Science.gov

Sample records for active mode measurements

  1. X-mode reflectometry for magnetohydrodynamic activity associated with q=1 surface measurements on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Vermare, L.; Clairet, F.; Gabillet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    2004-10-01

    Tore Supra is equipped with two 20 {mu}s fast sweep X-mode reflectometers operating between 50-110 GHz dedicated to density profile determination and an X-mode fixed frequency reflectometer operating between 105-155 GHz for density fluctuation measurements. Heterodyne and sine-cosine detection provide measurements of the reflected signal with high sensitivity. Operating profile reflectometer in burst mode (5 {mu}s dead time between two consecutive sweeps) allows quasi-simultaneous measurements at fixed frequency over a broad frequency band. Thus, information on plasma fluctuations, such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity, up to 20 kHz as well as a radial localization of the modes is accessible. The temporal evolution of the q=1 rational surface during sawtooth crash activity has been recorded in the plasma center with high spatial resolution. In addition, a direct comparison between signals associated with a central MHD mode from both profile and fluctuation reflectometers, positioned at different toroidal angles, allows one to determine the plasma toroidal velocity.

  2. Heat Transfer Measurements with Surface Mounted Foil-Sensors in an Active Mode: A Comprehensive Review and a New Design

    PubMed Central

    Mocikat, Horst; Herwig, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive review of film-sensors shows that they are primarily operated in a passive mode, i.e. without being actively heated to an extent, whereby they create a heat transfer situation on their own. Only when these sensors are used for wall shear stress measurements, the detection of laminar/turbulent transition, or the measurement of certain flow velocities, they are operated in an active mode, i.e. heated by an electrical current (after an appropriate calibration). In our study we demonstrate how these R(T)-based sensors (temperature dependence of the electrical resistance R) can also be applied in an active mode for heat transfer measurements. These measurements can be made on cold, unheated bodies, provided certain requirements with respect to the flow field are fulfilled. Our new sensors are laminated nickel- and polyimide-foils manufactured with a special technology, which is also described in detail. PMID:22574060

  3. An acoustic mode measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joppa, P. D.

    1984-10-01

    Turbomachinery noise propagates in aircraft jet engine ducts in a complicated manner. Measurement of this propagation is useful both to identify source mechanisms and to design efficient linings. A practical method of making these measurements has been developed, using linear arrays of equally spaced microphones mounted flush with the duct wall. Circumferential or axial arrays are analyzed by spatial Fourier transform, giving sound level as a function of spinning order or axial wavenumber respectively. Complex demodulation is used to acquire data in a modest bandwidth around a high frequency of interest. A joint NASA/Boeing test of the system used 32 microphones in a JT15D turbofan engine inlet. A 400-Hz bandwidth centered at blade passage frequency and at half blade passage frequency was studied. The theoretically predicted modes were clearly seen at blade passage frequency; broadband noise at half blade passage frequency was biased towards modes corotating with the fan. Interference between similar modes was not a significant problem. A lining design study indicated a 15 percent improvement in lining efficiency was possible when mode data were used, for this particular engine. The technique has proven reliable and useful for source diagnostics and lining design.

  4. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  5. Active Pneumatic Vibration Control by Using Pressure and Velocity Measurements and Adaptive Fuzzy Sliding-Mode Controller

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Yi; Liang, Jin-Wei; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an intelligent control strategy to overcome nonlinear and time-varying characteristics of a diaphragm-type pneumatic vibration isolator (PVI) system. By combining an adaptive rule with fuzzy and sliding-mode control, the method has online learning ability when it faces the system's nonlinear and time-varying behaviors during an active vibration control process. Since the proposed scheme has a simple structure, it is easy to implement. To validate the proposed scheme, a composite control which adopts both chamber pressure and payload velocity as feedback signal is implemented. During experimental investigations, sinusoidal excitation at resonance and random-like signal are input on a floor base to simulate ground vibration. Performances obtained from the proposed scheme are compared with those obtained from passive system and PID scheme to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed intelligent control. PMID:23820746

  6. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 2. Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT)-Based, Mixed-Mode (Electron Transfer (ET)/HAT), and Lipid Peroxidation Assays.

    PubMed

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    Measuring the antioxidant activity/capacity levels of food extracts and biological fluids is useful for determining the nutritional value of foodstuffs and for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of numerous oxidative stress-related diseases. Biologically, antioxidants play their health-beneficial roles via transferring a hydrogen (H) atom or an electron (e(-)) to reactive species, thereby deactivating them. Antioxidant activity assays imitate this action; that is, antioxidants are measured by their H atom transfer (HAT) or e(-) transfer (ET) to probe molecules. Antioxidant activity/capacity can be monitored by a wide variety of assays with different mechanisms, including HAT, ET, and mixed-mode (ET/HAT) assays, generally without distinct boundaries between them. Understanding the principal mechanisms, advantages, and disadvantages of the measurement assays is important for proper selection of method for valid evaluation of antioxidant properties in desired applications. This work provides a general and up-to-date overview of HAT-based, mixed-mode (ET/HAT), and lipid peroxidation assays available for measuring antioxidant activity/capacity and the chemistry behind them, including a critical evaluation of their advantages and drawbacks.

  7. Measurement equivalence in mixed mode surveys.

    PubMed

    Hox, Joop J; De Leeuw, Edith D; Zijlmans, Eva A O

    2015-01-01

    Surveys increasingly use mixed mode data collection (e.g., combining face-to-face and web) because this controls costs and helps to maintain good response rates. However, a combination of different survey modes in one study, be it cross-sectional or longitudinal, can lead to different kinds of measurement errors. For example, respondents in a face-to-face survey or a web survey may interpret the same question differently, and might give a different answer, just because of the way the question is presented. This effect of survey mode on the question-answer process is called measurement mode effect. This study develops methodological and statistical tools to identify the existence and size of mode effects in a mixed mode survey. In addition, it assesses the size and importance of mode effects in measurement instruments using a specific mixed mode panel survey (Netherlands Kinship Panel Study). Most measurement instruments in the NKPS are multi-item scales, therefore confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) will be used as the main analysis tool, using propensity score methods to correct for selection effects. The results show that the NKPS scales by and large have measurement equivalence, but in most cases only partial measurement equivalence. Controlling for respondent differences on demographic variables, and on scale scores from the previous uni-mode measurement occasion, tends to improve measurement equivalence, but not for all scales. The discussion ends with a review of the implications of our results for analyses employing these scales.

  8. Measurement equivalence in mixed mode surveys

    PubMed Central

    Hox, Joop J.; De Leeuw, Edith D.; Zijlmans, Eva A. O.

    2015-01-01

    Surveys increasingly use mixed mode data collection (e.g., combining face-to-face and web) because this controls costs and helps to maintain good response rates. However, a combination of different survey modes in one study, be it cross-sectional or longitudinal, can lead to different kinds of measurement errors. For example, respondents in a face-to-face survey or a web survey may interpret the same question differently, and might give a different answer, just because of the way the question is presented. This effect of survey mode on the question-answer process is called measurement mode effect. This study develops methodological and statistical tools to identify the existence and size of mode effects in a mixed mode survey. In addition, it assesses the size and importance of mode effects in measurement instruments using a specific mixed mode panel survey (Netherlands Kinship Panel Study). Most measurement instruments in the NKPS are multi-item scales, therefore confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) will be used as the main analysis tool, using propensity score methods to correct for selection effects. The results show that the NKPS scales by and large have measurement equivalence, but in most cases only partial measurement equivalence. Controlling for respondent differences on demographic variables, and on scale scores from the previous uni-mode measurement occasion, tends to improve measurement equivalence, but not for all scales. The discussion ends with a review of the implications of our results for analyses employing these scales. PMID:25699002

  9. Adaptive Batch Mode Active Learning.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shayok; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Panchanathan, Sethuraman

    2015-08-01

    Active learning techniques have gained popularity to reduce human effort in labeling data instances for inducing a classifier. When faced with large amounts of unlabeled data, such algorithms automatically identify the exemplar and representative instances to be selected for manual annotation. More recently, there have been attempts toward a batch mode form of active learning, where a batch of data points is simultaneously selected from an unlabeled set. Real-world applications require adaptive approaches for batch selection in active learning, depending on the complexity of the data stream in question. However, the existing work in this field has primarily focused on static or heuristic batch size selection. In this paper, we propose two novel optimization-based frameworks for adaptive batch mode active learning (BMAL), where the batch size as well as the selection criteria are combined in a single formulation. We exploit gradient-descent-based optimization strategies as well as properties of submodular functions to derive the adaptive BMAL algorithms. The solution procedures have the same computational complexity as existing state-of-the-art static BMAL techniques. Our empirical results on the widely used VidTIMIT and the mobile biometric (MOBIO) data sets portray the efficacy of the proposed frameworks and also certify the potential of these approaches in being used for real-world biometric recognition applications.

  10. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking. PMID:26367642

  11. Hypnotic induction decreases anterior default mode activity.

    PubMed

    McGeown, William J; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Venneri, Annalena; Kirsch, Irving

    2009-12-01

    The 'default mode' network refers to cortical areas that are active in the absence of goal-directed activity. In previous studies, decreased activity in the 'default mode' has always been associated with increased activation in task-relevant areas. We show that the induction of hypnosis can reduce anterior default mode activity during rest without increasing activity in other cortical regions. We assessed brain activation patterns of high and low suggestible people while resting in the fMRI scanner and while engaged in visual tasks, in and out of hypnosis. High suggestible participants in hypnosis showed decreased brain activity in the anterior parts of the default mode circuit. In low suggestible people, hypnotic induction produced no detectable changes in these regions, but instead deactivated areas involved in alertness. The findings indicate that hypnotic induction creates a distinctive and unique pattern of brain activation in highly suggestible subjects. PMID:19782614

  12. Link of local micro-morphology diversity with variability of the DAN active mode measurements along the rover Curiosity traverse in the Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Ruslan

    2014-05-01

    The rover Curiosity traverse from the Yellowknife Bay (YKB) up to the Darwin outcrop area (DOA) crossed mainly the Smooth Hummocky unit and in places - the Rugged unit spots. Whereas the Smooth Hummocky unit is characterized by low surface roughness and uniform tone, the Rugged unit is typically represented by outcrops with rougher surface texture. As it well seen based on Navcam and Mastcam images, the modern dominant micro-morphology of the landing site area is characteristic of surface shaped by strong aeolian deflation processes. Blowout shallow depressions and wind erosion remnants (in forms of mounds and ridges) are widespread along the rover traverse. As result, in most cases the surface texture of the regolith in the traverse area represents a desert pavement - a surface of tightly packed gravels and pebbles that armor lower more fine material below. Conglomerate outcrops are also exposed within both the Smooth Hummocky unit and the Rugged unit spots and aeolian accumulation features (aeolian drifts, small dunes and ripples) are relatively rare occurring mainly on local leeward slopes of mounds and ridges. During the traverse from the YKB to DOA the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument conducted 140 local active mode measurements of the thermal and epithermal neutrons counts in the top ~60 cm of the Martian subsurface with horizontal sensing "footprint" of about 3 m. Based on the active mode of the DAN measurements it was found that the thermal and epithermal neutron counts measured along the rover traverse show distinct variability from one rover location to another. It was found that a water equivalent of H (WEH) distribution in 60-cm subsurface layer along the rover traverse are fit by a two-layers model, where the top layer (with varied thickness) has less WEH ("dry") than the bottom layer ("wet"). It is distinct that spatial distribution of WEH within the top layer (1-2.5 wt. %) are chiefly homogeneous along the traverse, whereas the range of

  13. Evidences of correlation between the DAN active mode measurements variability and local surface micro-morphology diversity along the rover Curiosity traverse in the Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Ruslan

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument has been operational second year since almost immediately after the landing of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) on August 6, 2012 at the bottom of Gale Crater. In the report we present the result of the DAN measurement analysis, accumulated during 297-398 sols along the MSL rover Curiosity traverse from Yellowknife Bay (YKB) up to Darwin outcrop area (DOA). Along the part of the rover traverse the DAN instrument conducted 140 local active mode measurements of the thermal and epithermal neutrons counts in the top ~60 cm of the Martian subsurface with horizontal sensing “footprint” of about 3 m. As it well seen based on Navcam and Mastcam images, the modern dominant micro-morphology of the rover traverse area is characteristic of surface shaped by strong aeolian deflation processes. It was found that the thermal and epithermal neutron counts measured along the rover traverse show distinct variability from one rover location to another. At that, a water equivalent of H (WEH) distribution in 60-cm subsurface layer along the rover traverse are fit by a two-layers model, where the top layer (with varied thickness) has less WEH (“dry”) than the bottom layer (“wet”). It is notably that two-layer model of the water distribution in the subsurface layer corresponds well to both outcrops spots and deflated surfaces with variable top layer thickness, that is composed of finely granulated and coarse, rocky soil. This suggests that the boundary between the top and bottom layer may not represent a lithological difference but rather it is related with a level of surface regolith desiccation at the modern climatic conditions in the Gale crater area. In places where the surface regolith has been exposed for a longer period of time, the contrast in WEH between the top and bottom layers is essentially lower than in the cases of more recent surface regolith exposure by an aeolian erosion.

  14. Broadband radiation modes: Estimation and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2002-03-01

    In this paper we give a formulation of the most efficiently radiating vibration patterns of a vibrating body, the radiation modes, in the time domain. The radiation modes can be used to arrive at efficient weighting schemes for an array of sensors in order to reduce the controller dimensionality. Because these particular radiation modes are optimum in a broadband sense, they are termed broadband radiation modes. Methods are given to obtain these modes from measured data. The broadband radiation modes are used for the design of an actuator array in a feedback control system to reduce the sound power radiated from a plate. Three methods for the design of the actuator are compared, taking into account the reduction of radiated sound power in the controlled frequency range, but also the possible increase of radiated sound power in the uncontrolled frequency range.

  15. Rotating Rake Turbofan Duct Mode Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental measurement system was developed and implemented by the NASA Glenn Research Center in the 1990s to measure turbofan duct acoustic modes. The system is a continuously rotating radial microphone rake that is inserted into the duct. This Rotating Rake provides a complete map of the acoustic duct modes present in a ducted fan and has been used on a variety of test articles: from a low-speed, concept test rig, to a full-scale production turbofan engine. The Rotating Rake has been critical in developing and evaluating a number of noise reduction concepts as well as providing experimental databases for verification of several aero-acoustic codes. More detailed derivation of the unique Rotating Rake equations are presented in the appendix.

  16. Characterization of Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes for fluorescence decay measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, John C.; Phelan, Don; Morrison, Alan P.; Redfern, R. Michael; Mathewson, Alan

    2002-05-01

    Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APD) can be biased above the breakdown voltage to allow detection of single photons. Because of the increase in quantum efficiency, magnetic field immunity, robustness, longer operating lifetime and reduction in costs, solid-state detectors capable of operating at non-cryogenic temperatures and providing single photon detection capabilities provide attractive alternatives to the photomultiplier tube (PMT). Shallow junction Geiger mode APD detectors provide the ability to manufacture photon detectors and detector arrays with CMOS compatible processing steps and allows the use of novel Silicon-on-Insulator(SoI) technology to provide future integrated sensing solutions. Previous work on Geiger mode APD detectors has focused on increasing the active area of the detector to make it more PMT like, easing the integration of discrete reaction, detection and signal processing into laboratory experimental systems. This discrete model for single photon detection works well for laboratory sized test and measurement equipment, however the move towards microfluidics and systems on a chip requires integrated sensing solutions. As we move towards providing integrated functionality of increasingly nanoscopic sized emissions, small area detectors and detector arrays that can be easily integrated into marketable systems, with sensitive small area single photon counting detectors will be needed. This paper will demonstrate the 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional simulation of optical coupling that occurs in Geiger mode APDs. Fabricated Geiger mode APD detectors optimized for fluorescence decay measurements were characterized and preliminary results show excellent results for their integration into fluorescence decay measurement systems.

  17. Dual-Mode Scramjet Flameholding Operability Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Flameholding measurements were made in two different direct connect combustor facilities that were designed to simulate a cavity flameholder in the flowfield of a hydrocarbon fueled dual-mode scramjet combustor. The presence of a shocktrain upstream of the flameholder has a significant impact on the inlet flow to the combustor and on the flameholding limits. A throttle was installed in the downstream end of the test rigs to provide the needed back-pressurization and decouple the operation of the flameholder from the backpressure formed by heat release and thermal choking, as in a flight engine. Measurements were made primarily with ethylene fuel but a limited number of tests were also performed with heated gaseous JP-7 fuel injection. The flameholding limits were measured by ramping inlet air temperature down until blowout was observed. The tests performed in the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) facility used a hydrogen fueled vitiated air heater, Mach 2.2 and 3.3 inlet nozzles, a scramjet combustor rig with a 1.666 by 6 inch inlet and a 0.65 inch deep cavity. Mean blowout temperature measured at the baseline condition with ethylene fuel, the Mach 2.2 inlet and a cavity pressure of 21 psia was 1502 oR. Flameholding sensitivity to a variety of parameters was assessed. Blowout temperature was found to be most sensitive to fuel injection location and fuel flowrates and surprisingly insensitive to operating pressure (by varying both back-pressurization and inlet flowrate) and inlet Mach number. Video imaging through both the bottom and side wall windows was collected simultaneously and showed that the flame structure was quite unsteady with significant lateral movements as well as movement upstream of the flameholder. Experiments in the University of Virginia (UVa) test facility used a Mach 2 inlet nozzle with a 1 inch by 1.5 inch exit cross section, an aspect ratio of 1.5 versus 3.6 in the UTRC facility. The UVa facility tests were designed to measure the

  18. Comparison of Predicted Low Speed Fan Rotor/Stator Interaction Modes to Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Bridges, James; Envia, Edmane

    1996-01-01

    The V072 Rotor Wake/Stator Interaction Code is widely used as a state-of-the-art prediction code. This paper validates the code by comparing experimentally measured mode levels to those predicted by V072. The experimental mode levels were measured by the Rotating Rake system installed on the 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan at NASA Lewis Research Center. V072 predicted mode levels by inputting the actual wake profiles of the ANCF rotor measured by a 2-component hotwire. The mode levels were also predicted from the V072 wake models. V072 reasonably predicts the mode levels within the design limits of the code.

  19. Dynamic modeling of structures from measured complex modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, s. R.

    1982-01-01

    A technique is presented to use a set of identified complex modes together with an analytical mathematical model of a structure under test to compute improved mass, stiffness and damping matrices. A set of identified normal modes, computed from the measured complex modes, is used in the mass orthogonality equation to compute an improved mass matrix. This eliminates possible errors that may result from using approximated complex modes as normal modes. The improved mass matrix, the measured complex modes and the higher analytical modes are then used to compute the improved stiffness and damping matrices. The number of degrees-of-freedom of the improved model is limited to equal the number of elements in the measured modal vectors. A simulated experiment shows considerable improvements, in the system's analytical dynamic model, over the frequency range of the given measured modal information.

  20. Further Development of Rotating Rake Mode Measurement Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Hixon, Ray; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The Rotating Rake mode measurement system was designed to measure acoustic duct modes generated by a fan stage. After analysis of the measured data, the mode amplitudes and phases were quantified. For low-speed fans within axisymmetric ducts, mode power levels computed from rotating rake measured data would agree with the far-field power levels on a tone by tone basis. However, this agreement required that the sound from the noise sources within the duct propagated outward from the duct exit without reflection at the exit and previous studies suggested conditions could exist where significant reflections could occur. To directly measure the modes propagating in both directions within a duct, a second rake was mounted to the rotating system with an offset in both the axial and the azimuthal directions. The rotating rake data analysis technique was extended to include the data measured by the second rake. The analysis resulted in a set of circumferential mode levels at each of the two rake microphone locations. Radial basis functions were then least-squares fit to this data to obtain the radial mode amplitudes for the modes propagating in both directions within the duct. The fit equations were also modified to allow evanescent mode amplitudes to be computed. This extension of the rotating rake data analysis technique was tested using simulated data, numerical code produced data, and preliminary in-duct measured data.

  1. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bak, J. G.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable βN close to the ideal with-wall limit, βNwall, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at βN up to 86% of βNwall but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of βNwall without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  2. Acoustic Mode Measurements in the Inlet of a Model Turbofan Using a Continuously Rotating Rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Hall, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements of the spinning acoustic mode structure in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) have been completed. These measurements were taken using a unique and previously untried method which was first proposed by T.G. Sofrin. A continuously rotating microphone system was employed. The ADP model was designed and built by Pratt & Whitney and tested in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Three inlet configurations were tested with cut-on and cutoff stator vane sets. The cutoff stator was designed to suppress all modes at the blade passing frequency. Rotating rake measurements indicate that several extraneous circumferential modes were active. The mode orders suggest that their source was an interaction between the rotor and small interruptions in the casing tip treatment. The cut-on stator produced the expected circumferential modes plus higher levels of the unexpected modes seen with the cutoff stator.

  3. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Hall, David G.

    1993-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements of the spinning acoustic mode structure in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) have been completed. These measurements were taken using a unique and previously untried method which was first proposed by T.G. Sofrin. A continuously rotating microphone system was employed. The ADP model was designed and built by Pratt & Whitney and tested in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Three inlet configurations were tested with cut-on and cutoff stator vane sets. The cutoff stator was designed to suppress all modes at the blade passing frequency. Rotating rake measurements indicate that several extraneous circumferential modes were active. The mode orders suggest that their source was an interaction between the rotor and small interruptions in the casing tip treatment. The cut-on stator produced the expected circumferential modes plus higher levels of the unexpected modes seen with the cutoff stator.

  4. Batch Mode Active Sampling based on Marginal Probability Distribution Matching.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Fan, Wei; Davidson, Ian; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Ye, Jieping

    2012-01-01

    Active Learning is a machine learning and data mining technique that selects the most informative samples for labeling and uses them as training data; it is especially useful when there are large amount of unlabeled data and labeling them is expensive. Recently, batch-mode active learning, where a set of samples are selected concurrently for labeling, based on their collective merit, has attracted a lot of attention. The objective of batch-mode active learning is to select a set of informative samples so that a classifier learned on these samples has good generalization performance on the unlabeled data. Most of the existing batch-mode active learning methodologies try to achieve this by selecting samples based on varied criteria. In this paper we propose a novel criterion which achieves good generalization performance of a classifier by specifically selecting a set of query samples that minimizes the difference in distribution between the labeled and the unlabeled data, after annotation. We explicitly measure this difference based on all candidate subsets of the unlabeled data and select the best subset. The proposed objective is an NP-hard integer programming optimization problem. We provide two optimization techniques to solve this problem. In the first one, the problem is transformed into a convex quadratic programming problem and in the second method the problem is transformed into a linear programming problem. Our empirical studies using publicly available UCI datasets and a biomedical image dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in comparison with the state-of-the-art batch-mode active learning methods. We also present two extensions of the proposed approach, which incorporate uncertainty of the predicted labels of the unlabeled data and transfer learning in the proposed formulation. Our empirical studies on UCI datasets show that incorporation of uncertainty information improves performance at later iterations while our studies on 20

  5. Inferring Flare Loop Parameters with Measurements of Standing Sausage Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Standing fast sausage modes in flare loops were suggested to account for a considerable number of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the light curves of solar flares. This study continues our investigation into the possibility of inverting the measured periods P and damping times τ of sausage modes to deduce the transverse Alfvén time R/v_{Ai}, density contrast ρi/ρe, and the steepness of the density distribution transverse to flare loops. A generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage modes is derived for pressureless cylinders where density inhomogeneity of arbitrary form takes place within the cylinder. We show that in general the inversion problem is under-determined for QPP events where only a single sausage mode exists, whether the measurements are spatially resolved or unresolved. While R/v_{Ai} can be inferred to some extent, the range of possible steepness parameters may be too broad to be useful. However, for spatially resolved measurements where an additional mode is present, it is possible to deduce self-consistently ρi/ρe, the profile steepness, and the internal Alfvén speed v_{Ai}. We show that at least for a recent QPP event that involves a fundamental kink mode in addition to a sausage one, flare loop parameters are well constrained even if the specific form of the transverse density distribution remains unknown. We conclude that spatially resolved, multi-mode QPP measurements need to be pursued to infer flare loop parameters.

  6. HBT-EP Program: Active MHD Mode Dynamics and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, G. A.; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Byrne, P. J.; Donald, G. V.; Hughes, P. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.; Hansen, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    The HBT-EP active mode control research program aims to: (i) quantify external kink dynamics and multimode response to magnetic perturbations, (ii) understand the relationship between control coil configuration, conducting and ferritic wall effects, and active feedback control, and (iii) explore advanced feedback algorithms. Biorthogonal decomposition is used to observe multiple simultaneous resistive wall modes (RWM). A 512 core GPU-based low latency (14 μs) MIMO control system uses 96 inputs and 64 outputs for Adaptive Control of RWMs. An in-vessel adjustable ferritic wall is used to study ferritic RWMs with increased growth rates, RMP response, and disruptivity. A biased electrode in the plasma is used to control the rotation of external kinks and evaluate error fields. A Thomson scattering diagnostic measures Te and ne at 3 spatial points, soon to be extended to 10 points. A quasi-linear sharp-boundary model of the plasma's multimode response to error fields is developed to determine harmful error field structures and associated NTV and resonant torques. Upcoming machine upgrades will allow measurements and control of scrape-off-layer currents, and control of kink modes using optical diagnostics. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  7. Measurement of Spatial Filtering Capabilities of Single Mode Infrared Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ksendzov, Alexander; Bloemhof, E.; White, V.; Wallace, J. K.; Gappinger, R. O.; Sanghera, J. S.; Busse, L. E.; Kim, W. J.; Pureza, P. C.; Nguyen, V. Q.; Aggarwal, I. D.; Shalem, S.; Katzi, A.

    2006-01-01

    Spatial filtering is necessary to achieve deep nulls in optical interferometer and single mode infrared fibers can serve as spatial filters. The filtering function is based on the ability of these devices to perform the mode-cleaning function: only the component of the input field that is coupled to the single bound (fundamental) mode of the device propagates to the output without substantial loss. In practical fiber devices, there are leakage channels that cause light not coupled into the fundamental mode to propagate to the output. These include propagation through the fiber cladding and by means of a leaky mode. We propose a technique for measuring the magnitude of this leakage and apply it to infrared fibers made at the Naval Research Laboratory and at Tel Aviv University.

  8. Diagnostic for two-mode variable valve activation device

    SciTech Connect

    Fedewa, Andrew M

    2014-01-07

    A method is provided for diagnosing a multi-mode valve train device which selectively provides high lift and low lift to a combustion valve of an internal combustion engine having a camshaft phaser actuated by an electric motor. The method includes applying a variable electric current to the electric motor to achieve a desired camshaft phaser operational mode and commanding the multi-mode valve train device to a desired valve train device operational mode selected from a high lift mode and a low lift mode. The method also includes monitoring the variable electric current and calculating a first characteristic of the parameter. The method also includes comparing the calculated first characteristic against a predetermined value of the first characteristic measured when the multi-mode valve train device is known to be in the desired valve train device operational mode.

  9. Airborne Measurements of Coarse Mode Aerosol Composition and Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Brock, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Wilson, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse aerosol particles impact the earth's radiative balance by direct scattering and absorption of light and by promoting cloud formation. Modeling studies suggest that coarse mode mineral dust and sea salt aerosol are the dominant contributors to aerosol optical depth throughout much of the globe. Lab and field studies indicate that larger aerosol particles tend to be more efficient ice nuclei, and recent airborne measurements confirm the dominant role of mineral dust on cirrus cloud formation. However, our ability to simulate coarse mode particle abundance in large scale models is limited by a lack of validating measurements above the earth's surface. We present airborne measurements of coarse mode aerosol abundance and composition over several mid-latitude, sub-tropical, and tropical regions from the boundary layer to the stratosphere. In the free troposphere the coarse mode constitutes 10-50% of the total particulate mass over a wide range of environments. Above North America mineral dust typically dominates the coarse mode, but biomass burning particles and sea salt also contribute. In remote environments coarse mode aerosol mainly consists of internally mixed sulfate-organic particles. Both continental and marine convection can enhance coarse aerosol mass through direct lofting of primary particles and by secondary accumulation of aerosol material through cloud processing.

  10. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y. S. Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-15

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable β{sub N} close to the ideal with-wall limit, β{sub N}{sup wall}, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at β{sub N} up to 86% of β{sub N}{sup wall} but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of β{sub N}{sup wall} without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  11. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei measured, with the DANCE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Bečvář, F.; Krtička, M.; Valenta, S.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Spectra of γ-rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured with the DANCE detector. The objectives were to obtain new information on the photon strength of 153,155-159Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is built not only on the ground state, but also on all excited levels of the nuclei studied. Our approach allows estimating the summed scissors-mode strength \\sum B(M1)\\!\\!\\uparrow even for odd product nuclei for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our data indicate that for 157,159Gd the strength \\sum B(M1)\\!\\!\\uparrow is significantly higher compared to 156,158Gd.

  12. Expansion and orthogonalization of measured modes for structure identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Suzanne Weaver

    1989-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate a new simultaneous expansion/orthogonalization method in comparison with two previously published expansion methods and a widely used orthogonalization technique. Each expansion method uses data from an analytical model of the structure to complete the estimate of the mode shape vectors. Berman and Nagy used Guyan expansion in their work with improving analytical models. In this method, modes are expanded one at a time, producing a set not orthogonal with respect to the mass matrix. Baruch and Bar Itzhack's optimal orthogonalization procedure was used to subsequently adjust the expanded modes. A second expansion technique was presented by O'Callahan, Avitabile, and Reimer and separately by Kammer. Again, modes are expanded individually and orthogonalized after expansion with the same optimal technique as above. Finally, a simultaneous expansion/orthogonalization method was developed from the orthogonal Procrustes problem of computational mathematics. In this method modes are optimally expanded as a set and orthogonal with respect to the mass matrix as a result. Two demonstation problems were selected for the comparison of the methods described. The first problem is an 8 degree of freedom spring-mass problem first presented by Kabe. Several conditions were examined for expansion method including the presence of errors in the measured data and in the analysis models. As a second demonstration problem, data from tests of laboratory scale model truss structures was expanded for system identification. Tests with a complete structure produced a correlated analysis model and the stiffness and mass matrices. Tests of various damaged configurations produced measured data for 6 modes at 14 dof locations.

  13. Application of impedance measurement techniques to accelerating cavity mode characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. M.; Stefan, P. M.

    1993-11-01

    Impedance measurements, using a central wire to simulate the electron beam, were performed on a 52 MHz accelerating cavity at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This cavity was recently installed in the X-ray storage ring at the NSLS as a part of an upgrade of the ring. To damp higher-order modes (HOM) in this cavity, damping antennas have been installed. We implemented the impedance measurement technique to characterize the cavity modes up to 1 GHz and confirm the effectiveness of the damping antennas. Scattering parameters were measured using a network analyzer (HP 8510B) with a personal computer as a controller. Analysis based on S and T parameters for the system was used to solve for the cavity impedance, Z( ω), as a function of the measured transmission response, S21( ω). Search techniques were used to find the shunt resistance Rsh, and Q from the calculated Z( ω) for different modes. Our results for {R}/{Q} showed good agreement with URMEL simulations. The values of Q were compared with other independent Q measurement techniques. Our analytical technique offers an alternative approach for cases where full thru-reflection-line (TRL) calibration is not feasible and a more time-effective technique for obtaining {R}/{Q}, compared with the bead-pull method.

  14. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  15. Mode-locked laser autocollimator with an expanded measurement range.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Liu; Shimizu, Yuki; Kudo, Yukitoshi; Ito, So; Gao, Wei

    2016-07-11

    A mode-locked laser is employed as the light source of a laser autocollimator, instead of the conventionally employed single-wavelength laser, for an expanded range of tilt angle measurement. A group of the spatially separated diffracted beams from a diffraction grating are focused by a collimator objective to form an array of light spots on the focal plane of the collimator objective where a light position-sensing photodiode is located for detecting the linear displacement of the light spot array corresponding to the tilt angle of the reflector. A prototype mode-locked femtosecond laser autocollimator is designed and constructed for achieving a measurement range of 11000 arc-seconds.

  16. Preliminary mode distortion measurements on the Jefferson Lab IRFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen V. Benson; Joe Gubeli; Michelle D. Shinn

    2001-08-01

    We previously reported analytical calculations of mirror distortion in a high power FEL with a near-concentric cavity. Naive assumptions about the FEL power vs. distortion led us to believe that mirror losses were much lower than expected. Recently we have directly measured the mode size and beam quality as a function of power using a resonator with a center wavelength of 5 microns. The resonator mirrors were calcium fluoride. This material exhibits a large amount of distortion for a given power but, due to the negative slope of refractive index v temperature, adds almost no optical phase distortion on the laser output. The mode in the cavity can thus be directly calculated from the measurements at the resonator output. The presence of angular jitter produced results inconsistent with cold cavity expectations. Removing the effects of the angular jitter produces results in reasonable agreement with analytical models assuming mirror losses comparable to the original expectations.

  17. Lattice modes in molecular crystals measured with nuclear inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, V. G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rueffer, R.

    2006-03-01

    We reveal an important property of nuclear inelastic scattering in a molecular crystal with well-separated lattice and molecular modes: The presence of the molecular modes does not change the shape but merely rescales the lattice part of the energy dependence of nuclear inelastic scattering. Therefore, the density of states (DOS) of the lattice vibrations can be properly derived even from the lattice part of nuclear inelastic scattering alone. In this case, one has to substitute the mean recoil energy of a nucleus by the effective recoil energy of the molecule. In first approximation, the ratio of the recoil energies is close to the ratio of the nuclear and molecular masses. More precisely, it is given by the relative area of the lattice part in the entire DOS. The theoretical analysis is verified with numerical calculations for a model DOS and with the experimental data for the decamethyl ferrocene molecular crystal. More generally, the analysis is valid for any region of nuclear inelastic scattering around the central elastic peak with sufficiently narrow lines beyond it. Therefore, the demonstrated property of nuclear inelastic scattering allows for a much shorter measuring time in studies of lattice modes in molecular crystals, low-energy molecular modes in proteins, and in investigations of glass dynamics with molecular probes.

  18. Fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification for an active pelvis orthosis: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kebin; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Wang, Long; Munih, Marko; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification method for an active pelvis orthosis. Locomotion information measured by the onboard hip joint angle sensors and the pressure insoles is used to classify five locomotion modes, including two static modes (sitting, standing still), and three dynamic modes (level-ground walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The proposed method classifies these two kinds of modes first by monitoring the variation of the relative hip joint angle between the two legs within a specific period. Static states are then classified by the time-based absolute hip joint angle. As for dynamic modes, a fuzzy-logic based method is proposed for the classification. Preliminary experimental results with three able-bodied subjects achieve an off-line classification accuracy higher than 99.49%.

  19. Fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification for an active pelvis orthosis: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kebin; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Wang, Long; Munih, Marko; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification method for an active pelvis orthosis. Locomotion information measured by the onboard hip joint angle sensors and the pressure insoles is used to classify five locomotion modes, including two static modes (sitting, standing still), and three dynamic modes (level-ground walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The proposed method classifies these two kinds of modes first by monitoring the variation of the relative hip joint angle between the two legs within a specific period. Static states are then classified by the time-based absolute hip joint angle. As for dynamic modes, a fuzzy-logic based method is proposed for the classification. Preliminary experimental results with three able-bodied subjects achieve an off-line classification accuracy higher than 99.49%. PMID:26737144

  20. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  1. An Analysis of Fundamental Mode Surface Wave Amplitude Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schardong, L.; Ferreira, A. M.; van Heijst, H. J.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic tomography is a powerful tool to decipher the Earth's interior structure at various scales. Traveltimes of seismic waves are widely used to build velocity models, whereas amplitudes are still only seldomly accounted for. This mainly results from our limited ability to separate the various physical effects responsible for observed amplitude variations, such as focussing/defocussing, scattering and source effects. We present new measurements from 50 global earthquakes of fundamental-mode Rayleigh and Love wave amplitude anomalies measured in the period range 35-275 seconds using two different schemes: (i) a standard time-domain amplitude power ratio technique; and (ii) a mode-branch stripping scheme. For minor-arc data, we observe amplitude anomalies with respect to PREM in the range of 0-4, for which the two measurement techniques show a very good overall agreement. We present here a statistical analysis and comparison of these datasets, as well as comparisons with theoretical calculations for a variety of 3-D Earth models. We assess the geographical coherency of the measurements, and investigate the impact of source, path and receiver effects on surface wave amplitudes, as well as their variations with frequency in a wider range than previously studied.

  2. Superresolution measurement of nanofiber diameter by modes beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, E. F.; Solano, P.; Hoffman, J. E.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Fatemi, F. K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanofibers are becoming an important tool in quantum information technologies for coupling photonics systems to atomic systems. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing these nanofibers prior to integration into an apparatus are desirable. In this work, we probe the light propagating in a fused silica optical nanofiber (750-nm-diameter) by coupling it evanescently to a 6- μm-diameter microfiber that is scanned along the nanofiber length. This technique is capable of observing all possible beat lengths among different propagating modes. The beat lengths are strongly dependent on the nanofiber diameter and refractive index of the fiber. The steep dependence has enabled measurements of the fiber diameter with sub-Angstrom sensitivity. The diameter extracted from the beat length measurements agrees with a measurement made using scanning electron microscopy. Work supported by NSF.

  3. Measuring atmospheric dispersion with WLRS in multiple wavelength mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Haufe, K. H.; Dassing, Reiner

    1993-01-01

    The WLRS (Wettzell Laser Ranging System) allows the simultaneous tracking of satellites on two different wavelengths. These are the fundamental frequency of Nd:YAG at 1.064 microns and the second harmonic at 532 nm. Range measurements to the satellite LAGEOS were carried out with different experimental set-ups, after developing a detector unit based on a silicon avalanche photodiode in Geiger mode, which is sufficiently sensitive in the infrared domain. An approach towards a quantitative interpretation of the data is suggested and discussed briefly.

  4. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  5. Engaging in activities involving information technology: dimensions, modes, and flow.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Henry; Sharafi, Parvaneh; Hedman, Leif R

    2004-01-01

    An engagement mode involves a subject (e.g., a user of information technology, or IT) who is engaged in an activity with an object in a certain manner (the mode). The purpose of this study is to develop a general model of engagement modes that may be used for understanding how IT-related activities are shaped by properties of the user and the IT object. A questionnaire involving items on IT engagement and the experience of flow was administered to 300 participants. The results supported an engagement mode (EM) model involving 5 different engagement modes (enjoying/acceptance, ambition/curiosity, avoidance/hesitation, frustration/ anxiety, and efficiency/productivity) characterized on 3 dimensions (evaluation of object, locus of control between subject and object, and intrinsic or extrinsic focus of motivation). The flow experience follows from a balance between enjoying/ acceptance and efficiency/productivity propelled by ambition/curiosity. The EM model could provide a platform for considering how IT users, IT applications, and IT environments should work together to yield both enjoyment and efficiency. Actual or potential applications of this research include designing IT training programs on different levels of specificity. PMID:15359681

  6. Immersion mode ice nucleation measurements with the new Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber (PIMCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Monika; Lohmann, Ulrike; Welti, André; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2016-05-01

    The new Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber (PIMCA) has been developed for online immersion freezing of single-immersed aerosol particles. PIMCA is a vertical extension of the established Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC). PIMCA immerses aerosol particles into cloud droplets before they enter PINC. Immersion freezing experiments on cloud droplets with a radius of 5-7 μm at a prescribed supercooled temperature (T) and water saturation can be conducted, while other ice nucleation mechanisms (deposition, condensation, and contact mode) are excluded. Validation experiments on reference aerosol (kaolinite, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate) showed good agreement with theory and literature. The PIMCA-PINC setup was tested in the field during the Zurich AMBient Immersion freezing Study (ZAMBIS) in spring 2014 in Zurich, Switzerland. Significant concentrations of submicron ambient aerosol triggering immersion freezing at T > 236 K were rare. The mean frozen cloud droplet number concentration was estimated to be 7.22·105 L-1 for T < 238 K and determined from the measured frozen fraction and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations predicted for the site at a typical supersaturation of SS = 0.3%. This value should be considered as an upper limit of cloud droplet freezing via immersion and homogeneous freezing processes. The predicted ice nucleating particle (INP) concentration based on measured total aerosol larger than 0.5 μm and the parameterization by DeMott et al. (2010) at T = 238 K is INPD10=54 ± 39 L-1. This is a lower limit as supermicron particles were not sampled with PIMCA-PINC during ZAMBIS.

  7. Investigation of continuously traversing microphone system for mode measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicon, D. E.; Sofrin, T. G.; Mathews, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The continuously Traversing Microphone System consists of a data acquisition and processing method for obtaining the modal coefficients of the discrete, coherent acoustic field in a fan inlet duct. The system would be used in fan rigs or full scale engine installations where present measurement methods, because of the excessive number of microphones and long test times required, are not feasible. The purpose of the investigation reported here was to develop a method for defining modal structure by means of a continuously traversing microphone system and to perform an evaluation of the method, based upon analytical studies and computer simulated tests. A variety of system parameters were examined, and the effects of deviations from ideal were explored. Effects of traverse speed, digitizing rate, run time, roundoff error, calibration errors, and random noise background level were determined. For constant fan operating speed, the sensitivity of the method to normal errors and deviations was determined to be acceptable. Good recovery of mode coefficients was attainable. Fluctuating fan speed conditions received special attention, and it was concluded that by employing suitable time delay procedures, satisfactory information on mode coefficients can be obtained under realistic conditions. A plan for further development involving fan rig tests was prepared.

  8. Comb mode filtering silver mirror cavity for spectroscopic distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmíd, R.; Hänsel, A.; Pravdová, L.; Sobota, J.; Číp, O.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present a design of an external optical cavity based on Fabry-Perot etalons applied to a 100 MHz Er-doped fiber optical frequency comb working at 1560 nm to increase its repetition frequency. A Fabry-Perot cavity is constructed based on a transportable cage system with two silver mirrors in plano-concave geometry including the mode-matching lenses, fiber coupled collimation package and detection unit. The system enables full 3D angle mirror tilting and x-y off axis movement as well as distance between the mirrors. We demonstrate the increase of repetition frequency by direct measurement of the beat frequency and spectrally by using the virtually imaged phased array images.

  9. Coarse mode aerosol measurement using a Low Turbulence Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, J.; Bart, M.; Trembath, J.; McQuaid, J. B.; Brooks, B. J.; Osborne, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Sahara desert is a major natural source of global mineral dust emissions (Forster et al., 2007) through the mobilisation and lifting of dust particles into the atmosphere from dust storms. A significant fraction of this dust is in the aerosol coarse mode (Weinzierl et al., 2009). It is highlighted of the difficulty in making accurate and reliable measurements from an aircraft platform, particularly that of coarse mode aerosol (Wendisch et al., 2004). To achieve the measurement of a representative aerosol sample an aerosol inlet, on an aircraft, is required for the delivery of the sample to the instruments making the measurements. Inlet design can modify aerosol size distribution through either underestimating due to aerosol losses or overestimation due to enhancements. The Low Turbulence Inlet (LTI) was designed to improve inlet efficiency. This is achieved by reducing turbulence flow within the tip of the inlet, reducing impaction of particles to the walls of the inlet (Wilson et al., 2004). The LTI further maintains isokinetic sampling flow (free stream velocity, U0 and sampling velocity, U are equal to 1). Dust aerosol over the Sahara desert provides an excellent environment to test and quantify the capabilities of the LTI on the FAAM BAe 146, whilst enabling in-situ dust measurement. The LTI was operated during the Fennec field campaign in June 2011 with 11 flights during the campaign over Mauritania and Mali. We are using the LTI to provide critical information on the sampling characteristics of the inlet used by nearly all aerosol instruments inside the aircraft (AMS, Nephelometer, PSAP, and CCN). Inlet experiments were performed with identical Optical Particle Counters (OPC) connected to the rosemount and LTI with size distribution for each inlet measured and Rosemount enhancements determined. Rosemount inlet enhancements were determined to be 2 to 4 times for particles up to 2.5 µm. A key parameter in aerosol measurement is size distribution, in which

  10. Magnetocardiogram measured by fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karo, Hikaru; Sasada, Ichiro

    2015-05-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) of healthy volunteers has been measured by using a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer array of 32 channels in a magnetic shielded room (MSR). Sensor heads, which are employed, consist of a 45 mm long U-shaped amorphous wire core and a 1000-turn solenoid pick-up coil of 30 mm in length and 3 mm in outer diameter. The excitation current of 100 kHz with large dc bias current is fed directly into wire cores, which are connected in series, whereas the signal detection circuit is provided to each of the sensor heads. A special technique to avoid mutual interaction between sensor heads is implemented, where all the sensor heads are excited synchronously by using a single ac source. A 2-D array having 32 sensors with 4 cm grid spacing was used to measure MCG signals inside an MSR. Measured data from each channel were first filtered (0.16-100 Hz pass band), then averaged for 2 min synchronously with electrocardiogram's peaks taken from both hands. Noise remaining after the average is about 1.8 pTrms for the band-width of 0.16-100 Hz. The QRS complex and the T-wave are clearly detected.

  11. Measurement of RF Mode Purity in EC Transmission Test Line for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2009-11-26

    The transmission mode purity was measured at the ITER relevant transmission line for 170 GHz ECH and CD system. The measured purity of HE{sub 11} in transmission power was 73% and the other was higher order modes. The dominant higher order mode was LP{sub 11} mode (HE{sub 21}+TE{sub 01}). To improve the mode purity, the RF beam coupling in MOU was aligned because LP{sub 11} mode is generated the offset and the tilt angle of RF beam at the waveguide inlet. After the alignment, HE{sub 11} mode purity was increased to 87%.

  12. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Kathleen A.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R. Todd; Brewer, Judson A.

    2015-01-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest despite other studies reporting differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, this study compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity, and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies have used small groups, whereas the current study tested these hypotheses in a larger group. Results indicate that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network relative to an active task in meditators compared to controls. Regions of the default mode showing a group by task interaction include the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task. PMID:25904238

  13. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2015-09-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest, despite other studies having reported differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, in this study we compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate the findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation, beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies had used small groups, whereas in the present study we tested these hypotheses in a larger group. The results indicated that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network, relative to an active task, for meditators as compared to controls. Regions of the default mode network showing a Group × Task interaction included the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that the suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and they suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task.

  14. Small-displacement measurements using high-order Hermite-Gauss modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hengxin; Liu, Kui; Liu, Zunlong; Guo, Pengliang; Zhang, Junxiang; Gao, Jiangrui

    2014-03-24

    We present a scheme for small-displacement measurements using high-order Hermite-Gauss modes and balanced homodyne detection. We demonstrate its use with experimental results of displacement measurements using fundamental transverse mode TEM{sub 00} and first order transverse mode TEM{sub 10} as signal modes. The results show a factor of 1.41 improvement in measurement precision with the TEM{sub 10} mode compared with that with the TEM{sub 00} mode. This scheme has potential applications in precision metrology, atomic force microscopy, and optical imaging.

  15. Measurement of combustion response to transverse modes at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierman, Matthew Kenneth

    A two dimensional transverse combustor capable of producing and modulating an unstable flowfield was tested at Purdue. The combustor used an array of coaxial ox-centered shear injector elements. The oxidizer posts were able to be discretely changed in length between tests to investigate different post resonance conditions. A single Study element was placed in the middle of the driven unsteady flowfield so its response could be measured using pressure measurement and high speed imagery. This approach was supported by past testing of the longitudinal Continuously Variable Resonance Combustor and past transverse chambers. Mean flow rates and pressures were fixed across the series of tests. Phase lag data between pressure measurement locations support a simple linear post-to-chamber interaction mechanism. Phase lags between chamber measurements were unaffected by the change in oxidizer post length. Scaling was established between amplitude levels and post lengths between the longitudinal and transverse combustors, which further supported the proposed post-to-chamber response mechanism. High speed imaging of OH* chemiluminesence was used as a marker of heat release. Mean flame behavior showed broad distribution and flame shortening at high forcing amplitude and compact, elongated flame shape at low forcing amplitude. Multiple image analysis techniques were utilized to process these data. Proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition showed spatial and temporal character of image time slices sorted by descriptive content and frequency, respectively. These analyses both identified significant behavior at the same frequencies as chamber pressure perturbations. A systematic code was developed to select relevant time slices to generate flame describing functions of image magnitude and phase lag as a function of pressure amplitude. The magnitude flame describing functions showed low amplitude linear behavior with a divergence at high amplitude. For phase lag

  16. Measuring a Fiber-Optic Delay Line Using a Mode-Locked Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Meirong; McKee, Michael R.; Pak, Kyung S.; Yu, Nan

    2010-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts a laboratory setup for determining the optical length of a fiber-optic delay line at a precision greater than that obtainable by use of optical time-domain reflectometry or of mechanical measurement of length during the delay-line-winding process. In this setup, the delay line becomes part of the resonant optical cavity that governs the frequency of oscillation of a mode-locked laser. The length can then be determined from frequency-domain measurements, as described below. The laboratory setup is basically an all-fiber ring laser in which the delay line constitutes part of the ring. Another part of the ring - the laser gain medium - is an erbium-doped fiber amplifier pumped by a diode laser at a wavelength of 980 nm. The loop also includes an optical isolator, two polarization controllers, and a polarizing beam splitter. The optical isolator enforces unidirectional lasing. The polarization beam splitter allows light in only one polarization mode to pass through the ring; light in the orthogonal polarization mode is rejected from the ring and utilized as a diagnostic output, which is fed to an optical spectrum analyzer and a photodetector. The photodetector output is fed to a radio-frequency spectrum analyzer and an oscilloscope. The fiber ring laser can generate continuous-wave radiation in non-mode-locked operation or ultrashort optical pulses in mode-locked operation. The mode-locked operation exhibited by this ring is said to be passive in the sense that no electro-optical modulator or other active optical component is used to achieve it. Passive mode locking is achieved by exploiting optical nonlinearity of passive components in such a manner as to obtain ultra-short optical pulses. In this setup, the particular nonlinear optical property exploited to achieve passive mode locking is nonlinear polarization rotation. This or any ring laser can support oscillation in multiple modes as long as sufficient gain is present to overcome

  17. Measurement of Resonant Frequencies and Modes of Freestanding Nanoparticle Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Lin, Xiao-Min; Jaeger, Heinrich; Guest, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    We recently showed that freestanding membranes of ligated nanoparticles can be assembled in a one-step drying-mediated process [1]. These 10nm thin membranes can stretch over holes up to 100 microns in diameter and are supported by a substrate only along their outer edge, thereby freely suspending of the order of 100 million close-packed particles [2]. Previous work has focused on quasi-static mechanical properties [1-3]. Here we present the first investigation of the full dynamic response of freely suspended nanoparticle membranes, utilizing a high frequency laser interferometer with picometer sensitivity. This instrument allows us to rapidly measure the dynamical properties of freestanding nanoparticle monolayers for the first time including resonant frequencies, quality factors, and images of different modes.[4pt] [1] Klara E. Mueggenburg et al., ``Elastic membranes of close-packed nanoparticle arrays,'' Nature Materials 6, 656-660 (2007). [0pt] [2] Jinbo He et al., ``Fabrication and Mechanical properties of large-scale freestanding nanoparticle membranes,'' Small 6, 1449-1456 (2010).[0pt] [3] Pongsakorn Kanjanaboos et al., ``Strain Patterning and Direct Measurement of Poisson's Ratio in Nanoparticle Monolayer Sheets,'' Nano Letters 11, 2567-2571 (2011).

  18. Comparison of density fluctuation measurements between O-mode and X-mode reflectometry on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbaud, T.; Clairet, F.; Sabot, R.; Sirinelli, A.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.; Vermare, L.

    2006-10-15

    Reflectometry is a versatile diagnostic which allows both electronic density profile and density fluctuation measurements. Fast sweep heterodyne technique is particularly suitable for precise measurement of the phase of the reflected signal, which records the story of the wave propagation through the plasma up to the cutoff layer, including the density fluctuations. The present article exhibits a comparison of the density fluctuation radial profile measurements between fast sweep frequency technique, both using O-mode and X-mode polarizations, and fixed frequency technique. The correct agreement between all measurements of the relative values of the density fluctuation profiles reinforces the validity of the approximations used.

  19. ACTIVITIES: Centimeter and Millimeter Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolster, L. Carey

    1974-01-01

    An activity is suggested which will give junior high school students practice in estimating and measuring in centimeters and millimeters. Three worksheets are given, one of which is a model for making a metric caliper. (LS)

  20. Coupling of Low Speed Fan Stator Vane Unsteady Pressures to Duct Modes: Measured versus Predicted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Envia, Edmane

    1999-01-01

    Uniform-flow annular-duct Green's functions are the essential elements of the classical acoustic analogy approach to the problem of computing the noise generated by rotor-stator interaction inside the fan duct. This paper investigates the accuracy of this class of Green's functions for predicting the duct noise levels when measured stator vane unsteady surface pressures are used as input to the theoretical formulation. The accuracy of the method is evaluated by comparing the predicted and measured acoustic power levels for the NASA 48 inch low speed Active Noise Control Fan. The unsteady surface pressures are measured,by an array of microphones imbedded in the suction and pressure sides of a single vane, while the duct mode levels are measured using a rotating rake system installed in the inlet and exhaust sections of the fan duct. The predicted levels are computed using properly weighted integrals of measured surface pressure distribution. The data-theory comparisons are generally quite good particularly when the mode cut-off criterion is carefully interpreted. This suggests that, at least for low speed fans, the uniform-flow annular-duct Green's function theory can be reliably used for prediction of duct mode levels if the cascade surface pressure distribution is accurately known.

  1. Active/passive mode-locked laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Fountain, William D.; Johnson, Bertram C.

    1977-01-01

    A Q-switched/mode-locked Nd:YAG laser oscillator employing simultaneous active (electro-optic) and passive (saturable absorber) loss modulation within the optical cavity is described. This "dual modulation" oscillator can produce transform-limited pulses of duration ranging from about 30 psec to about 5 nsec with greatly improved stability compared to other mode-locked systems. The pulses produced by this system lack intrapulse frequency or amplitude modulation, and hence are idealy suited for amplification to high energies and for other applications where well-defined pulses are required. Also, the pulses of this system have excellent interpulse characteristics, wherein the optical noise between the individual pulses of the pulse train has a power level well below the power of the peak pulse of the train.

  2. Measuring the Built Environment for Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Brownson, Ross C.; Hoehner, Christine M.; Day, Kristen; Forsyth, Ann; Sallis, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the most important public health issues in the U.S. and internationally. Increasingly, links are being identified between various elements of the physical—or built—environment and physical activity. To understand the impact of the built environment on physical activity, the development of high-quality measures is essential. Three categories of built environment data are being used: (1) perceived measures obtained by telephone interview or self-administered questionnaires; (2) observational measures obtained using systematic observational methods (audits); and (3) archival data sets that are often layered and analyzed with GIS. This review provides a critical assessment of these three types of built-environment measures relevant to the study of physical activity. Among perceived measures, 19 questionnaires were reviewed, ranging in length from 7 to 68 questions. Twenty audit tools were reviewed that cover community environments (i.e., neighborhoods, cities), parks, and trails. For GIS-derived measures, more than 50 studies were reviewed. A large degree of variability was found in the operationalization of common GIS measures, which include population density, land-use mix, access to recreational facilities, and street pattern. This first comprehensive examination of built-environment measures demonstrates considerable progress over the past decade, showing diverse environmental variables available that use multiple modes of assessment. Most can be considered first-generation measures, so further development is needed. In particular, further research is needed to improve the technical quality of measures, understand the relevance to various population groups, and understand the utility of measures for science and public health. PMID:19285216

  3. Mechanisms for multiple activity modes of VTA dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Andrew; Faure, Philippe; Gutkin, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Midbrain ventral segmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons send numerous projections to cortical and sub-cortical areas, and diffusely release dopamine (DA) to their targets. DA neurons display a range of activity modes that vary in frequency and degree of burst firing. Importantly, DA neuronal bursting is associated with a significantly greater degree of DA release than an equivalent tonic activity pattern. Here, we introduce a single compartmental, conductance-based computational model for DA cell activity that captures the behavior of DA neuronal dynamics and examine the multiple factors that underlie DA firing modes: the strength of the SK conductance, the amount of drive, and GABA inhibition. Our results suggest that neurons with low SK conductance fire in a fast firing mode, are correlated with burst firing, and require higher levels of applied current before undergoing depolarization block. We go on to consider the role of GABAergic inhibition on an ensemble of dynamical classes of DA neurons and find that strong GABA inhibition suppresses burst firing. Our studies suggest differences in the distribution of the SK conductance and GABA inhibition levels may indicate subclasses of DA neurons within the VTA. We further identify, that by considering alternate potassium dynamics, the dynamics display burst patterns that terminate via depolarization block, akin to those observed in vivo in VTA DA neurons and in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) DA cell preparations under apamin application. In addition, we consider the generation of transient burst firing events that are NMDA-initiated or elicited by a sudden decrease of GABA inhibition, that is, disinhibition. PMID:26283955

  4. Burst mode trigger of STEREO in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Curtis, D.; Schroeder, P.

    2013-06-01

    Since the launch of the STEREO spacecraft, the in situ instrument suites have continued to modify their burst mode trigger in order to optimize the collection of high-cadence magnetic field, solar wind, and suprathermal electron data. This report reviews the criteria used for the burst mode trigger and their evolution with time. From 2007 to 2011, the twin STEREO spacecraft observed 236 interplanetary shocks, and 54% of them were captured by the burst mode trigger. The capture rate increased remarkably with time, from 30% in 2007 to 69% in 2011. We evaluate the performance of multiple trigger criteria and investigate why some of the shocks were missed by the trigger. Lessons learned from STEREO are useful for future missions, because the telemetry bandwidth needed to capture the waveforms of high frequency but infrequent events would be unaffordable without an effective burst mode trigger.

  5. Dissipative soliton in actively mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixin; Dai, Yitang; Yan, Li; Wu, Jian; Xu, Kun; Li, Yan; Lin, Jintong

    2012-03-12

    A dissipative soliton in an all-normal-dispersion actively mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser is reported for the first time. Pulses with 10-ps duration and edge-to-edge bandwidth of 9 nm are generated, and then extra-cavity compressed down to 560 fs due to the large chirp. Widely wavelength tuning between 1031 and 1080 nm is achieved by adjusting the driving frequency only. Our simulation shows that the proposed laser operates in the dissipative soliton shaping regime.

  6. Rotating rake design for unique measurement of fan-generated spinning acoustic modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Kevin E.; Hausmann, Clifford R.

    1993-01-01

    In light of the current emphasis on noise reduction in subsonic aircraft design, NASA has been actively studying the source of and propagation of noise generated by subsonic fan engines. NASA/LeRC has developed and tested a unique method of accurately measuring these spinning acoustic modes generated by an experimental fan. This mode measuring method is based on the use of a rotating microphone rake. Testing was conducted in the 9 x 15 Low-speed Wind Tunnel. The rotating rake was tested with the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. This memorandum discusses the design and performance of the motor/drive system for the fan-synchronized rotating acoustic rake. This novel motor/drive design approach is now being adapted for additional acoustic mode studies in new test rigs as baseline data for the future design of active noise control for subsonic fan engines. Included in this memorandum are the research requirements, motor/drive specifications, test performance results, and a description of the controls and software involved.

  7. Measuring Substantial Reductions in Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Charles; Evans, Meredyth; Jason, Leonard A.; So, Suzanna; Brown, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The case definitions for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) each include a disability criterion requiring substantial reductions in activity in order to meet diagnostic criteria. Difficulties have been encountered in defining and operationalizing the substantial reduction disability criterion within these various illness definitions. The present study sought to relate measures of past and current activities in several domains including the SF-36, an objective measure of activity (e.g. actigraphy), a self-reported quality of life scale, and measures of symptom severity. Results of the study revealed that current work activities had the highest number of significant associations with domains such as the SF-36 subscales, actigraphy, and symptom scores. As an example, higher self-reported levels of current work activity were associated with better health. This suggests that current work related activities may provide a useful domain for helping operationalize the construct of substantial reductions in activity. PMID:25584524

  8. Derivation of continuous wave mode output power from burst mode measurements in high-intensity ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Haller, Julian; Wilkens, Volker

    2014-03-01

    Measurement of the acoustic output power of transducers in burst mode and derivation of the results to the continuous wave (CW) case reduces heating problems during power measurements with radiation force balances and absorbing targets at high power levels, but requires the knowledge of an "effective duty factor," DReff. In this work, an alternative method for determining DReff is presented that allows the determination at any input voltage amplitude as it can be calculated from the input voltage rf signal in burst mode. Thus with this method, it is not necessary to apply CW signals at all.

  9. Measuring intracellular calcium fluxes in high throughput mode.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Chris; Smith, Fiona; Williams, Christine; Marcos, Sandra; Liu, Zhen Han; Hayter, Paul; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Keighley, Wilma; Gribbon, Phil; Sewing, Andreas

    2003-06-01

    The measurement of intracellular calcium fluxes in real time is widely applied within the pharmaceutical industry to measure the activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRhyp;s), either for pharmacological characterisation or to screen for new surrogate ligands. Initially restricted to G(q) coupled GPCRs, the introduction of promiscuous and chimeric G-proteins has further widened the application of these assays. The development of new calcium sensitive dyes and assays has provided sensitive, homogeneous assays which can be readily applied to high throughput screening (HTS). In this paper we describe the full automation of this assay type using a fluorometric imaging plate reader (FLIPR ) integrated into a Beckman/Sagian system to establish a simple robotic system that is well suited for the current medium throughput screening in this area of lead discovery. Using a recently completed HTS we discuss important determinants for FLIPR based screening, highlight some limitations of the current approach, and look at the requirements for future automated systems capable of keeping up with expanding compound files.

  10. Quantitative measurements of vibration amplitude using a contact-mode freestanding triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sihong; Niu, Simiao; Yang, Jin; Lin, Long; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-12-23

    A vibration sensor is usually designed to measure the vibration frequency but disregard the vibration amplitude, which is rather challenging to be quantified due to the requirement of linear response. Here, we show the application of triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) as a self-powered tool for quantitative measurement of vibration amplitude based on an operation mode, the contact-mode freestanding triboelectric nanogenerator (CF-TENG). In this mode, the triboelectrically charged resonator can be agitated to vibrate between two stacked stationary electrodes. Under the working principle with a constant capacitance between two electrodes, the amplitudes of the electric signals are proportional to the vibration amplitude of the resonator (provided that the resonator plate is charged to saturation), which has been illuminated both theoretically and experimentally. Together with its capability in monitoring the vibration frequency, the CF-TENG appears as the triboelectrification-based active sensor that can give full quantitative information about a vibration. In addition, the CF-TENG is also demonstrated as a power source for electronic devices.

  11. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  12. Electromechanical Mode Shape Estimation Based on Transfer Function Identification Using PMU Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Dosiek, Luke; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Pierre, John W.

    2009-07-30

    Power system mode shapes are key indication of how dynamic components participate in low-frequency oscillations. Traditionally, mode shapes are calculated from a linearized dynamic model. For large-scale power systems, obtaining accu-rate dynamic models is very difficult. Therefore, measurement-based mode shape estimation methods have certain advantages, especially for the application of real-time small signal stability monitoring. In this paper, a measurement-based mode shape iden-tification method is proposed. The general relationship between transfer function (TF) and mode shape is derived. As an example, a least square (LS) method is implemented to estimate mode shape using an autoregressive exogenous (ARX) model. The per-formance of the proposed method is evaluated by Monte-Carlo studies using simulation data from a 17-machine model. The re-sults indicate the validity of the proposed method in estimating mode shapes with reasonably good accuracy

  13. [Adaptation of acrylic resin dentures polymerized using various activation modes].

    PubMed

    Takamata, T; Inoue, Y; Hashimoto, K; Sugitou, S; Arakawa, H; Kurasawa, I

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dimensional accuracy of maxillary dentures made using a conventional heat-activated PMMA resin, a pour resin, a visible light-activated resin, and a microwave-activated acrylic resin. Two simple methods for measuring dimensional accuracy were used: (1) weight of impression material entrapped between the base and master die and (2) measurement of the posterior border gap at five locations. The volume of space between the denture base and the master die was determined by (1) computation and (2) estimation. Statistical analysis (Bartlett, ANOVA and Tukey's Tests) supported the following conclusions: (1) all groups showed a processing contraction, most apparent from buccal flange to buccal flange, (2) the poorest fitting group was processed in a brass flask and a water bath at a temperature which rose from 70 to 100 degrees C, using a heat activated resin (Acron), (3) the visible light activated resin (Triad) produced dentures of intermediate accuracy, as did Acupac 20 when either heat or microwave activated, (4) the two best fitting groups were prepared from a chemically activated resin system using pressure at low heat (PER form), and the resin developed for microwave activation (Acron MC).

  14. Default-mode-like network activation in awake rodents.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Baker, Scott J; Chandran, Prasant; Miller, Loan; Lee, Younglim; Marek, Gerard J; Sakoglu, Unal; Chin, Chih-Liang; Luo, Feng; Fox, Gerard B; Day, Mark

    2011-01-01

    During wakefulness and in absence of performing tasks or sensory processing, the default-mode network (DMN), an intrinsic central nervous system (CNS) network, is in an active state. Non-human primate and human CNS imaging studies have identified the DMN in these two species. Clinical imaging studies have shown that the pattern of activity within the DMN is often modulated in various disease states (e.g., Alzheimer's, schizophrenia or chronic pain). However, whether the DMN exists in awake rodents has not been characterized. The current data provides evidence that awake rodents also possess 'DMN-like' functional connectivity, but only subsequent to habituation to what is initially a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment as well as physical restraint. Specifically, the habituation process spanned across four separate scanning sessions (Day 2, 4, 6 and 8). At Day 8, significant (p<0.05) functional connectivity was observed amongst structures such as the anterior cingulate (seed region), retrosplenial, parietal, and hippocampal cortices. Prior to habituation (Day 2), functional connectivity was only detected (p<0.05) amongst CNS structures known to mediate anxiety (i.e., anterior cingulate (seed region), posterior hypothalamic area, amygdala and parabracial nucleus). In relating functional connectivity between cingulate-default-mode and cingulate-anxiety structures across Days 2-8, a significant inverse relationship (r = -0.65, p = 0.0004) was observed between these two functional interactions such that increased cingulate-DMN connectivity corresponded to decreased cingulate anxiety network connectivity. This investigation demonstrates that the cingulate is an important component of both the rodent DMN-like and anxiety networks.

  15. The Use of B-Mode Ultrasound for Measuring Subcutaneous Fat Thickness on the Upper Arms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Lawrence W.; Clark, Frank C.

    1985-01-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the potential use of B-mode ultrasound for measuring subcutaneous fat thickness at two arm sites. B-mode sonograms and skinfold measurements were found to be highly correlated for both men and women. (Author/MT)

  16. Actively mode-locked all fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Xu, Lixin; Li, Feng; Chung, Dick; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser that emits a cylindrical vector beam. An intra-cavity few-mode fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a short section of four-mode fiber is employed to provide mode selection and spectrum filtering functions. Mode coupling is achieved by offset splicing between the single-mode fiber and the four-mode fiber in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode-locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547 nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have a duration of 2 ns and repetition of 12.06 MHz. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity.

  17. Actively mode-locked all fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Xu, Lixin; Li, Feng; Chung, Dick; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser that emits a cylindrical vector beam. An intra-cavity few-mode fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a short section of four-mode fiber is employed to provide mode selection and spectrum filtering functions. Mode coupling is achieved by offset splicing between the single-mode fiber and the four-mode fiber in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode-locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547 nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have a duration of 2 ns and repetition of 12.06 MHz. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity. PMID:26907420

  18. Local measurements of tearing mode flows and the magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, D. A.; Gangadhara, S.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Fiksel, G.; Prager, S. C.; Craig, D.; Anderson, J. K.

    2010-08-15

    The first localized measurements of tearing mode flows in the core of a hot plasma are presented using nonperturbing measurements of the impurity ion flow. Emission from charge exchange recombination is collected by a novel high optical throughput duo spectrometer providing localized ({+-}1 cm) measurements of C{sup +6} impurity ion velocities resolved to <500 m/s with high bandwidth (100 kHz). Poloidal tearing mode flows in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch are observed to be localized to the mode resonant surface with a radial extent much broader than predicted by linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory but comparable to the magnetic island width. The relative poloidal flow amplitudes among the dominant core modes do not reflect the proportions of the magnetic amplitudes. The largest correlated flows are associated with modes having smaller magnetic amplitudes resonant near the midradius. The MHD dynamo due to these flows on the magnetic axis is measured to be adequate to balance the mean Ohm's law during reduced tearing activity and is significant but does not exclude other dynamo mechanisms from contributing during a surge in reconnection activity.

  19. Noninvasive ambulatory measurement system of cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban J; Chavez, Javier A P; Aqueveque, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    This work implements a noninvasive system that measures the movements caused by cardiac activity. It uses unobtrusive Electro-Mechanical Films (EMFi) on the seat and on the backrest of a regular chair. The system detects ballistocardiogram (BCG) and respiration movements. Real data was obtained from 54 volunteers. 19 of them were measured in the laboratory and 35 in a hospital waiting room. Using a BIOPAC acquisition system, the ECG was measured simultaneously to the BCG for comparison. Wavelet Transform (WT) is a better option than Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) for signal extraction and produces higher effective measurement time. In the laboratory, the best results are obtained on the seat. The correlation index was 0.9800 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were 0.7136 ± 4.3673 [BPM]. In the hospital waiting room, the best results are also from the seat sensor. The correlation index was 0.9840, and the limits of agreement were 0.4386 ± 3.5884 [BPM]. The system is able to measure BCG in an unobtrusive way and determine the cardiac frequency with high precision. It is simple to use, which means the system can easily be used in non-standard settings: resting in a chair or couch, at the gym, schools or in a hospital waiting room, as shown. PMID:26738057

  20. Time-domain multimode dispersion measurement in a higher-order-mode fiber

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ji; Pedersen, Martin E. V.; Wang, Ke; Xu, Chris; Grüner-Nielsen, Lars; Jakobsen, Dan

    2012-01-01

    We present a new multimode dispersion measurement technique based on the time-of-flight method. The modal delay and group velocity dispersion of all excited modes in a few-mode fiber can be measured simultaneously by a tunable pulsed laser and a high speed sampling oscilloscope. A newly designed higher-order-mode fiber with large anomalous dispersion in the LP02 mode has been characterized using this method, and experimental results are in good agreement with the designed dispersion values. The demonstrated technique is significantly simpler to implement than the existing frequency-domain or interferometry-based methods. PMID:22297348

  1. Measuring ultraviolet-visible light transmission of intraocular lenses: double-beam mode versus integrating-sphere mode.

    PubMed

    Akinay, Ali; Ong, Marcia D; Choi, Myoung; Karakelle, Mutlu

    2012-10-01

    This study compared integrating-sphere and double-beam methodologies for measuring the ultraviolet/visible transmission of intraocular lenses (IOLs). Transmission spectra of control IOLs and clinically explanted IOLs were measured with an optical spectrophotometer in two optical configurations: single-beam mode with integrating sphere detector and double-beam mode with photodiode detector. Effects of temperature and surface light scattering on transmittance were measured. Effects of lens power were measured and were modeled with ray-tracing software. Results indicated that transmission was consistent over a range of IOL powers when measured with the integrating-sphere configuration, but transmission gradually decreased with increasing IOL power (in a wavelength-dependent fashion) when measured with the double-beam configuration. Ray tracing indicated that the power-dependent loss in transmission was partially due to higher-powered IOLs spreading the light beam outside of the detector area. IOLs with surface light scattering had transmission spectra that differed between double-beam and integrating-sphere configurations in a power-dependent fashion. Temperature (ambient or physiological 35°C) did not affect transmission in the integrating-sphere configuration. Overall, results indicated that double-beam spectrophotometers may be useful for measuring transmittance of low-power IOLs, but an integrating-sphere configuration should be used to obtain accurate measurements of transmittance of higher-power IOLs.

  2. Measuring ultraviolet-visible light transmission of intraocular lenses: double-beam mode versus integrating-sphere mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinay, Ali; Ong, Marcia D.; Choi, Myoung; Karakelle, Mutlu

    2012-10-01

    This study compared integrating-sphere and double-beam methodologies for measuring the ultraviolet/visible transmission of intraocular lenses (IOLs). Transmission spectra of control IOLs and clinically explanted IOLs were measured with an optical spectrophotometer in two optical configurations: single-beam mode with integrating sphere detector and double-beam mode with photodiode detector. Effects of temperature and surface light scattering on transmittance were measured. Effects of lens power were measured and were modeled with ray-tracing software. Results indicated that transmission was consistent over a range of IOL powers when measured with the integrating-sphere configuration, but transmission gradually decreased with increasing IOL power (in a wavelength-dependent fashion) when measured with the double-beam configuration. Ray tracing indicated that the power-dependent loss in transmission was partially due to higher-powered IOLs spreading the light beam outside of the detector area. IOLs with surface light scattering had transmission spectra that differed between double-beam and integrating-sphere configurations in a power-dependent fashion. Temperature (ambient or physiological 35°C) did not affect transmission in the integrating-sphere configuration. Overall, results indicated that double-beam spectrophotometers may be useful for measuring transmittance of low-power IOLs, but an integrating-sphere configuration should be used to obtain accurate measurements of transmittance of higher-power IOLs.

  3. Active noise control using a distributed mode flat panel loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Rajamani, R; Dudney, J; Stelson, K A

    2003-07-01

    A flat panel distributed mode loudspeaker (DML) has many advantages over traditional cone speakers in terms of its weight, size, and durability. However, its frequency response is uneven and complex, thus bringing its suitability for active noise control (ANC) under question. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the effective use of panel DML speakers in an ANC application. Both feedback and feedforward control techniques are considered. Effective feedback control with a flat panel speaker could open up a whole range of new noise control applications and has many advantages over feedforward control. The paper develops a new control algorithm to attenuate tonal noise of a known frequency by feedback control. However, due to the uneven response of the speakers, feedback control is found to be only moderately effective even for this narrow-band application. Feedforward control proves to be most capable for the flat panel speaker. Using feedforward control, the sound pressure level can be significantly reduced in close proximity to an error microphone. The paper demonstrates an interesting application of the flat panel in which the panel is placed in the path of sound and effectively used to block sound transmission using feedforward control. This is a new approach to active noise control enabled by the use of flat panels and can be used to prevent sound from entering into an enclosure in the first place rather than the traditional approach of attempting to cancel sound after it enters the enclosure.

  4. Measuring activity in ant colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, C.; Fernández, J.; Pérez-Penichet, C.; Altshuler, E.

    2006-12-01

    Ants, as paradigm of social insects, have become a recurrent example of efficient problem solvers via self-organization. In spite of the simple behavior of each individual, the colony as a whole displays "swarm intelligence:" the organization of ant trails for foraging is a typical output of it. But conventional techniques of observation can hardly record the amount of data needed to get a detailed understanding of self-organization of ant swarms in the wild. Here we are presenting a measurement system intended to monitor ant activity in the field comprising massive data acquisition and high sensitivity. A central role is played by an infrared sensor devised specifically to monitor relevant parameters to the activity of ants through the exits of the nest, although other sensors detecting temperature and luminosity are added to the system. We study the characteristics of the activity sensor and its performance in the field. Finally, we present massive data measured at one exit of a nest of Atta insularis, an ant endemic to Cuba, to illustrate the potential of our system.

  5. Disentangling mode-specific selection and measurement bias in social surveys.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Barry; van den Brakel, Jan; Buelens, Bart; van der Laan, Jan; Klausch, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    A large-scale mixed-mode experiment linked to the Dutch Crime Victimization Survey was conducted in 2011. The experiment consisted of two waves; one wave with random assignment to one of the modes web, paper, telephone and face-to-face, and one follow-up wave to the full sample with interviewer modes only. The objective of the experiment is to estimate total mode effects and more specifically the corresponding mode effect components arising from undercoverage, nonresponse and measurement. In this paper, mode-specific selection and measurement bias are defined, and estimators for the bias terms based on the experimental design are introduced and discussed. The proposed estimators are applied to a number of key survey variables from the Labour Force Survey and the Crime Victimization Survey.

  6. Possibility of measuring the Abraham force using whispering gallery modes

    SciTech Connect

    Brevik, I.; Ellingsen, S. A.

    2010-06-15

    Critical experimental tests of the time-dependent Abraham force in phenomenological electrodynamics are scarce. In this paper, we analyze the possibility of making use of intensity-modulated whispering gallery modes in a microresonator for this purpose. Systems of this kind appear attractive, as the strong concentration of electromagnetic fields near the rim of the resonator serves to enhance the Abraham torque exerted by the field. We analyze mainly spherical resonators, although as an introductory step we consider also the cylinder geometry. The orders of magnitude of the Abraham torques are estimated by inserting reasonable and common values for the various input parameters. As expected, the predicted torques turn out to be very small, although probably not beyond reach experimentally. Our main idea is essentially a generalization of the method used by G. B. Walker et al.[Can. J. Phys. 53, 2577 (1975)] for low-frequency fields, to the optical case.

  7. Quantum Backaction Evading Measurement of Collective Mechanical Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ockeloen-Korppi, C. F.; Damskägg, E.; Pirkkalainen, J.-M.; Clerk, A. A.; Woolley, M. J.; Sillanpää, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    The standard quantum limit constrains the precision of an oscillator position measurement. It arises from a balance between the imprecision and the quantum backaction of the measurement. However, a measurement of only a single quadrature of the oscillator can evade the backaction and be made with arbitrary precision. Here we demonstrate quantum backaction evading measurements of a collective quadrature of two mechanical oscillators, both coupled to a common microwave cavity. The work allows for quantum state tomography of two mechanical oscillators, and provides a foundation for macroscopic mechanical entanglement and force sensing beyond conventional quantum limits.

  8. Herbicide activity of monosulfuron and its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhi-Jin; Ai, Ying-Wei; Qian, Chuan-Fan; Li, Zheng-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Monosulfuron was developed for weed control in the field of wheat (Triticum, aestivum L.) and millet (Panicum miliaceum L.) with the application rate ranging from 15 to 60 g ai/hm2. Herbicidal activity of monosulfuron was evaluated systematically by bioassay using maize (Zea mays L.) taproot as indicator and weed fresh weight of Acalypha australis L. and Echinochloa phyllopogon. Maize CAU 3138 was the most tolerant cultivars to monosulfuron with IC50 (concentration of 50% inhibition) of 85 microg/kg, Yedan 13 was one of the most sensitive cultivars to monosulfuron with IC50 of 6.4 microg/kg. Monosulfuron inhibited the growth of Acalypha australis L. strongly comparing with that of Echinochloa phyllopogon. Monosulfuron was a good acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitor in vitro, the I50 (50% of inhibition) of monosulfuron, chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and nicosulfuron for CAU 3138 were 32, 2, 19 and 26 nmol/L respectively, for Yedan 13 the I50 were 15, 3, 17 and 65 nmol/L respectively. In vivo ALS inhibition occurred only in higher concentration of 4 sulfonylurea herbicide tested. Comparison study of this test indicated that the mode of action of monosulfuron was the same as that of other sulfonylurea herbicides such as chlorsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and nicosulfuron, they were all inhibitors targeted at the ALS. PMID:16083111

  9. Modes of action of three disinfectant active substances: a review.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Stephen; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-12-01

    This review deals with three categories of active substances for disinfectant products, their modes of action (MOA), and how MOA can help predict propensity for resistance in microorganisms. Within the European Union applications for approval of disinfectants of all kinds must be submitted in a few years, and documentation on MOA and resistance must be part of those applications. Peracetic acid is an unspecific, pervasive oxidizer of C-C double bonds and reduced atoms. This MOA would imply poor chance for development of resistance in microorganisms, as borne out by the absence of such reports in the literature. The quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC's) are much more specific in their antimicrobial mechanism. Even very low concentrations cause damage to the cytoplasmic membrane due to perturbation of the bilayers by the molecules' alkyl chains. Development of microbial resistance to QAC's, as well as cross-resistance to antibiotics, are particularly well documented. The polymer PHMB is antimicrobial because it disturbs the cell membrane's bilayer by interacting with it along the surface of the membrane. Resistance to the polymer appears not to develop despite many years of use in many fields. However, PHMB's toxicity to humans upon inhalation dictates great caution when deploying the substance.

  10. Broad spectral range measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers using spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Martynkien, T.; Mergo, P.; Urbańczyk, W.

    2011-05-01

    Chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers is measured over a broad spectral range (e.g. 500-1600 nm) using two white-light spectral interferometric techniques. First, a technique employing an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fiber in the test arm is used to measure the wavelength dependence of the differential group effective index, or equivalently the chromatic dispersion of one polarization mode supported by the fiber. Second, a technique employing a tandem configuration of a Michelson interferometer and the optical fiber under test is used to measure the group modal birefringence in the fiber. From these measurements, the chromatic dispersion of the other polarization mode supported by the fiber is retrieved. We measured by these techniques the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in four air-silica holey fibers and revealed the dependence of zero-dispersion wavelength on the geometry of the holey fiber.

  11. Effect of Observation Mode on Measures of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Casabianca, Jodi M.

    2013-01-01

    As the education reform movement increasingly focuses on teachers and teaching, educators, policy-makers, and researchers need valid and reliable measures that can be used to evaluate individual teachers, provide guidance for improving teaching performance, and support research in ways that advance instruction and classroom dialog and practice. A…

  12. H-mode Edge Turbulence and Pedestal Measurements in Pegasus Plasmas using Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriete, D. M.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Thome, K. E.; Thompson, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    In Pegasus discharges, L-H mode transitions are induced using Ohmic heating and high-field-side fueling. H-mode plasmas have energy confinement consistent with the ITER98pb(y,2) scaling law, indications of increased electron and ion temperature, and an increase in core rotation compared to L-mode plasmas. Electron density and temperature profiles have been measured in the edge region using a scannable triple Langmuir probe on a shot-by-shot basis. In H-mode, a pressure pedestal that has a hyperbolic tangent shape and a ~ 2 cm ∇pe scale length is observed, in contrast to a linear shape in L-mode. Autopower spectra of the collected ion saturation current in H-mode discharges show a factor of ~ 3 reduction in fluctuations in the 50-200 kHz band with respect to L-mode. Two Langmuir probes with 8 cm poloidal separation have been installed on Pegasus. The turbulence correlation length in the edge will be measured by radially scanning the probes. Knowledge of the correlation length will be used to inform the design of a future 8-channel radial multiprobe array. This system will simultaneously measure the dynamic ne (R , t) , Te (R , t) , and Φ (R , t) profiles and fluctuations across the L-H mode transition and be used to investigate nonlinear ELM dynamics. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  13. Rotating Rake Mode Measurements Over Passive Treatment in a Ducted Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center s Rotating Rake mode measurement system has been successful in measuring the modal content propagating in hardwall ducts. This paper proposes an extension of the Rotating Rake measurement and analysis technique to treated sections by developing basis functions based on wall impedance boundary conditions for flow conditions (i.e., constant duct area and Mach number) where the closed form analytical solution exists. Analytical equations developed to estimate mode power are incorporated. This method is verified by decomposing and analyzing radial pressure profiles generated numerically by the Eversman propagation code. Several modes, frequencies and impedances are evaluated. Data from a low-speed ducted fan with several different impedance conditions was acquired and reduced to determine the best fit to the data. Using the impedance boundary conditions result in better mode measurement solutions.

  14. Duct Mode Measurements on the TFE731-60 Full Scale Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Konno, Kevin E.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    2002-01-01

    A continuously rotating rake with radial microphones was developed to measure the inlet and exhaust duct modes on a TFE731-60 turbofan engine. This was the first time the rotating rake technology was used on a production engine. The modal signature for the first three fan harmonics was obtained in the inlet and exhaust. Rotor-stator and rotor-strut interaction modes were measured. Total harmonic power was calculated over a range of fan speeds. Above sonic tip speed, the rotor locked mode was not strong enough to be identified, but the 'buzz-saw' noise at fan sub-harmonics was identified.

  15. On the impact of dissimilarity measure in k-modes clustering algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ng, Michael K; Li, Mark Junjie; Huang, Joshua Zhexue; He, Zengyou

    2007-03-01

    This correspondence describes extensions to the k-modes algorithm for clustering categorical data. By modifying a simple matching dissimilarity measure for categorical objects, a heuristic approach was developed in [4], [12] which allows the use of the k-modes paradigm to obtain a cluster with strong intrasimilarity and to efficiently cluster large categorical data sets. The main aim of this paper is to rigorously derive the updating formula of the k-modes clustering algorithm with the new dissimilarity measure and the convergence of the algorithm under the optimization framework. PMID:17224620

  16. Mode Content Determination of Terahertz Corrugated Waveguides Using Experimentally Measured Radiated Field Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer K.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on the accuracy of the mode content measurements in an overmoded corrugated waveguide using measured radiated field patterns. Experimental results were obtained at 250 GHz using a vector network analyzer with over 70 dB of dynamic range. The intensity and phase profiles of the fields radiated from the end of the 19 mm diameter helically tapped brass waveguide were measured on planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm from the waveguide end. The measured fields were back propagated to the waveguide aperture to provide three independent estimates of the field at the waveguide exit aperture. Projecting that field onto the modes of the guide determined the waveguide mode content. The three independent mode content estimates were found to agree with one another to an accuracy of better than ±0.3%. These direct determinations of the mode content were compared with indirect measurements using the experimentally measured amplitude in three planes, with the phase determined by a phase retrieval algorithm. The phase retrieval technique using the planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm yielded a mode content estimate in excellent agreement, within 0.3%, of the direct measurements. Phase retrieval results using planes at 10, 20, and 30 cm were less accurate due to truncation of the measurement in the transverse plane. The reported measurements benefited greatly from a precise mechanical alignment of the scanner with respect to the waveguide axis. These results will help to understand the accuracy of mode content measurements made directly in cold test and indirectly in hot test using the phase retrieval technique. PMID:25264391

  17. Actively mode-locked Tm(3+)-doped silica fiber laser with wavelength-tunable, high average output power.

    PubMed

    Kneis, Christian; Donelan, Brenda; Berrou, Antoine; Manek-Hönninger, Inka; Robin, Thierry; Cadier, Benoît; Eichhorn, Marc; Kieleck, Christelle

    2015-04-01

    A diode-pumped, actively mode-locked high-power thulium (Tm3+)-doped double-clad silica fiber laser is demonstrated, providing an average output power in mode-locked (continuous wave) operation of 53 W (72 W) with a slope efficiency of 34% (38%). Mode-locking in the 6th-harmonic order was obtained by an acousto-optic modulator driven at 66 MHz without dispersion compensation. The shortest measured output pulse width was 200 ps. Owing to a diffraction grating as cavity end mirror, the central wavelength could be tuned from 1.95 to 2.13 μm. The measured beam quality in mode-locked and continuous wave operation has been close to the diffraction limit. PMID:25831360

  18. Actively mode-locked Tm(3+)-doped silica fiber laser with wavelength-tunable, high average output power.

    PubMed

    Kneis, Christian; Donelan, Brenda; Berrou, Antoine; Manek-Hönninger, Inka; Robin, Thierry; Cadier, Benoît; Eichhorn, Marc; Kieleck, Christelle

    2015-04-01

    A diode-pumped, actively mode-locked high-power thulium (Tm3+)-doped double-clad silica fiber laser is demonstrated, providing an average output power in mode-locked (continuous wave) operation of 53 W (72 W) with a slope efficiency of 34% (38%). Mode-locking in the 6th-harmonic order was obtained by an acousto-optic modulator driven at 66 MHz without dispersion compensation. The shortest measured output pulse width was 200 ps. Owing to a diffraction grating as cavity end mirror, the central wavelength could be tuned from 1.95 to 2.13 μm. The measured beam quality in mode-locked and continuous wave operation has been close to the diffraction limit.

  19. Sliding mode-based lateral vehicle dynamics control using tyre force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnappillil Madhusudhanan, Anil; Corno, Matteo; Holweg, Edward

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a lateral vehicle dynamics control based on tyre force measurements is proposed. Most of the lateral vehicle dynamics control schemes are based on yaw rate whereas tyre forces are the most important variables in vehicle dynamics as tyres are the only contact points between the vehicle and road. In the proposed method, active front steering is employed to uniformly distribute the required lateral force among the front left and right tyres. The force distribution is quantified through the tyre utilisation coefficients. In order to address the nonlinearities and uncertainties of the vehicle model, a gain scheduling sliding-mode control technique is used. In addition to stabilising the lateral dynamics, the proposed controller is able to maintain maximum lateral acceleration. The proposed method is tested and validated on a multi-body vehicle simulator.

  20. Transmission (forward) mode, transcranial, noninvasive optoacoustic measurements for brain monitoring, imaging, and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Richardson, C. Joan; Fonseca, Rafael A.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Asokan, C. Vasantha; Agbor, Adaeze; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2016-03-01

    We proposed to use transmission (forward) mode for cerebral, noninvasive, transcranial optoacoustic monitoring, imaging, and sensing in humans. In the transmission mode, the irradiation of the tissue of interest and detection of optoacoustic signals are performed from opposite hemispheres, while in the reflection (backward) mode the irradiation of the tissue of interest and detection of optoacoustic signals are performed from the same hemisphere. Recently, we developed new, transmission-mode optoacoustic probes for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and for neonatal patients. The transmission mode probes have two major parts: a fiber-optic delivery system and an acoustic transducer (sensor). To obtain optoacoustic signals in the transmission mode, in this study we placed the sensor on the forehead, while light was delivered to the opposite side of the head. Using a medical grade, multi-wavelength, OPObased optoacoustic system tunable in the near infrared spectral range (680-950 nm) and a novel, compact, fiber-coupled, multi-wavelength, pulsed laser diode-based system, we recorded optoacoustic signals generated in the posterior part of the head of adults with TBI and neonates. The optoacoustic signals had two distinct peaks: the first peak from the intracranial space and the second peak from the scalp. The first peak generated by cerebral blood was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation. Moreover, the transmission mode measurements provided detection of intracranial hematomas in the TBI patients. The obtained results suggest that the transmission mode can be used for optoacoustic brain imaging, tomography, and mapping in humans.

  1. Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136. Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting Mode and Searching for Majoron-Emitting Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Herrin, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Observations of neutrino flavor oscillations have demonstrated that neutrinos have mass. Since the discovery of these oscillations, much progress has been made at mea- suring the neutrino mass-squared differences and lepton mixing angles that character- ize them. However, the origin and absolute scale of neutrino masses remain unknown. Unique among fermions, neutrinos can be Majorana particles, which could provide an explanation for neutrino masses. Discovery of a hypothetical process known as neutrinoless double beta decay would show that neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine the mass scale for neutrinos. The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) is a series of experiments searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The first experiment, EXO-200, began operation in 2011 and makes use of 200 kg of xenon enriched to 80.6% in 136Xe. The analysis presented here makes use of data from EXO-200 to obtain a more precise measurement of the half-life for the two-neutrino-emitting mode of double beta decay than previously reported. The analysis also sets limits on the half-lives for exotic, Majoron-emitting modes of neutrinoless double beta decay. Data from EXO-200 is also used to produce a measurement of the cosmic muon flux at the WIPP under- ground site where EXO-200 is located.

  2. Measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in optical fibres using white-light spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Kadulová, M.

    2010-04-01

    We report on a white-light interferometric technique for a broad spectral range measurement (e.g. 500-1600 nm) of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in short-length optical fibres. The technique utilizes an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fibre under test of known length inserted in one of the interferometer arms and the other arm with adjustable path length. We record a series of spectral interferograms by VIS-NIR and NIR fibre-optic spectrometers to measure the equalization wavelength as a function of the path length difference, or equivalently the differential group index dispersion of one polarization mode. The differential group dispersion of the other polarization mode is obtained from measurement of the group modal birefringence dispersion. We verify the applicability of the method by measuring the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in a birefringent holey fibre. We apply a five-term power series fit to the measured data and confirm by its differentiation that the chromatic dispersion agrees well with that specified by the manufacturer. We also measure by this technique the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in an elliptical-core fibre.

  3. Torsional mode ultrasonic helical waveguide sensor for re-configurable temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periyannan, Suresh; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces an ultrasonic torsional mode based technique, configured in the form of a helical "spring-like" waveguide, for multi-level temperature measurement. The multiple sensing levels can be repositioned by stretching or collapsing the spring to provide simultaneous measurements at different desired spacing in a given area/volume. The transduction is performed using piezo-electric crystals that generate and receive T(0,1) mode in a pulse echo mode. The gage lengths and positions of measurements are based on machining multiple reflector notches in the waveguide at required positions. The time of fight (TOF) measurements between the reflected signals from the notches provide local temperatures that compare well with co-located thermocouples.

  4. Measurements and computations of second-mode instability waves in three hypersonic wind tunnels.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Daniel R.; Alba, Christopher R.; Rufer, Shann J.; Beresh, Steven Jay; Casper, Katya M.; Berridge, Dennis C.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2010-06-01

    High-frequency pressure-fluctuation measurements were made in AEDC Tunnel 9 at Mach 10 and the NASA Langley 15-Inch Mach 6 and 31-Inch Mach 10 tunnels. Measurements were made on a 7{sup o}-half-angle cone model. Pitot measurements of freestream pressure fluctuations were also made in Tunnel 9 and the Langley Mach-6 tunnel. For the first time, second-mode waves were measured in all of these tunnels, using 1-MHz-response pressure sensors. In Tunnel 9, second-mode waves could be seen in power spectra computed from records as short as 80 {micro}s. The second-mode wave amplitudes were observed to saturate and then begin to decrease in the Langley tunnels, indicating wave breakdown. Breakdown was estimated to occur near N {approx} 5 in the Langley Mach-10 tunnel. The unit-Reynolds-number variations in the data from Tunnel 9 were too large to see the same processes.

  5. Mode-locking external-cavity laser-diode sensor for displacement measurements of technical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarske, Jürgen; Möbius, Jasper; Moldenhauer, Karsten

    2005-09-01

    A novel laser sensor for position measurements of technical solid-state surfaces is proposed. An external Fabry-Perot laser cavity is assembled by use of an antireflection-coated laser diode together with the technical surface. Mode locking results from pumping the laser diode synchronously to the mode spacing of the cavity. The laser cavity length, i.e., the distance to the measurement object, is determined by evaluation of the modulation transfer function of the cavity by means of a phase-locked loop. The mode-locking external-cavity laser sensor incorporates a resonance effect that results in highly resolving position and displacement measurements. More than a factor-of-10 higher resolution than with conventional nonresonant sensing principles is achieved. Results of the displacement measurements of various technical surfaces are reported. Experimental and theoretical investigations are in good agreement.

  6. Disease Activity Measures in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Nadia J.; Feldman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Disease activity refers to potentially reversible aspects of a disease. Measurement of disease activity in paediatric rheumatic diseases is a critical component of patient care and clinical research. Disease activity measures are developed systematically, often involving consensus methods. To be useful, a disease activity measure must be feasible, valid, and interpretable. There are several challenges in quantifying disease activity in paediatric rheumatology; namely, the conditions are multidimensional, the level of activity must be valuated in the context of treatment being received, there is no gold standard for disease activity, and it is often difficult to incorporate the patient's perspective of their disease activity. To date, core sets of response variables are defined for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis, as well as definitions for improvement in response to therapy. Several specific absolute disease activity measures also exist for each condition. Further work is required to determine the optimal disease activity measures in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24089617

  7. Measurement and reliability issues in resonant mode cantilever for bio-sensing application in fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathel, G.; Shajahan, M. S.; Bhadra, P.; Prabhakar, A.; Chadha, A.; Bhattacharya, E.

    2016-09-01

    Cantilevers immersed in liquid experience viscous damping and hydrodynamic loading. We report on the use of such cantilevers, operating in the dynamic mode with, (i) frequency sweeping and (ii) phase locked loop methods. The solution to reliability issues such as random drift in the resonant peak values, and interference of spurious modes in the resonance frequency spectrum, are explained based on the actuation signal provided and laser spot size. The laser beam spot size and its position on the cantilever were found to have an important role, on the output signal and resonance frequency. We describe a method to distinguish the normal modes from the spurious modes for a cantilever. Uncertainties in the measurements define the lower limit of mass detection (m min). The minimum detection limits of the two measurement methods are investigated by measuring salt adsorption from phosphate buffer solution, as an example, a mass of 14 pg was measured using the 14th transverse mode of a 500~μ m  ×  100 μm  ×  1 μm silicon cantilever. The optimized measurement was used to study the interaction between antibody and antigen.

  8. Dynamic Multiscale Modes of Resting State Brain Activity Detected by Entropy Field Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Frank, Lawrence R; Galinsky, Vitaly L

    2016-09-01

    The ability of functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) to noninvasively measure fluctuations in brain activity in the absence of an applied stimulus offers the possibility of discerning functional networks in the resting state of the brain. However, the reconstruction of brain networks from these signal fluctuations poses a significant challenge because they are generally nonlinear and nongaussian and can overlap in both their spatial and temporal extent. Moreover, because there is no explicit input stimulus, there is no signal model with which to compare the brain responses. A variety of techniques have been devised to address this problem, but the predominant approaches are based on the presupposition of statistical properties of complex brain signal parameters, which are unprovable but facilitate the analysis. In this article, we address this problem with a new method, entropy field decomposition, for estimating structure within spatiotemporal data. This method is based on a general information field-theoretic formulation of Bayesian probability theory incorporating prior coupling information that allows the enumeration of the most probable parameter configurations without the need for unjustified statistical assumptions. This approach facilitates the construction of brain activation modes directly from the spatial-temporal correlation structure of the data. These modes and their associated spatial-temporal correlation structure can then be used to generate space-time activity probability trajectories, called functional connectivity pathways, which provide a characterization of functional brain networks. PMID:27391678

  9. All fiber actively mode-locked fiber laser emitting cylindrical vector beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Xu, Lixin; Zhan, Qiwen

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser emitting cylindrical vector beam. A few-mode fiber Bragg grating is adopted to achieve mode selecting and spectrum filtering. An offset splicing of single-mode fiber with fourmode fiber is utilized as a mode coupler in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.3nm. The emitted modelocked pulses have a duration of 1ns and repetition of 12.06MHz. Both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with very good modal symmetry by adjusting the polarization in the laser cavity.

  10. Using online computer tailoring to promote physical activity: a randomized trial of text, video, and combined intervention delivery modes.

    PubMed

    Soetens, Katja C M; Vandelanotte, Corneel; de Vries, Hein; Mummery, Kerry W

    2014-12-01

    Website-delivered interventions are increasingly used to deliver physical activity interventions, yet problems with engagement and retention result in reduced effectiveness. Hence, alternative modes of online intervention delivery need to be explored. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a computer-tailored physical activity intervention delivered on the Internet in 3 delivery modes: video, text, or both. Australian adults (N = 803), recruited through e-mail, were randomized into the three delivery modes and received personal physical activity advice. Intervention content was identical across groups. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to compare the three groups regarding acceptability, website usability, and physical activity. Participants in the video group accepted the content of the physical activity advice significantly better (F = 5.59; p < .01), and spent significantly more time on the website (F = 21.19; p < .001) compared with the text and combination groups. Total physical activity improved significantly over time in all groups (F = 3.95; p < .01). Although the combination group increased physical activity the most, few significant differences between groups were observed. Providing video-tailored feedback has advantages over the conventional text-tailored interventions; however, this study revealed few behavioral differences. More studies, examining alternative delivery modes, that can overcome the limitations of the present study, are needed.

  11. Analysis of the characteristics of solar oscillation modes in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Basu, Sarbani

    2008-10-01

    We analyze the characteristics of high-degree solar acoustic modes in the vicinity of magnetic active regions and compare with those of magnetically quiet regions at the same latitude and at nearly the same time. We applied ring-diagram analysis to GONG+ and MDI data, using the 13-parameter mode-fitting model of Basu & Antia [1]. We explore the correlations of variations in mode frequencies, amplitudes, widths, and asymmetries with the total magnetic flux of the analyzed regions.

  12. External kink modes as a model for MHD activity associated with ELMs

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1992-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas in the high confinement mode of operation are known to exhibit edge localized activity referred to as ELMs. A model is proposed for the underlying cause in terms of the external kink mode. The build up of the current density near the plasma edge is shown to decrease the shear in the safety-factor, q, profile and lead to destabilization of the kink mode. The role of the plasma geometry and equilibrium profiles is discussed.

  13. Two modes of motion of the alligator lizard cochlea: Measurements and model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranyosi, A. J.; Freeman, Dennis M.

    2005-09-01

    Measurements of motion of an in vitro preparation of the alligator lizard basilar papilla in response to sound demonstrate elliptical trajectories. These trajectories are consistent with the presence of both a translational and rotational mode of motion. The translational mode is independent of frequency, and the rotational mode has a displacement peak near 5 kHz. These measurements can be explained by a simple mechanical system in which the basilar papilla is supported asymmetrically on the basilar membrane. In a quantitative model, the translational admittance is compliant while the rotational admittance is second order. Best-fit model parameters are consistent with estimates based on anatomy and predict that fluid flow across hair bundles is a primary source of viscous damping. The model predicts that the rotational mode contributes to the high-frequency slopes of auditory nerve fiber tuning curves, providing a physical explanation for a low-pass filter required in models of this cochlea. The combination of modes makes the sensitivity of hair bundles more uniform with radial position than that which would result from pure rotation. A mechanical analogy with the organ of Corti suggests that these two modes of motion may also be present in the mammalian cochlea.

  14. Formation of a hybrid plasmonic waveguide mode probed by dispersion measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.; Kurata, H.

    2015-04-07

    Hybrid waveguides, i.e., dielectric waveguides combined with plasmonic waveguides, have great potential for concomitantly exhibiting subwavelength confinement and long range propagation, enabling a highly integrated photonic circuit. We report the characterization of hybrid waveguide modes excited in Si/SiO{sub 2}/Al films, by dispersion measurement using angle-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy. This experiment directly verifies the formation of the hybrid waveguide mode with a strongly localized electromagnetic field in a 6-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer. The results clearly describe the characteristic behavior of the hybrid waveguide mode, which depends on the effective index of the constituent dielectric waveguide and the surface plasmon-polariton modes.

  15. Electron Gyro-scale Fluctuation Measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D R; Lee, W; Mazzucato, E; Park, H K; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Levinton, F M; Luhmann, N C; Menard, J E

    2009-08-10

    A collective scattering system has measured electron gyro-scale fluctuations in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-mode plasmas to investigate electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. Observations and results pertaining to fluctuation measurements in ETGstable regimes, the toroidal field scaling of fluctuation amplitudes, the relation between between fluctuation amplitudes and transport quantities, and fluctuation magnitudes and k-spectra are presented. Collectively, the measurements provide insight and guidance for understanding ETG turbulence and anomalous electron thermal transport.

  16. Activation of New Raman Modes by Inversion Symmetry Breaking in Type II Weyl Semimetal Candidate T'-MoTe2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Yu; Goldstein, Thomas; Venkataraman, Dhandapani; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    2016-09-14

    We synthesized distorted octahedral (T') molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2) and investigated its vibrational properties with Raman spectroscopy, density functional theory, and symmetry analysis. Compared to results from the high-temperature centrosymmetric monoclinic (T'mo) phase, four new Raman bands emerge in the low-temperature orthorhombic (T'or) phase, which was recently predicted to be a type II Weyl semimetal. Crystal-angle-dependent, light-polarization-resolved measurements indicate that all the observed Raman peaks belong to two categories: those vibrating along the zigzag Mo atomic chain (z-modes) and those vibrating in the mirror plane (m-modes) perpendicular to the zigzag chain. Interestingly, the low-energy shear z-mode and shear m-mode, absent from the T'mo spectra, become activated when sample cooling induces a phase transition to the T'or crystal structure. We interpret this observation as a consequence of inversion-symmetry breaking, which is crucial for the existence of Weyl fermions in the layered crystal. Our temperature-dependent Raman measurements further show that both the high-energy m-mode at ∼130 cm(-1) and the low-energy shear m-mode at ∼12 cm(-1) provide useful gauges for monitoring the broken inversion symmetry in the crystal. PMID:27517466

  17. Activation of New Raman Modes by Inversion Symmetry Breaking in Type II Weyl Semimetal Candidate T'-MoTe2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Yu; Goldstein, Thomas; Venkataraman, Dhandapani; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    2016-09-14

    We synthesized distorted octahedral (T') molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2) and investigated its vibrational properties with Raman spectroscopy, density functional theory, and symmetry analysis. Compared to results from the high-temperature centrosymmetric monoclinic (T'mo) phase, four new Raman bands emerge in the low-temperature orthorhombic (T'or) phase, which was recently predicted to be a type II Weyl semimetal. Crystal-angle-dependent, light-polarization-resolved measurements indicate that all the observed Raman peaks belong to two categories: those vibrating along the zigzag Mo atomic chain (z-modes) and those vibrating in the mirror plane (m-modes) perpendicular to the zigzag chain. Interestingly, the low-energy shear z-mode and shear m-mode, absent from the T'mo spectra, become activated when sample cooling induces a phase transition to the T'or crystal structure. We interpret this observation as a consequence of inversion-symmetry breaking, which is crucial for the existence of Weyl fermions in the layered crystal. Our temperature-dependent Raman measurements further show that both the high-energy m-mode at ∼130 cm(-1) and the low-energy shear m-mode at ∼12 cm(-1) provide useful gauges for monitoring the broken inversion symmetry in the crystal.

  18. Effect of light-curing units and activation mode on polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Pereira, José Carlos; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composites polymerized with a LED and a quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light sources. The LED was used in a conventional mode (CM) and the QTH was used in both conventional and pulse-delay modes (PD). The composite resins used were Z100, A110, SureFil and Bisfil 2B (chemical-cured). Composite deformation upon polymerization was measured by the strain gauge method. The shrinkage stress was measured by photoelastic analysis. The polymerization shrinkage data were analyzed statistically using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p < or = 0.05), and the stress data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < or = 0.05). Shrinkage and stress means of Bisfil 2B were statistically significant lower than those of Z100, A110 and SureFil. In general, the PD mode reduced the contraction and the stress values when compared to CM. LED generated the same stress as QTH in conventional mode. Regardless of the activation mode, SureFil produced lower contraction and stress values than the other light-cured resins. Conversely, Z100 and A110 produced the greatest contraction and stress values. As expected, the chemically cured resin generated lower shrinkage and stress than the light-cured resins. In conclusion, The PD mode effectively decreased contraction stress for Z100 and A110. Development of stress in light-cured resins depended on the shrinkage value.

  19. Activation energy measurements of cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature sweeps of cheeses using small amplitude oscillatory shear tests produced values for activation energy of flow (Ea) between 30 and 44 deg C. Soft goat cheese and Queso Fresco, which are high-moisture cheeses and do not flow when heated, exhibited Ea values between 30 and 60 kJ/mol. The ...

  20. Gaussian measures of entanglement versus negativities: Ordering of two-mode Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2005-09-15

    We study the entanglement of general (pure or mixed) two-mode Gaussian states of continuous-variable systems by comparing the two available classes of computable measures of entanglement: entropy-inspired Gaussian convex-roof measures and positive partial transposition-inspired measures (negativity and logarithmic negativity). We first review the formalism of Gaussian measures of entanglement, adopting the framework introduced in M. M. Wolf et al., Phys. Rev. A 69, 052320 (2004), where the Gaussian entanglement of formation was defined. We compute explicitly Gaussian measures of entanglement for two important families of nonsymmetric two-mode Gaussian state: namely, the states of extremal (maximal and minimal) negativities at fixed global and local purities, introduced in G. Adesso et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 087901 (2004). This analysis allows us to compare the different orderings induced on the set of entangled two-mode Gaussian states by the negativities and by the Gaussian measures of entanglement. We find that in a certain range of values of the global and local purities (characterizing the covariance matrix of the corresponding extremal states), states of minimum negativity can have more Gaussian entanglement of formation than states of maximum negativity. Consequently, Gaussian measures and negativities are definitely inequivalent measures of entanglement on nonsymmetric two-mode Gaussian states, even when restricted to a class of extremal states. On the other hand, the two families of entanglement measures are completely equivalent on symmetric states, for which the Gaussian entanglement of formation coincides with the true entanglement of formation. Finally, we show that the inequivalence between the two families of continuous-variable entanglement measures is somehow limited. Namely, we rigorously prove that, at fixed negativities, the Gaussian measures of entanglement are bounded from below. Moreover, we provide some strong evidence suggesting that they

  1. Theoretical study of mode evolution in active long tapered multimode fiber.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun; Lu, Qisheng

    2016-08-22

    A concise and effective model based on coupled mode theory to describe mode evolution in long tapered active fiber is presented in this manuscript. The mode coupling due to variation of core radius and slight perturbation have been analyzed and local gain with transverse spatial hole burning (TSHB) effect, loss and curvature have been taken into consideration in our model. On the base of this model, the mode evolution behaviors under different factors have been numerically investigated. Our model and results can provide instructive suggestions when designing long tapered fiber based laser and amplifiers. PMID:27557225

  2. Active and passive mode calibration of the Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J. M.

    2002-06-01

    The Combined Thermal/Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) non-destructive assay (NDA) system was designed to assay transuranic waste by employing an induced active neutron interrogation and/or a spontaneous passive neutron measurement. This is the second of two papers, and focuses on the passive mode, relating the net double neutron coincidence measurement to the plutonium mass via the calibration constant. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) calibration standards were used and the results verified with NIST-traceable verification standards. Performance demonstration program (PDP) 'empty' 208-L matrix drum was used for the calibration. The experimentally derived calibration constant was found to be 0.0735 {+-} 0.0059 g {sup 240}Pu effective per unit response. Using this calibration constant, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) criteria was satisfied with five minute waste assays in the range from 3 to 177g Pu. CTEN also participated in the PDP Cycle 8A blind assay with organic sludge and metal matrices and passed the criteria for accuracy and precision in both assay modes. The WIPP and EPA audit was completed March 1, 2002 and full certification is awaiting the closeout of one finding during the audit. With the successful closeout of the audit, the CTEN system will have shown that it can provide very fast assays (five minutes or less) of waste in the range from the minimum detection limit (about 2 mg Pu) to 177 g Pu.

  3. The study on integrated mode of inter-satellite communication/measurement in autonomous formation flyer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Liu, Lei; Yang, Yi-Kang

    2009-12-01

    Considering autonomous and AD-HOC networking of AFF, such as topology, multiple access mode, integrated mode of inter-satellite communication and measurements, and data transfer protocol, are presented and studied in this paper. Inter-satellite non-coherence spread spectrum ranging via full-duplex asynchronous communication link of CCSDS Proximity-1 transfer frame is deeply researched, and Sufficient simulation and engineering experiments are implemented and plenty of results are obtained, which show that the integrated mode of intra-satellite communication and measurement achieves excellent precision, integrates multiple functions in one device with more effective utilization ratio of channel in radio link. The production of principles and technologies in this dissertation has many academic and engineering values, can be used in many fields in the future.

  4. Algorithm Summary and Evaluation: Automatic Implementation of Ringdown Analysis for Electromechanical Mode Identification from Phasor Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Tuffner, Francis K.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Lin, Jenglung; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2010-02-28

    Small signal stability problems are one of the major threats to grid stability and reliability. Prony analysis has been successfully applied on ringdown data to monitor electromechanical modes of a power system using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. To facilitate an on-line application of mode estimation, this paper develops a recursive algorithm for implementing Prony analysis and proposed an oscillation detection method to detect ringdown data in real time. By automatically detecting ringdown data, the proposed method helps guarantee that Prony analysis is applied properly and timely on the ringdown data. Thus, the mode estimation results can be performed reliably and timely. The proposed method is tested using Monte Carlo simulations based on a 17-machine model and is shown to be able to properly identify the oscillation data for on-line application of Prony analysis. In addition, the proposed method is applied to field measurement data from WECC to show the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  5. Measurement of Field Aligned Electron and Ion Densities and Ducts from the Whistler and Z Mode Radio Sounding from IMAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Hazra, S.; Mayank, K.; Reddy, A.; Liu, Y.; Carpenter, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present recent results from the application of whistler mode (WM) and Z mode (ZM) radio sounding experiments from the IMAGE satellite to the magnetospheric plasma diagnostics. A recently developed WM radio sounding method [Sonwalkar et al., JGR, 116, A11210, doi:10.1029/2011JA016759, 2011] was applied to 200 cases of WM echoes observed within the plasmasphere to measure field aligned electron density (Ne) and ion densities (NH+, NHe+, NO+) for L~1.6 -4, altitude <5000 km, Kp ~1-7, and F10.7 ~ 72-110 (low solar activity). The measured plasma parameters are in general consistent with the past space borne (e.g. CHAMP, DMSP, Alouette, ISIS, AE) and ground (e.g. ionosonde) measurements, but show significant differences from those predicted by IRI-2012 and GCPM models. We believe our measurements will lead to an improved model of electron and ion densities at <5000 km within the plasmasphere. The WM radio sounding method was applied to a case study of the variation of plasma parameters at L~2 during the development of a major storm, from quiet conditions and subsequent recovery, followed by a moderate and minor storm. Our study showed that relative to the preceding quiet time: (1) There was depletion in electron density, H+, He+ and enhancement in O+ ions leading to increase in O+-H+ transition height; (2) The recovery period of electrons and individual ions was different; (3) A similar trend in the variation of electron density, H+, O+ was observed after the moderate storm and the minor storm but He+ was not affected. Following a ray tracing technique originally developed for whistler mode sounding, we analyzed the fast nonducted and ducted Z mode echoes to obtain field aligned electron density and duct parameters (duct width and enhancement) from the measured dispersion of Z mode echoes. With the help of two case studies, we illustrate that fast Z mode echoes provide measurement of electron density at altitudes <10,000 km and duct width and enhancement within an

  6. Real-Time Quadrature Measurement of a Single-Photon Wave Packet with Continuous Temporal-Mode Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Hisashi; Ohdan, Hideaki; Miyata, Kazunori; Taguchi, Masahiro; Makino, Kenzo; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Yoshikawa, Jun-ichi; Furusawa, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Real-time controls based on quantum measurements are powerful tools for various quantum protocols. However, their experimental realization has been limited by mode mismatch between the temporal mode of quadrature measurement and that heralded by photon detection. Here, we demonstrate real-time quadrature measurement of a single-photon wave packet induced by photon detection by utilizing continuous temporal-mode matching between homodyne detection and an exponentially rising temporal mode. Single photons in exponentially rising modes are also expected to be useful resources for interactions with other quantum systems.

  7. Real-Time Quadrature Measurement of a Single-Photon Wave Packet with Continuous Temporal-Mode Matching.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisashi; Ohdan, Hideaki; Miyata, Kazunori; Taguchi, Masahiro; Makino, Kenzo; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Yoshikawa, Jun-Ichi; Furusawa, Akira

    2016-06-10

    Real-time controls based on quantum measurements are powerful tools for various quantum protocols. However, their experimental realization has been limited by mode mismatch between the temporal mode of quadrature measurement and that heralded by photon detection. Here, we demonstrate real-time quadrature measurement of a single-photon wave packet induced by photon detection by utilizing continuous temporal-mode matching between homodyne detection and an exponentially rising temporal mode. Single photons in exponentially rising modes are also expected to be useful resources for interactions with other quantum systems.

  8. Analysis of the visual artifact in range-gated active imaging, especially in burst mode.

    PubMed

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2014-09-20

    After the demonstration of the occurrence of visual artifacts with an active imaging system in burst mode in a previous paper, the analysis of this phenomenon was realized. A visual artifact resulting from a remote zone in the scene can appear in the image of the real visualized zone when the duty cycle of laser pulses is close to 50%, as in the burst mode. Therefore, the elements of this remote zone will create confusion in the image, with erroneous estimated distances. These misinterpretations can be very embarrassing to those attempting to determine the distance of a target in the scene. From the modeling realized and validated in the previous paper, the behavior of the visual artifact was analyzed with two types of burst mode used in active imaging, the duration of the laser pulse being identical to the duration of the temporal aperture of the imager. In the first mode, the width of the visualized zone is set, depending on the distance. The second mode increases the width of the visualized zone so that the foreground of the zone is constantly visible. The results showed that the distance of the visual artifacts in variable mode increased much more quickly than the distance in fixed mode. In both modes, the most intense visual artifacts appear when the range of the visualized zone remains within the first kilometer. When this range is very short, the illuminance of the visual artifact in fixed mode is much more intense than the illuminance in variable mode. On the other hand, for long distances, the illuminance of the visual artifact in variable mode is greater than the illuminance in fixed mode, but decreases quickly beyond a certain distance, making it insignificant.

  9. Automation of Mode Locking in a Nonlinear Polarization Rotation Fiber Laser through Output Polarization Measurements.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Michel; Gagnon, Marc-Daniel; Habel, Joé

    2016-01-01

    When a laser is mode-locked, it emits a train of ultra-short pulses at a repetition rate determined by the laser cavity length. This article outlines a new and inexpensive procedure to force mode locking in a pre-adjusted nonlinear polarization rotation fiber laser. This procedure is based on the detection of a sudden change in the output polarization state when mode locking occurs. This change is used to command the alignment of the intra-cavity polarization controller in order to find mode-locking conditions. More specifically, the value of the first Stokes parameter varies when the angle of the polarization controller is swept and, moreover, it undergoes an abrupt variation when the laser enters the mode-locked state. Monitoring this abrupt variation provides a practical easy-to-detect signal that can be used to command the alignment of the polarization controller and drive the laser towards mode locking. This monitoring is achieved by feeding a small portion of the signal to a polarization analyzer measuring the first Stokes parameter. A sudden change in the read out of this parameter from the analyzer will occur when the laser enters the mode-locked state. At this moment, the required angle of the polarization controller is kept fixed. The alignment is completed. This procedure provides an alternate way to existing automating procedures that use equipment such as an optical spectrum analyzer, an RF spectrum analyzer, a photodiode connected to an electronic pulse-counter or a nonlinear detecting scheme based on two-photon absorption or second harmonic generation. It is suitable for lasers mode locked by nonlinear polarization rotation. It is relatively easy to implement, it requires inexpensive means, especially at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and it lowers the production and operation costs incurred in comparison to the above-mentioned techniques. PMID:26967924

  10. Noise amplitude measurements of single-mode CW lasers at radio frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.; Hillard, M. E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This letter presents the results of noise measurements for a variety of single-longitudinal-mode CW lasers (Ar/+/, standing-wave-dye, and ring-dye) that are commercially available. A quantitative comparison of the total output power fluctuations detected over the 7-300 MHz region (3 dB points) is presented.

  11. MULTI-SITE FIELD EVALUATION OF CANDIDATE SAMPLERS FOR MEASURING COARSE-MODE PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to expected changes to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter, comprehensive field studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of sampling methods for measuring coarse mode aerosols (i.e. PMc). Five separate PMc sampling approaches w...

  12. A measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the G0 experiment in forward mode

    SciTech Connect

    Covrig, Silviu Doru

    2004-01-01

    The G0 experiment in Hall C at Jefferson Lab measures the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron scattering off hydrogen and quasielastic electron scattering off deuterium in the Q2 range from 0.1 to 1 (GeV)2 in both forward and backward running modes by using a longitudinally polarized electron beam on unpolarized liquid targets. By measuring three independent asymmetries, one in forward running mode off liquid hydrogen and two in backward running mode, one off liquid hydrogen and one off liquid deuterium, the experiment aims to perform for the first time a complete separation and mapping of the strange vector form factors of the nucleon (G_Ms, G_Es) and the isovector axial form factor (G_Ae(T=1)) in three Q2 bins over the Q2 range from 0.1 to 1 (GeV/c)2. To complete the physics program in both forward and backward modes it will take about five years. To accomplish the forward running mode program some 100 C of data are needed. This thesis is based on 9 C of physics data taken during the first chekout of the G0 apparatus during October 2002 - January 2003.

  13. Real-Time Monitoring of Platelet Activation Using Quartz Thickness-Shear Mode Resonator Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiyan; Zhao, Guangyi; Zu, Hongfei; Wang, James H-C; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-02-01

    In this study, quartz thickness-shear mode (TSM) resonator sensors were adopted to monitor the process of platelet activation. Resting platelets adhering to fibrinogen-coated electrodes were activated by different concentrations of thrombin (1, 10, and 100 U/mL), and the corresponding electrical admittance spectra of TSM resonators during this process were recorded. Based on a bilayer-loading transmission line model of TSM resonators, the complex shear modulus (G' + jG″) and the average thickness (hPL) of the platelet monolayer at a series of time points were obtained. Decrease in thrombin concentration from 100 to 1 U/mL shifted all peaks and plateaus in G', G″, and hPL to higher time points, which could be attributed to the partial activation of platelets by low concentrations of thrombin. The peak value of hPL was acquired when platelets presented their typical spherical shape as the first transformation in activation process. The G' peak appeared 10 ∼ 20 min after hPL peak, when some filopods were observed along the periphery of platelets but without obvious cell spreading. As platelet spreading began and continued, G', G″, and hPL decreased, leading to a steady rise of resonance frequency shift of TSM resonator sensors. The results show high reliability and stability of TSM resonator sensors in monitoring the process of platelet activation, revealing an effective method to measure platelet activities in real-time under multiple experimental conditions. The G', G″, and hPL values could provide useful quantitative measures on platelet structure variations in activation process, indicating potential of TSM resonators in characterization of cells during their transformation. PMID:26840731

  14. Semi-active sliding mode control of vehicle suspension with magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Enrong; Zhang, Ning; Min, Fuhong; Subash, Rakheja; Su, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    The vehicle semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological damper(MRD) has been a hot topic since this decade, in which the robust control synthesis considering load variation is a challenging task. In this paper, a new semi-active controller based upon the inverse model and sliding mode control (SMC) strategies is proposed for the quarter-vehicle suspension with the magneto-rheological (MR) damper, wherein an ideal skyhook suspension is employed as the control reference model and the vehicle sprung mass is considered as an uncertain parameter. According to the asymptotical stability of SMC, the dynamic errors between the plant and reference systems are used to derive the control damping force acquired by the MR quarter-vehicle suspension system. The proposed modified Bouc-wen hysteretic force-velocity ( F- v) model and its inverse model of MR damper, as well as the proposed continuous modulation (CM) filtering algorithm without phase shift are employed to convert the control damping force into the direct drive current of the MR damper. Moreover, the proposed semi-active sliding mode controller (SSMC)-based MR quarter-vehicle suspension is systematically evaluated through comparing the time and frequency domain responses of the sprung and unsprung mass displacement accelerations, suspension travel and the tire dynamic force with those of the passive quarter-vehicle suspension, under three kinds of varied amplitude harmonic, rounded pulse and real-road measured random excitations. The evaluation results illustrate that the proposed SSMC can greatly suppress the vehicle suspension vibration due to uncertainty of the load, and thus improve the ride comfort and handling safety. The study establishes a solid theoretical foundation as the universal control scheme for the adaptive semi-active control of the MR full-vehicle suspension decoupled into four MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension systems.

  15. Three dimensional measurements of Geodesic Acoustic Mode with correlation Doppler reflectometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, W. L.; Shi, Z. B.; Xu, Y.; Zou, X. L.; Duan, X. R.; Chen, W.; Jiang, M.; Yang, Z. C.; Zhang, B. Y.; Shi, P. W.; Liu, Z. T.; Xu, M.; Song, X. M.; Cheng, J.; Ke, R.; Nie, L.; Cui, Z. Y.; Fu, B. Z.; Ding, X. T.; Dong, J. Q.; Liu, Yi.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Liu, Yong; the HL-2A Team

    2015-10-01

    Correlation Doppler reflectometers have been newly developed in the HL-2A Tokamak. Owing to the flexibility of the diagnostic arrangements, the multi-channel systems allow us to study, simultaneously, the radial properties of edge turbulence and its long-range correlation in both the poloidal and toroidal direction. With these reflectometers, three-dimensional spatial structure of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) is surveyed, including the symmetric feature of Er fluctuations in both poloidal and toroidal directions, and the radial propagation of GAMs. The bi-coherence analysis for the Er fluctuations suggests that the three-wave nonlinear interaction could be the mechanism for the generation of GAM. The temporal evolution of GAM during the plasma density modulation experiments has been studied. The results show that the collisional damping plays a role in suppressing the GAM magnitudes, and hence, weakening the regulating effects of GAM on ambient turbulence. Three dimensional correlation Doppler measurements of GAM activity demonstrate that the newly developed correlation Doppler reflectometers in HL-2A are powerful tools for edge turbulence studies with high reliability. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: ``1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics''.

  16. Target tracking using range-only measurements: application to ISAR mode of Ingara radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, Branko; Arulampalam, Sanjeev; McCarthy, James

    2001-11-01

    The problem is on-line target state estimation from range and range-rate measurements. The motivation for this work comes from the need to track a target in the ISAR mode of the DSTO Ingara Multi-Mode Radar during an extended data collection. The paper makes three main contributions. First, the theoretical Cramér-Rao bound for the performance of an unbiased range-only tracking algorithm is derived. Second, three algorithms are developed and compared to the theoretical bounds of performance. Third, the developed techniques are applied to real data collected in the recent trials with the Ingara radar.

  17. Measuring the complete transverse spatial mode spectrum of a wave field.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Gabriel F; Picón, Antonio; Zambrini, Roberta

    2008-05-01

    We put forward a method that allows the experimental determination of the entire spatial mode spectrum of any arbitrary monochromatic wave field in a plane normal to its propagation direction. For coherent optical fields, our spatial spectrum analyzer can be implemented with a small number of benchmark refractive elements embedded in a single Mach-Zehnder interferometer. We detail an efficient setup for measuring in the Hermite-Gaussian mode basis. Our scheme should also be feasible in the context of atom optics for analyzing the spatial profiles of macroscopic matter waves.

  18. Dynamic output feedback sliding mode control for uncertain mechanical systems without velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeang-Lin

    2010-04-01

    For MIMO mechanical systems using position measurements only, this paper presents a dynamic output feedback sliding mode control algorithm in which an additional dynamics is introduced into the design of the sliding surface. Although the system has the mismatched uncertainty and external disturbance, once the system is in the sliding mode, the proposed method can guarantee robust stabilization and sustain the nature of performing disturbance attenuation through utilizing H(infinity) control analytical technique. A controller is then designed to drive the system to the sliding surface in a finite time and stay on it thereafter. Finally, a numerical example is explained for demonstrating the applicability of the proposed scheme.

  19. Mode-shape measurement of piezoelectric plate using temporal speckle pattern interferometry and temporal standard deviation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Yuan; Ma, Chien-Ching

    2011-11-01

    This study proposes an image processing method to improve the quality of interference fringes in mode-shape measurement using temporal speckle pattern interferometry. A vibrating piezoelectric plate at resonance was investigated, and the full-field optical information was saved as a sequence of images. According to derived statistical properties, an algorithm was developed to remove noise from both the background and disturbance, resulting in high-resolution images of excellent quality. In addition, the resonant frequency and mode shape obtained using the proposed algorithm demonstrate excellent agreement with theoretical results obtained by the finite element method. PMID:22048391

  20. Angular dependence of source-target-detector in active mode standoff infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Aparicio-Bolaños, Joaquín. A.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-06-01

    Active mode standoff measurement using infrared spectroscopy were carried out in which the angle between target and the source was varied from 0-70° with respect to the surface normal of substrates containing traces of highly energetic materials (explosives). The experiments were made using three infrared sources: a modulated source (Mod-FTIR), an unmodulated source (UnMod-FTIR) and a scanning quantum cascade laser (QCL), part of a dispersive mid infrared (MIR) spectrometer. The targets consisted of PENT 200 μg/cm2 deposited on aluminum plates placed at 1 m from the sources. The evaluation of the three modalities was aimed at verifying the influence of the highly collimated laser beam in the detection in comparison with the other sources. The Mod-FTIR performed better than QCL source in terms of the MIR signal intensity decrease with increasing angle.

  1. Default Mode Network Activity Predicts Early Memory Decline in Healthy Young Adults Aged 18-31.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Steven M; Savalia, Neil K; Fishell, Andrew K; Gilmore, Adrian W; Zou, Fan; Balota, David A; McDermott, Kathleen B

    2016-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research conducted in healthy young adults is typically done with the assumption that this sample is largely homogeneous. However, studies from cognitive psychology suggest that long-term memory and attentional control begin to diminish in the third decade of life. Here, 100 participants between the ages of 18 and 31 learned Lithuanian translations of English words in an individual differences study using fMRI. Long-term memory ability was operationalized for each participant by deriving a memory score from 3 convergent measures. Age of participant predicted memory score in this cohort. In addition, degree of deactivation during initial encoding in a set of regions occurring largely in the default mode network (DMN) predicted both age and memory score. The current study demonstrates that early memory decline may partially be accounted for by failure to modulate activity in the DMN.

  2. Two stage activated sludge plants--influence of different operational modes on sludge bulking and nitrification.

    PubMed

    Wandl, G; Müller-Rechberger, H; Matsché, N; Svardal, K; Winkler, S

    2002-01-01

    Conventional two stage activated sludge plants often lack sufficient nutrient removal performance due to substrate limitation for denitrification in the second stage. For the extension of the Vienna Main WWTP a two stage concept has been developed and tested by means of a pilot plant (scale 1:10.000). The new concept enables the operation of two different modes: In BYPASS-mode a portion of the primary clarifier effluent is fed directly to the second stage; the HYBRID-mode includes the exchange of mixed liquor between the two stages; over the course of the pilot plant investigations it turned out that nutrient removal is strongly increased in comparison to conventional two stage mode, but the two modes of operation lead to different results with regard to the sludge quality and the nitrification performance. BYPASS mode yields a higher SVI in both stages and a lower nitrification performance in comparison to HYBRID mode. This is caused by the negative influence of the primary effluent on the biocoenosis of the second stage. Additionally, the reduced sludge loading of the first stage in this mode results in a higher sludge age which favours the growth of filaments (Microthrix and Nocardia). In HYBRID-mode the higher load of the first stage results in a lower sludge age, fatty components are metabolized and incorporated in the sludge, thus, the growth of filaments is significantly reduced. Additionally, nitrification inhibiting substances are degraded in the first stage, which results in a higher nitrification performance in the second stage.

  3. Doubly active Q switching and mode locking of an all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Díez, Antonio; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous and independent active Q switching and active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated using all-fiber modulation techniques. A magnetostrictive rod attached to the output fiber Bragg grating modulates the Q factor of the Fabry-Perot cavity, whereas active mode locking is achieved by amplitude modulation with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic device. Fully modulated Q-switched mode-locked trains of optical pulses were obtained for a wide range of pump powers and repetition rates. For a Q-switched repetition rate of 500 Hz and a pump power of 100 mW, the laser generates trains of 12-14 mode-locked pulses of about 1 ns each, within an envelope of 550 ns, an overall energy of 0.65 microJ, and a peak power higher than 250 W for the central pulses of the train.

  4. The influence of thoron on instruments measuring radon activity concentration.

    PubMed

    Michielsen, N; Bondiguel, S

    2015-11-01

    Thoron, the isotope 220 of radon, is a radionuclide whose concentration may influence the measurement of the activity concentration of (222)Rn in the air. If in the case of continuous and active sampling measuring instruments, using a pump for example, the influence of thoron on radon measurement is obvious and is taken into account in the apparatus, it is often assumed that in the case of a passive sampling, by diffusion through a filter for example, this thoron influence is negligible. This is due to the very short radioactive half-life of thoron, 55.6 s (3.82 d for (222)Rn), and the assumption that the diffusion time of thoron in the detection chamber is long enough beside that of the thoron half-life. The objective of this study is to check whether this assumption is true or not for different kinds of commercial electronic apparatus used to measure radon activity concentration from soil to dwellings. First of all, the devices were calibrated in activity concentration of radon, and then they were exposed to a controlled thoron atmosphere. The experiments concerning the thoron aimed to investigate the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode of the apparatus. Results of these experiments show that all devices have a very quick answer to thoron atmosphere, even though the sensitivities vary from one instrument to another. Results clearly show that this influence on radon measurement due to the thoron is observed also after the exposition because of the decay of (212)Pb and its progenies. In conclusion, the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode depends strongly on the type of instruments. The results of the present investigation show that for some apparatus, the influence of thoron cannot be disregarded especially when measuring radon in soil.

  5. Mode S and ADS-B as a Source of Clear-Air Turbulence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeć, Jacek; Kwiatkowski, Kamil; de Haan, Siebren; Malinowski, Szymon

    2016-04-01

    Clear-Air Turbulence (CAT) beside being the most common cause for commercial aircraft incidents in the cruise phase is a complex physical phenomenon. CAT is an effect of various underlying physical mechanisms such as different kinds of hydrodynamic instabilities or large scale forcing. In order to properly understand and correctly forecast it one needs a significant amount of observation data. Up to date the best available observations are the in-situ EDR (from eddy dissipation rate - a measure of turbulence intensity). Those observations are reported every ~1 min of flight (roughly every 15 km). Yet their availability is limited by the willingness of the airlines to cooperate in adjusting on-board software. However there is a class of data that can be accessed more freely. In this communication we present and discuss a feasibility analysis of the three methods of processing Mode S/ADS-B messages into viable turbulence measurements. The Mode S/ADS-B messages are unrestricted navigational data broadcast by most of the commercial aircraft. The unique characteristic of this data is a very high temporal resolution. This allows to employ processing which results in obtaining turbulence information characterized by spatial resolution comparable with the best available data sources. Moreover due to using Mode-S/ASS-B data, the number of aircraft that are providing observations increases significantly. The methods are either using simple positioning information available in the ADS-B or high-resolution wind information from the Mode S. The paper is largely based on the results of the methods application to the data originating from DELICAT flight campaign that took place in 2013. The flight campaign was conducted using NLR operated Cessna Citation II. The reference Mode-S/ADS-B data partly overlapping with the research flights were supplied by the KNMI. Analysis shows very significant potential of the Mode-S wind based methods. J. M. Kopeć, K. Kwiatkowski, S. de Haan, and

  6. X-ray microfabrication and measurement of a terahertz mode converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. H.; Shew, B. Y.; Wu, C. Y.; Chen, N. C.

    2010-05-01

    Mode converters are critical for frequency-tunable terahertz gyrotrons. This study reports the development of a broadband TE02 mode converter centered at 0.2 THz. An octafeed sidewall coupling structure was employed and the mode purity was analyzed. The converter was built using the technique of x-ray microfabrication. The x rays irradiated on the SU-8 resist and generated a template of very high thickness of 1.295 mm. Pulse electroplating technique was used to deposit copper on the structure along the template. The parts then went through precise machining and the residual resist was removed via high-flux radical etching. A computer-aided diagnostic system was introduced to measure the performance of the converter. Results suggest that the frequency response of resistivity should be taken into consideration for the devices in terahertz region.

  7. Common mode noise cancellation for electrically non-contact ECG measurement system on a chair.

    PubMed

    Keun Kim, Ko; Kyu Lim, Yong; Suk Park, Kwang

    2005-01-01

    Electrically non-contact ECG measurement system on a chair can be applied to a number of various fields for continuous health monitoring in daily life. However, the body is floated electrically for this system due to the capacitive electrodes and the floated body is very sensitive to the external noises or motion artifacts which affect the measurement system as the common mode noise. In this paper, the Driven-Seat-Ground circuit similar to the Driven-Right-Leg circuit is proposed to reduce the common mode noise. The analysis of this equivalent circuit is performed and the output signal waveforms are compared between with Driven-Seat-Ground and with capacitive ground. As the results, the Driven-Seat-Ground circuit improves significantly the properties of the fully capacitive ECG measurement system as the negative feedback.

  8. Active control of Type-I Edge-Localized Modes on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.; Koslowski, R.; Thomas, P.; Nardon, E.; Jachmich, S.; Baranov, Y.; Beurskens, M.; Bigi, M.; Crombe, K.; de la Luna, E.; De Vries, P.; Eich, T.; Esser, H. G.; Fundamenski, W.; Hawkes, N. C.; Jakubowski, M.; Kiptily, V.; Moreira, L.; Rachlew, Elisabeth G; Schmitz, O.; Zimmermann, O.

    2007-11-01

    The operational domain for active control of type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) with an n = 1 external magnetic perturbation field induced by the ex-vessel error field correction coils on JET has been developed towards more ITER-relevant regimes with high plasma triangularity, up to 0.45, high normalized beta, up to 3.0, plasma current up to 2.0 MA and q95 varied between 3.0 and 4.8. The results of ELM mitigation in high triangularity plasmas show that the frequency of type-I ELMs increased by a factor of 4 during the application of the n = 1 fields, while the energy loss per ELM, W/W, decreased from 6% to below the noise level of the diamagnetic measurement (<2%). No reduction of confinement quality (H98Y) during the ELM mitigation phase has been observed. The minimum n = 1 perturbation field amplitude above which the ELMs were mitigated increased with a lower q95 but always remained below the n = 1 locked mode threshold. The first results of ELM mitigation with n = 2 magnetic perturbations on JET demonstrate that the frequency of ELMs increased from 10 to 35 Hz and a wide operational window of q95 from 4.5 to 3.1 has been found.

  9. Design and control of a prosthetic leg for above-knee amputees operated in semi-active and active modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Yoon, Gun-Ha; Kang, Je-Won; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new prosthesis operated in two different modes; the semi-active and active modes. The semi-active mode is achieved from a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper, while the active mode is obtained from an electronically commutated (EC) motor. The knee joint part of the above knee prosthesis is equipped with the MR damper and EC motor. The MR damper generates reaction force by controlling the field-dependent yield stress of the MR fluid, while the EC motor actively controls the knee joint angle during gait cycle. In this work, the MR damper is designed as a two-end type flow mode mechanism without air chamber for compact size. On other hand, in order to predict desired knee joint angle to be controlled by EC motor, a polynomial prediction function using a statistical method is used. A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller integrated with the computed torque method is then designed and applied to both MR damper and EC motor to control the knee joint angle. It is demonstrated that the desired knee joint angle is well achieved in different walking velocities on the ground ground.

  10. Distance measurement using frequency scanning interferometry with mode-hoped laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M.; Sobee, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Terra, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, frequency scanning interferometry is implemented to measure distances up to 5 m absolutely. The setup consists of a Michelson interferometer, an external cavity tunable diode laser, and an ultra-low expansion (ULE) Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity to measure the frequency scanning range. The distance is measured by acquiring simultaneously the interference fringes from, the Michelson and the FP interferometers, while scanning the laser frequency. An online fringe processing technique is developed to calculate the distance from the fringe ratio while removing the parts result from the laser mode-hops without significantly affecting the measurement accuracy. This fringe processing method enables accurate distance measurements up to 5 m with measurements repeatability ±3.9×10-6 L. An accurate translation stage is used to find the FP cavity free-spectral-range and therefore allow accurate measurement. Finally, the setup is applied for the short distance calibration of a laser distance meter (LDM).

  11. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Revin, D G; Hemingway, M; Wang, Y; Cockburn, J W; Belyanin, A

    2016-05-05

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents.

  12. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    PubMed Central

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents. PMID:27147409

  13. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-05-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents.

  14. Measurements of the ponderomotive force including sideband mode coupling effects and damping rates

    SciTech Connect

    Meassick, S.; Intrator, T.; Hershkowitz, N.; Browning, J.; Majeski, R.

    1989-05-01

    Measurements of the interactions of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) with flute interchange modes are presented. Interactions between the applied l = 1 radio frequency (rf) wave and an m = -1 flute mode give rise to sidebands above and below the rf frequency with mode numbers of l = 0 and l = +2, respectively. The contribution of the sideband terms to stability are shown to cancel 40% of the direct ponderomotive contribution. This is less than the 90% predicted by theory (Phys. Fluids 30, 148 (1987)) for an applied l = +1 rf wave above the ion cyclotron frequency with a large separation between the plasma and the vacuum vessel. Measurements of the linear growth and damping rate of the flute instability in the presence of rf are in good agreement with that calculated by considering only the curvature-driven instability and the ponderomotive force. The growth rate of the magnetohydrodynamic mode is consistent with the primary force acting on the plasma being the curvature force. This method allows a determination of the net stabilizing force on the plasma.

  15. Measurements of frequency fluctuations in aluminum nitride contour-mode resonators.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nicholas; Piazza, Gianluca

    2014-06-01

    As part of the current drive to engineer miniaturized monolithic high-performance microelectromechanical-enabled oscillators, there is a need for further study of frequency fluctuations in microelectromechanical resonators. To this end, we present the measurement of frequency fluctuations for 128 aluminum nitride contour-mode resonators. The measurements show that fluctuations are sufficiently large to play an important role in oscillator performance. These results were obtained for the first time from vector network analyzer measurements and are accompanied by an analysis of the experimental setup.

  16. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Libo; Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Tongdong; Ding, Jianjun; Liu, Xixiang; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-01-01

    Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m3 to 900 kg/m3 and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail. PMID:27275823

  17. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Libo; Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Tongdong; Ding, Jianjun; Liu, Xixiang; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-01-01

    Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m³ to 900 kg/m³ and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail. PMID:27275823

  18. A MEMS Resonant Sensor to Measure Fluid Density and Viscosity under Flexural and Torsional Vibrating Modes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Libo; Hu, Yingjie; Wang, Tongdong; Ding, Jianjun; Liu, Xixiang; Zhao, Yulong; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-01-01

    Methods to calculate fluid density and viscosity using a micro-cantilever and based on the resonance principle were put forward. Their measuring mechanisms were analyzed and the theoretical equations to calculate the density and viscosity were deduced. The fluid-solid coupling simulations were completed for the micro-cantilevers with different shapes. The sensing chips with micro-cantilevers were designed based on the simulation results and fabricated using the micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Finally, the MEMS resonant sensor was packaged with the sensing chip to measure the densities and viscosities of eight different fluids under the flexural and torsional vibrating modes separately. The relative errors of the measured densities from 600 kg/m³ to 900 kg/m³ and viscosities from 200 μPa·s to 1000 μPa·s were calculated and analyzed with different microcantilevers under various vibrating modes. The experimental results showed that the effects of the shape and vibrating mode of micro-cantilever on the measurement accuracies of fluid density and viscosity were analyzed in detail.

  19. Resting spontaneous activity in the default mode network predicts performance decline during prolonged attention workload.

    PubMed

    Gui, Danyang; Xu, Sihua; Zhu, Senhua; Fang, Zhuo; Spaeth, Andrea M; Xin, Yuanyuan; Feng, Tingyong; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-10-15

    After continuous and prolonged cognitive workload, people typically show reduced behavioral performance and increased feelings of fatigue, which are known as "time-on-task (TOT) effects". Although TOT effects are pervasive in modern life, their underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we induced TOT effects by administering a 20-min continuous psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) to a group of 16 healthy adults and used resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine spontaneous brain activity changes associated with fatigue and performance. Behaviorally, subjects displayed robust TOT effects, as reflected by increasingly slower reaction times as the test progressed and higher self-reported mental fatigue ratings after the 20-min PVT. Compared to pre-test measurements, subjects exhibited reduced amplitudes of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) in the default mode network (DMN) and increased ALFF in the thalamus after the test. Subjects also exhibited reduced anti-correlations between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and right middle prefrontal cortex after the test. Moreover, pre-test resting ALFF in the PCC and medial prefrontal cortex (MePFC) predicted subjects' subsequent performance decline; individuals with higher ALFF in these regions exhibited more stable reaction times throughout the 20-min PVT. These results support the important role of both task-positive and task-negative networks in mediating TOT effects and suggest that spontaneous activity measured by resting-state BOLD fMRI may be a marker of mental fatigue.

  20. Youth Physical Activity Resource Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslow, Andra L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether use of physical activity resources (e.g., parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods: One hundred eleven adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported use of a physical activity resource (none /1 resources). The main…

  1. Actively mode-locked fiber ring laser by intermodal acousto-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Bello-Jiménez, M; Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Sáez-Rodríguez, D; Diez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2010-11-15

    We report an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser. A simple and low-insertion-loss acousto-optic modulator driven by standing flexural waves, which couples core-to-cladding modes in a standard single-mode optical fiber, is used as an active mechanism for mode locking. Among the remarkable features of the modulator, we mention its high modulation depth (72%), broad bandwidth (187 GHz), easy tunability in the optical wavelength, and low insertion losses (0.7 dB). The narrowest optical pulses obtained were of 95 ps time width, 21 mW peak power, repetition rate of 4.758 MHz, and 110 mW of pump power.

  2. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes: Insecticidal activity, mammalian toxicity, and mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Horsham, M.A.; Palmer, C.J.; Cole, L.M.; Casida, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    4-Ethynyl- and 4-(prop-1-ynyl)phenylsilatranes (N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub 3}SiR, R = C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CH or C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-C{triple bond}CCH{sub 3}) are highly toxic to houseflies (pretreated with piperonyl butoxide) and milkweed bugs (topical LD{sub 50}s 3-14 {mu}g/g) and to mice (intraperitoneal LD{sub 50}s 0.4-0.9 mg/kg), and they are moderately potent inhibitors of the ({sup 35}S)-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate or TBPS binding site (GABA-gated chloride channel) of mouse brain membranes. Scatchard analysis indicates noncompetitive interaction of 4-ethynylphenylsilatrane with the TBPS binding site. Phenylsilatrane analogues with 4-substituents of H, CH{sub 3}, Cl, Br, and C{triple bond}CSi(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} are highly toxic to mice but have little or no activity in the insect and receptor assays. Radioligand binding studies with (4-{sup 3}H)phenylsilatrane failed to reveal a specific binding site in mouse brain. Silatranes with R = H, CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}Cl, CH{double bond}CH{sub 2}, OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3} are of little or no activity in the insect and mouse toxicity and TBPS binding site assays as are the trithia and monocyclic analogues of phenylsilatrane. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes are new probes to examine the GABA receptor-ionophore complex of insects and mammals.

  3. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode.

    PubMed

    Poehlmann, Flavio R; Cappelli, Mark A; Rieker, Gregory B

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  4. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    PubMed Central

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively. PMID:21267082

  5. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  6. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode.

    PubMed

    Poehlmann, Flavio R; Cappelli, Mark A; Rieker, Gregory B

    2010-12-01

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 μF, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively. PMID:21267082

  7. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-09-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10-8 for a distance of 50 m.

  8. Current distribution measurements inside an electromagnetic plasma gun operated in a gas-puff mode

    SciTech Connect

    Poehlmann, Flavio R.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2010-12-15

    Measurements are presented of the time-dependent current distribution inside a coaxial electromagnetic plasma gun. The measurements are carried out using an array of six axially distributed dual-Rogowski coils in a balanced circuit configuration. The radial current distributions indicate that operation in the gas-puff mode, i.e., the mode in which the electrode voltage is applied before injection of the gas, results in a stationary ionization front consistent with the presence of a plasma deflagration. The effects of varying the bank capacitance, transmission line inductance, and applied electrode voltage were studied over the range from 14 to 112 {mu}F, 50 to 200 nH, and 1 to 3 kV, respectively.

  9. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10−8 for a distance of 50 m. PMID:26419282

  10. Measuring mode indices of a partially coherent vortex beam with Hanbury Brown and Twiss type experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Wang, Feiran; Chen, Dongxu; Wang, Yunlong; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Pei; Li, Fuli

    2016-02-01

    It is known that the cross-correlation function (CCF) of a partially coherent vortex (PCV) beam shows a robust link with the radial and azimuthal mode indices. However, the previous proposals are difficult to measure the CCF in practical systems, especially in the case of astronomical objects. In this letter, we demonstrate experimentally that the Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect can be used to measure the mode indices of the original vortex beam and investigate the relationship between the spatial coherent width and the characterization of CCF of the PCV beam. The technique we exploit is quite efficient and robust, and it may be useful in the field of free space communication and astronomy which are related to the photon's orbital angular momentum.

  11. Measurement of mode-locked laser timing jitter by use of phase-encoded optical sampling.

    PubMed

    Juodawlkis, P W; Twichell, J C; Wasserman, J L; Betts, G E; Williamson, R C

    2001-03-01

    The phase-noise characteristics of a harmonically mode-locked fiber laser are investigated with a new measurement technique called phase-encoded optical sampling. A polarization-maintaining ring laser is mode locked by use of the short-pulse electrical output of a resonant-tunneling diode oscillator, enabling it to produce 30-ps pulses at a 208-MHz repetition rate. The interferometric phase-encoded sampling technique provides 60-dB suppression of amplitude-jitter noise and allows supermode phase noise to be observed and quantified. The white-noise pulse-to-pulse timing jitter and the rms supermode timing jitter of the laser are measured to be less than 50 and 70 fs, respectively. PMID:18040304

  12. Experimental measurements of the m = 1 unstable diocotron mode in hollow electron columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W.; Mitchell, T. B.

    2006-10-18

    Trapped electron columns with hollow density profiles exhibit an exponential m = 1 diocotron instability which can not be accounted for in standard 2D fluid theory. End effects are believed responsible for the discrepancy. We present measurements of the instability for initial conditions where the hollowness and the end curvature were systematically varied. Mode eigenfunctions, eigenfrequencies and growth rate scalings are compared with existing theory and experiments. The agreement is fairly good although a few discrepancies remain.

  13. LLNL Measurements of Graded-Index Multi-Mode Fiber (ITF 47)

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.T.

    2000-05-01

    The Russian Federal Nuclear Center-All Russian Research Institute of Technical Physics, located in the Nuclear City of Snezhinsk, east of the Ural mountains and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories have been investigating the possibility of establishing a commercial optical fiber manufacturing facility. These discussions began in the summer of 1998. At that time three samples (single mode and multi-mode) of optical fiber were left at the Sandia National Laboratory. Sandia measured two of the segments and sent them to LLNL. The optical loss at 1550 nm and 1300 nm were higher than commercially available fiber. The measurements were complicated because the geometry of the fibers also did not meet specification. Since the core was not adequately centered coupling of optical energy into the fiber being tested varied widely depending on which end of the fiber was used for insertion. The results of these measurements were summarized in the informal report dated June 11, 1999, which was hand carried by Dr. Paul Herman during his July 1999 visit. During the July visit a 1.2-km long section of graded-index multimode fiber, ITF 47, was given to Herman. We had requested samples longer than the earlier ones (which were {approx}0.1 km long) in order that a cutback method could be used for the transmission measurements. The optical loss using the cutback technique and the transmission spectral measurements in the 600-1700 mn region are reported. Also physical measurements are reported of the fiber's diameter, concentricity, ellipticity and tensile strength (proof test). The test results are summarized in Table 1, ''Comparative Data for Multi-mode Optical Fiber.'' The table includes the values from the Industrial specification TIA/EIA 402AAAB, the commercial specification for Corning's 50/125 CPC6, the values measured on ITF-47 and provided by C-70, and LLNL's values for ITF-47 as well as the multimode values from the June 1999 samples.

  14. Measurements and Computations of Second-Mode Instability Waves in Three Hypersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berridge, Dennis C.; Casper, Katya M.; Rufer, Shann J.; Alba, Christopher R.; Lewis, Daniel R.; Beresh, Steven J.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency pressure-fluctuation measurements were made in AEDC Tunnel 9 at Mach 10 and the NASA Langley 15-Inch Mach 6 and 31-Inch Mach 10 tunnels. Measurements were made on a 7deg-half-angle cone model. Pitot measurements of freestream pressure fluctuations were also made in Tunnel 9 and the Langley Mach-6 tunnel. For the first time, second-mode waves were measured in all of these tunnels, using 1-MHz-response pressure sensors. In Tunnel 9, second-mode waves could be seen in power spectra computed from records as short as 80 micro-s. The second-mode wave amplitudes were observed to saturate and then begin to decrease in the Langley tunnels, indicating wave breakdown. Breakdown was estimated to occur near N approx. equals 5 in the Langley Mach-10 tunnel. The unit-Reynolds-number variations in the data from Tunnel 9 were too large to see the same processes. In Tunnel 9, the measured transition locations were found to be at N = 4.5 using thermocouples, and N = 5.3 using 50-kHz-response pressure sensors. What appears to be a very long transitional region was observed at a unit Reynolds number of 13.5 million per meter in Tunnel 9. These results were consistent with the high-frequency pressure fluctuation measurements. High-frequency pressure fluctuation measurements indicated that transition did occur in the Langley Mach-6 tunnel, but the location of transition was not precisely determined. Unit Reynolds numbers in the Langley Mach-10 tunnel were too low to observe transition. More analysis of this data set is expected in the future.

  15. Influence of Activity Mode on Feeling States of High School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, James C.; Pellet, Tracey L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in positive well-being, psychological distress, fatigue, and enjoyment vary as a function of physical activity mode. Fifty-five senior high school students participated in one of four fitness activities including two defined as traditional (running and step-aerobics) and two defined as…

  16. Dual-Pump CARS Measurements in the University of Virginia's Dual-Mode Scramjet: Configuration "C"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cantu, Luca; Gallo, Emanuela; Danehy, Paul M.; Rockwell, Robert; Goyne, Christopher; McDaniel, James

    2013-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted at the University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility in configuration C of the dual-mode scramjet. This is a continuation of previously published works on configuration A. The scramjet is hydrogen fueled and operated at two equivalence ratios, one representative of the scram mode and the other of the ram mode. Dual-pump CARS was used to acquire the mole fractions of the major species as well as the rotational and vibrational temperatures of N2. Developments in methods and uncertainties in fitting CARS spectra for vibrational temperature are discussed. Mean quantities and the standard deviation of the turbulent fluctuations at multiple planes in the flow path are presented. In the scram case the combustion of fuel is completed before the end of the measurement domain, while for the ram case the measurement domain extends into the region where the flow is accelerating and combustion is almost completed. Higher vibrational than rotational temperature is observed in those parts of the hot combustion plume where there is substantial H2 (and hence chemical reaction) present.

  17. Inverse method predicting spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field measurements.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Serge

    2005-02-01

    In the study the inverse problem of deducing the modal structure of the acoustic field generated by a ducted turbofan is addressed using conventional farfield directivity measurements. The final objective is to make input data available for predicting noise radiation in other configurations that would not have been tested. The present paper is devoted to the analytical part of that study. The proposed method is based on the equations governing ducted sound propagation and free-field radiation. It leads to fast computations checked on Rolls-Royce tests made in the framework of previous European projects. Results seem to be reliable although the system of equations to be solved is generally underdetermined (more propagating modes than acoustic measurements). A limited number of modes are thus selected according to any a priori knowledge of the sources. A first guess of the source amplitudes is obtained by adjusting the calculated maximum of radiation of each mode to the measured sound pressure level at the same angle. A least squares fitting gives the final solution. A simple correction can be made to take account of the mean flow velocity inside the nacelle which shifts the directivity patterns. It consists of modifying the actual frequency to keep the cut-off ratios unchanged. PMID:15759694

  18. Inverse method predicting spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, Serge

    2005-02-01

    In the study the inverse problem of deducing the modal structure of the acoustic field generated by a ducted turbofan is addressed using conventional farfield directivity measurements. The final objective is to make input data available for predicting noise radiation in other configurations that would not have been tested. The present paper is devoted to the analytical part of that study. The proposed method is based on the equations governing ducted sound propagation and free-field radiation. It leads to fast computations checked on Rolls-Royce tests made in the framework of previous European projects. Results seem to be reliable although the system of equations to be solved is generally underdetermined (more propagating modes than acoustic measurements). A limited number of modes are thus selected according to any a priori knowledge of the sources. A first guess of the source amplitudes is obtained by adjusting the calculated maximum of radiation of each mode to the measured sound pressure level at the same angle. A least squares fitting gives the final solution. A simple correction can be made to take account of the mean flow velocity inside the nacelle which shifts the directivity patterns. It consists of modifying the actual frequency to keep the cut-off ratios unchanged. .

  19. Study of Optical Mode Scrambling of Fiber Optics for High Precision Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassette, Anthony; Ge, Jian; Jeram, Sarik; Klanot, Khaya; Ma, Bo; Varosi, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Optical Fibers have been used throughout Astronomy for spectroscopy with spectrographs located some distance away from the telescope. This fiber-fed design has greatly increased precision for radial velocity (RV) measurements. However, due to the incomplete fiber illumination mode scrambling in the radial direction, high resolution spectrographs with regular circular fibers have suffered RV uncertainties on the order of a few to tens of m/s with stellar observations, which largely limited their sensitivity in detecting and characterizing low mass planets around stars. At the University of Florida, we studied mode scrambling gain of a few different optical devices, such as three-lens optical double scramblers, octagonal fibers and low numerical aperture fibers with a goal to find an optimal mode scrambling solution for the TOU optical very high resolution spectrograph (R=100,000, 0.38-0.9 microns) and FIRST near infrared high resolution spectrograph (R=60,000, 0.9-1.8 microns) for the on-going Dharma Planet Survey. This presentation will report our lab measurement results and also stellar RV measurements at the observatories.

  20. Quantifying radio-mode feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabala, Stanislav

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy formation models routinely invoke feedback from radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei to explain the observed masses and red colours of the most massive galaxies since z~1. Whether or not the observed AGN population can provide the required feedback, however, is an open question.We present a new dynamical model that relates AGN physical parameters to the observed properties of radio AGN. This model combines a traditional approach to modeling radio AGN with a semi-analytic description of AGN environments. The model reproduces a number of key features of the observed radio AGN populations, and we determine the energetics (specifically, jet kinetic powers and AGN lifetimes) of the observed local (z<0.1) radio AGN population, as a function of host galaxy properties.We find a broad distribution of jet powers that is largely independent of host galaxy mass, consistent with the idea that these radio AGN are fed by gas cooling from hot haloes in near heating-cooling equilibrium. On the other hand, the duration of the AGN phase appears strongly mass-dependent: massive galaxies host AGN that are longer-lived, and can therefore impart feedback for longer and on larger spatial scales. Finally, we compare the cumulative AGN energy output from ubiquitous weak AGN with their rare powerful counterparts, and find that radio AGN of all luminosities deliver a comparable amount of energy to their surroundings.I will outline how this approach can provide useful insights into AGN triggering and feedback mechanisms, as well as be used to correct for selection effects in large radio surveys. I will also outline the challenges (and solutions) to performing an AGN energetics analysis at high redshift.

  1. Measurement of magnetic turbulence structure and nonlinear mode coupling of tearing fluctuations in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch edge

    SciTech Connect

    Assadi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of current-driven modes are studied in the MST reversed field pinch. Measured low frequency (f < 35 kHz) magnetic fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 35 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized and externally resonant. Discrete dynamo events, ``sawtooth oscillations,`` have been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas. This phenomenon causes the plasma to become unstable to m = 1 tearing modes. The modes that may be important in different phases of these oscillations are identified. These results then assist in nonlinear studies and also help to interpret the spectral broadening of the measured data during a discrete dynamo event. Three-wave nonlinear coupling of spectral Fourier modes is measured in the MST by applying bispectral analysis to magnetic fluctuations measured at the plasma edge at 64 toroidal locations and 16 poloidal locations, permitting observation of coupling over 8 poloidal and 32 toroidal modes. Comparison to bispectra predicted by resistive MHD computation indicates reasonably good agreement. However, during the crash phase of the sawtooth oscillation the nonlinear coupling is strongly enhanced, concomitant with a broadened k-spectrum. During the sawtooth formation the plasma is undergoing a pure diffusive process. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. High frequency activity prior to a sawtooth crash is caused by nonlinear frequency (small-scale) mode coupling. Growth rate and coupling coefficients of toroidal mode spectra are calculated by statistical modeling. Temporal evolution of edge toroidal mode spectra has been predicted by transfer function analysis. The driving sources of electrostatic fields are different than for the magnetic fields. The characteristics of tearing modes can be altered by external field errors and addition of impurities to the plasma.

  2. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  3. Multiple dynamo modes as a mechanism for long-term solar activity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, M. J.; Käpylä, P. J.; Olspert, N.; Brandenburg, A.; Warnecke, J.; Karak, B. B.; Pelt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Solar magnetic activity shows both smooth secular changes, such as the modern Grand Maximum, and quite abrupt drops that are denoted as grand minima, such as the Maunder Minimum. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of convection-driven dynamos offer one way of examining the mechanisms behind these events. Aims: In this work, we analyze a solution of a solar-like DNS that was evolved for roughly 80 magnetic cycles of 4.9 years and where epochs of irregular behavior are detected. The emphasis of our analysis is to find physical causes for such behavior. Methods: The DNS employed is a semi-global (wedge-shaped) magnetoconvection model. For the data analysis tasks we use Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition and phase dispersion methods, as they are well suited for analyzing cyclic (non-periodic) signals. Results: A special property of the DNS is the existence of multiple dynamo modes at different depths and latitudes. The dominant mode is solar-like (equatorward migration at low latitudes and poleward at high latitudes). This mode is accompanied by a higher frequency mode near the surface and at low latitudes, showing poleward migration, and a low-frequency mode at the bottom of the convection zone. The low-frequency mode is almost purely antisymmetric with respect to the equator, while the dominant mode has strongly fluctuating mixed parity. The overall behavior of the dynamo solution is extremely complex, exhibiting variable cycle lengths, epochs of disturbed and even ceased surface activity, and strong short-term hemispherical asymmetries. Surprisingly, the most prominent suppressed surface activity epoch is actually a global magnetic energy maximum; during this epoch the bottom toroidal magnetic field obtains a maximum, demonstrating that the interpretation of grand minima-type events is non-trivial. The hemispherical asymmetries are seen only in the magnetic field, while the velocity field exhibits considerably weaker asymmetry. Conclusions: We interpret

  4. The Properties of Large Amplitude Whistler Mode Waves in the Magnetosphere: Propagation and Relationship with Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Goetz, K.; Breneman, A.; Kersten, K.

    2011-01-01

    Wepresent resultsof a studyof the characteristicsof very large amplitude whistler mode waves inside the terrestrial magnetosphere at radial distances of less than 15 RE using waveform capture data from the Wind spacecraft. We observed 247 whistler mode waves with at least one electric field component (105/247 had !80 mV/m peak!to!peak amplitudes) and 66 whistler mode waves with at least one search coil magnetic field component (38/66 had !0.8 nT peak!to!peak amplitudes). Wave vectors determined from events with three magnetic field components indicate that 30/46 propagate within 20 of the ambient magnetic field, though some are more oblique (up to "50 ). No relationship was observed between wave normal angle and GSM latitude. 162/247 of the large amplitude whistler mode waves were observed during magnetically active periods (AE > 200 nT). 217 out of 247 total whistler mode waves examined were observed inside the radiation belts. We present a waveform capture with the largest whistler wave magnetic field amplitude (^8 nT peak!to!peak) ever reported in the radiation belts. The estimated Poynting flux magnitude associated with this wave is ^300 mW/m2, roughly four orders of magnitude above estimates from previous satellite measurements. Such large Poynting flux values are consistent with rapid energization of electrons.

  5. Heterodyne Doppler velocity measurement of moving targets by mode-locked pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Ren, Deming; Zhao, Weijiang; Qu, Yanchen; Qian, Liming; Chen, Zhenlei

    2012-01-16

    In this study, heterodyne detection is adopted to measure the velocity of a target simulated by a rapidly rotating plate by using a mode-locked pulse laser as the resource. The coherent beat frequency of the signal light reflected by target and local oscillation light occurred on the surface of the detector. Then the waveform of beat frequency was processed by filtering to obtain the Doppler frequency shift of the signal light induced by target. With this frequency shift, the velocity of target could be obtained by calculation. Results indicate that the measurement has a high precision. The error on average is within 0.4 m/s. PMID:22274421

  6. Heterodyne Doppler velocity measurement of moving targets by mode-locked pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Ren, Deming; Zhao, Weijiang; Qu, Yanchen; Qian, Liming; Chen, Zhenlei

    2012-01-16

    In this study, heterodyne detection is adopted to measure the velocity of a target simulated by a rapidly rotating plate by using a mode-locked pulse laser as the resource. The coherent beat frequency of the signal light reflected by target and local oscillation light occurred on the surface of the detector. Then the waveform of beat frequency was processed by filtering to obtain the Doppler frequency shift of the signal light induced by target. With this frequency shift, the velocity of target could be obtained by calculation. Results indicate that the measurement has a high precision. The error on average is within 0.4 m/s.

  7. Measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime using the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-07-01

    We present a measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime in the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue using the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. From a sample of about of 360 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV, we reconstruct J/Psie+ pairs with invariant mass in the kinematically allowed range 4< M(J/Psie) < 6 GeV/c2. A fit to the decay-length distribution of 238 signal events yields a measured Bc+ meson lifetime of 0.463(-0.065)(+0.073)(stat) +/- 0.036(syst) ps.

  8. Measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime using the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-07-01

    We present a measurement of the Bc+ meson lifetime in the decay mode Bc+ --> J/Psie+nue using the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. From a sample of about of 360 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV, we reconstruct J/Psie+ pairs with invariant mass in the kinematically allowed range 4< M(J/Psie) < 6 GeV/c2. A fit to the decay-length distribution of 238 signal events yields a measured Bc+ meson lifetime of 0.463(-0.065)(+0.073)(stat) +/- 0.036(syst) ps. PMID:16907366

  9. Measuring Homework Completion in Behavioral Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Andrew M.; Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Kalibatseva, Zornitsa; Miller, Ivan W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an observer-based coding system for the characterization and completion of homework assignments during Behavioral Activation (BA). Existing measures of homework completion are generally unsophisticated, and there is no current measure of homework completion designed to capture the particularities…

  10. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  11. Optical impedance spectroscopy with single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Mendes, Sergio B

    2014-02-01

    An optical impedance spectroscopy (OIS) technique based on a single-mode electro-active-integrated optical waveguide (EA-IOW) was developed to investigate electron-transfer processes of redox adsorbates. A highly sensitive single-mode EA-IOW device was used to optically follow the time-dependent faradaic current originated from a submonolayer of cytochrome c undergoing redox exchanges driven by a harmonic modulation of the electric potential at several dc bias potentials and at several frequencies. To properly retrieve the faradaic current density from the ac-modulated optical signal, we introduce here a mathematical formalism that (i) accounts for intrinsic changes that invariably occur in the optical baseline of the EA-IOW device during potential modulation and (ii) provides accurate results for the electro-chemical parameters. We are able to optically reconstruct the faradaic current density profile against the dc bias potential in the working electrode, identify the formal potential, and determine the energy-width of the electron-transfer process. In addition, by combining the optically reconstructed faradaic signal with simple electrical measurements of impedance across the whole electrochemical cell and the capacitance of the electric double-layer, we are able to determine the time-constant connected to the redox reaction of the adsorbed protein assembly. For cytochrome c directly immobilized onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, we measured a reaction rate constant of 26.5 s(-1). Finally, we calculate the charge-transfer resistance and pseudocapacitance associated with the electron-transfer process and show that the frequency dependence of the redox reaction of the protein submonolayer follows as expected the electrical equivalent of an RC-series admittance diagram. Above all, we show here that OIS with single-mode EA-IOW's provide strong analytical signals that can be readily monitored even for small surface-densities of species involved in the redox

  12. Generation of picosecond pulses and frequency combs in actively mode locked external ring cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, Aleksander K.; Belyanin, Alexey; Malara, Pietro; Blanchard, Romain; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Capasso, Federico

    2013-12-02

    We propose a robust and reliable method of active mode locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and develop its theoretical description. Its key element is the use of an external ring cavity, which circumvents fundamental issues undermining the stability of mode locking in quantum cascade lasers. We show that active mode locking can give rise to the generation of picosecond pulses and phase-locked frequency combs containing thousands of the ring cavity modes.

  13. Dual resin cement knoop hardness after different activation modes through dental ceramics.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Thiago Assunção; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Borges, Luis Henrique; Vishal, Jain; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of ceramic compositions on Knoop Hardness Number (KHN) immediately and 24 h after polymerization and the effect of activation modes on the KHN of a resin cement. Ten Panavia F 2.0 resin cement discs were activated either directly using curing light, or chemically without light, or through 1.2-thick ceramic discs. The following ceramics were evaluated: Duceram, Cergogold, IPS Empress, IPS Empress 2, Procera, Cercon, In Ceram Alumina and In Ceram Zirconia. The KHN was obtained immediately and after 24-h testing time. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were performed for statistical analysis (p<0.05). Direct activation showed higher KHN than activation through ceramics and chemical activation for both immediate and 24-h post activation. The KHN for 24-h post activation time was higher than that of the immediate post activation time except for the direct activation mode. The glass and di-silicate based ceramics showed higher KHN than alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics, immediately and after 24-h. The reinforced and opaque ceramics had the lowest KHN. The ceramic composition resulted in light attenuation, lower polymerization and lower KHN, and the 24-h testing time promoted an improvement of KHN except for direct activation mode.

  14. Measurement of nonlinear normal modes using multi-harmonic stepped force appropriation and free decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, David A.; Allen, Matthew S.

    2016-08-01

    Nonlinear Normal Modes (NNMs) offer tremendous insight into the dynamic behavior of a nonlinear system, extending many concepts that are familiar in linear modal analysis. Hence there is interest in developing methods to experimentally and numerically determine a system's NNMs for model updating or simply to characterize its dynamic response. Previous experimental work has shown that a mono-harmonic excitation can be used to isolate a system's dynamic response in the neighborhood of a NNM along the main backbones of a system. This work shows that a multi-harmonic excitation is needed to isolate a NNM when well separated linear modes of a structure couple to produce an internal resonance. It is shown that one can tune the multiple harmonics of the input excitation using a plot of the input force versus the response velocity until the area enclosed by the force-velocity curve is minimized. Once an appropriated NNM is measured, one can increase the force level and retune the frequency to obtain a NNM at a higher amplitude or remove the excitation and measure the structure's decay down a NNM backbone. This work explores both methods using simulations and measurements of a nominally-flat clamped-clamped beam excited at a single point with a magnetic force. Numerical simulations are used to validate the method in a well defined environment and to provide comparison with the experimentally measured NNMs. The experimental results seem to produce a good estimate of two NNMs along their backbone and part of an internal resonance branch. Full-field measurements are then used to further explore the couplings between the underlying linear modes along the identified NNMs.

  15. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  16. Measurement of soft mode damping in SrTiO 3 by FIR surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaičikauskas, V.

    1995-01-01

    The results of investigation of low-frequency modes in SrTiO 3 crystals by FIR surface electromagnetic waves (SEW) are presented. Amplitude and phase spectroscopy methods, including SEW heterodying for the complex SEW refraction index nef measurements at temperatures of 80-300 K were applied. The SEW method appears to be convenient for the soft mode (SM) frequency and damping measurements and advantages against other method are discussed. The possible reasons of disagreement of SEW damping values at v = 84 cm -1 obtained by us and others are discussed. Sharp increase of SEW damping at this frequency when temperature increases was explained by transition of Fano type mode ( v < vTO) to Zenneck-Sommerfeld one ( v > vTO) with sufficiently larger damping. At liquid N temperature SM frequency take the value of 43 cm -1. It sufficiently well agrees with the one obtained by hyper-Raman and IRR methods. YBa 2Cu 3O 7 - x thin films Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric Ba xSr 1 - x TiO 3 and superconducting on SrTiO 3 showed the SEW sensitivity to the phase transitions of films. The maximum of SEW damping in Ba xSr 1 - xTiO 3 at the phase transition temperature was obtained. The plasma frequency vp as well as electron collisional frequency vτ in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 - x was obtained ( vp = 10 4cm -1, vt = 3000 cm -1 at 300 K).

  17. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A.

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  18. Measurements of fast-ion transport by mode-particle resonances on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscatello, C. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Harvey, R. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pace, D. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in tokamak plasmas manifest in a variety of ways, characterized by different scale lengths and mode frequencies. MHD activity can cause significant degradation of plasma performance due to transport of particles, energy and current. Among the many different types of MHD, arguably fishbones, sawteeth and Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) are observed to cause the largest fluxes of superthermal ions. DIII-D's expansive suite of diagnostics makes it possible to rigorously characterize these instabilities and study their interaction with fast ions. This review paper first presents an overview of the recent additions to DIII-D's collection of fast-ion diagnostics. The extended diagnostic capabilities are employed in a series of experiments to investigate fast-ion dynamics in the presence of fishbones, sawteeth and AEs. Results from these seemingly unrelated studies are highlighted, and they reveal that mode-particle resonances play the central role in the observed deterioration of fast-ion confinement.

  19. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants ( Kb) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH 2 (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  20. Image properties of list mode likelihood reconstruction for a rectangular positron emission mammography with DOI measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Klein, Gregory J.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2000-10-01

    A positron emission mammography scanner is under development at our Laboratory. The tomograph has a rectangular geometry consisting of four banks of detector modules. For each detector, the system can measure the depth of interaction information inside the crystal. The rectangular geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling and spatially variant sensitivity that are different from conventional PET systems. Therefore, it is of importance to study the image properties of the reconstructions. We adapted the theoretical analysis that we had developed for conventional PET systems to the list mode likelihood reconstruction for this tomograph. The local impulse response and covariance of the reconstruction can be easily computed using FFT. These theoretical results are also used with computer observer models to compute the signal-to-noise ratio for lesion detection. The analysis reveals the spatially variant resolution and noise properties of the list mode likelihood reconstruction. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with Monte Carlo results.

  1. Versatile chromatic dispersion measurement of a single mode fiber using spectral white light interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Dug Young

    2006-11-27

    We present a versatile and accurate chromatic dispersion measurement method for single mode optical fibers over a wide spectral range (200 nm) using a spectral domain white light interferometer. This technique is based on spectral interferometry with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer setup and a broad band light source. It takes less than a second to obtain a spectral interferogram for a few tens of centimeter length fiber sample. We have demonstrated that the relative group velocity, the chromatic dispersion and the dispersion slope of a sample fiber can be obtained very accurately regardless of the zero-dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of a sample after frequency dependent optical phase was directly retrieved from a spectral interferogram. The measured results with our proposed method were compared with those obtained with a conventional time-domain dispersion measurement method. A good agreement between those results indicates that our proposed method can measure the chromatic dispersion of a short length optical fiber with very high accuracy.

  2. A new resonant based measurement method for squeeze mode yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Shah, Kruti; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-10-01

    A new approach to measure the field-dependent yield stress of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in squeeze mode using the resonance concept is proposed. The measurement system is designed using the piezolaminated cantilever beam coupled with an electromagnetic coil based MR fluid squeezing setup. The cantilever beam is maintained at resonance using simple closed-loop electronics. The magnetic field produced by the coil changes the viscosity of MR fluids and produces an additional stiffness to the resonating cantilever beam. The shift in resonant frequency due to the change in viscosity of the MR fluid is measured, and the shift in frequency is analytically related to the yield stress. Two types of MR fluids based on sphere and plate iron particles are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed measurement system.

  3. Comparison of Two Different Modes of Active Recovery on Muscles Performance after Fatiguing Exercise in Mountain Canoeist and Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Mika, Anna; Oleksy, Łukasz; Kielnar, Renata; Wodka-Natkaniec, Ewa; Twardowska, Magdalena; Kamiński, Kamil; Małek, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to assess if the application of different methods of active recovery (working the same or different muscle groups from those which were active during fatiguing exercise) results in significant differences in muscle performance and if the efficiency of the active recovery method is dependent upon the specific sport activity (training loads). Design A parallel group non-blinded trial with repeated measurements. Methods Thirteen mountain canoeists and twelve football players participated in this study. Measurements of the bioelectrical activity, torque, work and power of the vastus lateralis oblique, vastus medialis oblique, and rectus femoris muscles were performed during isokinetic tests at a velocity of 90°/s. Results Active legs recovery in both groups was effective in reducing fatigue from evaluated muscles, where a significant decrease in fatigue index was observed. The muscles peak torque, work and power parameters did not change significantly after both modes of active recovery, but in both groups significant decrease was seen after passive recovery. Conclusions We suggest that 20 minutes of post-exercise active recovery involving the same muscles that were active during the fatiguing exercise is more effective in fatigue recovery than active exercise using the muscles that were not involved in the exercise. Active arm exercises were less effective in both groups which indicates a lack of a relationship between the different training regimens and the part of the body which is principally used during training. PMID:27706260

  4. Two novel measurements for the drive-mode resonant frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ancheng; Hu, Xiaoping; Luo, Bing; Jiang, Mingming; He, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kanghua

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the drive-mode resonance frequency of a micromachined vibratory gyroscope (MVG), one needs to measure it accurately and efficiently. The conventional approach to measure the resonant frequency is by performing a sweep frequency test and spectrum analysis. The method is time-consuming and inconvenient because of the requirements of many test points, a lot of data storage and off-line analyses. In this paper, we propose two novel measurement methods, the search method and track method, respectively. The former is based on the magnitude-frequency characteristics of the drive mode, utilizing a one-dimensional search technique. The latter is based on the phase-frequency characteristics, applying a feedback control loop. Their performances in precision, noise resistivity and efficiency are analyzed through detailed simulations. A test system is implemented based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and experiments are carried out. By comparing with the common approach, feasibility and superiorities of the proposed methods are validated. In particular, significant efficiency improvements are achieved whereby the conventional frequency method consumes nearly 5,000 s to finish a measurement, while only 5 s is needed for the track method and 1 s for the search method.

  5. Unsteady Heat-Flux Measurements of Second-Mode Instability Waves in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kergerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat- flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet-wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was developed to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  6. Dead time effects in turbulence spectra measured by burst-mode LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velte, Clara; Buchhave, Preben; George, William

    2014-11-01

    Dead time effects in laser Doppler measurements have not so far been considered a major problem. We show how dead time occurs in burst-mode laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) when using a so-called burst-mode LDA processor and describe their effects on the measured power spectra. We show how dead time effects may be caused by more than one seed particle being present in the measurement volume at the same time and explain analytically how dead time causes a reduction in the power in the spectrum at low frequencies and an oscillation in the spectrum at the high frequency end. We also present a realistic model for the data sampled from a processor with dead time and use this model to generate turbulence velocity data in a computer. Finally we compare the spectrum computed from realistic values of dead time and sample rate in the computer generated data and compare this spectrum to a measured spectrum in a free turbulent jet with similar parameters. The excellent agreement between the features of these spectra show that our model and explanation of the dead time effect is a valid one.

  7. Measurements of E-Mode Polarization and Temperature-E-Mode Correlation in the Cosmic Microwave Background from 100 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crites, A.T.; et al.

    2015-05-18

    We present measurements of E-mode polarization and temperature-E-mode correlation in the cosmic microwave background using data from the first season of observations with SPTpol, the polarization-sensitive receiver currently installed on the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The observations used in this work cover 100 ${{{\\rm deg} }^{2}}$ of sky with arcminute resolution at 150 GHz. We report the E-mode angular auto-power spectrum (EE) and the temperature-E-mode angular cross-power spectrum (TE) over the multipole range 500 < ℓ ≤ 5000. These power spectra improve on previous measurements in the high-ℓ (small-scale) regime. We fit the combination of the SPTpol power spectra, data from Planck, and previous SPT measurements with a six-parameter ΛCDM cosmological model. We find that the best-fit parameters are consistent with previous results. The improvement in high-ℓ sensitivity over previous measurements leads to a significant improvement in the limit on polarized point-source power: after masking sources brighter than 50 mJy in unpolarized flux at 150 GHz, we find a 95% confidence upper limit on unclustered point-source power in the EE spectrum of ${{D}_{\\ell }}=\\ell (\\ell +1){{C}_{\\ell }}/2\\pi \\lt 0.40\\ \\mu {{{\\rm K}}^{2}}$ at $\\ell =3000$, indicating that future EE measurements will not be limited by power from unclustered point sources in the multipole range $\\ell \\lt 3600$, and possibly much higher in $\\ell .$

  8. Modulation of activation-loop phosphorylation by JAK inhibitors is binding mode dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Débora; Rubert, Joëlle; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Scheufler, Clemens; Marque, Fanny; Régnier, Catherine H.; De Pover, Alain; Ryckelynck, Hugues; Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Goel, Aviva; Wyder, Lorenza; Tavares, Gisele; Baffert, Fabienne; Pissot-Soldermann, Carole; Manley, Paul W.; Gaul, Christoph; Voshol, Hans; Levine, Ross L.; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Radimerski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    JAK inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemias. Most of these drugs target the ATP-binding pocket and stabilize the active conformation of the JAK kinases. This type-I binding mode leads to an increase in JAK activation-loop phosphorylation, despite blockade of kinase function. Here we report that stabilizing the inactive state via type-II inhibition acts in the opposite manner, leading to a loss of activation-loop phosphorylation. We used X-ray crystallography to corroborate the binding mode and report for the first time the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain in an inactive conformation. Importantly, JAK inhibitor-induced activation-loop phosphorylation requires receptor interaction, as well as intact kinase and pseudokinase domains. Hence, depending on the respective conformation stabilized by a JAK inhibitor, hyperphosphorylation of the activation-loop may or may not be elicited. PMID:22684457

  9. Alternative Modes of Measuring Self-Reports on HIV-Related Behaviors among College Students: Web-Delivered Mode versus Paper-Pencil Mode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Su-I

    2007-01-01

    HIV-related behaviors, self-reported using Web-delivered or paper-pencil modes, were collected from two convenience samples of college students at a major university in the southeastern U.S. To enhance the equivalence of the comparisons, a subset pool of participants from each group, proportionally matched on key demographic variables including…

  10. Edge current profile measurements of peeling-like modes at high in Pegasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Lewicki, B. T.; Redd, A. J.

    2009-11-01

    Large-scale, coherent, high-m filamentary edge instabilities are routinely observed under conditions of high in Pegasus. These ELM-like filaments are characterized with high-speed imaging, as well as scanning magnetic and Langmuir probes. Their properties include: low- to intermediate-n; a coherent electromagnetic signature; large poloidal coherence lengths; rotation with the bulk plasma; and explosive detachment from the edge with outboard radial propagation. Stability is sensitive to jedge, with mode drive or suppression dependent on the sign of Ip. The extremely low B (Bt,0<=0.1 T) and high jedge 0.1 MA/m^2 in Pegasus lead to high peeling instability drive, proportional to , comparable to that achieved in H-mode on larger experiments. However, in Pegasus jedge is driven by large Ip (<= 50 MA/s) and associated skin currents as opposed to a localized region of high bootstrap current in an H-mode pedestal. A new radial array of Hall-effect sensors measures internal B,dge(R) directly with high spatial and temporal resolution to provide strong experimental constraint on jedge(ψ) in equilibrium reconstructions. Such equilibria may be used to uniquely test predictions of peeling-ballooning stability theory.

  11. Measurement of the Raman scattering cross section of the breathing mode in KDP and DKDP crystals.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Raman, Rajesh N; Yang, Steven T; Negres, Raluca A; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Henesian, Mark A

    2011-10-10

    The spontaneous Raman scattering cross sections of the main peaks (related to the A1 vibrational mode) in rapid and conventional grown potassium dihydrogen phosphate and deuterated crystals are measured at 532 nm, 355 nm, and 266 nm. The measurement involves the use of the Raman line of water centered at 3400 cm-1 as a reference to obtain relative values of the cross sections which are subsequently normalized against the known absolute value for water as a function of excitation wavelength. This measurement enables the estimation of the transverse stimulated Raman scattering gain of these nonlinear optical materials in various configurations suitable for frequency conversion and beam control in high-power, large-aperture laser systems.

  12. Resting Spontaneous Activity in the Default Mode Network Predicts Performance Decline during Prolonged Attention Workload

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Senhua; Fang, Zhuo; Spaeth, Andrea M.; Xin, Yuanyuan; Feng, Tingyong; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-01-01

    After continuous and prolonged cognitive workload, people typically show reduced behavioral performance and increased feelings of fatigue, which are known as “time-on-task (TOT) effects”. Although TOT effects are pervasive in modern life, their underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we induced TOT effects by administering a 20-minute continuous psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) to a group of 16 healthy adults and used resting-state blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine spontaneous brain activity changes associated with fatigue and performance. Behaviorally, subjects displayed robust TOT effects, as reflected by increasingly slower reaction times as the test progressed and higher self-reported mental fatigue ratings after the 20-minute PVT. Compared to pre-test measurements, subjects exhibited reduced amplitudes of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) in the default mode network (DMN) and increased ALFF in the thalamus after the test. Subjects also exhibited reduced anti-correlations between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and right middle prefrontal cortex after the test. Moreover, pre-test resting ALFF in the PCC and medial prefrontal cortex (MePFC) predicted subjects’ subsequent performance decline; individuals with higher ALFF in these regions exhibited more stable reaction times throughout the 20-minute PVT. These results support the important role of both task-positive and task-negative networks in mediating TOT effects and suggest that spontaneous activity measured by resting-state BOLD fMRI may be a marker of mental fatigue. PMID:26196666

  13. Elastic constant measurement of Ni-base superalloy with the RUS and mode selective EMAR methods.

    PubMed

    Ichitsubo, Tetsu; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Hirao, Masahiko; Tanaka, Katsushi; Osawa, Makoto; Yokokawa, Tadaharu; Kobayashi, Toshiharu; Harada, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    This paper reports the elastic constants of the Ni-base single crystal superalloy (TMS-26) with a rafted (lamellar) structure having tetragonal symmetry. The elastic constants have been measured at room temperature with the resonance ultrasound spectroscopy method and the mode-selective electromagnetic acoustic resonance method. The value of the elastic constant C33 (250.4 GPa) is almost equal to that of c11 (252.5 GPa), which indicates that the rafted structure virtually has the elastic anisotropy of cubic system. PMID:12159934

  14. Measurements of the photon detection efficiency done for Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, S.; Meddi, F.; Kuznetsova, E.

    2010-04-01

    Estimation of the Photon Detect Efficiency (PDE) of multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD) based on measurements of the G-APD response to low-intensity light is presented. The fit of the light-response spectra takes into account after-pulsing and cross-talk effects and yields the value of initial photons. Using a calibrated photo-detector as a reference, the value of the PDE can be calculated. The sources of systematic error of the obtained PDE is discussed as well as possibility for its minimization.

  15. Optical frequency-domain chromatic dispersion measurement method for higher-order modes in an optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Jung; Jung, Yongmin; Oh, Kyunghwan; Kim, Dug Young

    2005-12-12

    We propose a new chromatic dispersion measurement method for the higher-order modes of an optical fiber using optical frequency modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interferometry. An optical fiber which supports few excited modes was prepared for our experiments. Three different guiding modes of the fiber were identified by using far-field spatial beam profile measurements and confirmed with numerical mode analysis. By using the principle of a conventional FMWC interferometry with a tunable external cavity laser, we have demonstrated that the chromatic dispersion of a few-mode optical fiber can be obtained directly and quantitatively as well as qualitatively. We have also compared our measurement results with those of conventional modulation phase-shift method. PMID:19503215

  16. Stored-fluorography mode reduces radiation dose during cardiac catheterization measured with OSLD dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Tang, Kuo-Ting; Liu, Wei-Chung; Lin, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2015-12-01

    Coronary angiogram is an imperative tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases, in which cine-angiography is a commonly used method. Although the angiography proceeds under radiation, the potential risk of radiation exposure for both the patients and the operators was seldom noticed. In this study, the absorbed radiation dose in stored-fluorography mode was compared with that in cine-angiography mode by using optically simulated luminescent dosimeters to realize their effects on radiation dose. Patients received coronary angiogram via radial artery approach were randomized into the stored-fluorography group (N=30) or the cine-angiography group (N=30). The excluded criteria were: 1. women at pregnancy or on breast feeding, 2. chronic kidney diseases with glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min. During the coronary angiogram, absorbed dose of the patients and the operator radiation exposure was measured with optically simulated luminescent dosimeter (OSLD). The absorbed dose of the patients in the stored-fluorography group (3.13±0.25 mGy) was apparently lower than that in the cine-angiography group (65.57±5.37 mGy; P<0.001). For the operator, a statistical difference (P<0.001) was also found between the stored-fluorography group (0.09163 μGy) and the cine-angiography (0.6519μGy). Compared with traditional cine-angiography mode, the stored-fluorography mode can apparently reduce radiation exposure of the patients and the operator in coronary angiogram.

  17. Different pulse pattern generation by frequency detuning in pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Si, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Zong-Fu

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of our recent experimental investigation of the modulation frequency detuning effect on the output pulse dynamics in a pulse modulated actively mode-locked ytterbium doped fiber laser. The experimental study shows the existence of five different mode-locking states that mainly depend on the modulation frequency detuning, which are: (a) amplitude-even harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (b) Q-switched harmonic/fundamental mode-locking, (c) sinusoidal wave modulation mode, (d) pulses bundle state, and (e) noise-like state. A detailed experimental characterization of the output pulses dynamics in each operating mode is presented.

  18. Measuring of urban ultrafine aerosol as a part of regular air pollution monitoring activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejkrlík, Libor; Plachá, Helena

    2015-04-01

    Number size distribution of UFP has been measured since June 2012 to present time (end of 2014) at a background urban site in Northern Bohemia in the frame of UltraSchwarz Project. The project sustainability guarantees at least five years further measuring thus this highly specific activity already becomes part of existing air pollution monitoring system of Czech Hydrometeorological Institute. Number concentrations of UFP were measured by SMPS in a diameter range of 10 to 800 nm in 7 channels with time resolution of 10 minutes. For the purposes of this study the data were re-arranged into series of one-hour means in three size categories: nucleation mode (10-30 nm), Aitken mode (30-100 nm) and accumulation mode (100-800 nm). At the same measuring site 7 other air pollutants (PM1-BC, NO, NOX, NO2, O3, PM10 and SO2) were measured with identical time resolution. The successive daily courses of submicron particles in three size modes as well as of seven other ambient air pollutants were drawn in the form of 3D surface diagrams expressing different behavior of specific substances in the course of 26 months of continuous measuring campaign, allowing for analysis of both diurnal and seasonal changes. The three modes of UFP manifest diverse pictures, the nucleation mode is apparent mainly during warm seasons, the particles in Aitken mode behave rather indifferently to the period of the year and the accumulation mode has close relationship to coarse particles. Month by month correlation analysis indicate that nucleation mode nanoparticles are positively correlated especially with increasing O3 and SO2 concentration and that there exists connection between Aitken and accumulation modes and nitrogen oxides. In order to better understand fine time patterns we plan to calculate moving correlation indices over shorter time periods. Good idea would also be to make use of large database of data from nearby stations of CHMI to analyze the role of meteorological conditions.

  19. Measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers by white-light spectral interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadulová, M.; Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Martynkien, T.; Mergo, P.; Urbańczyk, W.

    2011-05-01

    We present two white-light spectral interferometric techniques for measurement of the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers over a broad spectral range (e.g. 500-1600 nm). First, a technique employing an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fiber in the test arm is used to measure the wavelength dependence of the differential group effective index, or equivalently the chromatic dispersion of one polarization mode supported by the fiber. Second, a technique employing a tandem configuration of a Michelson interferometer and the optical fiber under test is used to measure the group modal birefringence in the fiber. From these measurements, the chromatic dispersion of the other polarization mode supported by the fiber is retrieved. We measured by these techniques the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in three air-silica holey fibers and revealed the dependence of zero-dispersion wavelength on the geometry of the holey fiber.

  20. Measure of Legionella penumophila activity in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Soracco, R.J.; Pope, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila by serogroup-specific fluorescent antibodies was combined with a tetrazolium dye (INT) to measure electron transport activity. The biological uptake and reduction of the INT dye was studied in pure cultures and in natural water samples with respect to temperature. Uptake was complete within 60 min. Controls inhibited with formaldehyde demonstrated little activity. Both the in vitro and in situ determinations suggested that the electron transport system of Legionella was active over a temperature range of 25 to 60/sup 0/C.

  1. Measure of Legionella pneumophila activity in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Soracco, R.J.; Pope, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila by serogroup-specific fluorescent antibodies was combined with a tetrazolium dye (INT) to measure electron transport activity. The biological uptake and reduction of the INT dye was studied in pure cultures and in natural water samples with respect to temperature. Uptake was complete within 60 minutes. Controls inhibited with formaldehyde demonstrated little activity. Both the in vitro and in situ determinations suggested that the electron transport system of Legionella was active over a temperature range of 25/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/C.

  2. Detection of Cardiac Quiescence from B-Mode Echocardiography Using a Correlation-Based Frame-to-Frame Deviation Measure

    PubMed Central

    Mcclellan, James H.; Ravichandran, Lakshminarayan; Tridandapani, Srini

    2013-01-01

    Two novel methods for detecting cardiac quiescent phases from B-mode echocardiography using a correlation-based frame-to-frame deviation measure were developed. Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). Synchronous electrocardiography (ECG) and echocardiography data were obtained from 10 healthy human subjects (four male, six female, 23–45 years) and the interventricular septum (IVS) was observed using the apical four-chamber echocardiographic view. The velocity of the IVS was derived from active contour tracking and verified using tissue Doppler imaging echocardiography methods. In turn, the frame-to-frame deviation methods for identifying quiescence of the IVS were verified using active contour tracking. The timing of the diastolic quiescent phase was found to exhibit both inter- and intra-subject variability, suggesting that the current method of CTCA gating based on the ECG is suboptimal and that gating based on signals derived from cardiac motion are likely more accurate in predicting quiescence for cardiac imaging. Two robust and efficient methods for identifying cardiac quiescent phases from B-mode echocardiographic data were developed and verified. The methods presented in this paper will be used to develop new CTCA gating techniques and quantify the resulting potential improvement in CTCA image quality. PMID:26609501

  3. Size and environment dependence of surface phonon modes of gallium arsenide nanowires as measured by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spirkoska, D; Abstreiter, G; Fontcuberta I Morral, A

    2008-10-29

    Gallium arsenide nanowires were synthesized by gallium-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. By varying the growth time, nanowires with diameters ranging from 30 to 160 nm were obtained. Raman spectra of the nanowire ensembles were measured. The small linewidth of the optical phonon modes agree with an excellent crystalline quality. A surface phonon mode was also revealed, as a shoulder at lower frequencies of the longitudinal optical mode. In agreement with the theory, the surface mode shifts to lower wavenumbers when the diameter of the nanowires is decreased or the environment dielectric constant increased.

  4. Whispering Gallery Modes in Standard Optical Fibres for Fibre Profiling Measurements and Sensing of Unlabelled Chemical Species

    PubMed Central

    Boleininger, Anna; Lake, Thomas; Hami, Sophia; Vallance, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode resonances in liquid droplets and microspheres have attracted considerable attention due to their potential uses in a range of sensing and technological applications. We describe a whispering gallery mode sensor in which standard optical fibre is used as the whispering gallery mode resonator. The sensor is characterised in terms of the response of the whispering gallery mode spectrum to changes in resonator size, refractive index of the surrounding medium, and temperature, and its measurement capabilities are demonstrated through application to high-precision fibre geometry profiling and the detection of unlabelled biochemical species. The prototype sensor is capable of detecting unlabelled biomolecular species in attomole quantities. PMID:22294898

  5. Active Noise Control of Low Speed Fan Rotor-Stator Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hu, Ziqiang; Pla, Frederic G.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for active noise cancellation of fan tones. The control system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is cancelled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. Controller inputs are signals from a shaft encoder and a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. The key results are that the (6,0) mode was completely eliminated at 920 Hz and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 9.4 dB. Farfield 2BPF SPL reductions of 13 dB were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB modal PWL decrease. Global attenuation of PWL was obtained using an actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct.

  6. Wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as mode locker and tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenping; Chan, K. T.

    1999-07-01

    A wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium fiber ring laser was demonstrated using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as an intensity mode locker and a tunable optical filter. Very stable optical pulse trains at gigabit repetition rates were generated using harmonica mode locking. The supermode noise was suppressed to 60 dB below the signal level and the root-mean-square timing jitter (0.45 kHz-1 MHz) was found to be about 1% of the pulse duration. A continuous wavelength tuning range of 1.8 nm was achieved by changing the semiconductor laser temperature from 11.4 to 30 °C.

  7. Comparison of Tone Mode Measurements for a Forward Swept and Baseline Rotor Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    2003-01-01

    A forward swept fan, designated the Quite High Speed Fan (QHSF), was tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate its noise reduction relative to a baseline fan of the same aerodynamic performance. The design objective of the QHSF was a 6 dB reduction in Effective Perceived Noise Level relative to the baseline fan at the takeoff condition. The design noise reduction was to be a result of lower levels of multiple pure tone noise due to the forward swept rotor, and lower rotor/stator interaction tone noise from a leaned stator. Although the design 6 dB reduction was observed in far-field measurements, the induct mode measurements revealed the reasons for goals. All of the noise reduction was from the blade passing tone and its harmonics and most of this was unexpectedly from rotor/strut interaction modes. The reason for large differences in rotor/strut noise sources could not be determined with certainty. The reductions in the multiple pure tone noise for the forward swept rotor were not observed. this reduction were not the ones related to the design

  8. Dual-Mode Measurement and Theoretical Analysis of Evaporation Kinetics of Binary Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hanyu; He, Chi-Ruei; Basdeo, Carl; Li, Ji-Qin; Ye, Dezhuang; Kalonia, Devendra; Li, Si-Yu; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    Theoretical and experimental investigations are presented for the precision measurement of evaporation kinetics of binary mixtures using a quartz crystal resonator. A thin layer of light alcohol mixture including a volatile (methanol) and a much less volatile (1-butanol) components is deployed on top of the resonator. The normal or acoustic mode is to detect the moving liquid-vapor interface due to evaporation with a great spatial precision on the order of microns, and simultaneously the shear mode is used for in-situ detection of point viscosity or concentration of the mixture near the resonator. A one-dimensional theoretical model is developed to describe the underlying mass transfer and interfacial transport phenomena. Along with the modeling results, the transient evaporation kinetics, moving interface, and the stratification of viscosity of the liquid mixture during evaporation are simultaneously measured by the impedance response of the shear and longitudinal waves emitted from the resonator. The system can be used to characterize complicated evaporation kinetics involving multi-component fuels. American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, NSF CMMI-0952646.

  9. Measurement of distributed strain and temperature based on higher order and higher mode Bragg conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirkis, James S. (Inventor); Sivanesan, Ponniah (Inventor); Venkat, Venki S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A Bragg grating sensor for measuring distributed strain and temperature at the same time comprises an optical fiber having a single mode operating wavelength region and below a cutoff wavelength of the fiber having a multimode operating wavelength region. A saturated, higher order Bragg grating having first and second order Bragg conditions is fabricated in the optical fiber. The first order of Bragg resonance wavelength of the Bragg grating is within the single mode operating wavelength region of the optical fiber and the second order of Bragg resonance wavelength is below the cutoff wavelength of the fiber within the multimode operating wavelength region. The reflectivities of the saturated Bragg grating at the first and second order Bragg conditions are less than two orders of magnitude of one another. In use, the first and second order Bragg conditions are simultaneously created in the sensor at the respective wavelengths and a signal from the sensor is demodulated with respect to each of the wavelengths corresponding to the first and second order Bragg conditions. Two Bragg conditions have different responsivities to strain and temperature, thus allowing two equations for axial strain and temperature to be found in terms of the measure shifts in the primary and second order Bragg wavelengths. This system of equations can be solved for strain and temperature.

  10. Measuring cholinesterase activity in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Claus Henn, Birgit; McMaster, Suzanne; Padilla, Stephanie

    2006-10-01

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 different collection methods: a disposable plastic pipette, and a cotton-wool roll. A brief questionnaire was conducted each week to document changes in exposure to cholinesterase inhibitors for the duration of the sampling. To measure cholinesterase activity, an existing radiometric method was modified to make it suitable for human saliva. Using this method, cholinesterase activity was measurable in saliva, and duplicate samples showed reliable repeatability. Activity in both collection methods ranged from 3 to 265 nmol/h/ml saliva (mean = 52 +/- 37 [SD] nmol/h/ml saliva). For some individuals, enzyme activity was consistent over the five sampling weeks; for others, activity was highly variable. Coefficients of variation (CVs) were calculated to assess variability, and mean CVs were the same for both collection methods (about 35%). Adjusting for protein concentration in the pipette-collected samples did not change results. Both collection methods worked well for collecting between 1 and 3 ml saliva, but at the majority of visits (86%), participants preferred the cotton-wool roll. Results from this study suggest that saliva may be a useful indicator of potential neurotoxic effects from exposure to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides, but that factors affecting variability should be explored further.

  11. Dual-Pump CARS Measurements in the University of Virginia's Dual-Mode Scramjet: Configuration "A"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Gallo, Emanuela; Danehy, Paul M.; Rockwell, Robert; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe efforts to obtain canonical data sets to assist computational modelers in their development of models for the prediction of mixing and combustion in scramjet combustors operating in the ramjet-scramjet transition regime. The CARS technique is employed to acquire temporally and spatially resolved measurements of temperature and species mole-fraction at four planes, one upstream of an H2 fuel injector and three downstream. The technique is described and results are presented for cases with and without chemical reaction. The vibrational energy mode in the heated airstream of the combustor was observed to be frozen at near facility heater conditions and significant nonuniformities in temperature were observed, attributed to nonuniformities of temperature exiting the heater. The measurements downstream of fuel injection show development of mixing and combustion, and are already proving useful to the modelers.

  12. Measurement of electrodynamics characteristics of higher order modes for harmonic cavity at 2400 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashkov, Ya V.; Sobenin, N. P.; Gusarova, M. A.; Lalayan, M. V.; Bazyl, D. S.; Donetskiy, R. V.; Orlov, A. I.; Zobov, M. M.; Zavadtsev, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the frameworks of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) upgrade program an application of additional superconducting harmonic cavities operating at 800 MHz is currently under discussion. As a possible candidate, an assembly of two cavities with grooved beam pipes connected by a drift tube and housed in a common cryomodule, was proposed. In this article we discuss measurements of loaded Q-factors of higher order modes (HOM) performed on a scaled aluminium single cell cavity prototype with the fundamental frequency of 2400 MHz and on an array of two such cavities connected by a narrow beam pipe. The measurements were performed for the system with and without the matching load in the drift tube..

  13. Active mode-locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers with short gain recovery time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongrui; Belyanin, Alexey

    2015-02-23

    We investigate the dynamics of actively modulated mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) using space- and time-domain simulations of coupled density matrix and Maxwell equations with resonant tunneling current taken into account. We show that it is possible to achieve active mode locking and stable generation of picosecond pulses in high performance QCLs with a vertical laser transition and a short gain recovery time by bias modulation of a short section of a monolithic Fabry-Perot cavity. In fact, active mode locking in QCLs with a short gain recovery time turns out to be more robust to the variation of parameters as compared to previously studied lasers with a long gain recovery time. We investigate the effects of spatial hole burning and phase locking on the laser output.

  14. Combining metal and nonmetal isotopic measurements in barite to identify mode of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, E. M.; Paytan, A.; Eisenhauer, A.; Scher, H. D.; Wortmann, U.

    2014-12-01

    Barite (BaSO4) is a highly stable and widely-distributed mineral found in magmatic, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks (of all ages), as well as in soils, aerosol dust, and extraterrestrial material. Today, barite can form in a variety of settings in the oceans (hydrothermal, cold seeps, water column, sediments) and on the continents - where supersaturation and precipitation of barite typically occurs from the mixing of fluids - one containing Ba and another containing sulfate. Sulfur (δ34S) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes together with 87Sr/86Sr and stable Sr-isotopic signatures (δ88/86Sr) of modern authigenic continental barite are compared to modern pelagic marine barite and marine hydrothermal and cold seep barite to investigate the potential for their combined use to indicate mode of barite formation. The 87Sr/86Sr in barite cleary identifies the source of fluid for any particular type of barite (as previously noted, see Paytan et al., 2002). The highest (most radiogenic) 87Sr/86Sr values are measured in continental barite samples. There is no unique δ88/86Sr signature for any particular type of barite, but coretop marine (pelagic) barite has a consistent value measured from samples collected in different ocean basins. The highest and lowest δ88/86Sr values were measured in continental barite samples. The combination of isotopic systems result in unique δ88/86Sr and δ18O relationships and distinct δ88/86Sr and δ34S relationships for different types of barites investigated. Data suggest that the combined use of these metal and nonmetal isotopic measurements in barite could be useful as a new geochemical proxy to identify mode of barite mineralization for use in earth science applications including understanding ancient barite deposits.

  15. Analysis of time-resolved interaction force mode AFM imaging using active and passive probes.

    PubMed

    Giray Oral, Hasan; Parlak, Zehra; Levent Degertekin, F

    2012-09-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) mode imaging for atomic force microscopy (AFM). A nonlinear model of an active AFM probe, performing simultaneous topography and material property imaging on samples with varying elasticity and adhesion is implemented in Simulink®. The model is capable of simulating various imaging modes, probe structures, sample material properties, tip-sample interaction force models, and actuation and feedback schemes. For passive AFM cantilevers, the model is verified by comparing results from the literature. As an example of an active probe, the force sensing integrated readout and active tip (FIRAT) probe is used. Simulation results indicate that the active and damped nature of FIRAT provides a significant level of control over the force applied to the sample, minimizing sample indentation and topography error. Active tip control (ATC) preserves constant contact time during force control for stable contact while preventing the loss of material property information such as elasticity and adhesive force. Simulation results are verified by TRIF mode imaging of the samples with both soft and stiff regions. PMID:22813887

  16. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased. PMID:27003366

  17. Impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Groundwater quality deterioration has attracted world-wide concerns due to its importance for human water supply. Although more and more studies have shown that human activities and climate are changing the groundwater status, an investigation on how different groundwater heavy metals respond to human activity modes (e.g. mining, waste disposal, agriculture, sewage effluent and complex activity) in a varying climate has been lacking. Here, for each of six heavy metals (i.e. Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, Cd and Cu) in groundwater, we use >330 data points together with mixed-effect models to indicate that (i) human activity modes significantly influence the Cu and Mn but not Zn, Fe, Pb and Cd levels, and (ii) annual mean temperature (AMT) only significantly influences Cu and Pb levels, while annual precipitation (AP) only significantly affects Fe, Cu and Mn levels. Given these differences, we suggest that the impacts of human activity modes and climate on heavy metal "spread" in groundwater are biased.

  18. High-average-power actively-mode-locked Tm3+ fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerle, Michael; Kieleck, Christelle; Hübner, Philipp; Świderski, Jacek; Jackson, Stuart D.; Mazé, Gwenael; Eichhorn, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Fiber lasers emitting in the 2 μm wavelength range doped with thulium ions can be used as highly efficient pump sources for nonlinear converters to generate mid-infrared radiation. For spectroscopic purposes, illumination and countermeasures, a broad mid-infrared emission spectrum is advantageous. This can be reached by supercontinuum generation in fibers, e.g. fluoride fibers, which up to now has, however, only been presented with either low average power, complex Raman-shifted 1.55 μm pump sources or multi-stage amplifier pump schemes. Here we present recent results of a new actively-mode-locked single-oscillator scheme that can provide the high-repetition rate sub-ns pump pulses needed for pumping supercontinuum generators. A thulium-doped silica fiber laser is presented that provides > 11 W of average power CW-mode-locked pulses at 38 MHz repetition rate at ~ 38 ps pulse width. Upgrading the setup to allow Q-switched mode-locked operation yields mode-locked 40 MHz pulses arranged in 60 kHz bunched Q-switch envelopes and thus increases further the available peak power. In this Q-switched mode-locked regime over 5 W of average power has been achieved.

  19. Activity measurements of radon from construction materials.

    PubMed

    Fior, L; Nicolosi Corrêa, J; Paschuk, S A; Denyak, V V; Schelin, H R; Soreanu Pecequilo, B R; Kappke, J

    2012-07-01

    This work presents the results of radon concentration measurements of construction materials used in the Brazilian industry, such as clay (red) bricks and concrete blocks. The measurements focused on the detection of indoor radon activity during different construction stages and the analysis of radionuclides present in the construction materials. For this purpose, sealed chambers with internal dimensions of approximately 60×60×60 cm3 were built within a protected and isolated laboratory environment, and stable air humidity and temperature levels were maintained. These chambers were also used for radon emanation reduction tests. The chambers were built in four major stages: (1) assembly of the walls using clay (red) bricks, concrete blocks, and mortar; (2) installation of plaster; (3) finishing of wall surface using lime; and (4) insulation of wall surface and finishing using paint. Radon measurements were performed using polycarbonate etched track detectors. By comparing the three layers applied to the masonry walls, it was concluded that only the last step (wall painting using acrylic varnish) reduced the radon emanation, by a factor of approximately 2. Samples of the construction materials (clay bricks and concrete blocks) were ground, homogenized, and subjected to gamma-ray spectrometry analysis to evaluate the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K. The values for the index of the activity concentration (I), radium equivalent activity (Raeq), and external hazard index (Hext) showed that these construction materials could be used without restrictions or concern about the equivalent dose limit (1 mSv/year).

  20. Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Experiments Part I. Measurements of Magnetic Islands and Delta Prime

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Batha, S.H.

    1997-11-03

    Tearing type modes are observed in most high-confinement operation regimes in TFTR. Three different methods are used to measure the magnetic island widths: external magnetic coils, internal temperature fluctuation from electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic and an experiment where the plasma major radius is rapidly shifted (`Jog` experiments). A good agreement between the three methods is observed. Numerical and analytic calculations of delta prime (the tearing instability index) are compared with an experimental measurement of delta prime using the tearing mode eigenfunction mapped from the Jog data. The obtained negative delta prime indicates that the observed tearing modes cannot be explained by the classical current-gradient-driven tearing theory.

  1. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach.

    PubMed

    Wong, David W S; Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2011-06-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual's segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial-ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces.

  2. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2010-01-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual’s segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial–ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces. PMID:21643546

  3. Integrator or Coincidence Detector: A Novel Measure Based on the Discrete Reverse Correlation to Determine a Neuron's Operational Mode.

    PubMed

    Kanev, Jacob; Koutsou, Achilleas; Christodoulou, Chris; Obermayer, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    In this letter, we propose a definition of the operational mode of a neuron, that is, whether a neuron integrates over its input or detects coincidences. We complete the range of possible operational modes by a new mode we call gap detection, which means that a neuron responds to gaps in its stimulus. We propose a measure consisting of two scalar values, both ranging from -1 to +1: the neural drive, which indicates whether its stimulus excites the neuron, serves as background noise, or inhibits it; the neural mode, which indicates whether the neuron's response is the result of integration over its input, of coincidence detection, or of gap detection; with all three modes possible for all neural drive values. This is a pure spike-based measure and can be applied to measure the influence of either all or subset of a neuron's stimulus. We derive the measure by decomposing the reverse correlation, test it in several artificial and biological settings, and compare it to other measures, finding little or no correlation between them. We relate the results of the measure to neural parameters and investigate the effect of time delay during spike generation. Our results suggest that a neuron can use several different modes simultaneously on different subsets of its stimulus to enable it to respond to its stimulus in a complex manner. PMID:27557103

  4. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  5. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic walla)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco® 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m / n = 3 / 1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  6. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-15

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco{sup ®} 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m/n=3/1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  7. Accurate p-mode measurements of the G0V metal-rich CoRoT target HD 52265

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballot, J.; Gizon, L.; Samadi, R.; Vauclair, G.; Benomar, O.; Bruntt, H.; Mosser, B.; Stahn, T.; Verner, G. A.; Campante, T. L.; García, R. A.; Mathur, S.; Salabert, D.; Gaulme, P.; Régulo, C.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Appourchaux, T.; Baudin, F.; Catala, C.; Chaplin, W. J.; Deheuvels, S.; Michel, E.; Bazot, M.; Creevey, O.; Dolez, N.; Elsworth, Y.; Sato, K. H.; Vauclair, S.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.

    2011-06-01

    Context. The star HD 52265 is a G0V metal-rich exoplanet-host star observed in the seismology field of the CoRoT space telescope from November 2008 to March 2009. The satellite collected 117 days of high-precision photometric data on this star, showing that it presents solar-like oscillations. HD 52265 was also observed in spectroscopy with the Narval spectrograph at the same epoch. Aims: We characterise HD 52265 using both spectroscopic and seismic data. Methods: The fundamental stellar parameters of HD 52265 were derived with the semi-automatic software VWA, and the projected rotational velocity was estimated by fitting synthetic profiles to isolated lines in the observed spectrum. The parameters of the observed p modes were determined with a maximum-likelihood estimation. We performed a global fit of the oscillation spectrum, over about ten radial orders, for degrees l = 0 to 2. We also derived the properties of the granulation, and analysed a signature of the rotation induced by the photospheric magnetic activity. Results: Precise determinations of fundamental parameters have been obtained: Teff = 6100 ± 60 K, log g = 4.35 ± 0.09, [M/H] = 0.19 ± 0.05, as well as vsini=3.6+0.3-1.0kms. We have measured a mean rotation period Prot = 12.3 ± 0.15 days, and find a signature of differential rotation. The frequencies of 31 modes are reported in the range 1500-2550 μHz. The large separation exhibits a clear modulation around the mean value Dnu=98.3 ± 0.1 μHz. Mode widths vary with frequency along an S-shape with a clear local maximum around 1800 μHz. We deduce lifetimes ranging between 0.5 and 3 days for these modes. Finally, we find a maximal bolometric amplitude of about 3.96 ± 0.24 ppm for radial modes. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain.

  8. Development of Radar Control system for Multi-mode Active Phased Array Radar for atmospheric probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Modern multi-mode active phased array radars require highly efficient radar control system for hassle free real time radar operation. The requirement comes due to the distributed architecture of the active phased array radar, where each antenna element in the array is connected to a dedicated Transmit-Receive (TR) module. Controlling the TR modules, which are generally few hundreds in number, and functioning them in synchronisation, is a huge task during real time radar operation and should be handled with utmost care. Indian MST Radar, located at NARL, Gadanki, which is established during early 90's, as an outcome of the middle atmospheric program, is a remote sensing instrument for probing the atmosphere. This radar has a semi-active array, consisting of 1024 antenna elements, with limited beam steering, possible only along the principle planes. To overcome the limitations and difficulties, the radar is being augmented into fully active phased array, to accomplish beam agility and multi-mode operations. Each antenna element is excited with a dedicated 1 kW TR module, located in the field and enables to position the radar beam within 20° conical volume. A multi-channel receiver makes the radar to operate in various modes like Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS), Spaced Antenna (SA), Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) etc. Present work describes the real-time radar control (RC) system for the above described active phased array radar. The radar control system consists of a Spartan 6 FPGA based Timing and Control Signal Generator (TCSG), and a computer containing the software for controlling all the subsystems of the radar during real-time radar operation and also for calibrating the radar. The main function of the TCSG is to generate the control and timing waveforms required for various subsystems of the radar. Important components of the RC system software are (i) TR module configuring software which does programming, controlling and health parameter monitoring of the

  9. Development of Radar Control system for Multi-mode Active Phased Array Radar for atmospheric probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasodha, Polisetti; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Thriveni, A.

    2016-07-01

    Modern multi-mode active phased array radars require highly efficient radar control system for hassle free real time radar operation. The requirement comes due to the distributed architecture of the active phased array radar, where each antenna element in the array is connected to a dedicated Transmit-Receive (TR) module. Controlling the TR modules, which are generally few hundreds in number, and functioning them in synchronisation, is a huge task during real time radar operation and should be handled with utmost care. Indian MST Radar, located at NARL, Gadanki, which is established during early 90's, as an outcome of the middle atmospheric program, is a remote sensing instrument for probing the atmosphere. This radar has a semi-active array, consisting of 1024 antenna elements, with limited beam steering, possible only along the principle planes. To overcome the limitations and difficulties, the radar is being augmented into fully active phased array, to accomplish beam agility and multi-mode operations. Each antenna element is excited with a dedicated 1 kW TR module, located in the field and enables to position the radar beam within 20° conical volume. A multi-channel receiver makes the radar to operate in various modes like Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS), Spaced Antenna (SA), Frequency Domain Interferometry (FDI) etc. Present work describes the real-time radar control (RC) system for the above described active phased array radar. The radar control system consists of a Spartan 6 FPGA based Timing and Control Signal Generator (TCSG), and a computer containing the software for controlling all the subsystems of the radar during real-time radar operation and also for calibrating the radar. The main function of the TCSG is to generate the control and timing waveforms required for various subsystems of the radar. Important components of the RC system software are (i) TR module configuring software which does programming, controlling and health parameter monitoring of the

  10. Partial pressure measurements with an active spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, N.H.; Jensen, T.H.; Colchin, R.J.; Maingi, R.; Wade, M.R.; Finkenthal, D.F.; Naumenko, N.; Tugarinov, S.

    1998-07-01

    Partial pressure neutral ga measurements have been made using a commercial Penning gauge in conjunction with an active spectrometer. In prior work utilizing bandpass filters and conventional spectrometers, trace concentrations of the hydrogen isotopes H, D, T and of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar were determined from characteristic spectral lines in the light emitted by the neutral species of these elements. For all the elements mentioned, the sensitivity was limited by spectral contamination from a pervasive background of molecular hydrogen radiation. The active spectrometer overcomes this limitations by means of a digital lock-in method and correlation with reference spectra. Preliminary measurements of an admixture containing a trace amount of neon in deuterium show better than a factor of 20 improvement in sensitivity over conventional techniques. This can be further improved by correlating the relative intensities of multiple lines to sets of reference spectra.

  11. A Comparison of Measured Tone Modes for Two Low Noise Propulsion Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Elliott, David M.

    2000-01-01

    The acoustic modes for two low tip speed propulsion fans were measured to examine the effects of fan tip speed, at constant pressure ratio. A continuously rotating microphone method was used that provided the complete modal structure (circumferential and radial order) at the fundamental and second harmonic of the blade passing tone as well as most of the third harmonic modes. The fans are compared in terms of their rotor/stator interaction modal power, and total tone power. It was hoped that the lower tip speed might produce less noise. This was not the case. The higher tip speed fan, at both takeoff and cutback speeds, had lower tone and interaction levels. This could be an indication that the higher aerodynamic loading required to produce the same pressure ratio for the lower tip speed fan resulted in a greater velocity deficit in the blade wakes and thus more noise. Results consistent with expected rotor transmission effects were noted in the inlet modal structures of both fans.

  12. Multiple-Component Crystal Fabric Measurements from Acoustically-Generated Normal Modes in Borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluskiewicz, D. J.; Waddington, E. D.; McCarthy, M.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Voigt, D.; Matsuoka, K.

    2014-12-01

    Sound wave velocities in ice are a proxy of crystal orientation fabric. Because p- and s-waves respectively travel faster and slower in the direction of an ice crystal c-axis, the velocities of these waves in a fabric are related to the clustering of ice crystal c-axes in the direction of wave propagation. Previous sonic logs at Dome C, NGRIP, WAIS, and NEEM have inferred a single component fabric description from the velocities of vertically-propagating p-waves around each ice core borehole. These records supplement thin-section measurements of crystal fabric by sampling larger numbers of crystals in a depth-continuous log. Observations of azimuthally anisotropic vertical-girdle fabrics at ice-core sites such as WAIS, NGRIP, and EDML underly a benefit for logging methods that are sensitive to such fabrics. We present a theoretical framework for using borehole flexural modes to measure azimuthal crystal-fabric anisotropy, and describe ongoing efforts to develop a sonic logging tool for this purpose. We also present data from p-wave logs and thin section measurements at the WAIS Divide, and describe how a flexural wave log could supplement the existing measurements.

  13. Measurement of the $WW+WZ$ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, Martina

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode is presented. The measurement is carried out with 4.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector in √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The main experimental challenge is identifying the signal in the overwhelming background from W+jets production. The modeling of the W+jets background is carefully studied and a matrix element technique is used to build a discriminant to separate signal and background. The cross section of WW + WZ production is measured to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → WW + WZ) = 16.5-3.0+3.3 pb, in agreement with the next-to-leading order theoretical prediction of 15.1 ± 0.9 pb. The significance of the signal is evaluated to be 5.4σ. This measurement is an important milestone in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron.

  14. Velocity Measurement in a Dual-Mode Supersonic Combustor using Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyne, C. P.; McDaniel, J. C.; Krauss, R. H.; Day, S. W.; Reubush, D. E. (Technical Monitor); McClinton, C. R. (Technical Monitor); Reubush, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Temporally and spatially-resolved, two-component measurements of velocity in a supersonic hydrogen-air combustor are reported. The combustor had a single unswept ramp fuel injector and operated with an inlet Mach number of 2 and a flow total temperature approaching 1200 K. The experiment simulated the mixing and combustion processes of a dual-mode scramjet operating at a flight Mach number near 5. The velocity measurements were obtained by seeding the fuel with alumina particles and performing Particle Image Velocimetry on the mixing and combustion wake of the ramp injector. To assess the effects of combustion on the fuel air-mixing process, the distribution of time-averaged velocity and relative turbulence intensity was determined for the cases of fuel-air mixing and fuel-air reacting. Relative to the mixing case, the near field core velocity of the reacting fuel jet had a slower streamwise decay. In the far field, downstream of 4 to 6 ramp heights from the ramp base, the heat release of combustion resulted in decreased flow velocity and increased turbulence levels. The reacting measurements were also compared with a computational fluid dynamics solution of the flow field. Numerically predicted velocity magnitudes were higher than that measured and the jet penetration was lower.

  15. Measuring psychological engagement in youth activity involvement.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Heather L; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Busseri, Michael A; Gadbois, Shannon; Bowker, Anne; Findlay, Leanne

    2015-12-01

    Although psychological engagement (e.g., enjoyment, concentration) may be critical in fostering positive outcomes of youth activity participation, too few studies have been conducted to establish its role in development. Furthermore, an established measurement tool is lacking. In the current study, we evaluated a brief engagement measure with two Canadian samples of youth (Sample 1, N = 290, mean age = 16.9 years, 62% female; Sample 2, N = 1827, mean age = 13.1 years, 54% female). We conducted a confirmatory factor analysis with structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized structure of the model. We also assessed the measure's validity by testing relations between engagement and both perceived outcomes and positive features of activity settings. Psychological engagement was best captured by three latent cognitive, affective, and relational/spiritual factors and a second-order latent factor. Also, as anticipated, psychological engagement was associated with features of the activity setting and perceived impact.

  16. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  17. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  18. Enhanced method to reconstruct mode shapes of continuous scanning measurements using the Hilbert Huang transform and the modal analysis method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongsuh; Hussain, Syed Hassaan; Wang, Semyung; Park, Kyihwan

    2014-09-01

    Generally, it is time consuming to experimentally identify the operating deflection shape or mode shape of a structure. To overcome this problem, the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) technique has been recently proposed. This technique is used to extract the mode shape from measurements that continuously measure the vibration of a region of interest within a structure using a non-contact laser sensor. In previous research regarding the HHT, two technical processes were needed to obtain the mode shape for each mode. The purpose of this study is to improve and complement our previous research, and for this purpose, a modal analysis approach is adapted without using the two technical processes to obtain an accurate un-damped impulse response of each mode for continuous scanning measurements. In addition, frequency response functions for each type of beam are derived, making it possible to make continuously scanned measurements along a straight profile. In this paper, the technical limitations and drawbacks of the damping compensation technique used in previous research are identified. In addition, the separation of resonant frequency (the Doppler effect) that occurs in continuous scanning measurements and the separation of damping phenomenon are also observed. The proposed method is quantitatively verified by comparing it with the results obtained from a conventional approach to estimate the mode shape with an impulse response.

  19. Enhanced method to reconstruct mode shapes of continuous scanning measurements using the Hilbert Huang transform and the modal analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jongsuh; Hussain, Syed Hassaan; Wang, Semyung Park, Kyihwan

    2014-09-15

    Generally, it is time consuming to experimentally identify the operating deflection shape or mode shape of a structure. To overcome this problem, the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) technique has been recently proposed. This technique is used to extract the mode shape from measurements that continuously measure the vibration of a region of interest within a structure using a non-contact laser sensor. In previous research regarding the HHT, two technical processes were needed to obtain the mode shape for each mode. The purpose of this study is to improve and complement our previous research, and for this purpose, a modal analysis approach is adapted without using the two technical processes to obtain an accurate un-damped impulse response of each mode for continuous scanning measurements. In addition, frequency response functions for each type of beam are derived, making it possible to make continuously scanned measurements along a straight profile. In this paper, the technical limitations and drawbacks of the damping compensation technique used in previous research are identified. In addition, the separation of resonant frequency (the Doppler effect) that occurs in continuous scanning measurements and the separation of damping phenomenon are also observed. The proposed method is quantitatively verified by comparing it with the results obtained from a conventional approach to estimate the mode shape with an impulse response.

  20. Enhanced method to reconstruct mode shapes of continuous scanning measurements using the Hilbert Huang transform and the modal analysis method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongsuh; Hussain, Syed Hassaan; Wang, Semyung; Park, Kyihwan

    2014-09-01

    Generally, it is time consuming to experimentally identify the operating deflection shape or mode shape of a structure. To overcome this problem, the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) technique has been recently proposed. This technique is used to extract the mode shape from measurements that continuously measure the vibration of a region of interest within a structure using a non-contact laser sensor. In previous research regarding the HHT, two technical processes were needed to obtain the mode shape for each mode. The purpose of this study is to improve and complement our previous research, and for this purpose, a modal analysis approach is adapted without using the two technical processes to obtain an accurate un-damped impulse response of each mode for continuous scanning measurements. In addition, frequency response functions for each type of beam are derived, making it possible to make continuously scanned measurements along a straight profile. In this paper, the technical limitations and drawbacks of the damping compensation technique used in previous research are identified. In addition, the separation of resonant frequency (the Doppler effect) that occurs in continuous scanning measurements and the separation of damping phenomenon are also observed. The proposed method is quantitatively verified by comparing it with the results obtained from a conventional approach to estimate the mode shape with an impulse response. PMID:25273766

  1. Fifty-ps Raman fiber laser with hybrid active-passive mode locking.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A G; Kharenko, D S; Podivilov, E V; Babin, S A

    2016-07-25

    Actively mode locked Raman lasing in a ring PM-fiber cavity pumped by a linearly polarized Yb-doped fiber laser is studied. At co-propagating pumping, a stochastic pulse with duration defined by the AOM switching time (~15 ns) is generated with the round-trip period. At counter-propagating pumping, one or several sub-ns pulses (within the AOM switching envelope) are formed. It has been found that the formation of such stable multi-pulse structure is defined by the single-pulse energy limit (~20 nJ) set by the second-order Raman generation. Adding a NPE-based saturable absorber in the actively mode locked cavity, results in sufficient shortening of the generated pulses both in single- and multi-pulse regimes (down to 50 ps). A model is developed adequately describing the regimes. PMID:27464081

  2. Default-Mode Network Activity Identified by Group Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Conghui; Zhuang, Jie; Peng, Danling; Yu, Guoliang; Yang, Yanhui

    Default-mode network activity refers to some regional increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal during baseline than cognitive tasks. Recent functional imaging studies have found co-activation in a distributed network of cortical regions, including ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PPC) that characterize the default mode of human brain. In this study, general linear model and group independent component analysis (ICA) were utilized to analyze the fMRI data obtained from two language tasks. Both methods yielded similar, but not identical results and detected a resting deactivation network at some midline regions including anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Particularly, the group ICA method segregated functional elements into two separate maps and identified ventral cingulate component and fronto-parietal component. These results suggest that these two components might be linked to different mental function during "resting" baseline.

  3. Neutron and proton activation measurements from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radioactivity induced by high-energy protons and secondary neutrons (from nuclear interactions) in various samples returned from different locations in Skylab was measured directly by gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of decay gamma rays from the samples. Incident fluxes were derived from the activation measurements, using known nuclear cross-section. Neutron and proton flux values were found to range from 0.2 to 5 particles/sq cm-sec, depending on the energy range and location in Skylab. The thermal neutron flux was less than 0.07 neutrons/sq cm-sec. The results are useful for data analysis and planning of future high-energy astronomy experiments.

  4. Time-Distance Helioseismology with f Modes as a Method for Measurement of Near-Surface Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Gizon, Laurent

    1999-01-01

    Travel times measured for the f mode have been used to study flows near the solar surface in conjunction with simultaneous measurements of the magnetic field. Previous flow measurements of doppler surface rotation, small magnetic feature rotation, supergranular pattern rotation, and surface meridional circulation have been confirmed. In addition, the flow in supergranules due to Coriolis forces has been measured. The spatial and temporal power spectra for a six-day observing sequence has been measured.

  5. Measurement of Richtmyer–Meshkov mode coupling under steady shock conditions and at high energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, Carlos A.; Malamud, G.; Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.

    2015-10-19

    Here, we present experiments observing Richtmyer–Meshkov mode coupling and bubble competition in a system arising from well-characterized initial conditions and driven by a strong (Mach ~ 8) shock. These measurements and the analysis method developed to interpret them provide an important step toward the possibility of observing self-similarity under such conditions, as well as a general platform for performing and analyzing hydrodynamic instability experiments. A key feature of these experiments is that the shock is sustained sufficiently long that this nonlinear behavior occurs without decay of the shock velocity or other hydrodynamic properties of the system, which facilitates analysis and allows the results to be used in the study of analytic models.

  6. Measurement of Richtmyer–Meshkov mode coupling under steady shock conditions and at high energy density

    DOE PAGES

    Di Stefano, Carlos A.; Malamud, G.; Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.

    2015-10-19

    Here, we present experiments observing Richtmyer–Meshkov mode coupling and bubble competition in a system arising from well-characterized initial conditions and driven by a strong (Mach ~ 8) shock. These measurements and the analysis method developed to interpret them provide an important step toward the possibility of observing self-similarity under such conditions, as well as a general platform for performing and analyzing hydrodynamic instability experiments. A key feature of these experiments is that the shock is sustained sufficiently long that this nonlinear behavior occurs without decay of the shock velocity or other hydrodynamic properties of the system, which facilitates analysis andmore » allows the results to be used in the study of analytic models.« less

  7. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  8. Turbulent Statistics from Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  9. Turbulent Statistics From Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  10. Tests of a Two-Photon Technique for Measuring Polarization Mode Dispersion With Subfemtosecond Precision

    PubMed Central

    Dauler, Eric; Jaeger, Gregg; Muller, Antoine; Migdall, A.; Sergienko, A.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation is made of a recently introduced quantum interferometric method capable of measuring polarization mode dispersion (PMD) on sub-femtosecond scales, without the usual interferometric stability problems associated with such small time scales. The technique makes use of the extreme temporal correlation of orthogonally polarized pairs of photons produced via type-II phase-matched spontaneous parametric down-conversion. When sent into a simple polarization interferometer these photon pairs produce a sharp interference feature seen in the coincidence rate. The PMD of a given sample is determined from the shift of that interference feature as the sample is inserted into the system. The stability and resolution of this technique is shown to be below 0.2 fs. We explore how this precision is improved by reducing the length of the down-conversion crystal and increasing the spectral band pass of the system.

  11. Stability of the Tilt Modes of an Actively Controlled Flywheel Analyzed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.

    1999-01-01

    Applications of strongly gyroscopic rotors are becoming important, including flywheels for terrestrial and space energy storage and various attitude control devices for spacecraft. Some of these applications, especially the higher speed ones for energy storage, will have actively controlled magnetic bearings. These bearings will be required where speeds are too high for conventional bearings, where adequate lubrication is undesirable or impossible, or where bearing losses must be minimized for efficient energy storage. Flywheel rotors are highly gyroscopic, and above some speed that depends on the bandwidth of the feedback system, they always become unstable in an actively controlled magnetic bearing system. To assess ways to prevent instability until speeds well above the desired operating range, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center used a commercial controls code to calculate the eigenvalues of the tilt modes of a rigid gyroscopic rotor supported by active magnetic bearings. The real part of the eigenvalue is the negative of the damping of the mode, and the imaginary part is approximately equal to the mode s frequency.

  12. Mode of Action of Lactoperoxidase as Related to Its Antimicrobial Activity: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bafort, F.; Parisi, O.; Perraudin, J.-P.; Jijakli, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase is a member of the family of the mammalian heme peroxidases which have a broad spectrum of activity. Their best known effect is their antimicrobial activity that arouses much interest in in vivo and in vitro applications. In this context, the proper use of lactoperoxidase needs a good understanding of its mode of action, of the factors that favor or limit its activity, and of the features and properties of the active molecules. The first part of this review describes briefly the classification of mammalian peroxidases and their role in the human immune system and in host cell damage. The second part summarizes present knowledge on the mode of action of lactoperoxidase, with special focus on the characteristics to be taken into account for in vitro or in vivo antimicrobial use. The last part looks upon the characteristics of the active molecule produced by lactoperoxidase in the presence of thiocyanate and/or iodide with implication(s) on its antimicrobial activity. PMID:25309750

  13. Dual Mode NOx Sensor: Measuring Both the Accumulated Amount and Instantaneous Level at Low Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Beulertz, Gregor; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jaco H.; Moos, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The accumulating-type (or integrating-type) NOx sensor principle offers two operation modes to measure low levels of NOx: The direct signal gives the total amount dosed over a time interval and its derivative the instantaneous concentration. With a linear sensor response, no baseline drift, and both response times and recovery times in the range of the gas exchange time of the test bench (5 to 7 s), the integrating sensor is well suited to reliably detect low levels of NOx. Experimental results are presented demonstrating the sensor’s integrating properties for the total amount detection and its sensitivity to both NO and to NO2. We also show the correlation between the derivative of the sensor signal and the known gas concentration. The long-term detection of NOx in the sub-ppm range (e.g., for air quality measurements) is discussed. Additionally, a self-adaption of the measurement range taking advantage of the temperature dependency of the sensitivity is addressed. PMID:22736980

  14. Measurements of Nitrogen Dioxide Total Column Amounts using a Brewer Double Spectrophotometer in Direct Sun Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cede, Alexander; Herman, Jay; Richter, Andreas; Krotkov, Nickolay; Burrows, John

    2006-01-01

    NO2 column amounts were measured for the past 2 years at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, using a Brewer spectrometer in direct Sun mode. A new bootstrap method to calibrate the instrument is introduced and described. This technique selects the cleanest days from the database to obtain the solar reference spectrum. The main advantage for direct Sun measurements is that the conversion uncertainty from slant column to vertical column is negligible compared to the standard scattered light observations where it is typically on the order of 100% (2sigma) at polluted sites. The total 2sigma errors of the direct Sun retrieved column amounts decrease with solar zenith angle and are estimated at 0.2 to 0.6 Dobson units (DU, 1 DU approx. equal to 2.7 10(exp 16) molecules cm(exp -2)), which is more accurate than scattered light measurements for high NO2 amounts. Measured NO2 column amounts, ranging from 0 to 3 DU with a mean of 0.7 DU, show a pronounced daily course and a strong variability from day to day. The NO2 concentration typically increases from sunrise to noon. In the afternoon it decreases in summer and stays constant in winter. As expected from the anthropogenic nature of its source, NO2 amounts on weekends are significantly reduced. The measurements were compared to satellite retrievals from Scanning Image Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). Satellite data give the same average NO2 column and show a seasonal cycle that is similar to the ground data in the afternoon. We show that NO2 must be considered when retrieving aerosol absorption properties, especially for situations with low aerosol optical depth.

  15. Measuring primordial gravitational waves from CMB B−modes in cosmologies with generalized expansion histories

    SciTech Connect

    Antolini, Claudia; Martinelli, Matteo; Fantaye, Yabebal; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: mmartin@sissa.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-02-01

    We evaluate our capability to constrain the abundance of primordial tensor perturbations (primordial gravitational waves, PGWs) in cosmologies with generalized expansion histories in the epoch of cosmic acceleration. Forthcoming satellite and sub-orbital experiments probing polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) are expected to measure the B−mode power in CMB polarization, coming from PGWs on the degree scale, as well as gravitational lensing on arcminute scales; the latter is the main competitor for the measurement of PGWs, and is directly affected by the underlying expansion history, determined by the presence of a Dark Energy (DE) component. In particular, we consider early DE possible scenarios, in which the expansion history is substantially modified at the epoch in which the CMB lensing is most relevant. We show that the introduction of a parametrized DE may induce a variation as large as 30% in the ratio of the power of lensing and PGWs on the degree scale. We find that adopting the nominal specifications of upcoming satellite measurements, the constraining power on PGWs is weakened by the inclusion of the extra degrees of freedom, resulting in a reduction of about 10% of the upper limits on r in fiducial models with no GWs, as well as a comparable increase in the error bars in models with non-zero tensor power. Moreover, we find that the inclusion of sub-orbital CMB experiments, capable of mapping the B−mode power up to the angular scales which are affected by lensing, has the effect of restoring the forecasted performances with a fixed cosmological expansion history corresponding to a cosmological constant. Finally, we show how the combination of CMB data with Type Ia SuperNovae (SNe), Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Hubble constant allows to constrain simultaneously the primordial tensor power and the DE quantities in the parametrization we consider, consisting of present abundance and first redshift derivative of the energy

  16. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  17. Accessible cultural mind-set modulates default mode activity: evidence for the culturally situated brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenbo; Oyserman, Daphna; Liu, Qiang; Li, Hong; Han, Shihui

    2013-01-01

    Self-construal priming modulates human behavior and associated neural activity. However, the neural activity associated with the self-construal priming procedure itself remains unknown. It is also unclear whether and how self-construal priming affects neural activity prior to engaging in a particular task. To address this gap, we scanned Chinese adults, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, during self-construal priming and a following resting state. We found that, relative to a calculation task, both interdependent and independent self-construal priming activated the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). The contrast of interdependent vs. independent self-construal priming also revealed increased activity in the dorsal MPFC and left middle frontal cortex. The regional homogeneity analysis of the resting-state activity revealed increased local synchronization of spontaneous activity in the dorsal MPFC but decreased local synchronization of spontaneous activity in the PCC when contrasting interdependent vs. independent self-construal priming. The functional connectivity analysis of the resting-state activity, however, did not show significant difference in synchronization of activities in remote brain regions between different priming conditions. Our findings suggest that accessible collectivistic/individualistic mind-set induced by self-construal priming is associated with modulations of both task-related and resting-state activity in the default mode network.

  18. Mode I Toughness Measurements of Core/Facesheet Bonds in Honeycomb Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2006-01-01

    from the test and so the results can only be used in a qualitative manner. Second, only sandwich structure with thin facesheets can be tested (to facilitate wrapping of the facesheet around the climbing drum). In recognition of the need for a more quantitative facesheet/core fracture test, several workers have devised experimental techniques for characterizing the toughness of the facesheet/core interface. In all of these cases, the tests are designed to yield a mode I-dominated fracture toughness of the facesheet/core interface in a manner similar to that used to determine mode I fracture toughness of composite laminates. In the current work, a modified double cantilever beam is used to measure the mode I-dominated fracture toughness of the interface in a sandwich consisting of glass/phenolic honeycomb core reinforced with graphite epoxy facesheets. Two specimen configurations were tested as shown in Fig 2. The first configuration consisted of reinforcing the facesheets with aluminum blocks (Fig. 2a). In the second configuration unreinforced specimens were tested (Fig. 2b). Climbing drum peel tests were also conducted to compare the fracture behavior observed between this test and the modified double cantilever beam. This paper outlines the test procedures and data reduction strategies used to compute fracture toughness values from the tests. The effect of specimen reinforcement on fracture toughness of the facesheet/core interface is discussed.

  19. Flow visualization efforts and pilot measurements with a laser-Doppler anemometer in backscatter mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buetefisch, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    Activities involving the use flow visualization and laser anemometers are reviewed. In particular, turbulent pipe flow measurements and local velocity determination in a 3 X 3 sq meter wind tunnel are discussed. The calibration of laser anemometer systems using a rotating disk is also addressed.

  20. A High-Performance Current-Mode Source Driver IC for Mobile Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Il-Hun; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we describe two types of 8-bit current-mode driver ICs with a small area and good performance for applications high accuracy current-mode digital-to-analog converters (DACs), and improved channel-to-channel uniformity for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. One uses the proposed current steering DAC (type A), which is an improved architecture of a binary-weighted DAC, and the other uses a DAC that is a combination of a thermometer-decoded of the DAC and a binary-weighted type. The measured results show that the peak integral nonlinearity (INL) is within ±0.5 the least significant bit (LSB), the peak differential nonlinearity (DNL) is within ±0.5 LSB, and the nonuniformity of output current among channels and chips is within ±0.5 LSB. The size of the driver IC is 15,820 ×1,500 µm2 and the total power consumption of the current-mode driver IC is less than 9 mW when the display has full-white pattern with a luminance of 150 cd/m2. The chip area and power consumption with the proposed current DAC are reduced by 26 and 10%, respectively, compared with those of conventional driver ICs with a fully binary-weighted DAC.

  1. Dual mode antibacterial activity of ion substituted calcium phosphate nanocarriers for bone infections.

    PubMed

    Sampath Kumar, T S; Madhumathi, K; Rubaiya, Y; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25-0.75, and 2.5-7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40-50 nm and width 5-6 nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5 days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21 days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent drug

  2. Application of coupled mode theory and coherent superposition theory to phase-shift measurements on optical microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jack A.; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2016-10-01

    Several mathematical models exist in the literature to describe the properties of optical resonators. Here, coupled mode theory and coherent superposition theory are compared and their consistency is demonstrated as they are applied to phase-shift cavity ring-down measurements in optical (micro-)cavities. In the particular case of a whispering gallery mode in a microsphere cavity these models are applied to transmission measurements and backscattering measurements through the fiber taper that couples light into the microresonator. It is shown that both models produce identical relations when applied to these traveling wave cavities.

  3. Nd:YAG laser with passive-active mode-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weijiang; Chen, Zhenlei; Ren, Deming; Qu, Yanchen; Mo, Shuang; Huang, Jinjer; Andreev, Yury M.; Gorobets, Vadim A.; Petukhov, Vladimir O.; Zemlyanov, Aleksei A.

    2008-03-01

    All solid-state flash-lamp pumped passive-active mode-locked Nd3+:YAG laser is designed and experimentally studded. Saturation absorber Cr4+:YAG with initial transparency 25 and 47% are used as a passive Q-switcher and acousto-optical fused quartz modulator as an active mode-locker. Efficient length of the laser cavity with fixed mirror positions (1.45 m spaced) is droved by changes of 100% flat mirror for concave mirrors with different focus lengths. Changeable output mirrors with transparencies of 15 and 50% are used. Driving of the cavity parameters, laser and acousto-optical modulator power supply voltages let us to control output pulse train and single pulse parameters. As it goes from the analyses of oscillograms fixed with pyroelectric detector (τ=0.5 ns) and 1 GHz oscilloscope, over 95% of pulse output energy has been mode-locked. Average duration of the pulse train envelope of 5 to 50 single pulses at FWHM has been droved within 50 to 600 ns. When this single pulse duration is controlled but did not exceed 2 ns.

  4. Photocatalytic Active Radiation Measurements and Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Underwood, Lauren W.

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic materials are being used to purify air, to kill microbes, and to keep surfaces clean. A wide variety of materials are being developed, many of which have different abilities to absorb various wavelengths of light. Material variability, combined with both spectral illumination intensity and spectral distribution variability, will produce a wide range of performance results. The proposed technology estimates photocatalytic active radiation (PcAR), a unit of radiation that normalizes the amount of light based on its spectral distribution and on the ability of the material to absorb that radiation. Photocatalytic reactions depend upon the number of electron-hole pairs generated at the photocatalytic surface. The number of electron-hole pairs produced depends on the number of photons per unit area per second striking the surface that can be absorbed and whose energy exceeds the bandgap of the photocatalytic material. A convenient parameter to describe the number of useful photons is the number of moles of photons striking the surface per unit area per second. The unit of micro-einsteins (or micromoles) of photons per m2 per sec is commonly used for photochemical and photoelectric-like phenomena. This type of parameter is used in photochemistry, such as in the conversion of light energy for photosynthesis. Photosynthetic response correlates with the number of photons rather than by energy because, in this photochemical process, each molecule is activated by the absorption of one photon. In photosynthesis, the number of photons absorbed in the 400 700 nm spectral range is estimated and is referred to as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). PAR is defined in terms of the photosynthetic photon flux density measured in micro-einsteins of photons per m2 per sec. PcAR is an equivalent, similarly modeled parameter that has been defined for the photocatalytic processes. Two methods to measure the PcAR level are being proposed. In the first method, a calibrated

  5. Automatic segmentation and measurements of gestational sac using static B-mode ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Dheyaa Ahmed; Al-Assam, Hisham; Du, Hongbo; Farren, Jessica; Al-karawi, Dhurgham; Bourne, Tom; Jassim, Sabah

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound imagery has been widely used for medical diagnoses. Ultrasound scanning is safe and non-invasive, and hence used throughout pregnancy for monitoring growth. In the first trimester, an important measurement is that of the Gestation Sac (GS). The task of measuring the GS size from an ultrasound image is done manually by a Gynecologist. This paper presents a new approach to automatically segment a GS from a static B-mode image by exploiting its geometric features for early identification of miscarriage cases. To accurately locate the GS in the image, the proposed solution uses wavelet transform to suppress the speckle noise by eliminating the high-frequency sub-bands and prepare an enhanced image. This is followed by a segmentation step that isolates the GS through the several stages. First, the mean value is used as a threshold to binarise the image, followed by filtering unwanted objects based on their circularity, size and mean of greyscale. The mean value of each object is then used to further select candidate objects. A Region Growing technique is applied as a post-processing to finally identify the GS. We evaluated the effectiveness of the proposed solution by firstly comparing the automatic size measurements of the segmented GS against the manual measurements, and then integrating the proposed segmentation solution into a classification framework for identifying miscarriage cases and pregnancy of unknown viability (PUV). Both test results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in segmentation the GS and classifying the outcomes with high level accuracy (sensitivity (miscarriage) of 100% and specificity (PUV) of 99.87%).

  6. Measurements of undoped accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Kevin; Borselli, Mathew; Holabird, Kevin; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele; Deelman, Peter; Huang, Biqin; Sokolich, Marko; Warren, Leslie; Hazard, Thomas; Kiselev, Andrey; Ross, Richard; Gyure, Mark; Hunter, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    We report transport measurements of undoped single-well accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices with an integrated dot charge sensor. The device is designed so that individual forward-biased circular gates have dominant control of dot charge occupancy, and separate intervening gates have dominant control of tunnel rates and exchange coupling. We have demonstrated controlled loading of the first electron in single and double quantum dots. We used magneto-spectroscopy to measure singlet-triplet splittings in our quantum dots: values are typically ˜0.1 meV. Tunnel rates of single electrons to the baths can be controlled from less than 1 Hz to greater than 10 MHz. We are able to control the (0,2) to (1,1) coupling in a double quantum dot from under-coupled (tc < kT˜ 5μeV) to over-coupled (tc ˜ 0.1 meV) with a bias control of one exchange gate. Sponsored by the United States Department of Defense. Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited. The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

  7. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength goldmore » disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.« less

  8. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  9. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  10. Generation of dissipative solitons in an actively mode-locked ultralong fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Koliada, N A; Nyushkov, B N; Ivanenko, A V; Kobtsev, Sergey M; Harper, Paul; Turitsyn, Sergei K; Denisov, Vladimir I; Pivtsov, V S

    2013-02-28

    A single-pulse actively mode-locked fibre laser with a cavity length exceeding 1 km has been developed and investigated for the first time. This all-fibre erbium-doped laser has a normal intracavity dispersion and generates dissipative 8-ns solitons with a fundamental repetition rate of 163.8 kHz; the energy per pulse reaches 34 nJ. The implemented mode locking, based on the use of intracavity intensity modulator, provides self-triggering and high stability of pulsed lasing. A possibility of continuous tuning of the centre lasing wavelength in the range of 1558 - 1560 nm without any tunable spectral selective elements in the cavity is demonstrated. The tuning occurs when controlling the modulation signal frequency due to the forced change in the pulse repetition time (group delay) under the conditions of intracavity chromatic dispersion. (laser optics 2012)

  11. Piezo activated mode tracking system for widely tunable mode-hop-free external cavity mid-IR semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Gerard (Inventor); Tittel, Frank K. (Inventor); Curl, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A widely tunable, mode-hop-free semiconductor laser operating in the mid-IR comprises a QCL laser chip having an effective QCL cavity length, a diffraction grating defining a grating angle and an external cavity length with respect to said chip, and means for controlling the QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle. The laser of claim 1 wherein said chip may be tuned over a range of frequencies even in the absence of an anti-reflective coating. The diffraction grating is controllably pivotable and translatable relative to said chip and the effective QCL cavity length can be adjusted by varying the injection current to the chip. The laser can be used for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multi species trace-gas detection. Mode-hopping is avoided by controlling the effective QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle so as to replicate a virtual pivot point.

  12. Unconventional Bifunctional Lewis-Brønsted Acid Activation Mode in Bicyclic Guanidine-Catalyzed Conjugate Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bokun; Wong, Ming Wah

    2015-08-18

    DFT calculations have demonstrated that the unconventional bifunctional Brønsted-Lewis acid activation mode is generally applicable to a range of nucleophilic conjugate additions catalyzed by bicyclic guanidine catalysts. It competes readily with the conventional bifunctional Brønsted acid mode of activation. The optimal pro-nucleophiles for this unconventional bifunctional activation are acidic substrates with low pKa, while the best electrophiles are flexible 1,4-diamide and 1,4-diester conjugated systems.

  13. Contractile activity of the pectoralis in the zebra finch according to mode and velocity of flap-bounding flight.

    PubMed

    Tobalske, Bret W; Puccinelli, Lisa A; Sheridan, David C

    2005-08-01

    We studied flying zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata, N = 12), to provide a new test of a long-standing ;fixed-gear' hypothesis that flap-bounding birds use only intermittent non-flapping phases, instead of variation in muscle activity, to vary mechanical power output in flight. Using sonomicrometry and electromyography, we measured in vivo fascicle length and neuromuscular recruitment in the pectoralis as the birds flew in different flight modes (level, ascending, descending; mean velocity 1.6+/-0.3 m s(-1)) and across velocities in a new, variable-speed wind tunnel (0-12 m s(-1)). Synchronized high-speed digital video (250 Hz) provided a record of wing kinematics. Flight mode had a significant effect upon pectoralis strain, strain rate, fractional shortening and the relative timing of muscle activity (onset, offset and duration). Among flight velocities, we observed significant variation in pectoralis strain, fractional lengthening and shortening, strain rate, relative electromyographic (EMG) amplitude, and EMG duration and offset. In particular, variation in strain rate and relative EMG amplitude indicates that the fixed-gear hypothesis should be rejected. Instead, it appears that zebra finch vary work and power output within wingbeats by modulating muscle contractile behavior and between wingbeats using intermittent bounds. Muscle activity patterns and wing kinematics were similar between free flight and wind tunnel flight at similar speeds. Comparing flights with and without surgically implanted transducers and electrodes, zebra finch exhibited a reduction in maximum velocity (from 14 to 12 m s(-1)) and a significant increase in wingbeat frequency and percent time flapping. This identifies a potential limitation of in vivo flight measurements, and similar studies of bird flight should, therefore, include measurements of the extent to which flight performance is compromised by experimental protocol.

  14. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-15

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  15. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  16. Fluorescence measurement by a streak camera in a single-photon-counting mode.

    PubMed

    Komura, Masayuki; Itoh, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    We describe here a recently developed fluorescence measurement system that uses a streak camera to detect fluorescence decay in a single photon-counting mode. This system allows for easy measurements of various samples and provides 2D images of fluorescence in the wavelength and time domains. The great advantage of the system is that the data can be handled with ease; furthermore, the data are amenable to detailed analysis. We describe the picosecond kinetics of fluorescence in spinach Photosystem (PS) II particles at 4-77 K as a typical experimental example. Through the global analysis of the data, we have identified a new fluorescence band (F689) in addition to the already established F680, F685, and F695 emission bands. The blue shift of the steady-state fluorescence spectrum upon cooling below 77 K can be interpreted as an increase of the shorter-wavelength fluorescence, especially F689, due to the slowdown of the excitation energy transfer process. The F685 and F695 bands seem to be thermally equilibrated at 77 K but not at 4 K. The simple and efficient photon accumulation feature of the system allows us to measure fluorescence from leaves, solutions, single colonies, and even single cells. The 2D fluorescence images obtained by this system are presented for isolated spinach PS II particles, intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana, the PS I super-complex of a marine centric diatom, Chaetoceros gracilis, isolated membranes of a purple photosynthetic bacterium, Acidiphilium rubrum, which contains Zn-BChl a, and a coral that contains a green fluorescent protein and an algal endosymbiont, Zooxanthella. PMID:19568951

  17. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake - Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  18. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake: Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  19. Characterization of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode III Fracture Toughness Measurement of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is designed to initiate mode III delamination growth in composite laminates. The test has undergone several design changes during its development. The objective of this paper was to determine the suitability of the current ECT test design a mode III fracture test. To this end, ECT tests were conducted on specimens manufactured from IM7/8552 and S2/8552 tape laminates. Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed. The analysis results were used to calculate the distribution of mode I, mode II, and mode III strain energy release rate along the delamination front. The results indicated that mode IIIdominated delamination growth would be initiated from the specimen center. However, in specimens of both material types, the measured values of GIIIc exhibited significant dependence on delamination length. Load-displacement response of the specimens exhibited significant deviation from linearity before specimen failure. X-radiographs of a sample of specimens revealed that damage was initiated in the specimens prior to failure. Further inspection of the failure surfaces is required to identify the damage and determine that mode III delamination is initiated in the specimens.

  20. Investigations of the Wideband Spectrum of Higher Order Modes Measured on TESLA-style Cavities at the FLASH Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, S.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Frisch, J.; Li, Z.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Smith, T.; Baboi, N.; Eddy, N.; Piccoli, L.; Rechenmacher, R.; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2007-06-27

    Higher Order Modes (HOMs) excited by the passage of the beam through an accelerating cavity depend on the properties of both the cavity and the beam. It is possible, therefore, to draw conclusions on the inner geometry of the cavities based on observations of the properties of the HOM spectrum. A data acquisition system based on two 20 GS/s, 6 GHz scopes has been set up at the FLASH facility, DESY, in order to measure a significant fraction of the HOM spectrum predicted to be generated by the TESLA cavities used for the acceleration of its beam. The HOMs from a particular cavity at FLASH were measured under a range of known beam conditions. The dipole modes have been identified in the data. 3D simulations of different manufacturing errors have been made, and it has been shown that these simulations can predict the measured modes.

  1. Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

  2. Relativistic electron acceleration by compressional-mode ULF waves: Evidence from correlated Cluster, Los Alamos National Laboratory spacecraft, and ground-based magnetometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lun C.; Shao, X.; Sharma, A. S.; Fung, Shing F.

    2011-07-01

    Simultaneous observations by Cluster and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) spacecraft and Canadian Array for Real-Time Investigations of Magnetic Activity and International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects magnetometer arrays during a sudden storm commencement on 25 September 2001 show evidence of relativistic electron acceleration by compressional-mode ULF waves. The waves are driven by the quasiperiodic solar wind dynamical pressure fluctuations that continuously buffet the magnetosphere for ˜3 h. The compressional-mode ULF waves are identified by comparing the power of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations with the total magnetic field power. The radial distribution and azimuthal propagation of both toroidal and poloidal-mode ULF waves are derived from ground-based magnetometer data. The energetic electron fluxes measured by LANL show modulation of low-energy electrons and acceleration of high-energy electrons by the compressional poloidal-mode electric field oscillations. The energy threshold of accelerated electrons at the geosynchronous orbit is ˜0.4 MeV, which is roughly consistent with drift-resonant interaction of magnetospheric electrons with compressional-mode ULF waves.

  3. High performance dual-mode surface plasmon coupled emission imaging apparatus integrating Kretschmann and reverse Kretschmann configurations for flexible measurements.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei-Peng; Zhai, Yan-Yun; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Liu, Qian; Weng, Yu-Hua; Xie, Kai-Xin; Lin, Guo-Chun; Li, Yao-Qun

    2016-01-01

    A Kretschmann (KR) and reverse Kretschmann (RK) dual-mode surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE) imaging apparatus based on prism coupling was built up. Highly directional and polarized fluorescence images for both RK and KR configurations were obtained. Besides, surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence and free space imaging can also be measured conveniently from this apparatus. Combining the high sensitivity of KR mode and the simplicity of RK mode, the multifunctional imaging system is flexible to provide different configurations for imaging applications. Compared to the free space imaging, SPCE imaging provides enhanced fluorescence, especially large enhancement up to about 50 fold in KR configuration. Additionally, the degree of evanescent field enhancement effect was easily estimated experimentally using the apparatus to compare the different imaging configurations. We believed that the dual-mode SPCE imaging apparatus will be useful in fundamental study of plasmon-controlled fluorescence and be a powerful tool for optical imaging, especially for microarray and biological applications.

  4. The Negative Mode Proteome with Activated Ion Negative Electron Transfer Dissociation (AI-NETD)*

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Nicholas M.; Rush, Matthew J. P.; Rose, Christopher M.; Richards, Alicia L.; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Bailey, Derek J.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The field of proteomics almost uniformly relies on peptide cation analysis, leading to an underrepresentation of acidic portions of proteomes, including relevant acidic posttranslational modifications. Despite the many benefits negative mode proteomics can offer, peptide anion analysis remains in its infancy due mainly to challenges with high-pH reversed-phase separations and a lack of robust fragmentation methods suitable for peptide anion characterization. Here, we report the first implementation of activated ion negative electron transfer dissociation (AI-NETD) on the chromatographic timescale, generating 7,601 unique peptide identifications from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in single-shot nLC-MS/MS analyses of tryptic peptides—a greater than 5-fold increase over previous results with NETD alone. These improvements translate to identification of 1,106 proteins, making this work the first negative mode study to identify more than 1,000 proteins in any system. We then compare the performance of AI-NETD for analysis of peptides generated by five proteases (trypsin, LysC, GluC, chymotrypsin, and AspN) for negative mode analyses, identifying as many as 5,356 peptides (1,045 proteins) with LysC and 4,213 peptides (857 proteins) with GluC in yeast—characterizing 1,359 proteins in total. Finally, we present the first deep-sequencing approach for negative mode proteomics, leveraging offline low-pH reversed-phase fractionation prior to online high-pH separations and peptide fragmentation with AI-NETD. With this platform, we identified 3,467 proteins in yeast with trypsin alone and characterized a total of 3,730 proteins using multiple proteases, or nearly 83% of the expressed yeast proteome. This work represents the most extensive negative mode proteomics study to date, establishing AI-NETD as a robust tool for large-scale peptide anion characterization and making the negative mode approach a more viable platform for future proteomic studies. PMID:26193884

  5. Antiviral activity and specific modes of action of bacterial prodigiosin against Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Zeng, Cheng; Liu, RenHua; Chen, Jie; Li, Ru; Wang, XinYan; Bai, WenWen; Liu, XiaoYuan; Xiang, TingTing; Zhang, Lin; Wan, YongJi

    2016-05-01

    Prodigiosin, the tripyrrole red pigment, is a bacterial secondary metabolite with multiple bioactivities; however, the antiviral activity has not been reported yet. In the present study, we found the antiviral activity of bacterial prodigiosin on Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV)-infected cells in vitro, with specific modes of action. Prodigiosin at nontoxic concentrations selectively killed virus-infected cells, inhibited viral gene transcription, especially viral early gene ie-1, and prevented virus-mediated membrane fusion. Under prodigiosin treatment, both progeny virus production and viral DNA replication were significantly inhibited. Fluorescent assays showed that prodigiosin predominantly located in cytoplasm which suggested it might interact with cytoplasm factors to inhibit virus replication. In conclusion, the present study clearly indicates that prodigiosin possesses significant antiviral activity against BmNPV.

  6. Evidence for a Clathrin-independent mode of endocytosis at a continuously active sensory synapse.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Michaela; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; Regus-Leidig, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle exocytosis at chemical synapses is followed by compensatory endocytosis. Multiple pathways including Clathrin-mediated retrieval of single vesicles, bulk retrieval of large cisternae, and kiss-and-run retrieval have been reported to contribute to vesicle recycling. Particularly at the continuously active ribbon synapses of retinal photoreceptor and bipolar cells, compensatory endocytosis plays an essential role to provide ongoing vesicle supply. Yet, little is known about the mechanisms that contribute to endocytosis at these highly complex synapses. To identify possible specializations in ribbon synaptic endocytosis during different states of activity, we exposed mice to controlled lighting conditions and compared the distribution of endocytotic proteins at rod and cone photoreceptor, and ON bipolar cell ribbon synapses with light and electron microscopy. In mouse ON bipolar cell terminals, Clathrin-mediated endocytosis seemed to be the dominant mode of endocytosis at all adaptation states analyzed. In contrast, in mouse photoreceptor terminals in addition to Clathrin-coated pits, clusters of membranously connected electron-dense vesicles appeared during prolonged darkness. These clusters labeled for Dynamin3, Endophilin1, and Synaptojanin1, but not for AP180, Clathrin LC, and hsc70. We hypothesize that rod and cone photoreceptors possess an additional Clathrin-independent mode of vesicle retrieval supporting the continuous synaptic vesicle supply during prolonged high activity.

  7. Measurements of Branching Ratios And Search for CP Violation in the Modes B0 to Rho Pi, Rho K

    SciTech Connect

    Laplace, Sandrine; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2006-09-18

    The BABAR experiment, at the PEP-II collider at SLAC, has been studying since 1999 CP violation in the B meson system. After the precise measurement of sin2{beta}, one is now concentrating on measuring the angles {alpha} and {gamma} of the unitarity triangle. The work presented in this thesis concerns the measurement of the angle {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{pi} mode.

  8. Multiple Binding Modes between HNF4[alpha] and the LXXLL Motifs of PGC-1[alpha] Lead to Full Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Rha, Geun Bae; Wu, Guangteng; Shoelson, Steven E.; Chi, Young-In

    2010-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a novel nuclear receptor that participates in a hierarchical network of transcription factors regulating the development and physiology of such vital organs as the liver, pancreas, and kidney. Among the various transcriptional coregulators with which HNF4{alpha} interacts, peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) represents a novel coactivator whose activation is unusually robust and whose binding mode appears to be distinct from that of canonical coactivators such as NCoA/SRC/p160 family members. To elucidate the potentially unique molecular mechanism of PGC-1{alpha} recruitment, we have determined the crystal structure of HNF4{alpha} in complex with a fragment of PGC-1{alpha} containing all three of its LXXLL motifs. Despite the presence of all three LXXLL motifs available for interactions, only one is bound at the canonical binding site, with no additional contacts observed between the two proteins. However, a close inspection of the electron density map indicates that the bound LXXLL motif is not a selected one but an averaged structure of more than one LXXLL motif. Further biochemical and functional studies show that the individual LXXLL motifs can bind but drive only minimal transactivation. Only when more than one LXXLL motif is involved can significant transcriptional activity be measured, and full activation requires all three LXXLL motifs. These findings led us to propose a model wherein each LXXLL motif has an additive effect, and the multiple binding modes by HNF4{alpha} toward the LXXLL motifs of PGC-1{alpha} could account for the apparent robust activation by providing a flexible mechanism for combinatorial recruitment of additional coactivators and mediators.

  9. 3D Magnetic Measurements of Kink and Locked Modes in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Shiraki, D.

    2013-10-01

    The DIII-D magnetics diagnostic has been greatly expanded to fully characterize non-axisymmetric ``3D'' fields. Five poloidal locations now recover n <= 3 , while new HFS arrays provide poloidal spectral resolution of 7.4 cm. Initial measurements suggest externally driven kink structures deviate from MARS-F and IPEC models. These variations extend to the ideal regime, where toroidal agreement is observed. The plasma response to an n = 3 RMP increases monotonically as beta increases and q95 decreases, contrary to predictions of a screening to kink valley. Finally, the temporal evolution of the 3D eigenstructure of a slowly rotating (5 Hz) quasi-static, born locked, tearing mode provides the first evidence of an appreciable n = 2 error field, and an estimate of the phase for future correction. This new 3D capability will be used to understand and optimize control of RWMs, NTV torque, ELMs, and error field correction to extend stable tokamak operation. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FG02-04ER54761 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Edge mode velocities in the quantum Hall effect from a dc measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Philip; Feldman, D. E.

    Because of the bulk gap, low energy physics in the quantum Hall effect is confined to the edges of the 2D electron liquid. The velocities of edge modes are key parameters of edge physics. They were determined in several quantum Hall systems from time-resolved measurements and high-frequency ac transport. We propose a way to extract edge velocities from dc transport in a point contact geometry defined by narrow gates. The width of the gates assumes two different sizes at small and large distances from the point contact. The Coulomb interaction across the gates depends on the gate width and affects the conductance of the contact. The conductance exhibits two different temperature dependencies at high and low temperatures. The transition between the two regimes is determined by the edge velocity. An interesting feature of the low-temperature I - V curve is current oscillations as a function of the voltage. The oscillations emerge due to charge reflection from the interface of the regions defined by the narrow and wide sections of the gates. This work is available at arXiv:1510.01725 This work was supported by the NSF under Grant No. DMR-1205715.

  11. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.; Gobby, P. L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R. J.

    1997-04-15

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600-{mu}m-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-{mu}m and 60-{mu}m wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-{mu}m-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-{mu}m perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-{mu}m case when compared to targets without foam.

  12. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J.P.; Verdon, C.P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Boehly, T.R.; Bradley, D.K.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P.W.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Watt, R.G.; Gobby, P.L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5{times}10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4{percent}{endash}7{percent} over a 600-{mu}m-diam region defined by the 90{percent} intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-{mu}m and 60-{mu}m wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with {ital ORCHID} simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-{mu}m-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-{mu}m perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-{mu}m case when compared to targets without foam. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements with the OMEGA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Ofer, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.; Gobby, P. L.; Willi, O.; Taylor, R. J.

    1997-04-01

    The results from a series of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five to six 351-nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5×1014W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3-ns ramp and 3-ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600-μm-diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using through-foil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets with and without a foam buffer. The growth of both 31-μm and 60-μm wavelength perturbations was found to be in good agreement with ORCHID simulations when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The addition of a 30-mg/cc, 100-μm-thick polystyrene foam buffer layer resulted in reduced growth of the 31-μm perturbation and essentially unchanged growth for the 60-μm case when compared to targets without foam.

  14. Immobilised activated sludge based biosensor for biochemical oxygen demand measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Björnsson, L; Mattiasson, B

    2000-02-01

    A biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensor, based on an immobilised mixed culture of microorganisms in combination with a dissolved oxygen electrode, has been developed for the purpose of on-line monitoring of the biological treatment process for waste and wastewater. The sensor was designed for easy replacement of the biomembrane, thereby making it suitable for short-term use. The drawbacks of activated sludge based sensor, such as short sensor lifetime, were thereby circumvented. The sensor BOD measurements were carried out in the kinetic mode using a flow injection system, resulting in 25 s for one measurement followed by 4-8 min recovery time. Based on the results of normalised sensor responses, the OECD synthetic wastewater was considered to be a more suitable calibration solution in comparison with the GGA solution. Good agreement was achieved between the results of the sensor BOD measurement and those obtained from BOD5 analysis of a wastewater sample from a food-processing factory. Reproducibility of responses using one sensor was below +/- 5.6%, standard deviation. Reproducibility of responses using different sensors was within acceptable bias limits, viz. +/- 15% standard deviation.

  15. PARduino: A Simple Device Measuring and Logging Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Findley, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400 to 700 nm) is one of the primary controls of forest carbon and water relations. In complex terrain, PAR has high spatial-variability. Given the high cost of commercial datalogging equipment, spatially-distributed measurements of PAR have been typically modeled using geographic coordinates and terrain indices. Here, we present a design for a low cost, field-deployable device for measuring and logging PAR built around an Arduino microcontroller (we named it PARduino). PARduino provides for widely distributed sensor arrays and tests the feasibility of using hobbyist-grade electronics for collecting scientific data. PARduino components include a LiCor quantum sensor, EME Systems signal converter/amplifier, and Sparkfun's Arduino Pro Mini microcontroller. Additional components include a real time clock, a microSD flash memory card, and a custom printed circuit board (PCB). We selected the components with an eye towards ease of assembly. Everything can be connected to the PCB using through-hole soldering techniques. Since the device will be deployed in remote research plots that lack easy access to line power, battery life was also a consideration in the design. Extended deployment is possible because PARduino's software keeps it in a low-power sleep mode until ready to make a measurement. PARduino will be open-source hardware for use and improvement by others.

  16. Measurements of the effects of smoke on active circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Smoke has long been recognized as the most common source of fire damage to electrical equipment; however, most failures have been analyzed after the fire was out and the smoke vented. The effects caused while the smoke is still in the air have not been explored. Such effects have implications for new digital equipment being installed in nuclear reactors. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring work to determine the impact of smoke on digital instrumentation and control. As part of this program, Sandia National Laboratories has tested simple active circuits to determine how smoke affects them. These tests included the study of three possible failure modes on a functional board: (1) circuit bridging, (2) corrosion (metal loss), and (3) induction of stray capacitance. The performance of nine different circuits was measured continuously on bare and conformally coated boards during smoke exposures lasting 1 hour each and continued for 24 hours after the exposure started. The circuit that was most affected by smoke (100% change in measured values) was the one most sensitive to circuit bridging. Its high impedance (50 Mohm) was shorted during the exposure, but in some cases recovered after the smoke was vented. The other two failure modes, corrosion and induced stray capacitance, caused little change in the function of the circuits. The smoke permanently increased resistance of the circuit tested for corrosion, implying that the contacts were corroded. However, the change was very small (< 2%). The stray capacitance test circuit showed very little change after a smoke exposure in either the short or long term. The results of the tests suggest that conformal coatings and type of circuit are major considerations when designing digital circuitry to be used in critical control systems.

  17. Measurements of the Effects of Smoke on Active Circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.J.

    1999-02-09

    Smoke has long been recognized as the most common source of fire damage to electrical equipment; however, most failures have been analyzed after the fire was out and the smoke vented. The effects caused while the smoke is still in the air have not been explored. Such effects have implications for new digital equipment being installed in nuclear reactors. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring work to determine the impact of smoke on digital instrumentation and control. As part of this program, Sandia National Laboratories has tested simple active circuits to determine how smoke affects them. These tests included the study of three possible failure modes on a functional board: (1) circuit bridging, (2) corrosion (metal loss), and (3) induction of stray capacitance. The performance of nine different circuits was measured continuously on bare and conformably coated boards during smoke exposures lasting 1 hour each and continued for 24 hours after the exposure started. The circuit that was most affected by smoke (100% change in measured values) was the one most sensitive to circuit bridging. Its high impedance (50 M{Omega}) was shorted during the exposure, but in some cases recovered after the smoke was vented. The other two failure modes, corrosion and induced stray capacitance, caused little change in the function of the circuits. The smoke permanently increased resistance of the circuit tested for corrosion, implying that the cent acts were corroded. However, the change was very small (< 2%). The stray-capacitance test circuit showed very little change after a smoke exposure in either the short or long term. The results of the tests suggest that conformal coatings and type of circuit are major considerations when designing digital circuitry to be used in critical control systems.

  18. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Verdon, C. P.

    2000-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 {mu}m diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 {mu}m wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor growth-rate measurements on the OMEGA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Verdon, C. P.; Glendinning, S. G.; Kalantar, D. H.; Watt, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    The results from a series of single-mode, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth experiments performed on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar targets are reported. Planar targets with imposed mass perturbations were accelerated using five or six 351 nm laser beams overlapped with total intensities up to 2.5×1014 W/cm2. Experiments were performed with both 3 ns ramp and 3 ns flat-topped temporal pulse shapes. The use of distributed phase plates and smoothing by spectral dispersion resulted in a laser-irradiation nonuniformity of 4%-7% over a 600 μm diam region defined by the 90% intensity contour. The temporal growth of the modulation in optical depth was measured using throughfoil radiography and was detected with an x-ray framing camera for CH targets. Two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations (ORCHID) [R. L. McCrory and C. P. Verdon, in Inertial Confinement Fusion (Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1989), pp. 83-124] of the growth of 20, 31, and 60 μm wavelength perturbations were in good agreement with the experimental data when the experimental details, including noise, were included. The amplitude of the simulation optical depth is in good agreement with the experimental optical depth; therefore, great care must be taken when the growth rates are compared to dispersion formulas. Since the foil's initial condition just before it is accelerated is not that of a uniformly compressed foil, the optical density measurement does not accurately reflect the amplitude of the ablation surface but is affected by the initial nonuniform density profile.

  20. Measurements of Nucleation-Mode Particle Size Distributions in Aircraft Plumes during SULFUR 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Bradford, Deborah G.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the participation of the University of Denver in an airborne measurement program, SULFUR 6, which was undertaken in late September and early October of 1998 by the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft und Raumfahrt (DLR). Scientific findings from two papers that have been published or accepted and from one manuscript that is in preparation are presented. The SULFUR 6 experiment was designed to investigate the emissions from subsonic aircraft to constrain calculations of possible atmospheric chemical and climatic effects. The University of Denver effort contributed toward the following SULFUR 6 goals: (1) To investigate the relationship between fuel sulfur content (FSC--mass of sulfur per mass of fuel) and particle number and mass emission index (El--quantity emitted per kg of fuel burned); (2) To provide upper and lower limits for the mass conversion efficiency (nu) of fuel sulfur to gaseous and particulate sulfuric acid; (3) To constrain models of volatile particle nucleation and growth by measuring the particle size distribution between 3 and 100 nm at aircraft plume ages ranging from 10(exp -1) to 10(exp 3) s; (4) To determine microphysical and optical properties and bulk chemical composition of soot particles in aircraft exhaust; and (5) To investigate the differences in particle properties between aircraft plumes in contrail and non-contrail situations. The experiment focused on emissions from the ATTAS research aircraft (a well characterized, but older technology turbojet) and from an in-service Boeing 737-300 aircraft provided by Lufthansa, with modem, high-bypass turbofan engines. Measurements were made from the DLR Dassault Falcon 900 aircraft, a modified business jet. The Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Program (AEAP) provided funding to operate an instrument, the nucleation-mode aerosol size spectrometer (N-MASS), during the SULFUR 6 campaign and to analyze the data. The N-MASS was developed at the University of Denver with the support of

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Amine Oxides: Mode of Action and Structure-Activity Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Šubík, Július; Takácsová, Gizela; Pšenák, Mikuláš; Devínsky, Ferdinand

    1977-01-01

    The effect of N-alkyl derivatives of saturated heterocyclic amine oxides on the growth and metabolism of microorganisms has been studied. 4-Dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide inhibited the differentiation and growth of Bacillus cereus, of different species of filamentous fungi, and of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For vegetative cells, the effect of 4-dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide was lethal. Cells of S. cerevisiae, after interaction with 4-dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide, released intracellular K+ and were unable to oxidize or ferment glucose. The functions of isolated yeast mitochondria were also impaired. 4-Dodecylmorpholine-N-oxide at growth-inhibiting concentrations induced rapid lysis of osmotically stabilized yeast protoplasts, with the rate of lysis a function of temperature and of amine oxide concentration. A study of the relationships between structure, antimicrobial activity, and cytolytic activity was made with a group of structurally different amine oxides involving a series of homologous 4-alkylmorpholine-N-oxides, 1-alkylpiperidine-N-oxides, 1-dodecylpyrrolidine-N-oxide, 1-dodecylperhydroasepine-N-oxide, and N,N-dimethyldodecylamine oxide. Disorganization of the membrane structure after interaction of cells with the tested amine oxides was primarily responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the amine oxides. This activity was found to be dependent on the chain length of the hydrophobic alkyl group and was only moderately influenced by other substituents of the polarized N-oxide group. PMID:409340

  2. What is Local Mode (LM)? Global Mode (GM)? Calibration Mode?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... measurement in Global Mode (GM), Local Mode (LM), and Calibration. Global Mode is the normal acquisition with pole to pole coverage ... targets approximately 300 km in length Calibration Implemented bi-monthly Spectralon solar ...

  3. Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Experiments Part 1. Measurements of Magnetic Islands and Delta Prime.

    SciTech Connect

    E.D. Fredrickson; M.B. Bell; R.V. Budny; S.H. Batha; Z. Chang; et al

    1997-11-01

    Tearing-type modes are observed in most high-confinement operation regimes in TFTR. Three different methods are used to measure the magnetic island widths: external magnetic coils, internal temperature fluctuation from the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic, and an experiment where the plasma major radius is rapidly shifted ("Jog" experiments). A good agreement between the three methods is observed. Numerical and analytic calculations of delta prime (the tearing instability index) are compared with an experimental measurement of delta prime using the tearing-mode eigenfunction mapped from the jog data. The obtained negative delta prime indicates that the observed tearing modes cannot be explained by the classical current-gradient-driven tearing theory.

  4. Methylphenidate remediates error-preceding activation of the default mode brain regions in cocaine addicted individuals

    PubMed Central

    Matuskey, David; Luo, Xi; Zhang, Sheng; Morgan, Peter T.; Abdelghany, Osama; Malison, Robert T.; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2013-01-01

    Many previous studies suggest the potential of psychostimulants in improving cognitive functioning. Our earlier pharmacological brain imaging study showed that intravenous methylphenidate (MPH) improves inhibitory control by altering cortico-striato-thalamic activations in cocaine dependent (CD) individuals. Here we provide additional evidence for the effects of MPH in restoring cerebral activations during cognitive performance. Ten CD individuals performed a stop signal task (SST) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in two sessions, in which either MPH (0.5 mg/Kg BW) or saline was administered intravenously. In the SST, a frequent go signal instructs participants to make a speeded response and a less frequent stop signal instructs them to withhold the response. Our previous work described increased activation of the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex and ventromedial prefrontal cortex – regions of the default mode network (DMN) – before participants committed a stop error in healthy control but not CD individuals (Bednarski et al., 2011). The current results showed that, compared to saline, MPH restored error-preceding activations of DMN regions in CD individuals. The extent of the changes in precuneus activity was correlated with MPH-elicited increase in systolic blood pressure. These findings suggest that the influence of MPH on cerebral activations may extend beyond cognitive control and provide additional evidence warranting future studies to investigate the neural mechanisms and physiological markers of the efficacy of agonist therapy in cocaine dependence. PMID:23973363

  5. Variability in the Southern Annular Mode determines wildfire activity in Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Andrés; Veblen, Thomas T.

    2011-07-01

    Under the current global warming trend, wildfire activity is expected to decrease in biomass-limited fire regimes but increase in drought-limited fire regimes with abundant biomass. We examined the effects of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) on interannual variability in wildfire activity in xeric woodland and temperate rainforest ecosystems across a latitudinal range of 10° in temperate southwestern South America (SSA). Based on 42 fire history sites based on nearly 600 fire-scarred trees (the largest available dataset of annually resolved tree-ring records of fire activity in the Southern Hemisphere), we show that years of widespread fire in both xeric woodland and rainforest ecosystems are associated with positive departures of SAM. The association of positive SAM with increased fire activity is explained by the teleconnection of SAM to spring drought across most of SSA. During the late 20th century, only the rainforest ecosystem shows a strong increase in fire activity, which is consistent both with upward trends in SAM and with warming conditions. We attribute the lack of increased burning in the xeric woodland environment to socioeconomic factors and fire behavior (low severity) that facilitate more effective fire suppression in the xeric woodland habitat. Given projected future increases in SAM and the associated warm-dry trend, wildfire activity in much of SSA is likely to increase during the 21st century.

  6. Dual Mode Antibacterial Activity of Ion Substituted Calcium Phosphate Nanocarriers for Bone Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sampath Kumar, T. S.; Madhumathi, K.; Rubaiya, Y.; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25–0.75, and 2.5–7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40–50 nm and width 5–6 nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5 days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21 days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent

  7. Characterization of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode III Fracture Toughness Measurement of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is designed to initiate mode III delamination growth in composite laminates. An ECT specimen is a rectangular laminate, containing an edge delamination at the laminate mid-plane. Torsion load is applied to the specimens, resulting in relative transverse shear sliding of the delaminated faces. The test data reduction schemes are intended to yield initiation values of critical mode III strain energy release rate, G(sub IIIc), that are constant with delamination length. The test has undergone several design changes during its development. The objective of this paper was to determine the suitability of the current ECT test design as a mode III fracture test. To this end, ECT tests were conducted on specimens manufactured from IM7/8552 and specimens made from S2/8552 tape laminates. Several specimens, each with different delamination lengths are tested. Detailed, three-dimensional finite element analyses of the specimens were performed. The analysis results were used to calculate the distribution of mode I, mode II, and mode III strain energy release rate along the delamination front. The results indicated that mode III-dominated delamination growth would be initiated from the specimen center. However, in specimens of both material types, the measured values of G(sub IIIc) exhibited significant dependence on delamination length. Furthermore, there was a large amount of scatter in the data. Load-displacement response of the specimens exhibited significant deviation from linearity before specimen failure. X-radiographs of a sample of specimens revealed that damage was initiated in the specimens prior to failure. Further inspection of the failure surfaces is required to identify the damage and determine that mode III delamination is initiated in the specimens.

  8. A New Non-linear Technique for Measurement of Splitting Functions of Normal Modes of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachhai, S.; Masters, G.; Tkalcic, H.

    2014-12-01

    Normal modes are the vibrating patterns of the Earth in response to the large earthquakes. Normal mode spectra are split due to Earth's rotation, ellipticity, and heterogeneity. The normal mode splitting is visualized through splitting functions, which represent the local radial average of Earth's structure seen by a mode of vibration. The analysis of the splitting of normal modes can provide unique information about the lateral variation of the Earth's elastic properties that cannot be directly imaged in body wave tomographic images. The non-linear iterative spectral fitting of the observed complex spectra and autoregressive linear inversion have been widely utilized to compute the Earth's 3-D structure. However, the non-linear inversion requires a model of the earthquake source and the retrieved 3-D structure is sensitive to the initial constraints. In contrast, the autoregressive linear inversion does not require the source model. However, this method requires many events to achieve full convergence. In addition, significant disagreement exists between different studies because of the non-uniqueness of the problem and limitations of different methods. We thus apply the neighbourhood algorithm (NA) to measure splitting functions. The NA is an efficient model space search technique and works in two steps: In the first step, the algorithm finds all the models compatible with given data while the posterior probability density of the model parameters are obtained in the second step. The NA can address the problem of non-uniqueness by taking advantage of random sampling of the full model space. The parameter trade-offs are conveniently visualized using joint marginal distributions. In addition, structure coefficients uncertainties can be extracted from the posterior probability distribution. After demonstrating the feasibility of NA with synthetic examples, we compute the splitting functions for the mode 13S2 (sensitive to the inner core) from several large

  9. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  10. A measurement of the cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization power spectrum at sub-degree scales with POLARBEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Anthony, A. E.; Halverson, N. W.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Elleflot, T.; Feng, C.; Borrill, J.; Errard, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Flanigan, D.; Dobbs, M.; Gilbert, A.; Fabbian, G.; Collaboration: Polarbear Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    We report a measurement of the B-mode polarization power spectrum in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the POLARBEAR experiment in Chile. The faint B-mode polarization signature carries information about the universe's entire history of gravitational structure formation, and the cosmic inflation that may have occurred in the very early universe. Our measurement covers the angular multipole range 500 < ℓ < 2100 and is based on observations of an effective sky area of 25 deg{sup 2} with 3.'5 resolution at 150 GHz. On these angular scales, gravitational lensing of the CMB by intervening structure in the universe is expected to be the dominant source of B-mode polarization. Including both systematic and statistical uncertainties, the hypothesis of no B-mode polarization power from gravitational lensing is rejected at 97.2% confidence. The band powers are consistent with the standard cosmological model. Fitting a single lensing amplitude parameter A{sub BB} to the measured band powers, A{sub BB}=1.12±0.61(stat){sub −0.12}{sup +0.04}(sys)±0.07(multi), where A{sub BB} = 1 is the fiducial WMAP-9 ΛCDM value. In this expression, 'stat' refers to the statistical uncertainty, 'sys' to the systematic uncertainty associated with possible biases from the instrument and astrophysical foregrounds, and 'multi' to the calibration uncertainties that have a multiplicative effect on the measured amplitude A{sub BB}.

  11. Absolute frequency measurement of an acetylene stabilized laser using a selected single mode from a femtosecond fiber laser comb.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Han Young; Lee, Sung Hun; Lee, Won Kyu; Moon, Han Seb; Suh, Ho Suhng

    2008-03-01

    We performed an absolute frequency measurement of an acetylene stabilized laser utilizing a femtosecond injection locking technique that can select one component among the fiber laser comb modes. The injection locking scheme has all the fiber configurations. Femtosecond comb lines of 250 MHz spacing based on the fiber femtosecond laser were used for injection locking of a distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating at 1542 nm as a frequency reference. The comb injected DFB laser serves as a selection filter of optical comb modes and an amplifier for amplification of the selected mode. The DFB laser injection locked to the desired comb mode was used to evaluate the frequency stability and absolute frequency measurement of an acetylene stabilized laser. The frequency stability of the acetylene stabilized laser was measured to be 1.1 x 10(-12) for a 1 s averaging time, improving to 6.9 x 10(-14) after 512 s. The absolute frequency of the laser stabilized on the P(16) transition of (13)C(2)H(2) was measured to be 194 369 569 385.7 kHz.

  12. A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background B-mode Polarization Power Spectrum at Sub-degree Scales with POLARBEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Polarbear Collaboration: P. A. R. Ade; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A. E.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A. H.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Linder, E.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Orlando, A.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Schanning, I.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Takakura, S.; Tomaru, T.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    2014-10-01

    We report a measurement of the B-mode polarization power spectrum in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the POLARBEAR experiment in Chile. The faint B-mode polarization signature carries information about the universe's entire history of gravitational structure formation, and the cosmic inflation that may have occurred in the very early universe. Our measurement covers the angular multipole range 500 < l < 2100 and is based on observations of an effective sky area of 25 \\deg ^2 with 3.'5 resolution at 150 GHz. On these angular scales, gravitational lensing of the CMB by intervening structure in the universe is expected to be the dominant source of B-mode polarization. Including both systematic and statistical uncertainties, the hypothesis of no B-mode polarization power from gravitational lensing is rejected at 97.2% confidence. The band powers are consistent with the standard cosmological model. Fitting a single lensing amplitude parameter ABB to the measured band powers, ABB = 1.12 +/- 0.61 (stat) +0.04-0.12(sys) +/- 0.07 (multi), where ABB = 1 is the fiducial WMAP-9 ΛCDM value. In this expression, "stat" refers to the statistical uncertainty, "sys" to the systematic uncertainty associated with possible biases from the instrument and astrophysical foregrounds, and "multi" to the calibration uncertainties that have a multiplicative effect on the measured amplitude ABB .

  13. A scheme for approximate conditional teleportation of entangled two-mode cavity state without Bell state measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhi-Rong

    2008-05-01

    An alternative scheme to approximately conditionally teleport entangled two-mode cavity state without Bell state measurement in cavity QED is proposed. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of a ladder-type three-level atom with two bimodal cavities. The entangled cavity state is reconstructed with only one atom interacting with the two cavities successively.

  14. 10 CFR 431.324 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption of metal halide lamp ballasts. 431.324 Section 431.324 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND...

  15. 10 CFR 431.324 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency and standby mode energy consumption of metal halide lamp ballasts. 431.324 Section 431.324 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND...

  16. Application of strongly overcoupled resonant modes of long-period fiber gratings to measure the adulteration of olive oil.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Palas; Basumallick, Nandini; Dasgupta, Kamal; Ghosh, Ajay; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath

    2016-07-01

    We have shown that strongly overcoupled resonant modes of long-period fiber gratings (LPFGs) can be used to assess the adulteration of olive oil. In this background, we investigate the response characteristics of strongly overcoupled resonant modes of different orders to a surrounding medium, the refractive index (RI) of which is greater than that of the fiber cladding, and in the range where a precise refractive index measurement is immensely useful for inspecting the quality of olive oils and other edible oils. A theoretical simulation that would help in designing a sensor with suitable sensitivity and range of measurement has been presented in detail and also validated with experimental results. It was interesting to observe that in a high RI surrounding, a lower order overcoupled resonant mode is much more sensitive as compared to a higher-order one having a similar coupling coefficient. A quantitative analysis demonstrates that for a particular LPFG, the sensitivity of a strongly overcoupled LP06 mode was found to be ∼2000  dB/RIU, while that of the LP07 mode having similar coupling strength was ∼550  dB/RIU in the surrounding refractive index range from 1.458 to 1.520. The results have been validated experimentally. PMID:27409199

  17. Scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction measurements at beamline 7.0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Toomes, R.; Booth, N.A.; Woodruff, D.P.

    1997-04-01

    This report covers the results of the authors first experimental run, in May 1996, conducted to explore the advantages offered by the high spectral resolution available at the SpectroMicroscopy Facility on beam line 7.0 to conduct scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction (PhD). This technique is now a well-established method for the determination of local structure of atomic and molecular adsorbates on well-characterised surfaces. The directly-emitted component of an adsorbate core-level photoelectron wavefield interferes coherently with components of the same wavefield elastically scattered by surrounding atoms, leading to a modulation in the photoemission intensity as a function of kinetic energy in any specific emission direction. A series of such PhD modulation spectra, each typically covering energies from 50-500 eV, for a series of different emission directions, provides the basis for a quantitative structure determination of the emitter-scatterer geometry. Within the last years the authors have developed an integrated approach to extract the structural information from these photoelectron diffraction (PhD) spectra in a quantitative way. A direct data inversion technique (the so-called Projection method) provides a first-order estimate of the local adsorbate geometry in the form of an `image` of the scatterer atoms which are nearest neighbours to the emitter. This information is then used as a starting model for optimisation of the structural parameters by comparing the experimental PhD spectra with the results of multiple scattering simulations using a code developed by Fritzsche. The optimisation uses an automated trial-and-error procedure by minimising a reliability factor which provides an objective measure of the quality of agreement between experiment and theory. The authors have successfully applied this approach to the structure determination of about 30 adsorption systems.

  18. Investigation of impinging jet resonant modes using unsteady pressure-sensitive paint measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy; Edstrand, Adam; Alvi, Farrukh; Cattafesta, Louis; Yorita, Daisuke; Asai, Keisuke

    2015-05-01

    At given nozzle to plate spacings, the flow field of high-speed impinging jets is known to be characterized by a resonance phenomenon. Large coherent structures that convect downstream and impinge on the surface create strong acoustic waves that interact with the inherently unstable shear layer at the nozzle exit. This feedback mechanism, driven by the coherent structures in the jet shear layer, can either be axisymmetric or helical in nature. Fast-response pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is applied to the impingement surface to map the unsteady pressure distribution associated with these resonant modes. Phase-averaged results acquired at several kHz are obtained using a flush mounted unsteady pressure transducer on the impingement plate as a reference signal. Tests are conducted on a Mach 1.5 jet at nozzle to plate spacings of . The resulting phase-averaged distribution reveals dramatically different flow fields at the corresponding impingement heights. The existence of a purely axisymmetric mode with a frequency of 6.3 kHz is identified at and is characterized by concentric rings of higher/lower pressure that propagate radially with increasing phase. Two simultaneous modes are observed at with one being a dominant symmetric mode at 7.1 kHz and the second a sub-dominant helical mode at 4.3 kHz. Complimentary phase-conditioned Schlieren images are also obtained visualizing the flow structures associated with each mode and are consistent with the PSP results.

  19. The psychedelic state induced by ayahuasca modulates the activity and connectivity of the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C; Tofoli, Luis F; Santos, Antonio C; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN. PMID:25693169

  20. The brain on art: intense aesthetic experience activates the default mode network

    PubMed Central

    Vessel, Edward A.; Starr, G. Gabrielle; Rubin, Nava

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different sub-networks. Activity increased linearly with observers' ratings (4-level scale) in sensory (occipito-temporal) regions. Activity in the striatum (STR) also varied linearly with ratings, with below-baseline activations for low-rated artworks. In contrast, a network of frontal regions showed a step-like increase only for the most moving artworks (“4” ratings) and non-differential activity for all others. This included several regions belonging to the “default mode network” (DMN) previously associated with self-referential mentation. Our results suggest that aesthetic experience involves the integration of sensory and emotional reactions in a manner linked with their personal relevance. PMID:22529785

  1. The Psychedelic State Induced by Ayahuasca Modulates the Activity and Connectivity of the Default Mode Network

    PubMed Central

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C.; Tofoli, Luis F.; Santos, Antonio C.; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S.; Hallak, Jaime E. C.; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B.

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN. PMID:25693169

  2. The psychedelic state induced by ayahuasca modulates the activity and connectivity of the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Palhano-Fontes, Fernanda; Andrade, Katia C; Tofoli, Luis F; Santos, Antonio C; Crippa, Jose Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C; Ribeiro, Sidarta; de Araujo, Draulio B

    2015-01-01

    The experiences induced by psychedelics share a wide variety of subjective features, related to the complex changes in perception and cognition induced by this class of drugs. A remarkable increase in introspection is at the core of these altered states of consciousness. Self-oriented mental activity has been consistently linked to the Default Mode Network (DMN), a set of brain regions more active during rest than during the execution of a goal-directed task. Here we used fMRI technique to inspect the DMN during the psychedelic state induced by Ayahuasca in ten experienced subjects. Ayahuasca is a potion traditionally used by Amazonian Amerindians composed by a mixture of compounds that increase monoaminergic transmission. In particular, we examined whether Ayahuasca changes the activity and connectivity of the DMN and the connection between the DMN and the task-positive network (TPN). Ayahuasca caused a significant decrease in activity through most parts of the DMN, including its most consistent hubs: the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC)/Precuneus and the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). Functional connectivity within the PCC/Precuneus decreased after Ayahuasca intake. No significant change was observed in the DMN-TPN orthogonality. Altogether, our results support the notion that the altered state of consciousness induced by Ayahuasca, like those induced by psilocybin (another serotonergic psychedelic), meditation and sleep, is linked to the modulation of the activity and the connectivity of the DMN.

  3. Small business activity does not measure entrepreneurship.

    PubMed

    Henrekson, Magnus; Sanandaji, Tino

    2014-02-01

    Entrepreneurship policy mainly aims to promote innovative Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. However, the rate of entrepreneurship is commonly proxied using quantity-based metrics, such as small business activity, the self-employment rate, or the number of startups. We argue that those metrics give rise to misleading inferences regarding high-impact Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. To unambiguously identify high-impact entrepreneurs we focus on self-made billionaires (in US dollars) who appear on Forbes Magazine's list and who became wealthy by founding new firms. We identify 996 such billionaire entrepreneurs in 50 countries in 1996-2010, a systematic cross-country study of billionaire entrepreneurs. The rate of billionaire entrepreneurs correlates negatively with self-employment, small business ownership, and firm startup rates. Countries with higher income, higher trust, lower taxes, more venture capital investment, and lower regulatory burdens have higher billionaire entrepreneurship rates but less self-employment. Despite its limitations, the number of billionaire entrepreneurs appears to be a plausible cross-country measure of Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. PMID:24449873

  4. Small business activity does not measure entrepreneurship

    PubMed Central

    Henrekson, Magnus; Sanandaji, Tino

    2014-01-01

    Entrepreneurship policy mainly aims to promote innovative Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. However, the rate of entrepreneurship is commonly proxied using quantity-based metrics, such as small business activity, the self-employment rate, or the number of startups. We argue that those metrics give rise to misleading inferences regarding high-impact Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. To unambiguously identify high-impact entrepreneurs we focus on self-made billionaires (in US dollars) who appear on Forbes Magazine’s list and who became wealthy by founding new firms. We identify 996 such billionaire entrepreneurs in 50 countries in 1996–2010, a systematic cross-country study of billionaire entrepreneurs. The rate of billionaire entrepreneurs correlates negatively with self-employment, small business ownership, and firm startup rates. Countries with higher income, higher trust, lower taxes, more venture capital investment, and lower regulatory burdens have higher billionaire entrepreneurship rates but less self-employment. Despite its limitations, the number of billionaire entrepreneurs appears to be a plausible cross-country measure of Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. PMID:24449873

  5. Small business activity does not measure entrepreneurship.

    PubMed

    Henrekson, Magnus; Sanandaji, Tino

    2014-02-01

    Entrepreneurship policy mainly aims to promote innovative Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. However, the rate of entrepreneurship is commonly proxied using quantity-based metrics, such as small business activity, the self-employment rate, or the number of startups. We argue that those metrics give rise to misleading inferences regarding high-impact Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. To unambiguously identify high-impact entrepreneurs we focus on self-made billionaires (in US dollars) who appear on Forbes Magazine's list and who became wealthy by founding new firms. We identify 996 such billionaire entrepreneurs in 50 countries in 1996-2010, a systematic cross-country study of billionaire entrepreneurs. The rate of billionaire entrepreneurs correlates negatively with self-employment, small business ownership, and firm startup rates. Countries with higher income, higher trust, lower taxes, more venture capital investment, and lower regulatory burdens have higher billionaire entrepreneurship rates but less self-employment. Despite its limitations, the number of billionaire entrepreneurs appears to be a plausible cross-country measure of Schumpeterian entrepreneurship.

  6. Generalized Mueller matrix method for polarization mode dispersion measurement in a system with polarization-dependent loss or gain.

    PubMed

    Dong, H; Shum, P; Yan, M; Zhou, J Q; Ning, G X; Gong, Y D; Wu, C Q

    2006-06-12

    A generalized Mueller matrix method (GMMM) is proposed to measure the polarization mode dispersion (PMD) in an optical fiber system with polarization-dependent loss or gain (PDL/G). This algorithm is based on the polar decomposition of a 4X4 matrix which corresponds to a Lorentz transformation. Compared to the generalized Poincaré sphere method, the GMMM can measure PMD accurately with a relatively larger frequency step, and the obtained PMD data has very low noise level. PMID:19516669

  7. Semi-active damping with negative stiffness for multi-mode cable vibration mitigation: approximate collocated control solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.; Distl, H.

    2015-11-01

    This paper derives an approximate collocated control solution for the mitigation of multi-mode cable vibration by semi-active damping with negative stiffness based on the control force characteristics of clipped linear quadratic regulator (LQR). The control parameters are derived from optimal modal viscous damping and corrected in order to guarantee that both the equivalent viscous damping coefficient and the equivalent stiffness coefficient of the semi-active cable damper force are equal to their desired counterparts. The collocated control solution with corrected control parameters is numerically validated by free decay tests of the first four cable modes and combinations of these modes. The results of the single-harmonic tests demonstrate that the novel approach yields 1.86 times more cable damping than optimal modal viscous damping and 1.87 to 2.33 times more damping compared to a passive oil damper whose viscous damper coefficient is optimally tuned to the targeted mode range of the first four modes. The improvement in case of the multi-harmonic vibration tests, i.e. when modes 1 and 3 and modes 2 and 4 are vibrating at the same time, is between 1.55 and 3.81. The results also show that these improvements are obtained almost independent of the cable anti-node amplitude. Thus, the proposed approximate real-time applicable collocated semi-active control solution which can be realized by magnetorheological dampers represents a promising tool for the efficient mitigation of stay cable vibrations.

  8. Accuracy and robustness of a simple algorithm to measure vessel diameter from B-mode ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Brian E; Flavin, Daniel C; Bauschatz, Emily; Whitney, Heather M

    2016-06-01

    Measurement of changes in arterial vessel diameter can be used to assess the state of cardiovascular health, but the use of such measurements as biomarkers is contingent upon the accuracy and robustness of the measurement. This work presents a simple algorithm for measuring diameter from B-mode images derived from vascular ultrasound. The algorithm is based upon Gaussian curve fitting and a Viterbi search process. We assessed the accuracy of the algorithm by measuring the diameter of a digital reference object (DRO) and ultrasound-derived images of a carotid artery. We also assessed the robustness of the algorithm by manipulating the quality of the image. Across a broad range of signal-to-noise ratio and with varying image edge error, the algorithm measured vessel diameter within 0.7% of the creation dimensions of the DRO. This was a similar level of difference (0.8%) to when an ultrasound image was used. When SNR dropped to 18 dB, measurement error increased to 1.3%. When edge position was varied by as much as 10%, measurement error was well maintained between 0.68 and 0.75%. All these errors fall well within the margin of error established by the medical physics community for quantitative ultrasound measurements. We conclude that this simple algorithm provides consistent and accurate measurement of lumen diameter from B-mode images across a broad range of image quality. PMID:27055985

  9. Satellite cell activity is differentially affected by contraction mode in human muscle following a work-matched bout of exercise.

    PubMed

    Hyldahl, Robert D; Olson, Ty; Welling, Tyson; Groscost, Logan; Parcell, Allen C

    2014-01-01

    Optimal repair and adaptation of skeletal muscle is facilitated by resident stem cells (satellite cells). To understand how different exercise modes influence satellite cell dynamics, we measured satellite cell activity in conjunction with markers of muscle damage and inflammation in human skeletal muscle following a single work- and intensity-matched bout of eccentric (ECC) or concentric contractions (CON). Participants completed a single bout of ECC (n = 7) or CON (n = 7) of the knee extensors. A muscle biopsy was obtained before and 24 h after exercise. Functional measures and immunohistochemical analyses were used to determine the extent of muscle damage and indices of satellite cell activity. Cytokine concentrations were measured using a multiplexed magnetic bead assay. Isokinetic peak torque decreased following ECC (p < 0.05) but not CON. Greater histological staining of the damage marker Xin was observed in muscle samples of ECC vs. CON. Tenasin C immunoreactivity increased 15 fold (p < 0.01) following ECC and was unchanged following CON. The inflammatory cytokines interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) increased pre- to post-ECC (4.26 ± 1.4 vs. 10.49 ± 5.8 pg/ml, and 3.06 ± 0.7 vs. 6.25 ± 4.6 pg/ml, respectively; p < 0.05). There was no change in any cytokine post-CON. Satellite cell content increased 27% pre- to post-ECC (0.10 ± 0.031 vs. 0.127 ± 0.041, respectively; p < 0.05). There was no change in satellite cell number in CON (0.099 ± 0.027 vs. 0.102 ± 0.029, respectively). There was no fiber type-specific satellite cell response following either exercise mode. ECC but not CON resulted in an increase in MyoD positive nuclei per myofiber pre- to post-exercise (p < 0.05), but there was no change in MyoD DNA binding activity in either condition. In conclusion, ECC but not CON results in functional and histological evidence of muscle damage that is accompanied by increased satellite cell activity 24 h

  10. Satellite cell activity is differentially affected by contraction mode in human muscle following a work-matched bout of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hyldahl, Robert D.; Olson, Ty; Welling, Tyson; Groscost, Logan; Parcell, Allen C.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal repair and adaptation of skeletal muscle is facilitated by resident stem cells (satellite cells). To understand how different exercise modes influence satellite cell dynamics, we measured satellite cell activity in conjunction with markers of muscle damage and inflammation in human skeletal muscle following a single work- and intensity-matched bout of eccentric (ECC) or concentric contractions (CON). Participants completed a single bout of ECC (n = 7) or CON (n = 7) of the knee extensors. A muscle biopsy was obtained before and 24 h after exercise. Functional measures and immunohistochemical analyses were used to determine the extent of muscle damage and indices of satellite cell activity. Cytokine concentrations were measured using a multiplexed magnetic bead assay. Isokinetic peak torque decreased following ECC (p < 0.05) but not CON. Greater histological staining of the damage marker Xin was observed in muscle samples of ECC vs. CON. Tenasin C immunoreactivity increased 15 fold (p < 0.01) following ECC and was unchanged following CON. The inflammatory cytokines interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) increased pre- to post-ECC (4.26 ± 1.4 vs. 10.49 ± 5.8 pg/ml, and 3.06 ± 0.7 vs. 6.25 ± 4.6 pg/ml, respectively; p < 0.05). There was no change in any cytokine post-CON. Satellite cell content increased 27% pre- to post-ECC (0.10 ± 0.031 vs. 0.127 ± 0.041, respectively; p < 0.05). There was no change in satellite cell number in CON (0.099 ± 0.027 vs. 0.102 ± 0.029, respectively). There was no fiber type-specific satellite cell response following either exercise mode. ECC but not CON resulted in an increase in MyoD positive nuclei per myofiber pre- to post-exercise (p < 0.05), but there was no change in MyoD DNA binding activity in either condition. In conclusion, ECC but not CON results in functional and histological evidence of muscle damage that is accompanied by increased satellite cell activity 24 h

  11. Duration of activity and mode of action of modafinil: Studies on sleep and wakefulness in humans.

    PubMed

    Turner, C; Belyavin, A J; Nicholson, A N

    2014-07-01

    The duration of activity of modafinil was investigated in healthy male volunteers in two double-blind crossover studies. Mode of action was explored using a statistical model concerned with the relationship between total sleep duration and that of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Nocturnal sleep (23:00-07:00) followed by next-day performance (09:00-17:00) was studied in 12 subjects administered 100, 200, 300 mg modafinil and placebo, 0.5 h before bedtime. Performance overnight (19:00-08:45) followed by sleep (09:15-15:15) was studied in nine subjects administered 100, 200, 300, 400 mg modafinil, 300 mg caffeine and placebo at 22:15. Modafinil dose-dependently reduced sleep duration (nocturnal: 200 mg, p<0.05; 300 mg, p<0.001; morning: 300 and 400 mg, p<0.05) and REM sleep (nocturnal: 300 mg; morning: 400 mg; p<0.05). The statistical model revealed that reduced REM sleep was due to alerting activity, with no evidence of direct suppression of REM sleep, suggesting dopaminergic activity. Enhanced performance with modafinil during overnight work varied with dose (200 mg>100 mg; 300, 400 mg>200, 100 mg, caffeine). However, in the study of next-day performance, the enhancement was attenuated at the highest dose (300 mg) by the greater disturbance of prior sleep. These findings indicate that modafinil has a long duration of action, with alerting properties arising predominantly from dopaminergic activity. PMID:24306135

  12. Reconstituted B cell receptor signaling reveals carbohydrate-dependent mode of activation

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Rina F.; Patel, Jinal; Weaver, Grant C.; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wheatley, Adam K.; Yassine, Hadi M.; Costello, Catherine E.; Chandler, Kevin B.; McTamney, Patrick. M.; Nabel, Gary J.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Mascola, John R.; Carr, Steven A.; Lingwood, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Activation of immune cells (but not B cells) with lectins is widely known. We used the structurally defined interaction between influenza hemagglutinin (HA) and its cell surface receptor sialic acid (SA) to identify a B cell receptor (BCR) activation modality that proceeded through non-cognate interactions with antigen. Using a new approach to reconstitute antigen-receptor interactions in a human reporter B cell line, we found that sequence-defined BCRs from the human germline repertoire could be triggered by both complementarity to influenza HA and a separate mode of signaling that relied on multivalent ligation of BCR sialyl-oligosaccharide. The latter suggested a new mechanism for priming naïve B cell responses and manifested as the induction of SA-dependent pan-activation by peripheral blood B cells. BCR crosslinking in the absence of complementarity is a superantigen effect induced by some microbial products to subvert production of antigen-specific immune responses. B cell superantigen activity through affinity for BCR carbohydrate is discussed. PMID:27796362

  13. Increased default mode network activity in socially anxious individuals during reward processing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Social anxiety has been associated with potentiated negative affect and, more recently, with diminished positive affect. It is unclear how these alterations in negative and positive affect are represented neurally in socially anxious individuals and, further, whether they generalize to non-social stimuli. To explore this, we used a monetary incentive paradigm to explore the association between social anxiety and both the anticipation and consumption of non-social incentives. Eighty-four individuals from a longitudinal community sample underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while participating in a monetary incentive delay (MID) task. The MID task consisted of alternating cues indicating the potential to win or prevent losing varying amounts of money based on the speed of the participant’s response. We examined whether self-reported levels of social anxiety, averaged across approximately 7 years of data, moderated brain activity when contrasting gain or loss cues with neutral cues during the anticipation and outcome phases of incentive processing. Whole brain analyses and analyses restricted to the ventral striatum for the anticipation phase and the medial prefrontal cortex for the outcome phase were conducted. Results Social anxiety did not associate with differences in hit rates or reaction times when responding to cues. Further, socially anxious individuals did not exhibit decreased ventral striatum activity during anticipation of gains or decreased MPFC activity during the outcome of gain trials, contrary to expectations based on literature indicating blunted positive affect in social anxiety. Instead, social anxiety showed positive associations with extensive regions implicated in default mode network activity (for example, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, and parietal lobe) during anticipation and receipt of monetary gain. Social anxiety was further linked with decreased activity in the ventral striatum during anticipation

  14. Fiber Bragg grating writing technique for multimode optical fibers providing stimulation of few-mode effects in measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdine, Anton V.; Vasilets, Alexander A.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Morozov, Oleg G.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Kuznetzov, Artem A.; Faskhutdinov, Lenar M.; Kafarova, Anastasia M.; Minaeva, Alina Y.; Sevruk, Nikita L.

    2016-03-01

    This work is concerned with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) writing technique developed for graded-index multimode optical fibers applied in measurement systems based on a few-mode effects. We present some results of experimental approbation of proposed technique with Bragg wavelength 1310 and 1550 nm on samples of graded-index multimode optical fibers 50/125 of both new-generations Cat. OM2+/OM3 and old Cat. OM2 with preliminary measured refractive index profiles. While the first group fibers of Cat. OM2+/OM3 was characterized by almost ideal smooth graded refractive index profile and some fiber profile samples of this group contains thin central peak, the second fiber group profiles of Cat. OM2 differ by great central core defects representing dip or thick peak. Results of described FBG spectral response measurements under excitation of laser pigtailed by single-mode fiber are represented.

  15. Domain switching emission from the mixed-mode crack in ferroelectrics by birefringence measurement and phase field modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; Pan, Suxin; Liu, Qida; Wang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of domain switching near the tip of a mixed-mode crack (e.g., an inclined crack) is observed in ferroelectrics. The birefringence technique is used to measure the optical quantities to demonstrate the domain switching near the crack tip. The results show an intriguing feature that there appears electrical creep and domain switching emission from the crack tip. The actual time-dependence of domain switching emission and its anisotropic velocity is approximately measured. Moreover, the phase field modeling is developed to simulate polarization distribution and domain switching near the crack tip where the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau equation is used to describe the change of polarization. The phase field results indicate the same features of domain switching emission from the mixed-mode crack. A good agreement between phase field simulation and birefringence measurement is concluded by setting the appropriate kinetic coefficient in the time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau equation.

  16. Measurements of the edge current evolution and comparison with neoclassical calculations during MAST H-modes using motional Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, M. F. M.; Citrin, J.; Saarelma, S.; Temple, D.; Conway, N. J.; Kirk, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C. A.; MAST Team

    2012-02-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs), that are present in most tokamak H- (high confinement) modes, can cause significant damage to plasma facing components in fusion reactors. Controlling ELMs is considered necessary and hence it is vital to understand the underlying physics. The stability of ELMs is typically expressed in terms of the pressure gradient ∇p in the edge and the edge current density jphi. Both ∇p and jphi are usually derived from profiles fitted to the measured edge density and temperature profiles, where for the calculation of jphi neoclassical theory is used. This paper presents direct measurements of the magnetic pitch angle γm evolution in the edge and the derived jphi. These provide a method to validate the jphi as derived with neoclassical theory and they open up the possibility to find a complete, self-consistent set of edge profiles, that fit density, temperature and γm measurements, hence allowing for a more accurate stability analysis.

  17. Design and measurement of a TE13 input converter for high order mode gyrotron travelling wave amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Guo; Shu, Guoxiang; Yan, Ran; Wang, Li; Agurgo Balfour, E.; Fu, Hao; Luo, Yong; Wang, Shafei

    2016-03-01

    A technique to launch a circular TE13 mode to interact with the helical electron beam of a gyrotron travelling wave amplifier is proposed and verified by simulation and cold test in this paper. The high order (HOM) TE13 mode is excited by a broadband Y-type power divider with the aid of a cylindrical waveguide system. Using grooves and convex strips loaded at the lateral planes of the output cylindrical waveguide, the electric fields of the potential competing TE32 and TE71 modes are suppressed to allow the transmission of the dominant TE13 mode. The converter performance for different structural dimensions of grooves and convex strips is studied in detail and excellent results have been achieved. Simulation predicts that the average transmission is ˜-1.8 dB with a 3 dB bandwidth of 7.2 GHz (91.5-98.7 GHz) and port reflection is less than -15 dB. The conversion efficiency to the TE32 and TE71 modes are, respectively, under -15 dB and -24 dB in the operating frequency band. Such an HOM converter operating at W-band has been fabricated and cold tested with the radiation boundary. Measurement from the vector network analyzer cold test and microwave simulations show a good reflection performance for the converter.

  18. Techniques for Identifying and Measuring High Order Modes in RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, D.A.; Rimmer, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    We report on a number of techniques which can be used to unravel the higher-order-mode spectrum of an RF cavity. Most of these techniques involve the application of basic symmetry principles and require for their application only that the cavity exhibit some basic symmetry, possibly broken by the presence of couplers, apertures, etc., which permits a classification of these modes in terms of some property characterized by that symmetry, e.g., multipolarity for a cavity which is basically a figure of revolution. Several examples of the application of these techniques are given.

  19. Amplifier for measuring low-level signals in the presence of high common mode voltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukens, F. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high common mode rejection differential amplifier wherein two serially arranged Darlington amplifier stages are employed and any common mode voltage is divided between them by a resistance network. The input to the first Darlington amplifier stage is coupled to a signal input resistor via an amplifier which isolates the input and presents a high impedance across this resistor. The output of the second Darlington stage is transposed in scale via an amplifier stage which has its input a biasing circuit which effects a finite biasing of the two Darlington amplifier stages.

  20. Methods to Measure Physical Activity Behaviors in Health Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzhugh, Eugene C.

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is an important concept to measure in health education research. The health education researcher might need to measure physical activity because it is the primary measure of interest, or PA might be a confounding measure that needs to be controlled for in statistical analysis. The purpose of this commentary is to…

  1. Ductile strain rates measurements reveal continental crust long-term deformation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, E.; Leloup, P. H.; Sassier, C.; Gardien, V.; Ricard, Y.

    2012-04-01

    .5 x10-18 and 4.3 x10-13 s-1. Strain rates of natural quartz ribbons deformation under mid-crustal conditions appear better approximated by the QRS method if using Hirth (J. Earth Sciences, 2001) power flow law and the Shimizu piezometer. Most other combinations underestimate the strain rate. Applying the QRS method to major continental shear zones, we can quantify across-strike local strain rate variations and document where deformation localizes. For example, nine quartz ribbons sampled across the ASRR shear zone provided strain rates progressively increasing from the south-western border to the north-eastern border, from 2.5 x10-15 to 1.34 x10-12 s-1. The north-eastern border of the ASRR shear zone has been interpreted as the paleo-center of the shear zone, exhumed in the footwall of the active normal Red River fault. We conclude that strain localized at the paleo-center of the shear zone, as inferred by most of numerical models of shear zones deformation. Summation of the local strain rates yield global strain rates compatible with the fault rate deduced from geological constraints. This opens the way to extensive strain rate measurements, quantification of deformation localization and direct comparison with numerical models for continental lithosphere rheology and strain localisation.

  2. Bumblebees minimize control challenges by combining active and passive modes in unsteady winds

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Engels, Thomas; Schneider, Kai; Wang, Chun; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The natural wind environment that volant insects encounter is unsteady and highly complex, posing significant flight-control and stability challenges. It is critical to understand the strategies insects employ to safely navigate in natural environments. We combined experiments on free flying bumblebees with high-fidelity numerical simulations and lower-order modeling to identify the mechanics that mediate insect flight in unsteady winds. We trained bumblebees to fly upwind towards an artificial flower in a wind tunnel under steady wind and in a von Kármán street formed in the wake of a cylinder. Analysis revealed that at lower frequencies in both steady and unsteady winds the bees mediated lateral movement with body roll - typical casting motion. Numerical simulations of a bumblebee in similar conditions permitted the separation of the passive and active components of the flight trajectories. Consequently, we derived simple mathematical models that describe these two motion components. Comparison between the free-flying live and modeled bees revealed a novel mechanism that enables bees to passively ride out high-frequency perturbations while performing active maneuvers at lower frequencies. The capacity of maintaining stability by combining passive and active modes at different timescales provides a viable means for animals and machines to tackle the challenges posed by complex airflows. PMID:27752047

  3. Modulation of western North Pacific tropical cyclone activity by the Atlantic Meridional Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Villarini, Gabriele; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Rosati, Anthony; Yang, Xiaosong; Jia, Liwei; Zeng, Fanrong

    2016-05-01

    This study examines the year-to-year modulation of the western North Pacific (WNP) tropical cyclones (TC) activity by the Atlantic Meridional Mode (AMM) using both observations and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Forecast-oriented Low Ocean Resolution Version of CM2.5 (FLOR) global coupled model. 1. The positive (negative) AMM phase suppresses (enhances) WNP TC activity in observations. The anomalous occurrence of WNP TCs results mainly from changes in TC genesis in the southeastern part of the WNP. 2. The observed responses of WNP TC activity to the AMM are connected to the anomalous zonal vertical wind shear (ZVWS) caused by AMM-induced changes to the Walker circulation. During the positive AMM phase, the warming in the North Atlantic induces strong descending flow in the tropical eastern and central Pacific, which intensifies the Walker cell in the WNP. The intensified Walker cell is responsible for the suppressed (enhanced) TC genesis in the eastern (western) part of the WNP by strengthening (weakening) ZVWS. 3. The observed WNPTC-AMM linkage is examined by the long-term control and idealized perturbations experiment with FLOR-FA. A suite of sensitivity experiments strongly corroborate the observed WNPTC-AMM linkage and underlying physical mechanisms.

  4. In-space technology flight experiments: Middeck 0-gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) and Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venneri, Samuel L.

    1991-01-01

    The topics addressed are covered in viewgraph form. The objective of the Middeck 0-gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) programs is to study gravity dependent nonlinearities associated with fluid slosh and truss structure dynamics. MODE provides a reusable facility for on-orbit dynamics testing of small scale test articles in the shirt sleeve environment on the Shuttle middeck. Flight program objective of Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is to study gravity effects on the performance and stability of controlled structures.

  5. Cyclodextrin type dependent host-guest interaction mode with phthalocyanine and their influence on photodynamic activity to cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Wang, A; Ma, Y J; Xuan, H Y; Zhao, B; Li, X D; Zhou, J H; Zhou, L; Wei, S H

    2016-09-01

    Three host-guest complexes of phthalocyanines (Pc) with α-, β- or γ-cyclodextrins (CDs) were prepared and their interaction modes, reactive oxygen species (ROSs) generation ability and in vitro anticancer activities were studied and compared. After forming complex with CD, the aggregation degree of Pc was greatly decreased and the water solubility and photodynamic activity was sharply increased. Computer modeling results indicated that the interaction modes between Pc and CDs were varied with different kinds of CD. Especially, the complex of Pc and β-CD has superior stability, ROSs generation ability, and anticancer activity to other complexes.

  6. Measurements of sideband mode-coupling effects and linear MHD growth rates associated with the ponderomotive force

    SciTech Connect

    Meassick, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the interactions of rf waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) with flute interchange modes are presented. Interactions between the applied l = +1 rf wave and an m = {minus}1 flute mode give rise to sidebands above and below the rf frequency with mode numbers of l = 0 and l = +2 respectively. The contribution of the sideband terms to perturbed energy are shown to cancel 40% of the direct ponderomotive contribution for w/w{sub ci} = 1.25. This is less then the 90% predicted by self-consistent theories of the ponderomotive force for an applied l = +1 rf wave above the ion cyclotron frequency with a large separation between the plasma and the vacuum vessel. Measurements of the linear growth and decay rate of the flute instability in the presence of rf are presented. These measurements allow a determination of the net stabilizing force on the plasma. The measured growth rate is in good agreement with that calculated by considering only the curvature driven instability and the ponderomotive force.

  7. Numerical Technique for Analyzing Rotating Rake Mode Measurements in a Duct With Passive Treatment and Shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2007-01-01

    A technique is presented for the analysis of measured data obtained from a rotating microphone rake system. The system is designed to measure the interaction modes of ducted fans. A Fourier analysis of the data from the rotating system results in a set of circumferential mode levels at each radial location of a microphone inside the duct. Radial basis functions are then least-squares fit to this data to obtain the radial mode amplitudes. For ducts with soft walls and mean flow, the radial basis functions must be numerically computed. The linear companion matrix method is used to obtain both the eigenvalues of interest, without an initial guess, and the radial basis functions. The governing equations allow for the mean flow to have a boundary layer at the wall. In addition, a nonlinear least-squares method is used to adjust the wall impedance to best fit the data in an attempt to use the rotating system as an in-duct wall impedance measurement tool. Simulated and measured data are used to show the effects of wall impedance and mean flow on the computed results.

  8. Comparison of the activation time effects and the internal energy distributions for the CID, PQD and HCD excitation modes.

    PubMed

    Ichou, Farid; Schwarzenberg, Adrian; Lesage, Denis; Alves, Sandra; Junot, Christophe; Machuron-Mandard, Xavier; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2014-06-01

    Reproducibility among different types of excitation modes is a major bottleneck in the field of tandem mass spectrometry library development in metabolomics. In this study, we specifically evaluated the influence of collision voltage and activation time parameters on tandem mass spectrometry spectra for various excitation modes [collision-induced dissociation (CID), pulsed Q dissociation (PQD) and higher-energy collision dissociation (HCD)] of Orbitrap-based instruments. For this purpose, internal energy deposition was probed using an approach based on Rice-Rampserger-Kassel-Marcus modeling with three thermometer compounds of different degree of freedom (69, 228 and 420) and a thermal model. This model treats consecutively the activation and decomposition steps, and the survival precursor ion populations are characterized by truncated Maxwell-Boltzmann internal energy distributions. This study demonstrates that the activation time has a significant impact on MS/MS spectra using the CID and PQD modes. The proposed model seems suitable to describe the multiple collision regime in the PQD and HCD modes. Linear relationships between mean internal energy and collision voltage are shown for the latter modes and the three thermometer molecules. These results suggest that a calibration based on the collision voltage should provide reproducible for PQD, HCD to be compared with CID in tandem in space instruments. However, an important signal loss is observed in PQD excitation mode whatever the mass of the studied compounds, which may affect not only parent ions but also fragment ions depending on the fragmentation parameters. A calibration approach for the CID mode based on the variation of activation time parameter is more appropriate than one based on collision voltage. In fact, the activation time parameter in CID induces a modification of the collisional regime and thus helps control the orientation of the fragmentation pathways (competitive or consecutive dissociations).

  9. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint. PMID:25541751

  10. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint.

  11. Blade tip clearance measurement of the turbine engines based on a multi-mode fiber coupled laser ranging system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Wu, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jilong

    2014-11-01

    The blade tip clearance is a parameter of great importance to guarantee the efficiency and safety of the turbine engines. In this article, a laser ranging system designed for blade tip clearance measurement is presented. Multi-mode fiber is utilized for optical transmission to guarantee that enough optical power is received by the sensor probe. The model of the tiny sensor probe is presented. The error brought by the optical path difference of different modes of the fiber is estimated and the length of the fiber is limited to reduce this error. The measurement range in which the optical power received by the probe remains essentially unchanged is analyzed. Calibration experiments and dynamic experiments are conducted. The results of the calibration experiments indicate that the resolution of the system is about 0.02 mm and the range of the system is about 9 mm.

  12. Blade tip clearance measurement of the turbine engines based on a multi-mode fiber coupled laser ranging system

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Wu, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jilong

    2014-11-15

    The blade tip clearance is a parameter of great importance to guarantee the efficiency and safety of the turbine engines. In this article, a laser ranging system designed for blade tip clearance measurement is presented. Multi-mode fiber is utilized for optical transmission to guarantee that enough optical power is received by the sensor probe. The model of the tiny sensor probe is presented. The error brought by the optical path difference of different modes of the fiber is estimated and the length of the fiber is limited to reduce this error. The measurement range in which the optical power received by the probe remains essentially unchanged is analyzed. Calibration experiments and dynamic experiments are conducted. The results of the calibration experiments indicate that the resolution of the system is about 0.02 mm and the range of the system is about 9 mm.

  13. Measurement of optical activity of honey bee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Salgado-Verduzco, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Torres, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Optical activity of some substances, such as chiral molecules, often exhibits circular birefringence. Circular birefringence causes rotation of the vibration plane of the plane polarized light as it passes through the substance. In this work we present optical characterization of honey as function of the optical activity when it is placed in a polariscope that consists of a light source and properly arranged polarizing elements.

  14. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  15. Measurements of the evaporation and hygroscopic response of single fine-mode aerosol particles using a Bessel beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Cotterell, Michael I; Mason, Bernard J; Carruthers, Antonia E; Walker, Jim S; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    A single horizontally-propagating zeroth order Bessel laser beam with a counter-propagating gas flow was used to confine single fine-mode aerosol particles over extended periods of time, during which process measurements were performed. Particle sizes were measured by the analysis of the angular variation of light scattered at 532 nm by a particle in the Bessel beam, using either a probe beam at 405 nm or 633 nm. The vapour pressures of glycerol and 1,2,6-hexanetriol particles were determined to be 7.5 ± 2.6 mPa and 0.20 ± 0.02 mPa respectively. The lower volatility of hexanetriol allowed better definition of the trapping environment relative humidity profile over the measurement time period, thus higher precision measurements were obtained compared to those for glycerol. The size evolution of a hexanetriol particle, as well as its refractive index at wavelengths 532 nm and 405 nm, were determined by modelling its position along the Bessel beam propagation length while collecting phase functions with the 405 nm probe beam. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate have been performed on particles as small as 350 nm in radius, with growth curves well described by widely used equilibrium state models. These are the smallest particles for which single-particle hygroscopicity has been measured and represent the first measurements of hygroscopicity on fine mode and near-accumulation mode aerosols, the size regimes bearing the most atmospheric relevance in terms of loading, light extinction and scattering. Finally, the technique is contrasted with other single particle and ensemble methods, and limitations are assessed.

  16. Measurements of the evaporation and hygroscopic response of single fine-mode aerosol particles using a Bessel beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Cotterell, Michael I; Mason, Bernard J; Carruthers, Antonia E; Walker, Jim S; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    A single horizontally-propagating zeroth order Bessel laser beam with a counter-propagating gas flow was used to confine single fine-mode aerosol particles over extended periods of time, during which process measurements were performed. Particle sizes were measured by the analysis of the angular variation of light scattered at 532 nm by a particle in the Bessel beam, using either a probe beam at 405 nm or 633 nm. The vapour pressures of glycerol and 1,2,6-hexanetriol particles were determined to be 7.5 ± 2.6 mPa and 0.20 ± 0.02 mPa respectively. The lower volatility of hexanetriol allowed better definition of the trapping environment relative humidity profile over the measurement time period, thus higher precision measurements were obtained compared to those for glycerol. The size evolution of a hexanetriol particle, as well as its refractive index at wavelengths 532 nm and 405 nm, were determined by modelling its position along the Bessel beam propagation length while collecting phase functions with the 405 nm probe beam. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate have been performed on particles as small as 350 nm in radius, with growth curves well described by widely used equilibrium state models. These are the smallest particles for which single-particle hygroscopicity has been measured and represent the first measurements of hygroscopicity on fine mode and near-accumulation mode aerosols, the size regimes bearing the most atmospheric relevance in terms of loading, light extinction and scattering. Finally, the technique is contrasted with other single particle and ensemble methods, and limitations are assessed. PMID:24346588

  17. PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FROM CONTROLLED CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarized the results of field testing of the effectiveness of control measures for sources of fugitive particulate emissions found at construction sites. The effectiveness of watering temporary, unpaved travel surfaces on emissions of particulate matter with aerodyna...

  18. Identification of active elementary flux modes in mitochondria using selectively permeabilized CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Nicolae, Averina; Wahrheit, Judith; Nonnenmacher, Yannic; Weyler, Christian; Heinzle, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic compartmentation is a key feature of mammalian cells. Mitochondria are the powerhouse of eukaryotic cells, responsible for respiration and the TCA cycle. We accessed the mitochondrial metabolism of the economically important Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using selective permeabilization. We tested key substrates without and with addition of ADP. Based on quantified uptake and production rates, we could determine the contribution of different elementary flux modes to the metabolism of a substrate or substrate combination. ADP stimulated the uptake of most metabolites, directly by serving as substrate for the respiratory chain, thus removing the inhibitory effect of NADH, or as allosteric effector. Addition of ADP favored substrate metabolization to CO2 and did not enhance the production of other metabolites. The controlling effect of ADP was more pronounced when we supplied metabolites to the first part of the TCA cycle: pyruvate, citrate, α-ketoglutarate and glutamine. In the second part of the TCA cycle, the rates were primarily controlled by the concentrations of C4-dicarboxylates. Without ADP addition, the activity of the pyruvate carboxylase-malate dehydrogenase-malic enzyme cycle consumed the ATP produced by oxidative phosphorylation, preventing its accumulation and maintaining metabolic steady state conditions. Aspartate was taken up only in combination with pyruvate, whose uptake also increased, a fact explained by complex regulatory effects. Isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were identified as the key regulators of the TCA cycle, confirming existent knowledge from other cells. We have shown that selectively permeabilized cells combined with elementary mode analysis allow in-depth studying of the mitochondrial metabolism and regulation. PMID:26417715

  19. Identification of active elementary flux modes in mitochondria using selectively permeabilized CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Nicolae, Averina; Wahrheit, Judith; Nonnenmacher, Yannic; Weyler, Christian; Heinzle, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic compartmentation is a key feature of mammalian cells. Mitochondria are the powerhouse of eukaryotic cells, responsible for respiration and the TCA cycle. We accessed the mitochondrial metabolism of the economically important Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using selective permeabilization. We tested key substrates without and with addition of ADP. Based on quantified uptake and production rates, we could determine the contribution of different elementary flux modes to the metabolism of a substrate or substrate combination. ADP stimulated the uptake of most metabolites, directly by serving as substrate for the respiratory chain, thus removing the inhibitory effect of NADH, or as allosteric effector. Addition of ADP favored substrate metabolization to CO2 and did not enhance the production of other metabolites. The controlling effect of ADP was more pronounced when we supplied metabolites to the first part of the TCA cycle: pyruvate, citrate, α-ketoglutarate and glutamine. In the second part of the TCA cycle, the rates were primarily controlled by the concentrations of C4-dicarboxylates. Without ADP addition, the activity of the pyruvate carboxylase-malate dehydrogenase-malic enzyme cycle consumed the ATP produced by oxidative phosphorylation, preventing its accumulation and maintaining metabolic steady state conditions. Aspartate was taken up only in combination with pyruvate, whose uptake also increased, a fact explained by complex regulatory effects. Isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were identified as the key regulators of the TCA cycle, confirming existent knowledge from other cells. We have shown that selectively permeabilized cells combined with elementary mode analysis allow in-depth studying of the mitochondrial metabolism and regulation.

  20. Method of particle energy determination based on measurement of waveguide mode frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukhtin, A. V.

    2012-05-01

    A new method of determination of charged particle energy is developed. This method consists in use of dependency of waveguide mode frequencies on Lorenz factor of particle. For this method it is principal that the particle bunch generates radiation in waveguide and the mode frequencies depend essentially on the Lorenz factor. Three variants of realization of such technique are considered. The first variant consists in use of a thin dielectric layer in a waveguide. The second variant is based on use of a waveguide containing a system of wires coated with a dielectric material. The third version consists in application of a circular waveguide having a grid wall. For all cases analytical solutions of the problems are obtained (in the case of grid waveguide we use the averaged boundary conditions). Some typical results of computations are given. Advantages and disadvantages of different variants are discussed. It is noted that the grid waveguide can be used as well for generation of microwave radiation.

  1. Multilongitudinal mode fiber laser for highly-sensitive magnetic field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming; Liu, Danhui

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a magnetic field sensor based on a multilongitudinal mode fiber laser has been proposed by employing a rotary apparatus modulated by an external magnetic field. Due to the remarkable birefringence change caused by the fiber twist, the polarimetric mode beat frequency (PMBF) of the laser is sensitive to the applied magnetic field intensity. Experimental results show that the PMBF linearly shifts with the variation of the magnetic field intensity and the sensitivity reaches up to 10.4 KHz Oe-1 in the range of 0-270 Oe. Moreover, such a device has the advantages of easy fabrication, low cost and high resolution, offering potentials in the weak magnetic field applications.

  2. PCB bioavailability control in Lumbriculus variegatus through different modes of activated carbon addition to sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Xueli Sun; Upal Ghosh

    2007-07-01

    PCB bioavailability to a freshwater oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus) was studied using sediments from a PCB-impacted river that was treated with different modes of granular activated carbon (GAC) addition. The GAC used was bituminous coal-based type TOP. For sediment treated with 2.6% GAC and mixed for 2 min prior to L. variegatus addition, the reduction in total PCB biouptake was 70% for 75-300 {mu}m size carbon, and 92% for the 45-180 {mu}m size carbon. For the case where the GAC was placed as a thin layer on top of the sediments without mixing, the reduction in total PCB uptake was 70%. PCB biouptake kinetics study using treated and untreated sediment showed that the maximum PCB uptake in tissue was achieved at 28 days and decreased after that time. Although the absolute uptake of PCB changed over time, the percent reduction in total PCB uptake upon GAC amendment remained constant after the first few days. Our results indicated that PCB bioavailability was reduced upon the addition and little or no mixing of GAC into sediments. PCB aqueous equilibrium concentration and desorption rates were greatly reduced after GAC amendment, indicating reductions in the two primary mechanisms of PCB bioavailability in sediments: chemical activity and chemical accessibility. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The MODE family of on-orbit experiments: The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.; Deluis, Javier; Waldman, Mel; Bicos, Andy

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment entitled the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), proposed by the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is described. This is the second in a family of flight experiments being developed at MIT. The first is the Middeck 0-Gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE) which investigates the nonlinear behavior of contained fluids and truss structures in zero gravity. The objective of the MACE program is to investigate and validate the modeling of the dynamics of an actively controlled flexible, articulating, multibody platform free floating in zero gravity. A rationale and experimental approach for the program are presented. The rationale shows that on-orbit testing, coupled with ground testing and a strong analytical program, is necessary in order to fully understand both how flexibility of the platform affects the pointing problem, as well as how gravity perturbs this structural flexibility causing deviations between 1- and 0-gravity behavior. The experimental approach captures the essential physics of multibody platforms, by identifying the appropriate attributes, tests, and performance metrics of the test article and defines the tests required to successfully validate the analytical framework.

  4. Synchronous activation within the default mode network correlates with perceived social support.

    PubMed

    Che, Xianwei; Zhang, Qinglin; Zhao, Jizheng; Wei, Dongtao; Li, Bingbing; Guo, Yanan; Qiu, Jiang; Liu, Yijun

    2014-10-01

    Perceived social support emphasizes subjective feeling of provisions offered by family, friends and significant others. In consideration of the great significance of perceived social support to health outcomes, attempt to reveal the neural substrates of perceived social support will facilitate its application in a series of mental disorders. Perceived social support potentially relies on healthy interpersonal relationships calling for cognitive processes like perspective taking, empathy and theory of mind. Interestingly, functional activations and connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) are extensively involved in these interpersonal skills. As a result, it is proposed that synchronous activities among brain regions within the DMN will correlate with self-report of perceived social support. In the present study, we tried to investigate the associations between coherence among the DMN regions and perceived social support at resting state. A total of 333 (145 men) participants were directed to fulfill the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) after a 484-s functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning without any task. As a result, seed-based functional connectivity and power spectrum analyses revealed that heightened synchronicity among the DMN regions was associated with better performance on perceived social support. Moreover, results in the present study were independent of different methods, structural changes, and general cognitive performance.

  5. State observer-based sliding mode control for semi-active hydro-pneumatic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sizhong; Zhao, Yuzhuang; Liu, Gang; Yang, Lin

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an improved virtual reference model for semi-active suspension to coordinate the vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. The reference model combines the virtues of sky-hook with ground-hook control logic, and the hybrid coefficient is tuned according to the longitudinal and lateral acceleration so as to improve the vehicle stability especially in high-speed condition. Suspension state observer based on unscented Kalman filter is designed. A sliding mode controller (SMC) is developed to track the states of the reference model. The stability of the SMC strategy is proven by means of Lyapunov function taking into account the nonlinear damper characteristics and sprung mass variation of the vehicle. Finally, the performance of the controller is demonstrated under three typical working conditions: the random road excitation, speed bump road and sharp acceleration and braking. The simulation results indicated that, compared with the traditional passive suspension, the proposed control algorithm can offer a better coordination between vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. This approach provides a viable alternative to costlier active suspension control systems for commercial vehicles.

  6. Gamma-radiation-induced degradation of actively pumped single-mode ytterbium-doped optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, B.; Petrosky, J.; Pochet, M.; Usechak, N. G.; Francis, S. A.

    2014-03-01

    The integration of optical components into the digital processing units of satellite subsystems has the potential to remove interconnect bottlenecks inherent to the volume, mass, complexity, reliability and crosstalk issues of copper-based interconnects. Assuming on-board high-bandwidth communications will utilize passive optical fibers as a communication channel, this work investigates the impact of gamma irradiation from a Co-60 source on both passive optical fibers and ytterbium-doped single-mode fibers operated as amplifiers for a 1060-nm light source. Standard optical patch cables were evaluated along with active Yb-doped double-clad fibers. Varied exposure times and signal transmission wavelengths were used to investigate the degradation of the fibers exposed to total doses above 100 krad (Si). The effect on the amplified signal gain was studied for the Yb-doped fibers. The increased attenuation in the fibers across a broad wavelength range in response to multiple levels of gamma radiation exposure along with the effect that the increased attenuation has on the actively pumped Yb-doped fiber amplifier performance, is discussed.

  7. Regulators of complement activity mediate inhibitory mechanisms through a common C3b-binding mode.

    PubMed

    Forneris, Federico; Wu, Jin; Xue, Xiaoguang; Ricklin, Daniel; Lin, Zhuoer; Sfyroera, Georgia; Tzekou, Apostolia; Volokhina, Elena; Granneman, Joke Cm; Hauhart, Richard; Bertram, Paula; Liszewski, M Kathryn; Atkinson, John P; Lambris, John D; Gros, Piet

    2016-05-17

    Regulators of complement activation (RCA) inhibit complement-induced immune responses on healthy host tissues. We present crystal structures of human RCA (MCP, DAF, and CR1) and a smallpox virus homolog (SPICE) bound to complement component C3b. Our structural data reveal that up to four consecutive homologous CCP domains (i-iv), responsible for inhibition, bind in the same orientation and extended arrangement at a shared binding platform on C3b. Large sequence variations in CCP domains explain the diverse C3b-binding patterns, with limited or no contribution of some individual domains, while all regulators show extensive contacts with C3b for the domains at the third site. A variation of ~100° rotation around the longitudinal axis is observed for domains binding at the fourth site on C3b, without affecting the overall binding mode. The data suggest a common evolutionary origin for both inhibitory mechanisms, called decay acceleration and cofactor activity, with variable C3b binding through domains at sites ii, iii, and iv, and provide a framework for understanding RCA disease-related mutations and immune evasion. PMID:27013439

  8. Separation of Lamb waves modes using polarization filter of 3D laser measured signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2015-04-01

    Interpretation of Lamb waves signals can rise serious difficulties due to their multi-modal nature. Different modes propagating with different velocities can be misleading with damage reflected components. As a solution to this problem we propose a technique capable of modes separation based on a polarization filter. Both S0 and A0 Lamb modes exhibit elliptical polarization, however, their polarization parameters, i.e. the ratios of in-plane and out-of-plane displacements and phase-shifts between these components are different. Furthermore, these parameters can be considered constant in a narrow frequency band. Therefore, if the vertical and horizontal components of the wave motion are available, it is possible to apply signal processing technique referred to as oblique polarization filter. This operation is based on phase-shifts and amplifications of the in- and out-of-plane components, which results in orthogonal, linearly polarized A0 and S0 waves signals. In this paper the proposed technique will be illustrated using both numerical simulations and experimental data. The simulations of wave propagation were performed using local interaction simulation approach (LISA) assuming isotropic material. The experiments were performed using 3D laser scanning Doppler vibrometer that allowed to capture the in-plane and out-of-plane wave components.

  9. Measurements and Analysis of Longitudinal HOM Driven Coupled Bunch Modes in PEP-II Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; Winkle, D.Van; /SLAC

    2008-07-07

    The growth rates of the longitudinal higher-order impedance-driven beam modes have greatly increased since the initial PEP-II design and commissioning. This increase is attributed to the addition of 6 1.2MW RF stations with 8 accelerating cavities in the HER and 2 1.2MW RF stations with 4 accelerating cavities in the LER, which allowed operations at twice the design current and almost four times the luminosity. As a result, the damping requirements for the longitudinal feedback have greatly increased since the design, and the feedback filters and control schemes have evolved during PEP-II operations. In this paper, growth and damping rate data for the higher-order mode (HOM) driven coupled-bunch modes are presented from various PEP-II runs and are compared with historical estimates during commissioning. The effect of noise in the feedback processing channel is also studied. Both the stability and performance limits of the system are analyzed.

  10. Measuring Physical Activity in the Elderly: Some Implications for Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Roy J.

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of physical activity patterns is discussed in terms of data obtained by attitude assessment, activity questionnaires, personal monitoring devices, and fitness assessment. Problems of each technique are described. Application of activity measures to the estimation of total dietary needs is discussed. (SK)

  11. 12 CFR 1806.201 - Measuring and reporting Qualified Activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Measuring and reporting Qualified Activities..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ENTERPRISE AWARD PROGRAM Awards § 1806.201 Measuring and reporting Qualified... applicable BEA NOFA for current limitations on Qualified Activities. (e) Measuring the Value of...

  12. Colorimetry and SERS dual-mode detection of telomerase activity: combining rapid screening with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Chen, Hui; Hu, Guohua; Liu, Min; Chen, Peng; Cui, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    As an important biomarker and therapeutic target, telomerase has attracted considerable attention concerning its detection and monitoring. Here, we present a colorimetry and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dual-mode telomerase activity detection method, which has several distinctive advantages. First, colorimetric functionality allows rapid preliminary discrimination of telomerase activity by the naked eye. Second, the employment of SERS technique results in greatly improved detection sensitivity. Third, the combination of colorimetry and SERS into one detection system can ensure highly efficacious and sensitive screening of numerous samples. Besides, the avoidance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures further guarantees fine reliability and simplicity. Generally, the presented method is realized by an ``elongate and capture'' procedure. To be specific, gold nanoparticles modified with Raman molecules and telomeric repeat complementary oligonucleotide are employed as the colorimetric-SERS bifunctional reporting nanotag, while magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with telomerase substrate oligonucleotide are used as the capturing substrate. Telomerase can synthesize and elongate telomeric repeats onto the capturing substrate. The elongated telomeric repeats subsequently facilitate capturing of the reporting nanotag via hybridization between telomeric repeat and its complementary strand. The captured nanotags can cause a significant difference in the color and SERS intensity of the magnetically separated sediments. Thus both the color and SERS can be used as indicators of the telomerase activity. With fast screening ability and outstanding sensitivity, we anticipate that this method would greatly promote practical application of telomerase-based early-stage cancer diagnosis.As an important biomarker and therapeutic target, telomerase has attracted considerable attention concerning its detection and monitoring. Here, we present a colorimetry and

  13. Size distribution and emission rate measurement of fine and ultrafine particle from indoor human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Géhin, Evelyne; Ramalho, Olivier; Kirchner, Séverine

    Human indoor activities generate airborne particles which contribute to the increase of aerosol concentration levels in the home. The particle size distribution emission rate was measured for 18 different activities (burning candle or incense, cooking, spray use, computer printing and household cleaning). The particle emission rate was calculated from concentration measurements with a DMS500 (CAMBUSTION) in an experimental chamber (2.36 ± 0.05 m 3). The results showed that ultrafine particles are emitted during these activities and the lowest number distribution mode was 6 nm for one of the burning candles. All the cooking activities had similar emissions with a mode between 20 and 40 nm. The measured size distributions were represented in a database by the sum of 1, 2 or 3 lognormal distributions. The measured total emission rate ranged between 0.06 × 10 10 and 13.10 × 10 10 s -1 and the highest emission rate was measured for the self cleaning oven program (pyrolysis).

  14. The Self-Pleasantness Judgment Modulates the Encoding Performance and the Default Mode Network Activity.

    PubMed

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Cerles, Melanie; Ramdeen, Kylee T; Boudiaf, Naila; Pichat, Cedric; Hot, Pascal; Baciu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we evaluated the effect of self-relevance on cerebral activity and behavioral performance during an incidental encoding task. Recent findings suggest that pleasantness judgments reliably induce self-oriented (internal) thoughts and increase default mode network (DMN) activity. We hypothesized that this increase in DMN activity would relate to increased memory recognition for pleasantly-judged stimuli (which depend on internally-oriented attention) but decreased recognition for unpleasantly-judged items (which depend on externally-oriented attention). To test this hypothesis, brain activity was recorded from 21 healthy participants while they performed a pleasantness judgment requiring them to rate visual stimuli as pleasant or unpleasant. One hour later, participants performed a surprise memory recognition test outside of the scanner. Thus, we were able to evaluate the effects of pleasant and unpleasant judgments on cerebral activity and incidental encoding. The behavioral results showed that memory recognition was better for items rated as pleasant than items rated as unpleasant. The whole brain analysis indicated that successful encoding (SE) activates the inferior frontal and lateral temporal cortices, whereas unsuccessful encoding (UE) recruits two key medial posterior DMN regions, the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus (PCU). A region of interest (ROI) analysis including classic DMN areas, revealed significantly greater involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in pleasant compared to unpleasant judgments, suggesting this region's involvement in self-referential (i.e., internal) processing. This area may be responsible for the greater recognition performance seen for pleasant stimuli. Furthermore, a significant interaction between the encoding performance (successful vs. unsuccessful) and pleasantness was observed for the PCC, PCU and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Overall, our

  15. 47-channel burst-mode recording hydrophone system enabling measurements of the dynamic echolocation behavior of free-swimming dolphins.

    PubMed

    Starkhammar, Josefin; Amundin, Mats; Nilsson, Johan; Jansson, Tomas; Kuczaj, Stan A; Almqvist, Monica; Persson, Hans W

    2009-09-01

    Detailed echolocation behavior studies on free-swimming dolphins require a measurement system that incorporates multiple hydrophones (often >16). However, the high data flow rate of previous systems has limited their usefulness since only minute long recordings have been manageable. To address this problem, this report describes a 47-channel burst-mode recording hydrophone system that enables highly resolved full beamwidth measurements on multiple free-swimming dolphins during prolonged recording periods. The system facilitates a wide range of biosonar studies since it eliminates the need to restrict the movement of animals in order to study the fine details of their sonar beams.

  16. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  17. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  18. Hippocampal Sharp-Wave Ripples Influence Selective Activation of the Default Mode Network

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Raphael; Adhikari, Mohit H.; Hindriks, Rikkert; Mantini, Dante; Murayama, Yusuke; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Summary The default mode network (DMN) is a commonly observed resting-state network (RSN) that includes medial temporal, parietal, and prefrontal regions involved in episodic memory [1, 2, 3]. The behavioral relevance of endogenous DMN activity remains elusive, despite an emerging literature correlating resting fMRI fluctuations with memory performance [4, 5]—particularly in DMN regions [6, 7, 8]. Mechanistic support for the DMN’s role in memory consolidation might come from investigation of large deflections (sharp-waves) in the hippocampal local field potential that co-occur with high-frequency (>80 Hz) oscillations called ripples—both during sleep [9, 10] and awake deliberative periods [11, 12, 13]. Ripples are ideally suited for memory consolidation [14, 15], since the reactivation of hippocampal place cell ensembles occurs during ripples [16, 17, 18, 19]. Moreover, the number of ripples after learning predicts subsequent memory performance in rodents [20, 21, 22] and humans [23], whereas electrical stimulation of the hippocampus after learning interferes with memory consolidation [24, 25, 26]. A recent study in macaques showed diffuse fMRI neocortical activation and subcortical deactivation specifically after ripples [27]. Yet it is unclear whether ripples and other hippocampal neural events influence endogenous fluctuations in specific RSNs—like the DMN—unitarily. Here, we examine fMRI datasets from anesthetized monkeys with simultaneous hippocampal electrophysiology recordings, where we observe a dramatic increase in the DMN fMRI signal following ripples, but not following other hippocampal electrophysiological events. Crucially, we find increases in ongoing DMN activity after ripples, but not in other RSNs. Our results relate endogenous DMN fluctuations to hippocampal ripples, thereby linking network-level resting fMRI fluctuations with behaviorally relevant circuit-level neural dynamics. PMID:26898464

  19. Longitudinal changes of amygdala and default mode activation in adolescents prenatally exposed to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihao; Coles, Claire D; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Luo, Yuejia; Hu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) is associated with long-term and negative effect on arousal regulation. Recent neuroimaging studies have examined brain mechanisms related to arousal dysregulation with cross-sectional experimental designs; but longitudinal changes in the brain, reflecting group differences in neurodevelopment, have never been directly examined. To directly assess the interaction of PCE and neurodevelopment, the present study used a longitudinal design to analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data collected from 33 adolescents (21 with PCE and 12 non-exposed controls) while they performed the same working memory task with emotional distracters at two points in time. The mean age of participants was 14.3 years at time_1 and 16.7 years at time_2. With confounding factors statistically controlled, the fMRI data revealed significant exposure-by-time interaction in the activations of the amygdala and default mode network (DMN). For the control adolescents, brain activations associated with emotional arousal (amygdala) and cognitive effort (DMN) were both reduced at time_2 as compared to that at time_1. However, these activation reductions were not observed in the PCE group, indicating persistently high levels of emotional arousal and cognitive effort. In addition, correlations between longitudinal changes in the brain and in behavior have shown that adolescents with persistently high emotional arousal were more likely in need of high cognitive effort; and their cognitive performance was more likely to be affected by distractive challenges. The present results complement and extend previous findings from cross-sectional studies with further evidence supporting the view of PCE associated long-term teratogenic effects on arousal regulation.

  20. a Global Shear Velocity Model of the Upper Mantle from New Fundamental and Higher Rayleigh Mode Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2011-12-01

    We present a global SV-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle, built from a new dataset of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms. We use an extension of the automated waveform inversion approach of Debayle (1999) designed to improve the extraction of fundamental and higher mode information from a single surface wave seismogram. The improvement is shown to be significant in the transition zone structure which is constrained by the higher modes. The new approach is fully automated and can be run on a Beowulf computer to process massive surface wave dataset. It has been used to match successfully over 350 000 fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms, corresponding to about 20 millions of new measurements extracted from the seismograms. For each seismogram, we obtain a path average shear velocity and quality factor model, and a set of fundamental and higher mode dispersion and attenuation curves compatible with the recorded waveform. The set of dispersion curves provides a global database for future finite frequency inversion. Our new 3D SV-wave tomographic model takes into account the effect of azimuthal anisotropy and is constrained with a lateral resolution of several hundred kilometers and a vertical resolution of a few tens of kilometers. In the uppermost 200 km, our model shows a very strong correlation with surface tectonics. The slow velocity signature of mid-oceanic ridges extend down to ~100 km depth while the high velocity signature of cratons vanishes below 200 km depth. At depth greater than 400 km, the pattern of seismic velocities appear relatively homogeneous at large scale, except for high velocity slabs which produce broad high velocity regions within the transition zone. Although resolution is still good, the region between 200 and 400 km is associated with a complex pattern of seismic heterogeneities showing no simple correlation with the shallower or deeper structure.

  1. Long-term Passive Mode Data Measured by the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Instrument onboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and Comparison to REMS Surface Pressure and Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, I.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.; Boynton, W. V.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C. J.; Harshman, K.; Kozyrev, A.; Kuzmin, R.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mischna, M. A.; Moersch, J.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Tate, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Since the landing in August 2012, DAN has provided a wealth of scientific data from the successful surface operation in both Active mode and Passive mode. While the main DAN science investigation so far has focused in estimating the contents of water-equivalent-hydrogen (WEH) and chlorine-equivalent-neutron-absorption in the surface, here we will provide/discuss low energy (less than about 1 keV) background neutron environment at the Martian surface as measured by DAN Passive mode operation. Passive mode measurements have been done on almost every sols with durations ranging from 1 hour to ~9 hour, covering different times of a day. Neutrons from the onboard power source Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermonuclear Generator (MMRTG) and induced by Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR)/Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) interactions with the Martian atmosphere and the surface material contribute to the DAN passive data. An approach to separate out the respective contributions from the DAN total count rates was developed previously (Jun et al., 2013) using the data collected at Rocknest (where the rover stayed from sol 60 to sol 100). The main goal of this paper is to extend the same analysis to other locations encountered during the rover traverse especially to understand the long-term (through Sol 800, covering more than 1 Martian year) behavior of the neutron environment at the Martian surface as measured by DAN in response to variation of the free space GCR/SEP environment. Extensive Monte Carlo transport simulations using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) have been performed to support the analysis and to aid interpretation of the DAN passive data. In addition, the DAN passive data are compared to the long-term surface temperature and pressure data (both measured and modeled) from Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) to investigate possible correlation of the DAN data with ambient environmental conditions.

  2. Active microwave measurement of soil water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Cihlar, J.; Moore, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of radar backscatter from bare soil at 4.7, 5.9, and 7.1 GHz for incident angles of 0-70 deg have been analyzed to determine sensitivity to soil moisture. Because the effective depth of penetration of the radar signal is only about one skin depth, the observed signals were correlated with the moisture in a skin depth as characterized by the attenuation coefficient (reciprocal of skin depth). Since the attenuation coefficient is a monotonically increasing function of moisture density, it may also be used as a measure of moisture content over the distance involved, which varies with frequency and moisture content. The measurements show an approximately linear increase in scattering with attenuation coefficient of the soil at angles within 10 deg of vertical and all frequencies. At 4.7 GHz this increase continues relatively large out to 70 deg incidence, but by 7.1 GHz the sensitivity is much less even at 20 deg and practically gone at 50 deg.

  3. The Southern Annular Mode determines interannual and centennial-scale fire activity in temperate southwest Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Michela; Fletcher, Michael-Shawn

    2016-02-01

    Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is the primary mode of atmospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere. While it is well established that the current anthropogenic-driven trend in SAM is responsible for decreased rainfall in southern Australia, its role in driving fire regimes in this region has not been explored. We examined the connection between fire activity and SAM in southwest Tasmania, which lies in the latitudinal band of strongest correlation between SAM and rainfall in the Southern Hemisphere. We reveal that fire activity during a fire season is significantly correlated with the phase of SAM in the preceding year using superposed epoch analysis. We then synthesized new 14 charcoal records from southwest Tasmania spanning the last 1000 years, revealing a tight coupling between fire activity and SAM at centennial timescales, observing a multicentury increase in fire activity over the last 500 years and a spike in fire activity in the 21st century in response to natural and anthropogenic SAM trends.

  4. Towards Fast In-line Measurement of Water Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J.; Andreasen, M. B.; Pedersen, M.; Rasmussen, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    Water activity is widely used as a key parameter in controlling the quality of food and feed products, among others. For determining the water activity, the material is sampled from the manufacturing process and measured in the laboratory with water activity analyzers. The sampling procedure can lead to non-representative measurements, the measurement process is time consuming, and much of the produced material may be wasted before the measurement results are available. To reduce waste and to be able to optimize production processes, industry requires in-line measurement of relevant quality determining parameters, hereunder the water activity. In cooperation with a manufacturer of systems for automatic in-line sampling and measurement of moisture, density, and the size of items, a project was defined to also enable the manufacturer's existing products to perform automatic measurement of the water activity in a sample. The aim was to develop a measurement system with the ability to operate in an industrial environment, which in the end would increase the measurement speed significantly and minimize the problems related to the handling of samples. In the paper the selection and characterization of the sensors, the design of a measurement chamber, and various issues of modeling and methods to reduce measurement time are discussed. The paper also presents water activity measurements obtained from food and feed products with the system, and shows that reliable results can be obtained in a few minutes with a proper design of the measurement chamber and selection of a model.

  5. Measurement of single mode imprint in laser ablative drive of a thin Al foil by extreme ultraviolet laser radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E.; Wark, J.; Zhang, J.; Kalantar, D.; Key, M.H.; Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Neely, D.; Rose, S.; Warwick, J.; MacPhee, A.; Lewis, C.L.; Demir, A.; Lin, J.; Smith, R.; Tallents, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The temporal development of laser driven single mode perturbations in thin Al foils has been measured using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) laser radiography. 15, 30, 70 and 90 {mu}m single modes were imprinted on 2 {mu}m thick Al foils with an optical driver laser at 527 nm for intensities in the range 5{times}10{sup 12} to 1.5{times}10{sup 13}Wcm{sup {minus}2}. The magnitude of the imprinted perturbation at the time of shock break out was determined by fitting to the data estimated curves of growth of the Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability after shock break out. The efficiency of imprinting is independent of perturbation wavelength in the parameter range of this experiment, suggesting little influence of thermal conduction smoothing. The results are of interest for directly driven inertially confined fusion. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Measuring anisotropic friction on WTe2 using atomic force microscopy in the force-distance and friction modes.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Jolanta A

    2010-04-01

    Layered materials which can be easily cleaved have proved to be excellent samples for the study of atomic scale friction. The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have been particularly popular. These materials exhibit a number of interesting properties ranging from superconductivity to low frictional coefficients. In this paper we have investigated the tribology of the dichalcogenide-WTe2. The coefficient of friction is less than 0.040 along the Te rows and increases to over 0.045 across the rows. The frictional forces almost doubled at normal loads of 5000 nN when scanning in the [010] direction in comparison to the [100] direction. The frictional responses of the AFM probe have been monitored in the frictional force and force-versus-distance (f-d) mode. A comparison between the outcomes using the two different modes demonstrates the factors which need to be considered for accurate measurements. PMID:20355449

  7. Label free imaging system for measuring blood flow speeds using a single multi-mode optical fiber (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigal, Iliya; Caravaca Aguirre, Antonio M.; Gad, Raanan; Piestun, Rafael; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a single multi-mode fiber-based micro-endoscope for measuring blood flow speeds. We use the transmission-matrix wavefront shaping approach to calibrate the multi-mode fiber and raster-scan a focal spot across the distal fiber facet, imaging the cross-polarized back-reflected light at the proximal facet using a camera. This setup allows assessment of the backscattered photon statistics: by computing the mean speckle contrast values across the proximal fiber facet we show that spatially-resolved flow speed maps can be inferred by selecting an appropriate camera integration time. The proposed system is promising for minimally-invasive studies of neurovascular coupling in deep brain structures.

  8. Measuring anisotropic friction on WTe2 using atomic force microscopy in the force-distance and friction modes.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Jolanta A

    2010-04-01

    Layered materials which can be easily cleaved have proved to be excellent samples for the study of atomic scale friction. The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have been particularly popular. These materials exhibit a number of interesting properties ranging from superconductivity to low frictional coefficients. In this paper we have investigated the tribology of the dichalcogenide-WTe2. The coefficient of friction is less than 0.040 along the Te rows and increases to over 0.045 across the rows. The frictional forces almost doubled at normal loads of 5000 nN when scanning in the [010] direction in comparison to the [100] direction. The frictional responses of the AFM probe have been monitored in the frictional force and force-versus-distance (f-d) mode. A comparison between the outcomes using the two different modes demonstrates the factors which need to be considered for accurate measurements.

  9. Parameter sensitivity analysis of nonlinear piezoelectric probe in tapping mode atomic force microscopy for measurement improvement

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Rachael; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2014-02-21

    The equations of motion for a piezoelectric microcantilever are derived for a nonlinear contact force. The analytical expressions for natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained. Then, the method of multiple scales is used to analyze the analytical frequency response of the piezoelectric probe. The effects of nonlinear excitation force on the microcantilever beam's frequency and amplitude are analytically studied. The results show a frequency shift in the response resulting from the force nonlinearities. This frequency shift during contact mode is an important consideration in the modeling of AFM mechanics for generation of more accurate imaging. Also, a sensitivity analysis of the system parameters on the nonlinearity effect is performed. The results of a sensitivity analysis show that it is possible to choose parameters such that the frequency shift minimizes. Certain parameters such as tip radius, microcantilever beam dimensions, and modulus of elasticity have more influence on the nonlinearity of the system than other parameters. By changing only three parameters—tip radius, thickness, and modulus of elasticity of the microbeam—a more than 70% reduction in nonlinearity effect was achieved.

  10. Measurements of ion-ion collisional broadening of ion acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, T. E.; Benage, J. F.; Montgomery, D. S.; Murillo, M. S.; Wysocki, F. J.; Rostoker, N.

    2002-10-01

    Although collisional plasmas are often encountered in inertial confinement fusion, dense plasma experiments and astrophysics, very few experiments have looked at the effects produced by the presence of these collisions. Ion-acoustic modes are predicted to broaden due to ion-ion collisions when the ion-ion mean free path, λ_ii, becomes comparable to the ion-acoustic wavelength, λ_iaw. This paper presents the first quantitative data of ion-acoustic wave broadening in moderately ion-ion collisional (0.05modes was observed using collective Thomson scattering and analyzed using a collisional model that includes, ion and electron Landau, inhomogeneity and instrumental broadening. The results indicate that standard collisional models do not adequately predict the degree of ion-acoustic damping when 0.1

  11. The measurement of geodesic acoustic mode magnetic field oscillations in J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, T.; Wu, J.; Shen, H. G.; Deng, T. J.; Liu, A. D.; Xie, J. L.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.; Yu, C. X.; Sun, Y.; Liu, H.; Chen, Z. P.; Zhuang, G.

    2014-10-01

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) magnetic field oscillations have been investigated using three-dimension magnetic probe and Langmuir probe arrays in the edge of J-TEXT tokamak. The probe arrays are placed on the two top windows of tokamak, separated toroidally. Inside the LCFS, GAM shows apparent oscillations in floating potential. In contrast, GAM magnetic field oscillations are not significant in raw magnetic fields signals. Using toroidal correlation technique, the GAM magnetic field oscillations are distinguished from ambient magnetic field. The amplitudes of three dimension GAM magnetic field fluctuations, as well as the dependence with local plasma parameters such as safety factor and plasma beta, are coincident with theoretical predictions. And its toroidal symmetry mode structure, i.e. n = 0, is identified. Furthermore, the GAM current sheet, in which GAM oscillates, is firstly verified with magnetic probes arrays in different radial positions, which may help us to understand the radial structure of GAM. Supported by NNSFC (Nos. 10990210, 10990211, 10335060, 10905057 and 11375188), CPSF (No. 20080440104), YIF (No. WK2030040019) and KIPCAS (No. kjcx-yw-n28).

  12. Metastable atom-activated dissociation mass spectrometry of phosphorylated and sulfonated peptides in negative ion mode.

    PubMed

    Cook, Shannon L; Jackson, Glen P

    2011-06-01

    The dissociation behavior of phosphorylated and sulfonated peptide anions was explored using metastable atom-activated dissociation mass spectrometry (MAD-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). A beam of high kinetic energy helium (He) metastable atoms was exposed to isolated phosphorylated and sulfonated peptides in the 3- and 2- charge states. Unlike CID, where phosphate losses are dominant, the major dissociation channels observed using MAD were C(α) - C peptide backbone cleavages and neutral losses of CO(2), H(2)O, and [CO(2) + H(2)O] from the charge reduced (oxidized) product ion, consistent with an electron detachment dissociation (EDD) mechanism such as Penning ionization. Regardless of charge state or modification, MAD provides ample backbone cleavages with little modification loss, which allows for unambiguous PTM site determination. The relative abundance of certain fragment ions in MAD is also demonstrated to be somewhat sensitive to the number and location of deprotonation sites, with backbone cleavage somewhat favored adjacent to deprotonated sites like aspartic acid residues. MAD provides a complementary dissociation technique to CID, ECD, ETD, and EDD for peptide sequencing and modification identification. MAD offers the unique ability to analyze highly acidic peptides that contain few to no basic amino acids in either negative or positive ion mode.

  13. Hemodynamic Measurements of the Human Adult Head in Transmittance Mode by Near-Infrared Time-Resolved Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Oda, Motoki; Ohmae, Etsuko; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Daisuke; Yoshimoto, Kenji; Homma, Shu; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Using a near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS) system, we measured the human head in transmittance mode to obtain the optical properties and the hemodynamic changes of deep brain tissues in seven healthy adult volunteers during hyperventilation. For six out of seven volunteers, we obtained the optical signals with sufficient intensity within 10 sec. of sampling. We confirmed that it is possible to non-invasively measure the hemodynamic changes of the human head during hyperventilation, even in the transmittance measurements by the developed TRS system. These results showed that the level of deoxygenated hemoglobin was significantly increased, and the level of oxygenated and total hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation were also significantly decreased during hyperventilation. We expect that this TRS technique will be applied to clinical applications for measuring deep brain tissues and deep biological organs. PMID:26782238

  14. Idea Sharing: Using Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure" as a Means of Developing Different Modes of Student Authorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Stella

    2014-01-01

    In this "Idea Sharing" article, the author introduces Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure" as a critique of King James I's (England) concept of an absolute monarchy, in his constitutional treatise, "Basilikon Doron (1599)," the "kingly gift" that advises the young prince on the ethics of government and how to…

  15. Identification of a potent synthetic FXR agonist with an unexpected mode of binding and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, Stephen M.; Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnan; Adams, Alan D.; Sahoo, Soumya; Sitlani, Ayesha; Sparrow, Carl; Cui, Jisong; Becker, Joseph W.

    2008-07-08

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, plays important roles in the regulation of bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and insulin sensitivity. There is intense interest in understanding the mechanisms of FXR regulation and in developing pharmaceutically suitable synthetic FXR ligands that might be used to treat metabolic syndrome. We report here the identification of a potent FXR agonist (MFA-1) and the elucidation of the structure of this ligand in ternary complex with the human receptor and a coactivator peptide fragment using x-ray crystallography at 1.9-{angstrom} resolution. The steroid ring system of MFA-1 binds with its D ring-facing helix 12 (AF-2) in a manner reminiscent of hormone binding to classical steroid hormone receptors and the reverse of the pose adopted by naturally occurring bile acids when bound to FXR. This binding mode appears to be driven by the presence of a carboxylate on MFA-1 that is situated to make a salt-bridge interaction with an arginine residue in the FXR-binding pocket that is normally used to neutralize bound bile acids. Receptor activation by MFA-1 differs from that by bile acids in that it relies on direct interactions between the ligand and residues in helices 11 and 12 and only indirectly involves a protonated histidine that is part of the activation trigger. The structure of the FXR:MFA-1 complex differs significantly from that of the complex with a structurally distinct agonist, fexaramine, highlighting the inherent plasticity of the receptor.

  16. Dendritic Slow Dynamics Enables Localized Cortical Activity to Switch between Mobile and Immobile Modes with Noisy Background Input

    PubMed Central

    Kurashige, Hiroki; Câteau, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    Mounting lines of evidence suggest the significant computational ability of a single neuron empowered by active dendritic dynamics. This motivates us to study what functionality can be acquired by a network of such neurons. The present paper studies how such rich single-neuron dendritic dynamics affects the network dynamics, a question which has scarcely been specifically studied to date. We simulate neurons with active dendrites networked locally like cortical pyramidal neurons, and find that naturally arising localized activity – called a bump – can be in two distinct modes, mobile or immobile. The mode can be switched back and forth by transient input to the cortical network. Interestingly, this functionality arises only if each neuron is equipped with the observed slow dendritic dynamics and with in vivo-like noisy background input. If the bump activity is considered to indicate a point of attention in the sensory areas or to indicate a representation of memory in the storage areas of the cortex, this would imply that the flexible mode switching would be of great potential use for the brain as an information processing device. We derive these conclusions using a natural extension of the conventional field model, which is defined by combining two distinct fields, one representing the somatic population and the other representing the dendritic population. With this tool, we analyze the spatial distribution of the degree of after-spike adaptation and explain how we can understand the presence of the two distinct modes and switching between the modes. We also discuss the possible functional impact of this mode-switching ability. PMID:21931635

  17. Unsteady heat-flux measurements of second-mode instability waves in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat-flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors, and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are consistent with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was used to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  18. Review of Measures of Worksite Environmental and Policy Supports for Physical Activity and Healthy Eating

    PubMed Central

    Reeds, Dominic N.; van Bakergem, Margaret A.; Marx, Christine M.; Brownson, Ross C.; Pamulapati, Surya C.; Hoehner, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity prevention strategies are needed that target multiple settings, including the worksite. The objective of this study was to assess the state of science concerning available measures of worksite environmental and policy supports for physical activity (PA) and healthy eating (HE). Methods We searched multiple databases for instruments used to assess worksite environments and policies. Two commonly cited instruments developed by state public health departments were also included. Studies that were published from 1991 through 2013 in peer-reviewed publications and gray literature that discussed the development or use of these instruments were analyzed. Instrument administration mode and measurement properties were documented. Items were classified by general health topic, 5 domains of general worksite strategy, and 19 subdomains of worksite strategy specific to PA or HE. Characteristics of worksite measures were described including measurement properties, length, and administration mode, as well as frequencies of items by domain and subdomain. Results Seventeen instruments met inclusion criteria (9 employee surveys, 5 manager surveys, 1 observational assessment, and 2 studies that used multiple administration modes). Fourteen instruments included reliability testing. More items were related to PA than HE. Most instruments (n = 10) lacked items in the internal social environment domain. The most common PA subdomains were exercise facilities and lockers/showers; the most common HE subdomain was healthy options/vending. Conclusion This review highlights gaps in measurement of the worksite social environment. The findings provide a useful resource for researchers and practitioners and should inform future instrument development. PMID:25950572

  19. Neutron Yield Measurements via Aluminum Activation

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-08

    Neutron activation of aluminum may occur by several neutron capture reactions. Four such reactions are described here: {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(n, 2n){sup 26}Al and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg. The radioactive nuclei {sup 28}Al, {sup 24}Na, and {sup 27}Mg, which are produced via the {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg neutron reactions, beta decay to excited states of {sup 28}Si, {sup 24}Mg and {sup 27}Al respectively. These excited states then emit gamma rays as the nuclei de-excite to their respective ground states.

  20. Integrated microsphere whispering gallery mode probe for highly sensitive refractive index measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hanzheng; Yuan, Lei; Kim, Cheol-Woon; Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Xiao, Hai

    2016-06-01

    We report an integrated whispering gallery mode microresonator-based sensor probe for refractive index sensing. The probe was made by sealing a borosilicate glass microsphere into a thin-wall glass capillary pigtailed with a multimode optical fiber. The intensities of the resonant peaks were found decreasing exponentially (linearly in a log scale) with the increasing refractive index of the medium surrounding the capillary. The sensing capability of the integrated probe was tested using sucrose solutions of different concentrations and the resolution was estimated to be about 2.5×10-5 in the index range of 1.3458 to 1.3847. The integrated sensor probe may prove useful in many chemical and biological sensing applications where highly sensitive refractive index monitoring is needed.

  1. Vibration measurement and mode analysis on concrete structures with embedded fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Tjin, Chuan S.; Moyo, Pilate; Zheng, Xiahua; Brownjohn, James M. W.

    2001-08-01

    This paper reports our work on the applications of fiber Bragg grating-based strain sensors for the vibration tests and mode analysis on concrete structures. The arrayed fiber grating strain sensors, which were wavelength-division-multiplexed along the fibers, were attached onto the reinforced bars (rebars) before concrete was poured in to form a 5.5m long, 0.3m wide, 0.15m deep reinforced concrete beam. The embedded sensors will provide quasi-distributed real-time dynamic strain information along the length of the beam. For verification with the FBG strain sensors, some electrical accelerometers were also placed on the top surface of the concrete beam. All the data from FBG sensors and electrical accelerometers were recorded and analyzed by a computer. In the experiments, a hammer and an electrical shaker were used to excite the structure. The experimental results obtained with the FBG sensors show good consistency with the theoretical analysis.

  2. Control of Stationary Cross-Flow Modes in a Mach 3.5 Boundary Layer Using Patterned Passive and Active Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuele, Chan Yong

    2011-01-01

    Spanwise-periodic roughness designed to excite selected wavelengths of stationary cross- ow modes was investigated in a 3-D boundary layer at Mach 3.5. The test model was a sharp-tipped 14deg right-circular cone. The model and integrated sensor traversing system were placed in the Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low Disturbance Tunnel (SLDT) equipped with a "quiet design" nozzle at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model was oriented at a 4:2deg angle of attack to produce a mean cross-fl ow velocity component in the boundary layer over the cone. Five removable cone tips have been investigated. One has a smooth surface that is used to document the baseline ("natural") conditions. Two had minute (20 - 40 micron) "dimples" that are equally spaced around the circumference, at a streamwise location that is just upstream of the linear stability neutral growth branch for cross- ow modes. The azimuthal mode numbers of the dimpled tips were selected to either enhance the most amplified wave numbers, or to suppress the growth of the most amplified wave numbers. Two of the cone tips had an array of plasma streamwise vortex generators that were designed to simulate the disturbances produced by the passive patterned roughness. The results indicate that the stationary cross-fl ow modes were highly receptive to the patterned roughness of both passive and active types. The patterned passive roughness that was designed to suppress the growth of the most amplified modes had an azimuthal wavelength that was 66% smaller that that of the most amplified stationary cross- ow mode. This had the effect to increase the transition Reynolds number from 25% to 50% depending on the measurement technique. The application of the research is on turbulent transition control on swept wings of supersonic aircraft. The plasma-based roughness has the advantage over the passive roughness of being able to be adaptable to different conditions that would occur during a flight mission.

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2005-07-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic.

  4. Different Identity Revelation Modes in an Online Peer-Assessment Learning Environment: Effects on Perceptions toward Assessors, Classroom Climate and Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Fu-Yun; Wu, Chun-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The effects of four different identity revelation modes (three fixed modes: real-name, anonymity, nickname and one dynamic user self-choice mode) on participants' perceptions toward their assessors, classroom climate, and past experience with the learning activity in which they were engaged were examined. A pretest-posttest quasi-experimental…

  5. Use of B-mode ultrasonography for measuring femoral muscle thickness in dogs

    PubMed Central

    SAKAEDA, Kanako; SHIMIZU, Miki

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of muscle mass is important for evaluating muscle function and rehabilitation outcomes. Ultrasound has recently been successfully used to estimate muscle mass in humans by measuring muscle thickness. This study attempted to standardize procedures for measuring femoral muscle thickness ultrasonographically, as well as quantify the reliability and validity of ultrasound evaluations of muscle thickness compared to measurements made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in dogs. We evaluated the quadriceps femoris (QF), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles of 10 clinically healthy Beagle dogs. Scans were taken in 5 different sections divided equally between the greater trochanter and proximal patella. MRI was performed, followed by T1-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured with MRI, and muscle thickness was measured with MRI and ultrasonography. The thickness of the QF, BF and ST muscles as measured by ultrasound at slices 1–3 (from the proximal end to the middle of the femur), 2–4 (middle of the femur) and 2 (more proximal than the middle of the femur), respectively, was correlated with muscle thickness and CSA as measured by MRI. These sites showed a flat interface between muscle and transducer and were situated over belly muscle. No correlation between measurement types was seen in SM muscle. We must confirm this assessment method for various breeds, sizes, ages and muscle pathologies in dogs, thereby confirming that muscle thickness as measured ultrasonographically can reflect muscle function. PMID:26832997

  6. Brain and pineal 7α-hydroxypregnenolone stimulating locomotor activity: identification, mode of action and regulation of biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Haraguchi, Shogo; Fukada, Yoshitaka; Vaudry, Hubert

    2013-08-01

    Biologically active steroids synthesized in the central and peripheral nervous systems are termed neurosteroids. However, the biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of neurosteroids are still incompletely elucidated. 7α-Hydroxypregnenolone, a novel bioactive neurosteroid stimulating locomotor activity, has been recently identified in the brain of newts and quail. Subsequently, the mode of action and regulation of biosynthesis of 7α-hydroxypregnenolone have been determined. Moreover, recent studies on birds have demonstrated that the pineal gland, an endocrine organ located close to the brain, is an important site of production of neurosteroids de novo from cholesterol. 7α-Hydroxypregnenolone is a major pineal neurosteroid that stimulates locomotor activity in juvenile chickens, connecting light-induced gene expression with locomotion. This review summarizes the advances in our understanding of the identification, mode of action and regulation of biosynthesis of brain and pineal 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, a potent stimulator of locomotor activity.

  7. Measuring glottal activity during voiced speech using a tuned electromagnetic resonating collar sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. R., III; Keenaghan, K.; Desimini, S.

    2005-11-01

    Non-acoustic speech sensors can be employed to obtain measurements of one or more aspects of the speech production process, such as glottal activity, even in the presence of background noise. These sensors have a long history of clinical applications and have also recently been applied to the problem of denoising speech signals recorded in acoustically noisy environments (Ng et al 2000 Proc. Int. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP) (Istanbul, Turkey) vol 1, pp 229-32). Recently, researchers developed a new non-acoustic speech sensor based primarily on a tuned electromagnetic resonator collar (TERC) (Brown et al 2004 Meas. Sci. Technol. 15 1291). The TERC sensor measures glottal activity by sensing small changes in the dielectric properties of the glottis that result from voiced speech. This paper builds on the seminal work in Brown et al (2004). The primary contributions of this paper are (i) a description of a new single-mode TERC sensor design addressing the comfort and complexity issues of the original sensor, (ii) a complete description of new external interface systems used to obtain long-duration recordings from the TERC sensor and (iii) more extensive experimental results and analysis for the single-mode TERC sensor including spectrograms of speech containing both voiced and unvoiced speech segments in quiet and acoustically noisy environments. The experimental results demonstrate that the single-mode TERC sensor is able to detect glottal activity up to the fourth harmonic and is also insensitive to acoustic background noise.

  8. Dominant modes of relationship between U.S. temperature and geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prohaska, J. T.; Willett, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    Eigen-analysis is applied to a matrix of cross-correlation coefficients between the geomagnetic aa-index for 0 to 23-yr lag and the monthly mean temperature at 32 United States stations. About 75 percent of the relationship between the two fields is contained in three dominant modes. A secular trend (about 90 yr) and two 11-yr cycles dominate the mode time series. The month-to-month changes in the temperature anomaly patterns indicate a slow eddy-like motion to the east of the Continental Divide for all three dominant modes.

  9. Quantifying ant activity using vibration measurements.

    PubMed

    Oberst, Sebastian; Baro, Enrique Nava; Lai, Joseph C S; Evans, Theodore A

    2014-01-01

    Ant behaviour is of great interest due to their sociality. Ant behaviour is typically observed visually, however there are many circumstances where visual observation is not possible. It may be possible to assess ant behaviour using vibration signals produced by their physical movement. We demonstrate through a series of bioassays with different stimuli that the level of activity of meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus) can be quantified using vibrations, corresponding to observations with video. We found that ants exposed to physical shaking produced the highest average vibration amplitudes followed by ants with stones to drag, then ants with neighbours, illuminated ants and ants in darkness. In addition, we devised a novel method based on wavelet decomposition to separate the vibration signal owing to the initial ant behaviour from the substrate response, which will allow signals recorded from different substrates to be compared directly. Our results indicate the potential to use vibration signals to classify some ant behaviours in situations where visual observation could be difficult.

  10. Electromagnetic Measurements in an Active Oilfield Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Aldridge, D. F.; Bartel, L. C.; Knox, H. A.; Weiss, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    An important issue in oilfield development pertains to mapping and monitoring of the fracture distributions (either natural or man-made) controlling subsurface fluid flow. Although microseismic monitoring and analysis have been used for this purpose for several decades, there remain several ambiguities and uncertainties with this approach. We are investigating a novel electromagnetic (EM) technique for detecting and mapping hydraulic fractures in a petroleum reservoir by injecting an electrically conductive contrast agent into an open fracture. The fracture is subsequently illuminated by a strong EM field radiated by a large engineered antenna. Specifically, a grounded electric current source is applied directly to the steel casing of the borehole, either at/near the wellhead or at a deep downhole point. Transient multicomponent EM signals (both electric and magnetic) scattered by the conductivity contrast are then recorded by a surface receiver array. We are presently utilizing advanced 3D numerical modeling algorithms to accurately simulate fracture responses, both before and after insertion of the conductive contrast agent. Model results compare favorably with EM field data recently acquired in a Permian Basin oilfield. However, extraction of the very-low-amplitude fracture signatures from noisy data requires effective noise suppression strategies such as long stacking times, rejection of outliers, and careful treatment of natural magnetotelluric fields. Dealing with the ever-present "episodic EM noise" typical in an active oilfield environment (associated with drilling, pumping, machinery, traffic, etc.) constitutes an ongoing problem. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. A Measurement Activity to Encourage Exploration of Calculus Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuffey, William

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an activity that incorporates measurement in order to lead students to discover and explore fundamental concepts of calculus. Students are provided with an experientially real starting point involving measurement and are encouraged to engage in mathematical discussions in a low-stakes environment. I describe the activity as…

  12. Active pixel image sensor with a winner-take-all mode of operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mead, Carver (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An integrated CMOS semiconductor imaging device having two modes of operation that can be performed simultaneously to produce an output image and provide information of a brightest or darkest pixel in the image.

  13. Twin Knudsen Cell Configuration for Activity Measurements by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.

    1996-01-01

    A twin Knudsen cell apparatus for alloy activity measurements by mass spectrometry is described. Two Knudsen cells - one containing an alloy and one containing a pure component - are mounted on a single flange and translated into the sampling region via a motorized x-y table. Mixing of the molecular beams from the cells is minimized by a novel system of shutters. Activity measurements were taken on two well-characterized alloys to verify the operation of the system. Silver activity measurements are reported for Ag-Cu alloys and aluminum activity measurements are reported for Fe-Al alloys. The temperature dependence of activity for a 0.474 mol fraction Al-Fe alloy gives a partial molar heat of aluminum. Measurements taken with the twin cell show good agreement with literature values for these alloys.

  14. Micropower non-contact EEG electrode with active common-mode noise suppression and input capacitance cancellation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yu M; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2009-01-01

    A non-contact EEG electrode with input capacitance neutralization and common-mode noise suppression circuits is presented. The coin sized sensor capacitively couples to the scalp without direct contact to the skin. To minimize the effect of signal attenuation and channel gain mismatch, the input capacitance of each sensor is actively neutralized using positive feedback and bootstrapping. Common-mode suppression is achieved through a single conductive sheet to establish a common mode reference. Each sensor electrode provides a differential gain of 60 dB. Signals are transmitted in a digital serial daisy-chain directly from a local 16-bit ADC, minimizing the number of wires required to establish a high density EEG sensor network. The micropower electrode consumes only 600 microW from a single 3.3 V supply.

  15. Measuring MAP kinase activity in immune complex assays.

    PubMed

    Cherkasova, Vera A

    2006-11-01

    I present an overview of published methods for measuring mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activity on endogenous associated substrates, exogenously added substrates as well as determination of activation loop phosphorylation as a read-out of kinase activity in vivo. Detailed procedures for these assays are given for two MAP kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 and compared with other published protocols, including the protocols for Hog1 and Mpk1 MAPKs. Measuring kinase activity in immune complex assays can serve as an approach for identification of potential substrates of protein kinases as well as for detecting other kinase-associated proteins. PMID:16890454

  16. Conceptual design of an active feedback system for the control of the resistive shell mode in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2001-03-01

    A quadratic dispersion relation is derived which governs the feedback-modified stability of the resistive shell mode in a large-aspect ratio, low-{beta} tokamak plasma. The effectiveness of a given feedback scheme is determined by a single parameter, {alpha}{sub 0}, which measures the coupling of different poloidal harmonics due to the nonsinusoidal nature of the feedback currents. Feedback fails when this parameter becomes either too positive or too negative. Feedback schemes can be classified into three groups, depending on the relative values of the poloidal mode number, m{sub 0}, of the intrinsically unstable resistive shell mode, and the number, M, of feedback coils in the poloidal direction. Group I corresponds to M{<=}2m{sub 0} and M{ne}m{sub 0}; group II corresponds to M=m{sub 0}; finally, group III corresponds to M>2m{sub 0}. The optimal group I feedback scheme is characterized by extremely narrow detector loops placed as close as possible to the plasma, i.e., well inside the resistive shell. Of course, such a scheme would be somewhat impractical. The optimal group II feedback scheme is characterized by large, nonoverlapping detector loops, and moderately large, nonoverlapping feedback coils. Such a scheme is 100% effective (i.e., it makes the resistive shell appear superconducting) when the detector loops are located just outside the shell. Unfortunately, the scheme only works efficiently for resistive shell modes possessing one particular poloidal mode number. The optimal group III feedback scheme is characterized by slightly overlapping detector loops, and strongly overlapping feedback coils. Such a scheme is 100% effective when the detector loops are located just outside the shell. In addition, the scheme works efficiently for resistive shell modes with a range of different poloidal mode numbers.

  17. Active Learning: The Importance of Developing a Comprehensive Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Rodney; Palmer, Stuart; Hagel, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into the validity of a widely used scale for measuring the extent to which higher education students employ active learning strategies. The scale is the active learning scale in the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement. This scale is based on the Active and Collaborative Learning scale of the National…

  18. Nano-scale simulative measuring model for tapping mode atomic force microscopy and analysis for measuring a nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zone-Ching; Chou, Ming-Ho

    2010-07-01

    This study proposes to construct a nano-scale simulative measuring model of Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM), compare with the edge effect of simulative and measurement results. It combines with the Morse potential and vibration theory to calculate the tip-sample atomic interaction force between probe and sample. Used Silicon atoms (Si) arrange the shape of the rectangular cantilever probe and the nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample atomic model. The simulative measurements are compared with the results for the simulative measurements and experimental measurement. It is found that the scan rate and the probe tip's bevel angle are the two reasons to cause the surface error and edge effect of measuring the nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample by TM-AFM. And the bevel angle is about equal to the probe tip's bevel angle from the results of simulated and experimented on the vertical section of the sample edge. To compare with the edge effect between the simulation and experimental measurement, its error is small. It could be verified that the constructed simulative measuring model for TM-AFM in this article is reasonable.

  19. Contraction mode itself does not determine the level of mTORC1 activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ato, Satoru; Makanae, Yuhei; Kido, Kohei; Fujita, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Resistance training with eccentric contraction has been shown to augment muscle hypertrophy more than other contraction modes do (i.e., concentric and isometric contraction). However, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle contraction mode on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling using a standardized force-time integral (load (weight) × contraction time). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: eccentric contraction, concentric contraction, and isometric contraction. The right gastrocnemius muscle was exercised via percutaneous electrical stimulation-induced maximal contraction. In experiment 1, different modes of muscle contraction were exerted using the same number of reps in all groups, while in experiment 2, muscle contractions were exerted using a standardized force-time integral. Muscle samples were obtained immediately and 3 h after exercise. Phosphorylation of molecules associated with mTORC1 activity was assessed using western blot analysis. In experiment 1, the force-time integral was significantly different among contraction modes with a higher force-time integral for eccentric contraction compared to that for other contraction modes (P < 0.05). In addition, the force-time integral was higher for concentric contraction compared to that for isometric contraction (P < 0.05). Similarly, p70S6K phosphorylation level was higher for eccentric contraction than for other modes of contraction (P < 0.05), and concentric contraction was higher than isometric contraction (P < 0.05) 3 h after exercise. In experiment 2, under the same force-time integral, p70S6K (Thr389) and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation levels were similar among contraction modes 3 h after exercise. Our results suggest that mTORC1 activity is not determined by differences in muscle contraction mode itself. Instead, mTORC1 activity is determined by differences in the force

  20. Elucidation of the Mode of Action of a New Antibacterial Compound Active against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gerits, Evelien; Blommaert, Eline; Lippell, Anna; O’Neill, Alex J.; Weytjens, Bram; De Maeyer, Dries; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Marchal, Kathleen; Marchand, Arnaud; Chaltin, Patrick; Spincemaille, Pieter; De Brucker, Katrijn; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Swings, Toon; Liebens, Veerle; Fauvart, Maarten; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial and community-acquired infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria represent a major human health problem. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial characteristics and mode of action of a new antimicrobial compound, SPI031 (N-alkylated 3, 6-dihalogenocarbazol 1-(sec-butylamino)-3-(3,6-dichloro-9H-carbazol-9-yl)propan-2-ol), which was previously identified in our group. This compound exhibits broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including activity against the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that SPI031 has rapid bactericidal activity (7-log reduction within 30 min at 4x MIC) and that the frequency of resistance development against SPI031 is low. To elucidate the mode of action of SPI031, we performed a macromolecular synthesis assay, which showed that SPI031 causes non-specific inhibition of macromolecular biosynthesis pathways. Liposome leakage and membrane permeability studies revealed that SPI031 rapidly exerts membrane damage, which is likely the primary cause of its antibacterial activity. These findings were supported by a mutational analysis of SPI031-resistant mutants, a transcriptome analysis and the identification of transposon mutants with altered sensitivity to the compound. In conclusion, our results show that SPI031 exerts its antimicrobial activity by causing membrane damage, making it an interesting starting point for the development of new antibacterial therapies. PMID:27167126

  1. Elucidation of the Mode of Action of a New Antibacterial Compound Active against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gerits, Evelien; Blommaert, Eline; Lippell, Anna; O'Neill, Alex J; Weytjens, Bram; De Maeyer, Dries; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Marchal, Kathleen; Marchand, Arnaud; Chaltin, Patrick; Spincemaille, Pieter; De Brucker, Katrijn; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno P A; Swings, Toon; Liebens, Veerle; Fauvart, Maarten; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial and community-acquired infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria represent a major human health problem. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial characteristics and mode of action of a new antimicrobial compound, SPI031 (N-alkylated 3, 6-dihalogenocarbazol 1-(sec-butylamino)-3-(3,6-dichloro-9H-carbazol-9-yl)propan-2-ol), which was previously identified in our group. This compound exhibits broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, including activity against the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We found that SPI031 has rapid bactericidal activity (7-log reduction within 30 min at 4x MIC) and that the frequency of resistance development against SPI031 is low. To elucidate the mode of action of SPI031, we performed a macromolecular synthesis assay, which showed that SPI031 causes non-specific inhibition of macromolecular biosynthesis pathways. Liposome leakage and membrane permeability studies revealed that SPI031 rapidly exerts membrane damage, which is likely the primary cause of its antibacterial activity. These findings were supported by a mutational analysis of SPI031-resistant mutants, a transcriptome analysis and the identification of transposon mutants with altered sensitivity to the compound. In conclusion, our results show that SPI031 exerts its antimicrobial activity by causing membrane damage, making it an interesting starting point for the development of new antibacterial therapies. PMID:27167126

  2. Inter-trial analysis of post-movement Beta activities in EEG signals using multivariate empirical mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Chih; Lee, Po-Lei; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Yu-Te; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Lan, Gong-Yau

    2013-07-01

    Event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) is a technique to quantify subject's nonphase-locked neural activities underlying specific frequency bands, reactive to external/internal stimulus. However, conventional ERD/ERS studies usually utilize fixed frequency band determined from one or few channels to filter whole-head EEG/MEG data, which may inevitably include task-unrelated signals and result in underestimation of reactive oscillatory activities in multichannel studies. In this study, we adopted multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) to extract beta-related oscillatory activities in performing self-paced right and left index-finger lifting tasks. The MEMD extracts common modes from all channels in same-index intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) which allows the temporal-frequency features among different channels can be compared in each subband. The beta-band oscillatory activities were further bandpass filtered within trial-specific beta bands determined from sensorimotor-related channels (C3 and C4), and then rectified using amplitude modulation method to detect trial-by-trial beta rebound (BR) values in ERS time courses. The validity of the MEMD approach in BR values extraction has been demonstrated in multichannel EEG study which showed larger BR values than conventional ERS technique. The MEMD-based method enables the trial-by-trial extraction of sensorimotor oscillatory activities which might allow the exploration of subtle brain dynamics in future studies. PMID:23661320

  3. The 3-min test does not provide a valid measure of critical power using the SRM isokinetic mode.

    PubMed

    Karsten, B; Jobson, S A; Hopker, J; Passfield, L; Beedie, C

    2014-04-01

    Recent datas suggest that the mean power over the final 30 s of a 3-min all-out test is equivalent to Critical Power (CP) using the linear ergometer mode. The purpose of the present study was to identify whether this is also true using an "isokinetic mode". 13 cyclists performed: 1) a ramp test; 2) three 3-min all-out trials to establish End Power (EP) and work done above EP (WEP); and 3) 3 constant work rate trials to determine CP and the work done above CP (W') using the work-time (=CP1/W'1) and 1/time (=CP2/W'2) models. Coefficient of variation in EP was 4.45% between trials 1 and 2, and 4.29% between trials 2 and 3. Limits of Agreement for trials 1-2 and trials 2-3 were -2±38 W. Significant differences were observed between EP and CP1 (+37 W, P<0.001), between WEP and W'1(-6.2 kJ, P=0.001), between EP and CP2 (+31 W, P<0.001) and between WEP and W'2 (-4.2 kJ, P=0.006). Average SEE values for EP-CP1 and EP-CP2 of 7.1% and 6.6% respectively were identified. Data suggest that using an isokinetic mode 3-min all-out test, while yielding a reliable measure of EP, does not provide a valid measure of CP.

  4. Design of a high order Campbelling mode measurement system using open source hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izarra, G. de; Elter, Zs.; Jammes, C.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reviews a new real-time measurement instrument dedicated for online neutron monitoring with fission chambers in nuclear reactors. The instrument implements the higher order Campbelling methods and self-monitoring capabilities on an open source development board. The board includes an CPU/FPGA System on a Chip. The feasibility of the measurement instrument was tested both in laboratory with a signal generator and in the Minerve reactor. It is shown that the instrument provides reliable and robust count rate estimation over a wide reactor power range based on the third order statistics of the fission chamber signal. In addition, the system is able to identify whether the measured count rate change is due to the malfunction of the detector or due to the change in the neutron flux. The applied self-monitoring method is based on the spectral properties of the fission chamber signal. During the experimental verification, the considered malfunction was the change of the polarization voltage.

  5. Resin {sup 90}Y microsphere activity measurements for liver brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dezarn, William A.; Kennedy, Andrew S.

    2007-06-15

    The measurement of the radioactivity administered to the patient is one of the major components of {sup 90}Y microsphere liver brachytherapy. The activity of {sup 90}Y microspheres in a glass delivery vial was measured in a dose calibrator. The calibration value to use for {sup 90}Y in the dose calibrator was verified using an activity calibration standard provided by the microsphere manufacturer. This method allowed for the determination of a consistent, reproducible local activity standard. Additional measurements were made to determine some of the factors that could affect activity measurement. The axial response of the dose calibrator was determined by the ratio of activity measurements at the bottom and center of the dose calibrator. The axial response was 0.964 for a glass shipping vial, 1.001 for a glass V-vial, and 0.988 for a polycarbonate V-vial. Comparisons between activity measurements in the dose calibrator and those using a radiation survey meter were found to agree within 10%. It was determined that the dose calibrator method was superior to the survey meter method because the former allowed better defined measurement geometry and traceability of the activity standard back to the manufacturer. Part of the preparation of resin {sup 90}Y microspheres for patient delivery is to draw out a predetermined activity from a shipping vial and place it into a V-vial for delivery to the patient. If the drawn activity was placed in a glass V-vial, the activity measured in the dose calibrator with a glass V-vial was 4% higher than the drawn activity from the shipping vial standard. If the drawn activity was placed in a polycarbonate V-vial, the activity measured in the dose calibrator with a polycarbonate V-vial activity was 20% higher than the drawn activity from the shipping vial standard. Careful characterization of the local activity measurement standard is recommended instead of simply accepting the calibration value of the dose calibrator manufacturer.

  6. Structural modification of resveratrol leads to increased anti-tumor activity, but causes profound changes in the mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Scherzberg, Maria-Christina; Kiehl, Andreas; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Stark, Holger; Stein, Jürgen; Fürst, Robert; Steinhilber, Dieter; Ulrich-Rückert, Sandra

    2015-08-15

    (Z)-3,5,4′-Trimethoxystilbene (Z-TMS) is a resveratrol analog with increased antiproliferative activity towards a number of cancer cell lines compared to resveratrol, which has been shown to inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate if Z-TMS still shows potential for the prevention of metabolic diseases as known for resveratrol. Cell growth inhibition was determined with IC{sub 50} values for Z-TMS between 0.115 μM and 0.473 μM (resveratrol: 110.7 μM to 190.2 μM). Flow cytometric analysis revealed a G{sub 2}/M arrest after Z-TMS treatment, whereas resveratrol caused S phase arrest. Furthermore, Z-TMS was shown to impair microtubule polymerization. Beneficial effects on lipid accumulation were observed for resveratrol, but not for Z-TMS in an in vitro steatosis model. (E)-Resveratrol was confirmed to elevate cAMP levels, and knockdown of AMPK attenuated the antiproliferative activity, while Z-TMS did not show significant effects in these experiments. SIRT1 and AMPK activities were further measured indirectly via induction of the target gene small heterodimer partner (SHP). Thereby, (E)-resveratrol, but not Z-TMS, showed potent induction of SHP mRNA levels in an AMPK- and SIRT1-dependent manner, as confirmed by knockdown experiments. We provide evidence that Z-TMS does not show beneficial metabolic effects, probably due to loss of activity towards resveratrol target genes. Moreover, our data support previous findings that Z-TMS acts as an inhibitor of tubulin polymerization. These findings confirm that the methylation of resveratrol leads to profound changes in the mode of action, which should be taken into consideration when conducting lead structure optimization approaches. - Highlights: • Methylation of resveratrol leads to profound changes in biologic activity. • Z-TMS does not prevent hepatic steatosis, but inhibits tubulin polymerization. • Resveratrol analog Z-TMS does not influence known targets like

  7. Measurements of the masses, lifetimes and decay modes of hadrons at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2010-05-01

    The Tevatron provides 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions and allows for collection of rich b-hadron samples to the two experiments CDF and D0. The study of heavy flavor properties represents a fruitful opportunity to investigate the flavor sector of the Standard Model (SM) and to look for hints of New Physics (NP). Here we report the first measurement of polarization amplitudes in B{sub s}{sup 0} charmless decays, world leading results on b-hadron lifetimes, and measurements of several other properties of b-hadrons.

  8. A Modified Edge Crack Torsion Test for Measurement of Mode III Fracture Toughness of Laminated Tape Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Davidson, Barry D.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Modifications to the edge crack torsion (ECT) test are studied to improve the reliability of this test for measuring the mode-III fracture toughness, G (sub IIIc), of laminated tape fiber-reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites. First, the data reduction methods currently used in the ECT test are evaluated and deficiencies in their accuracy are discussed. An alternative data reduction technique, which uses a polynomial form to represent ECT specimen compliance solution, is evaluated and compared to FEA (finite element analysis) results. Second, seven batches of ECT specimens are tested, each batch containing specimens with a preimplanted midplane edge delamination and midplane plies with orientations of plus theta divided by minus theta, with theta ranging from 0 degrees to 90 degrees in 15-degree increments. Tests on these specimens show that intralaminar cracking occurs in specimens from all batches except for which theta = 15 degrees and 30 degrees. Tests on specimens of these two batches are shown to result in mode-III delamination growth at the intended ply interface. The findings from this study are encouraging steps towards the use of the ECT test as a standardized method for measuring G (sub IIIc), although further modification to the data reduction method is required to make it suitable for use as part of a standardized test method.

  9. The measurement of physical activity in young children.

    PubMed

    Noland, M; Danner, F; DeWalt, K; McFadden, M; Kotchen, J M

    1990-06-01

    Two studies were conducted to determine the validity of various measures of physical activity in young children. In Study 1, 21 preschool children were utilized to explore how well measures of children's activity obtained from parents, teachers, and the children predicted observed behavior at school and in the home. Study 2 (n = 51 preschool children) focused on the predictive validity of the Caltrac motion sensor. In both studies, detailed minute-by-minute ratings of children's activity in Study 1 were generally ineffective in predicting observed physical activity. Children's activity preferences, however, were significantly related to the proportion of high intensity physical activity performed. In Study 2, there was a significant relationship (r = .86, p less than .0001) between Caltrac readings and observed physical activity. This correlation was similar for boys and girls, normal and overweight children, and younger and older children. These findings suggest that the Caltrac monitor may provide a valid index of individual differences in physical activity in young children.

  10. Measurements of B→ D^(*) K^(*) Decays and Other Modes relevant to φ3 Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovny, P.; Browder, Thomas E.; Sakai, Yoshi

    2003-04-01

    We present new measurements of branching fractions and direct CP asymmetries for B^-→ D_CP K^-, observation of barB^0→ D^0 barK^(*)0 decays and discuss prospects for φ3 determination. The results are based on a data sample of 78 fb-1 recorded by the Belle collaboration at the KEKB e^+ e^- collider.

  11. Can Reliability of Multiple Component Measuring Instruments Depend on Response Option Presentation Mode?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menold, Natalja; Raykov, Tenko

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the possible dependency of composite reliability on presentation format of the elements of a multi-item measuring instrument. Using empirical data and a recent method for interval estimation of group differences in reliability, we demonstrate that the reliability of an instrument need not be the same when polarity of the…

  12. Charged fusion product loss measurements using nuclear activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Wieslander, E.; Arnold, D.; Dombrowski, H.; Laubenstein, M.; Murari, A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    In ITER, {alpha} particle loss measurements will be required in order to understand the alpha particle physics. Techniques capable of operating in a fusion reactor environment need further development. Recent experimental studies on JET demonstrated the potential of nuclear activation to measure the flux of escaping MeV ions. New results from MeV ion induced activation of metallic, ceramic, and crystal samples placed near the plasma edge are reported. Activation products were measured as function of orientation with respect to the magnetic field as well as function of the distance to the plasma. Sample activity was measured using ultralow-level gamma-ray spectrometry. Distribution of 14.68 MeV fusion proton induced activation products is strongly anisotropic in agreement with simulations and falls off sharply with increasing distance to the plasma. Prospects for using the technique in ITER are discussed.

  13. Measurement for polarization mode dispersion of LiNbO3 integrated waveguide modulator used white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhangjun; Peng, Feng; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Ai; Liang, Shuai; Yuan, Yonggui; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-01

    We present a method to measure the polarization mode dispersion (PMD) of the LiNbO3 multifunctional integrated waveguide modulator (MFIWM) which is consist of a Y-waveguide, two extended polarization maintaining (PM) fibers, lead-in PM pigtail and lead-out PM pigtail. This method is based on an all-fiber time-domain scanning white light interferometer and utilizes fast Fourier transform (FFT) technology to obtain interferometric phase. The PMD of each part of MFIWM was measured and distinguished accurately. It's demonstrated that, the PMD of Y-waveguide is 13.5 ps/nm/km@1555nm which is approximately 40~160 times of the PMD of PM fibers in the MFIWM under test.

  14. An Automatic Method for Measurements of Arterial Intima-Media Thickness Using Ultrasonic B-Mode Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinthio, Magnus; Ahlgren, Åsa Rydén; Jansson, Tomas; Nilsson, Tobias; Lindström, Kjell; Persson, Hans W.

    We have previously developed algorithms that use B-mode cineloops for simultaneous measurements of arterial diameter change and longitudinal movement of the arterial wall. In this study the lumen diameter algorithm was extended to also measure arterial intima-media thickness of the far wall. To optimize the algorithm the influence of the lateral width of the region-of-interest (1 pixel, 0.1 mm, 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2.5 mm and 5 mm) was evaluated. The algorithm estimated intima-media thickness at diastole automatically by measuring the distance between the two positions where the laterally averaged B-mode intensity envelope crosses a threshold value relative to the maximum amplitudes of the intimal and adventitial echoes, respectively. The sub-pixel resolution is achieved by solving the equation of a straight line between the two samples on either side of the threshold value. The measurements were performed on 20 healthy normotensive volunteers (age 25-57 years) on the common carotid artery 2-3 cm proximal to the bifurcation. For the 2.5-mm width, which was considered the best, the intima-media thickness was mean 646 μm (SD 66) for men and 613 μm (SD 68) for women. The systematic difference was -5 μm and the random difference was 31 μm. The CV was 4.9%. The study indicates that the reproducibility is sufficient for in vivo studies when the width of the region-of-interest is 1.0 mm or wider.

  15. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: initial test with elemental Hg.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T; Wang, Chuji

    2012-09-01

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p (3)P(0) in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10(9) (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10(6) (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p (3)P(0) is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10(12) (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min(-1); the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the

  16. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang Chuji

    2012-09-15

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10{sup 9} (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10{sup 6} (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10{sup 12} (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min{sup -1}; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements

  17. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-08-01

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-3He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-3He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of ˜50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  18. Whistler mode based explanation for the fast reconnection rate measured in the mit versatile toroidal facility.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nagendra

    2011-12-01

    Despite the widely discussed role of whistler waves in mediating magnetic reconnection (MR), the direct connection between such waves and the MR has not been demonstrated by comparing the characteristic temporal and spatial features of the waves and the MR process. Using the whistler wave dispersion relation, we theoretically predict the experimentally measured rise time (τ(rise)) of a few microseconds for the fast rising MR rate in the Versatile Toroidal Facility at MIT. The rise time is closely given by the inverse of the frequency bandwidth of the whistler waves generated in the evolving current sheet. The wave frequencies lie much above the ion cyclotron frequency, but they are limited to less than 0.1% of the electron cyclotron frequency in the argon plasma. The maximum normalized MR rate R=0.35 measured experimentally is precisely predicted by the angular dispersion of the whistler waves.

  19. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the All-Hadronic Mode at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass (M{sub top}) in the all-hadronic decay channel is presented. It uses 5.8 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Events with six to eight jets are selected by a neural network algorithm and by the requirement that at least one of the jets is tagged as a b quark jet. The measurement is performed with a likelihood fit technique, which simultaneously determines M{sub top} and the jet energy scale (JES) calibration. The fit yields a value of M{sub top} = 172.5 {+-} 1.4 (stat) {+-} 1.0 (JES) {+-} 1.1 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. Results from nondestructive assay measurement of the 296-P-34 Rotary mode core sampler HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    HOMAN, N.A.

    1999-06-04

    The objective of this data acquisition was to measure and identify the gamma emissions from the 296-P-34 exhauster high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Data acquisition was accomplished by nondestructive assay (NDA), using a portable gamma spectrometer calibrated to the exhauster HEPA filter geometry. The NDA technique that was used is referenced in 40 CFR 61 Appendix B Method 114 and also addressed in HNF-EP-0528.

  1. Thermal activation of regenerated fiber Bragg grating in few mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Man-Hong; Gunawardena, Dinusha S.; Lim, Kok-Sing; Machavaram, Venkata R.; Lee, Say-Hoe; Chong, Wu-Yi; Lee, Yen-Sian; Ahmad, Harith

    2016-03-01

    This work demonstrated for the first time, the thermal regeneration of two and four modes graded index fiber Bragg gratings using high temperature tube furnace. During the regeneration process, the seed grating is erased and a new grating with lower index contrast is formed. The thermal calibration shows that the temperature sensitivity of regenerated grating is slightly higher for fiber with larger core. On the other hand, the regeneration temperature is lower for fiber with smaller core. The temperature sustainability up to 900 °C is observed for the produced regenerated gratings in few mode fibers.

  2. The 3D study of X-mode reflectometry for density profile measurements on the JET tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacquin, S.; Fonseca, A.; Meneses, L.; Murari, A.; Walsh, M.; JET EFDA contributors, the

    2007-10-01

    An X-mode swept-frequency reflectometry diagnostic has recently been upgraded for density profile measurement on the JET tokamak. To overcome the extensive computing time required for full-wave simulation, a ray-tracing code has been developed for studying the 3D geometry effects on the JET reflectometry measurement of the density profile. Although such a ray-tracing code is not adequate to examine the role of plasma turbulence, comparisons with full-wave computations have shown that it is still a useful tool for simulation of the density profile measurements in the case of smooth spatial variations of the plasma parameters. The effects of the plasma geometry and the radiation pattern of the reflectometer emitting and receiving antennas on the spatial resolution of these measurements are investigated in this paper. In particular, the results point out the weak role played by the multi-dimensional effects on the reflectometry measurements performed in the equatorial mid-plane of large tokamaks such as JET.

  3. Ice nucleus activity measurements of solid rocket motor exhaust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The ice Nucleus activity of exhaust particles generated from combustion of Space Shuttle propellant in small rocket motors has been measured. The activity at -20 C was substantially lower than that of aerosols generated by unpressurized combustion of propellant samples in previous studies. The activity decays rapidly with time and is decreased further in the presence of moist air. These tests corroborate the low effectivity ice nucleus measurement results obtained in the exhaust ground cloud of the Space Shuttle. Such low ice nucleus activity implies that Space Shuttle induced inadvertent weather modification via an ice phase process is extremely unlikely.

  4. [Dynamics of active organic carbon in a paddy soil under different rice farming modes].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming; Cao, Cou-Gui; Jiang, Yang; Wang, Jin-Ping; Yue, Li-Xin; Cai, Ming-Li

    2010-08-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), readily oxidizable organic carbon (ROC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in a paddy soil under integrated rice-duck farming (RD), intermittent irrigation (RW), and conventional flooded irrigation (CK), the three rice farming modes typical in southern China. Under these three farming modes, the soil DOC and MBC contents reached the highest during the period from rice booting to heading, while the soil ROC content had less change during the whole rice growth period. Two-factor variance analysis showed that soil MBC was greatly affected by rice growth stage, soil DOC was greatly affected by rice growth stage and farming mode, and soil ROC was mainly affected by farming mode. Comparing with CK, RD significantly increased the soil DOC and ROC contents and their availability, while RW significantly decreased the soil DOC content and its availability but increased the soil ROC content and its availability. No significant differences were observed in the soil MBC and microbial quotient among RD, RW, and CK.

  5. Binding mode prediction of biologically active compounds from plant Salvia Miltiorrhiza as integrase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Nunthaboot, Nadtanet; Lugsanangarm, Kiattisak; Kokpol, Sirirat; Abd-Elazem, Ibrahim S

    2013-01-01

    Integrase (IN), an essential enzyme for HIV-1 replication, has been targeted in antiretroviral drug therapy. The emergence of HIV-1 variants clinically resistant to antiretroviral agents has lead to the development of alternative IN inhibitors. In the present work, binding modes of a high potent IN inhibitor, M522 and M532, within the catalytic binding site of wild type (WT) IN were determined using molecular docking calculation. Both M522 and M532 displayed similar modes of binding within the IN putative binding pocket and exhibited favorable interactions with the catalytic Mg2+ ions, the nearby amino acids and viral DNA through metal-ligand chelation, hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions. Furthermore, the modes of action of these two compounds against the mutated Y212R, N224H and S217H PFV IN were also predicted. Although the replacement of amino acid could somehow disturb inhibitor binding mode, almost key interactions which detected in the WT complexes were fairly conserved. Detailed information could highlight the application of M522 and M532 as candidate IN inhibitors for drug development against drug resistant strains. PMID:23750093

  6. Dynamics of different entanglement measures of two three-level atoms interacting nonlinearly with a single-mode field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghshahi, H. R.; Tavassoly, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a model which exhibits two identical Ξ-type three-level atoms interacting with a single-mode field with k-photon transition in an optical cavity enclosed by a Kerr medium. Considering full nonlinear formalism, it is assumed that the single-mode field, atom-field coupling and Kerr medium are all f-deformed. By using the adiabatic elimination method, it is shown that, the Hamiltonian of the considered system can be reduced to an effective Hamiltonian with two two-level atoms and f-deformed Stark shift. In spite of the fact that, the system seems to be complicated, under initial conditions which may be prepared for the atoms (coherent superposition of their ground and upper states) and the field (coherent state), the explicit form of the state vector of the entire system is analytically obtained. Then, the entanglement dynamics between different subsystems ( i.e. "field-two atoms", "atom-(field+atom)" and "atom-atom") are evaluated through appropriate measures like von Neumann entropy, tangle and concurrence. In addition, the effects of intensity-dependent coupling, deformed Kerr medium, detuning parameter, deformed Stark shift and multi-photon process on the considered entanglement measures are numerically analyzed, in detail. It is shown that the degree of entanglement between subsystems can be controlled by selecting the evolved parameters, suitably. Briefly, the Kerr medium highly decreases the amount of different considered measures of entanglement, especially for two-photon transition. This destructive effect preserves even when all other parameters are present, too. Furthermore, we find that the so-called entanglement sudden death and birth can occur in the atom-atom entanglement.

  7. Active thermal lensing elements for mode matching optimization in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulda, Paul

    2014-03-01

    In interferometric gravitational wave detectors of the advanced era and beyond, the high laser powers used lead to the generation of thermal lenses in the optics. This can lead to a reduction in the coupling between the various optical cavities comprising the detector, thus reducing its overall sensitivity. We present here an active device which can be used to compensate for such thermal effects, as well as static mismatches between cavities. The device uses a 4 segmented heater to heat a transmissive optic, generating a spherical or astigmatic lens which can be used to compensate other thermal lenses within an optical system. We report on in-vacuum tests of the device, including an interferometric measurement of the wavefront distortions induced by the device, and measurements of the dynamic range and response time. The device was shown to have no observable detrimental effect on wavefront distortion, a focal power dynamic range of 0 to -40 mD, and a response time of the order 1000 s. Supported by NSF grant PHY-1205512.

  8. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening, biological evaluation and binding mode analysis of a novel protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam-Chul; Seo, Seoung-Hwan; Kim, Dohee; Shin, Ji-Sun; Ju, Jeongmin; Seong, Jihye; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Iiyoun; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Yun Kyung; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2016-08-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor, mediating inflammation and pain signaling in neurons, thus it is considered to be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. In this study, we performed a ligand-based virtual screening of 1.6 million compounds by employing a common-feature pharmacophore model and two-dimensional similarity search to identify a new PAR2 antagonist. The common-feature pharmacophore model was established based on the biological screening results of our in-house library. The initial virtual screening yielded a total number of 47 hits, and additional biological activity tests including PAR2 antagonism and anti-inflammatory effects resulted in a promising candidate, compound 43, which demonstrated an IC50 value of 8.22 µM against PAR2. In next step, a PAR2 homology model was constructed using the crystal structure of the PAR1 as a template to explore the binding mode of the identified ligands. A molecular docking method was optimized by comparing the binding modes of a known PAR2 agonist GB110 and antagonist GB83, and applied to predict the binding mode of our hit compound 43. In-depth docking analyses revealed that the hydrophobic interaction with Phe243(5.39) is crucial for PAR2 ligands to exert antagonistic activity. MD simulation results supported the predicted docking poses that PAR2 antagonist blocked a conformational rearrangement of Na(+) allosteric site in contrast to PAR2 agonist that showed Na(+) relocation upon GPCR activation. In conclusion, we identified new a PAR2 antagonist together with its binding mode, which provides useful insights for the design and development of PAR2 ligands. PMID:27600555

  9. Soliton generation from an actively mode-locked fiber laser incorporating an electro-optic fiber modulator.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Mikael; Margulis, Walter; Tarasenko, Oleksandr; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik

    2012-01-30

    This work demonstrates an actively mode-locked fiber laser operating in soliton regime and employing an all-fiber electro-optic modulator. Nonlinear polarization rotation is utilized for femtosecond pulse generation. Stable operation of the all-fiber ring laser is readily achieved at a fundamental repetition rate of 2.6 MHz and produces 460 fs pulses with a spectral bandwidth of 5.3 nm.

  10. Impact of travel mode shift and trip distance on active and non-active transportation in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Parra, Diana C.; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Changes in urban mobility play a major role in transforming metropolitan areas into healthier places. This study quantified the impact of changes in travel mode shift and trip distance on active and non-active transportation of working age adult population of São Paulo. Methods and findings Through different scenarios, we estimated the daily time spent in transportation per inhabitant (divided in active and non-active transportation time) and the proportion of inhabitants accumulating 30 min or more of daily active transportation. The replacement of individual for collective motorized modes in long distance trips (> 1000 m) in combination with the substitution of long for short trips positively impacted all outcomes. Compared to the current situation, there was an increase in the active transportation time (from 19.4 to 26.7 min/inhabitant), which also increased the proportion of adults active for transportation (from 27.6% to 35.4%). Additionally, the non-active transportation time decreased (from 67.0 to 26.2 min/inhabitant), which helped to reduce the total time spent in transportation (from 86.4 to 52.9 min/inhabitant). Conclusion Transport and urban planning policies to reduce individual motorized trips and the number of long trips might produce important health benefits, both by increasing population levels of active transportation and reducing the non-active and the total time of daily trips. PMID:26844071

  11. Extracting spatial information from noise measurements of multi-spatial-mode quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, A. M.; Clark, J. B.; Glorieux, Q.; Lett, P. D.

    2012-11-01

    We show that it is possible to use the spatial quantum correlations present in twin beams to extract information about the shape of a binary amplitude mask in the path of one of the beams. The scheme, based on noise measurements through homodyne detection, is useful in the regime where the number of photons is low enough that direct detection with a photodiode is difficult but high enough that photon counting is not an option. We find that under some conditions the use of quantum states of light leads to an enhancement of the sensitivity in the estimation of the shape of the mask over what can be achieved with a classical state with equivalent properties (mean photon flux and noise properties). In addition, we show that the level of enhancement that is obtained is a result of the quantum correlations and cannot be explained with only classical correlations.

  12. Experimental Measurements of an Expansion Deflection Nozzle in Open Wake Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. V.; Sato, T.

    Expansion Deflection nozzles present an attractive proposition as a replacement for conventional nozzles on launch vehicles, due to their reduced length, and altitude compensating capability. However, it has long been speculated that they suffer in the latter regard due to aspiration of the low speed flow region inside the nozzle by the supersonic jet surrounding it. This effect is investigated in this paper by direct experimental measurement of base pressures, and found to have little effect on the base pressure of the nozzle within the range of operating conditions investigated. Wall pressures were also used to calculate the efficiency of the altitude compensation within the nozzle, which was found to be between 87 and 100% for the three operating pressure ratios examined. This represents a significant improvement over conventional nozzle performance, and further conformation that wake pressures are indeed close to ambient.

  13. MEASUREMENT OF THE SECONDARY EMISSION YIELD OF A THIN DIAMOND WINDOW IN TRANSMISSION MODE.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG, X.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The secondary emission enhanced photoinjector (SEEP) is a promising new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. A low current primary electron beam with energy of a few thousand electron-volts strikes a specially prepared diamond window which emits secondary electrons with a current two orders of magnitude higher. The secondary electrons are created at the back side of the diamond and drift through the window under the influence of a strong electrical field. A hydrogen termination at the exit surface of the window creates a negative electron affinity (NEA) which allows the electrons to leave the diamond. An experiment was performed to measure the secondary electron yield and other properties. The results are discussed in this paper.

  14. Measurement of the B-->Xsl+l- branching fraction with a sum over exclusive modes.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Lynch, G; Merchant, A M; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-08-20

    We measure the branching fraction for the flavor-changing neutral-current process B-->X(s)l(+)l(-) with a sample of 89x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BBmacr; events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage ring. The final state is reconstructed from e(+)e(-) or micro(+)micro(-) pairs and a hadronic system X(s) consisting of one K+/- or K(0)(S) and up to two pions, with at most one pi(0). We observe a signal of 40+/-10(stat)+/-2(syst) events and extract the inclusive branching fraction B(B-->X(s)l(+)l(-))=(5.6+/-1.5(stat)+/-0.6(exp syst)+/-1.1(model syst))x10(-6) for ml(+)(l(-))>0.2 GeV/c(2).

  15. Measurement of the high-field Q drop in the TM010 and TE011 modes in a niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel

    2006-04-01

    In the last few years superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio>200) niobium achieved accelerating gradients close to the theoretical limits. An obstacle towards achieving reproducibly higher fields is represented by ''anomalous'' losses causing a sharp degradation of the cavity quality factor when the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) is above about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. This effect, called ''Q drop'' has been measured in many laboratories with single- and multicell cavities mainly in the gigahertz range. In addition, a low-temperature (100-140 C) ''in situ'' baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q drop. In order to gain some understanding of the nature of these losses, a single-cell cavity has been tested in the TM010 and TE011 modes at 2 K. The feature of the TE011 mode is to have zero electric field on the cavity surface, so that electric field effects can be excluded as a source for the Q drop. This article will present some of the experimental results for different cavity treatments and will compare them with existing models.

  16. Surface plasmon resonance sensing of a biomarker of Alzheimer disease in an intensity measurement mode with a bimetallic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Sohn, Young-Soo; Kim, Chang-duk; Jang, Dae-ho

    2016-09-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor system with a bimetallic chip has been utilized to sense the very low concentration of amyloid-beta (A β)(1-42) by measurement of the reflectance variation. The bimetallic chip was comprised of Au (10 nm) and Ag (40 nm) on Cr (2 nm)-coated BK-7 glass substrate. Protein A was used to efficiently immobilize the antibody of A β(1-42) on the surface of the bimetallic chip. The reflectance curve of the bimetallic chip represented a narrower linewidth compared to that of the conventional gold (Au) chip. The SPR sensor using the bimetallic chip in the intensity interrogation mode acquired the response of A β(1-42) at concentrations of 250, 500, 750 and 1,000 pg/ml. The calibration plot showed a linear relationship between the mean reflectance variation and the A β(1-42) concentration. The results proved that the SPR sensor system with the bimetallic chip in the intensity interrogation mode can successfully detect various concentrations of A β(1-42), including critical concentration, to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Measurement of Local Electron Temperature in an Overdense Plasma Based Upon Mode-Converted Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimion, P. C.; Taylor, G.; Jones, B.; Spaleta, J.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    1999-11-01

    Most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot use standard ECE diagnostics to measure electron temperature (T_e). They either operate at high density relative to their magnetic field (e.g. ω_p>>Ωc in spherical tokamaks) or they do not have sufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition, optical thickness, τ>2. The τ for EBW is extremely high because it is an electrostatic wave with a large wavenumber. For NSTX τ ~ 3000 and for CDX-U τ ~ 300. The τ>2 condition can be reached with a plasma density > 10^11/cm^3 and Te > 1 eV. We report local electron temperature measurements made from mode converted EBW emission on CDX-U, where Te ~ 10 - 200 eV. The emission was absolutely calibrated and the inferred temperatures compared to other independent Te measurements. Using this technique, standard Te profiles have been constructed and local MHD has been observed. Initial results suggest Te measurements from EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts on plasmas where ω_p>>Ω_c.

  18. Validation of GPS derived integrated water vapor with microwave radiometer measurements in zenith and satellite tracking mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, Stefan; Shangguan, Ming; Deng, Zhiguo; Dick, Galina; Wickert, Jens; Zus, Florian

    2015-04-01

    Reliable and precise water vapour measurements are important for both, numerical weather prediction and climatological studies. In this context, zenith and slant total delay (ZTD, STD) data from Global Positioning System (GPS) ground observations provide a valuable source of integrated water vapour (IWV) information with high potential for assimilation to numerical weather models and nowcasting applications but also for climatological analysis of longer GPS IWV time series. Therefore it is important to validate the accuracy of GPS IWV with independent observations. For this purpose, in 2012 GFZ started to operate a water vapour radiometer (WVR) in vicinity of the Potsdam GPS station. It measures the absorption lines of atmospheric water vapour and oxygen at 14 frequency channels in the 22-58 GHz range and provides among others integrated water vapour measurements along the respective line of sight. Besides zenith IWV measurements the radiometer is operated in GPS satellite tracking mode enabling direct comparisons with the nearby GPS slant IWV observations (processed at GFZ). In this study we present validation results of GPS slant and zenith IWV data with the collocated radiometer observations. The validation covers all seasons including dry and wet humidity conditions. We address relations between the GPS-WVR differences and corresponding observation conditions that might have influence on the comparison results (elevation angles, ground pressure and temperature, atmospheric humidity).

  19. Measurement of anchoring coefficient of homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystal using a polarizing optical microscope in reflective mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Sang-In; Kim, Sung-Jo; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Although the homeotropic alignment of liquid crystals is widely used in LCD TVs, no easy method exists to measure its anchoring coefficient. In this study, we propose an easy and convenient measurement technique in which a polarizing optical microscope is used in the reflective mode with an objective lens having a low depth of focus. All measurements focus on the reflection of light near the interface between the liquid crystal and alignment layer. The change in the reflected light is measured by applying an electric field. We model the response of the director of the liquid crystal to the electric field and, thus, the change in reflectance. By adjusting the extrapolation length in the calculation, we match the experimental and calculated results and obtain the anchoring coefficient. In our experiment, the extrapolation lengths were 0.31 ± 0.04 μm, 0.32 ± 0.08 μm, and 0.23 ± 0.05 μm for lecithin, AL-64168, and SE-5662, respectively.

  20. A wideband high common mode rejection ratio amplifier and phase-locked loop demodulator for multifrequency impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Goovaerts, H G; Faes, T J; Raaijmakers, E; Heethaar, R M

    1998-11-01

    Design considerations and implementation of a multifrequency measuring channel for application in the field of bio-impedance measurement are discussed in this paper. The input amplifier has a differential configuration which is electrically isolated from the remaining circuits. Transformer coupling provides improved common mode rejection when compared to non-isolated input stages. The frequency characteristic of the section between input and demodulator is flat within +/- 0.1 dB between 4 kHz and 1024 kHz. The synchronous demodulator is based on a wideband switched video amplifier. In contrast to commonly used lock--in techniques, the carrier for demodulation is recovered from the input signal by means of a phase-locked loop. This method ensures zero phase shift with respect to the input signal and improves the accuracy of measurement. The system has been developed primarily for thoracic impedance cardiography (TIC) but has also successfully been applied in the field of total body bio-impedance analysis (BIA). At present an electrical impedance tomograph is under development based on the instrumentation described. Results regarding the measurement range and accuracy are given and some recordings of patient data are shown.

  1. Design of an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control for uncertain discrete-time nonlinear systems based on noisy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Toshio

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the design of an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control (AFSMC) for uncertain discrete-time nonlinear dynamic systems. The dynamic systems are described by a discrete-time state equation with nonlinear uncertainties, and the uncertainties include the modelling errors and the external disturbances to be unknown but nonlinear with the bounded properties. The states are measured by the restriction of measurement sensors and the contamination with independent measurement noises. The nonlinear uncertainties are approximated by using the fuzzy IF-THEN rules based on the universal approximation theorem, and the approximation error is compensated by adding an adaptive complementary term to the proposed AFSMC. The fuzzy inference approach based on the extended single input rule modules is proposed to reduce the number of the fuzzy IF-THEN rules. The estimates for the un-measurable states and the adjustable parameters are obtained by using the weighted least squares estimator and its simplified one. It is proved that under some conditions the estimation errors will remain in the vicinity of zero as time increases, and the states are ultimately bounded subject to the proposed AFSMC. The effectiveness of the proposed method is indicated through the simulation experiment of a simple numerical system.

  2. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements

    PubMed Central

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574316

  3. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  4. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574316

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of a stretch-activated channel inhibitor GsMTx4 with lipid membranes: two binding modes and effects of lipid structure.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Manami; Nishizawa, Kazuhisa

    2007-06-15

    Our recent molecular dynamics simulation study of hanatoxin 1 (HaTx1), a gating modifier that binds to the voltage sensor of K(+) channels, has shown that HaTx1 has the ability to interact with carbonyl oxygen atoms of both leaflets of the lipid bilayer membrane and to be located at a deep position within the membrane. Here we performed a similar study of GsMTx4, a stretch-activated channels inhibitor, belonging to the same peptide family as HaTx1. Both toxins have an ellipsoidal shape, a belt of positively charged residues around the periphery, and a hydrophobic protrusion. Results show that, like HaTx1, GsMTx4 can interact with the membrane in two different ways. When all the positively charged residues interact with the outer leaflet lipid, GsMTx4 can assume a shallow binding mode. On the other hand, when the electrostatic interaction brings the positively charged groups of K-8 and K-28 into the vicinity of the carbonyl oxygen atoms of the inner leaflet lipids, the system exhibits a deep binding mode. This deep mode is accompanied by local membrane thinning. For both HaTx1 and GsMTx4, our mean force measurement analyses show that the deep binding mode is energetically favored over the shallow mode when a DPPC (dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine) membrane is used at 310 K. In contrast, when a POPC (palmitooleoyl-phosphatidylcholine) membrane is used at 310 K, the two binding modes exhibited similar stability for both toxins. Similar analyses with DPPC membrane at 330 K led to an intermediary result between the above two results. Therefore, the structure of the lipid acyl chains appears to influence the location and the dynamics of the toxins within biological membranes. We also compared the behavior of an arginine and a lysine residue within the membrane. This is of interest because the arginine residue interaction with the lipid carbonyl oxygen atoms mediates the deep binding mode for HaTx1, whereas the lysine residue plays that role for GsMTx4. The arginine

  6. Characterization of regenerative stabilized actively mode-locked fiber laser incorporating a saturated amplifier in feed-back chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekal, Anish; Vijayan, Kovendhan; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2015-04-01

    An actively mode-locked fiber laser with regenerative stabilization established through a feed-back electronic amplifier operated in the saturation regime is reported in this paper. Compared to the regenerative stabilization schemes that employ phase-locked loops (PLL), a saturated amplifier has been used for inhibiting the transmission of amplitude noise through the feed-back chain. Such a laser system has been constructed, studied and characterized as a function of its design variables. Specifically, the electronic phase shift in the feed-back circuit and the RF power applied to the modulator have been varied to study their effect on the mode-locked pulse train. The influence of these parameters on super-mode noise is studied and the optimum values of phase shift and RF power of the recovered carrier at which the noise is found to be a minimum (-48 dB) has been determined. A comparison of systems with and without regenerative mode-locking under controlled conditions reveals that a regenerative system has at-least an order of magnitude better noise performance compared to a system without regeneration.

  7. A Simple and Accurate Method for Measuring Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din-Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents methods commonly used for investigating enzyme activity using catalase and presents a new method for measuring catalase activity that is more reliable and accurate. Provides results that are readily reproduced and quantified. Can also be used for investigations of enzyme properties such as the effects of temperature, pH, inhibitors,…

  8. Earthworm Biomass Measurement: A Science Activity for Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskett, Jonathan; Levine, Elissa; Carey, Pauline B.; Niepold III, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity on biomass measurement which, in this case, is the weight of a group of living things in a given area. The earthworm activity gives students a greater understanding of ecology, practical math applications, and the scientific method. (ASK)

  9. Seasonality in Children's Pedometer-Measured Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beighle, Aaron; Alderman, Brandon; Morgan, Charles F.; Le Masurier, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Seasonality appears to have an impact on children's physical activity levels, but equivocal findings demand more study in this area. With the increased use of pedometers in both research and practice, collecting descriptive data in various seasons to examine the impact of seasonality on pedometer-measured physical activity among children is…

  10. Long-term degradation of resin-based cements in substances present in the oral environment: influence of activation mode

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Eduardo Moreira; NORONHA-FILHO, Jaime Dutra; AMARAL, Cristiane Mariote; POSKUS, Laiza Tatiana; GUIMARÃES, José Guilherme Antunes

    2013-01-01

    Indirect restorations in contact with free gingival margins or principally within the gingival sulcus, where the presence of organic acids produced by oral biofilm is higher, may present faster degradation of the resin-based cement pellicle. Objectives: To investigate the degradation of four resin-based cements: Rely X ARC (R), Variolink II (V), enforce (E) and All Cem (A), after immersion in distilled water (DW), lactic acid (LA) and artificial saliva (AS) and to analyze the influence of the activation mode on this response. Material and Methods: Two activation modes were evaluated: chemical (Ch) and dual (D). In the dual activation, a two-millimeter thick ceramic disk (IPS empress System) was interposed between the specimen and light-curing unit tip. Specimens were desiccated, immersed in distilled water, artificial saliva and lactic acid 0.1 M at 37ºC for 180 days, weighed daily for the first 7 days, and after 14, 21, 28, 90 and 180 days and were desiccated again. Sorption and solubility (µg/mm3) were calculated based on ISO 4049. The data were submitted to multifactor analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Tukey's HSD test for media comparisons (α=0.05). Results: Sorption was higher after immersion in LA (p<0.05) and increased significantly with time (p<0.05). Sorption was influenced by the activation mode: Ch>D (p<0.05). The lowest solubility was presented by R (p<0.05). Conclusions: Lactic acid increased the degradation of resin-based cements. Moreover, the physical component of activation, i.e., light-activation, contributed to a low degradation of resin-based cements. PMID:23857651

  11. Comparison of Electron Imaging Modes for Dimensional Measurements in the Scanning Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Postek, Michael T; Vladár, András E; Villarrubia, John S; Muto, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Dimensional measurements from secondary electron (SE) images were compared with those from backscattered electron (BSE) and low-loss electron (LLE) images. With the commonly used 50% threshold criterion, the lines consistently appeared larger in the SE images. As the images were acquired simultaneously by an instrument with the capability to operate detectors for both signals at the same time, the differences cannot be explained by the assumption that contamination or drift between images affected the SE, BSE, or LLE images differently. Simulations with JMONSEL, an electron microscope simulator, indicate that the nanometer-scale differences observed on this sample can be explained by the different convolution effects of a beam with finite size on signals with different symmetry (the SE signal's characteristic peak versus the BSE or LLE signal's characteristic step). This effect is too small to explain the >100 nm discrepancies that were observed in earlier work on different samples. Additional modeling indicates that those discrepancies can be explained by the much larger sidewall angles of the earlier samples, coupled with the different response of SE versus BSE/LLE profiles to such wall angles. PMID:27452278

  12. GIS measured environmental correlates of active school transport: A systematic review of 14 studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Emerging frameworks to examine active school transportation (AST) commonly emphasize the built environment (BE) as having an influence on travel mode decisions. Objective measures of BE attributes have been recommended for advancing knowledge about the influence of the BE on school travel mode choice. An updated systematic review on the relationships between GIS-measured BE attributes and AST is required to inform future research in this area. The objectives of this review are: i) to examine and summarize the relationships between objectively measured BE features and AST in children and adolescents and ii) to critically discuss GIS methodologies used in this context. Methods Six electronic databases, and websites were systematically searched, and reference lists were searched and screened to identify studies examining AST in students aged five to 18 and reporting GIS as an environmental measurement tool. Fourteen cross-sectional studies were identified. The analyses were classified in terms of density, diversity, and design and further differentiated by the measures used or environmental condition examined. Results Only distance was consistently found to be negatively associated with AST. Consistent findings of positive or negative associations were not found for land use mix, residential density, and intersection density. Potential modifiers of any relationship between these attributes and AST included age, school travel mode, route direction (e.g., to/from school), and trip-end (home or school). Methodological limitations included inconsistencies in geocoding, selection of study sites, buffer methods and the shape of zones (Modifiable Areal Unit Problem [MAUP]), the quality of road and pedestrian infrastructure data, and school route estimation. Conclusions The inconsistent use of spatial concepts limits the ability to draw conclusions about the relationship between objectively measured environmental attributes and AST. Future research should explore

  13. Measurement of action spectra of light-activated processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Justin; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Upcroft, Jacqui; Upcroft, Peter; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina H.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a new experimental technique suitable for measurement of light-activated processes, such as fluorophore transport. The usefulness of this technique is derived from its capacity to decouple the imaging and activation processes, allowing fluorescent imaging of fluorophore transport at a convenient activation wavelength. We demonstrate the efficiency of this new technique in determination of the action spectrum of the light mediated transport of rhodamine 123 into the parasitic protozoan Giardia duodenalis.

  14. Measurement of direct photon emission in the K(L) ---> pi+ pi- gamma decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; Arenton, M.; Barker, A.R.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Corti, G.; /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-04-01

    In this paper the KTeV collaboration reports the analysis of 112.1 x 10{sup 3} candidate K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} decays including a background of 671 {+-} 41 events with the objective of determining the photon production mechanisms intrinsic to the decay process. These decays have been analyzed to extract the relative contributions of the Cp violating bremsstrahlung process and the CP conserving M1 and CP violating E1 direct photon emission processes. The M1 direct photon emission amplitude and its associated vector form factor parameterized as |{bar g}{sub M1}|(1 + a{sub 1}/a{sub 2}/(M{sub {rho}}{sup 2}-M{sub K}{sup 2}) + 2M{sub K}E{sub {gamma}}) have been measured to be |{bar g}{sub M1}| = 1.198 {+-} 0.035(stat) {+-} 0.086(syst) and a{sub 1}/a{sub 2} = =0.738 {+-} 0.007(stat) {+-} 0.018(syst) GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} respectively. An upper limit for the CP violating E1 direct emission amplitude |g{sub E1}| {le} 0.1 (90%CL) has been found. The overall ratio of direct photon emission (DE) to total photon emission including the bremsstrahlung process (IB) has been determined to be DE/(DE + IB) = 0.689 {+-} 0.021 for E{sub {gamma}} {ge} 20 MeV.

  15. Physics of locked modes in ITER: Error field limits, rotation for obviation, and measurement of field errors

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    The existing theoretical and experimental basis for predicting the levels of resonant static error field at different components m,n that stop plasma rotation and produce a locked mode is reviewed. For ITER ohmic discharges, the slow rotation of the very large plasma is predicted to incur a locked mode (and subsequent disastrous large magnetic islands) at a simultaneous weighted error field ({Sigma}{sub 1}{sup 3}w{sub m1}B{sup 2}{sub rm1}){sup {1/2}}/B{sub T} {ge} 1.9 x 10{sup -5}. Here the weights w{sub m1} are empirically determined from measurements on DIII-D to be w{sub 11} = 0. 2, w{sub 21} = 1.0, and w{sub 31} = 0. 8 and point out the relative importance of different error field components. This could be greatly obviated by application of counter injected neutral beams (which adds fluid flow to the natural ohmic electron drift). The addition of 5 MW of 1 MeV beams at 45{degrees} injection would increase the error field limit by a factor of 5; 13 MW would produce a factor of 10 improvement. Co-injection beams would also be effective but not as much as counter-injection as the co direction opposes the intrinsic rotation while the counter direction adds to it. A means for measuring individual PF and TF coil total axisymmetric field error to less than 1 in 10,000 is described. This would allow alignment of coils to mm accuracy and with correction coils make possible the very low levels of error field needed.

  16. Development of the Patient Activation Measure for mental health.

    PubMed

    Green, Carla A; Perrin, Nancy A; Polen, Michael R; Leo, Michael C; Hibbard, Judith H; Tusler, Martin

    2010-07-01

    Our objective was to adapt the physical health Patient Activation Measure (PAM) for use among people with mental health conditions (PAM-MH). Data came from three studies among people with chronic mental health conditions and were combined in Rasch analyses. The PAM-MH's psychometric properties equal those of the original 13-item PAM. Test-retest reliability and concurrent validity were good, and the PAM-MH showed sensitivity to change. The PAM-MH appears to be a reliable and valid measure of patient activation among individuals with mental health problems. It appears to have potential for use in assessing change in activation. PMID:19728074

  17. Analysis of initial in-plant active neutron multiplicity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.; Harker, W.C.

    1993-08-01

    This paper analyzes initial in-plant measurements made by active neutron multiplicity counting, a new technique currently under development for the assay of bulk uranium containing kilograms of {sup 235}U. The measurements were made at Savannah River and Y-12 using active well coincidence counters and prototype multiplicity electronics and software from Los Alamos. For one of the sets of highly enriched uranium samples measured to data, we improved the assay accuracy by an order-of-magnitude by adding the multiplicity analysis to the conventional coincidence analysis. This paper summarizes our results and describes areas where further work is needed.

  18. Cyclic lipopeptides as antibacterial agents - potent antibiotic activity mediated by intriguing mode of actions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tanja; Müller, Anna; Miess, Henrike; Gross, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are a promising class of natural products with antibiotic properties. CLPs are amphiphilic molecules, composed of a fatty acid tail linked to a short oligopeptide which form a macrocylic ring structure. This review presents an overview of this class of antibiotics, focusing on the current and potential therapeutic applications and placing particular emphasis on the molecular modes of action of these compounds.

  19. [Variations of microbial biomass and hydrolase activities in purple soil under different cropping modes as affected by ginger planting].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Xi; Wu, Fu-Zhong; Yang, Wan-Qin; Wang, Ao

    2012-02-01

    This paper studied the variations of soil microbial biomass C, N, and P contents and soil hydrolase activities under different cropping modes, i.e., corn + sweet potato intercropping (CS), soybean mono-cropping (SM), continuous cropping of ginger (CG), and rice-milk vetch rotation (RM) , after ginger planting in the purple soil area at the lower reaches of Minjiang River. Ginger planting decreased the soil microbial biomass C, N and P contents significantly. The decrement of the soil microbial biomass C and N contents after ginger planting was lesser under CS and RM than under SM and CG, but the soil microbial biomass P content was in adverse. Ginger planting also decreased the soil acid phosphatase activity significantly, and the decrement was the greatest under CS but the least under RM. The soil invertase activity decreased significantly under CG, and the soil urease activity had a significant decrease under SM, CG and RM. After ginger planting, the soil urease and intervase activities under CS were higher, as compared with those under the other cropping modes.

  20. MCG measurement in the environment of active magnetic shield.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kato, K; Kobayashi, K; Igarashi, A; Sato, T; Haga, A; Kasai, N

    2004-01-01

    MCG (Magnetocardiography) measurement by a SQUID gradiometer was attempted with only active magnetic shielding (active shielding). A three-axis-canceling-coil active shielding system, where three 16-10-16 turns-coil sets were put in the orthogonal directions, produces a homogeneous magnetic field in a considerable volume surrounding the center. Fluxgate sensors were used as the reference sensors of the system. The system can reduce environmental magnetic noise at low frequencies of less than a few Hz, at 50 Hz and at 150 Hz. Reducing such disturbances stabilizes biomagnetic measurement conditions for SQUIDs in the absence of magnetically shielded rooms (MSR). After filtering and averaging the measured MCG data by a first-order SQUID gradiometer with only the active shielding during the daytime, the QRS complex and T wave was clearly presented. PMID:16012640