patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia producing atrophy in the salience network give abnormally utilitarian responses to these dilemmas. Second, patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia have reduced recruitment of the default mode network compared with healthy control subjects when deliberating about these dilemmas. Third, a Granger causality analysis of functional neuroimaging data from healthy control subjects demonstrates directed functional connectivity from nodes of the salience network to nodes of the default mode network during moral reasoning. Fourth, this Granger causal influence is diminished in

  18. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic walla)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco® 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m / n = 3 / 1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  19. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-15

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco{sup ®} 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m/n=3/1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  20. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  1. Development of Radar Control system for Multi-mode Active Phased Array Radar for atmospheric probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Modern multi-mode active phased array radars require highly efficient radar control system for hassle free real time radar operation. The requirement comes due to the distributed architecture of the active phased array radar, where each antenna element in the array is connected to a dedicated Transmit-Receive (TR) module. Controlling the TR modules, which are generally few hundreds in number, and functioning them in synchronisation, is a huge task during real time radar operation and should be handled with utmost care. Indian MST Radar, located at NARL, Gadanki, which is established during early 90's, as an outcome of the middle atmospheric program, is a remote sensing instrument for probing the atmosphere. This radar has a semi-active array, consisting of 1024 antenna elements, with limited beam steering, possible only along the principle planes. To overcome the limitations and difficulties, the radar is being augmented into fully active phased array, to accomplish beam agility and multi-mode operations. Each antenna element is excited with a dedicated 1 kW TR module, located in the field and enables to position the radar beam within 20° conical volume. A multi-channel receiver makes the radar to operate in various modes like Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS), Spaced Antenna (SA), Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) etc. Present work describes the real-time radar control (RC) system for the above described active phased array radar. The radar control system consists of a Spartan 6 FPGA based Timing and Control Signal Generator (TCSG), and a computer containing the software for controlling all the subsystems of the radar during real-time radar operation and also for calibrating the radar. The main function of the TCSG is to generate the control and timing waveforms required for various subsystems of the radar. Important components of the RC system software are (i) TR module configuring software which does programming, controlling and health parameter monitoring of the

  2. Development of Radar Control system for Multi-mode Active Phased Array Radar for atmospheric probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Modern multi-mode active phased array radars require highly efficient radar control system for hassle free real time radar operation. The requirement comes due to the distributed architecture of the active phased array radar, where each antenna element in the array is connected to a dedicated Transmit-Receive (TR) module. Controlling the TR modules, which are generally few hundreds in number, and functioning them in synchronisation, is a huge task during real time radar operation and should be handled with utmost care. Indian MST Radar, located at NARL, Gadanki, which is established during early 90's, as an outcome of the middle atmospheric program, is a remote sensing instrument for probing the atmosphere. This radar has a semi-active array, consisting of 1024 antenna elements, with limited beam steering, possible only along the principle planes. To overcome the limitations and difficulties, the radar is being augmented into fully active phased array, to accomplish beam agility and multi-mode operations. Each antenna element is excited with a dedicated 1 kW TR module, located in the field and enables to position the radar beam within 20° conical volume. A multi-channel receiver makes the radar to operate in various modes like Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS), Spaced Antenna (SA), Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) etc. Present work describes the real-time radar control (RC) system for the above described active phased array radar. The radar control system consists of a Spartan 6 FPGA based Timing and Control Signal Generator (TCSG), and a computer containing the software for controlling all the subsystems of the radar during real-time radar operation and also for calibrating the radar. The main function of the TCSG is to generate the control and timing waveforms required for various subsystems of the radar. Important components of the RC system software are (i) TR module configuring software which does programming, controlling and health parameter monitoring of the

  3. Measurement of mixed-mode stress intensity factors using digital image correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; He, Lingfeng

    2012-07-01

    Applications of the digital image correlation method (DIC) for the determination of the mixed-mode stress intensity factors (SIF) is investigated in this paper. Experiments were performed on an edge fatigue cracked aluminum specimen using a special loading device, which is an appropriate apparatus for experimental mixed-mode fracture analysis. The full-field displacements around the crack-tip region of the test sample were calculated using DIC. And then the SIF associated with unavoidable rigid-body displacement motion were calculated simultaneously from the experimental data. The effect of the rigid body motion on the measured displacements was then eliminated using the computed rigid body translation and rotation. A coarse-fine searching method was developed to determine the crack-tip location. For validation, the SIF thus determined is compared with theoretical results, confirming the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed technique. Therefore it reveals that the DIC is a practical and effective tool for full-field deformation and SIF measurement.

  4. Measurement of distributed strain and temperature based on higher order and higher mode Bragg conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirkis, James S. (Inventor); Sivanesan, Ponniah (Inventor); Venkat, Venki S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A Bragg grating sensor for measuring distributed strain and temperature at the same time comprises an optical fiber having a single mode operating wavelength region and below a cutoff wavelength of the fiber having a multimode operating wavelength region. A saturated, higher order Bragg grating having first and second order Bragg conditions is fabricated in the optical fiber. The first order of Bragg resonance wavelength of the Bragg grating is within the single mode operating wavelength region of the optical fiber and the second order of Bragg resonance wavelength is below the cutoff wavelength of the fiber within the multimode operating wavelength region. The reflectivities of the saturated Bragg grating at the first and second order Bragg conditions are less than two orders of magnitude of one another. In use, the first and second order Bragg conditions are simultaneously created in the sensor at the respective wavelengths and a signal from the sensor is demodulated with respect to each of the wavelengths corresponding to the first and second order Bragg conditions. Two Bragg conditions have different responsivities to strain and temperature, thus allowing two equations for axial strain and temperature to be found in terms of the measure shifts in the primary and second order Bragg wavelengths. This system of equations can be solved for strain and temperature.

  5. Dual-Mode Measurement and Theoretical Analysis of Evaporation Kinetics of Binary Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hanyu; He, Chi-Ruei; Basdeo, Carl; Li, Ji-Qin; Ye, Dezhuang; Kalonia, Devendra; Li, Si-Yu; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    Theoretical and experimental investigations are presented for the precision measurement of evaporation kinetics of binary mixtures using a quartz crystal resonator. A thin layer of light alcohol mixture including a volatile (methanol) and a much less volatile (1-butanol) components is deployed on top of the resonator. The normal or acoustic mode is to detect the moving liquid-vapor interface due to evaporation with a great spatial precision on the order of microns, and simultaneously the shear mode is used for in-situ detection of point viscosity or concentration of the mixture near the resonator. A one-dimensional theoretical model is developed to describe the underlying mass transfer and interfacial transport phenomena. Along with the modeling results, the transient evaporation kinetics, moving interface, and the stratification of viscosity of the liquid mixture during evaporation are simultaneously measured by the impedance response of the shear and longitudinal waves emitted from the resonator. The system can be used to characterize complicated evaporation kinetics involving multi-component fuels. American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, NSF CMMI-0952646.

  6. Comparison of Tone Mode Measurements for a Forward Swept and Baseline Rotor Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    2003-01-01

    A forward swept fan, designated the Quite High Speed Fan (QHSF), was tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate its noise reduction relative to a baseline fan of the same aerodynamic performance. The design objective of the QHSF was a 6 dB reduction in Effective Perceived Noise Level relative to the baseline fan at the takeoff condition. The design noise reduction was to be a result of lower levels of multiple pure tone noise due to the forward swept rotor, and lower rotor/stator interaction tone noise from a leaned stator. Although the design 6 dB reduction was observed in far-field measurements, the induct mode measurements revealed the reasons for goals. All of the noise reduction was from the blade passing tone and its harmonics and most of this was unexpectedly from rotor/strut interaction modes. The reason for large differences in rotor/strut noise sources could not be determined with certainty. The reductions in the multiple pure tone noise for the forward swept rotor were not observed. this reduction were not the ones related to the design

  7. Measurement of Electron Thermal Transport Induced by ETG Modes in the Transition from the Slab to the Toroidal Branch of Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Vladimir; Balbaky, Abed; Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-10-01

    Transition from the slab to the toroidal branch of the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode has been successfully achieved in a basic experiment in Columbia Linear Machine CLM. The measurement of the radial electron thermal conductivity shows its increase with transition from slab to the toroidal ETG mode. A miniature triple probe was used for these measurements and the value of thermal χ⊥e conductivity is found to be about 2 - 12 m2/s. The corresponding gyrobohm diffusion coefficient χ⊥e , GB ~ 2 - 4 m2/s. A similar result of the transport measurement was obtained by using a novel diagnostic system. This research was supported by the Department of Electrical Engineering of Columbia University.

  8. Measuring Active Learning to Predict Course Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John E.; Ku, Heng-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether active learning within computer-based training courses can be measured and whether it serves as a predictor of learner-perceived course quality. A major corporation participated in this research, providing access to internal employee training courses, training representatives, and historical course evaluation data.…

  9. Methods and Technologies of XML Data Modeling for IP Mode Intelligent Measuring & Controlling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. X.; Hong, X. B.; Liu, J. G.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the IP mode intelligent measuring & controlling system (IMIMCS). Based on object-oriented modeling technology of UML and XML Schema, the innovative methods and technologies of some key problems for XML data modeling in the IMIMCS were especially discussed, including refinement for systemic business by means of use-case diagram of UML, the confirmation of the content of XML data model and logic relationship of the objects of XML Schema with the aid of class diagram of UML, the mapping rules from the UML object model to XML Schema. Finally, the application of the IMIMCS based on XML for a modern greenhouse was presented. The results show that the modeling methods of the measuring & controlling data in the IMIMCS involving the multi-layer structure and many operating systems process strong reliability and flexibility, guarantee uniformity of complex XML documents and meet the requirement of data communication across platform.

  10. Preferred modes in jets: comparison between different measures of the receptivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnaud, Xavier; Lesshafft, Lutz; Schmid, Peter J.; Huerre, Patrick

    2012-11-01

    The response of jets to frequency forcing is usually measured experimentally in terms of the maximum amplitude of velocity fluctuations reached along the axis (Crow & Champagne (1971)). In the present work, the preferred mode of isothermal jets is discussed in terms of the linear flow response to time-harmonic forcing (Trefethen et al. (1993)). The optimal frequency response is computed for different choices of the objective functional: the usual energy (L2) norm and the maximum amplitude over the entire domain (L∞ norm). The relevance and limitations of the different objective functionals are critically analyzed. Although the dominant flow structures are robustly identified in all cases, the measure of the flow response in terms of the maximum amplitude does not suffer from the continually slow axial growth of low frequency perturbations. The financial support of the EADS Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Dual-Pump CARS Measurements in the University of Virginia's Dual-Mode Scramjet: Configuration "A"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Gallo, Emanuela; Danehy, Paul M.; Rockwell, Robert; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe efforts to obtain canonical data sets to assist computational modelers in their development of models for the prediction of mixing and combustion in scramjet combustors operating in the ramjet-scramjet transition regime. The CARS technique is employed to acquire temporally and spatially resolved measurements of temperature and species mole-fraction at four planes, one upstream of an H2 fuel injector and three downstream. The technique is described and results are presented for cases with and without chemical reaction. The vibrational energy mode in the heated airstream of the combustor was observed to be frozen at near facility heater conditions and significant nonuniformities in temperature were observed, attributed to nonuniformities of temperature exiting the heater. The measurements downstream of fuel injection show development of mixing and combustion, and are already proving useful to the modelers.

  12. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  13. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  14. Combining metal and nonmetal isotopic measurements in barite to identify mode of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, E. M.; Paytan, A.; Eisenhauer, A.; Scher, H. D.; Wortmann, U.

    2014-12-01

    Barite (BaSO4) is a highly stable and widely-distributed mineral found in magmatic, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks (of all ages), as well as in soils, aerosol dust, and extraterrestrial material. Today, barite can form in a variety of settings in the oceans (hydrothermal, cold seeps, water column, sediments) and on the continents - where supersaturation and precipitation of barite typically occurs from the mixing of fluids - one containing Ba and another containing sulfate. Sulfur (δ34S) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes together with 87Sr/86Sr and stable Sr-isotopic signatures (δ88/86Sr) of modern authigenic continental barite are compared to modern pelagic marine barite and marine hydrothermal and cold seep barite to investigate the potential for their combined use to indicate mode of barite formation. The 87Sr/86Sr in barite cleary identifies the source of fluid for any particular type of barite (as previously noted, see Paytan et al., 2002). The highest (most radiogenic) 87Sr/86Sr values are measured in continental barite samples. There is no unique δ88/86Sr signature for any particular type of barite, but coretop marine (pelagic) barite has a consistent value measured from samples collected in different ocean basins. The highest and lowest δ88/86Sr values were measured in continental barite samples. The combination of isotopic systems result in unique δ88/86Sr and δ18O relationships and distinct δ88/86Sr and δ34S relationships for different types of barites investigated. Data suggest that the combined use of these metal and nonmetal isotopic measurements in barite could be useful as a new geochemical proxy to identify mode of barite mineralization for use in earth science applications including understanding ancient barite deposits.

  15. Measurements of thermospheric response to auroral activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okano, S.; Kim, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    The Joule heating produced by auroral electrojets and its thermospheric response can be studied by monitoring the thermospheric temperatures by optical methods; simultaneously, the concurrent auroral electrojet activities can be investigated by using geomagnetic records obtained from stations along a meridian close to the observation site of optical measurements. The measurements are reported of thermospheric response to auroral activities which were made at Albany (42.68 deg N, 73.82 deg W), New York on September 2, 1978 (UT) when an isolated substorm occured. The thermospheric temperatures were measured by using a high resolution Fabry-Perot interferometer that determines the line profiles of the (OI) 6300A line emission. The intensities and latitudinal positions of auroral electrojets were obtained by the analysis of magnetograms from the IMS Fort Churchill meridian chain stations.

  16. Fifty-ps Raman fiber laser with hybrid active-passive mode locking.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A G; Kharenko, D S; Podivilov, E V; Babin, S A

    2016-07-25

    Actively mode locked Raman lasing in a ring PM-fiber cavity pumped by a linearly polarized Yb-doped fiber laser is studied. At co-propagating pumping, a stochastic pulse with duration defined by the AOM switching time (~15 ns) is generated with the round-trip period. At counter-propagating pumping, one or several sub-ns pulses (within the AOM switching envelope) are formed. It has been found that the formation of such stable multi-pulse structure is defined by the single-pulse energy limit (~20 nJ) set by the second-order Raman generation. Adding a NPE-based saturable absorber in the actively mode locked cavity, results in sufficient shortening of the generated pulses both in single- and multi-pulse regimes (down to 50 ps). A model is developed adequately describing the regimes. PMID:27464081

  17. Default-Mode Network Activity Identified by Group Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Conghui; Zhuang, Jie; Peng, Danling; Yu, Guoliang; Yang, Yanhui

    Default-mode network activity refers to some regional increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal during baseline than cognitive tasks. Recent functional imaging studies have found co-activation in a distributed network of cortical regions, including ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PPC) that characterize the default mode of human brain. In this study, general linear model and group independent component analysis (ICA) were utilized to analyze the fMRI data obtained from two language tasks. Both methods yielded similar, but not identical results and detected a resting deactivation network at some midline regions including anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Particularly, the group ICA method segregated functional elements into two separate maps and identified ventral cingulate component and fronto-parietal component. These results suggest that these two components might be linked to different mental function during "resting" baseline.

  18. Ultrafast superconducting single-photon detector with a reduced active area coupled to a tapered lensed single-mode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, Maria V.; Divochiy, Alexander V.; Vakhtomin, Yury B.; Smirnov, Konstantin V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrafast niobium nitride (NbN) superconducting single-photon detector (SSPD) with an active area of 3×3 μm2 that offers better timing performance metrics than the previous SSPD with an active area of 7×7 μm2. The improved SSPD demonstrates a record timing jitter (<25 ps), an ultrashort recovery time (<2 ns), an extremely low dark count rate, and a high detection efficiency in a wide spectral range from visible part to near infrared. The record parameters were obtained due to the development of a new technique providing effective optical coupling between a detector with a reduced active area and a standard single-mode telecommunication fiber. The advantages of the new approach are experimentally confirmed by taking electro-optical measurements.

  19. Measurement of Bulk Velocity and Attenuation in Fluids and Particle Suspensions Using the Quasi-Scholte Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, F. B.; Cawley, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2006-03-01

    An alternative method to conventional ultrasonic test cells for fluid bulk property measurements is presented in this paper. An interface wave, called the quasi-Scholte (QS) mode, is used to extract the necessary information. The sensitivity of the quasi-Scholte (QS) mode to the liquid parameters is demonstrated. Experimental measurements of small changes in velocity due to temperature changes and measurements of silica-suspension properties have been successfully carried out using this method. Rapid fluid property measurements in harsh environments are possible. The transducer is separated from the measurement area by the "dipstick", which is inexpensive and portable.

  20. Online image acquisition system for wheel set measurement based on asynchronous reset mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kaihua; Guo, Yu; Chen, Yixin

    2011-11-01

    The wearing degree of the wheel set is one of the main factors that influence the safety and stability of running train. Measurement of wheel set wear has significant importance to railway safety. An automatic measurement method for geometrical parameters of wheel set based on optoelectronic technique was proposed. In the method, linear structured laser light was projected on the wheel tread surface. The geometrical parameters can be deduced from the profile image. An online image acquisition system was designed based on asynchronous reset of CCD. The entire time sequence of asynchronous reset was designed. The image was acquired only when wheel moved into the designed position. Image acquisition was fulfilled by hardware interrupt mode. Quantitative relation between position accuracy and speed, timedelay error, CCD resolution and imaging region was deuced. Relation between moving blur and speed, exposure time was also decided. The measuring system was installed along the straight railway section. When the wheel set was running in a limited speed, the devices placed alone railway line can measure the geometrical parameters automatically. Position accuracy achieved 1.1mm when moving speed reached 2km/h and moving blur was limited in less than one pixel size while exposure time set to be 1/5550s. The image definition can meet the demand of real and online measurement.

  1. The spatial distribution of p-mode absorption in active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of solar p-mode waves and active regions has been the subject of recent observational and theoretical investigations. Observations show that up to one-half of the power of incident high-degree acoustic may be absorbed in and around sunspots. In this paper the horizontal spatial distribution of high-degree p-mode absorption in solar active regions is explored. An appropriate Fourier-Hankel transform can be used to detect the mean absorption of waves passing through any given point on the solar surface. By repeating the analysis at multiple positions a map of the absorption can be constructed. A technique for optimal computation of absorption maps is developed and applied to observations of several active regions and an area of quiet sun near disk center. By comparing the distribution of p-mode absorption with magnetograms and line-wing intensity images, it is directly observed that the absorption is not limited to the location of the visible sunspots but is also associated with magnetic fields in the surrounding plage. It is estimated that the absorption efficiency scales roughly with the magnetic flux density, although the absorption appears to saturate inside the strongest fields.

  2. Prestimulus default mode activity influences depth of processing and recognition in an emotional memory task.

    PubMed

    Soravia, Leila M; Witmer, Joëlle S; Schwab, Simon; Nakataki, Masahito; Dierks, Thomas; Wiest, Roland; Henke, Katharina; Federspiel, Andrea; Jann, Kay

    2016-03-01

    Low self-referential thoughts are associated with better concentration, which leads to deeper encoding and increases learning and subsequent retrieval. There is evidence that being engaged in externally rather than internally focused tasks is related to low neural activity in the default mode network (DMN) promoting open mind and the deep elaboration of new information. Thus, reduced DMN activity should lead to enhanced concentration, comprehensive stimulus evaluation including emotional categorization, deeper stimulus processing, and better long-term retention over one whole week. In this fMRI study, we investigated brain activation preceding and during incidental encoding of emotional pictures and on subsequent recognition performance. During fMRI, 24 subjects were exposed to 80 pictures of different emotional valence and subsequently asked to complete an online recognition task one week later. Results indicate that neural activity within the medial temporal lobes during encoding predicts subsequent memory performance. Moreover, a low activity of the default mode network preceding incidental encoding leads to slightly better recognition performance independent of the emotional perception of a picture. The findings indicate that the suppression of internally-oriented thoughts leads to a more comprehensive and thorough evaluation of a stimulus and its emotional valence. Reduced activation of the DMN prior to stimulus onset is associated with deeper encoding and enhanced consolidation and retrieval performance even one week later. Even small prestimulus lapses of attention influence consolidation and subsequent recognition performance. PMID:26663662

  3. Activity measurements of radon from construction materials.

    PubMed

    Fior, L; Nicolosi Corrêa, J; Paschuk, S A; Denyak, V V; Schelin, H R; Soreanu Pecequilo, B R; Kappke, J

    2012-07-01

    This work presents the results of radon concentration measurements of construction materials used in the Brazilian industry, such as clay (red) bricks and concrete blocks. The measurements focused on the detection of indoor radon activity during different construction stages and the analysis of radionuclides present in the construction materials. For this purpose, sealed chambers with internal dimensions of approximately 60×60×60 cm3 were built within a protected and isolated laboratory environment, and stable air humidity and temperature levels were maintained. These chambers were also used for radon emanation reduction tests. The chambers were built in four major stages: (1) assembly of the walls using clay (red) bricks, concrete blocks, and mortar; (2) installation of plaster; (3) finishing of wall surface using lime; and (4) insulation of wall surface and finishing using paint. Radon measurements were performed using polycarbonate etched track detectors. By comparing the three layers applied to the masonry walls, it was concluded that only the last step (wall painting using acrylic varnish) reduced the radon emanation, by a factor of approximately 2. Samples of the construction materials (clay bricks and concrete blocks) were ground, homogenized, and subjected to gamma-ray spectrometry analysis to evaluate the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K. The values for the index of the activity concentration (I), radium equivalent activity (Raeq), and external hazard index (Hext) showed that these construction materials could be used without restrictions or concern about the equivalent dose limit (1 mSv/year). PMID:22280793

  4. Differential activation of the default mode network in jet lagged individuals.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Joana Fernandes; Gonçalves, Oscar Filipe; Maia, Liliana; Fernandes Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Perrone-McGovern, Kristin; Simon-Dack, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kristina; Oliveira-Silva, Patricia; Mesquita, Ana Raquel; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-02-01

    Long-term exposure to transmeridian flights has been shown to impact cognitive functioning. Nevertheless, the immediate effects of jet lag in the activation of specific brain networks have not been investigated. We analyzed the impact of short-term jet lag on the activation of the default mode network (DMN). A group of individuals who were on a transmeridian flight and a control group went through a functional magnetic resonance imaging acquisition. Statistical analysis was performed to test for differences in the DMN activation between groups. Participants from the jet lag group presented decreased activation in the anterior nodes of the DMN, specifically in bilateral medial prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex. No areas of increased activation were observed for the jet lag group. These results may be suggestive of a negative impact of jet lag on important cognitive functions such as introspection, emotional regulation and decision making in a few days after individuals arrive at their destination. PMID:25180985

  5. Characterization of wavelength-swept active mode locking fiber laser based on reflective semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Lee, Ju Han; Yung Jeong, Myung; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2011-07-01

    The static and dynamic characteristics of a wavelength-swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser are presented in both the time-region and wavelength-region. This paper shows experimentally that the linewidth of a laser spectrum and the bandwidth of the sweeping wavelength are dependent directly on the length and dispersion of the fiber cavity as well as the modulation frequency and sweeping rate under the mode-locking condition. To achieve a narrower linewidth, a longer length and higher dispersion of the fiber cavity as well as a higher order mode locking condition are required simultaneously. For a broader bandwidth, a lower order of the mode locking condition is required using a lower modulation frequency. The dynamic sweeping performance is also analyzed experimentally to determine its applicability to optical coherence tomography imaging. It is shown that the maximum sweeping rate can be improved by the increased free spectral range from the shorter length of the fiber cavity. A reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) was used to enhance the modulation and dispersion efficiency. Overall a triangular electrical signal can be used instead of the sinusoidal signal to sweep the lasing wavelength at a high sweeping rate due to the lack of mechanical restrictions in the wavelength sweeping mechanism.

  6. Effect of linewidth enhancement factor in actively mode-locked ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Nagano, Shigenori

    2014-03-01

    Fundamental performance of the swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system is defined by its wavelength-swept laser. Especially narrower instantaneous spectral linewidth of the laser has the advantage in deeprange tomography. We have demonstrated narrow-linewidth actively mode-locked ring lasers (AMLL), employing anomalous dispersion configuration. The linewidth of an AMLL is determined by anomalous dispersion and self-phase modulation (SPM) in the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). For such soliton-like phenomenon of AMLLs, numerical calculation predicts that both of large dispersion and small SPM make the linewidth narrower. Since the dispersion restricts wavelength sweeping range of AMLLs, too large dispersion cannot be used. To weaken the SPM effect, low linewidth enhancement factor α of SOA is desirable. Quantum-dot(QD)-based SOA offers low α-factor in comparison with quantum-well SOA (QWSOA). In this study, we employ a QDSOA as a gain medium in an AMLL and also use a QWSOA for comparison. The wavelength band of the QWSOA-AMLL is 1.5 μm and that of QDSOA-AMLL is 1.0 μm. Since we employed the 10 ps/nm of net dispersion in both configurations, the dispersion parameter β2 for the QDSOA-AMLL is approximately half of that for the QWSOA-AMLL. The measured full-width half-maximum (FWHM) linewidths in a static state were 0.08 nm for the QWSOA-AMLL and 0.04nm for the QDSOA-AMLL. In spite of the small β2 the QDSOA-AMLL achieves narrower spectral than the QWSOA-AMLL. We also confirmed that the interference signal was improved by adopting the QDSOA.

  7. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2010-01-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual’s segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial–ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces. PMID:21643546

  8. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, David W. S.; Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2011-06-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual's segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial-ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces.

  9. Measuring Stellar Oscillations Using Spitzer: P-Modes in the Hyades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzasi, Derek; Preston, Heather

    2005-06-01

    Observations of oscillations in solar-like stars are limited by the fact that the level of variability involved is typically very small (approximately 4-5 parts per million at optical wavelengths). While heroic efforts have made it possible to detect oscillations in a few solar-like stars from the ground, the most astrophysically interesting targets -- those in nearby open clusters -- are unreachable and likely to remain so for many years. Solar observations have shown that the amplitude of oscillations seen in the 4.7-micron CO lines is nearly two orders of magnitude higher than that seen at optical wavelengths. For solar-like stars, such lines dominate the spectrum in IRAC Band 2. In fact, we estimate that the amplitude of p-mode oscillations in that band will be approximately 200 parts per million. This is 40 times the level in the optical, and easily accessible using Spizer. We propose a long time series of observations of the star VB 64, in the Hyades. We anticipate being able to detect a number of distinct oscillation modes, and thus to determine the large separation. In combination with other, previously measured, physical parameters of VB 64, we expect to be able to determine values for mass, age, and chemical composition which are at least an order of magnitude more precise that has been previously possible for any star in the Hyades.

  10. A Comparison of Measured Tone Modes for Two Low Noise Propulsion Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Elliott, David M.

    2000-01-01

    The acoustic modes for two low tip speed propulsion fans were measured to examine the effects of fan tip speed, at constant pressure ratio. A continuously rotating microphone method was used that provided the complete modal structure (circumferential and radial order) at the fundamental and second harmonic of the blade passing tone as well as most of the third harmonic modes. The fans are compared in terms of their rotor/stator interaction modal power, and total tone power. It was hoped that the lower tip speed might produce less noise. This was not the case. The higher tip speed fan, at both takeoff and cutback speeds, had lower tone and interaction levels. This could be an indication that the higher aerodynamic loading required to produce the same pressure ratio for the lower tip speed fan resulted in a greater velocity deficit in the blade wakes and thus more noise. Results consistent with expected rotor transmission effects were noted in the inlet modal structures of both fans.

  11. Guided-mode-resonance-enhanced measurement of thin-film absorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifei; Huang, Yin; Sun, Jingxuan; Pandey, Santosh; Lu, Meng

    2015-11-01

    We present a numerical and experimental study of a guided-mode-resonance (GMR) device for detecting surface-bound light-absorbing thin films. The GMR device functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength strongly absorbed by the thin film. The GMR mode produces an evanescent field that results in enhanced optical absorption by the thin film. For a 100-nm-thick lossy thin film, the GMR device enhances its absorption coefficients over 26 × compared to a conventional glass substrate. Simulations show the clear quenching effect of the GMR when the extinction coefficient is greater than 0.01. At the resonant wavelength, the reflectance of the GMR surface correlates well with the degree of optical absorption. GMR devices are fabricated on a glass substrate using a surface-relief grating and a titanium-dioxide coating. To analyze a visible absorbing dye, the reflection coefficient of dye-coated GMR devices was measured. The GMR-based method was also applied to detecting acid gases, such as hydrochloric vapor, by monitoring the change in absorption in a thin film composed of a pH indicator, bromocresol green. This technique potentially allows absorption analysis in the visible and infrared ranges using inexpensive equipment. PMID:26561126

  12. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  13. Measurements of polarization mode dispersion on aerial optical cables: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, Justino; Horche, Paloma R.

    2013-10-01

    Higher bit-rate transmission is attractive for improving network resource efficiency and reducing the complexity of network management in future transmission systems. However, chromatic dispersion and Polarization Mode Dispersion (PMD) are one of the most serious impairments. In particular, PMD changes rapidly according to environmental variations such as temperature change and mechanical vibration. This study presents PMD measurements in a mixed aerial and buried optical longhaul network. PMD was measured as a part of a thorough analysis, in order to assess the possibility of deploying, in this actual route, a DWDM network based on 10 Gb/s and 40 Gb/s carriers long haul network based on DWDM technology PMD was measured as a part of the previous analysis, in order to assess the possibility of deploying routes based on 10 Gb/s carriers and on 40 Gb/s carriers. Changes of PMD were mainly introduced by external factors (such as temperature), but also by changes in the wind speed that significantly contributed to changes in Differential Group Delay (DGD), causing side-effects such as bending, transverse pressure or twists on the fiber hauls. In this study we will focus on the effects over PMD caused by the wind speed and its relevant impact on the aerial hauls, where the influence is significant. A quantitative comparison between data obtained from real measurements and data obtained from analytical approaches will be established.

  14. Velocity Measurement in a Dual-Mode Supersonic Combustor using Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyne, C. P.; McDaniel, J. C.; Krauss, R. H.; Day, S. W.; Reubush, D. E. (Technical Monitor); McClinton, C. R. (Technical Monitor); Reubush, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Temporally and spatially-resolved, two-component measurements of velocity in a supersonic hydrogen-air combustor are reported. The combustor had a single unswept ramp fuel injector and operated with an inlet Mach number of 2 and a flow total temperature approaching 1200 K. The experiment simulated the mixing and combustion processes of a dual-mode scramjet operating at a flight Mach number near 5. The velocity measurements were obtained by seeding the fuel with alumina particles and performing Particle Image Velocimetry on the mixing and combustion wake of the ramp injector. To assess the effects of combustion on the fuel air-mixing process, the distribution of time-averaged velocity and relative turbulence intensity was determined for the cases of fuel-air mixing and fuel-air reacting. Relative to the mixing case, the near field core velocity of the reacting fuel jet had a slower streamwise decay. In the far field, downstream of 4 to 6 ramp heights from the ramp base, the heat release of combustion resulted in decreased flow velocity and increased turbulence levels. The reacting measurements were also compared with a computational fluid dynamics solution of the flow field. Numerically predicted velocity magnitudes were higher than that measured and the jet penetration was lower.

  15. Multiple-Component Crystal Fabric Measurements from Acoustically-Generated Normal Modes in Borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluskiewicz, D. J.; Waddington, E. D.; McCarthy, M.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Voigt, D.; Matsuoka, K.

    2014-12-01

    Sound wave velocities in ice are a proxy of crystal orientation fabric. Because p- and s-waves respectively travel faster and slower in the direction of an ice crystal c-axis, the velocities of these waves in a fabric are related to the clustering of ice crystal c-axes in the direction of wave propagation. Previous sonic logs at Dome C, NGRIP, WAIS, and NEEM have inferred a single component fabric description from the velocities of vertically-propagating p-waves around each ice core borehole. These records supplement thin-section measurements of crystal fabric by sampling larger numbers of crystals in a depth-continuous log. Observations of azimuthally anisotropic vertical-girdle fabrics at ice-core sites such as WAIS, NGRIP, and EDML underly a benefit for logging methods that are sensitive to such fabrics. We present a theoretical framework for using borehole flexural modes to measure azimuthal crystal-fabric anisotropy, and describe ongoing efforts to develop a sonic logging tool for this purpose. We also present data from p-wave logs and thin section measurements at the WAIS Divide, and describe how a flexural wave log could supplement the existing measurements.

  16. Measurement of the $WW+WZ$ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, Martina

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode is presented. The measurement is carried out with 4.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector in √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The main experimental challenge is identifying the signal in the overwhelming background from W+jets production. The modeling of the W+jets background is carefully studied and a matrix element technique is used to build a discriminant to separate signal and background. The cross section of WW + WZ production is measured to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → WW + WZ) = 16.5-3.0+3.3 pb, in agreement with the next-to-leading order theoretical prediction of 15.1 ± 0.9 pb. The significance of the signal is evaluated to be 5.4σ. This measurement is an important milestone in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron.

  17. Enhanced method to reconstruct mode shapes of continuous scanning measurements using the Hilbert Huang transform and the modal analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jongsuh; Hussain, Syed Hassaan; Wang, Semyung Park, Kyihwan

    2014-09-15

    Generally, it is time consuming to experimentally identify the operating deflection shape or mode shape of a structure. To overcome this problem, the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) technique has been recently proposed. This technique is used to extract the mode shape from measurements that continuously measure the vibration of a region of interest within a structure using a non-contact laser sensor. In previous research regarding the HHT, two technical processes were needed to obtain the mode shape for each mode. The purpose of this study is to improve and complement our previous research, and for this purpose, a modal analysis approach is adapted without using the two technical processes to obtain an accurate un-damped impulse response of each mode for continuous scanning measurements. In addition, frequency response functions for each type of beam are derived, making it possible to make continuously scanned measurements along a straight profile. In this paper, the technical limitations and drawbacks of the damping compensation technique used in previous research are identified. In addition, the separation of resonant frequency (the Doppler effect) that occurs in continuous scanning measurements and the separation of damping phenomenon are also observed. The proposed method is quantitatively verified by comparing it with the results obtained from a conventional approach to estimate the mode shape with an impulse response.

  18. Enhanced method to reconstruct mode shapes of continuous scanning measurements using the Hilbert Huang transform and the modal analysis method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongsuh; Hussain, Syed Hassaan; Wang, Semyung; Park, Kyihwan

    2014-09-01

    Generally, it is time consuming to experimentally identify the operating deflection shape or mode shape of a structure. To overcome this problem, the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) technique has been recently proposed. This technique is used to extract the mode shape from measurements that continuously measure the vibration of a region of interest within a structure using a non-contact laser sensor. In previous research regarding the HHT, two technical processes were needed to obtain the mode shape for each mode. The purpose of this study is to improve and complement our previous research, and for this purpose, a modal analysis approach is adapted without using the two technical processes to obtain an accurate un-damped impulse response of each mode for continuous scanning measurements. In addition, frequency response functions for each type of beam are derived, making it possible to make continuously scanned measurements along a straight profile. In this paper, the technical limitations and drawbacks of the damping compensation technique used in previous research are identified. In addition, the separation of resonant frequency (the Doppler effect) that occurs in continuous scanning measurements and the separation of damping phenomenon are also observed. The proposed method is quantitatively verified by comparing it with the results obtained from a conventional approach to estimate the mode shape with an impulse response. PMID:25273766

  19. Partial pressure measurements with an active spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, N.H.; Jensen, T.H.; Colchin, R.J.; Maingi, R.; Wade, M.R.; Finkenthal, D.F.; Naumenko, N.; Tugarinov, S.

    1998-07-01

    Partial pressure neutral ga measurements have been made using a commercial Penning gauge in conjunction with an active spectrometer. In prior work utilizing bandpass filters and conventional spectrometers, trace concentrations of the hydrogen isotopes H, D, T and of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar were determined from characteristic spectral lines in the light emitted by the neutral species of these elements. For all the elements mentioned, the sensitivity was limited by spectral contamination from a pervasive background of molecular hydrogen radiation. The active spectrometer overcomes this limitations by means of a digital lock-in method and correlation with reference spectra. Preliminary measurements of an admixture containing a trace amount of neon in deuterium show better than a factor of 20 improvement in sensitivity over conventional techniques. This can be further improved by correlating the relative intensities of multiple lines to sets of reference spectra.

  20. Playing in parallel: the effects of multiplayer modes in active video game on motivation and physical exertion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Crouse, Julia

    2013-06-01

    Although multiplayer modes are common among contemporary video games, the bulk of game research focuses on the single-player mode. To fill the gap in the literature, the current study investigated the effects of different multiplayer modes on enjoyment, future play motivation, and the actual physical activity intensity in an active video game. One hundred sixty-two participants participated in a one-factor between-subject laboratory experiment with three conditions: (a) single player: play against self pretest score; (b) cooperation with another player in the same physical space; (c) parallel competition with another player in separated physical spaces. We found that parallel competition in separate physical spaces was the optimal mode, since it resulted in both high enjoyment and future play motivation and high physical intensity. Implications for future research on multiplayer mode and play space as well as active video game-based physical activity interventions are discussed. PMID:23509986

  1. Time-Distance Helioseismology with f Modes as a Method for Measurement of Near-Surface Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Gizon, Laurent

    1999-01-01

    Travel times measured for the f mode have been used to study flows near the solar surface in conjunction with simultaneous measurements of the magnetic field. Previous flow measurements of doppler surface rotation, small magnetic feature rotation, supergranular pattern rotation, and surface meridional circulation have been confirmed. In addition, the flow in supergranules due to Coriolis forces has been measured. The spatial and temporal power spectra for a six-day observing sequence has been measured.

  2. Dual mode antibacterial activity of ion substituted calcium phosphate nanocarriers for bone infections.

    PubMed

    Sampath Kumar, T S; Madhumathi, K; Rubaiya, Y; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25-0.75, and 2.5-7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40-50 nm and width 5-6 nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5 days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21 days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent drug

  3. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  4. Tests of a Two-Photon Technique for Measuring Polarization Mode Dispersion With Subfemtosecond Precision

    PubMed Central

    Dauler, Eric; Jaeger, Gregg; Muller, Antoine; Migdall, A.; Sergienko, A.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation is made of a recently introduced quantum interferometric method capable of measuring polarization mode dispersion (PMD) on sub-femtosecond scales, without the usual interferometric stability problems associated with such small time scales. The technique makes use of the extreme temporal correlation of orthogonally polarized pairs of photons produced via type-II phase-matched spontaneous parametric down-conversion. When sent into a simple polarization interferometer these photon pairs produce a sharp interference feature seen in the coincidence rate. The PMD of a given sample is determined from the shift of that interference feature as the sample is inserted into the system. The stability and resolution of this technique is shown to be below 0.2 fs. We explore how this precision is improved by reducing the length of the down-conversion crystal and increasing the spectral band pass of the system.

  5. Turbulent Statistics from Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  6. Turbulent Statistics From Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  7. ECCD-induced tearing mode stabilization via active control in coupled NIMROD/GENRAY HPC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Kruger, S. E.; Held, E. D.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-10-01

    Actively controlled electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) applied within magnetic islands formed by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) has been shown to control or suppress these modes. In conjunction with ongoing experimental efforts, the development and verification of integrated numerical models of this mode stabilization process is of paramount importance in determining optimal NTM stabilization strategies for ITER. In the advanced model developed by the SWIM Project, the equations/closures of extended (not reduced) MHD contain new terms arising from 3D (not toroidal or bounce-averaged) RF-induced quasilinear diffusion. The quasilinear operator formulation models the equilibration of driven current within the island using the same extended MHD dynamics which govern the physics of island formation, yielding a more accurate and self-consistent picture of 3D island response to RF drive. Results of computations which model ECRF deposition using ray tracing, assemble the 3D quasilinear operator from ray/profile data, and calculate the resultant forces within the extended MHD code will be presented. We also discuss the efficacy of various numerical active feedback control systems, which gather data from synthetic diagnostics to dynamically trigger and spatially align RF fields.

  8. Active control of ECCD-induced tearing mode stabilization in coupled NIMROD/GENRAY HPC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Kruger, Scott; Held, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Actively controlled ECCD applied in or near magnetic islands formed by NTMs has been successfully shown to control/suppress these modes, despite uncertainties in island O-point locations (where induced current is most stabilizing) relative to the RF deposition region. Integrated numerical models of the mode stabilization process can resolve these uncertainties and augment experimental efforts to determine optimal ITER NTM stabilization strategies. The advanced SWIM model incorporates RF effects in the equations/closures of extended MHD as 3D (not toroidal or bounce-averaged) quasilinear diffusion coefficients. Equilibration of driven current within the island geometry is modeled using the same extended MHD dynamics governing the physics of island formation, yielding a more accurate/self-consistent picture of island response to RF drive. Additionally, a numerical active feedback control system gathers data from synthetic diagnostics to dynamically trigger & spatially align the RF fields. Computations which model the RF deposition using ray tracing, assemble the 3D QL operator from ray & profile data, calculate the resultant xMHD forces, and dynamically realign the RF to more efficiently stabilize modes are presented; the efficacy of various control strategies is also discussed. Supported by the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling (CEMM); see also https://cswim.org.

  9. Measurement of glutathione in activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Dziurla, M A; Leroy, P; Strünkmann, G W; Salhi, M; Lee, D U; Camacho, P; Heinz, V; Müller, J A; Paul, E; Ginestet, Ph; Audic, J M; Block, J C

    2004-01-01

    Thermal, electric, mechanical or oxidative stress seem a promising way to reduce the production of excess activated sludge during biological wastewater treatment. However, the adaptation and the resistance of the sludge microbial ecosystem to stress conditions is a major question as it may definitively limit the effect of some treatments. Defence mechanisms developed by aerobic organisms, in particular, in response to oxidative stress involve various antioxidant activities and compounds such as glutathione. An HPLC method was developed for measuring reduced and total glutathione (GSH and GSHt) in perchloric acid sludge extracts. The method was sensitive, highly specific and validated for linearity, precision and recovery. Considering the extraction yield and the oxidation of GSH during extract storage, the measured GSH concentration was estimated to represent 60% of the GSH content from activated sludges. GSHt ranged from 0.32 to 3.34micromolg(-1) volatile solids and the GSH/GSHt ratio ranged from 32% to 91%. Measurements performed on sludges stressed in precise conditions selected to reach a reduction of sludge production showed a decrease of GSH and GSHt concentrations with thermal, mechanical, electric and ozone stress. PMID:14630122

  10. Status of LDEF activation measurements and archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. Alan; Parnell, Thomas A.; Laird, Christopher E.

    1995-01-01

    We review the status of induced radioactivity measurements for the LDEF spacecraft which includes studies of the nuclide, target, directional and depth dependences of the activation. Analysis of the data has focused on extraction of the specific activities for many materials to develop a global picture of the low Earth orbital environment to which the LDEF was subjected. Preliminary comparisons of data in a previous review showed that it was possible to make meaningful intercomparisons between results obtained at different facilities. Generally these comparisons were good and gave results to within 10-20 percent, although some analysis remains. These results clearly provide constraints for recent calculations being performed of the radiation environment of the LDEF. We are not anticipating a period of production of final activation results. An archive is being prepared jointly between NASA/Marshall and Eastern Kentucky University which will include gamma ray spectra and other intermediate results.

  11. Use of active extracts of poplar buds against Penicillium italicum and possible modes of action.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuzhen; Liu, Limei; Li, Dongmei; Xia, Huan; Su, Xiaojun; Peng, Litao; Pan, Siyi

    2016-04-01

    Antifungal components, from poplar buds active fraction (PBAF) against Penicillium italicum, the causal agent of blue mold in citrus fruits, were identified and possible action modes were investigated. Pinocembrin, chrysin and galangin were determined as active components in PBAF, using HPLC and HPLC-MS analysis. The antifungal activity is stable at temperatures ranging from 4 °C to 100 °C and pH levels ranging from 4 to 8. In the presence of PBAF, the hyphae become shriveled, wrinkled and the cell membrane became seriously disrupted. Further investigation on cell permeability, nucleic acid content and alkaline phosphatase suggest that the cell membrane might be the target. Mycelial oxygen consumption and the respiration-related enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and ATPase were all inhibited by PBAF. We propose that PBAF is a potentially useful alternative for blue mold control and may act against P. italicum by interfering with respiration and disrupting the cell membrane. PMID:26593534

  12. Active mode calibration of the combined thermal epithermal neutron (CTEN) system

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system was developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform active and passive neutron interrogation of waste. The higher energy epithermal neutrons are able to penetrate further into the matrix and active material, thus reducing matrix attenuation and self-shielding effects compared to a thermal neutron pulse alone. The developmental unit was installed in 2001 at the Los Alamos Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) facility to characterize waste for the TRU Waste Characterization Project (TWCP). This paper summarizes the active mode certification results. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable standards were used to determine the system response as a function of mass. Finally, NIST-traceable verification standards were used to verify the calibration in the range 30 milligrams to 25 g of weapons grade plutonium although self-shielding limits the upper active interrogation to 10 g.

  13. Neutron and proton activation measurements from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radioactivity induced by high-energy protons and secondary neutrons (from nuclear interactions) in various samples returned from different locations in Skylab was measured directly by gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of decay gamma rays from the samples. Incident fluxes were derived from the activation measurements, using known nuclear cross-section. Neutron and proton flux values were found to range from 0.2 to 5 particles/sq cm-sec, depending on the energy range and location in Skylab. The thermal neutron flux was less than 0.07 neutrons/sq cm-sec. The results are useful for data analysis and planning of future high-energy astronomy experiments.

  14. Generation of dissipative solitons in an actively mode-locked ultralong fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Koliada, N A; Nyushkov, B N; Ivanenko, A V; Kobtsev, Sergey M; Harper, Paul; Turitsyn, Sergei K; Denisov, Vladimir I; Pivtsov, V S

    2013-02-28

    A single-pulse actively mode-locked fibre laser with a cavity length exceeding 1 km has been developed and investigated for the first time. This all-fibre erbium-doped laser has a normal intracavity dispersion and generates dissipative 8-ns solitons with a fundamental repetition rate of 163.8 kHz; the energy per pulse reaches 34 nJ. The implemented mode locking, based on the use of intracavity intensity modulator, provides self-triggering and high stability of pulsed lasing. A possibility of continuous tuning of the centre lasing wavelength in the range of 1558 - 1560 nm without any tunable spectral selective elements in the cavity is demonstrated. The tuning occurs when controlling the modulation signal frequency due to the forced change in the pulse repetition time (group delay) under the conditions of intracavity chromatic dispersion. (laser optics 2012)

  15. Piezo activated mode tracking system for widely tunable mode-hop-free external cavity mid-IR semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Gerard (Inventor); Tittel, Frank K. (Inventor); Curl, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A widely tunable, mode-hop-free semiconductor laser operating in the mid-IR comprises a QCL laser chip having an effective QCL cavity length, a diffraction grating defining a grating angle and an external cavity length with respect to said chip, and means for controlling the QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle. The laser of claim 1 wherein said chip may be tuned over a range of frequencies even in the absence of an anti-reflective coating. The diffraction grating is controllably pivotable and translatable relative to said chip and the effective QCL cavity length can be adjusted by varying the injection current to the chip. The laser can be used for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multi species trace-gas detection. Mode-hopping is avoided by controlling the effective QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle so as to replicate a virtual pivot point.

  16. Dual Mode NOx Sensor: Measuring Both the Accumulated Amount and Instantaneous Level at Low Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Beulertz, Gregor; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jaco H.; Moos, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The accumulating-type (or integrating-type) NOx sensor principle offers two operation modes to measure low levels of NOx: The direct signal gives the total amount dosed over a time interval and its derivative the instantaneous concentration. With a linear sensor response, no baseline drift, and both response times and recovery times in the range of the gas exchange time of the test bench (5 to 7 s), the integrating sensor is well suited to reliably detect low levels of NOx. Experimental results are presented demonstrating the sensor’s integrating properties for the total amount detection and its sensitivity to both NO and to NO2. We also show the correlation between the derivative of the sensor signal and the known gas concentration. The long-term detection of NOx in the sub-ppm range (e.g., for air quality measurements) is discussed. Additionally, a self-adaption of the measurement range taking advantage of the temperature dependency of the sensitivity is addressed. PMID:22736980

  17. Wrestling model of the repertoire of activity propagation modes in quadruple neural networks.

    PubMed

    Shteingart, Hanan; Raichman, Nadav; Baruchi, Itay; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous activity of engineered quadruple cultured neural networks (of four-coupled sub-networks) exhibits a repertoire of different types of mutual synchronization events. Each event corresponds to a specific activity propagation mode (APM) defined by the order of activity propagation between the sub-networks. We statistically characterized the frequency of spontaneous appearance of the different types of APMs. The relative frequencies of the APMs were then examined for their power-law properties. We found that the frequencies of appearance of the leading (most frequent) APMs have close to constant algebraic ratio reminiscent of Zipf's scaling of words. We show that the observations are consistent with a simplified "wrestling" model. This model represents an extension of the "boxing arena" model which was previously proposed to describe the ratio between the two activity modes in two coupled sub-networks. The additional new element in the "wrestling" model presented here is that the firing within each network is modeled by a time interval generator with similar intra-network Lévy distribution. We modeled the different burst-initiation zones' interaction by competition between the stochastic generators with Gaussian inter-network variability. Estimation of the model parameters revealed similarity across different cultures while the inter-burst-interval of the cultures was similar across different APMs as numerical simulation of the model predicts. PMID:20890451

  18. Dual-mode operation of flexible piezoelectric polymer diaphragm for intracranial pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Wu, Pei-Ming; Shutter, Lori A.; Narayan, Raj K.

    2010-02-01

    The dual-mode operation of a polyvinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene (PVDF-TrFE) piezoelectric polymer diaphragm, in a capacitive or resonant mode, is reported as a flexible intracranial pressure (ICP) sensor. The pressure sensor using a capacitive mode exhibits a higher linearity and less power consumption than resonant mode operated pressure sensor. In contrast, the latter provides better sensitivity and easier adaption for wireless application. The metrological properties of the dual-mode ICP sensor being described are satisfactory in vitro. We propose that the piezoelectric polymer diaphragm has a promising future in intracranial pressure monitoring.

  19. Measurements of Nitrogen Dioxide Total Column Amounts using a Brewer Double Spectrophotometer in Direct Sun Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cede, Alexander; Herman, Jay; Richter, Andreas; Krotkov, Nickolay; Burrows, John

    2006-01-01

    NO2 column amounts were measured for the past 2 years at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, using a Brewer spectrometer in direct Sun mode. A new bootstrap method to calibrate the instrument is introduced and described. This technique selects the cleanest days from the database to obtain the solar reference spectrum. The main advantage for direct Sun measurements is that the conversion uncertainty from slant column to vertical column is negligible compared to the standard scattered light observations where it is typically on the order of 100% (2sigma) at polluted sites. The total 2sigma errors of the direct Sun retrieved column amounts decrease with solar zenith angle and are estimated at 0.2 to 0.6 Dobson units (DU, 1 DU approx. equal to 2.7 10(exp 16) molecules cm(exp -2)), which is more accurate than scattered light measurements for high NO2 amounts. Measured NO2 column amounts, ranging from 0 to 3 DU with a mean of 0.7 DU, show a pronounced daily course and a strong variability from day to day. The NO2 concentration typically increases from sunrise to noon. In the afternoon it decreases in summer and stays constant in winter. As expected from the anthropogenic nature of its source, NO2 amounts on weekends are significantly reduced. The measurements were compared to satellite retrievals from Scanning Image Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). Satellite data give the same average NO2 column and show a seasonal cycle that is similar to the ground data in the afternoon. We show that NO2 must be considered when retrieving aerosol absorption properties, especially for situations with low aerosol optical depth.

  20. Flow visualization efforts and pilot measurements with a laser-Doppler anemometer in backscatter mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buetefisch, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    Activities involving the use flow visualization and laser anemometers are reviewed. In particular, turbulent pipe flow measurements and local velocity determination in a 3 X 3 sq meter wind tunnel are discussed. The calibration of laser anemometer systems using a rotating disk is also addressed.

  1. Mode I Toughness Measurements of Core/Facesheet Bonds in Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2006-01-01

    from the test and so the results can only be used in a qualitative manner. Second, only sandwich structure with thin facesheets can be tested (to facilitate wrapping of the facesheet around the climbing drum). In recognition of the need for a more quantitative facesheet/core fracture test, several workers have devised experimental techniques for characterizing the toughness of the facesheet/core interface. In all of these cases, the tests are designed to yield a mode I-dominated fracture toughness of the facesheet/core interface in a manner similar to that used to determine mode I fracture toughness of composite laminates. In the current work, a modified double cantilever beam is used to measure the mode I-dominated fracture toughness of the interface in a sandwich consisting of glass/phenolic honeycomb core reinforced with graphite epoxy facesheets. Two specimen configurations were tested as shown in Fig 2. The first configuration consisted of reinforcing the facesheets with aluminum blocks (Fig. 2a). In the second configuration unreinforced specimens were tested (Fig. 2b). Climbing drum peel tests were also conducted to compare the fracture behavior observed between this test and the modified double cantilever beam. This paper outlines the test procedures and data reduction strategies used to compute fracture toughness values from the tests. The effect of specimen reinforcement on fracture toughness of the facesheet/core interface is discussed.

  2. Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

  3. Antiviral activity and specific modes of action of bacterial prodigiosin against Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Zeng, Cheng; Liu, RenHua; Chen, Jie; Li, Ru; Wang, XinYan; Bai, WenWen; Liu, XiaoYuan; Xiang, TingTing; Zhang, Lin; Wan, YongJi

    2016-05-01

    Prodigiosin, the tripyrrole red pigment, is a bacterial secondary metabolite with multiple bioactivities; however, the antiviral activity has not been reported yet. In the present study, we found the antiviral activity of bacterial prodigiosin on Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV)-infected cells in vitro, with specific modes of action. Prodigiosin at nontoxic concentrations selectively killed virus-infected cells, inhibited viral gene transcription, especially viral early gene ie-1, and prevented virus-mediated membrane fusion. Under prodigiosin treatment, both progeny virus production and viral DNA replication were significantly inhibited. Fluorescent assays showed that prodigiosin predominantly located in cytoplasm which suggested it might interact with cytoplasm factors to inhibit virus replication. In conclusion, the present study clearly indicates that prodigiosin possesses significant antiviral activity against BmNPV. PMID:26685856

  4. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  5. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength goldmore » disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.« less

  6. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I I; Chan, C T; Chan, H B; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  7. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  8. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  9. Comparisons of activity measurements with radionuclide calibrators.

    PubMed

    Oropesa, P; Hernández, A T; Serra, R; Martínez, E; Varela, C

    2003-01-01

    The correct administration to a patient of the prescribed activity of a radiopharmaceutical is an important factor to ensure the confidence in the diagnosis or the therapeutic efficiency, while at the same time keeping the unnecessary human exposure as low as possible. Comparisons of activity measurements for 131I, 201Tl and 99mTc with radionuclide calibrators were organized the first time in Cuba during 2002 with the aim of obtaining information about the quality of administration of radiopharmaceuticals. Ten Cuban nuclear medicine departments and the laboratories involved in the production of these kinds of compounds participated in the comparison runs. The results presented in this paper facilitated the identification of several problems and initiated corrective actions. In addition, they indicate the necessity of establishing Quality Systems in nuclear medicine in Cuba. PMID:14622940

  10. Short cavity active mode locking fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Han, Ga Hee; Jeong, Syung Won; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate a highly linear wavenumber- swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging without any wavenumber-space resampling process. In this all-electric AML wavenumber-swept mechanism, a conventional wavelength selection filter is eliminated and, instead, the suitable programmed electric modulation signal is directly applied to the gain medium. Various types of wavenumber (or wavelength) tunings can be implemented because of the filter-less cavity configuration. Therefore, we successfully demonstrate a linearly wavenumber-swept AML fiber laser with 26.5 mW of output power to obtain an in-vivo OCT image at the 100 kHz swept rate.

  11. Multiple Binding Modes between HNF4[alpha] and the LXXLL Motifs of PGC-1[alpha] Lead to Full Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Geun Bae; Wu, Guangteng; Shoelson, Steven E.; Chi, Young-In

    2010-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a novel nuclear receptor that participates in a hierarchical network of transcription factors regulating the development and physiology of such vital organs as the liver, pancreas, and kidney. Among the various transcriptional coregulators with which HNF4{alpha} interacts, peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) represents a novel coactivator whose activation is unusually robust and whose binding mode appears to be distinct from that of canonical coactivators such as NCoA/SRC/p160 family members. To elucidate the potentially unique molecular mechanism of PGC-1{alpha} recruitment, we have determined the crystal structure of HNF4{alpha} in complex with a fragment of PGC-1{alpha} containing all three of its LXXLL motifs. Despite the presence of all three LXXLL motifs available for interactions, only one is bound at the canonical binding site, with no additional contacts observed between the two proteins. However, a close inspection of the electron density map indicates that the bound LXXLL motif is not a selected one but an averaged structure of more than one LXXLL motif. Further biochemical and functional studies show that the individual LXXLL motifs can bind but drive only minimal transactivation. Only when more than one LXXLL motif is involved can significant transcriptional activity be measured, and full activation requires all three LXXLL motifs. These findings led us to propose a model wherein each LXXLL motif has an additive effect, and the multiple binding modes by HNF4{alpha} toward the LXXLL motifs of PGC-1{alpha} could account for the apparent robust activation by providing a flexible mechanism for combinatorial recruitment of additional coactivators and mediators.

  12. Photocatalytic Active Radiation Measurements and Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Underwood, Lauren W.

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic materials are being used to purify air, to kill microbes, and to keep surfaces clean. A wide variety of materials are being developed, many of which have different abilities to absorb various wavelengths of light. Material variability, combined with both spectral illumination intensity and spectral distribution variability, will produce a wide range of performance results. The proposed technology estimates photocatalytic active radiation (PcAR), a unit of radiation that normalizes the amount of light based on its spectral distribution and on the ability of the material to absorb that radiation. Photocatalytic reactions depend upon the number of electron-hole pairs generated at the photocatalytic surface. The number of electron-hole pairs produced depends on the number of photons per unit area per second striking the surface that can be absorbed and whose energy exceeds the bandgap of the photocatalytic material. A convenient parameter to describe the number of useful photons is the number of moles of photons striking the surface per unit area per second. The unit of micro-einsteins (or micromoles) of photons per m2 per sec is commonly used for photochemical and photoelectric-like phenomena. This type of parameter is used in photochemistry, such as in the conversion of light energy for photosynthesis. Photosynthetic response correlates with the number of photons rather than by energy because, in this photochemical process, each molecule is activated by the absorption of one photon. In photosynthesis, the number of photons absorbed in the 400 700 nm spectral range is estimated and is referred to as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). PAR is defined in terms of the photosynthetic photon flux density measured in micro-einsteins of photons per m2 per sec. PcAR is an equivalent, similarly modeled parameter that has been defined for the photocatalytic processes. Two methods to measure the PcAR level are being proposed. In the first method, a calibrated

  13. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-15

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  14. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  15. Characterization of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode III Fracture Toughness Measurement of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is designed to initiate mode III delamination growth in composite laminates. The test has undergone several design changes during its development. The objective of this paper was to determine the suitability of the current ECT test design a mode III fracture test. To this end, ECT tests were conducted on specimens manufactured from IM7/8552 and S2/8552 tape laminates. Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed. The analysis results were used to calculate the distribution of mode I, mode II, and mode III strain energy release rate along the delamination front. The results indicated that mode IIIdominated delamination growth would be initiated from the specimen center. However, in specimens of both material types, the measured values of GIIIc exhibited significant dependence on delamination length. Load-displacement response of the specimens exhibited significant deviation from linearity before specimen failure. X-radiographs of a sample of specimens revealed that damage was initiated in the specimens prior to failure. Further inspection of the failure surfaces is required to identify the damage and determine that mode III delamination is initiated in the specimens.

  16. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake: Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  17. Investigations of the Wideband Spectrum of Higher Order Modes Measured on TESLA-style Cavities at the FLASH Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, S.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Frisch, J.; Li, Z.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Smith, T.; Baboi, N.; Eddy, N.; Piccoli, L.; Rechenmacher, R.; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2007-06-27

    Higher Order Modes (HOMs) excited by the passage of the beam through an accelerating cavity depend on the properties of both the cavity and the beam. It is possible, therefore, to draw conclusions on the inner geometry of the cavities based on observations of the properties of the HOM spectrum. A data acquisition system based on two 20 GS/s, 6 GHz scopes has been set up at the FLASH facility, DESY, in order to measure a significant fraction of the HOM spectrum predicted to be generated by the TESLA cavities used for the acceleration of its beam. The HOMs from a particular cavity at FLASH were measured under a range of known beam conditions. The dipole modes have been identified in the data. 3D simulations of different manufacturing errors have been made, and it has been shown that these simulations can predict the measured modes.

  18. Relativistic electron acceleration by compressional-mode ULF waves: Evidence from correlated Cluster, Los Alamos National Laboratory spacecraft, and ground-based magnetometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Shao, X.; Sharma, A. S.; Fung, Shing F.

    2011-07-01

    Simultaneous observations by Cluster and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) spacecraft and Canadian Array for Real-Time Investigations of Magnetic Activity and International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects magnetometer arrays during a sudden storm commencement on 25 September 2001 show evidence of relativistic electron acceleration by compressional-mode ULF waves. The waves are driven by the quasiperiodic solar wind dynamical pressure fluctuations that continuously buffet the magnetosphere for ˜3 h. The compressional-mode ULF waves are identified by comparing the power of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations with the total magnetic field power. The radial distribution and azimuthal propagation of both toroidal and poloidal-mode ULF waves are derived from ground-based magnetometer data. The energetic electron fluxes measured by LANL show modulation of low-energy electrons and acceleration of high-energy electrons by the compressional poloidal-mode electric field oscillations. The energy threshold of accelerated electrons at the geosynchronous orbit is ˜0.4 MeV, which is roughly consistent with drift-resonant interaction of magnetospheric electrons with compressional-mode ULF waves.

  19. Thrust measurements in a low-magnetic field high-density mode in the helicon double layer thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, J.; West, M. D.; Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2010-08-01

    A momentum flux measuring instrument (MFMI) has been used to take thrust measurements of the helicon double layer thruster (HDLT) prototype immersed in a vacuum chamber. The MFMI recorded a sharp increase in force when the plasma transitioned into a low-magnetic field, high-density mode. The HDLT uses a helicon antenna to generate an ion beam-containing plasma in a diverging magnetic field. The presence of a low-magnetic field mode in the HDLT prototype was demonstrated and its properties were explored at 0.3 mTorr argon at various applied rf powers, locations within the source tube and downstream vacuum chamber, and applied magnetic field strengths. The low-magnetic field mode occurs at solenoid currents that correspond to peak magnetic fields between 20 and 30 G in the source tube and Langmuir probe measurements show that the mode is associated with an increase in ion density of up to six times the density at applied magnetic fields just outside the mode. This rise in ion density correlates with a peak in plasma resistance. Furthermore, the transition into the mode is accompanied by the appearance of a higher current ion beam in the downstream region of the expanding plasma and a rise in plasma potential of approximately 30% at 250 W rf power as measured by retarding field energy analyzers. This mode is of interest for the HDLT because it generates an ion beam-containing high-density (≈1017 m-3) expanding plasma at low-magnetic fields and rf powers as low as 130 W.

  20. Measuring Homework Completion in Behavioral Activation

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrew M.; Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Kalibatseva, Zornitsa; Miller, Ivan W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an observer-based coding system for the characterization and completion of homework assignments during Behavioral Activation (BA). Existing measures of homework completion are generally unsophisticated, and there is no current measure of homework completion designed to capture the particularities of BA. The tested scale sought to capture the type of assignment, realm of functioning targeted, extent of completion, and assignment difficulty. Homework assignments were drawn from 12 (mean age = 48, 83% female) clients in two trials of a 10-session BA manual targeting treatment-resistant depression in primary care. The two coders demonstrated acceptable or better reliability on most codes, and unreliable codes were dropped from the proposed scale. In addition, correlations between homework completion and outcome were strong, providing some support for construct validity. Ultimately, this line of research aims to develop a user-friendly, reliable measure of BA homework completion that can be completed by a therapist during session. PMID:20562324

  1. Single-mode array optoelectronic packaging based on actively aligned planar optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, Robert F.; Silva, Edward R.; Knapp, Daniel F.

    1996-03-01

    Packaging of integrated optoelectronic devices (e.g., laser diode arrays and OEICs) is motivated by potential cost savings and the increased functionality of more highly integrated devices. To date, attempts to package integrated optoelectronic devices with arrays of single- mode fibers have tended to exhibit high optical losses. We have developed a single-mode array packaging process based on the use of an intermediate silica-on-silicon planar optical waveguides (POWs) assembly to which optical fibers are attached using V-grooves. By lensing the POWs, we have achieved coupling efficiencies of greater than 50%. The photolithographic registration of the POWs allows a large (greater than or equal to 8) array of POWs with attached fibers to be aligned to an array of optoelectronic devices in a single active alignment procedure. This single active alignment step is well-suited to automation, and our approach is thus well-suited to achieving low cost in a manufacturing environment. We also discuss our positioning and mounting techniques, which provide high-stability coupling in adverse temperature and vibration environments and are compatible with hermetic packaging.

  2. Role of surface-active elements during keyhole-mode laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribic, B.; Tsukamoto, S.; Rai, R.; DebRoy, T.

    2011-12-01

    During high power density laser welding of mild steel, the keyhole depth, liquid metal flow, weld geometry and weld integrity are affected by base-metal sulfur content and oxygen (O2) present in the atmosphere or shielding gas. The role of these surface-active elements during keyhole-mode laser welding of steels is not well understood. In order to better understand their effects, welding of mild steel specimens containing various concentrations of oxygen and sulfur are examined. In addition, a numerical model is used to evaluate the influence of the surface-active elements on heat transfer and fluid flow in keyhole-mode laser welding. Increase in base-metal sulfur concentration or O2 content of shielding gas results in decreased weld widths. Sulfur results in a negligible increase in penetration depth whereas the presence of O2 in shielding gas significantly affects the weld penetration. It has earlier been proposed that oxygen, if present in the shielding gas, can get introduced into the weld pool resulting in formation of carbon monoxide (CO) at the keyhole surface and additional pressure from CO can result in increased penetration. Numerical modelling has been used in this work to understand the effects of formation of CO on the keyhole and weld geometries.

  3. In Situ Time Constant and Optical Efficiency Measurements of TRUCE Pixels in the Atacama B-Mode Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, S. M.; Appel, J. W.; Cho, H. M.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Irwin, K. D.; Kusaka, A.; Niemack, M. D.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L. A.; Parker, L. P.; Raghunathan, S.; Sievers, J. L.; Staggs, S. T.; Visnjic, K.

    2014-09-01

    The Atacama B-mode Search (ABS) instrument, which began observation in February of 2012, is a crossed-Dragone telescope located at an elevation of 5,100 m in the Atacama Desert in Chile. The primary scientific goal of ABS is to measure the B-mode polarization spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background from multipole moments of about 50 to 500 (angular scales from to ), a range that includes the primordial B-mode peak from inflationary gravitational waves. The ABS focal plane array consists of 240 pixels designed for observation at 145 GHz by the TRUCE collaboration. Each pixel has its own individual, single-moded feedhorn and contains two transition-edge sensor bolometers coupled to orthogonal polarizations that are read out using time domain multiplexing. We will report on the current status of ABS and discuss the time constants and optical efficiencies of the TRUCE detectors in the field.

  4. Dual Mode Antibacterial Activity of Ion Substituted Calcium Phosphate Nanocarriers for Bone Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sampath Kumar, T. S.; Madhumathi, K.; Rubaiya, Y.; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25–0.75, and 2.5–7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40–50 nm and width 5–6 nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5 days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21 days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent

  5. Bolt axial stress measurement based on a mode-converted ultrasound method using an electromagnetic acoustic transducer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xu; Wu, Xinjun; Wang, Yugang

    2014-03-01

    A method is proposed to measure the stress on a tightened bolt using an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). A shear wave is generated by the EMAT, and a longitudinal wave is obtained from the reflection of the shear wave due to the mode conversion. The ray paths of the longitudinal and the shear wave are analyzed, and the relationship between the bolt axial stress and the ratio of time of flight between two mode waves is then formulated. Based on the above outcomes, an EMAT is developed to measure the bolt axial stress without loosening the bolt, which is required in the conventional EMAT test method. The experimental results from the measurement of the bolt tension show that the shear and the mode-converted longitudinal waves can be received successfully, and the ratio of the times of flight of the shear and the mode-converted longitudinal waves is linearly proportional to the bolt axial tension. The non-contact characteristic of EMAT eliminates the effect of the couplant and also makes the measurement more convenient than the measurement performed using the piezoelectric transducer. This method provides a promising way to measure the stress on tightened bolts. PMID:24289900

  6. Measurements of Branching Ratios And Search for CP Violation in the Modes B0 to Rho Pi, Rho K

    SciTech Connect

    Laplace, Sandrine; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2006-09-18

    The BABAR experiment, at the PEP-II collider at SLAC, has been studying since 1999 CP violation in the B meson system. After the precise measurement of sin2{beta}, one is now concentrating on measuring the angles {alpha} and {gamma} of the unitarity triangle. The work presented in this thesis concerns the measurement of the angle {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{pi} mode.

  7. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.; Gobby, P. L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R. J.

    1997-04-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5×1014W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600-μm-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-μm and 60-μm wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-μm-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-μm perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-μm case when compared to targets without foam.

  8. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.; Gobby, P. L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R. J.

    1997-04-15

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600-{mu}m-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-{mu}m and 60-{mu}m wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-{mu}m-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-{mu}m perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-{mu}m case when compared to targets without foam.

  9. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J.P.; Verdon, C.P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Boehly, T.R.; Bradley, D.K.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Watt, R.G.; Gobby, P.L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5{times}10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4{percent}{endash}7{percent} over a 600-{mu}m-diam region defined by the 90{percent} intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-{mu}m and 60-{mu}m wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with {ital ORCHID} simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-{mu}m-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-{mu}m perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-{mu}m case when compared to targets without foam. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Edge mode velocities in the quantum Hall effect from a dc measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Philip; Feldman, D. E.

    Because of the bulk gap, low energy physics in the quantum Hall effect is confined to the edges of the 2D electron liquid. The velocities of edge modes are key parameters of edge physics. They were determined in several quantum Hall systems from time-resolved measurements and high-frequency ac transport. We propose a way to extract edge velocities from dc transport in a point contact geometry defined by narrow gates. The width of the gates assumes two different sizes at small and large distances from the point contact. The Coulomb interaction across the gates depends on the gate width and affects the conductance of the contact. The conductance exhibits two different temperature dependencies at high and low temperatures. The transition between the two regimes is determined by the edge velocity. An interesting feature of the low-temperature I - V curve is current oscillations as a function of the voltage. The oscillations emerge due to charge reflection from the interface of the regions defined by the narrow and wide sections of the gates. This work is available at arXiv:1510.01725 This work was supported by the NSF under Grant No. DMR-1205715.

  11. Split-mode fiber Bragg grating sensor for high-resolution static strain measurements.

    PubMed

    Malara, P; Mastronardi, L; Campanella, C E; Giorgini, A; Avino, S; Passaro, V M N; Gagliardi, G

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate a strain sensor with very high sensitivity in the static and low frequency regime based on a fiber ring cavity that includes a π phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating. The grating acts as a partial reflector that couples the two counter-propagating cavity modes, generating a splitting of the resonant frequencies. The presence of a sharp transition within the π phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating's spectral transmittance makes this frequency splitting extremely sensitive to length, temperature, and the refractive index of the fiber in the region where the grating is written. The splitting variations caused by small mechanical deformations of the grating are tracked in real time by interrogating a cavity resonance with a locked-carrier scanning-sideband technique. The measurable strain range and bandwidth are characterized, and a resolution of 320  pϵ/Hz(1/2) at 0 Hz is experimentally demonstrated, the highest achieved to date with a fiber Bragg grating sensor. PMID:25503025

  12. Edge mode velocities in the quantum Hall effect from a dc measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, P. T.; Feldman, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    Because of the bulk gap, low energy physics in the quantum Hall effect is confined to the edges of the 2D electron liquid. The velocities of edge modes are key parameters of edge physics. They were determined in several quantum Hall systems from time-resolved measurements and high-frequency ac transport. We propose a way to extract edge velocities from dc transport in a point contact geometry defined by narrow gates. The width of the gates assumes two different sizes at small and large distances from the point contact. The Coulomb interaction across the gates depends on the gate width and affects the conductance of the contact. The conductance exhibits two different temperature dependencies at high and low temperatures. The transition between the two regimes is determined by the edge velocity. An interesting feature of the low-temperature I-V curve is current oscillations as a function of the voltage. The oscillations emerge due to charge reflection from the interface of the regions defined by the narrow and wide sections of the gates.

  13. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  14. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Verdon, C. P.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5×1014 W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 μm diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 μm wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile.

  15. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Verdon, C. P.

    2000-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 {mu}m diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 {mu}m wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  16. The brain on art: intense aesthetic experience activates the default mode network

    PubMed Central

    Vessel, Edward A.; Starr, G. Gabrielle; Rubin, Nava

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different sub-networks. Activity increased linearly with observers' ratings (4-level scale) in sensory (occipito-temporal) regions. Activity in the striatum (STR) also varied linearly with ratings, with below-baseline activations for low-rated artworks. In contrast, a network of frontal regions showed a step-like increase only for the most moving artworks (“4” ratings) and non-differential activity for all others. This included several regions belonging to the “default mode network” (DMN) previously associated with self-referential mentation. Our results suggest that aesthetic experience involves the integration of sensory and emotional reactions in a manner linked with their personal relevance. PMID:22529785

  17. The Psychedelic State Induced by Ayahuasca Modulates the Activity and Connectivity of the Default Mode Network

    PubMed Central

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C.; Tofoli, Luis F.; Santos, Antonio C.; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S.; Hallak, Jaime E. C.; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B.

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN. PMID:25693169

  18. The psychedelic state induced by ayahuasca modulates the activity and connectivity of the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C; Tofoli, Luis F; Santos, Antonio C; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN. PMID:25693169

  19. Small acousto-optic modulation for active mode locking in the iodine photodissociation laser and the effect of supplementary saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.S.; Lee, S.S.

    1985-02-01

    Active, passive, and active--passive mode locking of the iodine photodissociation laser are investigated. The peak-to-background ratio (PBR) of the acousto-optically mode-locked pulse is 85% for rf power of 5 W. Passive mode locking using BDN dye gives PBR of 75% and has inferior reproducibility. The active--passive mode locking using the two methods simultaneously is useful for the pressure broadened iodine laser line and gives a PBR of 91%. In this case the rf power required for complete mode locking is calculated to be 7 W which is much less than the required power of 11 W in using active mode locking alone.

  20. Compensated Langmuir Probe Measurement of the Near-keeper Plasma of a Hollow Cathode Operating in Plume Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillefer, Zachary; Blandin, John; Szabo, James

    2014-10-01

    It has been reported that oscillations of the plasma potential, over a range of frequencies (<=1 kHz--2 MHz) are related to high energy ion production in the plume of a neutralizer hollow cathode when operating in plume mode. Impact of these high energy ions with the keeper electrode face is the dominant mechanism by which electrode erosion occurs over long periods of operation (~10,000 hours). Reliable measurement of the plasma properties in this operating mode is critical to development of computational models and efforts to mitigate the erosion and maximize lifetime of these cathodes. In this work, both plume and spot mode operating conditions of a low current (<=5 A), dispenser hollow cathode have been quantitatively identified. An emissive probe was used to characterize the plasma potential oscillations in the near-keeper plasma during plume mode operation. Large amplitude fluctuations (exceeding 70 V) of the plasma potential were observed, at a fundamental frequency of 55 kHz, along with 2nd and 3rd harmonics. In order to measure the local electron energy distribution function (EEDF) during plume mode operation, a compensated Langmuir probe was constructed, using RF chokes, to allow accurate measurement of the EEDF and calculation of the electron temperature.

  1. PARduino: A Simple Device Measuring and Logging Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Findley, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400 to 700 nm) is one of the primary controls of forest carbon and water relations. In complex terrain, PAR has high spatial-variability. Given the high cost of commercial datalogging equipment, spatially-distributed measurements of PAR have been typically modeled using geographic coordinates and terrain indices. Here, we present a design for a low cost, field-deployable device for measuring and logging PAR built around an Arduino microcontroller (we named it PARduino). PARduino provides for widely distributed sensor arrays and tests the feasibility of using hobbyist-grade electronics for collecting scientific data. PARduino components include a LiCor quantum sensor, EME Systems signal converter/amplifier, and Sparkfun's Arduino Pro Mini microcontroller. Additional components include a real time clock, a microSD flash memory card, and a custom printed circuit board (PCB). We selected the components with an eye towards ease of assembly. Everything can be connected to the PCB using through-hole soldering techniques. Since the device will be deployed in remote research plots that lack easy access to line power, battery life was also a consideration in the design. Extended deployment is possible because PARduino's software keeps it in a low-power sleep mode until ready to make a measurement. PARduino will be open-source hardware for use and improvement by others.

  2. Measurements of Nucleation-Mode Particle Size Distributions in Aircraft Plumes during SULFUR 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Bradford, Deborah G.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the participation of the University of Denver in an airborne measurement program, SULFUR 6, which was undertaken in late September and early October of 1998 by the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft und Raumfahrt (DLR). Scientific findings from two papers that have been published or accepted and from one manuscript that is in preparation are presented. The SULFUR 6 experiment was designed to investigate the emissions from subsonic aircraft to constrain calculations of possible atmospheric chemical and climatic effects. The University of Denver effort contributed toward the following SULFUR 6 goals: (1) To investigate the relationship between fuel sulfur content (FSC--mass of sulfur per mass of fuel) and particle number and mass emission index (El--quantity emitted per kg of fuel burned); (2) To provide upper and lower limits for the mass conversion efficiency (nu) of fuel sulfur to gaseous and particulate sulfuric acid; (3) To constrain models of volatile particle nucleation and growth by measuring the particle size distribution between 3 and 100 nm at aircraft plume ages ranging from 10(exp -1) to 10(exp 3) s; (4) To determine microphysical and optical properties and bulk chemical composition of soot particles in aircraft exhaust; and (5) To investigate the differences in particle properties between aircraft plumes in contrail and non-contrail situations. The experiment focused on emissions from the ATTAS research aircraft (a well characterized, but older technology turbojet) and from an in-service Boeing 737-300 aircraft provided by Lufthansa, with modem, high-bypass turbofan engines. Measurements were made from the DLR Dassault Falcon 900 aircraft, a modified business jet. The Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Program (AEAP) provided funding to operate an instrument, the nucleation-mode aerosol size spectrometer (N-MASS), during the SULFUR 6 campaign and to analyze the data. The N-MASS was developed at the University of Denver with the support of

  3. Measurements of the Effects of Smoke on Active Circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.J.

    1999-02-09

    Smoke has long been recognized as the most common source of fire damage to electrical equipment; however, most failures have been analyzed after the fire was out and the smoke vented. The effects caused while the smoke is still in the air have not been explored. Such effects have implications for new digital equipment being installed in nuclear reactors. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring work to determine the impact of smoke on digital instrumentation and control. As part of this program, Sandia National Laboratories has tested simple active circuits to determine how smoke affects them. These tests included the study of three possible failure modes on a functional board: (1) circuit bridging, (2) corrosion (metal loss), and (3) induction of stray capacitance. The performance of nine different circuits was measured continuously on bare and conformably coated boards during smoke exposures lasting 1 hour each and continued for 24 hours after the exposure started. The circuit that was most affected by smoke (100% change in measured values) was the one most sensitive to circuit bridging. Its high impedance (50 M{Omega}) was shorted during the exposure, but in some cases recovered after the smoke was vented. The other two failure modes, corrosion and induced stray capacitance, caused little change in the function of the circuits. The smoke permanently increased resistance of the circuit tested for corrosion, implying that the cent acts were corroded. However, the change was very small (< 2%). The stray-capacitance test circuit showed very little change after a smoke exposure in either the short or long term. The results of the tests suggest that conformal coatings and type of circuit are major considerations when designing digital circuitry to be used in critical control systems.

  4. ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENT OF FUNDAMENTAL AND HIGHER-ORDER MODES FOR 7-CELL CAVITY OF PETRA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kawashima, Y.; Blednykh, A.; Cupolo, J.; Davidsaver, M.; Holub, B.; Ma, H.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The booster synchrotron for NSLS-II will include a 7-cell PETRA cavity, which was manufactured for the PETRA-II project at DESY. The cavity fundamental frequency operates at 500 MHz. In order to verify the impedances of the fundamental and higher-order modes (HOM), which were calculated by computer code, we measured the magnitude of the electromagnetic field of the fundamental acceleration mode and HOM using the bead-pull method. To keep the cavity body temperature constant, we used a chiller system to supply cooling water at 20 degrees C. The bead-pull measurement was automated with a computer. We encountered some issues during the measurement process due to the difficulty in measuring the electromagnetic field magnitude in a multi-cell cavity. We describe the method and apparatus for the field measurement, and the obtained results.

  5. The interaction between gambling activities and modes of access: a comparison of Internet-only, land-based only, and mixed-mode gamblers.

    PubMed

    Gainsbury, Sally M; Russell, Alex; Blaszczynski, Alex; Hing, Nerilee

    2015-02-01

    Research suggests that Internet-based gambling includes risk factors that may increase gambling problems. The current study aimed to investigate subgroups of gamblers to identify the potential harms associated with various forms and modes of gambling. An online survey was completed by 4,594 respondents identified as Internet-only (IG), land-based only (LBGs), or mixed-mode (MMG) gamblers based on self-reported gambling behaviour in the last 12months. Results showed significant socio-demographic differences between groups, with the LBGs being the oldest and MMGs the youngest. MMGs engaged in the greatest variety of gambling forms, had the highest average problem gambling severity scores, and were more likely to attribute problems to sports betting than the other groups. IGs were involved in the lowest number of divergent gambling activities, most likely to gamble frequently on sports and races, and attribute problems to these forms. Compared to the other groups, LBs had a higher proportion of problem gamblers than IGs and were most likely to play electronic gaming machines weekly, with this form of gambling contributing to problems at a substantially greater rate. This study confirms the importance of considering gambling involvement across subgroups of Internet or land-based gamblers. There is a need to consider the interaction between forms and modes of gambling to advance our understanding of the potential risk of mode of gambling to contribute to problems. PMID:25305656

  6. Vibrational relaxation of the bending mode of shock-heated CO2 by laser-absorption measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, D. J.; Bershader, D.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the vibrational relaxation characteristics of shock-heated CO2 using a tuned CO2 laser absorption technique. Absorption-coefficient histories were obtained for a single rotational state in each of the -10 0- and -02 0- levels over the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K, and for 21 rotational states of the -10 0- level at 1000 K. These histories have been combined with translational-rotational temperature histories based on interferometer measurements to calculate vibrational relaxation times for the bending mode. The results verify the mutual equilibrium of the bending and symmetric-stretch modes due to Fermi resonance. The bending mode relaxation times are approximately 10% shorter than predicted from interferometer results using the ratio of specific heats. Furthermore, relaxation times based on measurements of different rotational states at 1000 K show a variation with quantum number J, indicating a possible rotational nonequilibrium during the vibration relaxation process.

  7. Semi-active damping with negative stiffness for multi-mode cable vibration mitigation: approximate collocated control solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.; Distl, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper derives an approximate collocated control solution for the mitigation of multi-mode cable vibration by semi-active damping with negative stiffness based on the control force characteristics of clipped linear quadratic regulator (LQR). The control parameters are derived from optimal modal viscous damping and corrected in order to guarantee that both the equivalent viscous damping coefficient and the equivalent stiffness coefficient of the semi-active cable damper force are equal to their desired counterparts. The collocated control solution with corrected control parameters is numerically validated by free decay tests of the first four cable modes and combinations of these modes. The results of the single-harmonic tests demonstrate that the novel approach yields 1.86 times more cable damping than optimal modal viscous damping and 1.87 to 2.33 times more damping compared to a passive oil damper whose viscous damper coefficient is optimally tuned to the targeted mode range of the first four modes. The improvement in case of the multi-harmonic vibration tests, i.e. when modes 1 and 3 and modes 2 and 4 are vibrating at the same time, is between 1.55 and 3.81. The results also show that these improvements are obtained almost independent of the cable anti-node amplitude. Thus, the proposed approximate real-time applicable collocated semi-active control solution which can be realized by magnetorheological dampers represents a promising tool for the efficient mitigation of stay cable vibrations.

  8. Top-down regulation of default mode activity in spatial visual attention.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaotong; Liu, Yijun; Yao, Li; Ding, Mingzhou

    2013-04-10

    Dorsal anterior cingulate and bilateral anterior insula form a task control network (TCN) whose primary function includes initiating and maintaining task-level cognitive set and exerting top-down regulation of sensorimotor processing. The default mode network (DMN), comprising an anatomically distinct set of cortical areas, mediates introspection and self-referential processes. Resting-state data show that TCN and DMN interact. The functional ramifications of their interaction remain elusive. Recording fMRI data from human subjects performing a visual spatial attention task and correlating Granger causal influences with behavioral performance and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activity we report three main findings. First, causal influences from TCN to DMN, i.e., TCN → DMN, are positively correlated with behavioral performance. Second, causal influences from DMN to TCN, i.e., DMN → TCN, are negatively correlated with behavioral performance. Third, stronger DMN → TCN are associated with less elevated BOLD activity in TCN, whereas the relationship between TCN → DMN and DMN BOLD activity is unsystematic. These results suggest that, during visual spatial attention, top-down signals from TCN to DMN regulate the activity in DMN to enhance behavioral performance, whereas signals from DMN to TCN, acting possibly as internal noise, interfere with task control, leading to degraded behavioral performance. PMID:23575842

  9. Top-down regulation of default mode activity in spatial visual attention

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaotong; Liu, Yijun; Yao, Li; Ding, Mingzhou

    2013-01-01

    Dorsal anterior cingulate and bilateral anterior insula form a task control network (TCN) whose primary function includes initiating and maintaining task-level cognitive set and exerting top-down regulation of sensorimotor processing. The default mode network (DMN), comprising an anatomically distinct set of cortical areas, mediates introspection and self-referential processes. Resting-state data show that TCN and DMN interact. The functional ramifications of their interaction remain elusive. Recording fMRI data from human subjects performing a visual spatial attention task and correlating Granger causal influences with behavioral performance and blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity we report three main findings. First, causal influences from TCN to DMN, i.e., TCN→DMN, are positively correlated with behavioral performance. Second, causal influences from DMN to TCN, i.e., DMN→TCN, are negatively correlated with behavioral performance. Third, stronger DMN→TCN are associated with less elevated BOLD activity in TCN, whereas the relationship between TCN→DMN and DMN BOLD activity is unsystematic. These results suggest that during visual spatial attention, top-down signals from TCN to DMN regulate the activity in DMN to enhance behavioral performance, whereas signals from DMN to TCN, acting possibly as internal noise, interfere with task control, leading to degraded behavioral performance. PMID:23575842

  10. Increased default mode network activity in socially anxious individuals during reward processing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Social anxiety has been associated with potentiated negative affect and, more recently, with diminished positive affect. It is unclear how these alterations in negative and positive affect are represented neurally in socially anxious individuals and, further, whether they generalize to non-social stimuli. To explore this, we used a monetary incentive paradigm to explore the association between social anxiety and both the anticipation and consumption of non-social incentives. Eighty-four individuals from a longitudinal community sample underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while participating in a monetary incentive delay (MID) task. The MID task consisted of alternating cues indicating the potential to win or prevent losing varying amounts of money based on the speed of the participant’s response. We examined whether self-reported levels of social anxiety, averaged across approximately 7 years of data, moderated brain activity when contrasting gain or loss cues with neutral cues during the anticipation and outcome phases of incentive processing. Whole brain analyses and analyses restricted to the ventral striatum for the anticipation phase and the medial prefrontal cortex for the outcome phase were conducted. Results Social anxiety did not associate with differences in hit rates or reaction times when responding to cues. Further, socially anxious individuals did not exhibit decreased ventral striatum activity during anticipation of gains or decreased MPFC activity during the outcome of gain trials, contrary to expectations based on literature indicating blunted positive affect in social anxiety. Instead, social anxiety showed positive associations with extensive regions implicated in default mode network activity (for example, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, and parietal lobe) during anticipation and receipt of monetary gain. Social anxiety was further linked with decreased activity in the ventral striatum during anticipation

  11. A New Non-linear Technique for Measurement of Splitting Functions of Normal Modes of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachhai, S.; Masters, G.; Tkalcic, H.

    2014-12-01

    Normal modes are the vibrating patterns of the Earth in response to the large earthquakes. Normal mode spectra are split due to Earth's rotation, ellipticity, and heterogeneity. The normal mode splitting is visualized through splitting functions, which represent the local radial average of Earth's structure seen by a mode of vibration. The analysis of the splitting of normal modes can provide unique information about the lateral variation of the Earth's elastic properties that cannot be directly imaged in body wave tomographic images. The non-linear iterative spectral fitting of the observed complex spectra and autoregressive linear inversion have been widely utilized to compute the Earth's 3-D structure. However, the non-linear inversion requires a model of the earthquake source and the retrieved 3-D structure is sensitive to the initial constraints. In contrast, the autoregressive linear inversion does not require the source model. However, this method requires many events to achieve full convergence. In addition, significant disagreement exists between different studies because of the non-uniqueness of the problem and limitations of different methods. We thus apply the neighbourhood algorithm (NA) to measure splitting functions. The NA is an efficient model space search technique and works in two steps: In the first step, the algorithm finds all the models compatible with given data while the posterior probability density of the model parameters are obtained in the second step. The NA can address the problem of non-uniqueness by taking advantage of random sampling of the full model space. The parameter trade-offs are conveniently visualized using joint marginal distributions. In addition, structure coefficients uncertainties can be extracted from the posterior probability distribution. After demonstrating the feasibility of NA with synthetic examples, we compute the splitting functions for the mode 13S2 (sensitive to the inner core) from several large

  12. Characterization of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode III Fracture Toughness Measurement of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is designed to initiate mode III delamination growth in composite laminates. An ECT specimen is a rectangular laminate, containing an edge delamination at the laminate mid-plane. Torsion load is applied to the specimens, resulting in relative transverse shear sliding of the delaminated faces. The test data reduction schemes are intended to yield initiation values of critical mode III strain energy release rate, G(sub IIIc), that are constant with delamination length. The test has undergone several design changes during its development. The objective of this paper was to determine the suitability of the current ECT test design as a mode III fracture test. To this end, ECT tests were conducted on specimens manufactured from IM7/8552 and specimens made from S2/8552 tape laminates. Several specimens, each with different delamination lengths are tested. Detailed, three-dimensional finite element analyses of the specimens were performed. The analysis results were used to calculate the distribution of mode I, mode II, and mode III strain energy release rate along the delamination front. The results indicated that mode III-dominated delamination growth would be initiated from the specimen center. However, in specimens of both material types, the measured values of G(sub IIIc) exhibited significant dependence on delamination length. Furthermore, there was a large amount of scatter in the data. Load-displacement response of the specimens exhibited significant deviation from linearity before specimen failure. X-radiographs of a sample of specimens revealed that damage was initiated in the specimens prior to failure. Further inspection of the failure surfaces is required to identify the damage and determine that mode III delamination is initiated in the specimens.

  13. A measurement of the cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization power spectrum at sub-degree scales with POLARBEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Anthony, A. E.; Halverson, N. W.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Elleflot, T.; Feng, C.; Borrill, J.; Errard, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Flanigan, D.; Dobbs, M.; Gilbert, A.; Fabbian, G.; Collaboration: Polarbear Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    We report a measurement of the B-mode polarization power spectrum in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the POLARBEAR experiment in Chile. The faint B-mode polarization signature carries information about the universe's entire history of gravitational structure formation, and the cosmic inflation that may have occurred in the very early universe. Our measurement covers the angular multipole range 500 < ℓ < 2100 and is based on observations of an effective sky area of 25 deg{sup 2} with 3.'5 resolution at 150 GHz. On these angular scales, gravitational lensing of the CMB by intervening structure in the universe is expected to be the dominant source of B-mode polarization. Including both systematic and statistical uncertainties, the hypothesis of no B-mode polarization power from gravitational lensing is rejected at 97.2% confidence. The band powers are consistent with the standard cosmological model. Fitting a single lensing amplitude parameter A{sub BB} to the measured band powers, A{sub BB}=1.12±0.61(stat){sub −0.12}{sup +0.04}(sys)±0.07(multi), where A{sub BB} = 1 is the fiducial WMAP-9 ΛCDM value. In this expression, 'stat' refers to the statistical uncertainty, 'sys' to the systematic uncertainty associated with possible biases from the instrument and astrophysical foregrounds, and 'multi' to the calibration uncertainties that have a multiplicative effect on the measured amplitude A{sub BB}.

  14. A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background B-mode Polarization Power Spectrum at Sub-degree Scales with POLARBEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Polarbear Collaboration: P. A. R. Ade; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A. E.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A. H.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Linder, E.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Orlando, A.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Schanning, I.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Takakura, S.; Tomaru, T.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    2014-10-01

    We report a measurement of the B-mode polarization power spectrum in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the POLARBEAR experiment in Chile. The faint B-mode polarization signature carries information about the universe's entire history of gravitational structure formation, and the cosmic inflation that may have occurred in the very early universe. Our measurement covers the angular multipole range 500 < l < 2100 and is based on observations of an effective sky area of 25 \\deg ^2 with 3.'5 resolution at 150 GHz. On these angular scales, gravitational lensing of the CMB by intervening structure in the universe is expected to be the dominant source of B-mode polarization. Including both systematic and statistical uncertainties, the hypothesis of no B-mode polarization power from gravitational lensing is rejected at 97.2% confidence. The band powers are consistent with the standard cosmological model. Fitting a single lensing amplitude parameter ABB to the measured band powers, ABB = 1.12 +/- 0.61 (stat) +0.04-0.12(sys) +/- 0.07 (multi), where ABB = 1 is the fiducial WMAP-9 ΛCDM value. In this expression, "stat" refers to the statistical uncertainty, "sys" to the systematic uncertainty associated with possible biases from the instrument and astrophysical foregrounds, and "multi" to the calibration uncertainties that have a multiplicative effect on the measured amplitude ABB .

  15. EBIT in the Magnetic Trapping Mode: Mass Spectrometry, Atomic Lifetime Measurements, and Charge Transfer Reactions of Highly Charged Atomic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikhard, L; Beiersdorfer, P; Trabert, E

    2001-07-10

    Although it may sound like a contradiction in terms, the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) works as an ion trap even when the electron beam is switched off. We present various experiments that exploit the ''magnetic trapping mode'' for investigations of ion confinement, charge exchange processes, atomic lifetime and ion mass measurements.

  16. A scheme for approximate conditional teleportation of entangled two-mode cavity state without Bell state measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhi-Rong

    2008-05-01

    An alternative scheme to approximately conditionally teleport entangled two-mode cavity state without Bell state measurement in cavity QED is proposed. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of a ladder-type three-level atom with two bimodal cavities. The entangled cavity state is reconstructed with only one atom interacting with the two cavities successively.

  17. Participation Weight Estimation in Power Oscillation Mode based on Synchronized Phasor Measurements and Auto-spectrum Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changsong; Watanabe, Masayuki; Mitani, Yasunori; Monchusi, Bessie

    In order to effectively monitor and control the interarea oscillations in a power system, it is crucial to obtain the full knowledge about the oscillation mode, such as participation level, mode distribution, frequency and damping. The paper presents an approach to estimate the participation weight of a generator in an oscillation mode based on synchronized phasor measurements and auto-spectrum analysis. The participation weight is a quantity defined in this paper to indicate the relative participation of one generator in one oscillation mode of interest. Compared to traditional participation factor computed from model-based modal analysis, the participation weight is directly defined and estimated based on the measurements of system output signals. The input-output relationship for a constant-parameter linear system when subjected to a stationary white noise disturbance is introduced to establish connection between measureable power system response quantities and participation weight. The auto-spectrum analysis is adopted to estimate participation weight with demonstrative examples, which include simulation examples as well as practical examples using measured phasor data from the CampusWAMS.

  18. Application of strongly overcoupled resonant modes of long-period fiber gratings to measure the adulteration of olive oil.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Palas; Basumallick, Nandini; Dasgupta, Kamal; Ghosh, Ajay; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath

    2016-07-01

    We have shown that strongly overcoupled resonant modes of long-period fiber gratings (LPFGs) can be used to assess the adulteration of olive oil. In this background, we investigate the response characteristics of strongly overcoupled resonant modes of different orders to a surrounding medium, the refractive index (RI) of which is greater than that of the fiber cladding, and in the range where a precise refractive index measurement is immensely useful for inspecting the quality of olive oils and other edible oils. A theoretical simulation that would help in designing a sensor with suitable sensitivity and range of measurement has been presented in detail and also validated with experimental results. It was interesting to observe that in a high RI surrounding, a lower order overcoupled resonant mode is much more sensitive as compared to a higher-order one having a similar coupling coefficient. A quantitative analysis demonstrates that for a particular LPFG, the sensitivity of a strongly overcoupled LP06 mode was found to be ∼2000  dB/RIU, while that of the LP07 mode having similar coupling strength was ∼550  dB/RIU in the surrounding refractive index range from 1.458 to 1.520. The results have been validated experimentally. PMID:27409199

  19. Development of Portable Beta Spectrometer for Sr-90 Activity Measurements in Field Conditions and Its Application in Rehabilitation Activities at RRC Kurchatov Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, V.N.; Volkovich, A.G.; Ivanov, O.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Smirnov, S.V.; Volkov, V.G.

    2006-07-01

    A new method to measure the Sr-90 ground specific activity in situ was developed. It is based on the count-rates determination in selected energy ranges of two registered apparatus spectra: total {beta} + {gamma} spectrum and {gamma} spectrum. A numerical simulation of the detector performance defined these energy ranges used for calculation of activity. For implementation of the proposed method a portable instrument was developed and manufactured. Parameters of the instrument are the following: the range of measurement for a specific activity mode - (60 - 3.0x10{sup 6}) Bq/kg; the range for total activity countable mode (0.5 - 2.0x10{sup 4}) Bq; minimum measurable specific activity Sr-90 for samples containing natural radionuclides - 60 Bq/kg, minimum measurable activity for samples not containing NRN - 0.5 Bq. (authors)

  20. Scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction measurements at beamline 7.0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Toomes, R.; Booth, N.A.; Woodruff, D.P.

    1997-04-01

    This report covers the results of the authors first experimental run, in May 1996, conducted to explore the advantages offered by the high spectral resolution available at the SpectroMicroscopy Facility on beam line 7.0 to conduct scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction (PhD). This technique is now a well-established method for the determination of local structure of atomic and molecular adsorbates on well-characterised surfaces. The directly-emitted component of an adsorbate core-level photoelectron wavefield interferes coherently with components of the same wavefield elastically scattered by surrounding atoms, leading to a modulation in the photoemission intensity as a function of kinetic energy in any specific emission direction. A series of such PhD modulation spectra, each typically covering energies from 50-500 eV, for a series of different emission directions, provides the basis for a quantitative structure determination of the emitter-scatterer geometry. Within the last years the authors have developed an integrated approach to extract the structural information from these photoelectron diffraction (PhD) spectra in a quantitative way. A direct data inversion technique (the so-called Projection method) provides a first-order estimate of the local adsorbate geometry in the form of an `image` of the scatterer atoms which are nearest neighbours to the emitter. This information is then used as a starting model for optimisation of the structural parameters by comparing the experimental PhD spectra with the results of multiple scattering simulations using a code developed by Fritzsche. The optimisation uses an automated trial-and-error procedure by minimising a reliability factor which provides an objective measure of the quality of agreement between experiment and theory. The authors have successfully applied this approach to the structure determination of about 30 adsorption systems.

  1. Investigation of impinging jet resonant modes using unsteady pressure-sensitive paint measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy; Edstrand, Adam; Alvi, Farrukh; Cattafesta, Louis; Yorita, Daisuke; Asai, Keisuke

    2015-05-01

    At given nozzle to plate spacings, the flow field of high-speed impinging jets is known to be characterized by a resonance phenomenon. Large coherent structures that convect downstream and impinge on the surface create strong acoustic waves that interact with the inherently unstable shear layer at the nozzle exit. This feedback mechanism, driven by the coherent structures in the jet shear layer, can either be axisymmetric or helical in nature. Fast-response pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is applied to the impingement surface to map the unsteady pressure distribution associated with these resonant modes. Phase-averaged results acquired at several kHz are obtained using a flush mounted unsteady pressure transducer on the impingement plate as a reference signal. Tests are conducted on a Mach 1.5 jet at nozzle to plate spacings of . The resulting phase-averaged distribution reveals dramatically different flow fields at the corresponding impingement heights. The existence of a purely axisymmetric mode with a frequency of 6.3 kHz is identified at and is characterized by concentric rings of higher/lower pressure that propagate radially with increasing phase. Two simultaneous modes are observed at with one being a dominant symmetric mode at 7.1 kHz and the second a sub-dominant helical mode at 4.3 kHz. Complimentary phase-conditioned Schlieren images are also obtained visualizing the flow structures associated with each mode and are consistent with the PSP results.

  2. Activation and Connectivity within the Default Mode Network Contribute Independently to Future-Oriented Thought.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoxiao; Yuan, Hong; Lei, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Future-oriented thought, a projection of the self into the future to pre-experience an event, has been linked to default mode network (DMN). Previous studies showed that the DMN was generally divided into two subsystems: anterior part (aDMN) and posterior part (pDMN). The former is mostly related to self-referential mental thought and latter engages in episodic memory retrieval and scene construction. However, functional contribution of these two subsystems and functional connectivity between them during future-oriented thought has rarely been reported. Here, we investigated these issues by using an experimental paradigm that allowed prospective, episodic decisions concerning one's future (Future Self) to be compared with self-referential decisions about one's immediate present state (Present Self). Additionally, two parallel control conditions that relied on non-personal semantic knowledge (Future Non-Self Control and Present Non-Self Control) were conducted. Our results revealed that the aDMN was preferentially activated when participants reflected on their present states, whereas the pDMN exhibited preferentially activation when participants reflected on their personal future. Intriguingly, significantly decreased aDMN-pDMN connectivity was observed when thinking about their future relative to other conditions. These results support the notion that activation within these subsystems and connectivity between them contribute differently to future-oriented thought. PMID:26867499

  3. Mode of physical activity and self-efficacy in older adults: a latent growth curve analysis.

    PubMed

    McAuley, E; Katula, J; Mihalko, S L; Blissmer, B; Duncan, T E; Pena, M; Dunn, E

    1999-09-01

    A randomized controlled trial examined the effect of two physical activity modes on changes in self-efficacy over the course of a 12-month period in older, formerly sedentary adults (N = 174, M age = 65.5 years). Participants were randomized into either an aerobic activity group or a stretching and toning group. Structural equation modeling was employed to conduct multiple sample latent growth curve analyses of individual growth in exercise and physical self-efficacy over time. Results revealed a curvilinear growth pattern for both types of efficacy with increases occurring over the first 6 months followed by declines at the 6-month follow-up. There was a significant treatment by mean level growth interaction for exercise efficacy with both groups increasing over time, but the aerobic group evidenced a twofold increase in growth over the stretching group. Structural analyses indicated that frequency of exercise participation was a significant predictor of overall growth in efficacy, and improvements in fitness were only related to exercise efficacy growth in the stretching group. Findings are discussed in terms of social cognitive theory and further application of latent growth curve modeling to studies of physical activity effects in older adults. PMID:10542821

  4. Activation and Connectivity within the Default Mode Network Contribute Independently to Future-Oriented Thought

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoxiao; Yuan, Hong; Lei, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Future-oriented thought, a projection of the self into the future to pre-experience an event, has been linked to default mode network (DMN). Previous studies showed that the DMN was generally divided into two subsystems: anterior part (aDMN) and posterior part (pDMN). The former is mostly related to self-referential mental thought and latter engages in episodic memory retrieval and scene construction. However, functional contribution of these two subsystems and functional connectivity between them during future-oriented thought has rarely been reported. Here, we investigated these issues by using an experimental paradigm that allowed prospective, episodic decisions concerning one’s future (Future Self) to be compared with self-referential decisions about one’s immediate present state (Present Self). Additionally, two parallel control conditions that relied on non-personal semantic knowledge (Future Non-Self Control and Present Non-Self Control) were conducted. Our results revealed that the aDMN was preferentially activated when participants reflected on their present states, whereas the pDMN exhibited preferentially activation when participants reflected on their personal future. Intriguingly, significantly decreased aDMN-pDMN connectivity was observed when thinking about their future relative to other conditions. These results support the notion that activation within these subsystems and connectivity between them contribute differently to future-oriented thought. PMID:26867499

  5. Modulation of western North Pacific tropical cyclone activity by the Atlantic Meridional Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Villarini, Gabriele; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Rosati, Anthony; Yang, Xiaosong; Jia, Liwei; Zeng, Fanrong

    2016-05-01

    This study examines the year-to-year modulation of the western North Pacific (WNP) tropical cyclones (TC) activity by the Atlantic Meridional Mode (AMM) using both observations and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Forecast-oriented Low Ocean Resolution Version of CM2.5 (FLOR) global coupled model. 1. The positive (negative) AMM phase suppresses (enhances) WNP TC activity in observations. The anomalous occurrence of WNP TCs results mainly from changes in TC genesis in the southeastern part of the WNP. 2. The observed responses of WNP TC activity to the AMM are connected to the anomalous zonal vertical wind shear (ZVWS) caused by AMM-induced changes to the Walker circulation. During the positive AMM phase, the warming in the North Atlantic induces strong descending flow in the tropical eastern and central Pacific, which intensifies the Walker cell in the WNP. The intensified Walker cell is responsible for the suppressed (enhanced) TC genesis in the eastern (western) part of the WNP by strengthening (weakening) ZVWS. 3. The observed WNPTC-AMM linkage is examined by the long-term control and idealized perturbations experiment with FLOR-FA. A suite of sensitivity experiments strongly corroborate the observed WNPTC-AMM linkage and underlying physical mechanisms.

  6. Direct measurement of loop gain and bandwidth of phase-locked loop for mode-locked laser.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dong; Tian, Jie; Sun, Fuyu; Huang, Xianhe

    2016-07-25

    A simple and robust technique for measuring the loop gain and bandwidth of a phase-locking loop (PLL) for mode-locked laser is proposed. This technique can be used for the real-time measurement of the PLL's real loop gain and bandwidth in a closed loop without breaking its locking state. The agreement of the experimental result and theoretical calculation proves the validity of the proposed technique for measuring the loop gain and bandwidth. This technique with a simple configuration can be easily expanded to other laser's locking system whose loop gain and bandwidth should be measured in advance. PMID:27464173

  7. Small business activity does not measure entrepreneurship.

    PubMed

    Henrekson, Magnus; Sanandaji, Tino

    2014-02-01

    Entrepreneurship policy mainly aims to promote innovative Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. However, the rate of entrepreneurship is commonly proxied using quantity-based metrics, such as small business activity, the self-employment rate, or the number of startups. We argue that those metrics give rise to misleading inferences regarding high-impact Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. To unambiguously identify high-impact entrepreneurs we focus on self-made billionaires (in US dollars) who appear on Forbes Magazine's list and who became wealthy by founding new firms. We identify 996 such billionaire entrepreneurs in 50 countries in 1996-2010, a systematic cross-country study of billionaire entrepreneurs. The rate of billionaire entrepreneurs correlates negatively with self-employment, small business ownership, and firm startup rates. Countries with higher income, higher trust, lower taxes, more venture capital investment, and lower regulatory burdens have higher billionaire entrepreneurship rates but less self-employment. Despite its limitations, the number of billionaire entrepreneurs appears to be a plausible cross-country measure of Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. PMID:24449873

  8. Small business activity does not measure entrepreneurship

    PubMed Central

    Henrekson, Magnus; Sanandaji, Tino

    2014-01-01

    Entrepreneurship policy mainly aims to promote innovative Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. However, the rate of entrepreneurship is commonly proxied using quantity-based metrics, such as small business activity, the self-employment rate, or the number of startups. We argue that those metrics give rise to misleading inferences regarding high-impact Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. To unambiguously identify high-impact entrepreneurs we focus on self-made billionaires (in US dollars) who appear on Forbes Magazine’s list and who became wealthy by founding new firms. We identify 996 such billionaire entrepreneurs in 50 countries in 1996–2010, a systematic cross-country study of billionaire entrepreneurs. The rate of billionaire entrepreneurs correlates negatively with self-employment, small business ownership, and firm startup rates. Countries with higher income, higher trust, lower taxes, more venture capital investment, and lower regulatory burdens have higher billionaire entrepreneurship rates but less self-employment. Despite its limitations, the number of billionaire entrepreneurs appears to be a plausible cross-country measure of Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. PMID:24449873

  9. Cyclodextrin type dependent host-guest interaction mode with phthalocyanine and their influence on photodynamic activity to cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Wang, A; Ma, Y J; Xuan, H Y; Zhao, B; Li, X D; Zhou, J H; Zhou, L; Wei, S H

    2016-09-01

    Three host-guest complexes of phthalocyanines (Pc) with α-, β- or γ-cyclodextrins (CDs) were prepared and their interaction modes, reactive oxygen species (ROSs) generation ability and in vitro anticancer activities were studied and compared. After forming complex with CD, the aggregation degree of Pc was greatly decreased and the water solubility and photodynamic activity was sharply increased. Computer modeling results indicated that the interaction modes between Pc and CDs were varied with different kinds of CD. Especially, the complex of Pc and β-CD has superior stability, ROSs generation ability, and anticancer activity to other complexes. PMID:27185136

  10. In-space technology flight experiments: Middeck 0-gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) and Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venneri, Samuel L.

    1991-01-01

    The topics addressed are covered in viewgraph form. The objective of the Middeck 0-gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) programs is to study gravity dependent nonlinearities associated with fluid slosh and truss structure dynamics. MODE provides a reusable facility for on-orbit dynamics testing of small scale test articles in the shirt sleeve environment on the Shuttle middeck. Flight program objective of Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is to study gravity effects on the performance and stability of controlled structures.

  11. Accuracy and robustness of a simple algorithm to measure vessel diameter from B-mode ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Brian E; Flavin, Daniel C; Bauschatz, Emily; Whitney, Heather M

    2016-06-01

    Measurement of changes in arterial vessel diameter can be used to assess the state of cardiovascular health, but the use of such measurements as biomarkers is contingent upon the accuracy and robustness of the measurement. This work presents a simple algorithm for measuring diameter from B-mode images derived from vascular ultrasound. The algorithm is based upon Gaussian curve fitting and a Viterbi search process. We assessed the accuracy of the algorithm by measuring the diameter of a digital reference object (DRO) and ultrasound-derived images of a carotid artery. We also assessed the robustness of the algorithm by manipulating the quality of the image. Across a broad range of signal-to-noise ratio and with varying image edge error, the algorithm measured vessel diameter within 0.7% of the creation dimensions of the DRO. This was a similar level of difference (0.8%) to when an ultrasound image was used. When SNR dropped to 18 dB, measurement error increased to 1.3%. When edge position was varied by as much as 10%, measurement error was well maintained between 0.68 and 0.75%. All these errors fall well within the margin of error established by the medical physics community for quantitative ultrasound measurements. We conclude that this simple algorithm provides consistent and accurate measurement of lumen diameter from B-mode images across a broad range of image quality. PMID:27055985

  12. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint. PMID:25541751

  13. Fiber Bragg grating writing technique for multimode optical fibers providing stimulation of few-mode effects in measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdine, Anton V.; Vasilets, Alexander A.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Morozov, Oleg G.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Kuznetzov, Artem A.; Faskhutdinov, Lenar M.; Kafarova, Anastasia M.; Minaeva, Alina Y.; Sevruk, Nikita L.

    2016-03-01

    This work is concerned with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) writing technique developed for graded-index multimode optical fibers applied in measurement systems based on a few-mode effects. We present some results of experimental approbation of proposed technique with Bragg wavelength 1310 and 1550 nm on samples of graded-index multimode optical fibers 50/125 of both new-generations Cat. OM2+/OM3 and old Cat. OM2 with preliminary measured refractive index profiles. While the first group fibers of Cat. OM2+/OM3 was characterized by almost ideal smooth graded refractive index profile and some fiber profile samples of this group contains thin central peak, the second fiber group profiles of Cat. OM2 differ by great central core defects representing dip or thick peak. Results of described FBG spectral response measurements under excitation of laser pigtailed by single-mode fiber are represented.

  14. Domain switching emission from the mixed-mode crack in ferroelectrics by birefringence measurement and phase field modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; Pan, Suxin; Liu, Qida; Wang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of domain switching near the tip of a mixed-mode crack (e.g., an inclined crack) is observed in ferroelectrics. The birefringence technique is used to measure the optical quantities to demonstrate the domain switching near the crack tip. The results show an intriguing feature that there appears electrical creep and domain switching emission from the crack tip. The actual time-dependence of domain switching emission and its anisotropic velocity is approximately measured. Moreover, the phase field modeling is developed to simulate polarization distribution and domain switching near the crack tip where the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau equation is used to describe the change of polarization. The phase field results indicate the same features of domain switching emission from the mixed-mode crack. A good agreement between phase field simulation and birefringence measurement is concluded by setting the appropriate kinetic coefficient in the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau equation.

  15. Design and measurement of a TE13 input converter for high order mode gyrotron travelling wave amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Guo; Shu, Guoxiang; Yan, Ran; Wang, Li; Agurgo Balfour, E.; Fu, Hao; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2016-03-01

    A technique to launch a circular TE13 mode to interact with the helical electron beam of a gyrotron travelling wave amplifier is proposed and verified by simulation and cold test in this paper. The high order (HOM) TE13 mode is excited by a broadband Y-type power divider with the aid of a cylindrical waveguide system. Using grooves and convex strips loaded at the lateral planes of the output cylindrical waveguide, the electric fields of the potential competing TE32 and TE71 modes are suppressed to allow the transmission of the dominant TE13 mode. The converter performance for different structural dimensions of grooves and convex strips is studied in detail and excellent results have been achieved. Simulation predicts that the average transmission is ˜-1.8 dB with a 3 dB bandwidth of 7.2 GHz (91.5-98.7 GHz) and port reflection is less than -15 dB. The conversion efficiency to the TE32 and TE71 modes are, respectively, under -15 dB and -24 dB in the operating frequency band. Such an HOM converter operating at W-band has been fabricated and cold tested with the radiation boundary. Measurement from the vector network analyzer cold test and microwave simulations show a good reflection performance for the converter.

  16. Techniques for Identifying and Measuring High Order Modes in RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, D.A.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    We report on a number of techniques which can be used to unravel the higher-order-mode spectrum of an RF cavity. Most of these techniques involve the application of basic symmetry principles and require for their application only that the cavity exhibit some basic symmetry, possibly broken by the presence of couplers, apertures, etc., which permits a classification of these modes in terms of some property characterized by that symmetry, e.g., multipolarity for a cavity which is basically a figure of revolution. Several examples of the application of these techniques are given.

  17. Amplifier for measuring low-level signals in the presence of high common mode voltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukens, F. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high common mode rejection differential amplifier wherein two serially arranged Darlington amplifier stages are employed and any common mode voltage is divided between them by a resistance network. The input to the first Darlington amplifier stage is coupled to a signal input resistor via an amplifier which isolates the input and presents a high impedance across this resistor. The output of the second Darlington stage is transposed in scale via an amplifier stage which has its input a biasing circuit which effects a finite biasing of the two Darlington amplifier stages.

  18. Regulators of complement activity mediate inhibitory mechanisms through a common C3b-binding mode.

    PubMed

    Forneris, Federico; Wu, Jin; Xue, Xiaoguang; Ricklin, Daniel; Lin, Zhuoer; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Volokhina, Elena; Granneman, Joke Cm; Hauhart, Richard; Bertram, Paula; Liszewski, M Kathryn; Atkinson, John P; Lambris, John D; Gros, Piet

    2016-05-17

    Regulators of complement activation (RCA) inhibit complement-induced immune responses on healthy host tissues. We present crystal structures of human RCA (MCP, DAF, and CR1) and a smallpox virus homolog (SPICE) bound to complement component C3b. Our structural data reveal that up to four consecutive homologous CCP domains (i-iv), responsible for inhibition, bind in the same orientation and extended arrangement at a shared binding platform on C3b. Large sequence variations in CCP domains explain the diverse C3b-binding patterns, with limited or no contribution of some individual domains, while all regulators show extensive contacts with C3b for the domains at the third site. A variation of ~100° rotation around the longitudinal axis is observed for domains binding at the fourth site on C3b, without affecting the overall binding mode. The data suggest a common evolutionary origin for both inhibitory mechanisms, called decay acceleration and cofactor activity, with variable C3b binding through domains at sites ii, iii, and iv, and provide a framework for understanding RCA disease-related mutations and immune evasion. PMID:27013439

  19. PCB bioavailability control in Lumbriculus variegatus through different modes of activated carbon addition to sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Xueli Sun; Upal Ghosh

    2007-07-01

    PCB bioavailability to a freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) was studied using sediments from a PCB-impacted river that was treated with different modes of granular activated carbon (GAC) addition. The GAC used was bituminous coal-based type TOP. For sediment treated with 2.6% GAC and mixed for 2 min prior to L. variegatus addition, the reduction in total PCB biouptake was 70% for 75-300 {mu}m size carbon, and 92% for the 45-180 {mu}m size carbon. For the case where the GAC was placed as a thin layer on top of the sediments without mixing, the reduction in total PCB uptake was 70%. PCB biouptake kinetics study using treated and untreated sediment showed that the maximum PCB uptake in tissue was achieved at 28 days and decreased after that time. Although the absolute uptake of PCB changed over time, the percent reduction in total PCB uptake upon GAC amendment remained constant after the first few days. Our results indicated that PCB bioavailability was reduced upon the addition and little or no mixing of GAC into sediments. PCB aqueous equilibrium concentration and desorption rates were greatly reduced after GAC amendment, indicating reductions in the two primary mechanisms of PCB bioavailability in sediments: chemical activity and chemical accessibility. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. State observer-based sliding mode control for semi-active hydro-pneumatic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sizhong; Zhao, Yuzhuang; Liu, Gang; Yang, Lin

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an improved virtual reference model for semi-active suspension to coordinate the vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. The reference model combines the virtues of sky-hook with ground-hook control logic, and the hybrid coefficient is tuned according to the longitudinal and lateral acceleration so as to improve the vehicle stability especially in high-speed condition. Suspension state observer based on unscented Kalman filter is designed. A sliding mode controller (SMC) is developed to track the states of the reference model. The stability of the SMC strategy is proven by means of Lyapunov function taking into account the nonlinear damper characteristics and sprung mass variation of the vehicle. Finally, the performance of the controller is demonstrated under three typical working conditions: the random road excitation, speed bump road and sharp acceleration and braking. The simulation results indicated that, compared with the traditional passive suspension, the proposed control algorithm can offer a better coordination between vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. This approach provides a viable alternative to costlier active suspension control systems for commercial vehicles.

  1. Mapping Inhibitor Binding Modes on an Active Cysteine Protease via NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gregory M.; Balouch, Eaman; Goetz, David H.; Lazic, Ana; McKerrow, James H.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Cruzain is a member of the papain/cathepsin-L family of cysteine proteases, and the major cysteine protease of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas’ disease. We report an auto-induction methodology that provides soluble-cruzain at high yields (> 30 mg per liter in minimal media). These increased yields provide sufficient quantities of active enzyme for use in NMR-based ligand mapping. Using CD and NMR spectroscopy, we also examined the solution-state structural dynamics of the enzyme in complex with a covalently bound vinyl sulfone inhibitor (K777). We report the backbone amide and side chain carbon chemical shift assignments of cruzain in complex with K777. These resonance assignments were used to identify and map residues located in the substrate binding pocket, including the catalytic Cys25 and His162. Selective 15N-Cys, 15N-His, and 13C-Met labeling was performed to quickly assess cruzain-ligand interactions for a set of eight low molecular weight compounds exhibiting micromolar binding or inhibition. Chemical shift perturbation mapping verifies that six of the eight compounds bind to cruzain at the active site. Three different binding modes were delineated for the compounds, namely covalent, non-covalent, and non-interacting. These results provide examples of how NMR spectroscopy can be used to screen compounds for fast evaluation of enzyme-inhibitor interactions in order to facilitate lead compound identification and subsequent structural studies. PMID:23181936

  2. The MODE family of on-orbit experiments: The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.; Deluis, Javier; Waldman, Mel; Bicos, Andy

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment entitled the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), proposed by the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is described. This is the second in a family of flight experiments being developed at MIT. The first is the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) which investigates the nonlinear behavior of contained fluids and truss structures in zero gravity. The objective of the MACE program is to investigate and validate the modeling of the dynamics of an actively controlled flexible, articulating, multibody platform free floating in zero gravity. A rationale and experimental approach for the program are presented. The rationale shows that on-orbit testing, coupled with ground testing and a strong analytical program, is necessary in order to fully understand both how flexibility of the platform affects the pointing problem, as well as how gravity perturbs this structural flexibility causing deviations between 1- and 0-gravity behavior. The experimental approach captures the essential physics of multibody platforms, by identifying the appropriate attributes, tests, and performance metrics of the test article and defines the tests required to successfully validate the analytical framework.

  3. The MODE family of on-orbit experiments: The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.; Deluis, Javier; Waldman, Mel; Bicos, Andy

    1990-12-01

    A flight experiment entitled the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), proposed by the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is described. This is the second in a family of flight experiments being developed at MIT. The first is the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) which investigates the nonlinear behavior of contained fluids and truss structures in zero gravity. The objective of the MACE program is to investigate and validate the modeling of the dynamics of an actively controlled flexible, articulating, multibody platform free floating in zero gravity. A rationale and experimental approach for the program are presented. The rationale shows that on-orbit testing, coupled with ground testing and a strong analytical program, is necessary in order to fully understand both how flexibility of the platform affects the pointing problem, as well as how gravity perturbs this structural flexibility causing deviations between 1- and 0-gravity behavior. The experimental approach captures the essential physics of multibody platforms, by identifying the appropriate attributes, tests, and performance metrics of the test article and defines the tests required to successfully validate the analytical framework.

  4. Automated inter-station measurements of fundamental mode phase velocities, and tomographic inversion for Central and Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soomro, Riaz Ahmed; Weidle, Christian; Lebedev, Sergei; Cristiano, Luigia; Meier, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Broad-band phase velocity measurements of fundamental mode surface waves yield information on the isotropic as well as anisotropic structure of the crust and the upper mantle. Dispersion curves may be determined by cross correlating direct and coda fundamental mode waveforms recorded at two stations on the great circle path. In many cases the cross correlation is less affected by scattering than the waveform itself. Examples show that broad band dispersion curves may be obtained by this interferometric measurement. Single event measurements may however be perturbed by off-path propagation, scattering at lateral heterogeneity, higher modes, noise, and erroneous response information. Due to the smooth nature of the 1D fundamental mode sensitivity kernels smooth dispersion curves are expected for media with moderate and smooth lateral heterogeneity. Therefore, smooth parts of the dispersion curves are selected. This reduces the influence of scattering, higher modes, and noise. Furthermore, comparison of a large number of dispersion curves measured along one path for both propagation directions may reveal smooth perturbations caused by off-path propagation and erroneous response information. Finally, after rejection of outliers smooth measurements for a larger number of events are averaged to find a path-average dispersion curve. Previously, the selection of the smooth part of the dispersion curve was made manually and if there were many station pair combinations and a large number of events the manual processing was time consuming. We now introduce the automated selection of the phase velocity curves, based on a set of rigorous, consistent, frequency- and distance-dependent criteria. The procedure is applied to around one million events and about 60,000 paths on permanent and temporary networks including TOR, and PASSEQ networks in central and northern Europe. Fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves are measured and anisotropic phase-velocity maps

  5. COMPARISON OF SULFUR MEASUREMENTS FROM A REGIONAL FINE PARTICLE NETWORK WITH CONCURRENT ACID MODES NETWORK RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 um) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Environmental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during a two year period in 1988-90. he 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the...

  6. Measurement of guided mode wavenumbers in soft tissue-bone mimicking phantoms using ultrasonic axial transmission.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangang; Foiret, Josquin; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Talmant, Maryline; Su, Zhongqing; Cheng, Li; Laugier, Pascal

    2012-05-21

    Human soft tissue is an important factor that influences the assessment of human long bones using quantitative ultrasound techniques. To investigate such influence, a series of soft tissue-bone phantoms (a bone-mimicking plate coated with a layer of water, glycerol or silicon rubber) were ultrasonically investigated using a probe with multi-emitter and multi-receiver arrays in an axial transmission configuration. A singular value decomposition signal processing technique was applied to extract the frequency-dependent wavenumbers of several guided modes. The results indicate that the presence of a soft tissue-mimicking layer introduces additional guided modes predicted by a fluid waveguide model. The modes propagating in the bone-mimicking plate covered by the soft-tissue phantom are only slightly modified compared to their counterparts in the free bone-mimicking plate, and they are still predicted by an elastic transverse isotropic two-dimensional waveguide. Altogether these observations suggest that the soft tissue-bone phantoms can be modeled as two independent waveguides. Even in the presence of the overlying soft tissue-mimicking layer, the modes propagating in the bone-mimicking plate can still be extracted and identified. These results suggest that our approach can be applied for the purpose of the characterization of the material and structural properties of cortical bone. PMID:22538382

  7. Measurements of differential group delay and chromatic dispersion for LP01 and LP11 modes of few-mode fibers with depressed claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Nori; Ohashi, Masaharu; Maruyama, Ryo; Kuwaki, Nobuo

    2015-02-01

    The chromatic dispersion of the LP11 mode in a few-mode fiber with low differential group delay is evaluated experimentally. A differential group delay of less than 100 ps/km around 1550 nm can be evaluated with the modal interferometer method. The white-light interferometric method confirms that the LP11 mode is behind the LP01 mode in the 1300-1600 nm wavelength region. The difference between the chromatic dispersion values of the two modes is less than 0.5 ps/km/nm, which means that the optical pulse spreading characteristics of the LP11 mode are similar to those of the LP01 mode for fibers with depressed claddings.

  8. Methods to Measure Physical Activity Behaviors in Health Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzhugh, Eugene C.

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is an important concept to measure in health education research. The health education researcher might need to measure physical activity because it is the primary measure of interest, or PA might be a confounding measure that needs to be controlled for in statistical analysis. The purpose of this commentary is to…

  9. Measurements of sideband mode-coupling effects and linear MHD growth rates associated with the ponderomotive force

    SciTech Connect

    Meassick, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the interactions of rf waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) with flute interchange modes are presented. Interactions between the applied l = +1 rf wave and an m = {minus}1 flute mode give rise to sidebands above and below the rf frequency with mode numbers of l = 0 and l = +2 respectively. The contribution of the sideband terms to perturbed energy are shown to cancel 40% of the direct ponderomotive contribution for w/w{sub ci} = 1.25. This is less then the 90% predicted by self-consistent theories of the ponderomotive force for an applied l = +1 rf wave above the ion cyclotron frequency with a large separation between the plasma and the vacuum vessel. Measurements of the linear growth and decay rate of the flute instability in the presence of rf are presented. These measurements allow a determination of the net stabilizing force on the plasma. The measured growth rate is in good agreement with that calculated by considering only the curvature driven instability and the ponderomotive force.

  10. Numerical Technique for Analyzing Rotating Rake Mode Measurements in a Duct With Passive Treatment and Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2007-01-01

    A technique is presented for the analysis of measured data obtained from a rotating microphone rake system. The system is designed to measure the interaction modes of ducted fans. A Fourier analysis of the data from the rotating system results in a set of circumferential mode levels at each radial location of a microphone inside the duct. Radial basis functions are then least-squares fit to this data to obtain the radial mode amplitudes. For ducts with soft walls and mean flow, the radial basis functions must be numerically computed. The linear companion matrix method is used to obtain both the eigenvalues of interest, without an initial guess, and the radial basis functions. The governing equations allow for the mean flow to have a boundary layer at the wall. In addition, a nonlinear least-squares method is used to adjust the wall impedance to best fit the data in an attempt to use the rotating system as an in-duct wall impedance measurement tool. Simulated and measured data are used to show the effects of wall impedance and mean flow on the computed results.

  11. Colorimetry and SERS dual-mode detection of telomerase activity: combining rapid screening with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Chen, Hui; Hu, Guohua; Liu, Min; Chen, Peng; Cui, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    As an important biomarker and therapeutic target, telomerase has attracted considerable attention concerning its detection and monitoring. Here, we present a colorimetry and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dual-mode telomerase activity detection method, which has several distinctive advantages. First, colorimetric functionality allows rapid preliminary discrimination of telomerase activity by the naked eye. Second, the employment of SERS technique results in greatly improved detection sensitivity. Third, the combination of colorimetry and SERS into one detection system can ensure highly efficacious and sensitive screening of numerous samples. Besides, the avoidance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures further guarantees fine reliability and simplicity. Generally, the presented method is realized by an ``elongate and capture'' procedure. To be specific, gold nanoparticles modified with Raman molecules and telomeric repeat complementary oligonucleotide are employed as the colorimetric-SERS bifunctional reporting nanotag, while magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with telomerase substrate oligonucleotide are used as the capturing substrate. Telomerase can synthesize and elongate telomeric repeats onto the capturing substrate. The elongated telomeric repeats subsequently facilitate capturing of the reporting nanotag via hybridization between telomeric repeat and its complementary strand. The captured nanotags can cause a significant difference in the color and SERS intensity of the magnetically separated sediments. Thus both the color and SERS can be used as indicators of the telomerase activity. With fast screening ability and outstanding sensitivity, we anticipate that this method would greatly promote practical application of telomerase-based early-stage cancer diagnosis.As an important biomarker and therapeutic target, telomerase has attracted considerable attention concerning its detection and monitoring. Here, we present a colorimetry and

  12. Constant-distance mode SECM as a tool to visualize local electrocatalytic activity of oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Michaela; Erichsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multidimensional shearforce-based constant-distance mode scanning electrochemical microscopy (4D SF/CD-SECM) was utilized for the investigation of the activity distribution of oxygen reduction catalysts. Carbon-supported Pt model catalyst powders have been immobilized in recessed microelectrodes and compared to a spot preparation technique. Microcavities serve as platform for the binder-free catalyst sample preparation exhibiting beneficial properties for constant-distance mode SECM imaging concerning modified surface area and catalyst loading. The integration of the redox competition mode of SECM into the detection scheme of the 4D SF/CD mode is demonstrated for specifically adapting high-resolution SECM experiments to powder-based catalyst preparations. PMID:24600538

  13. The Self-Pleasantness Judgment Modulates the Encoding Performance and the Default Mode Network Activity.

    PubMed

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Cerles, Melanie; Ramdeen, Kylee T; Boudiaf, Naila; Pichat, Cedric; Hot, Pascal; Baciu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we evaluated the effect of self-relevance on cerebral activity and behavioral performance during an incidental encoding task. Recent findings suggest that pleasantness judgments reliably induce self-oriented (internal) thoughts and increase default mode network (DMN) activity. We hypothesized that this increase in DMN activity would relate to increased memory recognition for pleasantly-judged stimuli (which depend on internally-oriented attention) but decreased recognition for unpleasantly-judged items (which depend on externally-oriented attention). To test this hypothesis, brain activity was recorded from 21 healthy participants while they performed a pleasantness judgment requiring them to rate visual stimuli as pleasant or unpleasant. One hour later, participants performed a surprise memory recognition test outside of the scanner. Thus, we were able to evaluate the effects of pleasant and unpleasant judgments on cerebral activity and incidental encoding. The behavioral results showed that memory recognition was better for items rated as pleasant than items rated as unpleasant. The whole brain analysis indicated that successful encoding (SE) activates the inferior frontal and lateral temporal cortices, whereas unsuccessful encoding (UE) recruits two key medial posterior DMN regions, the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus (PCU). A region of interest (ROI) analysis including classic DMN areas, revealed significantly greater involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in pleasant compared to unpleasant judgments, suggesting this region's involvement in self-referential (i.e., internal) processing. This area may be responsible for the greater recognition performance seen for pleasant stimuli. Furthermore, a significant interaction between the encoding performance (successful vs. unsuccessful) and pleasantness was observed for the PCC, PCU and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Overall, our

  14. The Self-Pleasantness Judgment Modulates the Encoding Performance and the Default Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Cerles, Melanie; Ramdeen, Kylee T.; Boudiaf, Naila; Pichat, Cedric; Hot, Pascal; Baciu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we evaluated the effect of self-relevance on cerebral activity and behavioral performance during an incidental encoding task. Recent findings suggest that pleasantness judgments reliably induce self-oriented (internal) thoughts and increase default mode network (DMN) activity. We hypothesized that this increase in DMN activity would relate to increased memory recognition for pleasantly-judged stimuli (which depend on internally-oriented attention) but decreased recognition for unpleasantly-judged items (which depend on externally-oriented attention). To test this hypothesis, brain activity was recorded from 21 healthy participants while they performed a pleasantness judgment requiring them to rate visual stimuli as pleasant or unpleasant. One hour later, participants performed a surprise memory recognition test outside of the scanner. Thus, we were able to evaluate the effects of pleasant and unpleasant judgments on cerebral activity and incidental encoding. The behavioral results showed that memory recognition was better for items rated as pleasant than items rated as unpleasant. The whole brain analysis indicated that successful encoding (SE) activates the inferior frontal and lateral temporal cortices, whereas unsuccessful encoding (UE) recruits two key medial posterior DMN regions, the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus (PCU). A region of interest (ROI) analysis including classic DMN areas, revealed significantly greater involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in pleasant compared to unpleasant judgments, suggesting this region’s involvement in self-referential (i.e., internal) processing. This area may be responsible for the greater recognition performance seen for pleasant stimuli. Furthermore, a significant interaction between the encoding performance (successful vs. unsuccessful) and pleasantness was observed for the PCC, PCU and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Overall, our

  15. Hippocampal Sharp-Wave Ripples Influence Selective Activation of the Default Mode Network.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Raphael; Adhikari, Mohit H; Hindriks, Rikkert; Mantini, Dante; Murayama, Yusuke; Logothetis, Nikos K; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-03-01

    The default mode network (DMN) is a commonly observed resting-state network (RSN) that includes medial temporal, parietal, and prefrontal regions involved in episodic memory [1-3]. The behavioral relevance of endogenous DMN activity remains elusive, despite an emerging literature correlating resting fMRI fluctuations with memory performance [4, 5]-particularly in DMN regions [6-8]. Mechanistic support for the DMN's role in memory consolidation might come from investigation of large deflections (sharp-waves) in the hippocampal local field potential that co-occur with high-frequency (>80 Hz) oscillations called ripples-both during sleep [9, 10] and awake deliberative periods [11-13]. Ripples are ideally suited for memory consolidation [14, 15], since the reactivation of hippocampal place cell ensembles occurs during ripples [16-19]. Moreover, the number of ripples after learning predicts subsequent memory performance in rodents [20-22] and humans [23], whereas electrical stimulation of the hippocampus after learning interferes with memory consolidation [24-26]. A recent study in macaques showed diffuse fMRI neocortical activation and subcortical deactivation specifically after ripples [27]. Yet it is unclear whether ripples and other hippocampal neural events influence endogenous fluctuations in specific RSNs-like the DMN-unitarily. Here, we examine fMRI datasets from anesthetized monkeys with simultaneous hippocampal electrophysiology recordings, where we observe a dramatic increase in the DMN fMRI signal following ripples, but not following other hippocampal electrophysiological events. Crucially, we find increases in ongoing DMN activity after ripples, but not in other RSNs. Our results relate endogenous DMN fluctuations to hippocampal ripples, thereby linking network-level resting fMRI fluctuations with behaviorally relevant circuit-level neural dynamics. PMID:26898464

  16. Longitudinal changes of amygdala and default mode activation in adolescents prenatally exposed to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihao; Coles, Claire D; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Luo, Yuejia; Hu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) is associated with long-term and negative effect on arousal regulation. Recent neuroimaging studies have examined brain mechanisms related to arousal dysregulation with cross-sectional experimental designs; but longitudinal changes in the brain, reflecting group differences in neurodevelopment, have never been directly examined. To directly assess the interaction of PCE and neurodevelopment, the present study used a longitudinal design to analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data collected from 33 adolescents (21 with PCE and 12 non-exposed controls) while they performed the same working memory task with emotional distracters at two points in time. The mean age of participants was 14.3 years at time_1 and 16.7 years at time_2. With confounding factors statistically controlled, the fMRI data revealed significant exposure-by-time interaction in the activations of the amygdala and default mode network (DMN). For the control adolescents, brain activations associated with emotional arousal (amygdala) and cognitive effort (DMN) were both reduced at time_2 as compared to that at time_1. However, these activation reductions were not observed in the PCE group, indicating persistently high levels of emotional arousal and cognitive effort. In addition, correlations between longitudinal changes in the brain and in behavior have shown that adolescents with persistently high emotional arousal were more likely in need of high cognitive effort; and their cognitive performance was more likely to be affected by distractive challenges. The present results complement and extend previous findings from cross-sectional studies with further evidence supporting the view of PCE associated long-term teratogenic effects on arousal regulation. PMID:26577285

  17. Hippocampal Sharp-Wave Ripples Influence Selective Activation of the Default Mode Network

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Raphael; Adhikari, Mohit H.; Hindriks, Rikkert; Mantini, Dante; Murayama, Yusuke; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Summary The default mode network (DMN) is a commonly observed resting-state network (RSN) that includes medial temporal, parietal, and prefrontal regions involved in episodic memory [1, 2, 3]. The behavioral relevance of endogenous DMN activity remains elusive, despite an emerging literature correlating resting fMRI fluctuations with memory performance [4, 5]—particularly in DMN regions [6, 7, 8]. Mechanistic support for the DMN’s role in memory consolidation might come from investigation of large deflections (sharp-waves) in the hippocampal local field potential that co-occur with high-frequency (>80 Hz) oscillations called ripples—both during sleep [9, 10] and awake deliberative periods [11, 12, 13]. Ripples are ideally suited for memory consolidation [14, 15], since the reactivation of hippocampal place cell ensembles occurs during ripples [16, 17, 18, 19]. Moreover, the number of ripples after learning predicts subsequent memory performance in rodents [20, 21, 22] and humans [23], whereas electrical stimulation of the hippocampus after learning interferes with memory consolidation [24, 25, 26]. A recent study in macaques showed diffuse fMRI neocortical activation and subcortical deactivation specifically after ripples [27]. Yet it is unclear whether ripples and other hippocampal neural events influence endogenous fluctuations in specific RSNs—like the DMN—unitarily. Here, we examine fMRI datasets from anesthetized monkeys with simultaneous hippocampal electrophysiology recordings, where we observe a dramatic increase in the DMN fMRI signal following ripples, but not following other hippocampal electrophysiological events. Crucially, we find increases in ongoing DMN activity after ripples, but not in other RSNs. Our results relate endogenous DMN fluctuations to hippocampal ripples, thereby linking network-level resting fMRI fluctuations with behaviorally relevant circuit-level neural dynamics. PMID:26898464

  18. The BaR-SPOrt experiment: measuring the CMBP E-mode power spectrum from Dome C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretti, E.; Cortiglioni, S.; Bernardi, G.; Casarini, L.; Cecchini, S.; Macculi, C.; Ramponi, M.; Sbarra, C.; Ventura, G.; Monari, J.; Poloni, M.; Poppi, S.; Baralis, M.; Peverini, O. A.; Tascone, R.; Virone, G.; Zannoni, M.; Bonometto, S.; Colombo, L.; Gervasi, M.; Sironi, G.; Fabbri, R.; Natale, V.; Nesti, R.; Nicastro, L.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; de Petris, M.; Boscaleri, A.; Sazhin, M.; Vinyajkin, E.

    The BaR-SPOrt experiment is designed to measure the E-mode power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) in the multipole range 50 < ℓ < 1000. In the current configuration at 32 GHz it can explore up to ℓ = 400. Recent low frequency observations of the target region show that the synchrotron emission should not contamine the CMBP already at 32 GHz. A 6-month observation of a 6° × 6° sky area during the polar night, in ideal environmental conditions, will allow the Italian-French collaboration to both measure the E mode power spectrum with appropriate sensitivity and perform important tests of the anomalous dust emission. The BaR-SPOrt 32 GHz instrument, now under test and ready for operations by Spring 2005, is proposed for 1 2 years Winter operations at Dome C.

  19. Blade tip clearance measurement of the turbine engines based on a multi-mode fiber coupled laser ranging system

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Wu, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jilong

    2014-11-15

    The blade tip clearance is a parameter of great importance to guarantee the efficiency and safety of the turbine engines. In this article, a laser ranging system designed for blade tip clearance measurement is presented. Multi-mode fiber is utilized for optical transmission to guarantee that enough optical power is received by the sensor probe. The model of the tiny sensor probe is presented. The error brought by the optical path difference of different modes of the fiber is estimated and the length of the fiber is limited to reduce this error. The measurement range in which the optical power received by the probe remains essentially unchanged is analyzed. Calibration experiments and dynamic experiments are conducted. The results of the calibration experiments indicate that the resolution of the system is about 0.02 mm and the range of the system is about 9 mm.

  20. Measurements of the evaporation and hygroscopic response of single fine-mode aerosol particles using a Bessel beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Cotterell, Michael I; Mason, Bernard J; Carruthers, Antonia E; Walker, Jim S; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    A single horizontally-propagating zeroth order Bessel laser beam with a counter-propagating gas flow was used to confine single fine-mode aerosol particles over extended periods of time, during which process measurements were performed. Particle sizes were measured by the analysis of the angular variation of light scattered at 532 nm by a particle in the Bessel beam, using either a probe beam at 405 nm or 633 nm. The vapour pressures of glycerol and 1,2,6-hexanetriol particles were determined to be 7.5 ± 2.6 mPa and 0.20 ± 0.02 mPa respectively. The lower volatility of hexanetriol allowed better definition of the trapping environment relative humidity profile over the measurement time period, thus higher precision measurements were obtained compared to those for glycerol. The size evolution of a hexanetriol particle, as well as its refractive index at wavelengths 532 nm and 405 nm, were determined by modelling its position along the Bessel beam propagation length while collecting phase functions with the 405 nm probe beam. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate have been performed on particles as small as 350 nm in radius, with growth curves well described by widely used equilibrium state models. These are the smallest particles for which single-particle hygroscopicity has been measured and represent the first measurements of hygroscopicity on fine mode and near-accumulation mode aerosols, the size regimes bearing the most atmospheric relevance in terms of loading, light extinction and scattering. Finally, the technique is contrasted with other single particle and ensemble methods, and limitations are assessed. PMID:24346588

  1. Measuring the geometry of the universe in the presence of isocurvature modes.

    PubMed

    Dunkley, J; Bucher, M; Ferreira, P G; Moodley, K; Skordis, C

    2005-12-31

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy constrains the geometry of the Universe because the positions of the acoustic peaks of the angular power spectrum depend strongly on the curvature of three-dimensional space. In this Letter we exploit current observations to determine the geometry in the presence of isocurvature modes. Most previous analyses assumed that the primordial perturbations were adiabatic. A priori one might expect that allowing isocurvature modes would substantially degrade constraints on the curvature. We find, however, that with additional data sets, the geometry remains well constrained. When the most general isocurvature perturbation is allowed, the CMB alone can only poorly constrain the geometry to . Including large-scale structure data, one obtains Ohm(0) = 1.07 +/- 0.03, and 1.06 +/- 0.02 when supplemented by supernova data and the determination of H(0). PMID:16486336

  2. The Southern Annular Mode determines interannual and centennial-scale fire activity in temperate southwest Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Michela; Fletcher, Michael-Shawn

    2016-02-01

    Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is the primary mode of atmospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere. While it is well established that the current anthropogenic-driven trend in SAM is responsible for decreased rainfall in southern Australia, its role in driving fire regimes in this region has not been explored. We examined the connection between fire activity and SAM in southwest Tasmania, which lies in the latitudinal band of strongest correlation between SAM and rainfall in the Southern Hemisphere. We reveal that fire activity during a fire season is significantly correlated with the phase of SAM in the preceding year using superposed epoch analysis. We then synthesized new 14 charcoal records from southwest Tasmania spanning the last 1000 years, revealing a tight coupling between fire activity and SAM at centennial timescales, observing a multicentury increase in fire activity over the last 500 years and a spike in fire activity in the 21st century in response to natural and anthropogenic SAM trends.

  3. Measurements of ocean bottom low-angle backscattering by single-mode reverberation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, J; Zhao, W Y; Peng, D Y; Li, H F; Gao, T F; Shang, E C

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of scattering due to interface roughness are usually described by the backscattering matrix for reverberation modeling. The backscattering matrix based on the Bass perturbation theory has significant differences from that based on the empirical scattering rule (Lambert's rule), especially at low grazing angles. In a waveguide environment with a point source, it is very difficult to extract the quantitative characteristics of the backscattering matrix at low grazing angles from the experimental data because of the difficulties in acquiring low-grazing-angle scattering data and separating the scattering data between different modes (grazing angles). In contrast, the use of single-mode excitations as sources in shallow-water waveguides enables acquisition of good quality low-grazing-angle scattering data. In this paper, the characteristics of the backscattering matrix were obtained from different single-mode reverberation experiments in shallow-water. The experiments were carried out at different sites during different seasons off the coasts of China. Model-data comparisons were made and the results showed that at low grazing angles (2°-5°), the backscattering matrices based on the Bass perturbation theory were in good agreement with the experimental data, but the backscattering matrices based on Lambert's rule were not. PMID:25480047

  4. KCNE gene expression is dependent on the proliferation and mode of activation of leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Laura; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Roig, Sara R.; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Manils, Joan; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels are tightly regulated during the immune system response. Leukocytes have a limited repertoire of Kv channels, whose physiological role is under intense investigation. A functional Kv channel is an oligomeric complex composed of pore-forming and ancillary subunits. The KCNE gene family is a novel group of modulatory Kv channel elements in leukocytes. Here, we characterized the gene expression of KCNEs (1–5) in leukocytes and investigated their regulation during leukocyte proliferation and mode of activation. Murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages, human Jurkat T-lymphocytes and human Raji B-cells were analyzed. KCNEs (1–5) are expressed in all leukocytes lineages. Most KCNE mRNAs show cell cycle-dependent regulation and are differentially regulated under specific insults. Our results further suggest a new and yet undefined physiological role for KCNE subunits in the immune system. Putative associations of these ancillary proteins with Kv channels would yield a wide variety of biophysically and pharmacologically distinct channels that fine-tune the immunological response. PMID:23327879

  5. Measurement of optical activity of honey bee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Salgado-Verduzco, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Torres, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Optical activity of some substances, such as chiral molecules, often exhibits circular birefringence. Circular birefringence causes rotation of the vibration plane of the plane polarized light as it passes through the substance. In this work we present optical characterization of honey as function of the optical activity when it is placed in a polariscope that consists of a light source and properly arranged polarizing elements.

  6. PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FROM CONTROLLED CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarized the results of field testing of the effectiveness of control measures for sources of fugitive particulate emissions found at construction sites. The effectiveness of watering temporary, unpaved travel surfaces on emissions of particulate matter with aerodyna...

  7. Are Preschool Children Active Enough? Objectively Measured Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardon, Greet M.; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe accelerometer-based physical activity levels in 4- and 5-year-old children (N = 76) on 2 weekdays and 2 weekend days. The children were sedentary for 9.6 hr (85%) daily, while they engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for 34 min (5%). Only 7% of the children engaged in MVPA for 60 min per…

  8. Wavelength-tunable 10 GHz actively harmonic mode-locked fiber laser based on semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yan; Tong, Xinglin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhan, Li; Hu, Pan; Chen, Liang

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate a widely wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked fiber laser based on semiconductor optical amplifier. Beneficiating from the actively mode-locking operation and the wavelength-tunable characteristics of a Fabry-Perot filter, different harmonic mode-locking orders, from the fundamental mode-locking order (18.9 MHz) to the 520th order (9.832 GHz), can be easily achieved. The spectral bandwidth corresponding to the fundamental repetition rate is 0.12 nm with the pulse duration of 9.8 ns, leading to the TBP value of 146, which is about 460 times the transform-limited value for soliton pulse. The highest repetition rate of the mode-locked pulses we obtained is 9.832 GHz, with a signal-to-noise ratio up to 50 dB. The theoretical transform-limited pulse duration is 21 ps. Meanwhile, the central wavelength can be continuously tuned over 43.4 nm range (1522.8-1566.2 nm). The higher repetition rate and the widely tuning wavelength range make the fiber laser to own great potential and promising prospects in areas such as optical communication and photonic analog-to-digital conversion (ADC).

  9. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  10. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  11. Different Identity Revelation Modes in an Online Peer-Assessment Learning Environment: Effects on Perceptions toward Assessors, Classroom Climate and Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Fu-Yun; Wu, Chun-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The effects of four different identity revelation modes (three fixed modes: real-name, anonymity, nickname and one dynamic user self-choice mode) on participants' perceptions toward their assessors, classroom climate, and past experience with the learning activity in which they were engaged were examined. A pretest-posttest quasi-experimental…

  12. The effect of L mode filaments on divertor heat flux profiles as measured by infrared thermography on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, A. J.; Fishpool, G.; Kirk, A.; the MAST Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2015-11-01

    Filamentary transport across the scrape off layer is a key issue for the design and operation of future devices, such as ITER, DEMO and MAST-U, as it sets the power loadings to the divertor and first wall of the machine. Analysis has been performed on L mode filaments in MAST in order to gain an understanding of the spatial structure and attempt to reconcile the different scales of the filament width and the power fall off length ({λq} ). The L mode filament heat flux arriving at the divertor has been measured using high spatial resolution (1.5 mm) infrared (IR) thermography. The filaments form discrete spiral patterns at the divertor which can be seen as bands of increased heat flux in the IR measurements. Analysis of the width and spacing of these bands at the divertor has allowed the toroidal mode number of the filaments to be determined (7≤slant n≤slant 22 ). The size of the filaments at the midplane has been determined using the target filament radial width and the magnetic field geometry. The filament width perpendicular to the magnetic field at the midplane has been found to be between 3 and 5 cm. Direct calculation of the filament width from midplane visible imaging gives a range of 4-6 cm which agrees well with the IR data.

  13. Control of Stationary Cross-Flow Modes in a Mach 3.5 Boundary Layer Using Patterned Passive and Active Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuele, Chan Yong

    2011-01-01

    Spanwise-periodic roughness designed to excite selected wavelengths of stationary cross- ow modes was investigated in a 3-D boundary layer at Mach 3.5. The test model was a sharp-tipped 14deg right-circular cone. The model and integrated sensor traversing system were placed in the Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low Disturbance Tunnel (SLDT) equipped with a "quiet design" nozzle at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model was oriented at a 4:2deg angle of attack to produce a mean cross-fl ow velocity component in the boundary layer over the cone. Five removable cone tips have been investigated. One has a smooth surface that is used to document the baseline ("natural") conditions. Two had minute (20 - 40 micron) "dimples" that are equally spaced around the circumference, at a streamwise location that is just upstream of the linear stability neutral growth branch for cross- ow modes. The azimuthal mode numbers of the dimpled tips were selected to either enhance the most amplified wave numbers, or to suppress the growth of the most amplified wave numbers. Two of the cone tips had an array of plasma streamwise vortex generators that were designed to simulate the disturbances produced by the passive patterned roughness. The results indicate that the stationary cross-fl ow modes were highly receptive to the patterned roughness of both passive and active types. The patterned passive roughness that was designed to suppress the growth of the most amplified modes had an azimuthal wavelength that was 66% smaller that that of the most amplified stationary cross- ow mode. This had the effect to increase the transition Reynolds number from 25% to 50% depending on the measurement technique. The application of the research is on turbulent transition control on swept wings of supersonic aircraft. The plasma-based roughness has the advantage over the passive roughness of being able to be adaptable to different conditions that would occur during a flight mission.

  14. Dominant modes of relationship between U.S. temperature and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prohaska, J. T.; Willett, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    Eigen-analysis is applied to a matrix of cross-correlation coefficients between the geomagnetic aa-index for 0 to 23-yr lag and the monthly mean temperature at 32 United States stations. About 75 percent of the relationship between the two fields is contained in three dominant modes. A secular trend (about 90 yr) and two 11-yr cycles dominate the mode time series. The month-to-month changes in the temperature anomaly patterns indicate a slow eddy-like motion to the east of the Continental Divide for all three dominant modes.

  15. Long-term Passive Mode Data Measured by the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Instrument onboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and Comparison to REMS Surface Pressure and Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, I.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.; Boynton, W. V.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C. J.; Harshman, K.; Kozyrev, A.; Kuzmin, R.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mischna, M. A.; Moersch, J.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Tate, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Since the landing in August 2012, DAN has provided a wealth of scientific data from the successful surface operation in both Active mode and Passive mode. While the main DAN science investigation so far has focused in estimating the contents of water-equivalent-hydrogen (WEH) and chlorine-equivalent-neutron-absorption in the surface, here we will provide/discuss low energy (less than about 1 keV) background neutron environment at the Martian surface as measured by DAN Passive mode operation. Passive mode measurements have been done on almost every sols with durations ranging from 1 hour to ~9 hour, covering different times of a day. Neutrons from the onboard power source Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermonuclear Generator (MMRTG) and induced by Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR)/Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) interactions with the Martian atmosphere and the surface material contribute to the DAN passive data. An approach to separate out the respective contributions from the DAN total count rates was developed previously (Jun et al., 2013) using the data collected at Rocknest (where the rover stayed from sol 60 to sol 100). The main goal of this paper is to extend the same analysis to other locations encountered during the rover traverse especially to understand the long-term (through Sol 800, covering more than 1 Martian year) behavior of the neutron environment at the Martian surface as measured by DAN in response to variation of the free space GCR/SEP environment. Extensive Monte Carlo transport simulations using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) have been performed to support the analysis and to aid interpretation of the DAN passive data. In addition, the DAN passive data are compared to the long-term surface temperature and pressure data (both measured and modeled) from Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) to investigate possible correlation of the DAN data with ambient environmental conditions.

  16. Parameter sensitivity analysis of nonlinear piezoelectric probe in tapping mode atomic force microscopy for measurement improvement

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Rachael; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2014-02-21

    The equations of motion for a piezoelectric microcantilever are derived for a nonlinear contact force. The analytical expressions for natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained. Then, the method of multiple scales is used to analyze the analytical frequency response of the piezoelectric probe. The effects of nonlinear excitation force on the microcantilever beam's frequency and amplitude are analytically studied. The results show a frequency shift in the response resulting from the force nonlinearities. This frequency shift during contact mode is an important consideration in the modeling of AFM mechanics for generation of more accurate imaging. Also, a sensitivity analysis of the system parameters on the nonlinearity effect is performed. The results of a sensitivity analysis show that it is possible to choose parameters such that the frequency shift minimizes. Certain parameters such as tip radius, microcantilever beam dimensions, and modulus of elasticity have more influence on the nonlinearity of the system than other parameters. By changing only three parameters—tip radius, thickness, and modulus of elasticity of the microbeam—a more than 70% reduction in nonlinearity effect was achieved.

  17. Label free imaging system for measuring blood flow speeds using a single multi-mode optical fiber (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigal, Iliya; Caravaca Aguirre, Antonio M.; Gad, Raanan; Piestun, Rafael; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a single multi-mode fiber-based micro-endoscope for measuring blood flow speeds. We use the transmission-matrix wavefront shaping approach to calibrate the multi-mode fiber and raster-scan a focal spot across the distal fiber facet, imaging the cross-polarized back-reflected light at the proximal facet using a camera. This setup allows assessment of the backscattered photon statistics: by computing the mean speckle contrast values across the proximal fiber facet we show that spatially-resolved flow speed maps can be inferred by selecting an appropriate camera integration time. The proposed system is promising for minimally-invasive studies of neurovascular coupling in deep brain structures.

  18. Measuring anisotropic friction on WTe2 using atomic force microscopy in the force-distance and friction modes.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Jolanta A

    2010-04-01

    Layered materials which can be easily cleaved have proved to be excellent samples for the study of atomic scale friction. The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have been particularly popular. These materials exhibit a number of interesting properties ranging from superconductivity to low frictional coefficients. In this paper we have investigated the tribology of the dichalcogenide-WTe2. The coefficient of friction is less than 0.040 along the Te rows and increases to over 0.045 across the rows. The frictional forces almost doubled at normal loads of 5000 nN when scanning in the [010] direction in comparison to the [100] direction. The frictional responses of the AFM probe have been monitored in the frictional force and force-versus-distance (f-d) mode. A comparison between the outcomes using the two different modes demonstrates the factors which need to be considered for accurate measurements. PMID:20355449

  19. Active pixel image sensor with a winner-take-all mode of operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mead, Carver (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An integrated CMOS semiconductor imaging device having two modes of operation that can be performed simultaneously to produce an output image and provide information of a brightest or darkest pixel in the image.

  20. Towards Fast In-line Measurement of Water Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J.; Andreasen, M. B.; Pedersen, M.; Rasmussen, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    Water activity is widely used as a key parameter in controlling the quality of food and feed products, among others. For determining the water activity, the material is sampled from the manufacturing process and measured in the laboratory with water activity analyzers. The sampling procedure can lead to non-representative measurements, the measurement process is time consuming, and much of the produced material may be wasted before the measurement results are available. To reduce waste and to be able to optimize production processes, industry requires in-line measurement of relevant quality determining parameters, hereunder the water activity. In cooperation with a manufacturer of systems for automatic in-line sampling and measurement of moisture, density, and the size of items, a project was defined to also enable the manufacturer's existing products to perform automatic measurement of the water activity in a sample. The aim was to develop a measurement system with the ability to operate in an industrial environment, which in the end would increase the measurement speed significantly and minimize the problems related to the handling of samples. In the paper the selection and characterization of the sensors, the design of a measurement chamber, and various issues of modeling and methods to reduce measurement time are discussed. The paper also presents water activity measurements obtained from food and feed products with the system, and shows that reliable results can be obtained in a few minutes with a proper design of the measurement chamber and selection of a model.

  1. Idea Sharing: Using Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure" as a Means of Developing Different Modes of Student Authorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Stella

    2014-01-01

    In this "Idea Sharing" article, the author introduces Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure" as a critique of King James I's (England) concept of an absolute monarchy, in his constitutional treatise, "Basilikon Doron (1599)," the "kingly gift" that advises the young prince on the ethics of government and how to…

  2. Unsteady heat-flux measurements of second-mode instability waves in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat-flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors, and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are consistent with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was used to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  3. Measuring mass density and ultrasonic wave velocity: A wavelet-based method applied in ultrasonic reflection mode.

    PubMed

    Metwally, Khaled; Lefevre, Emmanuelle; Baron, Cécile; Zheng, Rui; Pithioux, Martine; Lasaygues, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    When assessing ultrasonic measurements of material parameters, the signal processing is an important part of the inverse problem. Measurements of thickness, ultrasonic wave velocity and mass density are required for such assessments. This study investigates the feasibility and the robustness of a wavelet-based processing (WBP) method based on a Jaffard-Meyer algorithm for calculating these parameters simultaneously and independently, using one single ultrasonic signal in the reflection mode. The appropriate transmitted incident wave, correlated with the mathematical properties of the wavelet decomposition, was determined using a adapted identification procedure to build a mathematically equivalent model for the electro-acoustic system. The method was tested on three groups of samples (polyurethane resin, bone and wood) using one 1-MHz transducer. For thickness and velocity measurements, the WBP method gave a relative error lower than 1.5%. The relative errors in the mass density measurements ranged between 0.70% and 2.59%. Despite discrepancies between manufactured and biological samples, the results obtained on the three groups of samples using the WBP method in the reflection mode were remarkably consistent, indicating that it is a reliable and efficient means of simultaneously assessing the thickness and the velocity of the ultrasonic wave propagating in the medium, and the apparent mass density of material. PMID:26403278

  4. Integrated microsphere whispering gallery mode probe for highly sensitive refractive index measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hanzheng; Yuan, Lei; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Xiao, Hai

    2016-06-01

    We report an integrated whispering gallery mode microresonator-based sensor probe for refractive index sensing. The probe was made by sealing a borosilicate glass microsphere into a thin-wall glass capillary pigtailed with a multimode optical fiber. The intensities of the resonant peaks were found decreasing exponentially (linearly in a log scale) with the increasing refractive index of the medium surrounding the capillary. The sensing capability of the integrated probe was tested using sucrose solutions of different concentrations and the resolution was estimated to be about 2.5×10-5 in the index range of 1.3458 to 1.3847. The integrated sensor probe may prove useful in many chemical and biological sensing applications where highly sensitive refractive index monitoring is needed.

  5. Opto-mechanical force measurement of deep sub-wavelength plasmonic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, John; Dey, Dibyendu; Bonakdar, Alireza; Sklar, Alejandro; Memis, Omer G.; Gelfand, Ryan; Mohseni, Hooman

    2011-10-01

    Spatial mapping of optical force near the hot-spot of a metal-dielectric-metal bow-tie nanoantenna at a wavelength of 1550 nm is presented. Non contact mode atomic force microscopy is used with a lock-in method to produce the map. Maxwell's stress tensor method has also been used to simulate the force produced by the bow-tie and it agrees with the experimental data. If dual lock-in amplifiers are used, this method could potentially produce the near field intensity and optical force map simultaneously, both with high spatial resolution. Detailed mapping of the optical force is critical for many emerging applications such as plasmonic biosensing and optomechanical switching.

  6. Anisotropic mechanism on distinct transition modes of tip-activated multipolorizaion switching in epitaxial BiFeO3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y. P.; Soh, A. K.; Weng, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the extended Kittel's law, an anisotropic mechanism has been developed to investigate the complex multipolarization switching in (001) and (110) epitaxial BiFeO3 films, under a biased-tip field. Switching inhomogeneity and domain wall width evolution have been specifically accounted for. It has been found that distinct switching modes, i.e., the breakdown mode of 71°-switched domain and the activation mode of 180°/109° switching, exist and dominate the switching orders within switching process. Our predicted switching orders show excellent agreements with the existing experimental data and phase-field results. A two-step procedure is also proposed to fabricate single-phase 71° ferroelastic domain array of controllable density using (001) BiFeO3 films, which is favored in practice to significantly enhance the magnetoelectric coupling and photovoltage.

  7. Micropower non-contact EEG electrode with active common-mode noise suppression and input capacitance cancellation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu M; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2009-01-01

    A non-contact EEG electrode with input capacitance neutralization and common-mode noise suppression circuits is presented. The coin sized sensor capacitively couples to the scalp without direct contact to the skin. To minimize the effect of signal attenuation and channel gain mismatch, the input capacitance of each sensor is actively neutralized using positive feedback and bootstrapping. Common-mode suppression is achieved through a single conductive sheet to establish a common mode reference. Each sensor electrode provides a differential gain of 60 dB. Signals are transmitted in a digital serial daisy-chain directly from a local 16-bit ADC, minimizing the number of wires required to establish a high density EEG sensor network. The micropower electrode consumes only 600 microW from a single 3.3 V supply. PMID:19964104

  8. Review of Measures of Worksite Environmental and Policy Supports for Physical Activity and Healthy Eating

    PubMed Central

    Reeds, Dominic N.; van Bakergem, Margaret A.; Marx, Christine M.; Brownson, Ross C.; Pamulapati, Surya C.; Hoehner, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity prevention strategies are needed that target multiple settings, including the worksite. The objective of this study was to assess the state of science concerning available measures of worksite environmental and policy supports for physical activity (PA) and healthy eating (HE). Methods We searched multiple databases for instruments used to assess worksite environments and policies. Two commonly cited instruments developed by state public health departments were also included. Studies that were published from 1991 through 2013 in peer-reviewed publications and gray literature that discussed the development or use of these instruments were analyzed. Instrument administration mode and measurement properties were documented. Items were classified by general health topic, 5 domains of general worksite strategy, and 19 subdomains of worksite strategy specific to PA or HE. Characteristics of worksite measures were described including measurement properties, length, and administration mode, as well as frequencies of items by domain and subdomain. Results Seventeen instruments met inclusion criteria (9 employee surveys, 5 manager surveys, 1 observational assessment, and 2 studies that used multiple administration modes). Fourteen instruments included reliability testing. More items were related to PA than HE. Most instruments (n = 10) lacked items in the internal social environment domain. The most common PA subdomains were exercise facilities and lockers/showers; the most common HE subdomain was healthy options/vending. Conclusion This review highlights gaps in measurement of the worksite social environment. The findings provide a useful resource for researchers and practitioners and should inform future instrument development. PMID:25950572

  9. Use of B-mode ultrasonography for measuring femoral muscle thickness in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sakaeda, Kanako; Shimizu, Miki

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of muscle mass is important for evaluating muscle function and rehabilitation outcomes. Ultrasound has recently been successfully used to estimate muscle mass in humans by measuring muscle thickness. This study attempted to standardize procedures for measuring femoral muscle thickness ultrasonographically, as well as quantify the reliability and validity of ultrasound evaluations of muscle thickness compared to measurements made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in dogs. We evaluated the quadriceps femoris (QF), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles of 10 clinically healthy Beagle dogs. Scans were taken in 5 different sections divided equally between the greater trochanter and proximal patella. MRI was performed, followed by T1-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured with MRI, and muscle thickness was measured with MRI and ultrasonography. The thickness of the QF, BF and ST muscles as measured by ultrasound at slices 1-3 (from the proximal end to the middle of the femur), 2-4 (middle of the femur) and 2 (more proximal than the middle of the femur), respectively, was correlated with muscle thickness and CSA as measured by MRI. These sites showed a flat interface between muscle and transducer and were situated over belly muscle. No correlation between measurement types was seen in SM muscle. We must confirm this assessment method for various breeds, sizes, ages and muscle pathologies in dogs, thereby confirming that muscle thickness as measured ultrasonographically can reflect muscle function. PMID:26832997

  10. Use of B-mode ultrasonography for measuring femoral muscle thickness in dogs

    PubMed Central

    SAKAEDA, Kanako; SHIMIZU, Miki

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of muscle mass is important for evaluating muscle function and rehabilitation outcomes. Ultrasound has recently been successfully used to estimate muscle mass in humans by measuring muscle thickness. This study attempted to standardize procedures for measuring femoral muscle thickness ultrasonographically, as well as quantify the reliability and validity of ultrasound evaluations of muscle thickness compared to measurements made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in dogs. We evaluated the quadriceps femoris (QF), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles of 10 clinically healthy Beagle dogs. Scans were taken in 5 different sections divided equally between the greater trochanter and proximal patella. MRI was performed, followed by T1-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured with MRI, and muscle thickness was measured with MRI and ultrasonography. The thickness of the QF, BF and ST muscles as measured by ultrasound at slices 1–3 (from the proximal end to the middle of the femur), 2–4 (middle of the femur) and 2 (more proximal than the middle of the femur), respectively, was correlated with muscle thickness and CSA as measured by MRI. These sites showed a flat interface between muscle and transducer and were situated over belly muscle. No correlation between measurement types was seen in SM muscle. We must confirm this assessment method for various breeds, sizes, ages and muscle pathologies in dogs, thereby confirming that muscle thickness as measured ultrasonographically can reflect muscle function. PMID:26832997

  11. Elucidation of the Mode of Action of a New Antibacterial Compound Active against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gerits, Evelien; Blommaert, Eline; Lippell, Anna; O'Neill, Alex J; Weytjens, Bram; De Maeyer, Dries; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Marchal, Kathleen; Marchand, Arnaud; Chaltin, Patrick; Spincemaille, Pieter; De Brucker, Katrijn; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno P A; Swings, Toon; Liebens, Veerle; Fauvart, Maarten; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial and community-acquired infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria represent a major human health problem. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial characteristics and mode of action of a new antimicrobial compound, SPI031 (N-alkylated 3, 6-dihalogenocarbazol 1-(sec-butylamino)-3-(3,6-dichloro-9H-carbazol-9-yl)propan-2-ol), which was previously identified in our group. This compound exhibits broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including activity against the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that SPI031 has rapid bactericidal activity (7-log reduction within 30 min at 4x MIC) and that the frequency of resistance development against SPI031 is low. To elucidate the mode of action of SPI031, we performed a macromolecular synthesis assay, which showed that SPI031 causes non-specific inhibition of macromolecular biosynthesis pathways. Liposome leakage and membrane permeability studies revealed that SPI031 rapidly exerts membrane damage, which is likely the primary cause of its antibacterial activity. These findings were supported by a mutational analysis of SPI031-resistant mutants, a transcriptome analysis and the identification of transposon mutants with altered sensitivity to the compound. In conclusion, our results show that SPI031 exerts its antimicrobial activity by causing membrane damage, making it an interesting starting point for the development of new antibacterial therapies. PMID:27167126

  12. Elucidation of the Mode of Action of a New Antibacterial Compound Active against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gerits, Evelien; Blommaert, Eline; Lippell, Anna; O’Neill, Alex J.; Weytjens, Bram; De Maeyer, Dries; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Marchal, Kathleen; Marchand, Arnaud; Chaltin, Patrick; Spincemaille, Pieter; De Brucker, Katrijn; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Swings, Toon; Liebens, Veerle; Fauvart, Maarten; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial and community-acquired infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria represent a major human health problem. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial characteristics and mode of action of a new antimicrobial compound, SPI031 (N-alkylated 3, 6-dihalogenocarbazol 1-(sec-butylamino)-3-(3,6-dichloro-9H-carbazol-9-yl)propan-2-ol), which was previously identified in our group. This compound exhibits broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including activity against the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that SPI031 has rapid bactericidal activity (7-log reduction within 30 min at 4x MIC) and that the frequency of resistance development against SPI031 is low. To elucidate the mode of action of SPI031, we performed a macromolecular synthesis assay, which showed that SPI031 causes non-specific inhibition of macromolecular biosynthesis pathways. Liposome leakage and membrane permeability studies revealed that SPI031 rapidly exerts membrane damage, which is likely the primary cause of its antibacterial activity. These findings were supported by a mutational analysis of SPI031-resistant mutants, a transcriptome analysis and the identification of transposon mutants with altered sensitivity to the compound. In conclusion, our results show that SPI031 exerts its antimicrobial activity by causing membrane damage, making it an interesting starting point for the development of new antibacterial therapies. PMID:27167126

  13. Inter-trial analysis of post-movement Beta activities in EEG signals using multivariate empirical mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Chih; Lee, Po-Lei; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Yu-Te; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Lan, Gong-Yau

    2013-07-01

    Event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) is a technique to quantify subject's nonphase-locked neural activities underlying specific frequency bands, reactive to external/internal stimulus. However, conventional ERD/ERS studies usually utilize fixed frequency band determined from one or few channels to filter whole-head EEG/MEG data, which may inevitably include task-unrelated signals and result in underestimation of reactive oscillatory activities in multichannel studies. In this study, we adopted multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) to extract beta-related oscillatory activities in performing self-paced right and left index-finger lifting tasks. The MEMD extracts common modes from all channels in same-index intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) which allows the temporal-frequency features among different channels can be compared in each subband. The beta-band oscillatory activities were further bandpass filtered within trial-specific beta bands determined from sensorimotor-related channels (C3 and C4), and then rectified using amplitude modulation method to detect trial-by-trial beta rebound (BR) values in ERS time courses. The validity of the MEMD approach in BR values extraction has been demonstrated in multichannel EEG study which showed larger BR values than conventional ERS technique. The MEMD-based method enables the trial-by-trial extraction of sensorimotor oscillatory activities which might allow the exploration of subtle brain dynamics in future studies. PMID:23661320

  14. Neutron Yield Measurements via Aluminum Activation

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-08

    Neutron activation of aluminum may occur by several neutron capture reactions. Four such reactions are described here: {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(n, 2n){sup 26}Al and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg. The radioactive nuclei {sup 28}Al, {sup 24}Na, and {sup 27}Mg, which are produced via the {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg neutron reactions, beta decay to excited states of {sup 28}Si, {sup 24}Mg and {sup 27}Al respectively. These excited states then emit gamma rays as the nuclei de-excite to their respective ground states.

  15. Measuring glottal activity during voiced speech using a tuned electromagnetic resonating collar sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. R., III; Keenaghan, K.; Desimini, S.

    2005-11-01

    Non-acoustic speech sensors can be employed to obtain measurements of one or more aspects of the speech production process, such as glottal activity, even in the presence of background noise. These sensors have a long history of clinical applications and have also recently been applied to the problem of denoising speech signals recorded in acoustically noisy environments (Ng et al 2000 Proc. Int. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP) (Istanbul, Turkey) vol 1, pp 229-32). Recently, researchers developed a new non-acoustic speech sensor based primarily on a tuned electromagnetic resonator collar (TERC) (Brown et al 2004 Meas. Sci. Technol. 15 1291). The TERC sensor measures glottal activity by sensing small changes in the dielectric properties of the glottis that result from voiced speech. This paper builds on the seminal work in Brown et al (2004). The primary contributions of this paper are (i) a description of a new single-mode TERC sensor design addressing the comfort and complexity issues of the original sensor, (ii) a complete description of new external interface systems used to obtain long-duration recordings from the TERC sensor and (iii) more extensive experimental results and analysis for the single-mode TERC sensor including spectrograms of speech containing both voiced and unvoiced speech segments in quiet and acoustically noisy environments. The experimental results demonstrate that the single-mode TERC sensor is able to detect glottal activity up to the fourth harmonic and is also insensitive to acoustic background noise.

  16. Structural modification of resveratrol leads to increased anti-tumor activity, but causes profound changes in the mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Scherzberg, Maria-Christina; Kiehl, Andreas; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Stark, Holger; Stein, Jürgen; Fürst, Robert; Steinhilber, Dieter; Ulrich-Rückert, Sandra

    2015-08-15

    (Z)-3,5,4′-Trimethoxystilbene (Z-TMS) is a resveratrol analog with increased antiproliferative activity towards a number of cancer cell lines compared to resveratrol, which has been shown to inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate if Z-TMS still shows potential for the prevention of metabolic diseases as known for resveratrol. Cell growth inhibition was determined with IC{sub 50} values for Z-TMS between 0.115 μM and 0.473 μM (resveratrol: 110.7 μM to 190.2 μM). Flow cytometric analysis revealed a G{sub 2}/M arrest after Z-TMS treatment, whereas resveratrol caused S phase arrest. Furthermore, Z-TMS was shown to impair microtubule polymerization. Beneficial effects on lipid accumulation were observed for resveratrol, but not for Z-TMS in an in vitro steatosis model. (E)-Resveratrol was confirmed to elevate cAMP levels, and knockdown of AMPK attenuated the antiproliferative activity, while Z-TMS did not show significant effects in these experiments. SIRT1 and AMPK activities were further measured indirectly via induction of the target gene small heterodimer partner (SHP). Thereby, (E)-resveratrol, but not Z-TMS, showed potent induction of SHP mRNA levels in an AMPK- and SIRT1-dependent manner, as confirmed by knockdown experiments. We provide evidence that Z-TMS does not show beneficial metabolic effects, probably due to loss of activity towards resveratrol target genes. Moreover, our data support previous findings that Z-TMS acts as an inhibitor of tubulin polymerization. These findings confirm that the methylation of resveratrol leads to profound changes in the mode of action, which should be taken into consideration when conducting lead structure optimization approaches. - Highlights: • Methylation of resveratrol leads to profound changes in biologic activity. • Z-TMS does not prevent hepatic steatosis, but inhibits tubulin polymerization. • Resveratrol analog Z-TMS does not influence known targets like

  17. New Electron Temperature Measurements During Local Helicity Injection and H-mode Plasmas at the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Bodner, G. M.; Fonck, R. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Winz, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    Extrapolation of non-solenoidal startup via local helicity injection (LHI) to larger devices depends critically on confinement during the injection process. To begin quantifying confinement regimes, the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Pegasus ST was upgraded to include 12 radial positions and high temperature (0.1 measurements during high-density, quiescent, Ohmic L-mode discharges yielded well-resolved thermal electron distributions, with central Te = 150 eV. In the low-density LHI startup plasmas shot-to-shot averaging of data improves background measurements and increases signal-to-noise ratio. Initial core measurements during the drive phase of LHI suggest average Te of several hundred eV for plasmas with ne ~ 3x1018 m-3 and Ip ~ 0.15 MA. Experiments are underway to verify these unexpectedly high electron temperatures. If verified, these temperatures may reflect the dominance of high-energy electrons via fueling with LHI current streams with average energy ~1 keV. Further investigations will explore the dependence of the inferred electron distribution on fueling source, density, and electron injection potential. The upgraded Thomson scattering diagnostic will also be applied to Ohmic H-mode plasmas in Pegasus. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  18. Quantifying Ant Activity Using Vibration Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Oberst, Sebastian; Baro, Enrique Nava; Lai, Joseph C. S.; Evans, Theodore A.

    2014-01-01

    Ant behaviour is of great interest due to their sociality. Ant behaviour is typically observed visually, however there are many circumstances where visual observation is not possible. It may be possible to assess ant behaviour using vibration signals produced by their physical movement. We demonstrate through a series of bioassays with different stimuli that the level of activity of meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus) can be quantified using vibrations, corresponding to observations with video. We found that ants exposed to physical shaking produced the highest average vibration amplitudes followed by ants with stones to drag, then ants with neighbours, illuminated ants and ants in darkness. In addition, we devised a novel method based on wavelet decomposition to separate the vibration signal owing to the initial ant behaviour from the substrate response, which will allow signals recorded from different substrates to be compared directly. Our results indicate the potential to use vibration signals to classify some ant behaviours in situations where visual observation could be difficult. PMID:24658467

  19. Infiltration rate measurement by active perfluorocarbon monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Menzies, K.T.; Pong, C.M.; Randel, M.A. )

    1987-01-01

    The rate of air infiltration in homes and buildings is a significant factor affecting the magnitude of human exposure to air pollutants in the indoor environment. Several techniques have been utilized for the determination of air infiltration. These include building pressurization and tracer analysis, e.g., SF/sub 6/. Dietz and Cote at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have developed a simple, steady-state tracer kit that can be utilized by homeowners. This kit includes a source(s) of perfluorocarbon, i.e., perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH) or perfluorodimethylcyclohexane (PDCH), and a passive sampling tube containing Ambersorb XE-347. Typically, the sampling tube is deployed for several days and then returned to a laboratory for analysis by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/electron capture detection. The authors developed an alternative sampling and analysis technique for PMCH/PDCH in homes. In order to facilitate monitoring of short-term infiltration rates (i.e., less than one day) they developed an active sorbent sampling method and solvent desorption/gas chromatography/electron capture detection analytical method. The method is based on the collection of PMCH on charcoal. The method validation, which is discussed in this article, includes analytical method development, selection of a solid sorbent, determination of desorption efficiency, analysis of breakthrough, testing of storage stability, and assessment of precision and accuracy in both the laboratory and field environment.

  20. The Measurement of Physical Activity in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noland, Melody; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents data from two studies determining the validity of various measures of physical activity in preschool children. One explored how certain measures of activity predicted observed behavior. The other examined the Caltrac motion sensor's predictive validity. Results indicate the Caltrac monitor is sensitive to children's individual differences…

  1. 12 CFR 1806.201 - Measuring and reporting Qualified Activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measuring and reporting Qualified Activities. 1806.201 Section 1806.201 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ENTERPRISE AWARD PROGRAM Awards § 1806.201 Measuring and reporting Qualified Activities. (a) General. An Applicant...

  2. Measuring Reading Activity: An Inventory. Instructional Resource No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, John T.; And Others

    Noting that the amount of reading students do is related to their reading achievement, this booklet presents an instrument designed to measure the amount and breadth of students' reading in and out of school. The first part of the booklet discusses the Reading Activity Inventory (RAI) and how it differs from other reading activity measures, uses…

  3. A Measurement Activity to Encourage Exploration of Calculus Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuffey, William

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an activity that incorporates measurement in order to lead students to discover and explore fundamental concepts of calculus. Students are provided with an experientially real starting point involving measurement and are encouraged to engage in mathematical discussions in a low-stakes environment. I describe the activity as…

  4. Active Feedback Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode on the DIII-D Device

    SciTech Connect

    Okabayashi, M; Bialek, J; Chance, M S; Chu, M S; Fredrickson, E D; Garofalo, A M; Gryaznevich, M; Hatcher, R E; Jensen, T H; Johnson, L C; Lahaye, R J; Lazarus, E A; Makowski, M A; Manickam, J; Navratil, G A; Scoville, J T; Strait, E J; Turnbull, A D; Walker, M L

    2000-11-01

    A proof of principle magnetic feedback stabilization experiment has been carried out to suppress the resistive wall mode (RWM), a branch of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink mode under the influence of a stabilizing resistive wall, on the DIII-D tokamak device. The RWM was successfully suppressed and the high beta duration above the no wall limit was extended to more than 50 times the resistive wall flux diffusion time. It was observed that the mode structure was well preserved during the time of the feedback application. Several lumped parameter formulations were used to study the feedback process. The observed feedback characteristics are in good qualitative agreement with the analysis. These results provide encouragement to future efforts towards optimizing the RWM feedback methodology in parallel to what has been successfully developed for the n = 0 vertical positional control. Newly developed MHD codes have been extremely useful in guiding the experiments and in providing possible paths for the next step.

  5. Electromagnetic Measurements in an Active Oilfield Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.; Weiss, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    An important issue in oilfield development pertains to mapping and monitoring of the fracture distributions (either natural or man-made) controlling subsurface fluid flow. Although microseismic monitoring and analysis have been used for this purpose for several decades, there remain several ambiguities and uncertainties with this approach. We are investigating a novel electromagnetic (EM) technique for detecting and mapping hydraulic fractures in a petroleum reservoir by injecting an electrically conductive contrast agent into an open fracture. The fracture is subsequently illuminated by a strong EM field radiated by a large engineered antenna. Specifically, a grounded electric current source is applied directly to the steel casing of the borehole, either at/near the wellhead or at a deep downhole point. Transient multicomponent EM signals (both electric and magnetic) scattered by the conductivity contrast are then recorded by a surface receiver array. We are presently utilizing advanced 3D numerical modeling algorithms to accurately simulate fracture responses, both before and after insertion of the conductive contrast agent. Model results compare favorably with EM field data recently acquired in a Permian Basin oilfield. However, extraction of the very-low-amplitude fracture signatures from noisy data requires effective noise suppression strategies such as long stacking times, rejection of outliers, and careful treatment of natural magnetotelluric fields. Dealing with the ever-present "episodic EM noise" typical in an active oilfield environment (associated with drilling, pumping, machinery, traffic, etc.) constitutes an ongoing problem. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Ion temperature measurements of L-mode filaments in MAST by retarding field energy analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, S. Y.; Elmore, S.; Fishpool, G.; Dudson, B.; the MAST Team; the EUROFusion MST1 Team

    2016-04-01

    Retarding field energy analysers (RFEAs) have been used to compare the ion temperature (T i ) of large plasma filaments with the background plasma (composed of small scale filaments) at the midplane and divertor target in L mode discharges in the Mega Amp spherical tokamak (MAST). At low densities, at the midplane and divertor, at distances from 2 to 4 cm from the separatrix the temperature of ions in large filaments was found to be 2 to 3 times larger than the background plasma. At the midplane, the electron temperature for both large filaments and background plasma was around 3 to 7 times smaller than the ion temperature and had a flat profile across the scrape off layer (SOL). At higher densities, at the midplane and divertor, both the filament and background ion temperatures were smaller than at low density. At the midplane, the filament and background ion and electron temperature profiles across the SOL were relatively flat and of comparable magnitude, ranging in temperature from 5 to 25 eV.

  7. In utero Measurement of Heart Rate in Mouse by Noninvasive M-mode Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, WooJin; Seidah, Nabil G.; Prat, Annik

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most frequent noninfectious cause of death at birth. The incidence of CHD ranges from 4 to 50/1,000 births (Disease and injury regional estimates, World Health Organization, 2004). Surgeries that often compromise the quality of life are required to correct heart defects, reminding us of the importance of finding the causes of CHD. Mutant mouse models and live imaging technology have become essential tools to study the etiology of this disease. Although advanced methods allow live imaging of abnormal hearts in embryos, the physiological and hemodynamic states of the latter are often compromised due to surgical and/or lengthy procedures. Noninvasive ultrasound imaging, however, can be used without surgically exposing the embryos, thereby maintaining their physiology. Herein, we use simple M-mode ultrasound to assess heart rates of embryos at E18.5 in utero. The detection of abnormal heart rates is indeed a good indicator of dysfunction of the heart and thus constitutes a first step in the identification of developmental defects that may lead to heart failure. PMID:24300115

  8. Twin Knudsen Cell Configuration for Activity Measurements by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1996-01-01

    A twin Knudsen cell apparatus for alloy activity measurements by mass spectrometry is described. Two Knudsen cells - one containing an alloy and one containing a pure component - are mounted on a single flange and translated into the sampling region via a motorized x-y table. Mixing of the molecular beams from the cells is minimized by a novel system of shutters. Activity measurements were taken on two well-characterized alloys to verify the operation of the system. Silver activity measurements are reported for Ag-Cu alloys and aluminum activity measurements are reported for Fe-Al alloys. The temperature dependence of activity for a 0.474 mol fraction Al-Fe alloy gives a partial molar heat of aluminum. Measurements taken with the twin cell show good agreement with literature values for these alloys.

  9. Thermal activation of regenerated fiber Bragg grating in few mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Man-Hong; Gunawardena, Dinusha S.; Lim, Kok-Sing; Machavaram, Venkata R.; Lee, Say-Hoe; Chong, Wu-Yi; Lee, Yen-Sian; Ahmad, Harith

    2016-03-01

    This work demonstrated for the first time, the thermal regeneration of two and four modes graded index fiber Bragg gratings using high temperature tube furnace. During the regeneration process, the seed grating is erased and a new grating with lower index contrast is formed. The thermal calibration shows that the temperature sensitivity of regenerated grating is slightly higher for fiber with larger core. On the other hand, the regeneration temperature is lower for fiber with smaller core. The temperature sustainability up to 900 °C is observed for the produced regenerated gratings in few mode fibers.

  10. Measurement of uterine activity in vitro by integrating muscle tension

    PubMed Central

    Styles, P. R.; Sullivan, T. J.

    1962-01-01

    Spontaneous or electrically stimulated activity of the uterus is measured isometrically in vitro by integrating tension against time. Uterine contractions move the operating rod of a potentiometer transducer, the output voltage from which is coupled to an electrical integrator motor and a servo recorder. Several parameters of uterine activity can be expressed in a single measurement, and a record of isometric contractions is obtained simultaneously. Oxytocin can be assayed accurately and the effect of drugs on uterine motility can be measured. PMID:13918066

  11. Active Learning: The Importance of Developing a Comprehensive Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Rodney; Palmer, Stuart; Hagel, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into the validity of a widely used scale for measuring the extent to which higher education students employ active learning strategies. The scale is the active learning scale in the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement. This scale is based on the Active and Collaborative Learning scale of the National…

  12. Ultrafast superconducting single-photon detector with reduced-size active area coupled to a tapered lensed single-mode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorova, Maria V.; Divochiy, Alexander; Vachtomin, Yury B.; Smirnov, Konstantin V.

    2015-05-01

    We present an ultrafast NbN Superconducting single-photon detector (SSPD) with active area of 3x3 μm2, which reveals better timing performances than a previously developed SSPD with active area of 10x10 μm2. The improved SSPD demonstrates the record timing jitter <25 ps, ultra short recovery time <2 ns, extremely low dark counts level, and high detection efficiency (DE) in a wide spectral range from visible to near-infrared. The record parameters were obtained thanks to the development of a new technique of an effective optical coupling between a detector with reduced-size active area and a standard single-mode telecommunication fiber. The advantages of a new approach are experimentally confirmed by performed electro-optical measurements of the device performances.

  13. Mode-stirred chamber measurements of the Shielding Effectiveness of select cables and connectors

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, R.P.; Bacon, L.D.

    1990-06-01

    We have determined experimentally the Shielding Effectiveness (SE) at microwave frequencies of various types of single- and double-braided cables and connectors typical of systems that have been hardened to electromagnetic fields. This report describes a laboratory-sized reverberation chamber and the techniques used to measure the SE of several interconnecting components. Graphical results are presented in the report, along with smoothed overlay plots for each category of measurements. The overlay plots indicate the general trends in the raw data and highlight the differences between tested components. 7 refs., 22 figs.

  14. Measurements of the masses, lifetimes and decay modes of hadrons at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2010-05-01

    The Tevatron provides 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions and allows for collection of rich b-hadron samples to the two experiments CDF and D0. The study of heavy flavor properties represents a fruitful opportunity to investigate the flavor sector of the Standard Model (SM) and to look for hints of New Physics (NP). Here we report the first measurement of polarization amplitudes in B{sub s}{sup 0} charmless decays, world leading results on b-hadron lifetimes, and measurements of several other properties of b-hadrons.

  15. Learning with Summaries: Effects of Representation Mode and Type of Learning Activity on Comprehension and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leopold, Claudia; Sumfleth, Elke; Leutner, Detlev

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to examine whether students better understand a science text when they are asked to self-generate summaries or to study predefined summaries. Furthermore, we tested the effects of verbal and pictorial summaries. The experiment followed a 2 x 2 design with representation mode (verbal vs. pictorial) and learning…

  16. Binding mode prediction of biologically active compounds from plant Salvia Miltiorrhiza as integrase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Lugsanangarm, Kiattisak; Kokpol, Sirirat; Abd-Elazem, Ibrahim S

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN), an essential enzyme for HIV-1 replication, has been targeted in antiretroviral drug therapy. The emergence of HIV-1 variants clinically resistant to antiretroviral agents has lead to the development of alternative IN inhibitors. In the present work, binding modes of a high potent IN inhibitor, M522 and M532, within the catalytic binding site of wild type (WT) IN were determined using molecular docking calculation. Both M522 and M532 displayed similar modes of binding within the IN putative binding pocket and exhibited favorable interactions with the catalytic Mg2+ ions, the nearby amino acids and viral DNA through metal-ligand chelation, hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions. Furthermore, the modes of action of these two compounds against the mutated Y212R, N224H and S217H PFV IN were also predicted. Although the replacement of amino acid could somehow disturb inhibitor binding mode, almost key interactions which detected in the WT complexes were fairly conserved. Detailed information could highlight the application of M522 and M532 as candidate IN inhibitors for drug development against drug resistant strains. PMID:23750093

  17. Impact of travel mode shift and trip distance on active and non-active transportation in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Parra, Diana C.; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Changes in urban mobility play a major role in transforming metropolitan areas into healthier places. This study quantified the impact of changes in travel mode shift and trip distance on active and non-active transportation of working age adult population of São Paulo. Methods and findings Through different scenarios, we estimated the daily time spent in transportation per inhabitant (divided in active and non-active transportation time) and the proportion of inhabitants accumulating 30 min or more of daily active transportation. The replacement of individual for collective motorized modes in long distance trips (> 1000 m) in combination with the substitution of long for short trips positively impacted all outcomes. Compared to the current situation, there was an increase in the active transportation time (from 19.4 to 26.7 min/inhabitant), which also increased the proportion of adults active for transportation (from 27.6% to 35.4%). Additionally, the non-active transportation time decreased (from 67.0 to 26.2 min/inhabitant), which helped to reduce the total time spent in transportation (from 86.4 to 52.9 min/inhabitant). Conclusion Transport and urban planning policies to reduce individual motorized trips and the number of long trips might produce important health benefits, both by increasing population levels of active transportation and reducing the non-active and the total time of daily trips. PMID:26844071

  18. Active thermal lensing elements for mode matching optimization in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulda, Paul

    2014-03-01

    In interferometric gravitational wave detectors of the advanced era and beyond, the high laser powers used lead to the generation of thermal lenses in the optics. This can lead to a reduction in the coupling between the various optical cavities comprising the detector, thus reducing its overall sensitivity. We present here an active device which can be used to compensate for such thermal effects, as well as static mismatches between cavities. The device uses a 4 segmented heater to heat a transmissive optic, generating a spherical or astigmatic lens which can be used to compensate other thermal lenses within an optical system. We report on in-vacuum tests of the device, including an interferometric measurement of the wavefront distortions induced by the device, and measurements of the dynamic range and response time. The device was shown to have no observable detrimental effect on wavefront distortion, a focal power dynamic range of 0 to -40 mD, and a response time of the order 1000 s. Supported by NSF grant PHY-1205512.

  19. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser with active Q-switching and mode locking for hole drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solokhin, S. A.; Sirotkin, A. A.; Garnov, S. V.

    2011-06-01

    A diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating with active-passive Q-switch mode locking, has been developed. The acousto-optic repetition train was one kilohertz with generated pulse train widths 65 ns, single pulse widths 200 ps and an average power of 6.5 W. Improvement of efficiency of small diameter deep holes laser drilling in different materials was studied.

  20. Can Reliability of Multiple Component Measuring Instruments Depend on Response Option Presentation Mode?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menold, Natalja; Raykov, Tenko

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the possible dependency of composite reliability on presentation format of the elements of a multi-item measuring instrument. Using empirical data and a recent method for interval estimation of group differences in reliability, we demonstrate that the reliability of an instrument need not be the same when polarity of the…

  1. A thickness mode acoustic wave sensor for measuring interface stiffness between two elastic materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiankang; Wang, Wencai; Wang, Ji; Yang, Zengtao; Yang, Jiashi

    2008-08-01

    We studied thickness vibration of 2 elastic layers with an elastic interface mounted on a plate piezoelectric resonator. The effect of the interface elasticity on resonant frequencies was examined. The result obtained suggests an acoustic wave sensor for measuring the elastic property of an interface between 2 materials. PMID:18986911

  2. Guided modes measurements on optical thin films with high structurally induced anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenchen, Heidrun; Endelema, D.; Kaiser, Norbert; Flory, Francois

    1996-08-01

    Precise determination of the main refractive indices of biaxial anisotropic coatings is essential for the calculation of their optical performance. Measurements based on wave guiding methods have proved to yield excellent results with these layers. A comprehensive study on coatings with relatively low anisotropy, obliquely deposited under angles of 32 degrees or less, was done before, but coatings of higher structural anisotropy have not been concerned yet. With higher deposition angels, new problems arise because the microstructure deviates more and more from the model, and the column inclination angle has an increasing influence on the mathematical separation of the main refractive indices. In a theoretical study, this effect is shown to limit the precision and reliability of the method. Experimental results on HfO2 thin films, deposited under 0 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees, will be given. They were achieved using additional information about the coatings from transmission measurements between crossed polarizers and compared to results from ellipsometric and spectral photometric measurements. All measurements were performed at a wavelength of 632.8 nm.

  3. Measurements of B→ D^(*) K^(*) Decays and Other Modes relevant to φ3 Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovny, P.; Browder, Thomas E.; Sakai, Yoshi

    2003-04-01

    We present new measurements of branching fractions and direct CP asymmetries for B^-→ D_CP K^-, observation of barB^0→ D^0 barK^(*)0 decays and discuss prospects for φ3 determination. The results are based on a data sample of 78 fb-1 recorded by the Belle collaboration at the KEKB e^+ e^- collider.

  4. Measurement of Field Aligned Electron Density Distribution, Ducts, and Z-mode Cavities from the Ducted and Nonducted Fast Z-mode Echoes Observed on IMAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayank, K.; Sonwalkar, V. S.

    2012-12-01

    We present a method to measure geomagnetic field(B0) aligned electron density(Ne) distribution, ducts, and Z-mode(ZM) cavities from the ducted and nonducted fast ZM echoes observed from radio sounding at 50-1000 kHz by RPI/IMAGE. Roughly 2000 cases of fast ZM echoes have been observed on the IMAGE satellite in the altitude range of ˜800-10,000 km, invariant latitude range of 30° - 70°, and at all MLTs. In this paper we present two case studies: (1) nonducted C-D type fast ZM echoes observed on 19 June 2004 (L=3.81, Altitude=5340km, MLT=18.7), and (2) ducted C-D type fast ZM echoes observed on 10 July 2001 (L = 2.68, Altitude˜4100 km, MLT = 17.7). Nonducted fast ZM C(D) trace is obtained when the ZM signal is reflected at an altitude below(above) the satellite altitude, when the satellite is within the ZM cavities, at which fZ ˜ f, where fZ is the ZM cutoff frequency and f is the wave frequency. In the case of nonducted echoes, (1) the lower(upper) cutoff frequency of C-trace is less(more) than that of D-trace, (2) no higher trace (e.g., C+D, C+2D) exists, and (3) C and D traces are discrete i.e,. the echoes, at each frequency, are limited to 2-3 bins. From ray tracing calculations, we obtain four nonducted fast ZM echoes, each reflecting from locations where fZ ˜ f. Three of the echoes retrace their paths after reflection and one forms a loop. The shape of fZ contours in the magnetic meridional plane, the injected wave frequency(f), the location of the satellite with respect to fZ contours, the change in the size of the refractive index surfaces with altitude, and the Snell's law explains the generation of retracing and looping echoes. From the inversion of tg-f dispersion we obtain the field aligned Ne distribution both above and below the satellite from an altitude of ˜1500 km-10,000 km. The ducted echoes, obtained when the satellite is within a ZM cavity, are characterized by (1) integral relationship of echo time-delays (tg) of lower time delay traces (e

  5. Resin {sup 90}Y microsphere activity measurements for liver brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dezarn, William A.; Kennedy, Andrew S.

    2007-06-15

    The measurement of the radioactivity administered to the patient is one of the major components of {sup 90}Y microsphere liver brachytherapy. The activity of {sup 90}Y microspheres in a glass delivery vial was measured in a dose calibrator. The calibration value to use for {sup 90}Y in the dose calibrator was verified using an activity calibration standard provided by the microsphere manufacturer. This method allowed for the determination of a consistent, reproducible local activity standard. Additional measurements were made to determine some of the factors that could affect activity measurement. The axial response of the dose calibrator was determined by the ratio of activity measurements at the bottom and center of the dose calibrator. The axial response was 0.964 for a glass shipping vial, 1.001 for a glass V-vial, and 0.988 for a polycarbonate V-vial. Comparisons between activity measurements in the dose calibrator and those using a radiation survey meter were found to agree within 10%. It was determined that the dose calibrator method was superior to the survey meter method because the former allowed better defined measurement geometry and traceability of the activity standard back to the manufacturer. Part of the preparation of resin {sup 90}Y microspheres for patient delivery is to draw out a predetermined activity from a shipping vial and place it into a V-vial for delivery to the patient. If the drawn activity was placed in a glass V-vial, the activity measured in the dose calibrator with a glass V-vial was 4% higher than the drawn activity from the shipping vial standard. If the drawn activity was placed in a polycarbonate V-vial, the activity measured in the dose calibrator with a polycarbonate V-vial activity was 20% higher than the drawn activity from the shipping vial standard. Careful characterization of the local activity measurement standard is recommended instead of simply accepting the calibration value of the dose calibrator manufacturer.

  6. Actively stabilized optical fiber interferometry technique for online/in-process surface measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Kaiwei; Martin, Haydn; Jiang Xiangqian

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, we report the recent progress in optical-beam scanning fiber interferometry for potential online nanoscale surface measurement based on the previous research. It attempts to generate a robust and miniature measurement device for future development into a multiprobe array measurement system. In this research, both fiber-optic-interferometry and the wavelength-division-multiplexing techniques have been used, so that the optical probe and the optical interferometer are well spaced and fast surface scanning can be carried out, allowing flexibility for online measurement. In addition, this system provides a self-reference signal to stabilize the optical detection with high common-mode noise suppression by adopting an active phase tracking and stabilization technique. Low-frequency noise was significantly reduced compared with unstabilized result. The measurement of a sample surface shows an attained repeatability of 3.3 nm.

  7. An Automatic Method for Measurements of Arterial Intima-Media Thickness Using Ultrasonic B-Mode Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinthio, Magnus; Ahlgren, Åsa Rydén; Jansson, Tomas; Nilsson, Tobias; Lindström, Kjell; Persson, Hans W.

    We have previously developed algorithms that use B-mode cineloops for simultaneous measurements of arterial diameter change and longitudinal movement of the arterial wall. In this study the lumen diameter algorithm was extended to also measure arterial intima-media thickness of the far wall. To optimize the algorithm the influence of the lateral width of the region-of-interest (1 pixel, 0.1 mm, 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2.5 mm and 5 mm) was evaluated. The algorithm estimated intima-media thickness at diastole automatically by measuring the distance between the two positions where the laterally averaged B-mode intensity envelope crosses a threshold value relative to the maximum amplitudes of the intimal and adventitial echoes, respectively. The sub-pixel resolution is achieved by solving the equation of a straight line between the two samples on either side of the threshold value. The measurements were performed on 20 healthy normotensive volunteers (age 25-57 years) on the common carotid artery 2-3 cm proximal to the bifurcation. For the 2.5-mm width, which was considered the best, the intima-media thickness was mean 646 μm (SD 66) for men and 613 μm (SD 68) for women. The systematic difference was -5 μm and the random difference was 31 μm. The CV was 4.9%. The study indicates that the reproducibility is sufficient for in vivo studies when the width of the region-of-interest is 1.0 mm or wider.

  8. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang Chuji

    2012-09-15

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10{sup 9} (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10{sup 6} (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10{sup 12} (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min{sup -1}; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements

  9. M-Mode Ultrasound Reveals Earlier Gluteus Minimus Activity in Individuals With Chronic Hip Pain During a Step-down Task.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Angela V; Deshon, Louise; Strauss, Geoffrey R; McKay, Jan; Pickard, Christine M

    2016-04-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background The hip abductor muscles are important hip joint stabilizers. Hip joint pain may alter muscle recruitment. Motion-mode (M-mode) ultrasound enables noninvasive measurements of the onset of deep and superficial muscle motion, which is associated with activation onset. Objectives To compare (1) the onset of superficial and deep gluteus medius and gluteus minimus muscle motion relative to the instant of peak ground reaction force and (2) the level of swing-phase muscle motion during step-down between subjects with chronic hip pain and controls using M-mode ultrasound. Methods Thirty-five subjects with anterior, nontraumatic hip pain for more than 6 months (mean ± SD age, 54 ± 9 years) and 35 controls (age, 57 ± 7 years) were scanned on the lateral hip of the leading leg during frontal step-down onto a force platform using M-mode ultrasound. Computerized motion detection with the Teager-Kaiser energy operator was applied on the gluteus minimus and the deep and superficial gluteus medius to determine the time lag between muscle motion onset and instant of peak ground reaction force and the level of gluteus minimus motion during the swing phase. Time lags and motion levels were averaged per subject, and t tests were used to determine between-group differences. Results In participants with hip pain, gluteus minimus motion onset was 103 milliseconds earlier (P = .002) and superficial gluteus medius motion was 70 milliseconds earlier (P = .047) than those in healthy control participants. The level of gluteus minimus swing-phase motion was higher with pain (P = .006). Conclusion Increased gluteus minimus motion during the swing phase and earlier gluteus minimus and superficial gluteus medius motion in individuals with hip pain suggest an overall increase of muscle activity, possibly a protective behavior. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(4):277-285. Epub 8 Mar 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6132. PMID:26954272

  10. Charged fusion product loss measurements using nuclear activation.

    PubMed

    Bonheure, G; Hult, M; González de Orduña, R; Arnold, D; Dombrowski, H; Laubenstein, M; Wieslander, E; Vermaercke, P; Murari, A; Popovichev, S; Mlynar, J

    2010-10-01

    In ITER, α particle loss measurements will be required in order to understand the alpha particle physics. Techniques capable of operating in a fusion reactor environment need further development. Recent experimental studies on JET demonstrated the potential of nuclear activation to measure the flux of escaping MeV ions. New results from MeV ion induced activation of metallic, ceramic, and crystal samples placed near the plasma edge are reported. Activation products were measured as function of orientation with respect to the magnetic field as well as function of the distance to the plasma. Sample activity was measured using ultralow-level gamma-ray spectrometry. Distribution of 14.68 MeV fusion proton induced activation products is strongly anisotropic in agreement with simulations and falls off sharply with increasing distance to the plasma. Prospects for using the technique in ITER are discussed. PMID:21058458

  11. Measurements of mixed-mode crack surface displacements and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Altiero, N. J.; Mirmohamadsadegh, A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of a finite-width tension specimen containing a crack oriented at various angles to the load axis is attacked from experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Displacements of an electro-machined slot, 12.5 mm long and oriented at angles of 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 deg, are measured using a laser-based in-plane measuring technique. Various width specimens, ranging from a crack-length/width ratio of 0.167 to 0.794, are tested. A boundary-integral equation method is extended to deal with the presence of a sharp crack. Agreement between the two approaches is generally good except near the tips of the cracks.

  12. Measurements of collisionless heating effects in the H-mode of an inductively coupled plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaka-Ul-Islam, Mujahid; Graham, Bill; Gans, Timo; Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah

    2013-09-01

    Inductively coupled plasma systems (ICPs) for processing applications are often operated at low pressures, in the near-collisionless regime. In this regime, the electron mean free path is comparable or larger than the plasma dimensions. The electron dynamics in such ICPs has been investigated here, using phase and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) and Langmuir probe measurements. The PROES measurements are also used to calculate the Fourier harmonics components of the 2D excitation (in the radial axial plane). The experimental system is a standard GEC cell with the axial gap of ~4 cm, powered by 13.56 MHz RF power supply. The gas pressure was varied between 0.5 - 2 Pa. The PROES measurements and Fourier harmonics components confirm many of the previous simulation results in comparable operational regimes. The results show that in the 2D (radial-axial) plane, the plasma power is deposited in a spatially non-uniform and non-linear manner, with axial layers of positive and negative power absorption. The contribution of these nonlinear effects decreases with an increase in the pressure, as observed in previous experimental and simulation results.

  13. Method for measuring surface activity of silicon nitride powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanno, Y.; Imai, H.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous, alpha-, and beta-Si3N4 powders were activated by vibration ball milling in purified MeOH, and the surface activity of ground powders was determined by the temperature programmed desorption (TPD) method using NH3 gas. The concentration of active sites with a potential energy equivalent to the peak temperature in the spectrum increased was markedly by ball milling the amorphous Si3N4. The alpha- and beta-Si3N4 also had active sites produced by ball milling. The concentration of active site increased with increased ball milling time. A method for measuring surface activity of ceramic raw materials by TPD is proposed.

  14. Measuring C P violation and mixing in charm with inclusive self-conjugate multibody decay modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malde, S.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.

    2015-05-01

    Time-dependent studies of inclusive charm decays to multibody self-conjugate final states can be used to determine the indirect C P -violating observable AΓ and the mixing observable yC P , provided that the fractional C P -even content of the final state, F+ , is known. This approach can yield significantly improved sensitivity compared with the conventional method that relies on decays to C P eigenstates. In particular, D →π+π-π0 appears to be an especially powerful channel, given its relatively large branching fraction and the high value of F+ that has recently been measured at charm threshold.

  15. An intercepted feedback mode for light sensitive spectroscopic measurements in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smoliner, J; Brezna, W

    2007-10-01

    In most atomic force microscopes (AFMs), the motion of the tip is detected by the deflection of a laser beam shining onto the cantilever. AFM applications such as scanning capacitance spectroscopy or photocurrent spectroscopy, however, are severely disturbed by the intense stray light of the AFM laser. For this reason, an intercepted feedback method was developed, which allows to switch off the laser temporarily while the feedback loop keeps running. The versatility of this feedback method is demonstrated by measuring tip-force dependent Schottky barrier heights on GaAs samples. PMID:17979460

  16. Ice nucleus activity measurements of solid rocket motor exhaust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The ice Nucleus activity of exhaust particles generated from combustion of Space Shuttle propellant in small rocket motors has been measured. The activity at -20 C was substantially lower than that of aerosols generated by unpressurized combustion of propellant samples in previous studies. The activity decays rapidly with time and is decreased further in the presence of moist air. These tests corroborate the low effectivity ice nucleus measurement results obtained in the exhaust ground cloud of the Space Shuttle. Such low ice nucleus activity implies that Space Shuttle induced inadvertent weather modification via an ice phase process is extremely unlikely.

  17. ACTIVE FEEDBACK STABILZATION OF THE RESISTIVE WALL MODE ON THE DIII-D DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    M. OKABAYASHI; J. BIALEK; M.S. CHANCE; M.S. CHU; E.D. FREDRICKSON; A.M. GAROFALO; M. GRYAZNEVICH; R.E HATCHER; T.H. JENSEN; L.C. JOHNSON; R.J. LA HAYE; E,A. LAZARUS; M.A. MAKOWSKI; J. MANICKAM; G.A. NAVRATIL; J.T. SCOVILLE; E.J. STRAIT; A.D. TURNBULL; M.L. WALKER

    2000-11-01

    A proof of principle magnetic feedback stabilization experiment has been carried out to suppress the resistive wall mode (RWM), a branch of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink mode under the influence of a stabilizing resistive wall, on the DIII-D tokamak device [Plasma Phys. and Contr. Fusion Research (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1986), p. 159]. The RWM was successfully suppressed and the high beta duration above the no wall limit was extended to more than 50 times the resistive wall flux diffusion time. It was observed that the mode structure was well preserved during the time of the feedback application. Several lumped parameter formulations were used to study the feedback process. The observed feedback characteristics are in good qualitative agreement with the analysis. These results provide encouragement to future efforts towards optimizing the RWM feedback methodology in parallel to what has been successfully developed for the n = 0 vertical positional control. Newly developed MHD codes have been extremely useful in guiding the experiments and in providing possible paths for the next step.

  18. Dynamics of different entanglement measures of two three-level atoms interacting nonlinearly with a single-mode field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghshahi, H. R.; Tavassoly, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a model which exhibits two identical Ξ-type three-level atoms interacting with a single-mode field with k-photon transition in an optical cavity enclosed by a Kerr medium. Considering full nonlinear formalism, it is assumed that the single-mode field, atom-field coupling and Kerr medium are all f-deformed. By using the adiabatic elimination method, it is shown that, the Hamiltonian of the considered system can be reduced to an effective Hamiltonian with two two-level atoms and f-deformed Stark shift. In spite of the fact that, the system seems to be complicated, under initial conditions which may be prepared for the atoms (coherent superposition of their ground and upper states) and the field (coherent state), the explicit form of the state vector of the entire system is analytically obtained. Then, the entanglement dynamics between different subsystems ( i.e. "field-two atoms", "atom-(field+atom)" and "atom-atom") are evaluated through appropriate measures like von Neumann entropy, tangle and concurrence. In addition, the effects of intensity-dependent coupling, deformed Kerr medium, detuning parameter, deformed Stark shift and multi-photon process on the considered entanglement measures are numerically analyzed, in detail. It is shown that the degree of entanglement between subsystems can be controlled by selecting the evolved parameters, suitably. Briefly, the Kerr medium highly decreases the amount of different considered measures of entanglement, especially for two-photon transition. This destructive effect preserves even when all other parameters are present, too. Furthermore, we find that the so-called entanglement sudden death and birth can occur in the atom-atom entanglement.

  19. Complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC using highly adaptive fast mode decision based on macroblock motion activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdellah, Skoudarli; Mokhtar, Nibouche; Amina, Serir

    2015-11-01

    The H.264/AVC video coding standard is used in a wide range of applications from video conferencing to high-definition television according to its high compression efficiency. This efficiency is mainly acquired from the newly allowed prediction schemes including variable block modes. However, these schemes require a high complexity to select the optimal mode. Consequently, complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC encoder has recently become a very challenging task in the video compression domain, especially when implementing the encoder in real-time applications. Fast mode decision algorithms play an important role in reducing the overall complexity of the encoder. In this paper, we propose an adaptive fast intermode algorithm based on motion activity, temporal stationarity, and spatial homogeneity. This algorithm predicts the motion activity of the current macroblock from its neighboring blocks and identifies temporal stationary regions and spatially homogeneous regions using adaptive threshold values based on content video features. Extensive experimental work has been done in high profile, and results show that the proposed source-coding algorithm effectively reduces the computational complexity by 53.18% on average compared with the reference software encoder, while maintaining the high-coding efficiency of H.264/AVC by incurring only 0.097 dB in total peak signal-to-noise ratio and 0.228% increment on the total bit rate.

  20. Sliding mode fault detection and fault-tolerant control of smart dampers in semi-active control of building structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeganeh Fallah, Arash; Taghikhany, Touraj

    2015-12-01

    Recent decades have witnessed much interest in the application of active and semi-active control strategies for seismic protection of civil infrastructures. However, the reliability of these systems is still in doubt as there remains the possibility of malfunctioning of their critical components (i.e. actuators and sensors) during an earthquake. This paper focuses on the application of the sliding mode method due to the inherent robustness of its fault detection observer and fault-tolerant control. The robust sliding mode observer estimates the state of the system and reconstructs the actuators’ faults which are used for calculating a fault distribution matrix. Then the fault-tolerant sliding mode controller reconfigures itself by the fault distribution matrix and accommodates the fault effect on the system. Numerical simulation of a three-story structure with magneto-rheological dampers demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control system. It was shown that the fault-tolerant control system maintains the performance of the structure at an acceptable level in the post-fault case.

  1. Actinomycin D binding mode reveals the basis for its potent HIV-1 and cancer activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Vladescu, Ioana D.; McCauley, Micah J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2011-03-01

    Actinomycin D (ActD) is one of the most studied antibiotics, which has been used as an anti-cancer agent and also shown to inhibit HIV reverse transcription. Initial studies with ActD established that it intercalates double stranded DNA (dsDNA). However, recent studies have shown that ActD binds with even higher affinity to single stranded DNA (ssDNA). In our studies we use optical tweezers to stretch and hold single dsDNA molecule at constant force in the presence of varying ActD concentrations until the binding reaches equilibrium. The change in dsDNA length upon ActD binding measured as a function of time yields the rate of binding in addition to the equilibrium lengthening of DNA. The results suggest extremely slow kinetics, on the order of several minutes and 0.52 +/- 0.06 μ M binding affinity. Holding DNA at constant force while stretching and relaxing suggests that ActD binds to two single strands that are close to each other rather than to pure dsDNA or ssDNA. This suggests that biological activity of ActD that contributes towards the inhibition of cellular replication is due to its ability to bind at DNA bubbles during RNA transcription, thereby stalling the transcription process.

  2. MEASUREMENT OF THE SECONDARY EMISSION YIELD OF A THIN DIAMOND WINDOW IN TRANSMISSION MODE.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG, X.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The secondary emission enhanced photoinjector (SEEP) is a promising new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. A low current primary electron beam with energy of a few thousand electron-volts strikes a specially prepared diamond window which emits secondary electrons with a current two orders of magnitude higher. The secondary electrons are created at the back side of the diamond and drift through the window under the influence of a strong electrical field. A hydrogen termination at the exit surface of the window creates a negative electron affinity (NEA) which allows the electrons to leave the diamond. An experiment was performed to measure the secondary electron yield and other properties. The results are discussed in this paper.

  3. Extracting spatial information from noise measurements of multi-spatial-mode quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, A. M.; Clark, J. B.; Glorieux, Q.; Lett, P. D.

    2012-11-01

    We show that it is possible to use the spatial quantum correlations present in twin beams to extract information about the shape of a binary amplitude mask in the path of one of the beams. The scheme, based on noise measurements through homodyne detection, is useful in the regime where the number of photons is low enough that direct detection with a photodiode is difficult but high enough that photon counting is not an option. We find that under some conditions the use of quantum states of light leads to an enhancement of the sensitivity in the estimation of the shape of the mask over what can be achieved with a classical state with equivalent properties (mean photon flux and noise properties). In addition, we show that the level of enhancement that is obtained is a result of the quantum correlations and cannot be explained with only classical correlations.

  4. Measurement of the B-->Xsl+l- branching fraction with a sum over exclusive modes.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Lynch, G; Merchant, A M; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-08-20

    We measure the branching fraction for the flavor-changing neutral-current process B-->X(s)l(+)l(-) with a sample of 89x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BBmacr; events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage ring. The final state is reconstructed from e(+)e(-) or micro(+)micro(-) pairs and a hadronic system X(s) consisting of one K+/- or K(0)(S) and up to two pions, with at most one pi(0). We observe a signal of 40+/-10(stat)+/-2(syst) events and extract the inclusive branching fraction B(B-->X(s)l(+)l(-))=(5.6+/-1.5(stat)+/-0.6(exp syst)+/-1.1(model syst))x10(-6) for ml(+)(l(-))>0.2 GeV/c(2). PMID:15447173

  5. Experimental Measurements of an Expansion Deflection Nozzle in Open Wake Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. V.; Sato, T.

    Expansion Deflection nozzles present an attractive proposition as a replacement for conventional nozzles on launch vehicles, due to their reduced length, and altitude compensating capability. However, it has long been speculated that they suffer in the latter regard due to aspiration of the low speed flow region inside the nozzle by the supersonic jet surrounding it. This effect is investigated in this paper by direct experimental measurement of base pressures, and found to have little effect on the base pressure of the nozzle within the range of operating conditions investigated. Wall pressures were also used to calculate the efficiency of the altitude compensation within the nozzle, which was found to be between 87 and 100% for the three operating pressure ratios examined. This represents a significant improvement over conventional nozzle performance, and further conformation that wake pressures are indeed close to ambient.

  6. Active galactic nucleus feedback in an isolated elliptical galaxy: The effect of strong radiative feedback in the kinetic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Zhaoming; Yuan, Feng; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ciotti, Luca; Novak, Gregory S.

    2014-07-10

    Based on two-dimensional high-resolution hydrodynamic numerical simulation, we study the mechanical and radiative feedback effects from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) on the cosmological evolution of an isolated elliptical galaxy. The inner boundary of the simulation domain is carefully chosen so that the fiducial Bondi radius is resolved and the accretion rate of the black hole is determined self-consistently. It is well known that when the accretion rates are high and low, the central AGNs will be in cold and hot accretion modes, which correspond to the radiative and kinetic feedback modes, respectively. The emitted spectrum from the hot accretion flows is harder than that from the cold accretion flows, which could result in a higher Compton temperature accompanied by a more efficient radiative heating, according to previous theoretical works. Such a difference of the Compton temperature between the two feedback modes, the focus of this study, has been neglected in previous works. Significant differences in the kinetic feedback mode are found as a result of the stronger Compton heating. More importantly, if we constrain models to correctly predict black hole growth and AGN duty cycle after cosmological evolution, we find that the favored model parameters are constrained: mechanical feedback efficiency diminishes with decreasing luminosity (the maximum efficiency being ≅ 10{sup –3.5}), and X-ray Compton temperature increases with decreasing luminosity, although models with fixed mechanical efficiency and Compton temperature can be found that are satisfactory as well. We conclude that radiative feedback in the kinetic mode is much more important than previously thought.

  7. Measurement of the high-field Q drop in the TM010 and TE011 modes in a niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel

    2006-04-01

    In the last few years superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio>200) niobium achieved accelerating gradients close to the theoretical limits. An obstacle towards achieving reproducibly higher fields is represented by ''anomalous'' losses causing a sharp degradation of the cavity quality factor when the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) is above about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. This effect, called ''Q drop'' has been measured in many laboratories with single- and multicell cavities mainly in the gigahertz range. In addition, a low-temperature (100-140 C) ''in situ'' baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q drop. In order to gain some understanding of the nature of these losses, a single-cell cavity has been tested in the TM010 and TE011 modes at 2 K. The feature of the TE011 mode is to have zero electric field on the cavity surface, so that electric field effects can be excluded as a source for the Q drop. This article will present some of the experimental results for different cavity treatments and will compare them with existing models.

  8. [Remote sensing inversion mode of suspended particles concentration in Hangzhou Bay based on in situ measurement spectrum].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Zhou, Bin; Xu, Jian-Ming; Ling, Zai-Ying

    2008-11-01

    Suspended particles are one of major parameters of coastal water color remote sensing in China. The reflectances spectral of water were measured using an ASD field spectroscope, synchronously the suspended particles concentrations of surface water were acquired in Hangzhou Bay. Two remote sensing inversion models for suspended particles concentrations (SPC) were developed based on t hesimulated reflectance of MODIS & MERIS channels using artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm. Measurement results show that the total SPC of Hangzhou bay is comparatively high where the suspended sediments concentrations (SSC) are far more than chlorophyll concentrations, averagely 705 mg/L and 1.164 mg/m3, reseparately. The SPC in two measurement stations appears spatio-temporal variation, especially the short period change due to tidal cycle. There are two reflectance peaks in the measured spectral curves, one is between 650 nm to 750 nm, and the other is near 800 nm. The first order derivative curves of reflectance spectral indicate that the first reflectance peaks shift to long wavelength according to the increased SSC. The ANN models make full use of the spectral information in different channels which can simulate the pigment and non-pigment particles concentrations at same time. The fitting effects are preferable with R2 more than 0.95 for each model. The ANN mode can be used for satellite remote sensing inversion, especially MERIS data, because of its comparatively high spatial resolution. PMID:19186796

  9. Validation of GPS derived integrated water vapor with microwave radiometer measurements in zenith and satellite tracking mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, Stefan; Shangguan, Ming; Deng, Zhiguo; Dick, Galina; Wickert, Jens; Zus, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Reliable and precise water vapour measurements are important for both, numerical weather prediction and climatological studies. In this context, zenith and slant total delay (ZTD, STD) data from Global Positioning System (GPS) ground observations provide a valuable source of integrated water vapour (IWV) information with high potential for assimilation to numerical weather models and nowcasting applications but also for climatological analysis of longer GPS IWV time series. Therefore it is important to validate the accuracy of GPS IWV with independent observations. For this purpose, in 2012 GFZ started to operate a water vapour radiometer (WVR) in vicinity of the Potsdam GPS station. It measures the absorption lines of atmospheric water vapour and oxygen at 14 frequency channels in the 22-58 GHz range and provides among others integrated water vapour measurements along the respective line of sight. Besides zenith IWV measurements the radiometer is operated in GPS satellite tracking mode enabling direct comparisons with the nearby GPS slant IWV observations (processed at GFZ). In this study we present validation results of GPS slant and zenith IWV data with the collocated radiometer observations. The validation covers all seasons including dry and wet humidity conditions. We address relations between the GPS-WVR differences and corresponding observation conditions that might have influence on the comparison results (elevation angles, ground pressure and temperature, atmospheric humidity).

  10. Measurement of anchoring coefficient of homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystal using a polarizing optical microscope in reflective mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Sang-In; Kim, Sung-Jo; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Although the homeotropic alignment of liquid crystals is widely used in LCD TVs, no easy method exists to measure its anchoring coefficient. In this study, we propose an easy and convenient measurement technique in which a polarizing optical microscope is used in the reflective mode with an objective lens having a low depth of focus. All measurements focus on the reflection of light near the interface between the liquid crystal and alignment layer. The change in the reflected light is measured by applying an electric field. We model the response of the director of the liquid crystal to the electric field and, thus, the change in reflectance. By adjusting the extrapolation length in the calculation, we match the experimental and calculated results and obtain the anchoring coefficient. In our experiment, the extrapolation lengths were 0.31 ± 0.04 μm, 0.32 ± 0.08 μm, and 0.23 ± 0.05 μm for lecithin, AL-64168, and SE-5662, respectively.

  11. Design of an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control for uncertain discrete-time nonlinear systems based on noisy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Toshio

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the design of an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control (AFSMC) for uncertain discrete-time nonlinear dynamic systems. The dynamic systems are described by a discrete-time state equation with nonlinear uncertainties, and the uncertainties include the modelling errors and the external disturbances to be unknown but nonlinear with the bounded properties. The states are measured by the restriction of measurement sensors and the contamination with independent measurement noises. The nonlinear uncertainties are approximated by using the fuzzy IF-THEN rules based on the universal approximation theorem, and the approximation error is compensated by adding an adaptive complementary term to the proposed AFSMC. The fuzzy inference approach based on the extended single input rule modules is proposed to reduce the number of the fuzzy IF-THEN rules. The estimates for the un-measurable states and the adjustable parameters are obtained by using the weighted least squares estimator and its simplified one. It is proved that under some conditions the estimation errors will remain in the vicinity of zero as time increases, and the states are ultimately bounded subject to the proposed AFSMC. The effectiveness of the proposed method is indicated through the simulation experiment of a simple numerical system.

  12. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574316

  13. Lock-in common-mode rejection demodulation: Measurement technique and applications to thermal-wave detection. Experimental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paoloni, Stefano; Nicolaides, Lena; Mandelis, Andreas

    2000-06-01

    A new signal generation methodology based on lock-in amplifier common mode rejection demodulation for materials nondestructive evaluation has been implemented experimentally with thermal waves in a photothermal radiometric apparatus. A procedure to calibrate the experiment is described in order to take into account instrumental time delay phase shifts between the reference and the optical excitation wave form. Some preliminary results obtained on Zr-2.5Nb shot peened samples are presented and compared to those obtained by temporally modulating the pump intensity as a 50% duty cycle square wave. The comparison shows the new measurement methodology to be a very promising technique for nondestructive evaluation and depth profiling applications, featuring high detectivity for low-dynamic-range and poor-signal to noise ratio signals, such as those obtained with thermal-wave diagnostics.

  14. Evaluation of neural reflex activation as a mode of action for the acute respiratory effects of ozone.

    PubMed

    Prueitt, Robyn L; Goodman, Julie E

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of ozone has been associated with a variety of respiratory-related health endpoints in both epidemiology and controlled human exposure studies, including lung function decrements and airway inflammation. A mode of action (MoA) for these effects has not been established, but it has been proposed that they may occur through ozone-induced activation of neural reflexes. We critically reviewed experimental studies of ozone exposure and neural reflex activation and applied the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) mode-of-action/human relevance framework to evaluate the biological plausibility and human relevance of this proposed MoA. Based on the currently available experimental data, we found that the proposed MoA of neural reflex activation is biologically plausible for the endpoint of ozone-induced lung function decrements at high ozone exposures, but further studies are needed to fill important data gaps regarding the relevance of this MoA at lower exposures. A role for the proposed MoA in ozone-induced airway inflammation is less plausible, as the evidence is conflicting and is also of unclear relevance given the lack of studies conducted at lower exposures. The evidence suggests a different MoA for ozone-induced inflammation that may still be linked to the key events in the proposed MoA, such that neural reflex activation may have some degree of involvement in modulating ozone-induced neutrophil influx, even if it is not a direct role. PMID:27569521

  15. Earthworm Biomass Measurement: A Science Activity for Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskett, Jonathan; Levine, Elissa; Carey, Pauline B.; Niepold III, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity on biomass measurement which, in this case, is the weight of a group of living things in a given area. The earthworm activity gives students a greater understanding of ecology, practical math applications, and the scientific method. (ASK)

  16. Seasonality in Children's Pedometer-Measured Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beighle, Aaron; Alderman, Brandon; Morgan, Charles F.; Le Masurier, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Seasonality appears to have an impact on children's physical activity levels, but equivocal findings demand more study in this area. With the increased use of pedometers in both research and practice, collecting descriptive data in various seasons to examine the impact of seasonality on pedometer-measured physical activity among children is…

  17. A Simple and Accurate Method for Measuring Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din-Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents methods commonly used for investigating enzyme activity using catalase and presents a new method for measuring catalase activity that is more reliable and accurate. Provides results that are readily reproduced and quantified. Can also be used for investigations of enzyme properties such as the effects of temperature, pH, inhibitors,…

  18. Should soil testing services measure soil biological activity?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Health of agricultural soils depends largely on conservation management to promote soil organic C accumulation. Total soil organic C changes slowly, but active fractions are more dynamic. A key indicator of healthy soil is potential biological activity, which could be measured rapidly with soil te...

  19. Measurement of direct photon emission in the K(L) ---> pi+ pi- gamma decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; Arenton, M.; Barker, A.R.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Corti, G.; /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-04-01

    In this paper the KTeV collaboration reports the analysis of 112.1 x 10{sup 3} candidate K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} decays including a background of 671 {+-} 41 events with the objective of determining the photon production mechanisms intrinsic to the decay process. These decays have been analyzed to extract the relative contributions of the Cp violating bremsstrahlung process and the CP conserving M1 and CP violating E1 direct photon emission processes. The M1 direct photon emission amplitude and its associated vector form factor parameterized as |{bar g}{sub M1}|(1 + a{sub 1}/a{sub 2}/(M{sub {rho}}{sup 2}-M{sub K}{sup 2}) + 2M{sub K}E{sub {gamma}}) have been measured to be |{bar g}{sub M1}| = 1.198 {+-} 0.035(stat) {+-} 0.086(syst) and a{sub 1}/a{sub 2} = =0.738 {+-} 0.007(stat) {+-} 0.018(syst) GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} respectively. An upper limit for the CP violating E1 direct emission amplitude |g{sub E1}| {le} 0.1 (90%CL) has been found. The overall ratio of direct photon emission (DE) to total photon emission including the bremsstrahlung process (IB) has been determined to be DE/(DE + IB) = 0.689 {+-} 0.021 for E{sub {gamma}} {ge} 20 MeV.

  20. Field screening of waterborne petroleum hydrocarbons by thickness shear-mode resonator measurements.

    PubMed

    Applebee, Michelle S; Geissler, John D; Schellinger, Adam P; Jaeger, Richard J; Pierce, David T

    2004-01-01

    An inexpensive, field-portable sensor for direct, aggregate determination of aqueous petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) down to sub-ppm levels was developed. The basis of this sensor was an unusual, highly nongravimetric frequency response of 10 MHz (series fundamental) AT-cut quartz crystals when coated with rubbery silicone films. The response depended linearly and reliably on the total concentration of dissolved hydrocarbons over a range of 0.01-100 mg x L(-1) or up to aqueous solubility limits. Calibration sensitivities were measured individually for laboratory-prepared solutions of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene isomers) and C6-C8 aliphatic components. Each component demonstrated a method detection limit (MDL) in the low-to sub-ppm range (benzene 10 mg x L(-1), n-hexane 0.54 mg x L(-1)) for light coatings of a commercially available poly-(dimethylsiloxane) gum (OV-1, > 10(6) g x mol(-1)) and lower MDLs for heavier coatings. Pairwise responses for the aliphatic and benzenoid standards were additive, indicating that aggregate determinations of mixtures (especially light fuels) were possible. Natural matrix interferences caused by sample turbidity and ionic strength were overcome by simple preparative methods. Fuel-spiked natural waters were determined with respect to standards and verified by gas chromatography. A 0.19 mg x L(-1) MDL for gasoline was obtained for heavy OV-1 films. Field determinations of groundwater surrounding a leaking underground fuel tank demonstrated that the sensor and method were useful for on-site PH screening. Large differences between the equilibration times of aliphatic and benzenoid components also indicated one avenue for BTEX speciation with the device. PMID:14740741