Science.gov

Sample records for active motion compensation

  1. Multipurpose active/passive motion compensation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.A.; Clements, R.E.; Davenport, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    A microprocessor-controlled active/passive motion compensation system has been developed for deploying a variety of geotechnical in-situ testing devices with mobile drilling rigs from low-cost service vessels. The light-weight rotary heave compensator incorporates a hydraulic motor as the compensator actuator and a servo-controlled closed loop pump to reduce the air storage and power requirements. Unique features of the system are the use of inertial sensors to measure three components of boat motion, the ability to run the system in active/passive or passive modes, and the ability to automatically lower the drillstring at a constant velocity while maintaining motion compensation. Quantitative measurements made during sea trials offshore California yielded motion compensation accuracy approaching 98 percent which is much better than the compensation achieved with passive systems. Results are presented from offshore in-situ testing with a cone penetrometer, a vane shear device, and a suspension PS logger. The system can also be used for other offshore applications.

  2. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  3. Gmti Motion Compensation

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2004-07-20

    Movement of a GMTI radar during a coherent processing interval over which a set of radar pulses are processed may cause defocusing of a range-Doppler map in the video signal. This problem may be compensated by varying waveform or sampling parameters of each pulse to compensate for distortions caused by variations in viewing angles from the radar to the target.

  4. Development of magnetically preloaded air bearings for a linear slide: active compensation of three degrees of freedom motion errors.

    PubMed

    Ro, Seung-Kook; Kim, Soohyun; Kwak, Yoonkeun; Park, Chun-Hong

    2008-03-01

    This article describes a linear air-bearing stage that uses active control to compensate for its motion errors. The active control is based on preloads generated by magnetic actuators, which were designed to generate nominal preloads for the air bearings using permanent magnets to maintain the desired stiffness while changing the air-bearing clearance by varying the magnetic flux generated by the current in electromagnetic coils. A single-axis linear stage with a linear motor and 240 mm of travel range was built to verify this design concept and used to test its performance. The motion of the table in three directions was controlled with four magnetic actuators driven by current amplifiers and a DSP (Digital Signal Processor)-based digital controller. The motion errors were measured using a laser interferometer combined with a two-probe method, and had 0.085 microm of repeatability for the straightness error. As a result of feed-forward active compensation, the errors were reduced from 1.09 to 0.11 microm for the vertical motion, from 9.42 to 0.18 arcsec for the pitch motion, and from 2.42 to 0.18 arcsec for the roll motion. PMID:18377049

  5. Development of magnetically preloaded air bearings for a linear slide: Active compensation of three degrees of freedom motion errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Seung-Kook; Kim, Soohyun; Kwak, Yoonkeun; Park, Chun-Hong

    2008-03-01

    This article describes a linear air-bearing stage that uses active control to compensate for its motion errors. The active control is based on preloads generated by magnetic actuators, which were designed to generate nominal preloads for the air bearings using permanent magnets to maintain the desired stiffness while changing the air-bearing clearance by varying the magnetic flux generated by the current in electromagnetic coils. A single-axis linear stage with a linear motor and 240mm of travel range was built to verify this design concept and used to test its performance. The motion of the table in three directions was controlled with four magnetic actuators driven by current amplifiers and a DSP (Digital Signal Processor)-based digital controller. The motion errors were measured using a laser interferometer combined with a two-probe method, and had 0.085μm of repeatability for the straightness error. As a result of feed-forward active compensation, the errors were reduced from 1.09to0.11μm for the vertical motion, from 9.42to0.18arcsec for the pitch motion, and from 2.42to0.18arcsec for the roll motion.

  6. Fibre-coupled multiphoton microscope with adaptive motion compensation

    PubMed Central

    Sherlock, Ben; Warren, Sean; Stone, James; Neil, Mark; Paterson, Carl; Knight, Jonathan; French, Paul; Dunsby, Chris

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenge of sample motion during in vivo imaging, we present a fibre-coupled multiphoton microscope with active axial motion compensation. The position of the sample surface is measured using optical coherence tomography and fed back to a piezo actuator that adjusts the axial location of the objective to compensate for sample motion. We characterise the system’s performance and demonstrate that it can compensate for axial sample velocities up to 700 µm/s. Finally we illustrate the impact of motion compensation when imaging multiphoton excited autofluorescence in ex vivo mouse skin. PMID:26137387

  7. Block-classified motion compensation scheme for digital video

    SciTech Connect

    Zafar, S.; Zhang, Ya-Qin; Jabbari, B.

    1996-03-01

    A novel scheme for block-based motion compensation is introduced in which a block is classified according to the energy that is directly related to the motion activity it represents. This classification allows more flexibility in controlling the bit rate arid the signal-to-noise ratio and results in a reduction in motion search complexity. The method introduced is not dependent on the particular type of motion search algorithm implemented and can thus be used with any method assuming that the underlying matching criteria used is minimum absolute difference. It has been shown that the method is superior to a simple motion compensation algorithm where all blocks are motion compensated regardless of the energy resulting after the displaced difference.

  8. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Samuel B; Howe, Robert D

    2011-07-21

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  9. Offshore crane wave motion compensation apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P. R.

    1985-10-01

    Motion compensated load-lifting apparatus for use on marine vessels. Apparatus includes a traveling weight used to maintain tension in the load-lifting member, and a locking mechanism to prevent movement of the traveling weight in one direction. The locking mechanism, such as a ratchet and pawl, can be employed to lift the load from the vessel at optimum periods of wave movement. Load direction sensing devices prevent attempted lift of the load as the vessel falls.

  10. Advanced Motion Compensation Methods for Intravital Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has emerged in the recent decade as an indispensible imaging modality for the study of the micro-dynamics of biological processes in live animals. Technical advancements in imaging techniques and hardware components, combined with the development of novel targeted probes and new mice models, have enabled us to address long-standing questions in several biology areas such as oncology, cell biology, immunology and neuroscience. As the instrument resolution has increased, physiological motion activities have become a major obstacle that prevents imaging live animals at resolutions analogue to the ones obtained in vitro. Motion compensation techniques aim at reducing this gap and can effectively increase the in vivo resolution. This paper provides a technical review of some of the latest developments in motion compensation methods, providing organ specific solutions. PMID:24273405

  11. Smoothing of respiratory motion traces for motion-compensated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Floris; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: The CyberKnife system has been used successfully for several years to radiosurgically treat tumors without the need for stereotactic fixation or sedation of the patient. It has been shown that tumor motion in the lung, liver, and pancreas can be tracked with acceptable accuracy and repeatability. However, highly precise targeting for tumors in the lower abdomen, especially for tumors which exhibit strong motion, remains problematic. Reasons for this are manifold, like the slow tracking system operating at 26.5 Hz, and using the signal from the tracking camera ''as is''. Since the motion recorded with the camera is used to compensate for system latency by prediction and the predicted signal is subsequently used to infer the tumor position from a correlation model based on x-ray imaging of gold fiducials around the tumor, camera noise directly influences the targeting accuracy. The goal of this work is to establish the suitability of a new smoothing method for respiratory motion traces used in motion-compensated radiotherapy. The authors endeavor to show that better prediction--With a lower rms error of the predicted signal--and/or smoother prediction is possible using this method. Methods: The authors evaluated six commercially available tracking systems (NDI Aurora, PolarisClassic, Polaris Vicra, MicronTracker2 H40, FP5000, and accuTrack compact). The authors first tracked markers both stationary and while in motion to establish the systems' noise characteristics. Then the authors applied a smoothing method based on the a trous wavelet decomposition to reduce the devices' noise level. Additionally, the smoothed signal of the moving target and a motion trace from actual human respiratory motion were subjected to prediction using the MULIN and the nLMS{sub 2} algorithms. Results: The authors established that the noise distribution for a static target is Gaussian and that when the probe is moved such as to mimic human respiration, it remains Gaussian with the

  12. Motion compensation for structured light sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debjani; Mertz, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    In order for structured light methods to work outside, the strong background from the sun needs to be suppressed. This can be done with bandpass filters, fast shutters, and background subtraction. In general this last method necessitates the sensor system to be stationary during data taking. The contribution of this paper is a method to compensate for the motion if the system is moving. The key idea is to use video stabilization techniques that work even if the illuminator is switched on and off from one frame to another. We used OpenCV functions and modules to implement a robust and efficient method. We evaluated it under various conditions and tested it on a moving robot outdoors. We will demonstrate that one can not only do 3D reconstruction under strong ambient light, but that it is also possible to observe optical properties of the objects in the environment.

  13. Multisensory Self-Motion Compensation During Object Trajectory Judgments

    PubMed Central

    Dokka, Kalpana; MacNeilage, Paul R.; DeAngelis, Gregory C.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2015-01-01

    Judging object trajectory during self-motion is a fundamental ability for mobile organisms interacting with their environment. This fundamental ability requires the nervous system to compensate for the visual consequences of self-motion in order to make accurate judgments, but the mechanisms of this compensation are poorly understood. We comprehensively examined both the accuracy and precision of observers' ability to judge object trajectory in the world when self-motion was defined by vestibular, visual, or combined visual–vestibular cues. Without decision feedback, subjects demonstrated no compensation for self-motion that was defined solely by vestibular cues, partial compensation (47%) for visually defined self-motion, and significantly greater compensation (58%) during combined visual–vestibular self-motion. With decision feedback, subjects learned to accurately judge object trajectory in the world, and this generalized to novel self-motion speeds. Across conditions, greater compensation for self-motion was associated with decreased precision of object trajectory judgments, indicating that self-motion compensation comes at the cost of reduced discriminability. Our findings suggest that the brain can flexibly represent object trajectory relative to either the observer or the world, but a world-centered representation comes at the cost of decreased precision due to the inclusion of noisy self-motion signals. PMID:24062317

  14. Motion-compensated defect interpolation for flat-panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aach, Til; Barth, Erhardt; Mayntz, Claudia

    2004-05-01

    One advantage of flat-panel X-ray detectors is the immediate availability of the acquired images for display. Current limitations in large-area active-matrix manufacturing technology, however, require that the images read out from such detectors be processed to correct for inactive pixels. In static radiographs, these defects can only be interpolated by spatial filtering. Moving X-ray image modalities, such as fluoroscopy or cine-angiography, permit to use temporal information as well. This paper describes interframe defect interpolation algorithms based on motion compensation and filtering. Assuming the locations of the defects to be known, we fill in the defective areas from past frames, where the missing information was visible due to motion. The motion estimator is based on regularized block matching, with speedup obtained by successive elimination and related measures. To avoid the motion estimator locking on to static defects, these are cut out of each block during matching. Once motion is estimated, three methods are available for defect interpolation: direct filling-in by the motion-compensated predecessor, filling-in by a 3D-multilevel median filtered value, and spatiotemporal mean filtering. Results are shown for noisy fluoroscopy sequences acquired in clinical routine with varying amounts of motion and simulated defects up to six lines wide. They show that the 3D-multilevel median filter appears as the method of choice since it causes the least blur of the interpolated data, is robust with respect to motion estimation errors and works even in non-moving areas.

  15. Complexity scalable motion-compensated temporal filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerckx, Tom; Verdicchio, Fabio; Munteanu, Adrian; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Devos, Harald; Eeckhaut, Hendrik; Christiaens, Mark; Stroobandt, Dirk; Verkest, Diederik; Schelkens, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Computer networks and the internet have taken an important role in modern society. Together with their development, the need for digital video transmission over these networks has grown. To cope with the user demands and limitations of the network, compression of the video material has become an important issue. Additionally, many video-applications require flexibility in terms of scalability and complexity (e.g. HD/SD-TV, video-surveillance). Current ITU-T and ISO/IEC video compression standards (MPEG-x, H.26-x) lack efficient support for these types of scalability. Wavelet-based compression techniques have been proposed to tackle this problem, of which the Motion Compensated Temporal Filtering (MCTF)-based architectures couple state-of-the-art performance with full (quality, resolution, and frame-rate) scalability. However, a significant drawback of these architectures is their high complexity. The computational and memory complexity of both spatial domain (SD) MCTF and in-band (IB) MCTF video codec instantiations are examined in this study. Comparisons in terms of complexity versus performance are presented for both types of codecs. The paper indicates how complexity scalability can be achieved in such video-codecs, and analyses some of the trade-offs between complexity and coding performance. Finally, guidelines on how to implement a fully scalable video-codec that incorporates quality, temporal, resolution and complexity scalability are proposed.

  16. Motion compensation for PET image reconstruction using deformable tetrahedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manescu, P.; Ladjal, H.; Azencot, J.; Beuve, M.; Shariat, B.

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory-induced organ motion is a technical challenge to PET imaging. This motion induces displacements and deformation of the organs tissues, which need to be taken into account when reconstructing the spatial radiation activity. Classical image-based methods that describe motion using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms cannot fully take into account the non-reproducibility of the respiratory internal organ motion nor the tissue volume variations that occur during breathing. In order to overcome these limitations, various biomechanical models of the respiratory system have been developed in the past decade as an alternative to DIR approaches. In this paper, we describe a new method of correcting motion artefacts in PET image reconstruction adapted to motion estimation models such as those based on the finite element method. In contrast with the DIR-based approaches, the radiation activity was reconstructed on deforming tetrahedral meshes. For this, we have re-formulated the tomographic reconstruction problem by introducing a time-dependent system matrix based calculated using tetrahedral meshes instead of voxelized images. The MLEM algorithm was chosen as the reconstruction method. The simulations performed in this study show that the motion compensated reconstruction based on tetrahedral deformable meshes has the capability to correct motion artefacts. Results demonstrate that, in the case of complex deformations, when large volume variations occur, the developed tetrahedral based method is more appropriate than the classical DIR-based one. This method can be used, together with biomechanical models controlled by external surrogates, to correct motion artefacts in PET images and thus reducing the need for additional internal imaging during the acquisition.

  17. An adaptive algorithm for motion compensated color image coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwatra, Subhash C.; Whyte, Wayne A.; Lin, Chow-Ming

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive algorithm for motion compensated color image coding. The algorithm can be used for video teleconferencing or broadcast signals. Activity segmentation is used to reduce the bit rate and a variable stage search is conducted to save computations. The adaptive algorithm is compared with the nonadaptive algorithm and it is shown that with approximately 60 percent savings in computing the motion vector and 33 percent additional compression, the performance of the adaptive algorithm is similar to the nonadaptive algorithm. The adaptive algorithm results also show improvement of up to 1 bit/pel over interframe DPCM coding with nonuniform quantization. The test pictures used for this study were recorded directly from broadcast video in color.

  18. Motion compensation for brain PET imaging using wireless MR active markers in simultaneous PET-MR: phantom and non-human primate studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuan; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann; Normandin, Marc D.; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Brain PET scanning plays an important role in the diagnosis, prognostication and monitoring of many brain diseases. Motion artifacts from head motion are one of the major hurdles in brain PET. In this work, we propose to use wireless MR active markers to track head motion in real time during a simultaneous PET-MR brain scan and incorporate the motion measured by the markers in the listmode PET reconstruction. Several wireless MR active markers and a dedicated fast MR tracking pulse sequence module were built. Data were acquired on an ACR Flangeless PET phantom with multiple spheres and a non-human primate with and without motion. Motions of the phantom and monkey’s head were measured with the wireless markers using a dedicated MR tracking sequence module. The motion PET data were reconstructed using list-mode reconstruction with and without motion correction. Static reference was used as gold standard for quantitative analysis. The motion artifacts, which were prominent on the images without motion correction, were eliminated by the wireless marker based motion correction in both the phantom and monkey experiments. Quantitative analysis was performed on the phantom motion data from 24 independent noise realizations. The reduction of bias of sphere-to-background PET contrast by active marker based motion correction ranges from 26% to 64% and 17% to 25% for hot (i.e., radioactive) and cold (i.e., non-radioactive) spheres, respectively. The motion correction improved the channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio of the spheres by 1.2 to 6.9 depending on their locations and sizes. The proposed wireless MR active marker based motion correction technique removes the motion artifacts in the reconstructed PET images and yields accurate quantitative values. PMID:24418501

  19. Motion compensation for brain PET imaging using wireless MR active markers in simultaneous PET-MR: phantom and non-human primate studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuan; Ackerman, Jerome L; Petibon, Yoann; Normandin, Marc D; Brady, Thomas J; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2014-05-01

    Brain PET scanning plays an important role in the diagnosis, prognostication and monitoring of many brain diseases. Motion artifacts from head motion are one of the major hurdles in brain PET. In this work, we propose to use wireless MR active markers to track head motion in real time during a simultaneous PET-MR brain scan and incorporate the motion measured by the markers in the listmode PET reconstruction. Several wireless MR active markers and a dedicated fast MR tracking pulse sequence module were built. Data were acquired on an ACR Flangeless PET phantom with multiple spheres and a non-human primate with and without motion. Motions of the phantom and monkey's head were measured with the wireless markers using a dedicated MR tracking sequence module. The motion PET data were reconstructed using list-mode reconstruction with and without motion correction. Static reference was used as gold standard for quantitative analysis. The motion artifacts, which were prominent on the images without motion correction, were eliminated by the wireless marker based motion correction in both the phantom and monkey experiments. Quantitative analysis was performed on the phantom motion data from 24 independent noise realizations. The reduction of bias of sphere-to-background PET contrast by active marker based motion correction ranges from 26% to 64% and 17% to 25% for hot (i.e., radioactive) and cold (i.e., non-radioactive) spheres, respectively. The motion correction improved the channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio of the spheres by 1.2 to 6.9 depending on their locations and sizes. The proposed wireless MR active marker based motion correction technique removes the motion artifacts in the reconstructed PET images and yields accurate quantitative values. PMID:24418501

  20. Motion error compensation of multi-legged walking robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangwen; Chen, Xuedong; Wang, Xinjie; Tang, Weigang; Sun, Yi; Pan, Chunmei

    2012-07-01

    Existing errors in the structure and kinematic parameters of multi-legged walking robots, the motion trajectory of robot will diverge from the ideal sports requirements in movement. Since the existing error compensation is usually used for control compensation of manipulator arm, the error compensation of multi-legged robots has seldom been explored. In order to reduce the kinematic error of robots, a motion error compensation method based on the feedforward for multi-legged mobile robots is proposed to improve motion precision of a mobile robot. The locus error of a robot body is measured, when robot moves along a given track. Error of driven joint variables is obtained by error calculation model in terms of the locus error of robot body. Error value is used to compensate driven joint variables and modify control model of robot, which can drive the robots following control model modified. The model of the relation between robot's locus errors and kinematic variables errors is set up to achieve the kinematic error compensation. On the basis of the inverse kinematics of a multi-legged walking robot, the relation between error of the motion trajectory and driven joint variables of robots is discussed. Moreover, the equation set is obtained, which expresses relation among error of driven joint variables, structure parameters and error of robot's locus. Take MiniQuad as an example, when the robot MiniQuad moves following beeline tread, motion error compensation is studied. The actual locus errors of the robot body are measured before and after compensation in the test. According to the test, variations of the actual coordinate value of the robot centroid in x-direction and z-direction are reduced more than one time. The kinematic errors of robot body are reduced effectively by the use of the motion error compensation method based on the feedforward.

  1. Holographic motion picture camera with Doppler shift compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A holographic motion picture camera is reported for producing three dimensional images by employing an elliptical optical system. There is provided in one of the beam paths (the object or reference beam path) a motion compensator which enables the camera to photograph faster moving objects.

  2. Couch-based motion compensation: modelling, simulation and real-time experiments.

    PubMed

    Haas, Olivier C L; Skworcow, Piotr; Paluszczyszyn, Daniel; Sahih, Abdelhamid; Ruta, Mariusz; Mills, John A

    2012-09-21

    The paper presents a couch-based active motion compensation strategy evaluated in simulation and validated experimentally using both a research and a clinical Elekta Precise Table™. The control strategy combines a Kalman filter to predict the surrogate motion used as a reference by a linear model predictive controller with the control action calculation based on estimated position and velocity feedback provided by an observer as well as predicted couch position and velocity using a linearized state space model. An inversion technique is used to compensate for the dead-zone nonlinearity. New generic couch models are presented and applied to model the Elekta Precise Table™ dynamics and nonlinearities including dead zone. Couch deflection was measured for different manufacturers and found to be up to 25 mm. A feed-forward approach is proposed to compensate for such couch deflection. Simultaneous motion compensation for longitudinal, lateral and vertical motions was evaluated using arbitrary trajectories generated from sensors or loaded from files. Tracking errors were between 0.5 and 2 mm RMS. A dosimetric evaluation of the motion compensation was done using a sinusoidal waveform. No notable differences were observed between films obtained for a fixed- or motion-compensated target. Further dosimetric improvement could be made by combining gating, based on tracking error together with beam on/off time, and PSS compensation. PMID:22951301

  3. Signal based motion compensation for synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    John Kirk

    1999-06-07

    The purpose of the Signal Based Motion Compensation (SBMC) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) effort is to develop a method to measure and compensate for both down range and cross range motion of the radar in order to provide high quality focused SAR imagery in the absence of precision measurements of the platform motion. Currently SAR systems require very precise navigation sensors for motion compensation. These sensors are very expensive and are often supplied in pairs for reliability. In the case of GPS they can be jammed, further degrading performance. This makes for a potentially very expensive and possibly vulnerable SAR system. SBMC can eliminate or reduce the need for these expensive navigation sensors thus reducing the cost of budget minded SAR systems. The results on this program demonstrated the capability of the SBMC approach.

  4. Active Wireline Heave Compensation for Ocean Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, D.; Liu, T.; Swain, K.; Furman, C.; Iturrino, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    The up-and-down heave motion of a ship causes a similar motion on any instruments tethered on wireline cable below it. If the amplitude of this motion is greater than a few tens of cm, significant discrepancy in the depth below the ship is introduced, causing uncertainty in the acquired data. Large and irregular cabled motions also increase the risk of damaging tethered instruments, particularly those with relatively delicate sensors. In 2005, Schlumberger and Deep Down, Inc built an active wireline heave compensator (AHC) system for use onboard the JOIDES Resolution to compensate for heave motion on wireline logging tools deployed in scientific drill holes. The goals for the new AHC system were to (1) design a reliable heave compensation system; and (2) devise a robust and quantitative methodology for routine assessment of compensation efficiency (CE) during wireline operations. Software programs were developed to monitor CE and the dynamics of logging tools in real-time, including system performance under variable parameters such as water depth, sea state, cable length, logging speed and direction. We present the CE results from the AHC system on the JOIDES Resolution during a 5-year period of recent IODP operations and compare the results to those from previous compensation systems deployed during ODP and IODP. Based on new data under heave conditions of ±0.2-2.0 m and water depths of 300-4,800 m in open holes, the system reduces 65-80% of downhole tool displacement under stationary conditions and 50-60% during normal logging operations. Moreover, down/up tool motion at low speeds (300-600 m/h) reduces the system's CE values by 15-20%, and logging down at higher speeds (1,000-1,200 m/h) reduces CE values by 55-65%. Furthermore, the system yields slightly lower CE values of 40-50% without tension feedback of the downhole cable while logging. These results indicate that the new system's compensation efficiency is comparable to or better than previous systems

  5. Motion compensated SLAM for image guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Peter; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness and clinical benefits of image guided surgery are well established for procedures where there is manageable tissue motion. In minimally invasive cardiac, gastrointestinal, or abdominal surgery, large scale tissue deformation prohibits accurate registration and fusion of pre- and intraoperative data. Vision based techniques such as structure from motion and simultaneous localization and mapping are capable of recovering 3D structure and laparoscope motion. Current research in the area generally assumes the environment is static, which is difficult to satisfy in most surgical procedures. In this paper, a novel framework for simultaneous online estimation of laparoscopic camera motion and tissue deformation in a dynamic environment is proposed. The method only relies on images captured by the laparoscope to sequentially and incrementally generate a dynamic 3D map of tissue motion that can be co-registered with pre-operative data. The theoretical contribution of this paper is validated with both simulated and ex vivo data. The practical application of the technique is further demonstrated on in vivo procedures. PMID:20879352

  6. Motion compensation on synthetic aperture sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, R.; Acheroy, M.; Dupont, Y.

    2006-09-01

    High resolution sonars are required to detect and classify mines on the sea-bed. Synthetic aperture sonar increases the sonar cross range resolution by several orders of magnitudes while maintaining or increasing the area search rate. The resolution is however strongly dependent on the precision with which the motion errors of the platform can be estimated. The term micro-navigation is used to describe this very special requirement for sub-wavelength relative positioning of the platform. Therefore algorithms were designed to estimate those motion errors and to correct for them during the (ω, k)-reconstruction phase. To validate the quality of the motion estimation algorithms a single transmitter/multiple receiver simulator was build, allowing to generate multiple point targets with or without surge and/or sway and/or yaw motion errors. The surge motion estimation is shown on real data, which were taken during a sea trial in November of 2003 with the low frequency (12 kHz) side scan sonar (LFSS) moving on a rail positioned on the sea-bed near Marciana Marina on the Elba Island, Italy.

  7. Image-based respiratory motion compensation for fluoroscopic coronary roadmapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Tsin, Yanghai; Sundar, Hari; Sauer, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a new image-based respiratory motion compensation method for coronary roadmapping in fluoroscopic images. A temporal analysis scheme is proposed to identify static structures in the image gradient domain. An extended Lucas-Kanade algorithm involving a weighted sum-of-squared-difference (WSSD) measure is proposed to estimate the soft tissue motion in the presence of static structures. A temporally compositional motion model is used to deal with large image motion incurred by deep breathing. Promising results have been shown in the experiments conducted on clinical data. PMID:20879411

  8. Motion compensation technique for wide beam synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Jose E.; Cook, Daniel A.; Christoff, James T.

    2002-05-01

    Optimal performance of synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) systems requires accurate motion and medium compensation. Any uncorrected deviations from those assumed during the SAS beam formation process can degrade the beam pattern of the SA in various ways (broadening and distortion of the main lobe, increased side lobes and grating lobes levels, etc.). These would manifest in the imagery in the form of degraded resolution, blurring, target ghosts, etc. An accurate technique capable of estimating motion and medium fluctuations has been developed. The concept is to adaptively track a small patch on the sea bottom, which is in the order of a resolution cell, by steering the SAS beam as the platform moves in its trajectory. Any path length differences to that patch (other than the quadratic function product of the steering process) will be due to relative displacements caused by motion and/or medium fluctuations and can be detected by cross-correlation methods. This technique has advantages over other data driven motion compensation techniques because it operates in a much higher signal-to-noise beam space domain. The wide beam motion compensation technique was implemented in MATLAB and its performance evaluated via simulations. An overview of the technique, simulation, and results obtained are presented.

  9. Motion compensation by registration-based catheter tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Wimmer, Andreas; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2011-03-01

    The treatment of atrial fibrillation has gained increasing importance in the field of computer-aided interventions. State-of-the-art treatment involves the electrical isolation of the pulmonary veins attached to the left atrium under fluoroscopic X-ray image guidance. Due to the rather low soft-tissue contrast of X-ray fluoroscopy, the heart is difficult to see. To overcome this problem, overlay images from pre-operative 3-D volumetric data can be used to add anatomical detail. Unfortunately, these overlay images are static at the moment, i.e., they do not move with respiratory and cardiac motion. The lack of motion compensation may impair X-ray based catheter navigation, because the physician could potentially position catheters incorrectly. To improve overlay-based catheter navigation, we present a novel two stage approach for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation. First, a cascade of boosted classifiers is employed to segment a commonly used circumferential mapping catheter which is firmly fixed at the ostium of the pulmonary vein during ablation. Then, a 2-D/2-D model-based registration is applied to track the segmented mapping catheter. Our novel hybrid approach was evaluated on 10 clinical data sets consisting of 498 fluoroscopic monoplane frames. We obtained an average 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm, with a minimum error of 0.26 mm and a maximum error of 1.62 mm. These results demonstrate that motion compensation using registration-based catheter tracking is both feasible and accurate. Using this approach, we can only estimate in-plane motion. Fortunately, compensating for this is often sufficient for EP procedures where the motion is governed by breathing.

  10. Clinical evaluation of 4D PET motion compensation strategies for treatment verification in ion beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Gianoli, Chiara; Kurz, Christopher; Riboldi, Marco; Bauer, Julia; Fontana, Giulia; Baroni, Guido; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia

    2016-06-01

    A clinical trial named PROMETHEUS is currently ongoing for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT, Germany). In this framework, 4D PET-CT datasets are acquired shortly after the therapeutic treatment to compare the irradiation induced PET image with a Monte Carlo PET prediction resulting from the simulation of treatment delivery. The extremely low count statistics of this measured PET image represents a major limitation of this technique, especially in presence of target motion. The purpose of the study is to investigate two different 4D PET motion compensation strategies towards the recovery of the whole count statistics for improved image quality of the 4D PET-CT datasets for PET-based treatment verification. The well-known 4D-MLEM reconstruction algorithm, embedding the motion compensation in the reconstruction process of 4D PET sinograms, was compared to a recently proposed pre-reconstruction motion compensation strategy, which operates in sinogram domain by applying the motion compensation to the 4D PET sinograms. With reference to phantom and patient datasets, advantages and drawbacks of the two 4D PET motion compensation strategies were identified. The 4D-MLEM algorithm was strongly affected by inverse inconsistency of the motion model but demonstrated the capability to mitigate the noise-break-up effects. Conversely, the pre-reconstruction warping showed less sensitivity to inverse inconsistency but also more noise in the reconstructed images. The comparison was performed by relying on quantification of PET activity and ion range difference, typically yielding similar results. The study demonstrated that treatment verification of moving targets could be accomplished by relying on the whole count statistics image quality, as obtained from the application of 4D PET motion compensation strategies. In particular, the pre-reconstruction warping was shown to represent a promising choice when combined with intra

  11. Clinical evaluation of 4D PET motion compensation strategies for treatment verification in ion beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianoli, Chiara; Kurz, Christopher; Riboldi, Marco; Bauer, Julia; Fontana, Giulia; Baroni, Guido; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia

    2016-06-01

    A clinical trial named PROMETHEUS is currently ongoing for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT, Germany). In this framework, 4D PET-CT datasets are acquired shortly after the therapeutic treatment to compare the irradiation induced PET image with a Monte Carlo PET prediction resulting from the simulation of treatment delivery. The extremely low count statistics of this measured PET image represents a major limitation of this technique, especially in presence of target motion. The purpose of the study is to investigate two different 4D PET motion compensation strategies towards the recovery of the whole count statistics for improved image quality of the 4D PET-CT datasets for PET-based treatment verification. The well-known 4D-MLEM reconstruction algorithm, embedding the motion compensation in the reconstruction process of 4D PET sinograms, was compared to a recently proposed pre-reconstruction motion compensation strategy, which operates in sinogram domain by applying the motion compensation to the 4D PET sinograms. With reference to phantom and patient datasets, advantages and drawbacks of the two 4D PET motion compensation strategies were identified. The 4D-MLEM algorithm was strongly affected by inverse inconsistency of the motion model but demonstrated the capability to mitigate the noise-break-up effects. Conversely, the pre-reconstruction warping showed less sensitivity to inverse inconsistency but also more noise in the reconstructed images. The comparison was performed by relying on quantification of PET activity and ion range difference, typically yielding similar results. The study demonstrated that treatment verification of moving targets could be accomplished by relying on the whole count statistics image quality, as obtained from the application of 4D PET motion compensation strategies. In particular, the pre-reconstruction warping was shown to represent a promising choice when combined with intra

  12. Iterative motion compensation approach for ultrasonic thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Ioana; Hager, Gregory; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad

    2015-03-01

    As thermal imaging attempts to estimate very small tissue motion (on the order of tens of microns), it can be negatively influenced by signal decorrelation. Patient's breathing and cardiac cycle generate shifts in the RF signal patterns. Other sources of movement could be found outside the patient's body, like transducer slippage or small vibrations due to environment factors like electronic noise. Here, we build upon a robust displacement estimation method for ultrasound elastography and we investigate an iterative motion compensation algorithm, which can detect and remove non-heat induced tissue motion at every step of the ablation procedure. The validation experiments are performed on laboratory induced ablation lesions in ex-vivo tissue. The ultrasound probe is either held by the operator's hand or supported by a robotic arm. We demonstrate the ability to detect and remove non-heat induced tissue motion in both settings. We show that removing extraneous motion helps unmask the effects of heating. Our strain estimation curves closely mirror the temperature changes within the tissue. While previous results in the area of motion compensation were reported for experiments lasting less than 10 seconds, our algorithm was tested on experiments that lasted close to 20 minutes.

  13. New inverse synthetic aperture radar algorithm for translational motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocker, Richard P.; Henderson, Thomas B.; Jones, Scott A.; Frieden, B. R.

    1991-10-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) is an imaging technique that shows real promise in classifying airborne targets in real time under all weather conditions. Over the past few years a large body of ISAR data has been collected and considerable effort has been expended to develop algorithms to form high-resolution images from this data. One important goal of workers in this field is to develop software that will do the best job of imaging under the widest range of conditions. The success of classifying targets using ISAR is predicated upon forming highly focused radar images of these targets. Efforts to develop highly focused imaging computer software have been challenging, mainly because the imaging depends on and is affected by the motion of the target, which in general is not precisely known. Specifically, the target generally has both rotational motion about some axis and translational motion as a whole with respect to the radar. The slant-range translational motion kinematic quantities must be first accurately estimated from the data and compensated before the image can be focused. Following slant-range motion compensation, the image is further focused by determining and correcting for target rotation. The use of the burst derivative measure is proposed as a means to improve the computational efficiency of currently used ISAR algorithms. The use of this measure in motion compensation ISAR algorithms for estimating the slant-range translational motion kinematic quantities of an uncooperative target is described. Preliminary tests have been performed on simulated as well as actual ISAR data using both a Sun 4 workstation and a parallel processing transputer array. Results indicate that the burst derivative measure gives significant improvement in processing speed over the traditional entropy measure now employed.

  14. NIOS II processor-based acceleration of motion compensation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Diego; Botella, Guillermo; Mookherjee, Soumak; Meyer-Bäse, Uwe; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2011-06-01

    This paper focuses on the hardware acceleration of motion compensation techniques suitable for the MPEG video compression. A plethora of representative motion estimation search algorithms and the new perspectives are introduced. The methods and designs described here are qualified for medical imaging area where are involved larger images. The structure of the processing systems considered has a good fit for reconfigurable acceleration. The system is based in a platform like FPGA working with the Nios II Microprocessor platform applying C2H acceleration. The paper shows the results in terms of performance and resources needed.

  15. A Motion-Compensating Image-Compression Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Carol

    1994-01-01

    Chrominance used (in addition to luminance) in estimating motion. Variable-rate digital coding scheme for compression of color-video-image data designed to deliver pictures of good quality at moderate compressed-data rate of 1 to 2 bits per pixel, or of fair quality at rate less than 1 bit per pixel. Scheme, in principle, implemented by use of commercially available application-specific integrated circuits. Incorporates elements of some prior coding schemes, including motion compensation (MC) and discrete cosine transform (DCT).

  16. Topography-Dependent Motion Compensation: Application to UAVSAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Cathleen E.; Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    The UAVSAR L-band synthetic aperture radar system has been designed for repeat track interferometry in support of Earth science applications that require high-precision measurements of small surface deformations over timescales from hours to years. Conventional motion compensation algorithms, which are based upon assumptions of a narrow beam and flat terrain, yield unacceptably large errors in areas with even moderate topographic relief, i.e., in most areas of interest. This often limits the ability to achieve sub-centimeter surface change detection over significant portions of an acquired scene. To reduce this source of error in the interferometric phase, we have implemented an advanced motion compensation algorithm that corrects for the scene topography and radar beam width. Here we discuss the algorithm used, its implementation in the UAVSAR data processor, and the improvement in interferometric phase and correlation achieved in areas with significant topographic relief.

  17. Motion compensated reconstructions of calcified coronary plaques in cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Martin; Pan, Xiaochuan; Giger, Maryellen; Suzuki, Kenji

    2007-03-01

    In order to obtain motion-compensated reconstructions of calcified coronary plaques in cardiac CT, the dynamic trajectory of the plaque must be known rather accurately. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the dynamic trajectories of a plaque extracted from reconstructions provided by a previously developed tracking algorithm can be used for obtaining motion-compensated reconstructions of this plaque. A single projection dataset of the modified FORBILD phantom containing a calcified plaque undergoing continuous periodic motion was acquired with a gantry rotation time of 0.4 s and a heart rate of 90 bpm. Three sets of phase-correlated 4D ROI images centered on the calcified plaque (labeled G1, G2, and G3) were obtained from this dataset by varying the numbers of data segments used for cardiac gating (N = 1, 2, 3) during the reconstruction steps of the tracking algorithm. Dynamic trajectories from each of these datasets were calculated from edge-based segmentations of these datasets. When compared to the true trajectory (labeled T), root-mean-square (RMS) values of position for trajectories G1, G2, and G3 were 1.473 mm, 1.166 mm, and 0.736 mm, respectively. Trajectories G1, G2, G3, and T then were used to obtain motion-compensated reconstructions MC1, MC2, MC3, and MCT, respectively, at 6.25 ms time intervals over 2 cardiac cycles. The areas (number of pixels) of the plaque then were measured at all time intervals for each set of reconstructions. When compared against areas obtained for MCT, RMS values of areas for reconstructions MC1, MC2, and MC3 were 26.888, 12.384, and 4.837, respectively. On visual inspection, MC3 also exhibited the least motion artifacts at most time intervals.

  18. Viscoelastic model based force control for soft tissue interaction and its application in physiological motion compensation.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Zemiti, Nabil; Liu, Chao; Poignet, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Controlling the interaction between robots and living soft tissues has become an important issue as the number of robotic systems inside the operating room increases. Many researches have been done on force control to help surgeons during medical procedures, such as physiological motion compensation and tele-operation systems with haptic feedback. In order to increase the performance of such controllers, this work presents a novel force control scheme using Active Observer (AOB) based on a viscoelastic interaction model. The control scheme has shown to be stable through theoretical analysis and its performance was evaluated by in vitro experiments. In order to evaluate how the force control scheme behaves under the presence of physiological motion, experiments considering breathing and beating heart disturbances are presented. The proposed control scheme presented a stable behavior in both static and moving environment. The viscoelastic AOB presented a compensation ratio of 87% for the breathing motion and 79% for the beating heart motion. PMID:24612709

  19. Galvanometer control system design of aerial camera motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Mingrui; Cao, Jianzhong; Wang, Huawei; Guo, Yunzeng; Hu, Changchang; Tang, Hong; Niu, Yuefeng

    2015-10-01

    Aerial cameras exist the image motion on the flight. The image motion has seriously affected the image quality, making the image edge blurred and gray scale loss. According to the actual application situation, when high quality and high precision are required, the image motion compensation (IMC) should be adopted. This paper designs galvanometer control system of IMC. The voice coil motor as the actuator has a simple structure, fast dynamic response and high positioning accuracy. Double-loop feedback is also used. PI arithmetic and Hall sensors are used at the current feedback. Fuzzy-PID arithmetic and optical encoder are used at the speed feedback. Compared to conventional PID control arithmetic, the simulation results show that the control system has fast response and high control accuracy.

  20. Control-structure interaction/mirror motion compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaren, Mark; Chu, Peter; Price, Xen

    1992-01-01

    Space Systems/Loral (formerly Ford Aerospace, Space Systems Division) has implemented a rigid-body Mirror Motion Compensation (MMC) scheme for the GOES-I/M spacecraft currently being built for NASA and NOAA. This has resulted in a factor of 15 reduction in pointing error due to rigid-body spacecraft motion induced by the periodic black-body calibration maneuvers required for the instruments. For GOES the spacecraft and the payload mirrors are considered as rigid bodies. The structural flexibility effects are small and are included in the total pointing budget as a separate item. This paper extends the MMC technique to include structural flexibility. For large multi-payload platforms, the structural flexibility effects can be more important in sensor pointing jitter as the result of payload motion. Sensitivity results are included to show the importance of the dynamic model fidelity.

  1. Ultrasound tracking for intra-fractional motion compensation in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Schwaab, J; Prall, M; Sarti, C; Kaderka, R; Bert, C; Kurz, C; Parodi, K; Günther, M; Jenne, J

    2014-07-01

    Modern techniques as ion beam therapy or 4D imaging require precise target position information. However, target motion particularly in the abdomen due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge and demands methods that detect and compensate this motion. Ultrasound represents a non-invasive, dose-free and model-independent alternative to fluoroscopy, respiration belt or optical tracking of the patient surface. Thus, ultrasound based motion tracking was integrated into irradiation with actively scanned heavy ions. In a first in vitro experiment, the ultrasound tracking system was used to compensate diverse sinusoidal target motions in two dimensions. A time delay of ∼200 ms between target motion and reported position data was compensated by a prediction algorithm (artificial neural network). The irradiated films proved feasibility of the proposed method. Furthermore, a practicable and reliable calibration workflow was developed to enable the transformation of ultrasound tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system - even if the ultrasound probe moves due to respiration. A first proof of principle experiment was performed during time-resolved positron emission tomography (4DPET) to test the calibration workflow and to show the accuracy of an ultrasound based motion tracking in vitro. The results showed that optical ultrasound tracking can reach acceptable accuracies and encourage further research. PMID:24695273

  2. Motion-compensated non-contact detection of heart rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    A new non-contact heart rate detection method based on the dual-wavelength technique is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. It is a well-known fact that the differences in the circuits of two detection modules result in different responses of two modules for motion artifacts. This poses a great challenge to compensate the motion artifacts during measurements. In order to circumvent this problem, we have proposed the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter. Comparing with the time-domain adaptive filter and independent component analysis, the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter can suppress the interference caused by the two circuit differences and effectively compensate the motion artifacts. To make the device is much compact and portable, a photoelectric probe is designed. The measurement distance is from several centimeters up to several meters. Moreover, the data obtained by using this non-contact detection system is compared with those of the conventional finger blood volume pulse (BVP) sensor by simultaneously measuring the heart rate of the subject. The data obtained from the proposed non-contact system are consistent and comparable with that of the BVP sensor.

  3. Motion and deformation compensation for freehand prostate biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khallaghi, Siavash; Nouranian, Saman; Sojoudi, Samira; Ashab, Hussam A.; Machan, Lindsay; Chang, Silvia; Black, Peter; Gleave, Martin; Goldenberg, Larry; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a registration pipeline to compensate for prostate motion and deformation during targeted freehand prostate biopsies. We perform 2D-3D registration by reconstructing a thin-volume around the real-time 2D ultrasound imaging plane. Constrained Sum of Squared Differences (SSD) and gradient descent optimization are used to rigidly align the moving volume to the fixed thin-volume. Subsequently, B-spline de- formable registration is performed to compensate for remaining non-linear deformations. SSD and zero-bounded Limited memory Broyden Fletcher Goldfarb Shannon (LBFGS) optimizer are used to find the optimum B-spline parameters. Registration results are validated on five prostate biopsy patients. Initial experiments suggest thin- volume-to-volume registration to be more effective than slice-to-volume registration. Also, a minimum consistent 2 mm improvement of Target Registration Error (TRE) is achieved following the deformable registration.

  4. Motion-compensated compressed sensing for dynamic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Rajagopalan; Kim, Yookyung; Nadar, Mariappan S.; Bilgin, Ali

    2010-08-01

    The recently introduced Compressed Sensing (CS) theory explains how sparse or compressible signals can be reconstructed from far fewer samples than what was previously believed possible. The CS theory has attracted significant attention for applications such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) where long acquisition times have been problematic. This is especially true for dynamic MRI applications where high spatio-temporal resolution is needed. For example, in cardiac cine MRI, it is desirable to acquire the whole cardiac volume within a single breath-hold in order to avoid artifacts due to respiratory motion. Conventional MRI techniques do not allow reconstruction of high resolution image sequences from such limited amount of data. Vaswani et al. recently proposed an extension of the CS framework to problems with partially known support (i.e. sparsity pattern). In their work, the problem of recursive reconstruction of time sequences of sparse signals was considered. Under the assumption that the support of the signal changes slowly over time, they proposed using the support of the previous frame as the "known" part of the support for the current frame. While this approach works well for image sequences with little or no motion, motion causes significant change in support between adjacent frames. In this paper, we illustrate how motion estimation and compensation techniques can be used to reconstruct more accurate estimates of support for image sequences with substantial motion (such as cardiac MRI). Experimental results using phantoms as well as real MRI data sets illustrate the improved performance of the proposed technique.

  5. Navigated marker placement for motion compensation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterstein, A.; März, K.; Franz, A. M.; Hafezi, M.; Fard, N.; Sterzing, F.; Mehrabi, A.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy is frequently used to treat unoperated or partially resected tumors. Tumor movement, e.g. caused by respiration, is a major challenge in this context. Markers can be implanted around the tumor prior to radiation therapy for accurate tracking of tumor movement. However, accurate placement of these markers while keeping a secure margin around the target and while taking into account critical structures is a difficult task. Computer-assisted needle insertion has been an active field of research in the past decades. However, the challenge of navigated marker placement for motion compensated radiotherapy has not yet been addressed. This work presents a system to support marker implantation for radiotherapy under consideration of safety margins and optimal marker configuration. It is designed to allow placement of markers both percutaneously and during an open liver surgery. To this end, we adapted the previously proposed EchoTrack system which integrates ultrasound (US) imaging and electromagnetic (EM) tracking in a single mobile modality. The potential of our new marker insertion concept was evaluated in a phantom study by inserting sets of three markers around dedicated targets (n=22) simultaneously spacing the markers evenly around the target as well as placing the markers in a defined distance to the target. In all cases the markers were successfully placed in a configuration fulfilling the predefined criteria. This includes a minimum distance of 18.9 ± 2.4 mm between marker and tumor as well as a divergence of 2.1 ± 1.5 mm from the planned marker positions. We conclude that our system has high potential to facilitate the placement of markers in suitable configurations for surgeons without extensive experience in needle punctions as high quality configurations were obtained even by medical non-experts.

  6. Motion compensation for adaptive horizontal line array processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. C.

    2003-01-01

    Large aperture horizontal line arrays have small resolution cells and can be used to separate a target signal from an interference signal by array beamforming. High-resolution adaptive array processing can be used to place a null at the interference signal so that the array gain can be much higher than that of conventional beamforming. But these nice features are significantly degraded by the source motion, which reduces the time period under which the environment can be considered stationary from the array processing point of view. For adaptive array processing, a large number of data samples are generally required to minimize the variance of the cross-spectral density, or the covariance matrix, between the array elements. For a moving source and interference, the penalty of integrating over a large number of samples is the spread of signal and interference energy to more than one or two eigenvalues. The signal and interference are no longer clearly identified by the eigenvectors and, consequently, the ability to suppress the interference suffers. We show in this paper that the effect of source motion can be compensated for the (signal) beam covariance matrix, thus allowing integration over a large number of data samples without loss in the signal beam power. We employ an equivalent of a rotating coordinate frame to track the signal bearing change and use the waveguide invariant theory to compensate the signal range change by frequency shifting.

  7. Cardiac motion compensation and resolution modeling in simultaneous PET-MR: a cardiac lesion detection study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibon, Y.; Ouyang, J.; Zhu, X.; Huang, C.; Reese, T. G.; Chun, S. Y.; Li, Q.; El Fakhri, G.

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac motion and partial volume effects (PVE) are two of the main causes of image degradation in cardiac PET. Motion generates artifacts and blurring while PVE lead to erroneous myocardial activity measurements. Newly available simultaneous PET-MR scanners offer new possibilities in cardiac imaging as MRI can assess wall contractility while collecting PET perfusion data. In this perspective, we develop a list-mode iterative reconstruction framework incorporating both tagged-MR derived non-rigid myocardial wall motion and position dependent detector point spread function (PSF) directly into the PET system matrix. In this manner, our algorithm performs both motion ‘deblurring’ and PSF deconvolution while reconstructing images with all available PET counts. The proposed methods are evaluated in a beating non-rigid cardiac phantom whose hot myocardial compartment contains small transmural and non-transmural cold defects. In order to accelerate imaging time, we investigate collecting full and half k-space tagged MR data to obtain tagged volumes that are registered using non-rigid B-spline registration to yield wall motion information. Our experimental results show that tagged-MR based motion correction yielded an improvement in defect/myocardium contrast recovery of 34-206% as compared to motion uncorrected studies. Likewise, lesion detectability improved by respectively 115-136% and 62-235% with MR-based motion compensation as compared to gating and no motion correction and made it possible to distinguish non-transmural from transmural defects, which has clinical significance given the inherent limitations of current single modality imaging in identifying the amount of residual ischemia. The incorporation of PSF modeling within the framework of MR-based motion compensation significantly improved defect/myocardium contrast recovery (5.1-8.5%, p < 0.01) and defect detectability (39-56%, p < 0.01). No statistical difference was found in PET contrast and lesion

  8. Motion compensation for aircraft-borne interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Richard John

    This research has studied data driven techniques for roll compensation for aircraft-borne InSAR, for platforms where an accurate Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) is inappropriate due to limitations on weight or cost, such as a low-cost civilian mapping system or a miniature UAV. It is shown that for unknown topography, roll errors cannot simply be filtered from the interferogram due to a fundamental ambiguity between aircraft roll effects and certain types of undulating terrain. The solution to this problem lies in the differential Doppler shifts of the signals received at the two antennas. These are proportional to the aircraft roll rate and can be extracted by incoherent or coherent means and utilised to reconstruct the aircraft roll history. This research analyses, experimentally evaluates and further develops the incoherent Differential Doppler (DD) method for roll compensation, developed to the proof-of-concept stage by A. Currie at QinetiQ (Malvern) and compares this with the two-look method, which is a novel coherent technique developed, analysed and experimentally evaluated as part of this PhD from an original idea proposed by Prof. R. Voles of UCL. By means of empirical analysis, numerical simulation and real test data from the QinetiQ C-Band InSAR, it is shown that the two-look method offers significant advantages in sensitivity, frequency performance, robustness and efficiency of implementation over the DD method, particularly at long range. The experimental results also show that for the QinetiQ C-Band InSAR, the two-look method provides roll compensation to a similar quality or better than provided by the on-board Litton-93 INU, which has a specified accuracy of +/-0.05°. Ambiguities in the roll rate estimates from other motions are also shown to be small for this platform, and could be reduced further by employing differential GPS track compensation.

  9. Image motion compensation for the OSS-3/7 telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    The three telescope for the NASA Office of Space Science (OSS) Missions 3/7 will be clustered on the Instrument Point System (IPS). The IPS is to be mounted on a Spacelab pallet in the space shuttle orbiter. The three telescopes include the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT), the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT), and the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photopolarimetry Experiment (WUPPE). All three instruments have the ability to view from earth orbit stellar objects which are fainter than those which can be seen with ground-based telescopes. An Image Motion Compensation (IMC) system will be required for the appropriate conduct of the observations. The OSS-3/7 pointing problem is discussed, and a cost effective IMC system is proposed.

  10. Explore the multihypothesis motion compensation in video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Suxia; Wang, Yonghui; Fowler, James E.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, different types of mutihypothesis techniques are studied. Based on the transform domain multihypothesis provided in redundant discrete wavelet transform (RDWT), other multihypothesis methods, such as spatial domain or temporal domain multihypothesis are added to improve the performance of a single multihypothesis scheme. Experimental results show that combining two types of multihypothesis motion compensation (MHMC) is promising. Choosing wisely, combining three MHMC methods is possible to get a gain. But as more and more multihypothesis involved, the room of improvement is getting smaller and smaller. At the same time, the increasement of the overhead burden also limits the gain of adding more hypothesis. Also the limitation of combining MHMC techniques along with the vector burden are discussed.

  11. Compensation of intra-frame head motion in PET data with motion corrected independent component analysis (MCICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Martin J.; Gadala, Marwa; Abu-Gharbieh, Rafeef

    2005-04-01

    Independent Component Analysis (ICA) has proved a powerful exploratory analysis method for fMRI. In the ICA model, the fMRI data at a given time point are modeled as the linear superposition of spatially independent (and spatially stationary) component maps. The ICA model has been recently applied to positron emission tomography (PET) data with some success (Human Brain Mapping 18:284-295(2003), IEEE Trans. BME, Naganawa et al, in press). However, in PET imaging each frame is, in fact, activity integrated over a relatively long period of time, making the assumption that the underlying component maps are spatially stationary (and hence no head movement has taken place during the frame collection) very tenuous. Here we extend the application of the ICA model to 11C-methylphenidate PET data by assuming that each frame is actually composed of the superposition of rigidly transformed underlying spatial components. We first determine the "noisy" initial spatially independent components of a data set under the erroneous assumption of no intra or inter-frame motion. Aspects of the initial components that reliably track spatial perturbations of the data are then determined to produce the motion-compensated components. Initial components included ring-like spatial distributions, indicating that movement corrupts the statistical properties of the data. The final intra-frame motion-compensated components included more plausible symmetric and robust activity in the striatum as would be expected compared to the raw data and the initial components. We conclude that 1) intra-frame motion is a serious confound in PET imaging which affects the statistical properties of the data and 2) our proposed procedure ameliorates such motion effects.

  12. Towards robust 3D visual tracking for motion compensation in beating heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Richa, Rogério; Bó, Antônio P L; Poignet, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    In the context of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, active vision-based motion compensation schemes have been proposed for mitigating problems related to physiological motion. However, robust and accurate visual tracking remains a difficult task. The purpose of this paper is to present a robust visual tracking method that estimates the 3D temporal and spatial deformation of the heart surface using stereo endoscopic images. The novelty is the combination of a visual tracking method based on a Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) model for representing the heart surface deformations with a temporal heart motion model based on a time-varying dual Fourier series for overcoming tracking disturbances or failures. The considerable improvements in tracking robustness facing specular reflections and occlusions are demonstrated through experiments using images of in vivo porcine and human beating hearts. PMID:21277821

  13. Complexity analysis of scalable motion-compensated wavelet video decoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landge, Gouri; van der Schaar, Mihaela; Akella, Venkatesh

    2004-11-01

    Scalable wavelet video coders based on Motion Compensated Temporal Filtering (MCTF) have been shown to exhibit good coding efficiency over a large range of bit-rates, in addition to providing spatial, temporal and SNR scalabilities. However, the complexity of these wavelet video coding schemes has not been thoroughly investigated. In this paper, we analyze the computational complexity of a fully-scalable MCTF-based wavelet video decoder that is likely to become part of the emerging MPEG-21 standard. We model the change in computational complexity of various components of the decoder as a function of bit-rate, encoding parameters such as filter types for spatial and temporal decomposition and the number of decomposition levels, and sequence characteristics. A key by-product of our analysis is the observation that fixed-function hardware accelerators are not appropriate for implementing these next generation fully scalable video decoders. The absolute complexity of the various functional units as well as their relative complexity varies depending on the transmission bit-rate, thereby requiring different hardware/software architecture support at different bit-rates. To cope with these variations, a preliminary architecture comprising of a reconfigurable co-processor and a general purpose processor is proposed as an implementation platform for these video decoders. We also propose an algorithm to utilize the co-processor efficiently.

  14. Pulmonary imaging using respiratory motion compensated simultaneous PET/MR

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Joyita; Huang, Chuan; Li, Quanzheng; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is confounded by blurring artifacts caused by respiratory motion. These artifacts degrade both image quality and quantitative accuracy. In this paper, the authors present a complete data acquisition and processing framework for respiratory motion compensated image reconstruction (MCIR) using simultaneous whole body PET/magnetic resonance (MR) and validate it through simulation and clinical patient studies. Methods: The authors have developed an MCIR framework based on maximum a posteriori or MAP estimation. For fast acquisition of high quality 4D MR images, the authors developed a novel Golden-angle RAdial Navigated Gradient Echo (GRANGE) pulse sequence and used it in conjunction with sparsity-enforcing k-t FOCUSS reconstruction. The authors use a 1D slice-projection navigator signal encapsulated within this pulse sequence along with a histogram-based gate assignment technique to retrospectively sort the MR and PET data into individual gates. The authors compute deformation fields for each gate via nonrigid registration. The deformation fields are incorporated into the PET data model as well as utilized for generating dynamic attenuation maps. The framework was validated using simulation studies on the 4D XCAT phantom and three clinical patient studies that were performed on the Biograph mMR, a simultaneous whole body PET/MR scanner. Results: The authors compared MCIR (MC) results with ungated (UG) and one-gate (OG) reconstruction results. The XCAT study revealed contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improvements for MC relative to UG in the range of 21%–107% for 14 mm diameter lung lesions and 39%–120% for 10 mm diameter lung lesions. A strategy for regularization parameter selection was proposed, validated using XCAT simulations, and applied to the clinical studies. The authors’ results show that the MC image yields 19%–190% increase in the CNR of high-intensity features of interest affected by

  15. Cardiac motion compensation and resolution modeling in simultaneous PET-MR: a cardiac lesion detection study

    PubMed Central

    Petibon, Y; Ouyang, J; Zhu, X; Huang, C; Reese, T G; Chun, S Y; Li, Q; El Fakhri, G

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac motion and Partial Volume Effects (PVE) are two of the main causes of image degradation in cardiac PET. Motion generates artifacts and blurring while PVE lead to erroneous myocardial activity measurements. Newly available simultaneous PET-MR scanners offer new possibilities in cardiac imaging as MRI can assess wall contractility while collecting PET perfusion data. In this perspective, we develop a list-mode iterative reconstruction framework incorporating both tagged-MR derived non-rigid myocardial wall motion and position dependent detector Point Spread Function (PSF) directly into the PET system matrix. In this manner, our algorithm performs both motion “deblurring” and PSF deconvolution while reconstructing images with all available PET counts. The proposed methods are evaluated in a beating non-rigid cardiac phantom whose hot myocardial compartment contains small transmural and non-transmural cold defects. In order to accelerate imaging time, we investigate collecting full and half k-space tagged MR data to obtain tagged volumes that are registered using non-rigid B-spline registration to yield wall motion information. Our experimental results show that tagged-MR based motion correction yielded an improvement in defect/myocardium contrast recovery of 34-206% as compared to motion uncorrected studies. Likewise, lesion detectability improved by respectively 115-136% and 62-235% with MR-based motion compensation as compared to gating and no motion correction and made it possible to distinguish non-transmural from transmural defects, which has clinical significance given inherent limitations of current single modality imaging in identifying the amount of residual ischemia. The incorporation of PSF modeling within the framework of MR-based motion compensation significantly improved defect/myocardium contrast recovery (5.1-8.5%, p<0.01) and defect detectability (39-56%, p<0.01). No statistical difference was found in PET contrast and lesion detectability

  16. Five-dimensional motion compensation for respiratory and cardiac motion with cone-beam CT of the thorax region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Hahn, Andreas; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We propose an adapted method of our previously published five-dimensional (5D) motion compensation (MoCo) algorithm1, developed for micro-CT imaging of small animals, to provide for the first time motion artifact-free 5D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from a conventional flat detector-based CBCT scan of clinical patients. Image quality of retrospectively respiratory- and cardiac-gated volumes from flat detector CBCT scans is deteriorated by severe sparse projection artifacts. These artifacts further complicate motion estimation, as it is required for MoCo image reconstruction. For high quality 5D CBCT images at the same x-ray dose and the same number of projections as todays 3D CBCT we developed a double MoCo approach based on motion vector fields (MVFs) for respiratory and cardiac motion. In a first step our already published four-dimensional (4D) artifact-specific cyclic motion-compensation (acMoCo) approach is applied to compensate for the respiratory patient motion. With this information a cyclic phase-gated deformable heart registration algorithm is applied to the respiratory motion-compensated 4D CBCT data, thus resulting in cardiac MVFs. We apply these MVFs on double-gated images and thereby respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated 5D CBCT images are obtained. Our 5D MoCo approach processing patient data acquired with the TrueBeam 4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). Our double MoCo approach turned out to be very efficient and removed nearly all streak artifacts due to making use of 100% of the projection data for each reconstructed frame. The 5D MoCo patient data show fine details and no motion blurring, even in regions close to the heart where motion is fastest.

  17. Image-Based Motion Compensation for High-Resolution Extremities Cone-Beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Cao, Q.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the extremities provides high spatial resolution, but its quantitative accuracy may be challenged by involuntary sub-mm patient motion that cannot be eliminated with simple means of external immobilization. We investigate a two-step iterative motion compensation based on a multi-component metric of image sharpness. Methods Motion is considered with respect to locally rigid motion within a particular region of interest, and the method supports application to multiple locally rigid regions. Motion is estimated by maximizing a cost function with three components: a gradient metric encouraging image sharpness, an entropy term that favors high contrast and penalizes streaks, and a penalty term encouraging smooth motion. Motion compensation involved initial coarse estimation of gross motion followed by estimation of fine-scale displacements using high resolution reconstructions. The method was evaluated in simulations with synthetic motion (1–4 mm) applied to a wrist volume obtained on a CMOS-based CBCT testbench. Structural similarity index (SSIM) quantified the agreement between motion-compensated and static data. The algorithm was also tested on a motion contaminated patient scan from dedicated extremities CBCT. Results Excellent correction was achieved for the investigated range of displacements, indicated by good visual agreement with the static data. 10–15% improvement in SSIM was attained for 2–4 mm motions. The compensation was robust against increasing motion (4% decrease in SSIM across the investigated range, compared to 14% with no compensation). Consistent performance was achieved across a range of noise levels. Significant mitigation of artifacts was shown in patient data. Conclusion The results indicate feasibility of image-based motion correction in extremities CBCT without the need for a priori motion models, external trackers, or fiducials. PMID:27346909

  18. Image-based motion compensation for high-resolution extremities cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Cao, Q.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the extremities provides high spatial resolution, but its quantitative accuracy may be challenged by involuntary sub-mm patient motion that cannot be eliminated with simple means of external immobilization. We investigate a two-step iterative motion compensation based on a multi-component metric of image sharpness. Methods: Motion is considered with respect to locally rigid motion within a particular region of interest, and the method supports application to multiple locally rigid regions. Motion is estimated by maximizing a cost function with three components: a gradient metric encouraging image sharpness, an entropy term that favors high contrast and penalizes streaks, and a penalty term encouraging smooth motion. Motion compensation involved initial coarse estimation of gross motion followed by estimation of fine-scale displacements using high resolution reconstructions. The method was evaluated in simulations with synthetic motion (1-4 mm) applied to a wrist volume obtained on a CMOS-based CBCT testbench. Structural similarity index (SSIM) quantified the agreement between motion-compensated and static data. The algorithm was also tested on a motion contaminated patient scan from dedicated extremities CBCT. Results: Excellent correction was achieved for the investigated range of displacements, indicated by good visual agreement with the static data. 10-15% improvement in SSIM was attained for 2-4 mm motions. The compensation was robust against increasing motion (4% decrease in SSIM across the investigated range, compared to 14% with no compensation). Consistent performance was achieved across a range of noise levels. Significant mitigation of artifacts was shown in patient data. Conclusion: The results indicate feasibility of image-based motion correction in extremities CBCT without the need for a priori motion models, external trackers, or fiducials.

  19. PET Motion Compensation for Radiation Therapy Using a CT-Based Mid-Position Motion Model: Methodology and Clinical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kruis, Matthijs F.; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Belderbos, José S.A.; Herk, Marcel van

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional positron emission tomography (4D PET) imaging of the thorax produces sharper images with reduced motion artifacts. Current radiation therapy planning systems, however, do not facilitate 4D plan optimization. When images are acquired in a 2-minute time slot, the signal-to-noise ratio of each 4D frame is low, compromising image quality. The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the construction of mid-position 3D PET scans, with motion compensated using a 4D computed tomography (CT)-derived motion model. Methods and Materials: All voxels of 4D PET were registered to the time-averaged position by using a motion model derived from the 4D CT frames. After the registration the scans were summed, resulting in a motion-compensated 3D mid-position PET scan. The method was tested with a phantom dataset as well as data from 27 lung cancer patients. Results: PET motion compensation using a CT-based motion model improved image quality of both phantoms and patients in terms of increased maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) values and decreased apparent volumes. In homogenous phantom data, a strong relationship was found between the amplitude-to-diameter ratio and the effects of the method. In heterogeneous patient data, the effect correlated better with the motion amplitude. In case of large amplitudes, motion compensation may increase SUV{sub max} up to 25% and reduce the diameter of the 50% SUV{sub max} volume by 10%. Conclusions: 4D CT-based motion-compensated mid-position PET scans provide improved quantitative data in terms of uptake values and volumes at the time-averaged position, thereby facilitating more accurate radiation therapy treatment planning of pulmonary lesions.

  20. Intrinsic feature-based pose measurement for imaging motion compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S.; Goddard, Jr., James Samuel

    2014-08-19

    Systems and methods for generating motion corrected tomographic images are provided. A method includes obtaining first images of a region of interest (ROI) to be imaged and associated with a first time, where the first images are associated with different positions and orientations with respect to the ROI. The method also includes defining an active region in the each of the first images and selecting intrinsic features in each of the first images based on the active region. Second, identifying a portion of the intrinsic features temporally and spatially matching intrinsic features in corresponding ones of second images of the ROI associated with a second time prior to the first time and computing three-dimensional (3D) coordinates for the portion of the intrinsic features. Finally, the method includes computing a relative pose for the first images based on the 3D coordinates.

  1. A High Performance and Low Bandwidth Multi-Standard Motion Compensation Design for HD Video Decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xianmin; Liu, Peilin; Zhou, Dajiang; Zhu, Jiayi; Pan, Xingguang; Goto, Satoshi

    Motion compensation is widely used in many video coding standards. Due to its bandwidth requirement and complexity, motion compensation is one of the most challenging parts in the design of high definition video decoder. In this paper, we propose a high performance and low bandwidth motion compensation design, which supports H.264/AVC, MPEG-1/2 and Chinese AVS standards. We introduce a 2-Dimensional cache that can greatly reduce the external bandwidth requirement. Similarities among the 3 standards are also explored to reduce hardware cost. We also propose a block-pipelining strategy to conceal the long latency of external memory access. Experimental results show that our motion compensation design can reduce the bandwidth by 74% in average and it can real-time decode 1920x1088@30fps video stream at 80MHz.

  2. List mode reconstruction for PET with motion compensation: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2002-07-01

    Motion artifacts can be a significant factor that limits the image quality in high-resolution PET. Surveillance systems have been developed to track the movements of the subject during a scan. Development of reconstruction algorithms that are able to compensate for the subject motion will increase the potential of PET. In this paper we present a list mode likelihood reconstruction algorithm with the ability of motion compensation. The subject motion is explicitly modeled in the likelihood function. The detections of each detector pair are modeled as a Poisson process with time-varying rate function. The proposed method has several advantages over the existing methods. It uses all detected events and does not introduce any interpolation error. Computer simulations show that the proposed method can compensate simulated subject movements and that the reconstructed images have no visible motion artifacts.

  3. Motion compensation of optical mapping signals from isolated beating rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stender, B.; Ernst, F.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Z. X.; Schlaefer, A.

    2013-09-01

    Optical mapping is a well established technique for recording monophasic action potential traces on the epicardial surface of isolated hearts. This measuring technique offers a high spatial resolution but it is sensitive towards myocardial motion. Motion artifacts occur because the mapping between a certain tissue portion sending out fluorescent light and a pixel of the photo detector changes over time. So far this problem has been addressed by suppressing the motion or ratiometric imaging. We developed a different approach to compensate the motion artifacts based on image registration. We could demonstrate how an image deformation field temporally changing with the heart motion could be determined. Using these deformation field time series for image transformation motion signals could be generated for each image pixel which were then successfully applied to remove baseline shift and compensate motion artifacts potentially leading to errors within maps of the first arrival time. The investigation was based on five different rat hearts stained with Di-4-ANEPPS.

  4. Low-cost multi-hypothesis motion compensation for video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Dong, Shengfu; Wang, Ronggang; Wang, Zhenyu; Ma, Siwei; Wang, Wenmin; Gao, Wen

    2014-02-01

    In conventional motion compensation, prediction block is related only with one motion vector for P frame. Multihypothesis motion compensation (MHMC) is proposed to improve the prediction performance of conventional motion compensation. However, multiple motion vectors have to be searched and coded for MHMC. In this paper, we propose a new low-cost multi-hypothesis motion compensation (LMHMC) scheme. In LMHMC, a block can be predicted from multiple-hypothesis with only one motion vector to be searched and coded into bit-stream, other motion vectors are predicted from motion vectors of neighboring blocks, and so both the encoding complexity and bit-rate of MHMC can be saved by our proposed LMHMC. By adding LMHMC as an additional mode in MPEG internet video coding (IVC) platform, the B-D rate saving is up to 10%, and the average B-D rate saving is close to 5% in Low Delay configure. We also compare the performance between MHMC and LMHMC in IVC platform, the performance of MHMC is improved about 2% on average by LMHMC.

  5. Motion compensation for electro-optical line scanner sensors using incomplete data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Gregory J.

    2000-11-01

    When imaging the ground from the air, distortions can occur if the imagery was created form an electro-optical line scanner pointing to nadir and mounted on the bottom of an airborne platform. The inability of the aircraft to maintain a perfect trajectory can cause the distortions. In the worst case scenario, camera stabilizers fail, no geographical reference or navigation data is available, and the sensor periodically fails leaving incomplete data for image construction. Motion compensation can restore the images. This paper describes various distortions that can be created for an airborne nadir-aimed line scanner. A motion-compensation technique is introduced that combines multiple cues from geographical reference and navigation data as well as line-scan matched filtering. A semi- automated restoration implementation is introduced followed by the automated line-scan matched filter implementation. These various compensation techniques provide backup for each other thus creating a more efficient motion- compensation system. Even in the worst case scenario, the system continues to attempt motion compensation using an optimal line-scan matched filtering technique. The results of using this automated technique for motion compensation is demonstrated using simulated high-definition imagery and then using actual electro-optical and hyperspectral images that were obtained form the Dynamic Data Base (DDB) program sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

  6. Risk compensation behaviours in construction workers' activities.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yingbin; Wu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether the construction workers have the tendency of engaging in risk compensation behaviours, and identify the demographic variables, which may influence the extent to which the construction workers may show risk compensation behaviours. Both quantitative (survey) and qualitative (interviews) approaches were used in this study. A questionnaire survey was conducted with all the construction workers on three building construction sites of a leading construction company in Australia. Semi-structured interviews were then conducted to validate the findings of the quantitative research. The findings indicate that workers tend to show risk compensation behaviours in the construction environment. The workers with more working experience, higher education, or having never been injured at work before have a higher tendency to show risk compensation in their activities than the others. The implication is that contractors need to assess the potential influence of workers' risk compensation behaviours when evaluating the effect of risk control measures. It is recommended that supervisors pay more attention to the behavioural changes of those workers who have more experience, higher education, and have never been injured before after the implementation of new safety control measures on construction site. PMID:24134314

  7. Region of interest motion compensation for PET image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Feng; Pan, Tinsu; Clark, John W; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2007-05-21

    A motion-incorporated reconstruction (MIR) method for gated PET imaging has recently been developed by several authors to correct for respiratory motion artifacts in PET imaging. This method however relies on a motion map derived from images (4D PET or 4D CT) of the entire field of view (FOV). In this study we present a region of interest (ROI)-based extension to this method, whereby only the motion map of a user-defined ROI is required and motion incorporation during image reconstruction is solely performed within the ROI. A phantom study and an NCAT computer simulation study were performed to test the feasibility of this method. The phantom study showed that the ROI-based MIR produced results that are within 1.26% of those obtained by the full image-based MIR approach when using the same accurate motion information. The NCAT phantom study on the other hand, further verified that motion of features of interest in an image can be estimated more efficiently and potentially more accurately using the ROI-based approach. A reduction of motion estimation time from 450 s to 30 and 73 s was achieved for two different ROIs respectively. In addition, the ROI-based approach showed a reduction in registration error of 43% for one ROI, which effectively reduced quantification bias by 44% and 32% using mean and maximum voxel values, respectively. PMID:17473344

  8. List mode reconstruction for PET with motion compensation: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2002-07-03

    Motion artifacts can be a significant factor that limits the image quality in high-resolution PET. Surveillance systems have been developed to track the movements of the subject during a scan. Development of reconstruction algorithms that are able to compensate for the subject motion will increase the potential of PET. In this paper we present a list mode likelihood reconstruction algorithm with the ability of motion compensation. The subject moti is explicitly modeled in the likelihood function. The detections of each detector pair are modeled as a Poisson process with time vary ingrate function. The proposed method has several advantages over the existing methods. It uses all detected events and does not introduce any interpolation error. Computer simulations show that the proposed method can compensate simulated subject movements and that the reconstructed images have no visible motion artifacts.

  9. Verification and compensation of respiratory motion using an ultrasound imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Chiu, Wei-Hung; Tien, Der-Chi; Wu, Ren-Hong; Hsu, Chung-Hsien

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if it is feasible to use ultrasound imaging as an aid for moving the treatment couch during diagnosis and treatment procedures associated with radiation therapy, in order to offset organ displacement caused by respiratory motion. A noninvasive ultrasound system was used to replace the C-arm device during diagnosis and treatment with the aims of reducing the x-ray radiation dose on the human body while simultaneously being able to monitor organ displacements. Methods: This study used a proposed respiratory compensating system combined with an ultrasound imaging system to monitor the compensation effect of respiratory motion. The accuracy of the compensation effect was verified by fluoroscopy, which means that fluoroscopy could be replaced so as to reduce unnecessary radiation dose on patients. A respiratory simulation system was used to simulate the respiratory motion of the human abdomen and a strain gauge (respiratory signal acquisition device) was used to capture the simulated respiratory signals. The target displacements could be detected by an ultrasound probe and used as a reference for adjusting the gain value of the respiratory signal used by the respiratory compensating system. This ensured that the amplitude of the respiratory compensation signal was a faithful representation of the target displacement. Results: The results show that performing respiratory compensation with the assistance of the ultrasound images reduced the compensation error of the respiratory compensating system to 0.81–2.92 mm, both for sine-wave input signals with amplitudes of 5, 10, and 15 mm, and human respiratory signals; this represented compensation of the respiratory motion by up to 92.48%. In addition, the respiratory signals of 10 patients were captured in clinical trials, while their diaphragm displacements were observed simultaneously using ultrasound. Using the respiratory compensating system to offset, the diaphragm

  10. Compensation of motion artifacts in catheter-based optical frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ha, J. Y.; Shishkov, M.; Colice, M.; Oh, W. Y.; Yoo, H.; Liu, L.; Tearney, G. J.; Bouma, B. E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel heterodyne Doppler interferometer method for compensating motion artifacts caused by cardiac motion in intracoronary optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is demonstrated. To track the relative motion of a catheter with regard to the vessel, a motion tracking system is incorporated with a standard OFDI system by using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) techniques. Without affecting the imaging beam, dual WDM monochromatic beams are utilized for tracking the relative radial and longitudinal velocities of a catheter-based fiber probe. Our results demonstrate that tracking instantaneous velocity can be used to compensate for distortion in the images due to motion artifacts, thus leading to accurate reconstruction and volumetric measurements with catheter-based imaging. PMID:20589002

  11. Compensation of Motion Artifacts for Time-of-Flight Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Marvin; Kolb, Andreas

    During the last years, Time-of-Flight sensors achieved a significant impact onto research fields in computer vision. For dynamic scenes however, most sensor’s working principles lead to significant artifacts in respect to sensor or object motion - artifacts that commonly affect distance reliability and thus affect downstream processing tasks in a negative way.

  12. Respiratory motion compensation algorithm of ultrasound hepatic perfusion data acquired in free-breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kaizhi; Zhang, Xuming; Chen, Guangxie; Weng, Fei; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-10-01

    Images acquired in free breathing using contrast enhanced ultrasound exhibit a periodic motion that needs to be compensated for if a further accurate quantification of the hepatic perfusion analysis is to be executed. In this work, we present an algorithm to compensate the respiratory motion by effectively combining the PCA (Principal Component Analysis) method and block matching method. The respiratory kinetics of the ultrasound hepatic perfusion image sequences was firstly extracted using the PCA method. Then, the optimal phase of the obtained respiratory kinetics was detected after normalizing the motion amplitude and determining the image subsequences of the original image sequences. The image subsequences were registered by the block matching method using cross-correlation as the similarity. Finally, the motion-compensated contrast images can be acquired by using the position mapping and the algorithm was evaluated by comparing the TICs extracted from the original image sequences and compensated image subsequences. Quantitative comparisons demonstrated that the average fitting error estimated of ROIs (region of interest) was reduced from 10.9278 +/- 6.2756 to 5.1644 +/- 3.3431 after compensating.

  13. Compensation of skull motion and breathing motion in CT using data-based and image-based metrics, respectively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, H.; Rohkohl, C.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel reconstruction for motion correction of non-cardiac organs. With non-cooperative patients or in emergency case, breathing motion or motion of the skull may compromise image quality. Our algorithm is based on the optimization of either motion artefact metrics or data-driven metrics. This approach was successfully applied in cardiac CTA [1]. While motion correction of the coronary vessels requires a local motion model, global motion models are sufficient for organs like the lung or the skull. The parameter vector for the global affine motion is estimated iteratively, using the open source optimization library NLOPT. The image is updated using motion compensated reconstruction in each of the iterations. Evaluation of the metric value, e.g. the image entropy, provides information for the next iteration loop. After reaching the fixed point of the iteration, the final motion parameters are used for a motion-compensated full quality reconstruction. In head imaging the motion model is based on translation and rotation, in thoracic imaging the rotation is replaced by non-isotropic scaling in all three dimensions. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in thoracic imaging by evaluating PET-CT data from free-breathing patients. In neuro imaging, data from stroke patients showing skull tremor were analyzed. It was shown that motion artefacts can be largely reduced and spatial resolution was restored. In head imaging, similar results can be obtained using motion artefact metrics or data-driven metrics. In case of image-based metrics, the entropy of the image proved to be superior. Breathing motion could also be significantly reduced using entropy metric. However, in this case data driven metrics cannot be applied because the line integrals associated to the ROI of the lung have to be computed using the local ROI mechanism [2] It was shown that the lung signal is corrupted by signals originating from the complement of the lung. Thus a meaningful

  14. Image-based iterative compensation of motion artifacts in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schretter, Colas; Rose, Georg; Bertram, Matthias

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: This article presents an iterative method for compensation of motion artifacts for slowly rotating computed tomography (CT) systems. Patient's motion introduces inconsistencies among projections and yields severe reconstruction artifacts for free-breathing acquisitions. Streaks and doubling of structures can appear and the resolution is limited by strong blurring. Methods: The rationale of the proposed motion compensation method is to iteratively correct the reconstructed image by first decomposing the perceived motion in projection space, then reconstructing the motion artifacts in image space, and finally subtracting the artifacts from an initial image. The initial image is reconstructed from the acquired data and might contain motion blur artifacts but, nevertheless, is considered as a reference for estimating the reconstruction artifacts. Results: Qualitative and quantitative figures are shown for experiments based on numerically simulated projections of a sequence of clinical images resulting from a respiratory-gated helical CT acquisition. The border of the diaphragm becomes progressively sharper and the contrast improves for small structures in the lungs. Conclusions: The originality of the technique stems from the fact that the patient motion is not explicitly estimated but the motion artifacts are reconstructed in image space. This approach could provide sharp static anatomical images on interventional C-arm systems or on slowly rotating X-ray equipments in radiotherapy.

  15. Circuit for continuous motional series resonant frequency and motional resistance monitoring of quartz crystal resonators by parallel capacitance compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnau, A.; Sogorb, T.; Jimenez, Y.

    2002-07-01

    A deep analysis of the problem associated with oscillators as interface circuits for quartz-crystal-microbalance sensors, reveals that the so-called static capacitance of the sensor is one of the elements that makes the use of oscillators more critical for sensors applications. A phase-locked-loop based circuit specifically designed for compensating the parallel capacitance effects in quartz crystal resonator sensors is presented. This circuit permits the calibration of the external circuitry to the sensor and an accurate determination of the effective capacitive compensation. The system provides a continuous measurement of the motional series resonant frequency and motional resistance. An extension and automation of the proposed system for multiple sensor characterization is introduced. The theoretical analysis of the circuit along with the experimental results presented prove that the proposed system is a good alternative for quartz sensors characterization.

  16. Block-classified bidirectional motion compensation scheme for wavelet-decomposed digital video

    SciTech Connect

    Zafar, S.; Zhang, Y.Q.; Jabbari, B.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper the authors introduce a block-classified bidirectional motion compensation scheme for the previously developed wavelet-based video codec, where multiresolution motion estimation is performed in the wavelet domain. The frame classification structure described in this paper is similar to that used in the MPEG standard. Specifically, the I-frames are intraframe coded, the P-frames are interpolated from a previous I- or a P-frame, and the B-frames are bidirectional interpolated frames. They apply this frame classification structure to the wavelet domain with variable block sizes and multiresolution representation. They use a symmetric bidirectional scheme for the B-frames and classify the motion blocks as intraframe, compensated either from the preceding or the following frame, or bidirectional (i.e., compensated based on which type yields the minimum energy). They also introduce the concept of F-frames, which are analogous to P-frames but are predicted from the following frame only. This improves the overall quality of the reconstruction in a group of pictures (GOP) but at the expense of extra buffering. They also study the effect of quantization of the I-frames on the reconstruction of a GOP, and they provide intuitive explanation for the results. In addition, the authors study a variety of wavelet filter-banks to be used in a multiresolution motion-compensated hierarchical video codec.

  17. A Range Compensating Feed Motion Concept for Spaceborne Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Durden, Stephen L.; Im, Eastwood

    2005-01-01

    Tropical cyclones can cause major loss of both life and property, so that improvements in forecasting motion, intensity, and rainfall are needed. Such forecasting requires accurate measurements of the current state of the cyclone. Ground-based Doppler radars have long been used as an effective means of monitoring severe precipitating storms. Because of the oceanic nature of tropical cyclones, remote monitoring from space is desirable. Recently, the Precipitation Radar (PR) [1] aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) [2] satellite has demonstrated an unprecedented capacity for 3-D imaging of precipitating storms. Nonetheless, due to the relatively long TRMM return cycle (less than once per day) the value of PR data has primarily been limited to the understanding of climatological properties of tropical cyclones [3]. The return cycle can be substantially reduced by sensing from a geostationary platform.

  18. Compensation for respiratory motion by gated radiotherapy: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Lars; Tücking, Thomas; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2005-05-01

    Respiratory organ motion is known to be one of the largest intrafractional organ motions. Therefore, it is important to investigate the potential benefit of gated dose delivery approaches which aim to account for the respective dose uncertainties. In this study respiration is simulated by a moving lung phantom; the movement is not restricted to a normal sinusoidal progression and simulates the one of the embedded lung tumour in the cranial-caudal direction. An IMRT plan with a total of 29 beam segments was designed for the treatment of this tumour. It was irradiated in its resting position—which is the position at exhalation—and during movement. Furthermore the irradiation was triggered using different amplitude thresholds, which means that the irradiation only proceeded if the deviation of the tumour's position from its resting position is smaller than the given threshold. We determined the gating-related increase of the treatment time for various gating procedures. We also measured the resulting dose distribution in specific slices of the phantom perpendicular to the direction of the movement using film dosimetry and compared it to the dose distribution of the static case. Since these film measurements cannot be done inside the whole tumour, additionally the movement and gating was simulated using the planning software to calculate the 3D dose distribution inside the tumour and to generate dose volume histograms for different treatment modalities. The total treatment time was observed to increase by 20%-100% depending on the individual gating threshold and can be calculated easily. The analysis of the films showed that irradiation without gating leads to significant underdosages up to 33%, especially at the edge of the tumour. With gating it is possible to considerably reduce this underdosage down to 9% depending on the trigger threshold. The calculation of the dose volume histograms makes it possible to find a reasonable compromise between the improvement of

  19. Prostate implant reconstruction from C-arm images with motion-compensated tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Moradi, Mehdi; Wen, Xu; French, Danny; Lobo, Julio; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate localization of prostate implants from several C-arm images is necessary for ultrasound-fluoroscopy fusion and intraoperative dosimetry. The authors propose a computational motion compensation method for tomosynthesis-based reconstruction that enables 3D localization of prostate implants from C-arm images despite C-arm oscillation and sagging. Methods: Five C-arm images are captured by rotating the C-arm around its primary axis, while measuring its rotation angle using a protractor or the C-arm joint encoder. The C-arm images are processed to obtain binary seed-only images from which a volume of interest is reconstructed. The motion compensation algorithm, iteratively, compensates for 2D translational motion of the C-arm by maximizing the number of voxels that project on a seed projection in all of the images. This obviates the need for C-arm full pose tracking traditionally implemented using radio-opaque fiducials or external trackers. The proposed reconstruction method is tested in simulations, in a phantom study and on ten patient data sets. Results: In a phantom implanted with 136 dummy seeds, the seed detection rate was 100% with a localization error of 0.86 {+-} 0.44 mm (Mean {+-} STD) compared to CT. For patient data sets, a detection rate of 99.5% was achieved in approximately 1 min per patient. The reconstruction results for patient data sets were compared against an available matching-based reconstruction method and showed relative localization difference of 0.5 {+-} 0.4 mm. Conclusions: The motion compensation method can successfully compensate for large C-arm motion without using radio-opaque fiducial or external trackers. Considering the efficacy of the algorithm, its successful reconstruction rate and low computational burden, the algorithm is feasible for clinical use.

  20. A method for motion compensation of a moving nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and its application to frequency analysis of pharyngeal pulsation.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S N; Murata, T; Ebina, Y; Okada, H; Miki, T

    1998-05-13

    A new sequential image processing method for motion compensation of a moving object with stringy shape has been developed for estimating the pharyngeal pulsation of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans under several environmental conditions. The method is based on the pixel data transfer on a new image frame while changing the boundary shape and the position but preserving the conformation of the inner structure of an object. All digitized image frames of C. elegans were first converted to motion-compensated images to arrange the pulsation site in the same region of the every transformed frame. The pulsation site was then automatically detected by determining the pixels where the temporal brightness variation was much larger than that of the other pixels. Finally, the pulsation frequency was determined by the Fourier analysis. The validity of our method has been confirmed by analyzing various test data, and the method has been applied for detecting the pharyngeal pulsation frequencies of C. elegans on some environmental conditions, i.e. feed bacteria-free/rich, doping of nerve inactivating ethyl-alcohol and nerve stimulant neurochemical substance of serotonin. The motion compensation method automatically provided reasonable pulsation frequencies which were found to be comparable to those obtained by manual counting. Thus the method is useful for systematic investigations on the variation of pharyngeal pulsation associated with the activity change of the nervous system in environments. PMID:9684336

  1. Ultrasonic diaphragm tracking for cardiac interventional navigation on 3D motion compensated static roadmaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timinger, Holger; Kruger, Sascha; Dietmayer, Klaus; Borgert, Joern

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to cardiac interventional navigation on 3D motion-compensated static roadmaps is presented. Current coronary interventions, e.g. percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties, are performed using 2D X-ray fluoroscopy. This comes along with well-known drawbacks like radiation exposure, use of contrast agent, and limited visualization, e.g. overlap and foreshortening, due to projection imaging. In the presented approach, the interventional device, i.e. the catheter, is tracked using an electromagnetic tracking system (MTS). Therefore, the catheters position is mapped into a static 3D image of the volume of interest (VOI) by means of an affine registration. In order to compensate for respiratory motion of the catheter with respect to the static image, a parameterized affine motion model is used which is driven by a respiratory sensor signal. This signal is derived from ultrasonic diaphragm tracking. The motion compensation for the heartbeat is done using ECG-gating. The methods are validated using a heart- and diaphragm-phantom. The mean displacement of the catheter due to the simulated organ motion decreases from approximately 9 mm to 1.3 mm. This result indicates that the proposed method is able to reconstruct the catheter position within the VOI accurately and that it can help to overcome drawbacks of current interventional procedures.

  2. A motion-compensated scheme for helical cone-beam reconstruction in cardiac CT angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Stevendaal, U. van; Berg, J. von; Lorenz, C.; Grass, M.

    2008-07-15

    Since coronary heart disease is one of the main causes of death all over the world, cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging is an application of very high interest in order to verify indications timely. Due to the cardiac motion, electrocardiogram (ECG) gating has to be implemented into the reconstruction of the measured projection data. However, the temporal and spatial resolution is limited due to the mechanical movement of the gantry and due to the fact that a finite angular span of projections has to be acquired for the reconstruction of each voxel. In this article, a motion-compensated reconstruction method for cardiac CT is described, which can be used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio or to suppress motion blurring. Alternatively, it can be translated into an improvement of the temporal and spatial resolution. It can be applied to the entire heart in common and to high contrast objects moving with the heart in particular, such as calcified plaques or devices like stents. The method is based on three subsequent steps: As a first step, the projection data acquired in low pitch helical acquisition mode together with the ECG are reconstructed at multiple phase points. As a second step, the motion-vector field is calculated from the reconstructed images in relation to the image in a reference phase. Finally, a motion-compensated reconstruction is carried out for the reference phase using those projections, which cover the cardiac phases for which the motion-vector field has been determined.

  3. SAR System for UAV Operation with Motion Error Compensation beyond the Resolution Cell

    PubMed Central

    González-Partida, José-Tomás; Almorox-González, Pablo; Burgos-García, Mateo; Dorta-Naranjo, Blas-Pablo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system that is under development in the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. The system uses Linear Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (LFM-CW) radar with a two antenna configuration for transmission and reception. The radar operates in the millimeter-wave band with a maximum transmitted bandwidth of 2 GHz. The proposed system is being developed for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operation. Motion errors in UAV operation can be critical. Therefore, this paper proposes a method for focusing SAR images with movement errors larger than the resolution cell. Typically, this problem is solved using two processing steps: first, coarse motion compensation based on the information provided by an Inertial Measuring Unit (IMU); and second, fine motion compensation for the residual errors within the resolution cell based on the received raw data. The proposed technique tries to focus the image without using data of an IMU. The method is based on a combination of the well known Phase Gradient Autofocus (PGA) for SAR imagery and typical algorithms for translational motion compensation on Inverse SAR (ISAR). This paper shows the first real experiments for obtaining high resolution SAR images using a car as a mobile platform for our radar.

  4. Stability of Single Particle Motion with Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; Abreu, N.

    2008-05-01

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we proposed a low energy electron beam with a Gaussian transverse profiles to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, with a weak-strong beam-beam interaction model, we investigate the stability of single particle motion in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. Tune footprints, tune diffusion, Lyapunov exponents, and 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation. A tune scan is performed and the possibility of increasing the bunch intensity is studied. The cause of tune footprint foldings is discussed, and the tune diffusion and Lyapunov exponent analysis are compared.

  5. High-resolution motion-compensated imaging photoplethysmography for remote heart rate monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Audrey; Wang, Xiao Yu; Amelard, Robert; Scharfenberger, Christian; Leong, Joanne; Kulinski, Jan; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel non-contact photoplethysmographic (PPG) imaging system based on high-resolution video recordings of ambient reflectance of human bodies that compensates for body motion and takes advantage of skin erythema fluctuations to improve measurement reliability for the purpose of remote heart rate monitoring. A single measurement location for recording the ambient reflectance is automatically identified on an individual, and the motion for the location is determined over time via measurement location tracking. Based on the determined motion information motion-compensated reflectance measurements at different wavelengths for the measurement location can be acquired, thus providing more reliable measurements for the same location on the human over time. The reflectance measurement is used to determine skin erythema fluctuations over time, resulting in the capture of a PPG signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. To test the efficacy of the proposed system, a set of experiments involving human motion in a front-facing position were performed under natural ambient light. The experimental results demonstrated that skin erythema fluctuations can achieve noticeably improved average accuracy in heart rate measurement when compared to previously proposed non-contact PPG imaging systems.

  6. 3D optical imagery for motion compensation in a limb ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranger, Bryan J.; Feigin, Micha; Zhang, Xiang; Mireault, Al; Raskar, Ramesh; Herr, Hugh M.; Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional processes for prosthetic socket fabrication are heavily subjective, often resulting in an interface to the human body that is neither comfortable nor completely functional. With nearly 100% of amputees reporting that they experience discomfort with the wearing of their prosthetic limb, designing an effective interface to the body can significantly affect quality of life and future health outcomes. Active research in medical imaging and biomechanical tissue modeling of residual limbs has led to significant advances in computer aided prosthetic socket design, demonstrating an interest in moving toward more quantifiable processes that are still patient-specific. In our work, medical ultrasonography is being pursued to acquire data that may quantify and improve the design process and fabrication of prosthetic sockets while greatly reducing cost compared to an MRI-based framework. This paper presents a prototype limb imaging system that uses a medical ultrasound probe, mounted to a mechanical positioning system and submerged in a water bath. The limb imaging is combined with three-dimensional optical imaging for motion compensation. Images are collected circumferentially around the limb and combined into cross-sectional axial image slices, resulting in a compound image that shows tissue distributions and anatomical boundaries similar to magnetic resonance imaging. In this paper we provide a progress update on our system development, along with preliminary results as we move toward full volumetric imaging of residual limbs for prosthetic socket design. This demonstrates a novel multi-modal approach to residual limb imaging.

  7. Compensation technique for the intrinsic error in ultrasound motion estimation using a speckle tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, Hirofumi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Toru

    2015-07-01

    High-accuracy ultrasound motion estimation has become an essential technique in blood flow imaging, elastography, and motion imaging of the heart wall. Speckle tracking has been one of the best motion estimators; however, conventional speckle-tracking methods neglect the effect of out-of-plane motion and deformation. Our proposed method assumes that the cross-correlation between a reference signal and a comparison signal depends on the spatio-temporal distance between the two signals. The proposed method uses the decrease in the cross-correlation value in a reference frame to compensate for the intrinsic error caused by out-of-plane motion and deformation without a priori information. The root-mean-square error of the estimated lateral tissue motion velocity calculated by the proposed method ranged from 6.4 to 34% of that using a conventional speckle-tracking method. This study demonstrates the high potential of the proposed method for improving the estimation of tissue motion using an ultrasound speckle-tracking method in medical diagnosis.

  8. Real-time circumferential mapping catheter tracking for motion compensation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Wimmer, Andreas; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Atilla; Liao, Rui; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) has been identified as a major cause of stroke. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become an increasingly important treatment option, especially when drug therapy fails. Navigation under X-ray can be enhanced by using augmented fluoroscopy. It renders overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then fused with X-ray images to provide more details about the underlying soft-tissue anatomy. Unfortunately, these fluoroscopic overlay images are compromised by respiratory and cardiac motion. Various methods to deal with motion have been proposed. To meet clinical demands, they have to be fast. Methods providing a processing frame rate of 3 frames-per-second (fps) are considered suitable for interventional electrophysiology catheter procedures if an acquisition frame rate of 2 fps is used. Unfortunately, when working at a processing rate of 3 fps, the delay until the actual motion compensated image can be displayed is about 300 ms. More recent algorithms can achieve frame rates of up to 20 fps, which reduces the lag to 50 ms. By using a novel approach involving a 3-D catheter model, catheter segmentation and a distance transform, we can speed up motion compensation to 25 fps which results in a display delay of only 40 ms on a standard workstation for medical applications. Our method uses a constrained 2-D/3-D registration to perform catheter tracking, and it obtained a 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm.

  9. Studies on dynamic motion compensation and positioning accuracy on star tracker.

    PubMed

    Jun, Zhang; Yuncai, Hao; Li, Wang; Da, Liu

    2015-10-01

    Error from motion is the dominant restriction on the improvement of dynamic performance on a star tracker. As a remarkable motion error, the degree of nonuniformity of the star image velocity field on the detector is studied, and thus a general model for the moving star spot is built. To minimize velocity nonuniformity, a novel general method is proposed to derive the proper motion compensation and location accuracy in cases of both uniform velocity and acceleration. Using this method, a theoretic analysis on the accuracy of time-delayed integration and similar techniques, which are thought of as state-of-the-art approaches to reduce error from motion, is conducted. The simulations and experimental results validate the proposed method. Our method shows a more steady performance than the dynamic binning algorithm. The positional error could be neglected when the smear length is far less than 3.464 times the scale of star spot, which suggests accuracy can be maintained by changing frame-integration time inverse proportional to the velocity on the focal plane. It also shows that the acceleration effect must be compensated to achieve accuracy close to the Cramér-Rao lower bound. PMID:26479618

  10. ISAR motion compensation using the burst derivative measure as a focal quality indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocker, Richard P.; Jones, Scott A.

    1993-04-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) is an imaging technique that shows great promise in classifying airborne targets in realtime, under all weather conditions. The success of classifying targets using ISAR is predicated upon forming highly focused radar images of these targets. Efforts to develop highly focused imaging computer software have been challenging, mainly because the imaging depends on and is affected by the motion of the target. Computationally intensive motion compensation algorithms have been developed to remove the unwanted degrading effects of target motion. Those particular motion compensation algorithms which require the use of a space-domain focal quality indicator, e.g., entropy, to determine image sharpness as processing proceeds pay a severe computational penalty due to the large number of two-dimensional fast Fourier transforms (2D-FFT's) which must be computed. This is due to the fact that the actual processing of ISAR data is primarily done in the spatial frequency domain and not in the space-domain where the final ISAR image is displayed. If a focal quality indicator could be developed to measure image sharpness in the spatial frequency domain, then the computational burden introduced by the numerous 2D-FFT's could be greatly relaxed. This paper describes the use of a new focal quality indicator called the burst derivative measure for determining ISAR image sharpness in the spatial frequency domain. Tests have been performed on simulated as well as actual ISAR data using both the burst derivative measure and the entropy measure.

  11. Conjugate field approaches for active array compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Two approaches for calculating the compensating feed array complex excitations are namely, the indirect conjugate field matching (ICFM) and the direct conjugate field matching (DCFM) approach. In the ICFM approach the compensating feed array excitations are determined by considering the transmitting mode and the reciprocity principle. The DCF, in contrast calculates the array excitations by integrating directly the induced surface currents on the reflector under a receiving mode. DCFM allows the reflector to be illuminated by an incident plane wave with a tapered amplitude. The level of taper can effectively control the sidelobe level of the compensated antenna pattern. Both approaches are examined briefly.

  12. Detection of obstacles on runway using Ego-Motion compensation and tracking of significant features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasturi, Rangachar (Principal Investigator); Camps, Octavia (Principal Investigator); Gandhi, Tarak; Devadiga, Sadashiva

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a method for obstacle detection on a runway for autonomous navigation and landing of an aircraft. Detection is done in the presence of extraneous features such as tiremarks. Suitable features are extracted from the image and warping using approximately known camera and plane parameters is performed in order to compensate ego-motion as far as possible. Residual disparity after warping is estimated using an optical flow algorithm. Features are tracked from frame to frame so as to obtain more reliable estimates of their motion. Corrections are made to motion parameters with the residual disparities using a robust method, and features having large residual disparities are signaled as obstacles. Sensitivity analysis of the procedure is also studied. Nelson's optical flow constraint is proposed to separate moving obstacles from stationary ones. A Bayesian framework is used at every stage so that the confidence in the estimates can be determined.

  13. Compensation of motion artifacts in intracoronary optical frequency domain imaging and optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jinyong; Yoo, Hongki; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-01-01

    Intracoronary optical coherence tomography and optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) have been utilized for two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging of vascular microanatomy. Image quality and the spatial accuracy of multidimensional reconstructions, however, can be degraded due to artifacts resulting from relative motion between the intracoronary catheter and the vessel wall. To track the relative motion of a catheter with regard to the vessel, a motion tracking system was incorporated with a standard OFDI system by using wavelength division multiplexing techniques. Motion of the vessel was acquired by a frequency shift of the backscattered light caused by the Doppler effect. A single monochromatic beam was utilized for tracking the relative longitudinal displacements of a catheter-based fiber probe with regard to the vessel. Although two tracking beams are, in general, required to correct for longitudinal motion artifacts, the accurate reconstruction in a longitudinal view was achieved by the Doppler frequency information of a single beam. Our results demonstrate that the single beam based motion tracking scheme is a cost-effective, practical approach to compensating for longitudinal distortions due to cardiac dynamics, thus leading to accurate quantitative analysis of 3D intracoronary OFDI. PMID:21993895

  14. Motion estimation and compensation based on region-constrained warping prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Dong-Il; Sung, Joon H.; Kim, Jeong K.; Lee, ChoongWoong

    1998-01-01

    The visually annoying artifacts resulting form block matching algorithm (BMA), blocky artifacts, become noticeable in applications for low bit rates. Warping prediction (WP) based schemes can remove the blocky artifacts of BMA successfully, but they also produce severe prediction errors around the boundaries of moving objects. Since the errors around the boundaries of objects are visually sensitive, they may sometimes look more annoying than blocky artifacts. The lack of ability of modeling motion discontinuities is the major reason of the errors from WP. Motion discontinuities usually exist in practical video sequences, so that it is required to develop a more reliable motion estimation and usually exist in practical video sequences, so that it is required to develop a more reliable motion estimation and compensation scheme for low bit rate applications. In this paper, we propose a new WP scheme, named region constrained warping prediction (RCWP), which places motion discontinuities according to the segmentation results. In RCWP, there is mutual dependency between estimated motion field and segmentation mask. Because of the mutual dependency, an iterative refinement process is also introduced. Experimental results have shown that the proposed algorithm can provide much better subjective and objective performance than the BMA and the conventional warping prediction.

  15. Complex amplitude correlation for compensation of large in-plane motion in digital speckle pattern interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Svanbro, Angelica; Sjoedahl, Mikael

    2006-12-01

    The use of complex amplitude correlation to compensate for large in-plane motion in digital speckle pattern interferometry is investigated. The result is compared with experiments where digital speckle photography (DSP) is used for compensation. An advantage of using complex amplitude correlation instead of intensity correlation (as in DSP) is that the phase change describing the deformation is retrieved directly from the correlation peak, and there is no need to compensate for the large movement and then use the interferometric algorithms. A discovered drawback of this method is that the correlation values drop quickly if a phase gradient larger than {pi} is present in the subimages used for cross correlation. This means that, for the complex amplitude correlation to be used, the size of the subimages must be well chosen or a third parameter in the cross-correlation algorithm that compensates for the phase variation is needed.Correlation values and wrapped phase maps from the two techniques (intensity and complex amplitude correlation) are presented.

  16. High-Frame-Rate Echocardiography Using Coherent Compounding With Doppler-Based Motion-Compensation.

    PubMed

    Poree, Jonathan; Posada, Daniel; Hodzic, Amir; Tournoux, Francois; Cloutier, Guy; Garcia, Damien

    2016-07-01

    High-frame-rate ultrasonography based on coherent compounding of unfocused beams can potentially transform the assessment of cardiac function. As it requires successive waves to be combined coherently, this approach is sensitive to high-velocity tissue motion. We investigated coherent compounding of tilted diverging waves, emitted from a 2.5 MHz clinical phased array transducer. To cope with high myocardial velocities, a triangle transmit sequence of diverging waves is proposed, combined with tissue Doppler imaging to perform motion compensation (MoCo). The compound sequence with integrated MoCo was adjusted from simulations and was tested in vitro and in vivo. Realistic myocardial velocities were analyzed in an in vitro spinning disk with anechoic cysts. While a 8 dB decrease (no motion versus high motion) was observed without MoCo, the contrast-to-noise ratio of the cysts was preserved with the MoCo approach. With this method, we could provide high-quality in vivo B-mode cardiac images with tissue Doppler at 250 frames per second. Although the septum and the anterior mitral leaflet were poorly apparent without MoCo, they became well perceptible and well contrasted with MoCo. The septal and lateral mitral annulus velocities determined by tissue Doppler were concordant with those measured by pulsed-wave Doppler with a clinical scanner (r(2)=0.7,y=0.9 x+0.5,N=60) . To conclude, high-contrast echo cardiographic B-mode and tissue Doppler images can be obtained with diverging beams when motion compensation is integrated in the coherent compounding process. PMID:26863650

  17. An analysis of the treatment couch and control system dynamics for respiration-induced motion compensation

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Warren D.; McAvoy, Thomas J.

    2006-12-15

    Sophisticated methods for real-time motion compensation include using the linear accelerator, MLC, or treatment couch. To design such a couch, the required couch and control system dynamics need to be investigated. We used an existing treatment couch known as the Hexapod{sup TM} to gain insight into couch dynamics and an internal model controller to simulate feedback control of respiration-induced motion. The couch dynamics, described using time constants and dead times, were investigated using step inputs. The resulting data were modeled as first and second order systems with dead time. The couch was determined to have a linear response for step inputs {<=}1 cm. Motion data from 12 patients were obtained using a skin marker placed on the abdomen of the patient and the marker data were assumed to be an exact surrogate of tumor motion. The feedback system was modeled with the couch as a second-ordersystem and the controller as a first order system. The time constants of the couch and controller and the dead times were varied starting with parameters obtained from the Hexapod{sup TM} couch and the performance of the feedback system was evaluated. The resulting residual motion under feedback control was generally <0.3 cm when a fast enough couch was simulated.

  18. Analytic signal phase-based myocardial motion estimation in tagged MRI sequences by a bilinear model and motion compensation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Basarab, Adrian; Girard, Patrick R; Croisille, Pierre; Clarysse, Patrick; Delachartre, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Different mathematical tools, such as multidimensional analytic signals, allow for the calculation of 2D spatial phases of real-value images. The motion estimation method proposed in this paper is based on two spatial phases of the 2D analytic signal applied to cardiac sequences. By combining the information of these phases issued from analytic signals of two successive frames, we propose an analytical estimator for 2D local displacements. To improve the accuracy of the motion estimation, a local bilinear deformation model is used within an iterative estimation scheme. The main advantages of our method are: (1) The phase-based method allows the displacement to be estimated with subpixel accuracy and is robust to image intensity variation in time; (2) Preliminary filtering is not required due to the bilinear model. The proposed algorithm, integrating phase-based optical flow motion estimation and the combination of global motion compensation with local bilinear transform, allows spatio-temporal cardiac motion analysis, e.g. strain and dense trajectory estimation over the cardiac cycle. Results from 7 realistic simulated tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences show that our method is more accurate compared with state-of-the-art method for cardiac motion analysis and with another differential approach from the literature. The motion estimation errors (end point error) of the proposed method are reduced by about 33% compared with that of the two methods. In our work, the frame-to-frame displacements are further accumulated in time, to allow for the calculation of myocardial Lagrangian cardiac strains and point trajectories. Indeed, from the estimated trajectories in time on 11 in vivo data sets (9 patients and 2 healthy volunteers), the shape of myocardial point trajectories belonging to pathological regions are clearly reduced in magnitude compared with the ones from normal regions. Myocardial point trajectories, estimated from our phase-based analytic

  19. Compensation based on linearized analysis for a six degree of freedom motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Dieudonne, J. E.; Martin, D. J., Jr.; Copeland, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The inertial response characteristics of a synergistic, six-degree-of-freedom motion base are presented in terms of amplitude ratio and phase lag as functions of frequency data for the frequency range of interest (0 to 2 Hz) in real time, digital, flight simulators. The notch filters which smooth the digital-drive signals to continuous drive signals are presented, and appropriate compensation, based on the inertial response data, is suggested. The existence of an inverse transformation that converts actuator extensions into inertial positions makes it possible to gather the response data in the inertial axis system.

  20. Motion Compensated Ultrasound Imaging Allows Thermometry and Image Guided Drug Delivery Monitoring from Echogenic Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Ektate, Kalyani; Kapoor, Ankur; Maples, Danny; Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; VanOsdol, Joshua; Ramasami, Selvarani; Ranjan, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used both for cancer diagnosis and to assess therapeutic success, but due to its weak tissue contrast and the short half-life of commercially available contrast agents, it is currently not practical for assessing motion compensated contrast-enhanced tumor imaging, or for determining time-resolved absolute tumor temperature while simultaneously reporting on drug delivery. The objectives of this study were to: 1) develop echogenic heat sensitive liposomes (E-LTSL) and non-thermosensitive liposomes (E-NTSL) to enhance half-life of contrast agents, and 2) measure motion compensated temperature induced state changes in acoustic impedance and Laplace pressure of liposomes to monitor temperature and doxorubicin (Dox) delivery to tumors. LTSL and NTSL containing Dox were co-loaded with an US contrast agent (perfluoropentane, PFP) using a one-step sonoporation method to create E-LTSL and E-NTSL. To determine temperature induced intensity variation with respect to the state change of E-LTSL and E-NTSL in mouse colon tumors, cine acquisition of 20 frames/second for about 20 min (or until wash out) at temperatures of 42°C, 39.5°C, and 37°C was performed. A rigid rotation and translation was applied to each of the "key frames" to adjust for any gross motion that arose due to motion of the animal or the transducer. To evaluate the correlation between ultrasound (US) intensity variation and Dox release at various temperatures, treatment (5 mg Dox/kg) was administered via a tail vein once tumors reached a size of 300-400 mm(3), and mean intensity within regions of interest (ROIs) defined for each sample was computed over the collected frames and normalized in the range of [0,1]. When the motion compensation technique was applied, a > 2-fold drop in standard deviation in mean image intensity of tumor was observed, enabling a more robust estimation of temporal variations in tumor temperatures for 15-20 min. due to state change of E-LTSL and E

  1. Motion Compensated Ultrasound Imaging Allows Thermometry and Image Guided Drug Delivery Monitoring from Echogenic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Ektate, Kalyani; Kapoor, Ankur; Maples, Danny; Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; VanOsdol, Joshua; Ramasami, Selvarani; Ranjan, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used both for cancer diagnosis and to assess therapeutic success, but due to its weak tissue contrast and the short half-life of commercially available contrast agents, it is currently not practical for assessing motion compensated contrast-enhanced tumor imaging, or for determining time-resolved absolute tumor temperature while simultaneously reporting on drug delivery. The objectives of this study were to: 1) develop echogenic heat sensitive liposomes (E-LTSL) and non-thermosensitive liposomes (E-NTSL) to enhance half-life of contrast agents, and 2) measure motion compensated temperature induced state changes in acoustic impedance and Laplace pressure of liposomes to monitor temperature and doxorubicin (Dox) delivery to tumors. LTSL and NTSL containing Dox were co-loaded with an US contrast agent (perfluoropentane, PFP) using a one-step sonoporation method to create E-LTSL and E-NTSL. To determine temperature induced intensity variation with respect to the state change of E-LTSL and E-NTSL in mouse colon tumors, cine acquisition of 20 frames/second for about 20 min (or until wash out) at temperatures of 42°C, 39.5°C, and 37°C was performed. A rigid rotation and translation was applied to each of the “key frames” to adjust for any gross motion that arose due to motion of the animal or the transducer. To evaluate the correlation between ultrasound (US) intensity variation and Dox release at various temperatures, treatment (5 mg Dox/kg) was administered via a tail vein once tumors reached a size of 300-400 mm3, and mean intensity within regions of interest (ROIs) defined for each sample was computed over the collected frames and normalized in the range of [0,1]. When the motion compensation technique was applied, a > 2-fold drop in standard deviation in mean image intensity of tumor was observed, enabling a more robust estimation of temporal variations in tumor temperatures for 15-20 min. due to state change of E-LTSL and E

  2. 3D model-based catheter tracking for motion compensation in EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Liao, Rui; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained heart arrhythmia and a leading cause of stroke. Its treatment by radio-frequency catheter ablation, performed using fluoroscopic image guidance, is gaining increasingly more importance. Two-dimensional fluoroscopic navigation can take advantage of overlay images derived from pre-operative 3-D data to add anatomical details otherwise not visible under X-ray. Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of these static overlay images for catheter navigation. We developed an approach for image-based 3-D motion compensation as a solution to this problem. A bi-plane C-arm system is used to take X-ray images of a special circumferential mapping catheter from two directions. In the first step of the method, a 3-D model of the device is reconstructed. Three-dimensional respiratory motion at the site of ablation is then estimated by tracking the reconstructed catheter model in 3-D. This step involves bi-plane fluoroscopy and 2-D/3-D registration. Phantom data and clinical data were used to assess our model-based catheter tracking method. Experiments involving a moving heart phantom yielded an average 2-D tracking error of 1.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 1.1 mm. Our evaluation of clinical data sets comprised 469 bi-plane fluoroscopy frames (938 monoplane fluoroscopy frames). We observed an average 2-D tracking error of 1.0 mm +/- 0.4 mm and an average 3-D tracking error of 0.8 mm +/- 0.5 mm. These results demonstrate that model-based motion-compensation based on 2-D/3-D registration is both feasible and accurate.

  3. Reciprocating motion of active deformable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarama, M.; Ohta, T.

    2016-05-01

    Reciprocating motion of an active deformable particle in a homogeneous medium is studied theoretically. For generality, we employ a simple model derived from symmetry considerations for the center-of-mass velocity and elliptical and triangular deformations in two dimensions. We carry out, for the first time, a systematic investigation of the reciprocating motion of a self-propelled particle. It is clarified that spontaneous breaking of the front-rear asymmetry is essential for the reciprocating motion. Moreover, two routes are found for the formation of the reciprocating motion. One is a bifurcation from a motionless stationary state. The other is destabilisation of an oscillatory rectilinear motion.

  4. Treatment Parameters Optimization to Compensate for Interfractional Anatomy Variability and Intrafractional Tumor Motion

    PubMed Central

    Brevet, Romain; Richter, Daniel; Graeff, Christian; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Scanned ion beam therapy of lung tumors is severely limited in its clinical applicability by intrafractional organ motion, interference effects between beam and tumor motion (interplay), as well as interfractional anatomic changes. To compensate for dose deterioration caused by intrafractional motion, motion mitigation techniques, such as gating, have been developed. However, optimization of the treatment parameters is needed to further improve target dose coverage and normal tissue sparing. The aim of this study was to determine treatment-planning parameters that permit to recover good target coverage for each fraction of lung tumor treatments. For 9 lung tumor patients from MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, Texas), a total of 70 weekly time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) datasets, which depict the evolution of the patient anatomy over the several fractions of the treatment, were available. Using the GSI in-house treatment planning system TRiP4D, 4D simulations were performed on each weekly 4DCT for each patient using gating and optimization of a single treatment plan based on a planning CT acquired prior to treatment. The impact on target dose coverage (V 95%,CTV) of variations in focus size and length of the gating window, as well as different additional margins and the number of fields was analyzed. It appeared that interfractional variability could potentially have a larger impact on V 95%,CTV than intrafractional motion. However, among the investigated parameters, the use of a large beam spot size, a short gating window, additional margins, and multiple fields permitted to obtain an average V 95%,CTV of 96.5%. In the presented study, it was shown that optimized treatment parameters have an important impact on target dose coverage in the treatment of moving tumors. Indeed, intrafractional motion occurring during the treatment of lung tumors and interfractional variability were best mitigated using a large focus, a short gating window, additional margins

  5. Treatment Parameters Optimization to Compensate for Interfractional Anatomy Variability and Intrafractional Tumor Motion.

    PubMed

    Brevet, Romain; Richter, Daniel; Graeff, Christian; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Scanned ion beam therapy of lung tumors is severely limited in its clinical applicability by intrafractional organ motion, interference effects between beam and tumor motion (interplay), as well as interfractional anatomic changes. To compensate for dose deterioration caused by intrafractional motion, motion mitigation techniques, such as gating, have been developed. However, optimization of the treatment parameters is needed to further improve target dose coverage and normal tissue sparing. The aim of this study was to determine treatment-planning parameters that permit to recover good target coverage for each fraction of lung tumor treatments. For 9 lung tumor patients from MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, Texas), a total of 70 weekly time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) datasets, which depict the evolution of the patient anatomy over the several fractions of the treatment, were available. Using the GSI in-house treatment planning system TRiP4D, 4D simulations were performed on each weekly 4DCT for each patient using gating and optimization of a single treatment plan based on a planning CT acquired prior to treatment. The impact on target dose coverage (V 95%,CTV) of variations in focus size and length of the gating window, as well as different additional margins and the number of fields was analyzed. It appeared that interfractional variability could potentially have a larger impact on V 95%,CTV than intrafractional motion. However, among the investigated parameters, the use of a large beam spot size, a short gating window, additional margins, and multiple fields permitted to obtain an average V 95%,CTV of 96.5%. In the presented study, it was shown that optimized treatment parameters have an important impact on target dose coverage in the treatment of moving tumors. Indeed, intrafractional motion occurring during the treatment of lung tumors and interfractional variability were best mitigated using a large focus, a short gating window, additional margins

  6. Breathing motion compensated reconstruction for C-arm cone beam CT imaging: initial experience based on animal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, D.; Lin, M.; Rao, P. P.; Loffroy, R.; Liapi, E.; Noordhoek, N.; Eshuis, P.; Radaelli, A.; Grass, M.; Geschwind, J.-F. H.

    2012-03-01

    C-arm based tomographic 3D imaging is applied in an increasing number of minimal invasive procedures. Due to the limited acquisition speed for a complete projection data set required for tomographic reconstruction, breathing motion is a potential source of artifacts. This is the case for patients who cannot comply breathing commands (e.g. due to anesthesia). Intra-scan motion estimation and compensation is required. Here, a scheme for projection based local breathing motion estimation is combined with an anatomy adapted interpolation strategy and subsequent motion compensated filtered back projection. The breathing motion vector is measured as a displacement vector on the projections of a tomographic short scan acquisition using the diaphragm as a landmark. Scaling of the displacement to the acquisition iso-center and anatomy adapted volumetric motion vector field interpolation delivers a 3D motion vector per voxel. Motion compensated filtered back projection incorporates this motion vector field in the image reconstruction process. This approach is applied in animal experiments on a flat panel C-arm system delivering improved image quality (lower artifact levels, improved tumor delineation) in 3D liver tumor imaging.

  7. Performance evaluation of motion compensation methods in ISAR by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaoda; Wu, Xiaoqing

    Three methods of motion compensation are considered: the scatterer point referencing method, the track-the-target centroid method, and the maximum likelihood (ML) image formation and motion compensation method. Computer simulations of imaging an aircraft in straight flight by a ground-based ISAR (inverse synthetic aperture radar) were carried out. The SNR performance, the susceptibility to target scintillation, and the computational complexity of the three methods are evaluated and compared. It is shown that the scatterer point referencing method is simple in computation, but is susceptible to target scintillation. The track-the-target centroid method and the ML method are able to greatly reduce the track loss arising from target scintillation at the cost of a higher computational load. The SNR performance of the track-the-target centroid method is poorer than that of the other two methods. The ML method suffers from the largest computational complexity among the three methods. Nevertheless, the ML method can provide the best SNR performance of the three methods.

  8. Quantification of microcirculatory parameters by joint analysis of flow-compensated and non-flow-compensated intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) data.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Knutsson, Linda; Wirestam, Ronnie; Nilsson, Markus; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Topgaard, Daniel; Lasič, Samo

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy and precision of perfusion fraction and blood velocity dispersion estimates in intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging, using joint analysis of flow-compensated and non-flow-compensated motion-encoded MRI data. A double diffusion encoding sequence capable of switching between flow-compensated and non-flow-compensated encoding modes was implemented. In vivo brain data were collected in eight healthy volunteers and processed using the joint analysis. Simulations were used to compare the performance of the proposed analysis method with conventional IVIM analysis. With flow compensation, strong rephasing was observed for the in vivo data, approximately cancelling the IVIM effect. The joint analysis yielded physiologically reasonable perfusion fraction maps. Estimated perfusion fractions were 2.43 ± 0.81% in gray matter, 1.81 ± 0.90% in deep gray matter, and 1.64 ± 0.72% in white matter (mean ± SD, n = 8). Simulations showed improved accuracy and precision when using joint analysis of flow-compensated and non-flow-compensated data, compared with conventional IVIM analysis. Double diffusion encoding with flow compensation was feasible for in vivo imaging of the perfusion fraction in the brain. The strong rephasing implied that blood flowing through the cerebral microvascular system was closer to the ballistic limit than the diffusive limit. © 2016 The Authors NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26952166

  9. Voltage and Current Unbalance Compensation Using a Parallel Active Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Tolbert, Leon M; Kueck, John D; Rizy, D Tom

    2007-01-01

    A three-phase insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT)-based parallel active filter is used for current and/or voltage unbalance compensation. An instantaneous power theory is adopted for real-time calculation and control. Three control schemes, current control, voltage control, and integrated control are proposed to compensate the unbalance of current, voltage, or both. The compensation results of the different control schemes in unbalance cases (load unbalance or voltage source unbalance) are compared and analyzed. The simulation and experimental results show that the control schemes can compensate the unbalance in load current or in the voltage source. Different compensation objectives can be achieved, i.e., balanced and unity power factor source current, balanced and regulated voltage, or both, by choosing appropriate control schemes.

  10. Rapid maneuvering of multi-body dynamic systems with optimal motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, B.; Gargano, R.; Sears, A.; Karpenko, M.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid maneuvering of multi-body dynamical systems is an important, yet challenging, problem in many applications. Even in the case of rigid bodies, it can be difficult to maintain precise control over nominally stationary links if it is required to move some of the other links quickly because of the various nonlinearities and coupled interactions that occur between the bodies. Typical control concepts treat the multi-body motion control problem in two-stages. First, the nonlinear and coupling terms are treated as disturbances and a trajectory tracking control law is designed in order to attenuate their effects. Next, motion profiles are designed, based on kinematics parameterizations, and these are used as inputs to the closed loop system to move the links. This paper describes an approach for rapid maneuvering of multi-body systems that uses optimal control theory to account for dynamic nonlinearities and coupling as part of the motion trajectory design. Incorporating appropriate operational constraints automatically compensates for these multi-body effects so that motion time can be reduced while simultaneously achieving other objectives such as reducing the excitation of selected links. Since the compensatory effect is embedded within the optimal motion trajectories, the performance improvement can be obtained even when using simple closed-loop architectures for maneuver implementation. Simulation results for minimum time control of a two-axis gimbal system and for rapid maneuvering of a TDRS single-access antenna, wherein it is desired to limit the excitation of the satellite body to which the antenna is attached, are presented to illustrate the concepts.

  11. Internal image motion compensation system for the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorell, K. R.; Parsons, E. K.; Powell, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is being designed as a 1-m, cryogenically cooled telescope capable of a thirty-fold improvement over currently available infrared instruments. The SIRTF, mounted in the Orbiter bay on the Instrument Pointing System (IPS), requires that the image at the focal plane be stabilized to better than 0.1 arcsec with an absolute accuracy of 1 arcsec in order to attain this goal. Current estimates of IPS performance for both stability and accuracy indicate that additional stabilization will be necessary to meet the SIRTF requirements. An Image Motion Compensation (IMC) system, utilizing a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) star tracker located at the focal plane and a steerable mirror in the SIRTF optical path, has been designed to work in conjunction with the IPS.

  12. Catheter tracking via online learning for dynamic motion compensation in transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic overlay of 3D models onto 2D X-ray images has important applications in image guided interventions. In this paper, we present a novel catheter tracking for motion compensation in the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI). To address such challenges as catheter shape and appearance changes, occlusions, and distractions from cluttered backgrounds, we present an adaptive linear discriminant learning method to build a measurement model online to distinguish catheters from background. An analytic solution is developed to effectively and efficiently update the discriminant model and to minimize the classification errors between the tracking object and backgrounds. The online learned discriminant model is further combined with an offline learned detector and robust template matching in a Bayesian tracking framework. Quantitative evaluations demonstrate the advantages of this method over current state-of-the-art tracking methods in tracking catheters for clinical applications. PMID:23286027

  13. Error motion compensating tracking interferometer for the position measurement of objects with rotational degree of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holler, Mirko; Raabe, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The nonaxial interferometric position measurement of rotating objects can be performed by imaging the laser beam of the interferometer to a rotating mirror which can be a sphere or a cylinder. This, however, requires such rotating mirrors to be centered on the axis of rotation as a wobble would result in loss of the interference signal. We present a tracking-type interferometer that performs such measurement in a general case where the rotating mirror may wobble on the axis of rotation, or even where the axis of rotation may be translating in space. Aside from tracking, meaning to measure and follow the position of the rotating mirror, the interferometric measurement errors induced by the tracking motion of the interferometer itself are optically compensated, preserving nanometric measurement accuracy. As an example, we show the application of this interferometer in a scanning x-ray tomography instrument.

  14. Unbalance vibratory displacement compensation for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hui; Xu, Longxiang; Zhu, Yili

    2013-01-01

    As the dynamic stiffness of radial magnetic bearings is not big enough, when the rotor spins at high speed, unbalance displacement vibration phenomenon will be produced. The most effective way for reducing the displacement vibration is to enhance the radial magnetic bearing stiffness through increasing the control currents, but the suitable control currents are not easy to be provided, especially, to be provided in real time. To implement real time unbalance displacement vibration compensation, through analyzing active magnetic bearings (AMB) mathematical model, the existence of radial displacement runout is demonstrated. To restrain the runout, a new control scheme-adaptive iterative learning control (AILC) is proposed in view of rotor frequency periodic uncertainties during the startup process. The previous error signal is added into AILC learning law to enhance the convergence speed, and an impacting factor β influenced by the rotor rotating frequency is introduced as learning output coefficient to improve the rotor control effects. As a feed-forward compensation controller, AILC can provide one unknown and perfect compensatory signal to make the rotor rotate around its geometric axis through power amplifier and radial magnetic bearings. To improve AMB closed-loop control system robust stability, one kind of incomplete differential PID feedback controller is adopted. The correctness of the AILC algorithm is validated by the simulation of AMB mathematical model adding AILC compensation algorithm through MATLAB soft. And the compensation for fixed rotational frequency is implemented in the actual AMB system. The simulation and experiment results show that the compensation scheme based on AILC algorithm as feed-forward compensation and PID algorithm as close-loop control can realize AMB system displacement minimum compensation at one fixed frequency, and improve the stability of the control system. The proposed research provides a new adaptive iterative learning

  15. Source motion detection, estimation, and compensation for underwater acoustics inversion by wideband ambiguity lag-Doppler filtering.

    PubMed

    Josso, Nicolas F; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Gervaise, Cédric

    2010-12-01

    Acoustic channel properties in a shallow water environment with moving source and receiver are difficult to investigate. In fact, when the source-receiver relative position changes, the underwater environment causes multipath and Doppler scale changes on the transmitted signal over low-to-medium frequencies (300 Hz-20 kHz). This is the result of a combination of multiple paths propagation, source and receiver motions, as well as sea surface motion or water column fast changes. This paper investigates underwater acoustic channel properties in a shallow water (up to 150 m depth) and moving source-receiver conditions using extracted time-scale features of the propagation channel model for low-to-medium frequencies. An average impulse response of one transmission is estimated using the physical characteristics of propagation and the wideband ambiguity plane. Since a different Doppler scale should be considered for each propagating signal, a time-warping filtering method is proposed to estimate the channel time delay and Doppler scale attributes for each propagating path. The proposed method enables the estimation of motion-compensated impulse responses, where different Doppler scaling factors are considered for the different time delays. It was validated for channel profiles using real data from the BASE'07 experiment conducted by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Undersea Research Center in the shallow water environment of the Malta Plateau, South Sicily. This paper provides a contribution to many field applications including passive ocean tomography with unknown natural sources position and movement. Another example is active ocean tomography where sources motion enables to rapidly cover one operational area for rapid environmental assessment and hydrophones may be drifting in order to avoid additional flow noise. PMID:21218875

  16. Motion-compensated noncontact imaging photoplethysmography to monitor cardiorespiratory status during exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Greenwald, Stephen; Chambers, Jonathon; Zhu, Yisheng

    2011-07-01

    With the advance of computer and photonics technology, imaging photoplethysmography [(PPG), iPPG] can provide comfortable and comprehensive assessment over a wide range of anatomical locations. However, motion artifact is a major drawback in current iPPG systems, particularly in the context of clinical assessment. To overcome this issue, a new artifact-reduction method consisting of planar motion compensation and blind source separation is introduced in this study. The performance of the iPPG system was evaluated through the measurement of cardiac pulse in the hand from 12 subjects before and after 5 min of cycling exercise. Also, a 12-min continuous recording protocol consisting of repeated exercises was taken from a single volunteer. The physiological parameters (i.e., heart rate, respiration rate), derived from the images captured by the iPPG system, exhibit functional characteristics comparable to conventional contact PPG sensors. Continuous recordings from the iPPG system reveal that heart and respiration rates can be successfully tracked with the artifact reduction method even in high-intensity physical exercise situations. The outcome from this study thereby leads to a new avenue for noncontact sensing of vital signs and remote physiological assessment, with clear applications in triage and sports training.

  17. [Motion-compensated compressed sensing four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Zhang, Hua; He, Ji; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Bian, Zhao-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Jian-Hua

    2016-06-20

    Restriction by hardware caused the very low projection number at a single phase for 4-dimensional cone beam (4D-CBCT) CT imaging, and reconstruction using conventional reconstruction algorithms is thus constrained by serious streak artifacts and noises. To address this problem, we propose an approach to reconstructing 4D-CBCT images with multi-phase projections based on the assumption that the image at one phase can be viewed as the motion-compensated image at another phase. Specifically, we formulated a cost function using multi-phase projections to construct the fidelity term and the TV regularization method. For fidelity term construction, the projection data of the current phase and those at other phases were jointly used by reformulating the imaging model. The Gradient-Projection-Barzilai-Line search (GPBL) method was used to optimize the complex cost function. Physical phantom and patient data results showed that the proposed approach could effectively reduce the noise and artifacts, and the introduction of additional temporal correlation did not introduce new artifacts or motion blur. PMID:27435778

  18. Development of a frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system based on real-time 6D position monitoring and adaptive head motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, Rodney D.; Wen, Zhifei; Sadinski, Meredith; Farrey, Karl; Yenice, Kamil M.

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers radiation with great spatial accuracy. To achieve sub-millimeter accuracy for intracranial SRS, a head ring is rigidly fixated to the skull to create a fixed reference. For some patients, the invasiveness of the ring can be highly uncomfortable and not well tolerated. In addition, placing and removing the ring requires special expertise from a neurosurgeon, and patient setup time for SRS can often be long. To reduce the invasiveness, hardware limitations and setup time, we are developing a system for performing accurate head positioning without the use of a head ring. The proposed method uses real-time 6D optical position feedback for turning on and off the treatment beam (gating) and guiding a motor-controlled 3D head motion compensation stage. The setup consists of a central control computer, an optical patient motion tracking system and a 3D motion compensation stage attached to the front of the LINAC couch. A styrofoam head cast was custom-built for patient support and was mounted on the compensation stage. The motion feedback of the markers was processed by the control computer, and the resulting motion of the target was calculated using a rigid body model. If the target deviated beyond a preset position of 0.2 mm, an automatic position correction was performed with stepper motors to adjust the head position via the couch mount motion platform. In the event the target deviated more than 1 mm, a safety relay switch was activated and the treatment beam was turned off. The feasibility of the concept was tested using five healthy volunteers. Head motion data were acquired with and without the use of motion compensation over treatment times of 15 min. On average, test subjects exceeded the 0.5 mm tolerance 86% of the time and the 1.0 mm tolerance 45% of the time without motion correction. With correction, this percentage was reduced to 5% and 2% for the 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm tolerances, respectively.

  19. Calculating activation energies for temperature compensation in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2011-10-01

    Many biological species possess a circadian clock, which helps them anticipate daily variations in the environment. In the absence of external stimuli, the rhythm persists autonomously with a period of approximately 24 h. However, single pulses of light, nutrients, chemicals or temperature can shift the clock phase. In the case of light- and temperature-cycles, this allows entrainment of the clock to cycles of exactly 24 h. Circadian clocks have the remarkable property of temperature compensation, that is, the period of the circadian rhythm remains relatively constant within a physiological range of temperatures. For several organisms, temperature-regulated processes within the circadian clock have been identified in recent years. However, how these processes contribute to temperature compensation is not fully understood. Here, we theoretically investigate temperature compensation in general oscillatory systems. It is known that every oscillator can be locally temperature compensated around a reference temperature, if reactions are appropriately balanced. A balancing is always possible if the control coefficient with respect to the oscillation period of at least one reaction in the oscillator network is positive. However, for global temperature compensation, the whole physiological temperature range is relevant. Here, we use an approach which leads to an optimization problem subject to the local balancing principle. We use this approach to analyse different circadian clock models proposed in the literature and calculate activation energies that lead to temperature compensation.

  20. Active damping and compensation of satellite appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, W.; Baier, H.

    1993-10-01

    Future space missions will employ large and, for lightweight reasons, extremely flexible structures with very high performance requirements such as high pointing accuracy and stability, and high shape precision. This requires actively damping out vibrations induced by spacecraft maneuvers. The damping of the solar array vibrations is a characteristic task for such active interface devices. The example of an active interface for damping the bending vibrations of large conventional solar arrays is addressed. Other typical active components are active tube sections for damping the vibrations of large booms, and interfaces between satellite and vibrating large masts carrying high precision reflectors or measurement systems. The mechanical properties of the interfaces and the technological requirements related to their development are determined. New 'smart' materials are prominent among current concerns. Piezoelectric polymer foils bonded to structural shell surfaces, embedded thin piezoceramics plates, and embedded fiber optics sensors, as well as the implementation of materials such as memory alloys, are here addressed.

  1. Nonrigid motion compensation in B-mode and contrast enhanced ultrasound image sequences of the carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Diego D. B.; Akkus, Zeynettin; Bosch, Johan G.; van den Oord, Stijn C. H.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Klein, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we investigate nonrigid motion compensation in simultaneously acquired (side-by-side) B-mode ultrasound (BMUS) and contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) image sequences of the carotid artery. These images are acquired to study the presence of intraplaque neovascularization (IPN), which is a marker of plaque vulnerability. IPN quantification is visualized by performing the maximum intensity projection (MIP) on the CEUS image sequence over time. As carotid images contain considerable motion, accurate global nonrigid motion compensation (GNMC) is required prior to the MIP. Moreover, we demonstrate that an improved lumen and plaque differentiation can be obtained by averaging the motion compensated BMUS images over time. We propose to use a previously published 2D+t nonrigid registration method, which is based on minimization of pixel intensity variance over time, using a spatially and temporally smooth B-spline deformation model. The validation compares displacements of plaque points with manual trackings by 3 experts in 11 carotids. The average (+/- standard deviation) root mean square error (RMSE) was 99+/-74μm for longitudinal and 47+/-18μm for radial displacements. These results were comparable with the interobserver variability, and with results of a local rigid registration technique based on speckle tracking, which estimates motion in a single point, whereas our approach applies motion compensation to the entire image. In conclusion, we evaluated that the GNMC technique produces reliable results. Since this technique tracks global deformations, it can aid in the quantification of IPN and the delineation of lumen and plaque contours.

  2. Real-time high-speed motion blur compensation system based on back-and-forth motion control of galvanometer mirror.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Takanoshin; Ishikawa, Masatoshi

    2015-12-14

    We developed a novel real-time motion blur compensation system for the blur caused by high-speed one-dimensional motion between a camera and a target. The system consists of a galvanometer mirror and a high-speed color camera, without the need for any additional sensors. We controlled the galvanometer mirror with continuous back-and-forth oscillating motion synchronized to a high-speed camera. The angular speed of the mirror is given in real time within 10 ms based on the concept of background tracking and rapid raw Bayer block matching. Experiments demonstrated that our system captures motion-invariant images of objects moving at speeds up to 30 km/h. PMID:26698958

  3. Evaluation of motion compensation method for assessing the gastrointestinal motility using three dimensional endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2016-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most common gastrointestinal disorders. The term "functional" is generally applied to disorders where there are no structural abnormalities. Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the several mechanisms that have been proposed for the pathogenesis of FGID and is usually examined by manometry, a pressure test. There have been no attempts to examine the gastrointestinal dysmotility by endoscopy. We have proposed an imaging system for the assessment of gastric motility using a three-dimensional endoscope. After we newly developed a threedimensional endoscope and constructed a wave simulated model, we established a method of extracting three-dimensional contraction waves derived from a three-dimensional profile of the wave simulated model obtained with the endoscope. In the study, the endoscope and the wave simulated model were fixed to the ground. However, in a clinical setting, it is hard for endoscopists to keep the endoscope still. Moreover, stomach moves under the influence of breathing. Thus, three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall is necessary for the accurate assessment of gastrointestinal motility. In this paper, we propose a motion compensation method using three-dimensional scene flow. The scene flow of the feature point calculated by obtained images in a time series enables the three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall. We confirmed the validity of a proposed method first by a known-movement object and then by a wave simulated model.

  4. Three Dimensional Motion Compensation for Real-Time MRI Guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Abdominal Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, M.; De Senneville, B. D.; Roujol, S.; Hey, S.; Maclair, G.; Köhler, M. O.; Quesson, B.; Moonen, C. T. W.

    2010-03-01

    MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has evolved into a promising non-invasive technique for the ablation of pathological tissue in abdominal organs. However, since the high perfusion rates of these organs lead to effective cooling, sustained sonications of 30-90 s are required to achieve a sufficiently high temperature elevation to induce necrosis. This is complicated by the constant displacement of the target due to the respiratory cycle. This study proposes sub-second 3D HIFU-beam steering under MR-guidance for the near real-time compensation of respiratory motion as a possible solution. The target position is observed in 3D space by coupling rapid 2D MR-imaging with prospective slice tracking (PST) based on pencil-beam navigator echoes. Continuous real-time image processing provides temperature maps, thermal dose estimates and the target position at a frequency of 10 Hz and an update latency of less than 120 ms. The suggested method is evaluated with phantom experiments and its feasibility is verified in-vivo with an ablation experiment on a porcine kidney where it allows to achieve a thermal energy deposition which is comparable to static control experiments.

  5. Doppler-based motion compensation algorithm for focusing the signature of a rotorcraft.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Geoffrey H

    2013-02-01

    A computationally efficient algorithm was developed and tested to compensate for the effects of motion on the acoustic signature of a rotorcraft. For target signatures with large spectral peaks that vary slowly in amplitude and have near constant frequency, the time-varying Doppler shift can be tracked and then removed from the data. The algorithm can be used to preprocess data for classification, tracking, and nulling algorithms. The algorithm was tested on rotorcraft data. The average instantaneous frequency of the first harmonic of a rotorcraft was tracked with a fixed-lag smoother. Then, state space estimates of the frequency were used to calculate a time warping that removed the effect of a time-varying Doppler shift from the data. The algorithm was evaluated by analyzing the increase in the amplitude of the harmonics in the spectrum of a rotorcraft. The results depended upon the frequency of the harmonics and the processing interval duration. Under good conditions, the results for the fundamental frequency of the target (~11 Hz) almost achieved an estimated upper bound. The results for higher frequency harmonics had larger increases in the amplitude of the peaks, but significantly lower than the estimated upper bounds. PMID:23363088

  6. Model-based lasso catheter tracking in monoplane fluoroscopy for 3D breathing motion compensation during EP procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Rui

    2010-02-01

    Radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of the pulmonary veins (PVs) attached to the left atrium (LA) is usually carried out under fluoroscopy guidance. Overlay of detailed anatomical structures via 3-D CT and/or MR volumes onto the fluoroscopy helps visualization and navigation in electrophysiology procedures (EP). Unfortunately, respiratory motion may impair the utility of static overlay of the volume with fluoroscopy for catheter navigation. In this paper, we propose a B-spline based method for tracking the circumferential catheter (lasso catheter) in monoplane fluoroscopy. The tracked motion can be used for the estimation of the 3-D trajectory of breathing motion and for subsequent motion compensation. A lasso catheter is typically used during EP procedures and is pushed against the ostia of the PVs to be ablated. Hence this method does not require additional instruments, and achieves motion estimation right at the site of ablation. The performance of the proposed tracking algorithm was evaluated on 340 monoplane frames with an average error of 0.68 +/- 0.36 mms. Our contributions in this work are twofold. First and foremost, we show how to design an effective, practical, and workflow-friendly 3-D motion compensation scheme for EP procedures in a monoplane setup. In addition, we develop an efficient and accurate method for model-based tracking of the circumferential lasso catheter in the low-dose EP fluoroscopy.

  7. Efficient compression of motion-compensated sub-images with Karhunen-Loeve transform in three-dimensional integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ho-Hyun; Shin, Dong-Hak; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2010-03-01

    An approach to highly enhance the compression efficiency of the integral images by applying the Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT) algorithm to the motion-compensated sub-images is proposed. The sub-images transformed from the elemental images picked-up from the three-dimensional (3D) object might represent the different perspectives of the object. Thus, the similarity among the sub-images gets better than that among the elemental images, so that an improvement of compression efficiency of the sub-images could be obtained. However, motion vectors occurred among the sub-images might result in an additional increase of image data to be compressed. Accordingly, in this paper, motion vectors have been estimated and compensated in all sub-image in advance. Then the KLT algorithm was applied to these motion-compensated sub-images for compression. It is shown from some experimental results that compression efficiency of the proposed method has been improved up to 24.44%, 40.62%, respectively, on the average compared to that of the conventional KLT compression method and that of the JPEG.

  8. Self-similarity in active colloid motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, Colin; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    The self-similarity of displacements among randomly evolving systems has been used to describe the foraging patterns of animals and predict the growth of financial systems. At micron scales, the motion of colloidal particles can be analyzed by sampling their spatial displacement in time. For self-similar systems in equilibrium, the mean squared displacement increases linearly in time. However, external forces can take the system out of equilibrium, creating active colloidal systems, and making this evolution more complex. A moment scaling spectrum of the distribution of particle displacements quantifies the degree of self-similarity in the colloid motion. We will demonstrate that, by varying the temporal and spatial characteristics of the external forces, one can control the degree of self-similarity in active colloid motion.

  9. Evaluation of interpolation methods for surface-based motion compensated tomographic reconstruction for cardiac angiographic C-arm data

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Kerstin; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Zheng Yefeng; Wang Yang; Lauritsch, Guenter; Rohkohl, Christopher; Maier, Andreas K.; Schultz, Carl; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: For interventional cardiac procedures, anatomical and functional information about the cardiac chambers is of major interest. With the technology of angiographic C-arm systems it is possible to reconstruct intraprocedural three-dimensional (3D) images from 2D rotational angiographic projection data (C-arm CT). However, 3D reconstruction of a dynamic object is a fundamental problem in C-arm CT reconstruction. The 2D projections are acquired over a scan time of several seconds, thus the projection data show different states of the heart. A standard FDK reconstruction algorithm would use all acquired data for a filtered backprojection and result in a motion-blurred image. In this approach, a motion compensated reconstruction algorithm requiring knowledge of the 3D heart motion is used. The motion is estimated from a previously presented 3D dynamic surface model. This dynamic surface model results in a sparse motion vector field (MVF) defined at control points. In order to perform a motion compensated reconstruction, a dense motion vector field is required. The dense MVF is generated by interpolation of the sparse MVF. Therefore, the influence of different motion interpolation methods on the reconstructed image quality is evaluated. Methods: Four different interpolation methods, thin-plate splines (TPS), Shepard's method, a smoothed weighting function, and a simple averaging, were evaluated. The reconstruction quality was measured on phantom data, a porcine model as well as on in vivo clinical data sets. As a quality index, the 2D overlap of the forward projected motion compensated reconstructed ventricle and the segmented 2D ventricle blood pool was quantitatively measured with the Dice similarity coefficient and the mean deviation between extracted ventricle contours. For the phantom data set, the normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) and the universal quality index (UQI) were also evaluated in 3D image space. Results: The quantitative evaluation of all

  10. Gain-compensated sinusoidal scanning of a galvanometer mirror in proportional-integral-differential control using the pre-emphasis technique for motion-blur compensation.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Takanoshin; Senoo, Taku; Ishikawa, Masatoshi

    2016-07-20

    We propose a method to achieve precise sine-wave path tracking for real-time motion-blur compensation to extend the corresponding frequency spectrum in proportional-integral-differential (PID) control by using a pre-emphasis technique. We calculate pre-emphasis coefficients in advance to follow a sine wave with a gain of 0 dB and multiply the input signal by these pre-emphasis coefficients. In experiments, we were thus able to extend the greatest frequency from 100 to 500 Hz and achieve gain improvement of approximately 3 dB at 400 and 500 Hz. For the application of inspection, we confirmed that motion blur is significantly reduced when the system operates at high frequency, and we achieved a responsiveness 3.3 times higher than that of our previous system. PMID:27463919

  11. Compensating for Tumor Motion by a 6-Degree-of-Freedom Treatment Couch: Is Patient Tolerance an Issue?

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Reinhart A. Arnold, Winfried; Steixner, Eva; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Lukas, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients could tolerate the motion of a robotic couch that compensates for breathing-induced tumor motion. Methods and Materials: A total of 10 healthy subjects and 23 radio-oncology patients underwent simulated extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (two 30-min sessions) on a robotic couch programmed to follow a fictitious tumor trajectory of 20x5x5 mm (cranio-caudal, left-right, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively) while rotating 2 deg. around a cranio-caudal axis at a frequency of 5 seconds per loop. Results: No session had to be interrupted and no nausea was induced. However, one patient refused the second session due to general deterioration and not all patients could keep their arms elevated for the entire session. Conclusions: Our findings showed that most patients tolerated compensatory couch motion and that motion sickness should not pose a problem in the investigation of this tumor-tracking method.

  12. Tracking 'differential organ motion' with a 'breathing' multileaf collimator: magnitude of problem assessed using 4D CT data and a motion-compensation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, J. R.; Webb, S.; McQuaid, D.; Binnie, D. M.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2007-08-01

    Intrafraction tumour (e.g. lung) motion due to breathing can, in principle, be compensated for by applying identical breathing motions to the leaves of a multileaf collimator (MLC) as intensity-modulated radiation therapy is delivered by the dynamic MLC (DMLC) technique. A difficulty arising, however, is that irradiated voxels, which are in line with a bixel at one breathing phase (at which the treatment plan has been made), may move such that they cease to be in line with that breathing bixel at another phase. This is the phenomenon of differential voxel motion and existing tracking solutions have ignored this very real problem. There is absolutely no tracking solution to the problem of compensating for differential voxel motion. However, there is a strategy that can be applied in which the leaf breathing is determined to minimize the geometrical mismatch in a least-squares sense in irradiating differentially-moving voxels. A 1D formulation in very restricted circumstances is already in the literature and has been applied to some model breathing situations which can be studied analytically. These are, however, highly artificial. This paper presents the general 2D formulation of the problem including allowing different importance factors to be applied to planning target volume and organ at risk (or most generally) each voxel. The strategy also extends the literature strategy to the situation where the number of voxels connecting to a bixel is a variable. Additionally the phenomenon of 'cross-leaf-track/channel' voxel motion is formally addressed. The general equations are presented and analytic results are given for some 1D, artificially contrived, motions based on the Lujan equations of breathing motion. Further to this, 3D clinical voxel motion data have been extracted from 4D CT measurements to both assess the magnitude of the problem of 2D motion perpendicular to the beam-delivery axis in clinical practice and also to find the 2D optimum breathing-leaf strategy

  13. Evaluating the utility of 3D TRUS image information in guiding intra-procedure registration for motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, Tharindu; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    In targeted 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy, patient and prostate movement during the procedure can cause target misalignments that hinder accurate sampling of pre-planned suspicious tissue locations. Multiple solutions have been proposed for motion compensation via registration of intra-procedural TRUS images to a baseline 3D TRUS image acquired at the beginning of the biopsy procedure. While 2D TRUS images are widely used for intra-procedural guidance, some solutions utilize richer intra-procedural images such as bi- or multi-planar TRUS or 3D TRUS, acquired by specialized probes. In this work, we measured the impact of such richer intra-procedural imaging on motion compensation accuracy, to evaluate the tradeoff between cost and complexity of intra-procedural imaging versus improved motion compensation. We acquired baseline and intra-procedural 3D TRUS images from 29 patients at standard sextant-template biopsy locations. We used the planes extracted from the 3D intra-procedural scans to simulate 2D and 3D information available in different clinically relevant scenarios for registration. The registration accuracy was evaluated by calculating the target registration error (TRE) using manually identified homologous fiducial markers (micro-calcifications). Our results indicate that TRE improves gradually when the number of intra-procedural imaging planes used in registration is increased. Full 3D TRUS information helps the registration algorithm to robustly converge to more accurate solutions. These results can also inform the design of a fail-safe workflow during motion compensation in a system using a tracked 2D TRUS probe, by prescribing rotational acquisitions that can be performed quickly and easily by the physician immediately prior to needle targeting.

  14. Image motion compensation by area correlation and centroid tracking of solar surface features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, M. E.; Mcintosh, W. R.; Cumings, N. P.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental solar correlation tracker was tested and evaluated on a ground-based solar magnetograph. Using sunspots as fixed targets, tracking error signals were derived by which the telescope image was stabilized against wind induced perturbations. Two methods of stabilization were investigated; mechanical stabilization of the image by controlled two-axes motion of an active optical element in the telescope beam, and electronic stabilization by biasing of the electron scan in the recording camera. Both approaches have demonstrated telescope stability of about 0.6 arc sec under random perturbations which can cause the unstabilized image to move up to 120 arc sec at frequencies up to 30 Hz.

  15. Sensor Saturation Compensated Smoothing Algorithm for Inertial Sensor Based Motion Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Quoc Khanh; Suh, Young Soo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a smoothing algorithm for compensating inertial sensor saturation is proposed. The sensor saturation happens when a sensor measures a value that is larger than its dynamic range. This can lead to a considerable accumulated error. To compensate the lost information in saturated sensor data, we propose a smoothing algorithm in which the saturation compensation is formulated as an optimization problem. Based on a standard smoothing algorithm with zero velocity intervals, two saturation estimation methods were proposed. Simulation and experiments prove that the proposed methods are effective in compensating the sensor saturation. PMID:24806740

  16. Compensation of Wave-Induced Motion and Force Phenomena for Ship-Based High Performance Robotic and Human Amplifying Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Love, LJL

    2003-09-24

    Learning Controller has little impact due to the variable nature of the wave period. We then introduce a new approach to HAT control, Ship Motion Compensation for Force Control Systems (SMCFCS). This basic approach uses inclinometer and acceleration information from the base of the robot to compensate for ship motion disturbances. Results of the simulation study show over an order of magnitude decrease in the disturbance force reflected back to the operator and an order of magnitude increase in positioning accuracy and resolution.

  17. Adaptive robust motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders with LuGre model-based friction compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Deyuan; Tao, Guoliang; Liu, Hao; Zhu, Xiaocong

    2014-07-01

    Friction compensation is particularly important for motion trajectory tracking control of pneumatic cylinders at low speed movement. However, most of the existing model-based friction compensation schemes use simple classical models, which are not enough to address applications with high-accuracy position requirements. Furthermore, the friction force in the cylinder is time-varying, and there exist rather severe unmodelled dynamics and unknown disturbances in the pneumatic system. To deal with these problems effectively, an adaptive robust controller with LuGre model-based dynamic friction compensation is constructed. The proposed controller employs on-line recursive least squares estimation (RLSE) to reduce the extent of parametric uncertainties, and utilizes the sliding mode control method to attenuate the effects of parameter estimation errors, unmodelled dynamics and disturbances. In addition, in order to realize LuGre model-based friction compensation, the modified dual-observer structure for estimating immeasurable friction internal state is developed. Therefore, a prescribed motion tracking transient performance and final tracking accuracy can be guaranteed. Since the system model uncertainties are unmatched, the recursive backstepping design technology is applied. In order to solve the conflicts between the sliding mode control design and the adaptive control design, the projection mapping is used to condition the RLSE algorithm so that the parameter estimates are kept within a known bounded convex set. Finally, the proposed controller is tested for tracking sinusoidal trajectories and smooth square trajectory under different loads and sudden disturbance. The testing results demonstrate that the achievable performance of the proposed controller is excellent and is much better than most other studies in literature. Especially when a 0.5 Hz sinusoidal trajectory is tracked, the maximum tracking error is 0.96 mm and the average tracking error is 0.45 mm. This

  18. Proper Motion Of Emerging Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lirong

    2009-05-01

    Observational and modeling results indicate that typically the leading magnetic field of bipolar active regions is often spatially more compact, while more dispersed and fragmented in following polarity. Tian & Alexander (2009, ApJ, 695) studied 15 emerging active regions and find that magnetic helicity flux injected into the corona by the leading polarity is generally several times larger than that injected by the following polarity. They argue that the asymmetry of the magnetic helicity should be responsible for the asymmetry of the magnetic morphology. This argument is supported by two resent model results that magnetic flux tubes with higher degree of twist (and therefor greater magnetic tension) have higher rates of emergence (Murray & Hood 2008, A&A, 479; Cheung et al. 2008, ApJ, 687). These results are consistent because the proper motion (related to the emergence) of the leading polarity was found to be faster than that of the following polarity (van Driel-Gesztelyi & Petrovay 1990, Solar Phys., 126). In this paper, we will reinvestigate the proper motion of leading and following polarities of the emerging active regions, and study possible relationship between the proper motion and magnetic helicity.

  19. Motion compensation method using dynamic programming for quantification of neovascularization in carotid atherosclerotic plaques with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkus, Zeynettin; Hoogi, Assaf; Renaud, Guillaume; ten Kate, Gerrit L.; van den Oord, Stijn C. H.; Schinkel, Arend F. L.; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2012-03-01

    Intraplaque neovascularization (IPN) has been linked with progressive atherosclerotic disease and plaque instability in several studies. Quantification of IPN may allow early detection of vulnerable plaques. A dedicated motion compensation method with normalized-cross-correlation (NCC) block matching combined with multidimensional (2D+time) dynamic programming (MDP) was developed for quantification of IPN in small plaques (<30% diameter stenosis). The method was compared to NCC block matching without MDP (forward tracking (FT)) and showed to improve motion tracking. Side-by-side CEUS and B-mode ultrasound images of carotid arteries were acquired by a Philips iU22 system with a L9-3 linear array probe. The motion pattern for the plaque region was obtained from the Bmode images with MDP. MDP results were evaluated in-vitro by a phantom and in-vivo by comparing to manual tracking of three experts for multibeat-image-sequences (MIS) of 11 plaques. In the in-vivo images, the absolute error was 72+/-55μm (mean+/-SD) for X (longitudinal) and 34+/-23μm for Y (radial). The method's success rate was visually assessed on 67 MIS. The tracking was considered failed if it deviated >2 pixels (~200μm) from true motion in any frame. Tracking was scored as fully successful in 63 MIS (94%) for MDP vs. 52(78%) for FT. The range of displacement over these 63 was 1045+/-471μm (X) and 395+/-216μm (Y). The tracking sporadically failed in 4 MIS (6%) due to poor image quality, jugular vein proximity and out-of-plane motion. Motion compensation showed improved lumen-plaque contrast separation. In conclusion, the proposed method is sufficiently accurate and successful for in vivo application.

  20. Inferential modeling and predictive feedback control in real-time motion compensation using the treatment couch during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peng; D'Souza, Warren D; McAvoy, Thomas J; Ray Liu, K J

    2007-10-01

    Tumor motion induced by respiration presents a challenge to the reliable delivery of conformal radiation treatments. Real-time motion compensation represents the technologically most challenging clinical solution but has the potential to overcome the limitations of existing methods. The performance of a real-time couch-based motion compensation system is mainly dependent on two aspects: the ability to infer the internal anatomical position and the performance of the feedback control system. In this paper, we propose two novel methods for the two aspects respectively, and then combine the proposed methods into one system. To accurately estimate the internal tumor position, we present partial-least squares (PLS) regression to predict the position of the diaphragm using skin-based motion surrogates. Four radio-opaque markers were placed on the abdomen of patients who underwent fluoroscopic imaging of the diaphragm. The coordinates of the markers served as input variables and the position of the diaphragm served as the output variable. PLS resulted in lower prediction errors compared with standard multiple linear regression (MLR). The performance of the feedback control system depends on the system dynamics and dead time (delay between the initiation and execution of the control action). While the dynamics of the system can be inverted in a feedback control system, the dead time cannot be inverted. To overcome the dead time of the system, we propose a predictive feedback control system by incorporating forward prediction using least-mean-square (LMS) and recursive least square (RLS) filtering into the couch-based control system. Motion data were obtained using a skin-based marker. The proposed predictive feedback control system was benchmarked against pure feedback control (no forward prediction) and resulted in a significant performance gain. Finally, we combined the PLS inference model and the predictive feedback control to evaluate the overall performance of the

  1. Extreme fluctuations of active Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Kleinbeck, Kevin; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    In active Brownian motion, an internal propulsion mechanism interacts with translational and rotational thermal noise and other internal fluctuations to produce directed motion. We derive the distribution of its extreme fluctuations and identify its universal properties using large deviation theory. The limits of slow and fast internal dynamics give rise to a kink-like and parabolic behavior of the corresponding rate functions, respectively. For dipolar Janus particles in two- and three-dimensions interacting with a field, we predict a novel symmetry akin to, but different from, the one related to entropy production. Measurements of these extreme fluctuations could thus be used to infer properties of the underlying, often hidden, network of states.

  2. Compensation for thermally induced birefringence in polycrystalline ceramic active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M A; Khazanov, E A

    2003-10-31

    Polycrystalline ceramics differ significantly from single crystals in that the crystallographic axes (and hence of the axes of thermally induced birefringence) are oriented randomly in each granule of the ceramic. The quaternion formalism is employed to calculate the depolarisation in the ceramics and the efficiency of its compensation. The obtained analytic expressions are in good agreement with the numerical relations. It is shown that the larger the ratio of the sample length to the granule size, the closer the properties of the ceramics to those of a single crystal with the [111] orientation (in particular, the uncompensated depolarisation is inversely proportional to this ratio). (active media)

  3. 75 FR 15495 - Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP)) Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP)) Activities... (CPEP).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP)...

  4. 78 FR 6848 - Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program) Activities Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program) Activities Under OMB....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

  5. Marker-less multi-frame motion tracking and compensation in PET-brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, C.; Mukherjee, J. M.; Johnson, K.; Olivier, P.; Song, X.; Shao, L.; King, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    In PET brain imaging, patient motion can contribute significantly to the degradation of image quality potentially leading to diagnostic and therapeutic problems. To mitigate the image artifacts resulting from patient motion, motion must be detected and tracked then provided to a motion correction algorithm. Existing techniques to track patient motion fall into one of two categories: 1) image-derived approaches and 2) external motion tracking (EMT). Typical EMT requires patients to have markers in a known pattern on a rigid too attached to their head, which are then tracked by expensive and bulky motion tracking camera systems or stereo cameras. This has made marker-based EMT unattractive for routine clinical application. Our main contributions are the development of a marker-less motion tracking system that uses lowcost, small depth-sensing cameras which can be installed in the bore of the imaging system. Our motion tracking system does not require anything to be attached to the patient and can track the rigid transformation (6-degrees of freedom) of the patient's head at a rate 60 Hz. We show that our method can not only be used in with Multi-frame Acquisition (MAF) PET motion correction, but precise timing can be employed to determine only the necessary frames needed for correction. This can speeds up reconstruction by eliminating the unnecessary subdivision of frames.

  6. Respiratory Motion-Compensated Radial Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced (DCE)-MRI of Chest and Abdominal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Guo, Junyu; Rosen, Mark A.; Song, Hee Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI is becoming an increasingly important tool for evaluating tumor vascularity and assessing the effectiveness of emerging antiangiogenic and antivascular agents. In chest and abdominal regions, however, respiratory motion can seriously degrade the achievable image quality in DCE-MRI studies. The purpose of this work is to develop a respiratory motion-compensated DCE-MRI technique that combines the self-gating properties of radial imaging with the reconstruction flexibility afforded by the golden-angle view-order strategy. Following radial data acquisition, the signal at k-space center is first used to determine the respiratory cycle, and consecutive views during the expiratory phase of each respiratory period (34–55 views, depending on the breathing rate) are grouped into individual segments. Residual intra-segment translation of lesion is subsequently compensated for by an autofocusing technique that optimizes image entropy, while intersegment translation (among different respiratory cycles) is corrected using 3D image correlation. The resulting motion-compensated, undersampled dynamic image series is then processed to reduce image streaking and to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) prior to perfusion analysis, using either the k-space-weighted image contrast (KWIC) radial filtering technique or principal component analysis (PCA). The proposed data acquisition scheme also allows for high framerate arterial input function (AIF) sampling and free-breathing baseline T1 mapping. The performance of the proposed radial DCE-MRI technique is evaluated in subjects with lung and liver lesions, and results demonstrate that excellent pixelwise perfusion maps can be obtained with the proposed methodology. PMID:18956465

  7. Nonrigid PET motion compensation in the lower abdomen using simultaneous tagged-MRI and PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, B.; Cho, S.; Chun, S. Y.; Zhu, X.; Alpert, N. M.; El Fakhri, G.; Reese, T.; Catana, C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We propose a novel approach for PET respiratory motion correction using tagged-MRI and simultaneous PET-MRI acquisitions.Methods: We use a tagged-MRI acquisition followed by motion tracking in the phase domain to estimate the nonrigid deformation of biological tissues during breathing. In order to accurately estimate motion even in the presence of noise and susceptibility artifacts, we regularize the traditional HARP tracking strategy using a quadratic roughness penalty on neighboring displacement vectors (R-HARP). We then incorporate the motion fields estimated with R-HARP in the system matrix of an MLEM PET reconstruction algorithm formulated both for sinogram and list-mode data representations. This approach allows reconstruction of all detected coincidences in a single image while modeling the effect of motion both in the emission and the attenuation maps. At present, tagged-MRI does not allow estimation of motion in the lungs and our approach is therefore limited to motion correction in soft tissues. Since it is difficult to assess the accuracy of motion correction approaches in vivo, we evaluated the proposed approach in numerical simulations of simultaneous PET-MRI acquisitions using the NCAT phantom. We also assessed its practical feasibility in PET-MRI acquisitions of a small deformable phantom that mimics the complex deformation pattern of a lung that we imaged on a combined PET-MRI brain scanner.Results: Simulations showed that the R-HARP tracking strategy accurately estimated realistic respiratory motion fields for different levels of noise in the tagged-MRI simulation. In simulations of tumors exhibiting increased uptake, contrast estimation was 20% more accurate with motion correction than without. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was more than 100% greater when performing motion-corrected reconstruction which included all counts, compared to when reconstructing only coincidences detected in the first of eight gated frames. These results were

  8. Active Heave-Compensated Coring On The New Jersey Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, D. L.; Pardey, M.; Austin, J. A.; Goff, J. A.; Alexander, C.; Christensen, B. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Fulthorpe, C. S.; Nordfjord, S.; Sommerfield, C.; Venherm, C.

    2003-12-01

    The continental shelves are of obvious scientific and strategic importance. However, the ability to cost-effectively collect core samples of continental shelf sediments has been limited by technical difficulties. Many sites of scientific interest are too shallow to be drilled by large drill ships, and they are too deep to be drilled economically from jack-up platforms. DOSECC has developed an Active Heave Compensated (AHC800) drilling system under sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research to overcome these obstacles by building a small active heave compensated drilling rig that can be used to collect high-quality core from selected vessels of opportunity. The AHC800 drilling rig is designed to collect continuous core to a total drill string length of 800 m. Water depths of 200 m and less are optimal; however, with some modification operation in deeper water is possible. The AHC800 senses vessel heave using a constantly tensioned low-stretch taut line attached to a seafloor weight. A linear position transducer is attached to this taut line and through the data acquisition system, the ship's distance from the bottom is communicated to the heave compensation computer running Labview RT operating system and object-based software language. This real-time control system is used to achieve a 10-ms control loop for both data gathering and output functions. The Labview RT system continuously controls two hydraulic cylinders that keep the heave carriage and the drill string at the same reference distance from the bottom. The AHC800 system was used on the R/V Knorr on the New Jersey continental shelf in water depths from 74 to 130 m from 25 Sep to 15 Oct 2002. The AHC800 system performed up to and beyond its design specifications. The rig was designed to compensate for 2.44 m of heave with an 8 s period. However, the Knorr's response was a 6 s period resulting in a significant increase in the required acceleration as well as a faster response time for the system as a whole

  9. 77 FR 56710 - Proposed Information Collection (Veteran's Application for Compensation and/or Pension) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veteran's Application for Compensation and/or Pension) Activity..., for compensation and/or pension benefit sought. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... Compensation and/or Pension, VA Form 21-526. b. Veteran's Supplemental Claim Application, VA Form 21-526b....

  10. Use of Three-Dimensional Gaussian Interpolation in the Projector/Backprojector Pair of Iterative Reconstruction for Compensation of Known Rigid-Body Motion in SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bing; Gifford, Howard C.; Beach, Richard D.; Boening, Guido; Gennert, Michael A.; King, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the extended imaging times employed in SPECT and PET, patient motion during imaging is a common clinical occurrence. The fast and accurate correction of the three-dimensional (3D) translational and rotational patient motion in iterative reconstruction is thus necessary to address this important cause of artifacts. We propose a method of incorporating 3D Gaussian interpolation in the projector/backprojector pair to facilitate compensation for rigid-body motion in addition to attenuation and distance-dependent blurring. The method works as the interpolation step for moving the current emission voxel estimates and attenuation maps in the global coordinate system to the new patient location in the rotating coordinate system when calculating the expected projection. It also is employed for moving back the backprojection of the ratio of the measured projection to the expected projection and backprojection of the unit value (sensitivity factor) to the original location. MCAT simulations with known six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) motion were employed to evaluate the accuracy of our method of motion compensation. We also tested the method with acquisitions of the Data Spectrum Anthropomorphic phantom where motion during SPECT acquisition was measured using the Polaris IR motion tracking system. No motion artifacts were seen on the reconstructions with the motion compensation. PMID:16827485

  11. Brightness-compensated 3-D optical flow algorithm for monitoring cochlear motion patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Tiedemann, Miriam; Fridberger, Anders; Ulfendahl, Mats; de Monvel, Jacques Boutet

    2010-09-01

    A method for three-dimensional motion analysis designed for live cell imaging by fluorescence confocal microscopy is described. The approach is based on optical flow computation and takes into account brightness variations in the image scene that are not due to motion, such as photobleaching or fluorescence variations that may reflect changes in cellular physiology. The 3-D optical flow algorithm allowed almost perfect motion estimation on noise-free artificial sequences, and performed with a relative error of <10% on noisy images typical of real experiments. The method was applied to a series of 3-D confocal image stacks from an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig cochlea. The complex motions caused by slow pressure changes in the cochlear compartments were quantified. At the surface of the hearing organ, the largest motion component was the transverse one (normal to the surface), but significant radial and longitudinal displacements were also present. The outer hair cell displayed larger radial motion at their basolateral membrane than at their apical surface. These movements reflect mechanical interactions between different cellular structures, which may be important for communicating sound-evoked vibrations to the sensory cells. A better understanding of these interactions is important for testing realistic models of cochlear mechanics.

  12. Perceived causality influences brain activity evoked by biological motion.

    PubMed

    Morris, James P; Pelphrey, Kevin A; McCarthy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated brain activity in an observer who watched the hand and arm motions of an individual when that individual was, or was not, the cause of the motion. Subjects viewed a realistic animated 3D character who sat at a table containing four pistons. On Intended Motion trials, the character raised his hand and arm upwards. On Unintended Motion trials, the piston under one of the character's hands pushed the hand and arm upward with the same motion. Finally, during Non-Biological Motion control trials, a piston pushed a coffee mug upward in the same smooth motion. Hand and arm motions, regardless of intention, evoked significantly more activity than control trials in a bilateral region that extended ventrally from the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) region and which was more spatially extensive in the right hemisphere. The left pSTS near the temporal-parietal junction, robustly differentiated between the Intended Motion and Unintended Motion conditions. Here, strong activity was observed for Intended Motion trials, while Unintended Motion trials evoked similar activity as the coffee mug trials. Our results demonstrate a strong hemispheric bias in the role of the pSTS in the perception of causality of biological motion. PMID:18633843

  13. Fast tool servo system for online compensation of error motion on an ultraprecision lathe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Sun, Tao

    2009-05-01

    In order to obtain high accuracy and a fine surface finish of large area workpiece, position control of machine tool has become the main concern to achieve high precision position control. In this system, diamond turning with a fast tool servo (FTS) driven by a piezoelectric actuator along with a capacitive displacement sensor was chosen as the fabrication method. A laser interferometer is implemented to measure the straightness error of the translational slide accurately. The detected error signals are compensated by the FTS during the cutting process. To achieve better tracking performance, proportional integral (PI) feed back control with a feed-forward predictor is implemented. Experimental results show that the FTS can effectively and successfully compensate the straightness errors of the X-axis translational slide of the miniature ultra-precision lathe.

  14. Dosimetric impact of intrafraction motion for compensator-based proton therapy of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li; Sandison, George A.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Chien Hsi, Wen; Li, X. Allen

    2008-06-01

    Compensator-based proton therapy of lung cancer using an un-gated treatment while allowing the patient to breathe freely requires a compensator design that ensures tumor coverage throughout respiration. Our investigation had two purposes: one is to investigate the dosimetric impact when a composite compensator correction is applied, or is not, and the other one is to evaluate the significance of using different respiratory phases as the reference computed tomography (CT) for treatment planning dose calculations. A 4D-CT-based phantom study and a real patient treatment planning study were performed. A 3D MIP dataset generated over all phases of the acquired 4D-CT scans was adopted to design the field-specific composite aperture and compensator. In the phantom study, the MIP-based compensator design plan named plan D was compared to the other three plans, in which average intensity projection (AIP) images in conjunction with the composite target volume contour copied from the MIP images were used. Relative electron densities within the target envelope were assigned either to original values from the AIP image dataset (plan A) or to predetermined values, 0.8 (plan B) and 0.9 (plan C). In the patient study, the dosimetric impact of a compensator design based on the MIP images (plan ITVMIP) was compared to designs based on end-of-inhale (EOI) (plan ITVEOI) and middle-of-exhale (MOE) CT images (plan ITVMOE). The dose distributions were recalculated for each phase. Throughout the ten phases, it shows that DGTVmin changed slightly from 86% to 89% (SD = 0.9%) of prescribed dose (PD) in the MIP plan, while varying greatly from 10% to 79% (SD = 26.7%) in plan A, 17% to 73% (SD = 22.5%) in plan B and 53% to 73% (SD = 6.8%) in plan C. The same trend was observed for DGTVmean and V95 with less amplitude. In the MIP-based plan ITVMIP, DGTVmean was almost identically equal to 95% in each phase (SD = 0.5%). The patient study verified that the MIP approach increased the minimum

  15. Image-domain motion compensated time resolved 4D cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Sun, Zhihui; Segars, W. Paul; Fishman, Elliot K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2007-03-01

    Two major problems with the current electrocardiogram-gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging technique are a large patient radiation dose (10-15 mSv) and insufficient temporal resolution (83-165 ms). Our long-term goal is to develop new time resolved and low dose cardiac CT imaging techniques that consist of image reconstruction algorithms and estimation methods of the time-dependent motion vector field (MVF) of the heart from the acquired CT data. Toward this goal, we developed a method that estimates the 2D components of the MVF from a sequence of cardiac CT images and used it to "reconstruct" cardiac images at rapidly moving phases. First, two sharp image frames per heart beat (cycle) obtained at slow motion phases (i.e., mid-diastole and end-systole) were chosen. Nodes were coarsely placed among images; and the temporal motion of each node was modeled by B-splines. Our cost function consisted of 3 terms: mean-squared-error with the block-matching, and smoothness constraints in space and time. The time-dependent MVF was estimated by minimizing the cost function. We then warped images at slow motion phases using the estimated vector fields to "reconstruct" images at rapidly moving phase. The warping algorithm was evaluated using true time-dependent motion vector fields and images both provided by the NCAT phantom program. Preliminary results from ongoing quantitative and qualitative evaluation using the 4D NCAT phantom and patient data are encouraging. Major motion artifact is much reduced. We conclude the new image-based motion estimation technique is an important step toward the development of the new cardiac CT imaging techniques.

  16. From Cannibalism to Active Motion of Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2008-03-01

    The detailed mechanisms leading to collective dynamics in groups of animals and insect are still poorly understood. A recent study by Simpson et. al. suggests cannibalism as a driving mechanism for coordinated migration of mormon crickets [1]. Based on this result we propose a simple generic model of brownian particles interacting by asymmetric, non-conservative collisions accounting for cannibalistic behavior and the corresponding avoidance strategy. We discuss our model in one and two dimensions and show that a certain type of collisions drives the system out of equilibrium and leads to coordinated active motion of groups.[1] Stephen J. Simpson, Gregory A. Sword, Patrick D. Lorch and Iain D. Couzin: Cannibal crickets on a forced march for protein and salt, PNAS, 103:4152-4156, 2006

  17. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Compensation during Gait using Hamstring Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catalfamo, Paola Formento; Aguiar, Gerardo; Curi, Jorge; Braidot, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has shown that an increase in hamstring activation may compensate for anterior tibial transalation (ATT) in patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee (ACLd); however, the effects of this compensation still remain unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify the activation of the hamstring muscles needed to compensate the ATT in ACLd knee during the complete gait cycle and to evaluate the effect of this compensation on quadriceps activation and joint contact forces. A two dimensional model of the knee was used, which included the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints, knee ligaments, the medial capsule and two muscles units. Simulations were conducted to determine the ATT in healthy and ACLd knee and the hamstring activation needed to correct the abnormal ATT to normal levels (100% compensation) and to 50% compensation. Then, the quadriceps activation and the joint contact forces were calculated. Results showed that 100% compensation would require hamstring and quadriceps activations larger than their maximum isometric force, and would generate an increment in the peak contact force at the tibiofemoral (115%) and patellofemoral (48%) joint with respect to the healthy knee. On the other hand, 50% compensation would require less force generated by the muscles (less than 0.85 of maximum isometric force) and smaller contact forces (peak tibiofemoral contact force increased 23% and peak patellofemoral contact force decreased 7.5% with respect to the healthy knee). Total compensation of ATT by means of increased hamstring activity is possible; however, partial compensation represents a less deleterious strategy. PMID:20721326

  18. A Newly Developed Long-Stroke Vertical Nano-Motion Platform with Gravity Compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Motohiro; Yoshioka, Hayato; Shinno, Hidenori

    Demands for three-dimensional nano-positioning are increasing in a wide range of industries. In order to meet such demands, it is necessary to realize a stable long-stroke vertical nano-motion. In long-stroke vertical motion control, the minimization of gravity load is one of the most important issues. In addition, it is important to minimize error factor from nonlinear phenomenon such as friction, vibration and heat transfer. In general, however, it is difficult to support gravity load of the moving part and to ensure that the vertical motion platform is free from such error factors which may occur during its nano-positioning. In this study, therefore, a novel vertical motion platform with a noncontact counterbalancing mechanism is developed for achieving long-stroke vertical nano-motion. The developed platform is characterized by a noncontact drive with a voice coil motor, by levitation with aerostatic guideways, by a counterbalance with noncontact vacuum cylinders, by an overall structure made of ceramics and by a symmetrical structural configuration. The positioning performance of the developed platform is evaluated through a series of vertical positioning experiments. The experimental results demonstrate that the developed platform has a superior positioning performance.

  19. Spontaneous motion in hierarchically assembled active matter

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Tim; Chen, Daniel T. N.; DeCamp, Stephen J.; Heymann, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-01-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication1. Besides their biological importance, such inherently non-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for developing biomimetic active materials from microscopic components that consume energy to generate continuous motion2–4. Being actively driven, these materials are not constrained by the laws of equilibrium statistical mechanics and can thus exhibit highly sought-after properties such as autonomous motility, internally generated flows and self-organized beating5–7. Starting from extensile microtubule bundles, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of conventional polymer gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubules form a percolating active network characterized by internally driven chaotic flows, hydrodynamic instabilities, enhanced transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, 3D networks spontaneously adsorb onto the droplet surfaces to produce highly active 2D nematic liquid crystals whose streaming flows are controlled by internally generated fractures and self-healing, as well as unbinding and annihilation of oppositely charged disclination defects. The resulting active emulsions exhibit unexpected properties, such as autonomous motility, which are not observed in their passive analogues. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblages of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are starkly different from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks, challenging us to develop a theoretical framework that would allow for a systematic engineering of their far-from-equilibrium material properties. PMID:23135402

  20. Relative role of motion and PSF compensation in whole-body oncologic PET-MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Petibon, Yoann; Syrkina, Aleksandra; Huang, Chuan; Ouyang, Jinsong; Li, Quanzheng; El Fakhri, Georges; Reese, Timothy G.; Chen, Yen-Lin

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion and partial-volume effects are the two main sources of image degradation in whole-body PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR allows measurement of respiratory motion using MRI while collecting PET events. Improved PET images may be obtained by modeling respiratory motion and point spread function (PSF) within the PET iterative reconstruction process. In this study, the authors assessed the relative impact of PSF modeling and MR-based respiratory motion correction in phantoms and patient studies using a whole-body PET-MR scanner. Methods: An asymmetric exponential PSF model accounting for radially varying and axial detector blurring effects was obtained from point source acquisitions performed in the PET-MR scanner. A dedicated MRI acquisition protocol using single-slice steady state free-precession MR acquisitions interleaved with pencil-beam navigator echoes was developed to track respiratory motion during PET-MR studies. An iterative ordinary Poisson fully 3D OSEM PET reconstruction algorithm modeling all the physical effects of the acquisition (attenuation, scatters, random events, detectors efficiencies, PSF), as well as MR-based nonrigid respiratory deformations of tissues (in both emission and attenuation maps) was developed. Phantom and{sup 18}F-FDG PET-MR patient studies were performed to evaluate the proposed quantitative PET-MR methods. Results: The phantom experiment results showed that PSF modeling significantly improved contrast recovery while limiting noise propagation in the reconstruction process. In patients with soft-tissue static lesions, PSF modeling improved lesion contrast by 19.7%–109%, enhancing the detectability and assessment of small tumor foci. In a patient study with small moving hepatic lesions, the proposed reconstruction technique improved lesion contrast by 54.4%–98.1% and reduced apparent lesion size by 21.8%–34.2%. Improvements were particularly important for the smallest lesion undergoing large motion

  1. Relative role of motion and PSF compensation in whole-body oncologic PET-MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Ouyang, Jinsong; Reese, Timothy G.; Li, Quanzheng; Syrkina, Aleksandra; Chen, Yen-Lin; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion and partial-volume effects are the two main sources of image degradation in whole-body PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR allows measurement of respiratory motion using MRI while collecting PET events. Improved PET images may be obtained by modeling respiratory motion and point spread function (PSF) within the PET iterative reconstruction process. In this study, the authors assessed the relative impact of PSF modeling and MR-based respiratory motion correction in phantoms and patient studies using a whole-body PET-MR scanner. Methods: An asymmetric exponential PSF model accounting for radially varying and axial detector blurring effects was obtained from point source acquisitions performed in the PET-MR scanner. A dedicated MRI acquisition protocol using single-slice steady state free-precession MR acquisitions interleaved with pencil-beam navigator echoes was developed to track respiratory motion during PET-MR studies. An iterative ordinary Poisson fully 3D OSEM PET reconstruction algorithm modeling all the physical effects of the acquisition (attenuation, scatters, random events, detectors efficiencies, PSF), as well as MR-based nonrigid respiratory deformations of tissues (in both emission and attenuation maps) was developed. Phantom and 18F-FDG PET-MR patient studies were performed to evaluate the proposed quantitative PET-MR methods. Results: The phantom experiment results showed that PSF modeling significantly improved contrast recovery while limiting noise propagation in the reconstruction process. In patients with soft-tissue static lesions, PSF modeling improved lesion contrast by 19.7%–109%, enhancing the detectability and assessment of small tumor foci. In a patient study with small moving hepatic lesions, the proposed reconstruction technique improved lesion contrast by 54.4%–98.1% and reduced apparent lesion size by 21.8%–34.2%. Improvements were particularly important for the smallest lesion undergoing large motion at

  2. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ted

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that…

  3. Control of transient vibrations due to stage movements in 6-dof active pneumatic table by inertial force compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jong-Oh; Kim, Kwang-joon

    2013-10-01

    Passive pneumatic tables are popularly used in precision measurements or processes for isolation of ground vibrations over frequency ranges higher than resonance frequencies of a few Hz typically. Recently, active pneumatic tables are also used often because the passive systems are liable to table excitations in the low resonance frequency ranges, causing long settling times. In studies on the active tables, disturbances onto the tables were often regarded to be unknown and, hence, feedback control algorithms were implemented. However, the disturbances are mostly due to inertial forces due to movement of equipment on the table, e.g., x-y stages. Such a movement is given relative to the table as command inputs. Since absolute motion of the table is normally measured in an active isolation table, absolute motion of the equipment can be easily estimated for calculation of the inertial force exerted onto the table by the moving equipment. Consequently, by compensating dynamic pressure inside the pneumatic chamber to counteract with the inertia force due to the equipment motion, resultant forces acting onto the table can be made zero. In this paper, how to apply the proposed feed-forward control algorithm to a 6-degree of freedom active pneumatic table with time-delay pneumatic control is presented. Performance of the inertial force compensation control evaluated through experiments is also discussed.

  4. Spatial and Temporal Control of Hyperthermia Using Real Time Ultrasonic Thermal Strain Imaging with Motion Compensation, Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Foiret, Josquin; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2015-01-01

    Mild hyperthermia has been successfully employed to induce reversible physiological changes that can directly treat cancer and enhance local drug delivery. In this approach, temperature monitoring is essential to avoid undesirable biological effects that result from thermal damage. For thermal therapies, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been employed to control real-time Focused Ultrasound (FUS) therapies. However, combined ultrasound imaging and therapy systems offer the benefits of simple, low-cost devices that can be broadly applied. To facilitate such technology, ultrasound thermometry has potential to reliably monitor temperature. Control of mild hyperthermia was previously achieved using a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller based on thermocouple measurements. Despite accurate temporal control of heating, this method is limited by the single position at which the temperature is measured. Ultrasound thermometry techniques based on exploiting the thermal dependence of acoustic parameters (such as longitudinal velocity) can be extended to create thermal maps and allow an accurate monitoring of temperature with good spatial resolution. However, in vivo applications of this technique have not been fully developed due to the high sensitivity to tissue motion. Here, we propose a motion compensation method based on the acquisition of multiple reference frames prior to treatment. The technique was tested in the presence of 2-D and 3-D physiological-scale motion and was found to provide effective real-time temperature monitoring. PID control of mild hyperthermia in presence of motion was then tested with ultrasound thermometry as feedback and temperature was maintained within 0.3°C of the requested value. PMID:26244783

  5. Spatial and Temporal Control of Hyperthermia Using Real Time Ultrasonic Thermal Strain Imaging with Motion Compensation, Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Foiret, Josquin; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2015-01-01

    Mild hyperthermia has been successfully employed to induce reversible physiological changes that can directly treat cancer and enhance local drug delivery. In this approach, temperature monitoring is essential to avoid undesirable biological effects that result from thermal damage. For thermal therapies, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been employed to control real-time Focused Ultrasound (FUS) therapies. However, combined ultrasound imaging and therapy systems offer the benefits of simple, low-cost devices that can be broadly applied. To facilitate such technology, ultrasound thermometry has potential to reliably monitor temperature. Control of mild hyperthermia was previously achieved using a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller based on thermocouple measurements. Despite accurate temporal control of heating, this method is limited by the single position at which the temperature is measured. Ultrasound thermometry techniques based on exploiting the thermal dependence of acoustic parameters (such as longitudinal velocity) can be extended to create thermal maps and allow an accurate monitoring of temperature with good spatial resolution. However, in vivo applications of this technique have not been fully developed due to the high sensitivity to tissue motion. Here, we propose a motion compensation method based on the acquisition of multiple reference frames prior to treatment. The technique was tested in the presence of 2-D and 3-D physiological-scale motion and was found to provide effective real-time temperature monitoring. PID control of mild hyperthermia in presence of motion was then tested with ultrasound thermometry as feedback and temperature was maintained within 0.3°C of the requested value. PMID:26244783

  6. The Use of Anatomical Information for Molecular Image Reconstruction Algorithms: Attenuation/Scatter Correction, Motion Compensation, and Noise Reduction.

    PubMed

    Chun, Se Young

    2016-03-01

    PET and SPECT are important tools for providing valuable molecular information about patients to clinicians. Advances in nuclear medicine hardware technologies and statistical image reconstruction algorithms enabled significantly improved image quality. Sequentially or simultaneously acquired anatomical images such as CT and MRI from hybrid scanners are also important ingredients for improving the image quality of PET or SPECT further. High-quality anatomical information has been used and investigated for attenuation and scatter corrections, motion compensation, and noise reduction via post-reconstruction filtering and regularization in inverse problems. In this article, we will review works using anatomical information for molecular image reconstruction algorithms for better image quality by describing mathematical models, discussing sources of anatomical information for different cases, and showing some examples. PMID:26941855

  7. Automatic tracking of an organ section with an ultrasound probe: compensation of respiratory motion.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Caroline; Krupa, Alexandre; Gangloff, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    In minimally invasive surgery or needle insertion procedures, the ultrasound imaging can easily and safely be used to visualize the target to reach. However the manual stabilization of the view of this target, which undergoes the physiological motions of the patient, can be a challenge for the surgeon. In this paper, we propose to perform this stabilization with a robotic arm equipped with a 2D ultrasound probe. The six degrees of freedom of the probe are controlled by an image-based approach, where we choose as visual feedback the image intensity. The accuracy of the control law is ensured by the consideration of the periodicity of the physiological motions in a predictive controller. Tracking tasks performed on a realistic abdominal phantom validate the proposed approach and its robustness to deformation is assessed on a gelatin-made deformable phantom. PMID:22003600

  8. Rain detection and removal algorithm using motion-compensated non-local mean filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B. C.; Seo, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposed a novel rain detection and removal algorithm robust against camera motions. It is very difficult to detect and remove rain in video with camera motion. So, most previous works assume that camera is fixed. However, these methods are not useful for application. The proposed algorithm initially detects possible rain streaks by using spatial properties such as luminance and structure of rain streaks. Then, the rain streak candidates are selected based on Gaussian distribution model. Next, a non-rain block matching algorithm is performed between adjacent frames to find similar blocks to each including rain pixels. If the similar blocks to the block are obtained, the rain region of the block is reconstructed by non-local mean (NLM) filtering using the similar neighbors. Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms previous works in terms of objective and subjective visual quality.

  9. Active motion assisted by correlated stochastic torques.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian; Radtke, Paul K; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Hänggi, Peter

    2011-07-01

    The stochastic dynamics of an active particle undergoing a constant speed and additionally driven by an overall fluctuating torque is investigated. The random torque forces are expressed by a stochastic differential equation for the angular dynamics of the particle determining the orientation of motion. In addition to a constant torque, the particle is supplemented by random torques, which are modeled as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with given correlation time τ(c). These nonvanishing correlations cause a persistence of the particles' trajectories and a change of the effective spatial diffusion coefficient. We discuss the mean square displacement as a function of the correlation time and the noise intensity and detect a nonmonotonic dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient with respect to both correlation time and noise strength. A maximal diffusion behavior is obtained if the correlated angular noise straightens the curved trajectories, interrupted by small pirouettes, whereby the correlated noise amplifies a straightening of the curved trajectories caused by the constant torque. PMID:21867138

  10. Heart motion uncertainty compensation prediction method for robot assisted beating heart surgery - Master-slave Kalman Filters approach.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fan; Yu, Yang; Cui, Shigang; Zhao, Li; Wu, Xingli

    2014-05-01

    Robot Assisted Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) allows the heart keep beating in the surgery by actively eliminating the relative motion between point of interest (POI) on the heart surface and surgical tool. The inherited nonlinear and diverse nature of beating heart motion gives a huge obstacle for the robot to meet the demanding tracking control requirements. In this paper, we novelty propose a Master-slave Kalman Filter based on beating heart motion Nonlinear Adaptive Prediction (NAP) algorithm. In the study, we describe the beating heart motion as the combination of nonlinearity relating mathematics part and uncertainty relating non-mathematics part. Specifically, first, we model the nonlinearity of the heart motion via quadratic modulated sinusoids and estimate it by a Master Kalman Filter. Second, we involve the uncertainty heart motion by adaptively change the covariance of the process noise through the slave Kalman Filter. We conduct comparative experiments to evaluate the proposed approach with four distinguished datasets. The results indicate that the new approach reduces prediction errors by at least 30 μm. Moreover, the new approach performs well in robustness test, in which two kinds of arrhythmia datasets from MIT-BIH arrhythmia database are assessed. PMID:24788450

  11. An integrated bioimpedance—ECG gating technique for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation in cardiac PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Fürst, Sebastian; Loher, Simone; Vauhkonen, Marko; Schwaiger, Markus; Hakulinen, Mikko A.

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory motion may degrade image quality in cardiac PET imaging. Since cardiac PET studies often involve cardiac gating by ECG, a separate respiratory monitoring system is required increasing the logistic complexity of the examination, in case respiratory gating is also needed. Thus, we investigated the simultaneous acquisition of both respiratory and cardiac gating signals using II limb lead mimicking electrode configuration during cardiac PET scans of 11 patients. In addition to conventional static and ECG-gated images, bioimpedance technique was utilized to generate respiratory- and dual-gated images. The ability of the bioimpedance technique to monitor intrathoracic respiratory motion was assessed estimating cardiac displacement between end-inspiration and -expiration. The relevance of dual gating was evaluated in left ventricular volume and myocardial wall thickness measurements. An average 7.6  ±  3.3 mm respiratory motion was observed in the study population. Dual gating showed a small but significant increase (4 ml, p = 0.042) in left ventricular myocardial volume compared to plain cardiac gating. In addition, a thinner myocardial wall was observed in dual-gated images (9.3  ±  1.3 mm) compared to cardiac-gated images (11.3  ±  1.3 mm, p = 0.003). This study shows the feasibility of bioimpedance measurements for dual gating in a clinical setting. The method enables simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals using a single device with standard ECG electrodes.

  12. Three-dimensional reconstruction of coronary stents in vivo based on motion compensated X-ray angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Dirk; Movassaghi, Babak; Grass, Michael; Schoonenberg, Gert; Florent, Raoul; Wink, Onno; Klein, Andrew J. P.; Chen, James Y.; Garcia, Joel; Messenger, John C.; Carroll, John D.

    2007-03-01

    The complete expansion of the stent during a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedure is essential for treatment of a stenotic segment of a coronary artery. Inadequate expansion of the stent is a major predisposing factor to in-stent restenosis and acute thrombosis. Stents are positioned and deployed by fluoroscopic guidance. Although the current generation of stents are made of materials with some degree of radio-opacity to detect their location after deployment, proper stent expansion is hard to asses. In this work, we introduce a new method for the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the coronary stents in-vivo utilizing two-dimensional projection images acquired during rotational angiography (RA). The acquisition protocol consist of a propeller rotation of the X-ray C-arm system of 180°, which ensures sufficient angular coverage for volume reconstruction. The angiographic projections were acquired at 30 frames per second resulting in 180 projections during a 7 second rotational run. The motion of the stent is estimated from the automatically tracked 2D coordinates of the markers on the balloon catheter. This information is used within a motion-compensated reconstruction algorithm. Therefore, projections from different cardiac phases and motion states can be used, resulting in improved signal-to-noise ratio of the stent. Results of 3D reconstructed coronary stents in vivo, with high spatial resolution are presented. The proposed method allows for a comprehensive and unique quantitative 3D assessment of stent expansion that rivals current X-ray and intravascular ultrasound techniques.

  13. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Ted

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that students who participated in these activities performed better on examination questions pertaining to retrograde motion than students who did not. Potential explanations for this result, including the breaking of classroom routine, the effect of body movement on conceptual memory, and egocentric spatial proprioception, are considered.

  14. People can understand descriptions of motion without activating visual motion brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Dravida, Swethasri; Saxe, Rebecca; Bedny, Marina

    2013-01-01

    What is the relationship between our perceptual and linguistic neural representations of the same event? We approached this question by asking whether visual perception of motion and understanding linguistic depictions of motion rely on the same neural architecture. The same group of participants took part in two language tasks and one visual task. In task 1, participants made semantic similarity judgments with high motion (e.g., “to bounce”) and low motion (e.g., “to look”) words. In task 2, participants made plausibility judgments for passages describing movement (“A centaur hurled a spear … ”) or cognitive events (“A gentleman loved cheese …”). Task 3 was a visual motion localizer in which participants viewed animations of point-light walkers, randomly moving dots, and stationary dots changing in luminance. Based on the visual motion localizer we identified classic visual motion areas of the temporal (MT/MST and STS) and parietal cortex (inferior and superior parietal lobules). We find that these visual cortical areas are largely distinct from neural responses to linguistic depictions of motion. Motion words did not activate any part of the visual motion system. Motion passages produced a small response in the right superior parietal lobule, but none of the temporal motion regions. These results suggest that (1) as compared to words, rich language stimuli such as passages are more likely to evoke mental imagery and more likely to affect perceptual circuits and (2) effects of language on the visual system are more likely in secondary perceptual areas as compared to early sensory areas. We conclude that language and visual perception constitute distinct but interacting systems. PMID:24009592

  15. Locally connected adaptive Gabor filter for real-time motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hau

    1994-07-01

    Software has been developed to implement the Gabor motion detection algorithm. This software consists of utility functions, algorithm modules, and test pattern generators for the experiments and verification of the spatial and temporal selectivity. Based on the theoretical analysis, the optical flow was computed for several artificially generated test patterns. These test patterns are designed to test the concept of spatial and orientation selectivity. The patterns were generated by using virtual reality technique based on three-dimensional computer graphics. In addition to the algorithm development and verification, we have also started work on the design and verification of the electronics basic building blocks for the VLSI implementation. This early start of the hardware design concurrent with the algorithm analysis and verification will further ensure the quality of the work in both hardware and software. In order to benchmark the VLSI chips, a hardware prototype board is under design and construction. This board will be used to compare the performance of digital approach vs. analog approach, analog approach based on the standard off-the-shelf components vs. analog customer-design VLSI approach.

  16. 77 FR 70210 - Agency Information Collection (Veteran's Application for Compensation and/or Pension): Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Veteran's Application for Compensation and/or Pension): Activity... Pension, VA Form 21-526. b. Veteran's Supplemental Claim Application, VA Form 21-526b. c. Authorization.... Veterans complete VA Form 21-526 to initially apply for compensation and/or pension benefits. b....

  17. Changes in Muscle Activation after Reach Training with Gravity Compensation in Chronic Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prange, Gerdienke B.; Krabben, Thijs; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Ijzerman, Maarten J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of gravity compensation training on reaching and underlying changes in muscle activation. In this clinical trial, eight chronic stroke patients with limited arm function received 18 sessions (30 min) of gravity-compensated reach training (during 6 weeks) in combination with a rehabilitation…

  18. A common-path optical coherence tomography distance-sensor based surface tracking and motion compensation hand-held microsurgical tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kang; Gehlbach, Peter; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-03-01

    Microsurgery requires constant attention to the involuntary motion due to physiological tremors. In this work, we demonstrated a simple and compact hand-held microsurgical tool capable of surface tracking and motion compensation based on common-path optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) distance-sensor to improve the accuracy and safety of microsurgery. This tool is miniaturized into a 15mm-diameter plastic syringe and capable of surface tracking at less than 5 micrometer resolution. A phantom made with Intralipid layers is used to simulate a real tissue surface and a single-fiber integrated micro-dissector works as a surgical tip to perform tracking and accurate incision on the phantom surface. The micro-incision depth is evaluated after each operation through a fast 3D scanning by the Fourier domain OCT system. The results using the surface tracking and motion compensation tool show significant improvement compared to the results by free-hand.

  19. A computational method for estimating the dosimetric effect of intra-fraction motion on step-and-shoot IMRT and compensator plans.

    PubMed

    Waghorn, Ben J; Shah, Amish P; Ngwa, Wilfred; Meeks, Sanford L; Moore, Joseph A; Siebers, Jeffrey V; Langen, Katja M

    2010-07-21

    Intra-fraction organ motion during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment can cause differences between the planned and the delivered dose distribution. To investigate the extent of these dosimetric changes, a computational model was developed and validated. The computational method allows for calculation of the rigid motion perturbed three-dimensional dose distribution in the CT volume and therefore a dose volume histogram-based assessment of the dosimetric impact of intra-fraction motion on a rigidly moving body. The method was developed and validated for both step-and-shoot IMRT and solid compensator IMRT treatment plans. For each segment (or beam), fluence maps were exported from the treatment planning system. Fluence maps were shifted according to the target position deduced from a motion track. These shifted, motion-encoded fluence maps were then re-imported into the treatment planning system and were used to calculate the motion-encoded dose distribution. To validate the accuracy of the motion-encoded dose distribution the treatment plan was delivered to a moving cylindrical phantom using a programmed four-dimensional motion phantom. Extended dose response (EDR-2) film was used to measure a planar dose distribution for comparison with the calculated motion-encoded distribution using a gamma index analysis (3% dose difference, 3 mm distance-to-agreement). A series of motion tracks incorporating both inter-beam step-function shifts and continuous sinusoidal motion were tested. The method was shown to accurately predict the film's dose distribution for all of the tested motion tracks, both for the step-and-shoot IMRT and compensator plans. The average gamma analysis pass rate for the measured dose distribution with respect to the calculated motion-encoded distribution was 98.3 +/- 0.7%. For static delivery the average film-to-calculation pass rate was 98.7 +/- 0.2%. In summary, a computational technique has been developed to calculate the

  20. 2D-3D rigid registration to compensate for prostate motion during 3D TRUS-guided biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, Tharindu; Fenster, Aaron; Bax, Jeffrey; Gardi, Lori; Romagnoli, Cesare; Samarabandu, Jagath; Ward, Aaron D.

    2012-02-01

    Prostate biopsy is the clinical standard for prostate cancer diagnosis. To improve the accuracy of targeting suspicious locations, systems have been developed that can plan and record biopsy locations in a 3D TRUS image acquired at the beginning of the procedure. Some systems are designed for maximum compatibility with existing ultrasound equipment and are thus designed around the use of a conventional 2D TRUS probe, using controlled axial rotation of this probe to acquire a 3D TRUS reference image at the start of the biopsy procedure. Prostate motion during the biopsy procedure causes misalignments between the prostate in the live 2D TRUS images and the pre-acquired 3D TRUS image. We present an image-based rigid registration technique that aligns live 2D TRUS images, acquired immediately prior to biopsy needle insertion, with the pre-acquired 3D TRUS image to compensate for this motion. Our method was validated using 33 manually identified intrinsic fiducials in eight subjects and the target registration error was found to be 1.89 mm. We analysed the suitability of two image similarity metrics (normalized cross correlation and mutual information) for this task by plotting these metrics as a function of varying parameters in the six degree-of-freedom transformation space, with the ground truth plane obtained from registration as the starting point for the parameter exploration. We observed a generally convex behaviour of the similarity metrics. This encourages their use for this registration problem, and could assist in the design of a tool for the detection of misalignment, which could trigger the execution of a non-real-time registration, when needed during the procedure.

  1. Static antennae act as locomotory guides that compensate for visual motion blur in a diurnal, keen-eyed predator

    PubMed Central

    Zurek, Daniel B.; Gilbert, Cole

    2014-01-01

    High visual acuity allows parallel processing of distant environmental features, but only when photons are abundant enough. Diurnal tiger beetles (Carabidae: Cicindelinae) have acute vision for insects and visually pursue prey in open, flat habitats. Their fast running speed causes motion blur that degrades visual contrast, forces stop-and-go pursuit and potentially impairs obstacle detection. We demonstrate here that vision is insufficient for obstacle detection during running, and show instead that antennal touch is both necessary and sufficient for obstacle detection. While running, tiger beetle vision appears to be photon-limited in a way reminiscent of animals in low-light habitats. Such animals often acquire wide-field spatial information through mechanosensation mediated by longer, more mobile appendages. We show that a nocturnal tiger beetle species waves its antennae in elliptical patterns typical of poorly sighted insects. While antennae of diurnal species are also used for mechanosensation, they are rigidly held forward with the tips close to the substrate. This enables timely detection of path obstructions followed by an increase in body pitch to avoid collision. Our results demonstrate adaptive mechanosensory augmentation of blurred visual information during fast locomotion, and suggest that future studies may reveal non-visual sensory compensation in other fast-moving animals. PMID:24500171

  2. Static antennae act as locomotory guides that compensate for visual motion blur in a diurnal, keen-eyed predator.

    PubMed

    Zurek, Daniel B; Gilbert, Cole

    2014-03-22

    High visual acuity allows parallel processing of distant environmental features, but only when photons are abundant enough. Diurnal tiger beetles (Carabidae: Cicindelinae) have acute vision for insects and visually pursue prey in open, flat habitats. Their fast running speed causes motion blur that degrades visual contrast, forces stop-and-go pursuit and potentially impairs obstacle detection. We demonstrate here that vision is insufficient for obstacle detection during running, and show instead that antennal touch is both necessary and sufficient for obstacle detection. While running, tiger beetle vision appears to be photon-limited in a way reminiscent of animals in low-light habitats. Such animals often acquire wide-field spatial information through mechanosensation mediated by longer, more mobile appendages. We show that a nocturnal tiger beetle species waves its antennae in elliptical patterns typical of poorly sighted insects. While antennae of diurnal species are also used for mechanosensation, they are rigidly held forward with the tips close to the substrate. This enables timely detection of path obstructions followed by an increase in body pitch to avoid collision. Our results demonstrate adaptive mechanosensory augmentation of blurred visual information during fast locomotion, and suggest that future studies may reveal non-visual sensory compensation in other fast-moving animals. PMID:24500171

  3. 34/45-Mbps 3D HDTV digital coding scheme using modified motion compensation with disparity vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Sei; Matsumoto, Shuichi

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes a digital compression coding scheme for transmitting three dimensional stereo HDTV signals with full resolution at bit-rates around 30 to 40 Mbps to be adapted for PDH networks of the CCITT 3rd digital hierarchy, 34 Mbps and 45 Mbps, SDH networks of 52 Mbps and ATM networks. In order to achieve a satisfactory quality for stereo HDTV pictures, three advanced key technologies are introduced into the MPEG-2 Multi-View Profile, i.e., a modified motion compensation using disparity vectors estimated between the left and right pictures, an adaptive rate control using a common buffer memory for left and right pictures encoding, and a discriminatory bit allocation which results in the improvement of left pictures quality without any degradation of right pictures. From the results of coding experiment conducted to evaluate the coding picture achieved by this coding scheme, it is confirmed that our coding scheme gives satisfactory picture quality even at 34 Mbps including audio and FEC data.

  4. A one-degree-of-freedom assistive exoskeleton with inertia compensation: the effects on the agility of leg swing motion.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Ollinger, G; Colgate, J E; Peshkin, M A; Goswami, A

    2011-03-01

    Many of the current implementations of exoskeletons for the lower extremities are conceived to either augment the user's load-carrying capabilities or reduce muscle activation during walking. Comparatively little research has been conducted on enabling an exoskeleton to increase the agility of lower-limb movements. One obstacle in this regard is the inertia of the exoskeleton's mechanism, which tends to reduce the natural frequency of the human limbs. A control method is presented that produces an approximate compensation of the inertia of an exoskeleton's mechanism. The controller was tested on a statically mounted, single-degree-of-freedom (DOF) exoskeleton that assists knee flexion and extension. Test subjects performed multiple series of leg-swing movements in the context of a computer-based, sprint-like task. A large initial acceleration of the leg was needed for the subjects to track a virtual target on a computer screen. The uncompensated inertia of the exoskeleton mechanism slowed down the transient response of the subjects' limb, in comparison with trials performed without the exoskeleton. The subsequent use of emulated inertia compensation on the exoskeleton allowed the subjects to improve their transient response for the same task. PMID:21485325

  5. Prospective Real-Time Correction for Arbitrary Head Motion Using Active Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Melvyn B.; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J.; Swaminathan, Srirama V.; Brown, Truman R.

    2011-01-01

    Patient motion during an MRI exam can result in major degradation of image quality, and is of increasing concern due to the aging population and its associated diseases. This work presents a general strategy for real-time, intra-image compensation of rigid-body motion that is compatible with multiple imaging sequences. Image quality improvements are established for structural brain MRI acquired during volunteer motion. A headband integrated with three active markers is secured to the forehead. Prospective correction is achieved by interleaving a rapid track-and-update module into the imaging sequence. For every repetition of this module, a short tracking pulse-sequence re-measures the marker positions; during head motion, the rigid-body transformation that realigns the markers to their initial positions is fed back to adaptively update the image-plane – maintaining it at a fixed orientation relative to the head – before the next imaging segment of k-space is acquired. In cases of extreme motion, corrupted lines of k-space are rejected and re-acquired with the updated geometry. High precision tracking measurements (0.01 mm) and corrections are accomplished in a temporal resolution (37 ms) suitable for real-time application. The correction package requires minimal additional hardware and is fully integrated into the standard user interface, promoting transferability to clinical practice. PMID:19488989

  6. Image-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unberath, Mathias; Choi, Jang-Hwan; Berger, Martin; Maier, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    We previously introduced four fiducial marker-based strategies to compensate for involuntary knee-joint motion during weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of the lower body. 2D methods showed significant reduction of motion- related artifacts, but 3D methods worked best. However, previous methods led to increased examination times and patient discomfort caused by the marker attachment process. Moreover, sub-optimal marker placement may lead to decreased marker detectability and therefore unstable motion estimates. In order to reduce overall patient discomfort, we developed a new image-based 2D projection shifting method. A C-arm cone-beam CT system was used to acquire projection images of five healthy volunteers at various flexion angles. Projection matrices for the horizontal scanning trajectory were calibrated using the Siemens standard PDS-2 phantom. The initial reconstruction was forward projected using maximum-intensity projections (MIP), yielding an estimate of a static scan. This estimate was then used to obtain the 2D projection shifts via registration. For the scan with the most motion, the proposed method reproduced the marker-based results with a mean error of 2.90 mm +/- 1.43 mm (compared to a mean error of 4.10 mm +/- 3.03 mm in the uncorrected case). Bone contour surrounding modeling clay layer was improved. The proposed method is a first step towards automatic image-based, marker-free motion-compensation.

  7. Motion-compensated PET image reconstruction with respiratory-matched attenuation correction using two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Ahn, Il Jun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Byung Il; Ra, Jong Beom

    2013-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for diagnosis and follow up assessment of radiotherapy. However, thoracic and abdominal PET suffers from false staging and incorrect quantification of the radioactive uptake of lesion(s) due to respiratory motion. Furthermore, respiratory motion-induced mismatch between a computed tomography (CT) attenuation map and PET data often leads to significant artifacts in the reconstructed PET image. To solve these problems, we propose a unified framework for respiratory-matched attenuation correction and motion compensation of respiratory-gated PET. For the attenuation correction, the proposed algorithm manipulates a 4D CT image virtually generated from two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images, rather than a real 4D CT image which significantly increases the radiation burden on a patient. It also utilizes CT-driven motion fields for motion compensation. To realize the proposed algorithm, we propose an improved region-based approach for non-rigid registration between body CT images, and we suggest a selection scheme of 3D CT images that are respiratory-matched to each respiratory-gated sinogram. In this work, the proposed algorithm was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by using patient datasets including lung and/or liver lesion(s). Experimental results show that the method can provide much clearer organ boundaries and more accurate lesion information than existing algorithms by utilizing two low-dose CT images.

  8. Motion-compensated hand-held common-path Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography probe for image-guided intervention

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Liu, Xuan; Song, Cheol; Kang, Jin U.

    2012-01-01

    A motion-compensated, hand-held, common-path, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography imaging probe has been developed for image-guided intervention during microsurgery. A hand-held prototype instrument was achieved by integrating an imaging fiber probe inside a stainless steel needle and attached to the ceramic shaft of a piezoelectric motor housed in an aluminum handle. The fiber probe obtains A-scan images. The distance information was extracted from the A-scans to track the sample surface distance and a fixed distance was maintained by a feedback motor control which effectively compensated hand tremor and target movements in the axial direction. Real-time data acquisition, processing, motion compensation, and image visualization and saving were implemented on a custom CPU-GPU hybrid architecture. We performed 10× zero padding to the raw spectrum to obtain 0.16 µm position accuracy with a compensation rate of 460 Hz. The root-mean-square error of hand-held distance variation from target position was measured to be 2.93 µm. We used a cross-correlation maximization-based shift correction algorithm for topology correction. To validate the system, we performed free-hand OCT M-scan imaging using various samples. PMID:23243562

  9. Point-light biological motion perception activates human premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Saygin, Ayse Pinar; Wilson, Stephen M; Hagler, Donald J; Bates, Elizabeth; Sereno, Martin I

    2004-07-01

    Motion cues can be surprisingly powerful in defining objects and events. Specifically, a handful of point-lights attached to the joints of a human actor will evoke a vivid percept of action when the body is in motion. The perception of point-light biological motion activates posterior cortical areas of the brain. On the other hand, observation of others' actions is known to also evoke activity in motor and premotor areas in frontal cortex. In the present study, we investigated whether point-light biological motion animations would lead to activity in frontal cortex as well. We performed a human functional magnetic resonance imaging study on a high-field-strength magnet and used a number of methods to increase signal, as well as cortical surface-based analysis methods. Areas that responded selectively to point-light biological motion were found in lateral and inferior temporal cortex and in inferior frontal cortex. The robust responses we observed in frontal areas indicate that these stimuli can also recruit action observation networks, although they are very simplified and characterize actions by motion cues alone. The finding that even point-light animations evoke activity in frontal regions suggests that the motor system of the observer may be recruited to "fill in" these simplified displays. PMID:15240810

  10. Antenna gain of actively compensated free-space optical communication systems under strong turbulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Juan C; Brown, David M; Young, David W

    2014-05-19

    Current Strehl ratio models for actively compensated free-space optical communications terminals do not accurately predict system performance under strong turbulence conditions as they are based on weak turbulence theory. For evaluation of compensated systems, we present an approach for simulating the Strehl ratio with both low-order (tip/tilt) and higher-order (adaptive optics) correction. Our simulation results are then compared to the published models and their range of turbulence validity is assessed. Finally, we propose a new Strehl ratio model and antenna gain equation that are valid for general turbulence conditions independent of the degree of compensation. PMID:24921373

  11. The Results of a Simulator Study to Determine the Effects on Pilot Performance of Two Different Motion Cueing Algorithms and Various Delays, Compensated and Uncompensated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Li-Wen; Cardullo, Frank M.; Telban, Robert J.; Houck, Jacob A.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted employing the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS) at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. This study compared two motion cueing algorithms, the NASA adaptive algorithm and a new optimal control based algorithm. Also, the study included the effects of transport delays and the compensation thereof. The delay compensation algorithm employed is one developed by Richard McFarland at NASA Ames Research Center. This paper reports on the analyses of the results of analyzing the experimental data collected from preliminary simulation tests. This series of tests was conducted to evaluate the protocols and the methodology of data analysis in preparation for more comprehensive tests which will be conducted during the spring of 2003. Therefore only three pilots were used. Nevertheless some useful results were obtained. The experimental conditions involved three maneuvers; a straight-in approach with a rotating wind vector, an offset approach with turbulence and gust, and a takeoff with and without an engine failure shortly after liftoff. For each of the maneuvers the two motion conditions were combined with four delay conditions (0, 50, 100 & 200ms), with and without compensation.

  12. Descriptor for spatial distribution of motion activity for compressed video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divakaran, Ajay; Sun, Huifang

    1999-12-01

    In this paper we present a new descriptor for spatial distribution of motion activity in video sequences. We use the magnitude of the motion vectors as a measure of the intensity of motion cavity in a macro-block. We construct a matrix Cmv consisting of the magnitudes of the motion vector for each macro-block of a given P frame. We compute the average magnitude of the motion vector per macro-block Cavg, and then use Cavg as a threshold on the matrix C by setting the elements of C that are less than Cavg to zero. We classify the runs of zeros into three categories based on length, and count the number of runs of each category in the matrix C. Our activity descriptor for a frame thus consists of four parameters viz. the average magnitude of the motion vectors and the numbers of runs of short, medium and long length. Since the feature extraction is in the compressed domain and simple, it is extremely fast. We have tested it on the MPEG-7 test content set, which consists of approximately 14 hours of MPEG-1 encoded video content of different kinds. We find that our descriptor enables fast and accurate indexing of video. It is robust to noise and changes in encoding parameters such as frame size, frame rate, encoding bit rate, encoding format etc. It is a low-level non-semantic descriptor that gives semantic matches within the same program, and is thus very suitable for applications such as video program browsing. We also find that indirect and computationally simpler measures of the magnitude of the motion vectors such as bits taken to encode the motion vectors, though less effective, also can be used in our run-length framework.

  13. Generic motion platform for active vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiman, Carl F. R.; Vincze, Markus

    1996-10-01

    The term 'active vision' was first used by Bajcsy at a NATO workshop in 1982 to describe an emerging field of robot vision which departed sharply from traditional paradigms of image understanding and machine vision. The new approach embeds a moving camera platform as an in-the-loop component of robotic navigation or hand-eye coordination. Visually served steering of the focus of attention supercedes the traditional functions of recognition and gaging. Custom active vision platforms soon proliferated in research laboratories in Europe and North America. In 1990 the National Science Foundation funded the design of a common platform to promote cooperation and reduce cost in active vision research. This paper describes the resulting platform. The design was driven by payload requirements for binocular motorized C-mount lenses on a platform whose performance and articulation emulate those of the human eye- head system. The result was a 4-DOF mechanisms driven by servo controlled DC brush motors. A crossbeam supports two independent worm-gear driven camera vergence mounts at speeds up to 1,000 degrees per second over a range of +/- 90 degrees from dead ahead. This crossbeam is supported by a pan-tilt mount whose horizontal axis intersects the vergence axes for translation-free camera rotation about these axes at speeds up to 500 degrees per second.

  14. First Steps Toward Ultrasound-Based Motion Compensation for Imaging and Therapy: Calibration with an Optical System and 4D PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schwaab, Julia; Kurz, Christopher; Sarti, Cristina; Bongers, André; Schoenahl, Frédéric; Bert, Christoph; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia; Jenne, Jürgen Walter

    2015-01-01

    Target motion, particularly in the abdomen, due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge in many diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Hence, methods to detect and compensate this motion are required. Diagnostic ultrasound (US) represents a non-invasive and dose-free alternative to fluoroscopy, providing more information about internal target motion than respiration belt or optical tracking. The goal of this project is to develop an US-based motion tracking for real-time motion correction in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging, notably in 4D positron emission tomography (PET). In this work, a workflow is established to enable the transformation of US tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system – even if the US probe is moving due to respiration. It is shown that the US tracking signal is equally adequate for 4D PET image reconstruction as the clinically used respiration belt and provides additional opportunities in this concern. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality. The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation. Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible. PMID:26649277

  15. Optical Modeling Activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 3; Wavefront Aberrations due to Alignment and Figure Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This is part three of a series describing the ongoing optical modeling activities for James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The work here investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The optical design of the telescope is a three-mirror anastigmat, with an active fold mirror at the exit pupil for fine guiding. The primary mirror is over 6.5 meters in diameter, and is composed of 18 hexagonal segments that can individually positioned on hexapods, as well as compensated for radius of curvature. This effectively gives both alignment and figure control of the primary mirror. The secondary mirror can be moved in rigid body only, giving alignment control of the telescope. The tertiary mirror is fixed, however, as well as the location of the science instrumentation. Simulations are performed of various combinations of active alignment corrections of component figure errors, and of primary mirror figure corrections of alignment errors. Single field point and moderate field knowledge is assumed in the corrections. Aberrations over the field are reported for the varying cases, and examples presented.

  16. Tracer motion in an active dumbbell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suma, Antonio; Cugliandolo, Leticia F.; Gonnella, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    The diffusion properties of spherical tracers coupled through a repulsive potential to a system of active dumbbells are analyzed. We model the dumbbells’ dynamics with Langevin equations and the activity with a self-propulsive force of constant magnitude directed along the main axis of the molecules. Two types of tracers are considered. Thermal tracers are coupled to the same bath as the dumbbells while athermal tracers are not; both interact repulsively with the dumbbells. We focus our attention on the intruders’ mean square displacement and how it compares to the one of the dumbbells. We show that the dynamics of thermal intruders, with mass similar to the one of the dumbbells, display the typical four time-lag regimes of the dumbbells’ mean square displacement. The thermal tracers’ late-time diffusion coefficient depends on their mass very weakly and it is close to the one of the dumbbells at low Péclet only. Athermal tracers only have ballistic and late-time diffusive regimes. The late time diffusion coefficients of athermal tracers and dumbbells have similar values at high Péclet number when their masses are of the same order, while at low Péclet number this coefficient gets close to the one of the dumbbells only when the tracers are several order of magnitude heavier than the dumbbells. We propose a generalization of the Enskog law for dilute hard disks, that describes the athermal tracers’ mean square displacement in the form of a scaling law in terms of their mass.

  17. Optical modeling activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST): III. Wavefront aberrations due to alignment and figure compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is part three of a series describing the ongoing optical modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two papers discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients [1-2]. The work here investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (i.e. the primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The optical design of the telescope is a three-mirror anastigmat, with an active fold mirror at the exit pupil for fine guiding. The primary mirror is over 6.5 meters in diameter, and is composed of 18 hexagonal segments that can individually positioned on hexapods, as well as compensated for radius of curvature. This architecture effectively gives both alignment and figure control of the primary mirror. The secondary mirror can be moved in rigid body only, and the tertiary mirror is fixed. Simulations are performed of various combinations of alignment and figure errors corrected by the primary and secondary mirrors. Single field point knowledge is assumed in the corrections, and aberrations over the field are reported for the varying cases.

  18. Design of active temperature compensated composite free-free beam MEMS resonators in a standard process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xereas, George; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2014-03-01

    Frequency references are used in almost every modern electronic device including mobile phones, personal computers, and scientific and medical instrumentation. With modern consumer mobile devices imposing stringent requirements of low cost, low complexity, compact system integration and low power consumption, there has been significant interest to develop batch-manufactured MEMS resonators. An important challenge for MEMS resonators is to match the frequency and temperature stability of quartz resonators. We present 1MHz and 20MHz temperature compensated Free-Free beam MEMS resonators developed using PolyMUMPS, which is a commercial multi-user process available from MEMSCAP. We introduce a novel temperature compensation technique that enables high frequency stability over a wide temperature range. We used three strategies: passive compensation by using a structural gold (Au) layer on the resonator, active compensation through using a heater element, and a Free-Free beam design that minimizes the effects of thermal mismatch between the vibrating structure and the substrate. Detailed electro-mechanical simulations were performed to evaluate the frequency response and Quality Factor (Q). Specifically, for the 20MHz device, a Q of 10,000 was obtained for the passive compensated design. Finite Element Modeling (FEM) simulations were used to evaluate the Temperature Coefficient of frequency (TCf) of the resonators between -50°C and 125°C which yielded +0.638 ppm/°C for the active compensated, compared to -1.66 ppm/°C for the passively compensated design and -8.48 ppm/°C for uncompensated design for the 20MHz device. Electro-thermo-mechanical simulations showed that the heater element was capable of increasing the temperature of the resonators by approximately 53°C with an applied voltage of 10V and power consumption of 8.42 mW.

  19. Actively compensation of low order aberrations by refractive shaping system for high power slab lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zheng-wei; Guo, Ya-ding; Chen, Zhong-zheng; Li, Shuai; Xu, Yi-ting; Xu, Jian; Wang, Bao-shan; Gong, Ke-ling; Gao, Hong-wei; Bo, Yong; Peng, Qin-jun; Cui, Da-fu; Xu, Zu-yan

    2015-12-01

    We present a compact refractive shaping system for actively compensating low order aberrations of high power slab lasers. The shaping system includes three spherical lenses and two cylindrical lenses. Both theoretical and experimental investigations were performed to evaluate the compensation capability of the refractive shaping system. For a typical input beam with large low order aberrations of peak-to-valley (PV)=66.10λ and root-mean-square (RMS)=16.05λ, adjusting the distance between lenses, the wavefront aberrations are reduced to PV=0.48λ, RMS=0.10λ for the theoretical simulation and PV=0.50λ, RMS=0.11λ for the experimental result, respectively. It indicates that the main low order aberrations of defocus and 0° astigmatism can be significantly compensated by actively adjusting the distance between lenses and the experimental result agree well with the theoretical simulation.

  20. Physical activity compensates for increased mortality risk among older people with poor muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Portegijs, E; Rantanen, T; Sipilä, S; Laukkanen, P; Heikkinen, E

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether habitual physical activity can compensate for the increased mortality risk among older people with poor muscle strength. Mortality was followed up for 10 years after laboratory examination in 558 community dwelling 75- and 80-year-old men and women. Maximal isometric strength of five muscle groups was measured and tertile cut-off points were used to categorize participants. Participants, who reported moderate physical activity for at least 4 h a week, were categorized as physically active and the others as sedentary. High muscle strength and physical activity both protected from mortality, but their effect was not additive. Within each muscle strength tertile, physically active people had a lower mortality risk than sedentary people, the effect being most pronounced among those with lower strength in all muscle groups. A high level of physical activity may thus compensate for the increased mortality associated with low muscle strength. PMID:17166169

  1. Active and passive compensation of APPLE II-introduced multipole errors through beam-based measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Huang, Szu-Jung; Fu, Huang-Wen; Chang, Ho-Ping; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2016-08-01

    The effect of an APPLE II-type elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) on the beam dynamics were investigated using active and passive methods. To reduce the tune shift and improve the injection efficiency, dynamic multipole errors were compensated using L-shaped iron shims, which resulted in stable top-up operation for a minimum gap. The skew quadrupole error was compensated using a multipole corrector, which was located downstream of the EPU for minimizing betatron coupling, and it ensured the enhancement of the synchrotron radiation brightness. The investigation methods, a numerical simulation algorithm, a multipole error correction method, and the beam-based measurement results are discussed.

  2. On Some Passive and Active Motion in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misbah, Chaouqi

    This contribution focuses on two main questions inspired by biology: (i) passive motion under flow, like advection of red blood cells in the circulatory system, and (ii) active motion generated by actin polymerization, as encountered in cells of the immune system and some micro-organisms (e.g. some bacteria and viruses). The first part is dedicated to the dynamics and rheology of vesicles (a simple model for red blood cells) under flow. Some results obtained on red blood cells are also presented and compared to vesicles. Vesicles and red blood cells under flow exhibit several interesting dynamics: tank-treading, tumbling, vacillating-breathing, and so on. These dynamics have a direct impact on rheology, as will be discussed both from the theoretical and experimental point of views. The second part addresses active motion. Some Bacteria (like Listeria) are known to transfect cells thanks to the polymerization on their surface of an actin gel. Monomeric actin proteins are recruited from the transfected cell when the bacteria gets in contact with the cell surface. It has been found that the bacteria propulsion into the cell occurs in the absence of molecular motors. Biomimetic experiments on beads and droplets have revealed that motion is a consequence of a spontaneous symmetry breaking that is accompanied with force generation. A simple basic model taking into account growth of actin and elasticity is sufficient to capture the essence of symmetry breaking and force generation, as will be presented in this contribution.

  3. Three-dimensional motion of the upper extremity joints during various activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Junya; Masuda, Tadashi; Koyama, Takayuki; Nakamaru, Koji; Isozaki, Koji; Okawa, Atsushi; Morita, Sadao

    2010-11-16

    Highly reliable information on the range of motion (ROM) required to perform activities of daily living (ADL) is important to allow rehabilitation professionals to make appropriate clinical judgments of patients with limited ROM of the upper extremity joints. There are, however, no data available that take full account of corrections for gimbal-lock and soft tissue artifacts, which affect estimation errors for joint angles. We used an electromagnetic three-dimensional tracking system (FASTRAK) to measure the three-dimensional ROM of the upper extremity joints of healthy adults (N=20, age range 18-34) during 16 ADL movement tasks. The ROM required for the performance of each movement was shown in terms of the joint angle at the completion of the task, using a new definition of joint angle and regression analysis to compensate for estimation errors. The results of this study may be useful in setting goals for the treatment of upper extremity joint function. PMID:20727523

  4. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1989-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  5. Active phase compensation system for fiber optic holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optic delivery systems promise to extend the application of holography to severe environments by simplifying test configurations and permitting the laser to be remotely placed in a more benign location. However, the introduction of optical fiber leads to phase stability problems. Environmental effects cause the pathlengths of the fibers to change randomly, preventing the formation of stationary interference patterns which are required for holography. An active phase control system has been designed and used with an all-fiber optical system to stabilize the phase difference between light emitted from two fibers, and to step the phase difference by 90 deg without applying any constraints on the placement of the fibers. The accuracy of the phase steps is shown to be better than 0.02 deg., and a stable phase difference can be maintained for 30 min. This system can be applied to both conventional and electro-optic holography, as well as to any system where the maintenance of an accurate phase difference between two coherent beams is required.

  6. Increased activity in frontal motor cortex compensates impaired speech perception in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yi; Buchsbaum, Bradley R.; Grady, Cheryl L.; Alain, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Understanding speech in noisy environments is challenging, especially for seniors. Although evidence suggests that older adults increasingly recruit prefrontal cortices to offset reduced periphery and central auditory processing, the brain mechanisms underlying such compensation remain elusive. Here we show that relative to young adults, older adults show higher activation of frontal speech motor areas as measured by functional MRI during a syllable identification task at varying signal-to-noise ratios. This increased activity correlates with improved speech discrimination performance in older adults. Multivoxel pattern classification reveals that despite an overall phoneme dedifferentiation, older adults show greater specificity of phoneme representations in frontal articulatory regions than auditory regions. Moreover, older adults with stronger frontal activity have higher phoneme specificity in frontal and auditory regions. Thus, preserved phoneme specificity and upregulation of activity in speech motor regions provide a means of compensation in older adults for decoding impoverished speech representations in adverse listening conditions. PMID:27483187

  7. Motion Sensor Reactivity in Physically Active Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Timothy K.; Dinger, Mary K.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether young adults changed their physical activity (PA) behavior when wearing motion sensors. PA patterns of 119 young adults (M age = 20.82 years, SD = 1.50, M body mass index = 23.93 kg/m[superscript 2] , SD = 4.05) were assessed during 2 consecutive weeks. In Week 1, participants wore an accelerometer.…

  8. Hybrid magnetic mechanism for active locomotion based on inchworm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic robots have been studied in the past. Insect-type micro-robots are used in various biomedical applications; researchers have developed inchworm micro-robots for endoscopic use. A biological inchworm has a looping locomotion gait. However, most inchworm micro-robots depend on a general bending, or bellows, motion. In this paper, we introduce a new robotic mechanism using magnetic force and torque control in a rotating magnetic field for a looping gait. The proposed robot is controlled by the magnetic torque, attractive force, and body mechanisms (two stoppers, flexible body, and different frictional legs). The magnetic torque generates a general bending motion. In addition, the attractive force and body mechanisms produce the robot’s looping motion within a rotating magnetic field and without the use of an algorithm for field control. We verified the device’s performance and analyzed the motion through simulations and various experiments. The robot mechanism can be applied to active locomotion for various medical robots, such as wireless endoscopes.

  9. Active compensation of large dispersion of femtosecond pulses for precision laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Lee, Keunwoo; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2011-02-28

    We describe an active way of compensation for large dispersion induced in the femtosecond light pulses travelling in air for laser ranging. The pulse duration is consistently regulated at 250 fs by dispersion control, allowing sub-micrometer resolution in measuring long distances by means of time-of-flight measurement. This method could facilitate more reliable applications of femtosecond pulses for satellite laser ranging, laser altimetry and active LIDAR applications. PMID:21369227

  10. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  11. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  12. Thermally activated depinning motion of contact lines in pseudopartial wetting.

    PubMed

    Du, Lingguo; Bodiguel, Hugues; Colin, Annie

    2014-07-01

    We investigate pressure-driven motion of liquid-liquid menisci in circular tubes, for systems in pseudopartial wetting conditions. The originality of this type of wetting lies in the coexistence of a macroscopic contact angle with a wetting liquid film covering the solid surface. Focusing on small capillary numbers, we report observations of an apparent contact angle hysteresis at first sight similar to the standard partial wetting case. However, this apparent hysteresis exhibits original features. We observe very long transient regimes before steady state, up to several hundreds of seconds. Furthermore, in steady state, the velocities are nonzero, meaning that the contact line is not strongly pinned to the surface defects, but are very small. The velocity of the contact line tends to vanish near the equilibrium contact angle. These observations are consistent with the thermally activated depinning theory that has been proposed to describe partial wetting systems on disordered substrates and suggest that a single physical mechanism controls both the hysteresis (or the pinning) and the motion of the contact line. The proposed analysis leads to the conclusion that the depinning activated energy is lower with pseudopartial wetting systems than with partial wetting ones, allowing the direct observation of the thermally activated motion of the contact line. PMID:25122310

  13. Motion Sensor Use for Physical Activity Data: Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Margaret; Grey, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity continues to be a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and only one half of adults in the United States meet physical activity (PA) goals. PA data are often collected for surveillance or for measuring change after an intervention. One of the challenges in PA research is quantifying exactly how much and what type of PA is taking place—especially because self-report instruments have inconsistent validity. Objective The purpose is to review the elements to consider when collecting PA data via motion sensors, including the difference between PA and exercise; type of data to collect; choosing the device; length of time to monitor PA; instructions to the participants; and interpretation of the data. Methods The current literature on motion sensor research was reviewed and synthesized to summarize relevant considerations when using a motion sensor to collect PA data. Results Exercise is a division of PA that is structured, planned, and repetitive. Pedometer data includes steps taken, and calculated distance and energy expenditure. Accelerometer data includes activity counts and intensity. The device chosen depends on desired data, cost, validity, and ease of use. Reactivity to the device may influence the duration of data collection. Instructions to participants may vary depending on purpose of the study. Experts suggest pedometer data be reported as steps—since that is the direct output—and distance traveled and energy expenditure are estimated values. Accelerometer count data may be analyzed to provide information on time spent in moderate or vigorous activity. Discussion Thoughtful decision making about PA data collection using motion sensor devices is needed to advance nursing science. PMID:26126065

  14. Dosage Compensation in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER Triploids. II. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, Gustavo; Plaut, Walter

    1973-01-01

    The level of activity of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was determinel in flies having seven different chromosomic constitutions. All those having an integral number of chromosomes [XAA, XXAA, XAAA, XXAAA, and XXXAAA (X=X chromosome, A=set of autosomes)] were found to have similar units of enzyme activity/mg live weight, while diploid females with a duplication and triploid females with a deficiency showed dosage effect. The amount of enzyme activity per cell, on the other hand, is also independent of the number of X's present but appears roughly proportional to the number of sets of autosomes.—It is proposed that dosage-compensated sex-linked genes are controlled by a positively acting regulatory factor(s) of autosomal origin. With this hypothesis it is possible to explain dosage compensation as a consequence of general regulatory mechanisms without invoking a special device which applies only to the X chromosomes. PMID:17248620

  15. Autonomous Motion Learning for Intra-Vehicular Activity Space Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yutaka; Yairi, Takehisa; Machida, Kazuo

    Space robots will be needed in the future space missions. So far, many types of space robots have been developed, but in particular, Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) space robots that support human activities should be developed to reduce human-risks in space. In this paper, we study the motion learning method of an IVA space robot with the multi-link mechanism. The advantage point is that this space robot moves using reaction force of the multi-link mechanism and contact forces from the wall as space walking of an astronaut, not to use a propulsion. The control approach is determined based on a reinforcement learning with the actor-critic algorithm. We demonstrate to clear effectiveness of this approach using a 5-link space robot model by simulation. First, we simulate that a space robot learn the motion control including contact phase in two dimensional case. Next, we simulate that a space robot learn the motion control changing base attitude in three dimensional case.

  16. Motion of Euglena gracilis: Active fluctuations and velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, P.; Romensky, M.; Scholz, D.; Lobaskin, V.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and active Brownian particle theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80(23), 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a constant propulsion with multiplicative noise.

  17. ATPase activity and its temperature compensation of the cyanobacterial clock protein KaiC.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Reiko; Miyake, Ayumi; Iwase, Ryo; Hayashi, Fumio; Uzumaki, Tatsuya; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2008-04-01

    KaiA, KaiB and KaiC constitute the circadian clock machinery in cyanobacteria. KaiC is a homohexamer; its subunit contains duplicated halves, each with a set of ATPase motifs. Here, using highly purified KaiC preparations of the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 produced in Escherichia coli, we found that the N- and C-terminal domains of KaiC had extremely weak ATPase activity. ATPase activity showed temperature compensation in wild-type KaiC, but not in KaiC(S431A/T432A), a mutant that lacks two phosphorylation sites. We concluded that KaiC phosphorylation is involved in the ATPase temperature-compensation mechanism-which is probably critical to the stability of the circadian clock in cyanobacteria-and we hypothesized the following temperature-compensation mechanism: (i) The C-terminal phosphorylation sites of a KaiC hexamer subunit are phosphorylated by the C-terminal domain of an adjacent KaiC subunit; (ii) the phosphorylation suppresses the ATPase activity of the C-terminal domain; and (iii) the phosphorylated KaiC spontaneously dephosphorylates, resulting in the recover of ATPase activity. PMID:18363969

  18. A motion-compensated image filter for low-dose fluoroscopy in a real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Naoki; Ishikawa, Masayori; Sutherland, Kenneth; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Matsuura, Taeko; Toramatsu, Chie; Takao, Seishin; Nihongi, Hideaki; Shimizu, Shinichi; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    In the real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system, a surrogate fiducial marker inserted in or near the tumor is detected by fluoroscopy to realize respiratory-gated radiotherapy. The imaging dose caused by fluoroscopy should be minimized. In this work, an image processing technique is proposed for tracing a moving marker in low-dose imaging. The proposed tracking technique is a combination of a motion-compensated recursive filter and template pattern matching. The proposed image filter can reduce motion artifacts resulting from the recursive process based on the determination of the region of interest for the next frame according to the current marker position in the fluoroscopic images. The effectiveness of the proposed technique and the expected clinical benefit were examined by phantom experimental studies with actual tumor trajectories generated from clinical patient data. It was demonstrated that the marker motion could be traced in low-dose imaging by applying the proposed algorithm with acceptable registration error and high pattern recognition score in all trajectories, although some trajectories were not able to be tracked with the conventional spatial filters or without image filters. The positional accuracy is expected to be kept within ±2 mm. The total computation time required to determine the marker position is a few milliseconds. The proposed image processing technique is applicable for imaging dose reduction. PMID:25129556

  19. Active sensor/actuator assemblies for vibration damping, compensation, measurement, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryaboy, Vyacheslav M.; Kasturi, Prakash S.

    2010-04-01

    The vibration control module known as IQ damper had been developed as part of active vibration damping system for optical tables and other precision vibration isolated platforms. The present work describes steps to expand the application of these units to other tasks, namely, (1) dynamic testing of structures and (2) compensation of forced vibration in local areas. The sensor-actuator assembly, including signal conditioning circuits, is designed as a compact dynamically symmetric module with mechanical interface to an optical table. The test data show that the vibration control modules can be used to measure dynamic compliance characteristics of optical tables with precision comparable to that of dedicated vibration measurement systems. Stable concerted work of active vibration control modules compensating forced harmonic vibration is demonstrated experimentally.

  20. Common approach for compensation of axial motion artifacts in swept-source OCT and dispersion in Fourier-domain OCT.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, Dierck; Bonin, Tim; Lührs, Christian; Franke, Gesa; Hagen-Eggert, Martin; Koch, Peter; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2012-03-12

    Swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) is sensitive to sample motion during the wavelength sweep, which leads to image blurring and image artifacts. In line-field and full-field SS-OCT parallelization is achieved by using a line or area detector, respectively. Thus, approximately 1000 lines or images at different wavenumbers are acquired. The sweep duration is identically with the acquisition time of a complete B-scan or volume, rendering parallel SS-OCT more sensitive to motion artifacts than scanning OCT. The effect of axial motion on the measured spectra is similar to the effect of non-balanced group velocity dispersion (GVD) in the interferometer arms. It causes the apparent optical path lengths in the sample arm to vary with the wavenumber. Here we propose the cross-correlation of sub-bandwidth reconstructions (CCSBR) as a new algorithm that is capable of detecting and correcting the artifacts induced by axial motion in line-field or full-field SS-OCT as well as GVD mismatch in any Fourier-domain OCT (FD-OCT) setup. By cross-correlating images which were reconstructed from a limited spectral range of the interference signal, a phase error is determined which is used to correct the spectral modulation prior to the calculation of the A-scans. Performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on in vivo full-field SS-OCT images of skin and scanning FD-OCT of skin and retina. PMID:22418560

  1. Photothermally activated motion and ignition using aluminum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, Jacques E.; Chong Xinyuan; Zhang Mingjun; Zhang Zhili; Jiang Naibo; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2013-01-14

    The aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) are demonstrated to serve as active photothermal media, to enhance and control local photothermal energy deposition via the photothermal effect activated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and amplified by Al NPs oxidation. The activation source is a 2-AA-battery-powered xenon flash lamp. The extent of the photothermally activated movement of Al NPs can be {approx}6 mm. Ignition delay can be {approx}0.1 ms. Both scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements of motion-only and after-ignition products confirm significant Al oxidation occurs through sintering and bursting after the flash exposure. Simulations suggest local heat generation is enhanced by LSPR. The positive-feedback effects from the local heat generation amplified by Al oxidation produce a large increase in local temperature and pressure, which enhances movement and accelerates ignition.

  2. Fusion of Smartphone Motion Sensors for Physical Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2014-01-01

    For physical activity recognition, smartphone sensors, such as an accelerometer and a gyroscope, are being utilized in many research studies. So far, particularly, the accelerometer has been extensively studied. In a few recent studies, a combination of a gyroscope, a magnetometer (in a supporting role) and an accelerometer (in a lead role) has been used with the aim to improve the recognition performance. How and when are various motion sensors, which are available on a smartphone, best used for better recognition performance, either individually or in combination? This is yet to be explored. In order to investigate this question, in this paper, we explore how these various motion sensors behave in different situations in the activity recognition process. For this purpose, we designed a data collection experiment where ten participants performed seven different activities carrying smart phones at different positions. Based on the analysis of this data set, we show that these sensors, except the magnetometer, are each capable of taking the lead roles individually, depending on the type of activity being recognized, the body position, the used data features and the classification method employed (personalized or generalized). We also show that their combination only improves the overall recognition performance when their individual performances are not very high, so that there is room for performance improvement. We have made our data set and our data collection application publicly available, thereby making our experiments reproducible. PMID:24919015

  3. Respiratory motion compensation for simultaneous PET/MR based on a 3D-2D registration of strongly undersampled radial MR data: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rank, Christopher M.; Heußer, Thorsten; Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We propose a new method for PET/MR respiratory motion compensation, which is based on a 3D-2D registration of strongly undersampled MR data and a) runs in parallel with the PET acquisition, b) can be interlaced with clinical MR sequences, and c) requires less than one minute of the total MR acquisition time per bed position. In our simulation study, we applied a 3D encoded radial stack-of-stars sampling scheme with 160 radial spokes per slice and an acquisition time of 38 s. Gated 4D MR images were reconstructed using a 4D iterative reconstruction algorithm. Based on these images, motion vector fields were estimated using our newly-developed 3D-2D registration framework. A 4D PET volume of a patient with eight hot lesions in the lungs and upper abdomen was simulated and MoCo 4D PET images were reconstructed based on the motion vector fields derived from MR. For evaluation, average SUVmean values of the artificial lesions were determined for a 3D, a gated 4D, a MoCo 4D and a reference (with ten-fold measurement time) gated 4D reconstruction. Compared to the reference, 3D reconstructions yielded an underestimation of SUVmean values due to motion blurring. In contrast, gated 4D reconstructions showed the highest variation of SUVmean due to low statistics. MoCo 4D reconstructions were only slightly affected by these two sources of uncertainty resulting in a significant visual and quantitative improvement in terms of SUVmean values. Whereas temporal resolution was comparable to the gated 4D images, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were close to the 3D reconstructions.

  4. Crew activity and motion effects on the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochon, Brian V.; Scheer, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Among the significant sources of internal disturbances that must be considered in the design of space station vibration control systems are the loads induced on the structure from various crew activities. Flight experiment T013, flown on the second manned mission of Skylab, measured force and moment time histories for a range of preplanned crew motions and activities. This experiment has proved itself invaluable as a source of on-orbit crew induced loads that has allowed a space station forcing function data base to be built. This will enable forced response such as acceleration and deflections, attributable to crew activity, to be calculated. The flight experiment, resultant database and structural model pre-processor, analysis examples and areas of combined research shall be described.

  5. An attack aimed at active phase compensation in one-way phase-encoded QKD systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhao-Yue; Yu, Ning-Na; Wei, Zheng-Jun; Wang, Jin-Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2014-08-01

    Phase drift is an inherent problem in one-way phase-encoded quantum key distribution (QKD) systems. Although combining passive with active phase compensation (APC) processes can effectively compensate for the phase drift, the security problems brought about by these processes are rarely considered. In this paper, we point out a security hole in the APC process and put forward a corresponding attack scheme. Under our proposed attack, the quantum bit error rate (QBER) of the QKD can be close to zero for some conditions. However, under the same conditions the ratio r of the key "0" and the key "1" which Bob (the legal communicators Alice and Bob) gets is no longer 1:1 but 2:1, which may expose Eve (the eavesdropper). In order to solve this problem, we modify the resend strategy of the attack scheme, which can force r to reach 1 and the QBER to be lower than the tolerable QBER.

  6. Study on a Mechanical Semi-Active Heave Compensation System of Drill String for Use on Floating Drilling Platform.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyou; Tang, Yang; Huang, Chongjun; Xie, Chong

    2015-01-01

    There are some disadvantages for existing heave compensation systems of drill string used for the Floating Drilling Platform (FDP), including high energy consumption, large and complex structure, and expensive manufacturing and maintenance costs. In view of the above, we present a streamlined mechanical semi-active heave compensation system (MSAHC) in this study. This system consists of active compensation part with the pinion and rack and passive compensation part. In order to evaluate system performance of the MSAHC, we establish its simulation model with AMEsim software. In the process of simulation, displacement of rotary hook and energy consumption is regarded as performance parameters of the system. And the change rule of two performance parameters are analyzed by changing these design parameters including gear radius of the pinion and rack, scale coefficient of PID, rotary hook load, heave height and heave period of the FDP, and accumulator volume. Then, based on the simulation results of the MSAHC system performance, we have selected out a best set of design parameters from them. Moreover, the feasibility of the design scheme of the MSAHC is effectively verified by comparison with the existing three heave compensation system. The result shows that the energy consumption of the MSAHC is lower than the active heave compensation system (AHC) and the semi-active heave compensation system (SAHC) when achieving a same compensation effect as well as the accumulator volume of MSAHC is half of the passive heave compensation system (PHC). Therefore, the new designed MSAHC not only ensure compensation effect but also lower energy consumption, and its structure is simplified by adopting the simple mechanical structure to decrease manufacturing cost, maintenance cost and floor space. PMID:26186620

  7. Study on a Mechanical Semi-Active Heave Compensation System of Drill String for Use on Floating Drilling Platform

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingyou; Tang, Yang; Huang, Chongjun; Xie, Chong

    2015-01-01

    There are some disadvantages for existing heave compensation systems of drill string used for the Floating Drilling Platform (FDP), including high energy consumption, large and complex structure, and expensive manufacturing and maintenance costs. In view of the above, we present a streamlined mechanical semi-active heave compensation system (MSAHC) in this study. This system consists of active compensation part with the pinion and rack and passive compensation part. In order to evaluate system performance of the MSAHC, we establish its simulation model with AMEsim software. In the process of simulation, displacement of rotary hook and energy consumption is regarded as performance parameters of the system. And the change rule of two performance parameters are analyzed by changing these design parameters including gear radius of the pinion and rack, scale coefficient of PID, rotary hook load, heave height and heave period of the FDP, and accumulator volume. Then, based on the simulation results of the MSAHC system performance, we have selected out a best set of design parameters from them. Moreover, the feasibility of the design scheme of the MSAHC is effectively verified by comparison with the existing three heave compensation system. The result shows that the energy consumption of the MSAHC is lower than the active heave compensation system (AHC) and the semi-active heave compensation system (SAHC) when achieving a same compensation effect as well as the accumulator volume of MSAHC is half of the passive heave compensation system (PHC). Therefore, the new designed MSAHC not only ensure compensation effect but also lower energy consumption, and its structure is simplified by adopting the simple mechanical structure to decrease manufacturing cost, maintenance cost and floor space. PMID:26186620

  8. Active Motion Control of Tetrahymena pyriformis by Galvanotaxis and Geotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun

    2013-11-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the swimming behavior of microorganisms and biologically inspired micro-robots. These microorganisms naturally accompanied by complex motions. Therefore it is important to understand the flow characteristics as well as control mechanisms. One of eukaryotic cells, the protozoa are a diverse group of unicellular organisms, many of which are motile cilia. Motile cilia are cover on the surface of cell in large numbers and beat in oriented waves. Sequential beating motions of a single cilium form metachronal strokes, producing a propagation wave, and therefore the body is achieved propulsion force. So preliminary studies are achieved to understand the flow induced by swimming microorganisms. Based on hydrodynamic results, the follow study of a few micro-scale protozoa cell, such as the Tetrahymena pyriformis, has provided active or passive control into several external stimuli. In typical control methods, the galvanotaxis and geotaxis were adopted active and passive control, respectively. The validation of galvanotaxis is used DC and AC voltage. In terms of geotaxis, corrugated microstructures were used to control in the microchannel. This research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST, 2011-0016461), National Science Foundation (NSF) CMMI Control Systems Program (#1000255) and Army Research Office (W911NF-11-1-0490).

  9. Documenting Western Burrowing Owl Reproduction and Activity Patterns Using Motion-Activated Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-08-01

    We used motion-activated cameras to monitor the reproduction and patterns of activity of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) above ground at 45 burrows in south-central Nevada during the breeding seasons of 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2005. The 37 broods, encompassing 180 young, raised over the four years represented an average of 4.9 young per successful breeding pair. Young and adult owls were detected at the burrow entrance at all times of the day and night, but adults were detected more frequently during afternoon/early evening than were young. Motion-activated cameras require less effort to implement than other techniques. Limitations include photographing only a small percentage of owl activity at the burrow; not detecting the actual number of eggs, young, or number fledged; and not being able to track individual owls over time. Further work is also necessary to compare the accuracy of productivity estimates generated from motion-activated cameras with other techniques.

  10. Compensation for Adolescents’ School Mental Load by Physical Activity on Weekend Days

    PubMed Central

    Kudláček, Michal; Frömel, Karel; Jakubec, Lukáš; Groffik, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and objective: Increasing mental load and inadequate stress management significantly affect the efficiency, success and safety of the educational/working process in adolescents. The objective of this study is to determine the extent that adolescents compensate for their school mental load by physical activity (PA) on weekend days and, thus, to contribute to the objective measurement of mental load in natural working conditions. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2013 and April 2014. A set of different methods was employed—self-administered questionnaire (IPAQ-long questionnaire), objective measurements—pedometers, and accelerometers (ActiTrainers). They was distributed to 548 students from 17 high schools. Participants’ mental load was assessed based on the difference between PA intensity and/or physical inactivity and heart rate range. Results: The participants with the highest mental load during school lessons do not compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. Conclusions: Adolescents need to be encouraged to be aware of their subjective mental load and to intentionally compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. It is necessary to support the process of adopting habits by sufficient physical literacy of students, as well as teachers, and by changes in the school program. PMID:27005652

  11. Characterization and modelling of the boron-oxygen defect activation in compensated n-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Schön, J.; Niewelt, T.; Broisch, J.; Warta, W.; Schubert, M. C.

    2015-12-28

    A study of the activation of the light-induced degradation in compensated n-type Czochralski grown silicon is presented. A kinetic model is established that verifies the existence of both the fast and the slow components known from p-type and proves the quadratic dependence of the defect generation rates of both defects on the hole concentration. The model allows for the description of lifetime degradation kinetics in compensated n-type silicon under various intensities and is in accordance with the findings for p-type silicon. We found that the final concentrations of the slow defect component in compensated n-type silicon only depend on the interstitial oxygen concentration and on neither the boron concentration nor the equilibrium electron concentration n{sub 0}. The final concentrations of the fast defect component slightly increase with increasing boron concentration. The results on n-type silicon give new insight to the origin of the BO defect and question the existing models for the defect composition.

  12. Phase coherent averaging in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using interleaved navigator scans: compensation of motion artifacts and magnetic field instabilities.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Thorsten; Czisch, Michael; Elbel, Gregor K; Hennig, Juergen

    2002-06-01

    The quality of spectra in (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is strongly affected by temporal signal instabilities during the acquisition. One reason for these instabilities are hardware imperfections, e.g., drifts of the main magnetic field in superconducting magnets. This is of special concern in high-field systems where the specification of the field stability is close to the spectral linewidth. A second major potential source of artifacts, particularly in clinical MRS, is patient motion. Using standard acquisition schemes of phase-cycled averaging of the individual acquisitions, long-term effects (field drifts) as well as changes on a shorter time scale (motion) can severely reduce spectral quality. The new technique for volume-selective MRS presented here is based on the additional interleaved acquisition of a navigator signal during the recovery time of the metabolite acquisition. It corrects for temporal signal instabilities by means of a deconvolution of the metabolite and the navigator signal. This leads to phase-corrected individual metabolite scans and upon summation to a phase-coherent averaging scheme. The interleaved navigator acquisition does not require any user interaction or supervision, while sequence efficiency is maintained. PMID:12111954

  13. Effective one step-iterative fiducial marker-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Berger, Martin; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    We previously introduced three different fiducial marker-based correction methods (2D projection shifting, 2D projection warping, and 3D image warping) for patients' involuntary motion in the lower body during weight-bearing Carm CT scanning. The 3D warping method performed better than 2D methods since it could more accurately take into account the lower body motion in 3D. However, as the 3D warping method applies different rotational and translational movement to the reconstructed image for each projection frame, distance-related weightings were slightly twisted and thus result in overlaying background noise over the entire image. In order to suppress background noise and artifacts (e.g. metallic marker-caused streaks), the 3D warping method has been improved by incorporating bilateral filtering and a Landwebertype iteration in one step. A series of projection images of five healthy volunteers standing at various flexion angles were acquired using a C-arm cone-beam CT system with a flat panel. A horizontal scanning trajectory of the C-arm was calibrated to generate projection matrices. Using the projection matrices, the static reference marker coordinates in 3D were estimated and used for the improved 3D warping method. The improved 3D warping method effectively reduced background noise down below the noise level of 2D methods and also eliminated metal-generated streaks. Thus, improved visibility of soft tissue structures (e.g. fat and muscle) was achieved while maintaining sharp edges at bone-tissue interfaces. Any high resolution weight-bearing cone-beam CT system can apply this method for motion compensation.

  14. The NACA High-Speed Motion-Picture Camera Optical Compensation at 40,000 Photographs Per Second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Cearcy D

    1946-01-01

    The principle of operation of the NACA high-speed camera is completely explained. This camera, operating at the rate of 40,000 photographs per second, took the photographs presented in numerous NACA reports concerning combustion, preignition, and knock in the spark-ignition engine. Many design details are presented and discussed, details of an entirely conventional nature are omitted. The inherent aberrations of the camera are discussed and partly evaluated. The focal-plane-shutter effect of the camera is explained. Photographs of the camera are presented. Some high-speed motion pictures of familiar objects -- photoflash bulb, firecrackers, camera shutter -- are reproduced as an illustration of the quality of the photographs taken by the camera.

  15. Analysis, measurement, and compensation of mechanical errors of IR-systems mounted on a five-axis motion table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszunas, Jerzy J.; Plorin, Jürgen; Kipfelsberger, Bernhard; Sonner, Christian; Engelhardt, Wolfgang

    2003-09-01

    LFK-Lenkflugkörpersysteme GmbH develops missile systems for a wide field of military purposes. The Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) facility of LFK in Unterschleissheim uses a five axis motion simulation table and an IR scene projection system. The system is designed for test and evaluation of several missile programs due to the dimensions of the five axis table and it's dynamic performance /1/. In a certain cruise missile program there was the need for system tests with nearly all components of the missile as well as special investigations and validation trials for the subsystem consisting of the IR-seeker and the image processing computer. The components had also to pass their qualification tests with the assistance of the HWIL team. These tests and their analysis are focussed to the mechanical accuracy of the gimbals and resolvers of the IR seeker and the tracking accuracy of the image processing computer. Before starting tests in the HWIL it is absolutely necessary to identify errors caused by mechanical tolerances of the test equipment (e.g. mounting of the seeker and the IR projection system) on the five axis motion simulator. Otherwise the obtained test results includes these errors and lead to incorrect system performance evaluation. There are different mechanical errors in mounting which can occur are analysed below. The main problem is caused by possible shifts of the IR-seeker in a plane perpendicular to the optical axis (with gimbals in zero position). Therefore a procedure has been developed using IR test images, a frame grabber and image processing routines to determine the mounting failures. These can be corrected by using mechanical adjustment tools designed and realised for this purpose.

  16. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  17. Time-delay compensation for stabilization imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yueting; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi; Feng, Huajun

    2014-05-01

    The spatial resolution of imaging systems for airborne and space-borne remote sensing are often limited by image degradation resulting from mechanical vibrations of platforms during image exposure. A straightforward way to overcome this problem is to actively stabilize the optical axis or drive the focal plane synchronous to the motion image during exposure. Thus stabilization imaging system usually consists of digital image motion estimation and micromechanical compensation. The performance of such kind of visual servo system is closely related to precision of motion estimation and time delay. Large time delay results in larger phase delay between motion estimation and micromechanical compensation, and leads to larger uncompensated residual motion and limited bandwidth. The paper analyzes the time delay caused by image acquisition period and introduces a time delay compensation method based on SVM (Support Vector Machine) motion prediction. The main idea to cancel the time delay is to predict the current image motion from delayed measurements. A support vector machine based method is designed to predict the image motion. A prototype of stabilization imaging system has been implemented in the lab. To analyze the influences of time delay on system performance and to verify the proposed time delay cancelation method, comparative experiments over various frequencies of vibration are taken. The experimental results show that, the accuracy of motion compensation and the bandwidth of the system can be significantly improved with time delay cancelation.

  18. Ambulatory measurement of knee motion and physical activity: preliminary evaluation of a smart activity monitor

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, James; Alaiti, Amer; Goldvasser, Dov; Scarborough, Donna; Freiberg, Andrew; Rubash, Harry; Malchau, Henrik; Harris, William; Krebs, David

    2006-01-01

    Background There is currently a paucity of devices available for continuous, long-term monitoring of human joint motion. Non-invasive, inexpensive devices capable of recording human activity and joint motion have many applications for medical research. Such a device could be used to quantify range of motion outside the gait laboratory. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the modified Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA) in measuring knee flexion angles, to detect different physical activities, and to quantify how often healthy subjects use deep knee flexion in the ambulatory setting. Methods We compared Biomotion Laboratory (BML) "gold standard" data to simultaneous IDEEA measures of knee motion and gait, step up/down, and stair descent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, we used a series of choreographed physical activities outside the BML to confirm the IDEEA's ability to accurately measure 7 commonly-performed physical activities. Subjects then continued data collection during ordinary activities outside the gait laboratory. Results Pooled correlations between the BML and IDEEA knee flexion angles were .97 +/- .03 for step up/down, .98 +/- .02 for stair descent, and .98 +/- .01 for gait. In the BML protocol, the IDEEA accurately identified gait, but was less accurate in identifying step up/down and stair descent. During sampling outside the BML, the IDEEA accurately detected walking, running, stair ascent, stair descent, standing, lying, and sitting. On average, subjects flexed their knees >120° for 0.17% of their data collection periods outside the BML. Conclusion The modified IDEEA system is a useful clinical tool for evaluating knee motion and multiple physical activities in the ambulatory setting. These five healthy subjects rarely flexed their knees >120°. PMID:16970818

  19. Activity-based exploitation of Full Motion Video (FMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, Shashi

    2012-06-01

    Video has been a game-changer in how US forces are able to find, track and defeat its adversaries. With millions of minutes of video being generated from an increasing number of sensor platforms, the DOD has stated that the rapid increase in video is overwhelming their analysts. The manpower required to view and garner useable information from the flood of video is unaffordable, especially in light of current fiscal restraints. "Search" within full-motion video has traditionally relied on human tagging of content, and video metadata, to provision filtering and locate segments of interest, in the context of analyst query. Our approach utilizes a novel machine-vision based approach to index FMV, using object recognition & tracking, events and activities detection. This approach enables FMV exploitation in real-time, as well as a forensic look-back within archives. This approach can help get the most information out of video sensor collection, help focus the attention of overburdened analysts form connections in activity over time and conserve national fiscal resources in exploiting FMV.

  20. Respiratory motion compensated overlay of surface models from cardiac MR on interventional x-ray fluoroscopy for guidance of cardiac resynchronization therapy procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzke, R.; Bornstedt, A.; Lutz, A.; Schenderlein, M.; Hombach, V.; Binner, L.; Rasche, V.

    2010-02-01

    Various multi-center trials have shown that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective procedure for patients with end-stage drug invariable heart failure (HF). Despite the encouraging results of CRT, at least 30% of patients do not respond to the treatment. Detailed knowledge of the cardiac anatomy (coronary venous tree, left ventricle), functional parameters (i.e. ventricular synchronicity) is supposed to improve CRT patient selection and interventional lead placement for reduction of the number of non-responders. As a pre-interventional imaging modality, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging has the potential to provide all relevant information. With functional information from CMR optimal implantation target sites may be better identified. Pre-operative CMR could also help to determine whether useful vein target segments are available for lead placement. Fused with X-ray, the mainstay interventional modality, improved interventional guidance for lead-placement could further help to increase procedure outcome. In this contribution, we present novel and practicable methods for a) pre-operative functional and anatomical imaging of relevant cardiac structures to CRT using CMR, b) 2D-3D registration of CMR anatomy and functional meshes with X-ray vein angiograms and c) real-time capable breathing motion compensation for improved fluoroscopy mesh overlay during the intervention based on right ventricular pacer lead tracking. With these methods, enhanced interventional guidance for left ventricular lead placement is provided.

  1. Automated analysis of non-mass-enhancing lesions in breast MRI based on morphological, kinetic, and spatio-temporal moments and joint segmentation-motion compensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Shutler, Jamie D.; Lobbes, Marc; Burgeth, Bernhard; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) represents an established method for the detection and diagnosis of breast lesions. While mass-like enhancing lesions can be easily categorized according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon, a majority of diagnostically challenging lesions, the so called non-mass-like enhancing lesions, remain both qualitatively as well as quantitatively difficult to analyze. Thus, the evaluation of kinetic and/or morphological characteristics of non-masses represents a challenging task for an automated analysis and is of crucial importance for advancing current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Compared to the well-characterized mass-enhancing lesions, non-masses have no well-defined and blurred tumor borders and a kinetic behavior that is not easily generalizable and thus discriminative for malignant and benign non-masses. To overcome these difficulties and pave the way for novel CAD systems for non-masses, we will evaluate several kinetic and morphological descriptors separately and a novel technique, the Zernike velocity moments, to capture the joint spatio-temporal behavior of these lesions, and additionally consider the impact of non-rigid motion compensation on a correct diagnosis.

  2. The motion of Martian glaciers and volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, L.

    2015-10-01

    The role of density of the heat flow on the velocity of motion of Martian glaciers is investigated using numerical model. We find that for enhanced heat flow the motion could increase dramatically. Similar effect could be achieved by thick insulating thermally layer on the top of the glacier.

  3. Pointing compensation system for spacecraft instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, Carl T. (Inventor); Gamble, Donald W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A closed loop system reduces pointing errors in one or more spacecraft instruments. Associated with each instrument is a electronics package (3) for commanding motion in that instrument and a pointing control system (5) for imparting motion in that instrument in response to a command (4) from the commanding package (3). Spacecraft motion compensation logic (25) compensates for instrument pointing errors caused by instrument-motion-induced spacecraft motion. Any finite number of instruments can be so compensated, by providing each pointing control system (5) and each commanding package (3), for the instruments desired to be compensated, with a link to the spacecraft motion compensation logic (25). The spacecraft motion compensation logic (25) is an electronic manifestation of the algebraic negative of a model of the dynamics of motion of the spacecraft. An example of a suitable model, and computer-simulated results, are presented.

  4. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions. [for active control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results indicating that unsteady aerodynamic loads derived under the assumption of simple harmonic motions executed by airfoil or wing can be extended to arbitrary motions are summarized. The generalized Theodorsen (1953) function referable to loads due to simple harmonic oscillations of a wing section in incompressible flow, the Laplace inversion integral for unsteady aerodynamic loads, calculations of root loci of aeroelastic loads, and analysis of generalized compressible transient airloads are discussed.

  5. Mathematical model for the simulation of Dynamic Docking Test System (DDST) active table motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.; Graves, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The mathematical model developed to describe the three-dimensional motion of the dynamic docking test system active table is described. The active table is modeled as a rigid body supported by six flexible hydraulic actuators which produce the commanded table motions.

  6. New hybrid active power filter for harmonic current suppression and reactive power compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biricik, Samet; Cemal Ozerdem, Ozgur; Redif, Soydan; Sezai Dincer, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    In the case of undistorted and balanced grid voltages, low ratio shunt active power filters (APFs) can give unity power factors and achieve current harmonic cancellation. However, this is not possible when source voltages are distorted and unbalanced. In this study, the cost-effective hybrid active power filter (HAPF) topology for satisfying the requirements of harmonic current suppression and non-active power compensation for industry is presented. An effective strategy is developed to observe the effect of the placement of power capacitors and LC filters with the shunt APF. A new method for alleviating the negative effects of a nonideal grid voltage is proposed that uses a self-tuning filter algorithm with instantaneous reactive power theory. The real-time control of the studied system was achieved with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architecture, which was developed using the OPAL-RT system. The performance result of the proposed HAPF system is tested and presented under nonideal supply voltage conditions.

  7. On the spontaneous collective motion of active matter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous directed motion, a hallmark of cell biology, is unusual in classical statistical physics. Here we study, using both numerical and analytical methods, organized motion in models of the cytoskeleton in which constituents are driven by energy-consuming motors. Although systems driven by small-step motors are described by an effective temperature and are thus quiescent, at higher order in step size, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, flowing and oscillating behavior emerges. Motors that respond with a negative susceptibility to imposed forces lead to an apparent negative-temperature system in which beautiful structures form resembling the asters seen in cell division. PMID:21876141

  8. On the spontaneous collective motion of active matter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G

    2011-09-13

    Spontaneous directed motion, a hallmark of cell biology, is unusual in classical statistical physics. Here we study, using both numerical and analytical methods, organized motion in models of the cytoskeleton in which constituents are driven by energy-consuming motors. Although systems driven by small-step motors are described by an effective temperature and are thus quiescent, at higher order in step size, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, flowing and oscillating behavior emerges. Motors that respond with a negative susceptibility to imposed forces lead to an apparent negative-temperature system in which beautiful structures form resembling the asters seen in cell division. PMID:21876141

  9. Effective temperature and spontaneous collective motion of active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Spontaneous directed motion, a hallmark of cell biology, is unusual in classical statistical physics. Here we study, using both numerical and analytical methods, organized motion in models of the cytoskeleton in which constituents are driven by energy-consuming motors. Although systems driven by small-step motors are described by an effective temperature and are thus quiescent, at higher order in step size, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, flowing and oscillating behavior emerges. Motors that respond with a negative susceptibility to imposed forces lead to an apparent negative temperature system in which beautiful structures form resembling the asters seen in cell division.

  10. Method for determination of the degree of compensation for electrically active impurities in multivalley semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Baranskii, P. I.; Gaidar, G. P.

    2013-06-15

    A method for determination of the degree of compensation k = N{sub a}/N{sub d} for shallow impurities in n-Si crystals with a nondegenerate electron gas is suggested. Data facilitating practical determination of the degree of compensation are given.

  11. 34 CFR 222.22 - How does the Secretary treat compensation from Federal activities for purposes of determining...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Secretary treat compensation from Federal activities for purposes of determining eligibility and payments? 222.22 Section 222.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IMPACT AID...

  12. Molybdenum substitution for improving the charge compensation and activity of Li2MnO3.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Gao, Yurui; Kong, Qingyu; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Liquan

    2014-07-01

    Lithium-rich layer-structured oxides xLi2 MnO3 ⋅ (1-x)LiMO2 (0compensation contributed by O(2-) in Li2 MnO3 leads to the evolution of oxygen during the initial Li(+) ion extraction at high voltage and voltage fading in subsequent cycling, resulting in a safety hazard and poor cycling performance of the battery. Molybdenum substitution was performed in this work to provide another electron donor and to enhance the electrochemical activity of Li2 MnO3 -based cathode materials. X-ray diffraction and adsorption studies indicated that Mo(5+) substitution expands the unit cell in the crystal lattice and weakens the LiO and MnO bonds, as well as enhancing the activity of Li2 MnO3 by lowering its delithiation potential and suppressing the release of oxygen. In addition, the chemical environment of O(2-) ions in molybdenum-substituted Li2 MnO3 is more reversible than in the unsubstituted sample during cycling. Therefore molybdenum substitution is expected to improve the performances of the Li2 MnO3 -based lithium-rich cathode materials. PMID:24939463

  13. Analysis of neck muscle activity and comparison of head movement and body movement during rotational motion.

    PubMed

    Sirikantharajah, Shahini; Valter McConville, Kristiina M; Zolfaghari, Nika

    2015-08-01

    The neck is a very delicate part of the body that is highly prone to whiplash injuries, during jerk. A lot of the research relating to whiplash injuries performed to date has been tested in environments with linear motions and have mostly applied their work to car collisions. Whiplash injuries can also affect disabled individuals during falls, bed transfers, and while travelling in wheelchairs. The primary objective of this paper was to focus on neck and body behaviour during rotational motion, rather than linear motion which has been often associated with car collisions. This paper takes the current motion signal processing technique a step further by computing the differential between head and body motion. Neck electromyogram (EMG) and angular velocity data of the head and body were acquired simultaneously from 20 subjects, as they were rotated 45 degrees in the forward pitch plane, with and without visual input, in a motion simulator. The centre of rotation (COR) on the simulator was located behind the subject Results showed that neck muscle behaviour was affected by the forward rotations, as well as visual input. Anterior neck muscles were most active during forward rotations and trials including VR. Maximum effective muscle power and activity of 10.54% and 55.72 (mV/mV)·s were reached respectively. Furthermore, during forward rotations the motion profiles started off with dominance in body motion, followed by dominance in head motion. PMID:26737049

  14. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  15. [Communication and noise. Speech intelligibility of airplane pilots with and without active noise compensation].

    PubMed

    Matschke, R G

    1994-08-01

    Noise exposure measurements were performed with pilots of the German Federal Navy during flight situations. The ambient noise levels during regular flight were maintained at levels above a 90 dB A-weighted level. This noise intensity requires wearing ear protection to avoid sound-induced hearing loss. To be able to understand radio communication (ATC) in spite of a noisy environment, headphone volume must be raised above the noise of the engines. The use of ear plugs in addition to the headsets and flight helmets is only of limited value because personal ear protection affects the intelligibility of ATC. Whereas speech intelligibility of pilots with normal hearing is affected to only a smaller degree, pilots with pre-existing high-frequency hearing losses show substantial impairments of speech intelligibility that vary in proportion to the hearing deficit present. Communication abilities can be reduced drastically, which in turn can affect air traffic security. The development of active noise compensation devices (ANC) that make use of the "anti-noise" principle may be a solution to this dilemma. To evaluate the effectiveness of an ANC-system and its influence on speech intelligibility, speech audiometry was performed with a German standardized test during simulated flight conditions with helicopter pilots. Results demonstrate the helpful effect on speech understanding especially for pilots with noise-induced hearing losses. This may help to avoid pre-retirement professional disability. PMID:7960953

  16. Mantle compensation of active metamorphic core complexes at Woodlark rift in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Abers, Geoffrey A; Ferris, Aaron; Craig, Mitchell; Davies, Hugh; Lerner-Lam, Arthur L; Mutter, John C; Taylor, Brian

    2002-08-22

    In many highly extended rifts on the Earth, tectonic removal of the upper crust exhumes mid-crustal rocks, producing metamorphic core complexes. These structures allow the upper continental crust to accommodate tens of kilometres of extension, but it is not clear how the lower crust and underlying mantle respond. Also, despite removal of the upper crust, such core complexes remain both topographically high and in isostatic equilibrium. Because many core complexes in the western United States are underlain by a flat Moho discontinuity, it has been widely assumed that their elevation is supported by flow in the lower crust or by magmatic underplating. These processes should decouple upper-crust extension from that in the mantle. In contrast, here we present seismic observations of metamorphic core complexes of the western Woodlark rift that show the overall crust to be thinned beneath regions of greatest surface extension. These core complexes are actively being exhumed at a rate of 5-10 km Myr(-1), and the thinning of the underlying crust appears to be compensated by mantle rocks of anomalously low density, as indicated by low seismic velocities. We conclude that, at least in this case, the development of metamorphic core complexes and the accommodation of high extension is not purely a crustal phenomenon, but must involve mantle extension. PMID:12192406

  17. Development and Psychometric Properties of the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living: Compensation Scale

    PubMed Central

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn; Lamb, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The Instrumental Activities of Daily Living – Compensation (IADL-C) scale was developed to capture early functional difficulties and to quantify compensatory strategy use that may mitigate functional decline in the aging population. The IADL-C was validated in a sample of cognitively healthy older adults (N=184) and individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; N=92) and dementia (N=24). Factor analysis and Rasch item analysis led to the 27-item IADL-C informant questionnaire with four functional domain subscales (money and self-management, home daily living, travel and event memory, and social skills). The subscales demonstrated good internal consistency (Rasch reliability 0.80 to 0.93) and test-retest reliability (Spearman coefficients 0.70 to 0.91). The IADL-C total score and subscales showed convergent validity with other IADL measures, discriminant validity with psychosocial measures, and the ability to discriminate between diagnostic groups. The money and self management subscale showed notable difficulties for individuals with MCI, whereas difficulties with home daily living became more prominent for dementia participants. Compensatory strategy use increased in the MCI group and decreased in the dementia group. PMID:25344901

  18. High-contrast imaging with an arbitrary aperture: Active compensation of aperture discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin

    2013-06-01

    We present a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach relies on using two sequential deformable mirrors (DMs) to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of DM surfaces that yield high-contrast point-spread functions is not linear, and nonlinear methods are needed to find the true minimum in the optimization topology. We solve the highly nonlinear Monge-Ampere equation that is the fundamental equation describing the physics of phase-induced amplitude modulation. We determine the optimum configuration for our two sequential DM system and show that high-throughput and high-contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies. We name this process Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD). We show that for geometries similar to the James Webb Space Telescope, ACAD can attain at least 10{sup –7} in contrast and an order of magnitude higher for both the future extremely large telescopes and on-axis architectures reminiscent of the Hubble Space Telescope. We show that the converging nonlinear mappings resulting from our DM shapes actually damp near-field diffraction artifacts in the vicinity of the discontinuities. Thus, ACAD actually lowers the chromatic ringing due to diffraction by segment gaps and struts while not amplifying the diffraction at the aperture edges beyond the Fresnel regime. This outer Fresnel ringing can be mitigated by properly designing the optical system. Consequently, ACAD is a true broadband solution to the problem of high-contrast imaging with segmented and/or on-axis apertures. We finally show that once the nonlinear solution is found, fine tuning with linear methods used in wavefront control can be applied to further contrast by another order of magnitude. Generally speaking

  19. 78 FR 68780 - Treatment of Income From Indian Fishing Rights-Related Activity as Compensation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... Executive Order 13563. Therefore, a regulatory assessment is not required. It has also been determined that... subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture. Section 1.415(c)-2(c)(3) excludes from compensation...

  20. Resistance of Cancer Cells to Targeted Therapies Through the Activation of Compensating Signaling Loops.

    PubMed

    von Manstein, Viktoria; Yang, Chul Min; Richter, Diane; Delis, Natalia; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of low molecular weight kinase inhibitors as "targeted" drugs has led to remarkable advances in the treatment of cancer patients. The clinical benefits of these tumor therapies, however, vary widely in patient populations and with duration of treatment. Intrinsic and acquired resistance against such drugs limits their efficacy. In addition to the well studied mechanisms of resistance based upon drug transport and metabolism, genetic alterations in drug target structures and the activation of compensatory cell signaling have received recent attention. Adaptive responses can be triggered which counteract the initial dependence of tumor cells upon a particular signaling molecule and allow only a transient inhibition of tumor cell growth. These compensating signaling mechanisms are often based upon the relief of repression of regulatory feedback loops. They might involve cell autonomous, intracellular events or they can be mediated via the secretion of growth factor receptor ligands into the tumor microenvironment and signal induction in an auto- or paracrine fashion. The transcription factors Stat3 and Stat5 mediate the biological functions of cytokines, interleukins and growth factors and can be considered as endpoints of multiple signaling pathways. In normal cells this activation is transient and the Stat molecules return to their non-phosphorylated state within a short time period. In tumor cells the balance between activating and de-activating signals is disturbed resulting in the persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5. The constant activation of Stat3 induces the expression of target genes, which cause the proliferation and survival of cancer cells, as well as their migration and invasive behavior. Activating components of the Jak-Stat pathway have been recognized as potentially valuable drug targets and important principles of compensatory signaling circuit induction during targeted drug treatment have been discovered in the context of kinase

  1. GABAA-receptor activation in the subthalamic nucleus compensates behavioral asymmetries in the hemiparkinsonian rat.

    PubMed

    Petri, David; Pum, Martin; Vesper, Jan; Huston, Joseph P; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2013-09-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) has a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Modulation of STN activity (by lesions, pharmacological or electrical stimulation) has been shown to improve motor parameters in PD patients and in animal models of PD. In an attempt to characterize the neurochemical bases for such antiparkinsonian action, we address specific neurotransmitter systems via local pharmacological manipulation of the STN in hemiparkinsonian rats. Here, we have focused on the GABAergic and glutamatergic receptors in the STN. In animals with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigro-striatal tract, we administered either the selective GABAA-agonist muscimol (0.5 μg and 1.0 μg), the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine; 2.5 μg), or vehicle (0.25 μl) into the STN. The effects of GABAergic and glutamatergic modulation of the STN on motor parameters were assessed by gauging rotational behavior and locomotion. Application of muscimol ipsilateral to the side of dopamine-depletion influenced turning behavior in a dose-dependent fashion, with the low dose re-adjusting turning behavior to a non-biased distribution, and the high dose evoking contraversive turning. The administration of MK-801 did not have such effects. These findings give evidence for the involvement of GABAergic activation in the STN in the compensation of motor asymmetries in the hemiparkinsonian rat, whereas N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-antagonism was ineffective in this model of PD. PMID:23727148

  2. Physical Activity Recognition Based on Motion in Images Acquired by a Wearable Camera

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Lu; Jia, Wenyan; Fernstrom, John D.; Sclabassi, Robert J.; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2011-01-01

    A new technique to extract and evaluate physical activity patterns from image sequences captured by a wearable camera is presented in this paper. Unlike standard activity recognition schemes, the video data captured by our device do not include the wearer him/herself. The physical activity of the wearer, such as walking or exercising, is analyzed indirectly through the camera motion extracted from the acquired video frames. Two key tasks, pixel correspondence identification and motion feature extraction, are studied to recognize activity patterns. We utilize a multiscale approach to identify pixel correspondences. When compared with the existing methods such as the Good Features detector and the Speed-up Robust Feature (SURF) detector, our technique is more accurate and computationally efficient. Once the pixel correspondences are determined which define representative motion vectors, we build a set of activity pattern features based on motion statistics in each frame. Finally, the physical activity of the person wearing a camera is determined according to the global motion distribution in the video. Our algorithms are tested using different machine learning techniques such as the K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Naive Bayesian and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The results show that many types of physical activities can be recognized from field acquired real-world video. Our results also indicate that, with a design of specific motion features in the input vectors, different classifiers can be used successfully with similar performances. PMID:21779142

  3. Active knee motion after cruciate ligament rupture. Stereoradiography.

    PubMed

    Kärrholm, J; Selvik, G; Elmqvist, L G; Hansson, L I

    1988-04-01

    In 10 patients with an old injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, the three-dimensional movements of the knee joint were studied when the patients flexed their knees. Tibial motions were recorded using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. Internal rotation and adduction of the tibia were reduced in the injured knees when compared with the intact knees; during flexion of the knee joint, the tibial intercondylar eminence occupied a more lateral and posterior position on the injured side. Our results may indicate that the knee joint is continuously exposed to abnormal stresses when the anterior cruciate ligament is torn. PMID:3364185

  4. Yaw Motion Cues in Helicopter Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffrey A.; Johnson, Walter W.

    1996-01-01

    A piloted simulation that examined the effects of yaw motion cues on pilot-vehicle performance, pilot workload, and pilot motion perception was conducted on the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator. The vehicle model that was used represented an AH-64 helicopter. Three tasks were performed in which only combinations of vehicle yaw and vertical displacement were allowed. The commands issued to the motion platform were modified to present the following four motion configurations for a pilot located forward of the center of rotation: (1) only the linear translations, (2) only the angular rotation, (3) both the linear translations and the angular rotation, and (4) no motion. The objective data indicated that pilot-vehicle performance was reduced and the necessary control activity increased when linear motion was removed; however, the lack of angular rotation did not result in a measured degradation for almost all cases. Also, pilots provided subjective assessments of their compensation required, the motion fidelity, and their judgment of whether or not linear or rotational cockpit motion was present. Ratings of compensation and fidelity were affected only by linear acceleration, and the rotational motion had no significant impact. Also, when only linear motion was present, pilots typically reported the presence of rotation. Thus, linear acceleration cues, not yaw rotational cues, appear necessary to simulate hovering flight.

  5. Move with Science: Energy, Force, & Motion. An Activities-Based Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beven, Roy Q.

    The secondary school level activities contained in this book use the subject of transportation to teach the basic concepts of physics and several areas of human biology. The material is organized into sections including curriculum design, activities, background readings, and resources. Activities focus on such topics as notions of motion stability…

  6. Rational positive real approximations for LQG optimal compensators arising in active stabilization of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desantis, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the approximation problem for a class of optimal compensators for flexible structures is considered. The particular case of a simply supported truss with an offset antenna is dealt with. The nonrational positive real optimal compensator transfer function is determined, and it is proposed that an approximation scheme based on a continued fraction expansion method be used. Comparison with the more popular modal expansion technique is performed in terms of stability margin and parameters sensitivity of the relative approximated closed loop transfer functions.

  7. A Snapshot of Industry and Academic Professional Activities, Compensation, and Engagement in Educational Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packman, Sheryl; Camara, Wayne J.; Huff, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a snapshot of educational measurement professionals--their educational, professional and demographic backgrounds, as well as their workplace settings, job tasks, professional involvement, and compensation practices. Two previous studies have surveyed employers, but this is the first attempt to conduct a comprehensive survey of…

  8. Polymer structure and the compensation effect of the diffusion pre-exponential factor and activation energy of a permeating solute.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ju-Meng; Qiu, Jun; Madeira, Luis M; Mendes, Adélio

    2007-03-22

    In the present work, the relation between the pre-exponential factor and the apparent activation energy of diffusion, ln D(0) = alpha + betaE(D), so-called compensation effect, is re-examined and critically discussed for diffusion of gases in rubbery and glassy polymers. In principle, the above equation could be derived from the enthalpy-entropy compensation in the framework of the transition state theory. However, one should consider the influence of the jump length term contained in the pre-exponential factor, which may be affected by permeating species and polymer properties. We found that parameter alpha depends on penetrant size and polymer properties, such as local chain mobility and free volume. This can be interpreted by the fact that the jump length is affected by both penetrant and polymer properties. Finally, methods for estimating the jump length are discussed. PMID:17316040

  9. Flexor tendon excursion and load during passive and active simulated motion: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, A; Yoon, H K; Karia, R; Lee, S K

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the amount of tendon excursion and load experienced during simulated active and passive rehabilitation exercises. Six cadaver specimens were utilized to examine tendon excursion and load. Lateral fluoroscopic images were used to measure the excursions of metal markers placed in the flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus tendons of the index, middle, and ring fingers. Measurements were performed during ten different passive and active simulated motions. Mean tendon forces were higher in all active versus passive movements. Blocking movements placed the highest loads on the flexor tendons. Active motion resulted in higher tendon excursion than did passive motion. Simulated hook position resulted in the highest total tendon excursion and the highest inter-tendinous excursion. This knowledge may help optimize the management of the post-operative exercise therapy regimen. PMID:23221181

  10. Effects of eating on vection-induced motion sickness, cardiac vagal tone, and gastric myoelectric activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uijtdehaage, S. H.; Stern, R. M.; Koch, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of food ingestion on motion sickness severity and its physiological mechanisms. Forty-six fasted subjects were assigned either to a meal group or to a no-meal group. Electrogastrographic (EGG) indices (normal 3 cpm activity and abnormal 4-9 cpm tachyarrhythmia) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) were measured before and after a meal and during a subsequent exposure to a rotating drum in which illusory self-motion was induced. The results indicated that food intake enhanced cardiac parasympathetic tone (RSA) and increased gastric 3 cpm activity. Postprandial effects on motion sickness severity remain equivocal due to group differences in RSA baseline levels. During drum rotation, dysrhythmic activity of the stomach (tachyarrhythmia) and vagal withdrawal were observed. Furthermore, high levels of vagal tone prior to drum rotation predicted a low incidence of motion sickness symptoms, and were associated positively with gastric 3 cpm activity and negatively with tachyarrhythmia. These data suggest that enhanced levels of parasympathetic activity can alleviate motion sickness symptoms by suppressing, in part, its dysrhythmic gastric underpinnings.

  11. Visuotactile motion congruence enhances gamma-band activity in visual and somatosensory cortices.

    PubMed

    Krebber, Martin; Harwood, James; Spitzer, Bernhard; Keil, Julian; Senkowski, Daniel

    2015-08-15

    When touching and viewing a moving surface our visual and somatosensory systems receive congruent spatiotemporal input. Behavioral studies have shown that motion congruence facilitates interplay between visual and tactile stimuli, but the neural mechanisms underlying this interplay are not well understood. Neural oscillations play a role in motion processing and multisensory integration. They may also be crucial for visuotactile motion processing. In this electroencephalography study, we applied linear beamforming to examine the impact of visuotactile motion congruence on beta and gamma band activity (GBA) in visual and somatosensory cortices. Visual and tactile inputs comprised of gratings that moved either in the same or different directions. Participants performed a target detection task that was unrelated to motion congruence. While there were no effects in the beta band (13-21Hz), the power of GBA (50-80Hz) in visual and somatosensory cortices was larger for congruent compared with incongruent motion stimuli. This suggests enhanced bottom-up multisensory processing when visual and tactile gratings moved in the same direction. Supporting its behavioral relevance, GBA was correlated with shorter reaction times in the target detection task. We conclude that motion congruence plays an important role for the integrative processing of visuotactile stimuli in sensory cortices, as reflected by oscillatory responses in the gamma band. PMID:26026813

  12. Embodied Semiotic Activities and Their Role in the Construction of Mathematical Meaning of Motion Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzer, Galit; Yerushalmy, Michal

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the relation between bodily actions, artifact-mediated activities, and semiotic processes that students experience while producing and interpreting graphs of two-dimensional motion in the plane. We designed a technology-based setting that enabled students to engage in embodied semiotic activities and experience two modes of…

  13. Your Students Can Be Rocket Scientists! A Galaxy of Great Activities about Astronauts, Gravity, and Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1994-01-01

    Presents activities for a springtime Space Day that can teach students about astronauts, gravity, and motion. Activities include creating a paper bag spacecraft to study liftoff and having students simulate gravity's effects by walking in various manners and recording pulse rates. A list of resources is included. (SM)

  14. Morphometrical investigations on the reproductive activity of the ovaries in rats subjected to immobilization and to motion activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantinov, N.; Cheresharov, L.; Toshkova, S.

    1982-01-01

    Wistar-strain white female rats were divided into three groups, with the first group subjected to motion loading, the second used as control, and the third group was immobilized. A considerable reduction in numbers of corpora lutea was observed in the immobilized group, together with smaller numbers of embryos, high percent of embryo mortality, fetal growth retardation, and endometrium disorders. The control group showed no deviation from normal conditions, and there was slight improvement in reproductive activity of animals under motion loading.

  15. Active feed array compensation for reflector antenna surface distortions. Ph.D. Thesis - Akron Univ., Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of electromagnetic compensation for reflector antenna surface distortions is investigated. The performance characteristics of large satellite communication reflector antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts, mainly due to thermal effects from solar radiation. The technique developed can be used to maintain the antenna boresight directivity and sidelobe level independent of thermal effects on the reflector surface. With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), a greater flexibility in array fed reflector antenna systems can be achieved. MMIC arrays provide independent control of amplitude and phase for each of the many radiating elements in the feed array. By assuming a known surface distortion profile, a simulation study is carried out to examine the antenna performance as a function of feed array size and number of elements. Results indicate that the compensation technique can effectively control boresight directivity and sidelobe level under peak surface distortion in the order of tenth of a wavelength.

  16. Spontaneous Motion in Hierarchically Assembled Active Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication. Besides their biological importance, such inherently far-from-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for the development of soft materials with highly sought after biomimetic properties such as autonomous motility and self-healing. I will describe our exploration of such a class of biologically inspired soft active materials. Starting from extensile bundles comprised of microtubules and kinesin, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of polymeric gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubule bundles form an active gel network capable of generating internally driven chaotic flows that enhance transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, these 3D networks buckle onto the water-oil interface forming a dense thin film of bundles exhibiting cascades of collective buckling, fracture, and self-healing driven by internally generated stresses from the kinesin clusters. When compressed against surfaces, this active nematic cortex exerts traction stresses that propel the locomotion of the droplet. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblies of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are fundamentally distinct from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks. These assemblies, in turn, enable the generation of a new class of materials that exhibit macroscale flow phenomena emerging from nanoscale components.

  17. Relationship between spinal range of motion and trunk muscle activity during trunk rotation

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Tomoaki; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Nakazawa, Rie; Wada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between spinal range of motion and trunk muscle activity during trunk rotation using a three-dimensional motion analysis system and surface electromyography. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects comprised 11 healthy men. A three-dimensional motion analysis system measured the trunk rotational angle of 4 segments of the thoracic vertebrae and 2 segments of the lumbar vertebrae. Surface electromyography measured the activities of the unilateral latissimus dorsi, lumbar multifidus, rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis muscles. [Results] During ipsilateral rotation at thoracic vertebral levels, the muscle activity of the latissimus dorsi and external oblique was significantly increased compared with the activity in the 0–10% range of trunk rotation. During early ipsilateral rotation at lumbar vertebral levels, the muscle activity of the internal oblique and transversus abdominis was significantly increased compared with that in the 0–10% range of trunk rotation. During contralateral rotation at both thoracic and lumbar vertebral levels, the muscle activity of the external oblique was significantly increased compared with that in the 0–10% range of trunk rotation. [Conclusion] This study indicates that it is important to consider vertebral segments and spinal range of motion during trunk rotation. PMID:27065549

  18. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity. PMID:27597999

  19. Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in collective active motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breier, Rebekka E.; Selinger, Robin L. B.; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Herminghaus, Stephan; Mazza, Marco G.

    2016-02-01

    Chiral symmetry breaking is ubiquitous in biological systems, from DNA to bacterial suspensions. A key unresolved problem is how chiral structures may spontaneously emerge from achiral interactions. We study a simple model of active swimmers in three dimensions that effectively incorporates hydrodynamic interactions. We perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations (up to 106 particles) and find long-lived metastable collective states that exhibit chiral organization although the interactions are achiral. We elucidate under which conditions these chiral states will emerge and grow to large scales. To explore the complex phase space available to the system, we perform nonequilibrium quenches on a one-dimensional Lebwohl-Lasher model with periodic boundary conditions to study the likelihood of formation of chiral structures.

  20. Activation of Nanoscale Allosteric Protein Domain Motion Revealed by Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Farago, Bela; Li, Jianquan; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2010-01-01

    NHERF1 is a multidomain scaffolding protein that assembles signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by the membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 Ångstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length-scales and on submicrosecond timescales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much-simplified coarse-grained model suffices to describe interdomain motion of a multidomain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves changes in long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond timescales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE. PMID:21081097

  1. Individual differences in distraction by motion predicted by neural activity in MT/V5

    PubMed Central

    Lechak, Jennifer R.; Leber, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals differ substantially in their susceptibility to distraction by irrelevant visual information. Previous research has uncovered how individual variability in the goal-driven component of attentional control influences distraction, yet it remains unknown whether other sources of variability between individuals also predict distraction. In this fMRI study, we showed that an individual's inherent sensitivity to passively viewed visual motion predicts his/her susceptibility to distraction by motion. Bilateral MT/V5 was localized in participants during passive viewing of moving stimuli, affording a baseline measure of motion sensitivity. Next, participants performed a visual search task with an irrelevant motion singleton distractor, and both behavioral and neural indices of distraction were recorded. Results revealed that both of these indices were predicted by the independent index of motion sensitivity. An additional analysis of moment-to-moment fluctuations in distraction within individuals revealed that distraction could be predicted by pretrial fMRI activity in several brain regions, including MT+, which likely reflected the observer's momentary propensity to process motion. Together, these results shed light on how variability in factors other than goal-driven processing, both within and between individuals, affects attentional control and one's perception of the visual world. PMID:22375110

  2. Extraction of motion strength and motor activity signals from video recordings of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Karayiannis, N B; Srinivasan, S; Bhattacharya, R; Wise, M S; Frost, J D; Mizrahi, E M

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents two methods developed to extract quantitative information from video recordings of neonatal seizures in the form of temporal motion strength and motor activity signals. Motion strength signals are extracted by measuring the area of the body parts that move during the seizure and the relative speed of motion using a combination of spatiotemporal subband decomposition of video, nonlinear filtering, and segmentation. Motor activity signals are extracted by tracking selected anatomical sites during the seizure using a modified version of a feature-tracking procedure developed for video, known as the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) algorithm. The experiments indicate that the temporal signals produced by the proposed methods provide the basis for differentiating myoclonic from focal clonic seizures and distinguishing these types of neonatal seizures from normal infant behaviors. PMID:11585212

  3. [Insufficient legal rights of traffic accident victims. Insurance companies should force more active compensation claims].

    PubMed

    Gullbring, B; Månsson, M; Walheim, G

    2000-11-15

    According to law, persons injured in road traffic accidents are entitled to compensation. In almost 92% of cases, victims accept a modified solution suggested by the insurance company involved. If an agreement cannot be reached, or the disability is 10% or more, the case is referred to The Road Traffic Injuries Commission (TSN). Insurance companies often claim that the lengthy wait for a final ruling--up to four years or more--is due to the lack of a doctor's certificate of disability. PMID:11116870

  4. Radical advancement in multi-spectral imaging for autonomous vehicles (UAVs, UGVs, and UUVs) using active compensation.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Brian F.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this LDRD was to demonstrate a compact, multi-spectral, refractive imaging systems using active optical compensation. Compared to a comparable, conventional lens system, our system has an increased operational bandwidth, provides for spectral selectivity and, non-mechanically corrects aberrations induced by the wavelength dependent properties of a passive refractive optical element (i.e. lens). The compact nature and low power requirements of the system lends itself to small platforms such as autonomous vehicles. In addition, the broad spectral bandwidth of our system would allow optimized performance for both day/night use, and the multi-spectral capability allows for spectral discrimination and signature identification.

  5. An advanced static var compensator based on a three level IGBT inverter modelling analysis and active power filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draou, Azeddine

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the dynamic performance analysis of an Advanced Static Var Compensator (ASVC) using three-level neutral point-clamped voltage source inverter. The paper presents the principles of operating and the method of reference currents generation. The dynamic behaviour of the system is further analysed using Matlab/Simulink with SimPower Systems toolbox through a set of simulation tests. The results obtained have been applied to an active power filter which might lead to the design of a robust controller for current harmonics and reactive power applications

  6. Influence of gravity compensation on kinematics and muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury: an explorative study.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Snoek, Govert J; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Nene, Anand V; Jannink, Michiel J A

    2010-01-01

    Many interventions in upper-limb rehabilitation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) use arm support (gravity compensation); however, its specific effects on kinematics and muscle activation characteristics in subjects with a CSCI are largely unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional explorative study to study these effects. Nine subjects with a CSCI performed two goal-directed arm movements (maximal reach, reach and retrieval) with and without gravity compensation. Angles at elbow and shoulder joints and muscle activation were measured and compared. Seven subjects reduced elbow extension (range 1.8°-4.5°) during the maximal reaching task with gravity compensation. In the reach and retrieval task with gravity compensation, all subjects decreased elbow extension (range 0.1°-11.0°). Eight subjects executed movement closer to the body. Regarding muscle activation, gravity compensation did not influence timing; however, the amplitude of activation decreased, especially in antigravity muscles, namely mean change +/- standard deviation of descending part of trapezius (18.2% +/- 37.5%), anterior part of deltoid (37.7% +/- 16.7%), posterior part of deltoid (32.0% +/- 13.9%), and long head biceps (49.6% +/- 20.0%). Clinical implications for the use of gravity compensation in rehabilitation (during activities of daily living or exercise therapy) should be further investigated with a larger population. PMID:21110258

  7. Image-based synchronization of force and bead motion in active electromagnetic microrheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Young; Saleh, Omar A.

    2014-12-01

    In the past, electromagnetic tweezers have been used to make active microrheometers. An active microrheometer measures the dynamic mechanical properties of a material from the motion of embedded particles under external force, e.g. a sinusoidal magnetic force generated by a sinusoidal current on a coil. The oscillating amplitude and the phase lag of the motion are then used to estimate the material’s dynamic mechanical properties. The phase lag, in particular, requires precise synchronization of the particle motion with the external force. In previous works, synchronization difficulties have arisen from measuring two parameters with two instruments, one of them being a camera. We solved the synchronization issue by measuring two parameters with a single instrument, the camera alone. From captured images, particles can be tracked in three dimensions through an image-analysis algorithm while the current on the coil can be measured from the brightness of the image; this enables simultaneous synchronization of the phases of the driving current on the electromagnet coil and the motion of the magnetic probe particle. We calibrate the phase delay between the magnetic force and the particle’s motion in glycerol and confirm the calibration with a Hall probe. The technique is further tested by measuring the shear modulus of a polyacrylamide gel, and comparing the results to those obtained using a conventional rheometer.

  8. Prospective active marker motion correction improves statistical power in BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Melvyn B.; Goldman, Robin I.; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J.; Sajda, Paul; Brown, Truman R.

    2013-01-01

    Group level statistical maps of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals acquired using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have become a basic measurement for much of systems, cognitive and social neuroscience. A challenge in making inferences from these statistical maps is the noise and potential confounds that arise from the head motion that occurs within and between acquisition volumes. This motion results in the scan plane being misaligned during acquisition, ultimately leading to reduced statistical power when maps are constructed at the group level. In most cases, an attempt is made to correct for this motion through the use of retrospective analysis methods. In this paper, we use a prospective active marker motion correction (PRAMMO) system that uses radio frequency markers for real-time tracking of motion, enabling on-line slice plane correction. We show that the statistical power of the activation maps is substantially increased using PRAMMO compared to conventional retrospective correction. Analysis of our results indicates that the PRAMMO acquisition reduces the variance without decreasing the signal component of the BOLD (beta). Using PRAMMO could thus improve the overall statistical power of fMRI based BOLD measurements, leading to stronger inferences of the nature of processing in the human brain. PMID:23220430

  9. Evidence of left-lateral active motion at the North America-Caribbean plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. D.; Ellouz, N.; Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Meyer, B.; Momplaisir, R.; Granja, J. L.; Battani, A.; Burov, E. B.; Clouard, V.; Deschamps, R.; Gorini, C.; Hamon, Y.; LE Pourhiet, L.; Loget, N.; Lucazeau, F.; Pillot, D.; Poort, J.; Tankoo, K.; Cuevas, J. L.; Alcaide, J.; Poix, C. J.; Mitton, S.; Rodriguez, Y.; Schmitz, J.; Munoz Martin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The North America-Caribbean plate boundary is one of the least-known among large plate boundaries. Although it was identified early on as an example of a strike-slip fault in the north of Hispaniola, its structure and rate of motion remains poorly constrained. We present the first direct evidence for active sinistral strike-slip motion along this fault, based on swath seafloor mapping of the northern Haiti area. There is evidence for ~16.5 km of apparent strike-slip motion along the mapped segment of the Septentrional fault zone off Cap Haitien town which is terminated to the east onland Dominican republic and in the west to southern Cuban margin. By evaluating these new constraints within the context of geodetic models of global plate motions, we estimate an activity of the fault since 2 Ma with an angular velocity for the Caribbean plate relative to the North America predicted 6-12 mmyr-1 sinistral motion along the Septentrional fault zone. This transform fault was initiated around 20 million years ago in its western segment and since 2 Ma in its eastern segment in response to a regional reorganization of plate velocities and directions, which induced a change in configuration of plate boundaries.

  10. Analysis and active compensation of microphonics in continuous wave narrow-bandwidth superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Kugeler, O.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-08-01

    Many proposals for next generation light sources based on single pass free electron lasers or energy recovery linac facilities require a continuous wave (cw) driven superconducting linac. The effective beam loading in such machines is very small and in principle the cavities can be operated at a bandwidth of a few Hz and with less than a few kW of rf power. However, a power reserve is required to ensure field stability. A major error source is the mechanical microphonics detuning of the niobium cavities. To understand the influence of cavity detuning on longitudinal beam stability, a measurement program has been started at the horizontal cavity test facility HoBiCaT at HZB to study TESLA-type cavities. The microphonics detuning spectral content, peak detuning values, and the driving terms for these mechanical oscillations have been analyzed. In combination with the characterization of cw-adapted fast tuning systems based on the piezoelectric effect this information has been used to design a detuning compensation algorithm. It has been shown that a compensation factor between 2-7 is achievable, reducing the typical detuning of 2-3 Hz rms to below 0.5 Hz rms. These results were included in rf-control simulations of the cavities, and it was demonstrated that a phase stability below 0.02° can be achieved.

  11. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2–30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  12. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  13. Electronic Motion Sensors and Heart Rate as Measures of Physical Activity in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedson, Patty S.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews several mechanical and electronic techniques for monitoring physical activity in children. The paper focuses on motion sensors (Large Scale Integrated Sensor and Caltrac Accelerometer) and heart rate, and it presents recommendations for establishing general guidelines for appropriate use of such monitoring devices with children. (SM)

  14. Compensation Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roady, Celia

    2008-01-01

    Congress, the news media, and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) continue to cast a wary eye on the compensation of nonprofit leaders. Hence, any college or university board that falls short of IRS expectations in its procedures for setting the president's compensation is putting the president, other senior officials, and board members at…

  15. Photovoltaic power converter system with a controller configured to actively compensate load harmonics

    DOEpatents

    de Rooij, Michael Andrew; Steigerwald, Robert Louis; Delgado, Eladio Clemente

    2008-12-16

    Photovoltaic power converter system including a controller configured to reduce load harmonics is provided. The system comprises a photovoltaic array and an inverter electrically coupled to the array to generate an output current for energizing a load connected to the inverter and to a mains grid supply voltage. The system further comprises a controller including a first circuit coupled to receive a load current to measure a harmonic current in the load current. The controller includes a second circuit to generate a fundamental reference drawn by the load. The controller further includes a third circuit for combining the measured harmonic current and the fundamental reference to generate a command output signal for generating the output current for energizing the load connected to the inverter. The photovoltaic system may be configured to compensate harmonic currents that may be drawn by the load.

  16. Human movements and abstract motion displays activate different processes in the observer's motor system.

    PubMed

    Agosta, Sara; Battelli, Lorella; Casile, Antonino

    2016-04-15

    Brain imaging studies have shown that observation of both bodily movements and abstract motion displays complying with human kinematics activate the observer's motor cortex. However, it is unknown whether the same processes are active in the two conditions. Here, we addressed this issue using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to directly compare cortico-spinal excitability during observation of actions and motion stimuli that complied with or violated normal human kinematics. We found that kinematics significantly modulated the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) produced by TMS during observation of both human and abstract motion stimuli. However, only the temporal unfolding of cortico-spinal excitability during observation of human movements significantly correlated with instantaneous stimulus velocity. This correlation was present for normal movements and also for a subset of the movements having unnatural kinematics. Furthermore, bodily movements for which we found no correlation between MEPs and stimulus velocity produced significantly higher MEPs. Our novel results suggest a dissociation in how human movements and abstract motion displays engage the observer's motor system. Specifically, while both stimulus types significantly activate the observer's motor cortex, only bodily movements produce patterns of cortico-spinal excitability that closely follow the velocity profile of the observed movement. This internal "re-enactment" of observed bodily movements seems to be only partially attuned to normal human kinematics. PMID:26854559

  17. On the relationship between photospheric footpoint motions and coronal heating in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Asgari-Targhi, M.; Berger, M. A.

    2014-05-20

    Coronal heating theories can be classified as either direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC) mechanisms, depending on whether the coronal magnetic field responds quasi-statically or dynamically to the photospheric footpoint motions. In this paper we investigate whether photospheric footpoint motions with velocities of 1-2 km s{sup –1} can heat the corona in active regions, and whether the corona responds quasi-statically or dynamically to such motions (DC versus AC heating). We construct three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models for the Alfvén waves and quasi-static perturbations generated within a coronal loop. We find that in models where the effects of the lower atmosphere are neglected, the corona responds quasi-statically to the footpoint motions (DC heating), but the energy flux into the corona is too low compared to observational requirements. In more realistic models that include the lower atmosphere, the corona responds more dynamically to the footpoint motions (AC heating) and the predicted heating rates due to Alfvén wave turbulence are sufficient to explain the observed hot loops. The higher heating rates are due to the amplification of Alfvén waves in the lower atmosphere. We conclude that magnetic braiding is a highly dynamic process.

  18. Active-site motions and polarity enhance catalytic turnover of hydrated subtilisin dissolved in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Elton P; Eppler, Ross K; Beaudoin, Julianne M; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2009-04-01

    The enzyme subtilisin Carlsberg was surfactant-solubilized into two organic solvents, isooctane and tetrahydrofuran, and hydrated through stepwise changes in the thermodynamic water activity, a(w). The apparent turnover number k(cat)(app) in these systems ranged from 0.2 to 80 s(-1) and increased 11-fold in isooctane and up to 50-fold in tetrahydrofuran with increasing a(w). (19)F NMR relaxation experiments employing an active-site inhibitor were used to assess the dependence of active-site motions on a(w). The rates of NMR-derived fast (k > 10(7) s(-1)) and slow (k < 10(4) s(-1)) active-site motions increased in both solvents upon hydration, but only the slow motions correlated with k(cat). The (19)F chemical shift was a sensitive probe of the local electronic environment and provided an empirical measure of the active-site dielectric constant epsilon(as), which increased with hydration to epsilon(as) approximately 13 in each solvent. In both solvents, the transition state free energy data and epsilon(as) followed Kirkwood's model for the continuum solvation of a dipole, indicating that water also enhanced catalysis by altering the active-site's electronic environment and increasing its polarity to better stabilize the transition state. These results reveal that favorable dynamic and electrostatic effects both contribute to accelerated catalysis by solubilized subtilisin Carlsberg upon hydration in organic solvents. PMID:19317505

  19. Active-site motions and polarity enhance catalytic turnover of hydrated subtilisin dissolved in organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Elton P; Eppler, Ross K; Beaudoin, Julianne M; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2009-01-01

    The enzyme subtilisin Carlsberg was surfactant-solubilized into two organic solvents, isooctane and tetrahydrofuran, and hydrated through stepwise changes in the thermodynamic water activity, aw. The apparent turnover number kcatapp in these systems ranged from 0.2 to 80 s−1 and increased 11-fold in isooctane and up to 50-fold in tetrahydrofuran with increasing aw. 19F-NMR relaxation experiments employing an active-site inhibitor were used to assess the dependence of active-site motions on aw. The rates of NMR-derived fast (k > 107 s−1) and slow (k < 104 s−1) active-site motions increased in both solvents upon hydration, but only the slow motions correlated with kcat. The 19F chemical shift was a sensitive probe of the local electronic environment and provided an empirical measure of the active-site dielectric constant εas, which increased with hydration to εas ≈ 13 in each solvent. In both solvents the transition state free energy data and εas followed Kirkwood’s model for the continuum solvation of a dipole, indicating that water also enhanced catalysis by altering the active-site’s electronic environment and increasing its polarity to better stabilize the transition state. These results reveal that favorable dynamic and electrostatic effects both contribute to accelerated catalysis by solubilized subtilisin Carlsberg upon hydration in organic solvents. PMID:19317505

  20. Realtime recognition of complex human daily activities using human motion and location data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chun; Sheng, Weihua

    2012-09-01

    Daily activity recognition is very useful in robot-assisted living systems. In this paper, we proposed a method to recognize complex human daily activities which consist of simultaneous body activities and hand gestures in an indoor environment. A wireless power-aware motion sensor node is developed which consists of a commercial orientation sensor, a wireless communication module, and a power management unit. To recognize complex daily activities, three motion sensor nodes are attached to the right thigh, the waist, and the right hand of a human subject, while an optical motion capture system is used to obtain his/her location information. A three-level dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) is implemented to model the intratemporal and intertemporal constraints among the location, body activity, and hand gesture. The body activity and hand gesture are estimated using a Bayesian filter and a short-time Viterbi algorithm, which reduces the computational complexity and memory usage. We conducted experiments in a mock apartment environment and the obtained results showed the effectiveness and accuracy of our method. PMID:22434793

  1. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic{sup 18}F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R{sup 2} = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast.

  2. A Review of Accelerometry-Based Wearable Motion Detectors for Physical Activity Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Che-Chang; Hsu, Yeh-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Characteristics of physical activity are indicative of one’s mobility level, latent chronic diseases and aging process. Accelerometers have been widely accepted as useful and practical sensors for wearable devices to measure and assess physical activity. This paper reviews the development of wearable accelerometry-based motion detectors. The principle of accelerometry measurement, sensor properties and sensor placements are first introduced. Various research using accelerometry-based wearable motion detectors for physical activity monitoring and assessment, including posture and movement classification, estimation of energy expenditure, fall detection and balance control evaluation, are also reviewed. Finally this paper reviews and compares existing commercial products to provide a comprehensive outlook of current development status and possible emerging technologies. PMID:22163626

  3. Range of Motion Requirements for Upper-Limb Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Lisa Smurr; Cowley, Jeffrey; Wilken, Jason M.; Resnik, Linda

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We quantified the range of motion (ROM) required for eight upper-extremity activities of daily living (ADLs) in healthy participants. METHOD. Fifteen right-handed participants completed several bimanual and unilateral basic ADLs while joint kinematics were monitored using a motion capture system. Peak motions of the pelvis, trunk, shoulder, elbow, and wrist were quantified for each task. RESULTS. To complete all activities tested, participants needed a minimum ROM of −65°/0°/105° for humeral plane angle (horizontal abduction–adduction), 0°–108° for humeral elevation, −55°/0°/79° for humeral rotation, 0°–121° for elbow flexion, −53°/0°/13° for forearm rotation, −40°/0°/38° for wrist flexion–extension, and −28°/0°/38° for wrist ulnar–radial deviation. Peak trunk ROM was 23° lean, 32° axial rotation, and 59° flexion–extension. CONCLUSION. Full upper-limb kinematics were calculated for several ADLs. This methodology can be used in future studies as a basis for developing normative databases of upper-extremity motions and evaluating pathology in populations. PMID:26709433

  4. Complementary limb motion estimation for the control of active knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Burgkart, Rainer; Hartmann, Cornelia; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Riener, Robert; Buss, Martin

    2011-02-01

    To restore walking after transfemoral amputation, various actuated exoprostheses have been developed, which control the knee torque actively or via variable damping. In both cases, an important issue is to find the appropriate control that enables user-dominated gait. Recently, we suggested a generic method to deduce intended motion of impaired or amputated limbs from residual human body motion. Based on interjoint coordination in physiological gait, statistical regression is used to estimate missing motion. In a pilot study, this complementary limb motion estimation (CLME) strategy is applied to control an active knee exoprosthesis. A motor-driven prosthetic knee with one degree of freedom has been realized, and one above-knee amputee has used it with CLME. Performed tasks are walking on a treadmill and alternating stair ascent and descent. The subject was able to walk on the treadmill at varying speeds, but needed assistance with the stairs, especially to descend. The promising results with CLME are compared with the subject's performance with her own prosthesis, the C-Leg from Otto Bock. PMID:21303189

  5. Biocatalyst activity in nonaqueous environments correlates with centisecond-range protein motions

    PubMed Central

    Eppler, Ross K.; Hudson, Elton P.; Chase, Shannon D.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Reimer, Jeffrey A.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies exploring the relationship between enzymatic catalysis and protein dynamics in the aqueous phase have yielded evidence that dynamics and enzyme activity are strongly correlated. Given that protein dynamics are significantly attenuated in organic solvents and that proteins exhibit a wide range of motions depending on the specific solvent environment, the nonaqueous milieu provides a unique opportunity to examine the role of protein dynamics in enzyme activity. Variable-temperature kinetic measurements, X-band electron spin resonance spectroscopy, 1H NMR relaxation, and 19F NMR spectroscopy experiments were performed on subtilisin Carlsberg colyophilized with several inorganic salts and suspended in organic solvents. The results indicate that salt activation induces a greater degree of transition-state flexibility, reflected by a more positive ΔΔS†, for the more active biocatalyst preparations in organic solvents. In contrast, ΔΔH† was negligible regardless of salt type or salt content. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy and 1H NMR relaxation measurements, including spin-lattice relaxation, spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, and longitudinal magnetization exchange, revealed that the enzyme's turnover number (kcat) was strongly correlated with protein motions in the centisecond time regime, weakly correlated with protein motions in the millisecond regime, and uncorrelated with protein motions on the piconanosecond timescale. In addition, 19F chemical shift measurements and hyperfine tensor measurements of biocatalyst formulations inhibited with 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl fluoride and 4-ethoxyfluorophosphinyl-oxy-TEMPO, respectively, suggest that enzyme activation was only weakly affected by changes in active-site polarity. PMID:18840689

  6. Biocatalyst activity in nonaqueous environments correlates with centisecond-range protein motions.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Ross K; Hudson, Elton P; Chase, Shannon D; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2008-10-14

    Recent studies exploring the relationship between enzymatic catalysis and protein dynamics in the aqueous phase have yielded evidence that dynamics and enzyme activity are strongly correlated. Given that protein dynamics are significantly attenuated in organic solvents and that proteins exhibit a wide range of motions depending on the specific solvent environment, the nonaqueous milieu provides a unique opportunity to examine the role of protein dynamics in enzyme activity. Variable-temperature kinetic measurements, X-band electron spin resonance spectroscopy, (1)H NMR relaxation, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy experiments were performed on subtilisin Carlsberg colyophilized with several inorganic salts and suspended in organic solvents. The results indicate that salt activation induces a greater degree of transition-state flexibility, reflected by a more positive DeltaDeltaS(dagger), for the more active biocatalyst preparations in organic solvents. In contrast, DeltaDeltaH(dagger) was negligible regardless of salt type or salt content. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy and (1)H NMR relaxation measurements, including spin-lattice relaxation, spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, and longitudinal magnetization exchange, revealed that the enzyme's turnover number (k(cat)) was strongly correlated with protein motions in the centisecond time regime, weakly correlated with protein motions in the millisecond regime, and uncorrelated with protein motions on the piconanosecond timescale. In addition, (19)F chemical shift measurements and hyperfine tensor measurements of biocatalyst formulations inhibited with 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl fluoride and 4-ethoxyfluorophosphinyl-oxy-TEMPO, respectively, suggest that enzyme activation was only weakly affected by changes in active-site polarity. PMID:18840689

  7. Examining the Magnetic Field Strength and the Horizontal and Vertical Motions in an Emerging Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Yu-Che

    2016-03-01

    Earlier observational studies have used the time evolution of emerging magnetic flux regions at the photosphere to infer their subsurface structures, assuming that the flux structure does not change significantly over the near-surface layer. In this study, we test the validity of this assumption by comparing the horizontal and vertical motions of an emerging active region. The two motions would be correlated if the emerging structure is rigid. The selected active region (AR) NOAA 11645 is not embedded in detectable preexisting magnetic field. The observed horizontal motion is quantified by the separation of the two AR polarities and the width of the region. The vertical motion is derived from the magnetic buoyancy theory. Our results show that the separation of the polarities is fastest at the beginning with a velocity of {≈ }4 Mm hr^{-1} and decreases to ≤ 1 Mm hr^{-1} after the main growing phase of flux emergence. The derived thick flux-tube buoyant velocity is between 1 and 3 Mm hr^{-1}, while the thin flux-tube approximation results in an unreasonably high buoyant velocity, consistent with the expectation that the approximation is inappropriate at the surface layer. The observed horizontal motion is not found to directly correlate with either the magnetic field strength or the derived buoyant velocities. However, the percentage of the horizontally oriented fields and the temporal derivatives of the field strength and the buoyant velocity show some positive correlations with the separation velocity. The results of this study imply that the assumption that the emerging active region is the cross section of a rising flux tube whose structure can be considered rigid as it rises through the near-surface layer should be taken with caution.

  8. Healthy eating at school to compensate for the activity-related obesigenic lifestyle in children and adolescents: the Quebec experience.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Angelo; Arguin, Hélène

    2011-03-01

    In this article, we describe the Quebec experience about the determinants of childhood obesity and the search for solutions, which are well adapted to the constraints of the current lifestyle. As expected, it is likely that a decrease in physical fitness and its related sedentariness as well as suboptimal food habits have contributed to the increase in overweight prevalence that was observed between 1980 and 2000. Our research experience suggests that other less suspected activity related factors have also played an important role in the occurrence of the obesity epidemic. This is particularly the case for short sleeping and demanding mental work, which are features of our modern lifestyle. Because there is no foreseeable prospect for a change in sleep and mental work habits, we argue that compensations in other factors may be necessary to prevent weight gain in this new context. We thus developed a concept of food design aiming at the maximization of the satiating properties of a food or a meal course. In this context, we were successful in the design of healthy lunch bags for students of a school located in a low socioeconomic area. Indeed, for a majority of menus, an optimal compromise seemed to be reached between nutrient composition, satiating potential, palatability, and financial accessibility. In summary, the Quebec experience reveals that childhood obesity is a complex problem that partly results from unsuspected environmental factors that deserve creative solutions to at least partly compensate for their effect. PMID:22332048

  9. Cobalt(III) Protoporphyrin Activates the DGCR8 Protein and Can Compensate microRNA Processing Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Barr, Ian; Weitz, Sara H; Atkin, Talia; Hsu, PeiKen; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph A; Weiss, Shimon; Guo, Feng

    2015-06-18

    Processing of microRNA primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs) is highly regulated and defects in the processing machinery play a key role in many human diseases. In 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), heterozygous deletion of DiGeorge critical region gene 8 (DGCR8) causes a processing deficiency, which contributes to abnormal brain development. The DGCR8 protein is the RNA-binding partner of Drosha RNase, both essential for processing canonical pri-miRNAs. To identify an agent that can compensate reduced DGCR8 expression, we screened for metalloporphyrins that can mimic the natural DGCR8 heme cofactor. We found that Co(III) protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) stably binds DGCR8 and activates it for pri-miRNA processing in vitro and in HeLa cells. Importantly, treating cultured Dgcr8(+/-) mouse neurons with Co(III)PPIX can compensate the pri-miRNA processing defects. Co(III)PPIX is effective at concentrations as low as 0.2 μM and is not degraded by heme degradation enzymes, making it useful as a research tool and a potential therapeutic. PMID:26091172

  10. The Impact of Model Uncertainty on Spatial Compensation in Active Structural Acoustic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Sprofera, Joseph D.; Clark, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent boundary layer (TBL) noise is considered a primary factor in the interior noise experienced by passengers aboard commercial airliners. There have been numerous investigations of interior noise control devoted to aircraft panels; however, practical realization is a challenge since the physical boundary conditions are uncertain at best. In most prior studies, pinned or clamped boundary conditions have been assumed; however, realistic panels likely display a range of varying boundary conditions between these two limits. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is a challenge for control system designers, both in terms of the compensator implemented and the location of actuators and sensors required to achieve the desired control. The impact of model uncertainties, uncertain boundary conditions in particular, on the selection of actuator and sensor locations for structural acoustic control are considered herein. Results from this research effort indicate that it is possible to optimize the design of actuator and sensor location and aperture, which minimizes the impact of boundary conditions on the desired structural acoustic control.

  11. Motion-base simulator results of advanced supersonic transport handling qualities with active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, J. B.; Joshi, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    Handling qualities of the unaugmented advanced supersonic transport (AST) are deficient in the low-speed, landing approach regime. Consequently, improvement in handling with active control augmentation systems has been achieved using implicit model-following techniques. Extensive fixed-based simulator evaluations were used to validate these systems prior to tests with full motion and visual capabilities on a six-axis motion-base simulator (MBS). These tests compared the handling qualities of the unaugmented AST with several augmented configurations to ascertain the effectiveness of these systems. Cooper-Harper ratings, tracking errors, and control activity data from the MBS tests have been analyzed statistically. The results show the fully augmented AST handling qualities have been improved to an acceptable level.

  12. Alumina Encapsulated Strain Gage Not Mechanically Attached To The Substrate, Used to Temperature Compensate an Active High Temperature Gage In A Half-Bridge Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazza, Anthony (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A temperature compensation element for a high-temperature strain gage and the method of fabricating the same. Preferably, the element is a "dummy" strain gage not mechanically attached to the substrate. The element is encapsulated in an insulative material and used to compensate an active high-temperature strain gage and wired in a half-bridge configuration. The temperature compensation element and high-temperature strain gage are fabricated using the method of the present invention. This method includes temporarily adhering the element to a heat sink, encapsulated in an insulative material and then removed from the heat sink. Next, the element is either stacked or placed near the active gage. Ideally, the element and the active gage have substantially similar heat transfer and electrical properties.

  13. Influence of a voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter on the transient stability of power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Tang, Y. J.; Shi, J.; Chen, N.; Song, M.; Cheng, S. J.; Hu, Y.; Chen, X. S.

    2009-10-01

    We have proposed a voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL). In this paper, the influence of the SFCL on the transient stability of power system is investigated. For the typical one-machine infinite-bus system, the power-angle characteristics of generator with SFCL are studied in different working conditions, and the transient physical process is analyzed. Using MATLAB SIMULINK, the power-angle swing curves are simulated under different current-limiting modes, fault types and fault clearance times. The results show that the proposed SFCL can effectively reduce the transient swing amplitude of rotor and extend the critical clearance time under mode 1, compared with mode 2 and mode 3 having few effects on enhancing the transient stability.

  14. Synchrony - Cyberknife Respiratory Compensation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ozhasoglu, Cihat Saw, Cheng B.; Chen Hungcheng; Burton, Steven; Komanduri, Krishna; Yue, Ning J.; Huq, Saiful M.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2008-07-01

    Studies of organs in the thorax and abdomen have shown that these organs can move as much as 40 mm due to respiratory motion. Without compensation for this motion during the course of external beam radiation therapy, the dose coverage to target may be compromised. On the other hand, if compensation of this motion is by expansion of the margin around the target, a significant volume of normal tissue may be unnecessarily irradiated. In hypofractionated regimens, the issue of respiratory compensation becomes an important factor and is critical in single-fraction extracranial radiosurgery applications. CyberKnife is an image-guided radiosurgery system that consists of a 6-MV LINAC mounted to a robotic arm coupled through a control loop to a digital diagnostic x-ray imaging system. The robotic arm can point the beam anywhere in space with 6 degrees of freedom, without being constrained to a conventional isocenter. The CyberKnife has been recently upgraded with a real-time respiratory tracking and compensation system called Synchrony. Using external markers in conjunction with diagnostic x-ray images, Synchrony helps guide the robotic arm to move the radiation beam in real time such that the beam always remains aligned with the target. With the aid of Synchrony, the tumor motion can be tracked in three-dimensional space, and the motion-induced dosimetric change to target can be minimized with a limited margin. The working principles, advantages, limitations, and our clinical experience with this new technology will be discussed.

  15. The American compensation phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Bale, A

    1990-01-01

    In this article, the author defines the occupational safety and health domain, characterizes the distinct compensation phenomenon in the United States, and briefly reviews important developments in the last decade involving Karen Silkwood, intentional torts, and asbestos litigation. He examines the class conflict over the value and meaning of work-related injuries and illnesses involved in the practical activity of making claims and turning them into money through compensation inquiries. Juries, attributions of fault, and medicolegal discourse play key roles in the compensation phenomenon. This article demonstrates the extensive, probing inquiry through workers' bodies constituted by the American compensation phenomenon into the moral basis of elements of the system of production. PMID:2139638

  16. Conical Euler simulation and active suppression of delta wing rocking motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    A conical Euler code was developed to study unsteady vortex-dominated flows about rolling highly-swept delta wings, undergoing either forced or free-to-roll motions including active roll suppression. The flow solver of the code involves a multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme which uses a finite volume spatial discretization of the Euler equations on an unstructured grid of triangles. The code allows for the additional analysis of the free-to-roll case, by including the rigid-body equation of motion for its simultaneous time integration with the governing flow equations. Results are presented for a 75 deg swept sharp leading edge delta wing at a freestream Mach number of 1.2 and at alpha equal to 10 and 30 deg angle of attack. A forced harmonic analysis indicates that the rolling moment coefficient provides: (1) a positive damping at the lower angle of attack equal to 10 deg, which is verified in a free-to-roll calculation; (2) a negative damping at the higher angle of attack equal to 30 deg at the small roll amplitudes. A free-to-roll calculation for the latter case produces an initially divergent response, but as the amplitude of motion grows with time, the response transitions to a wing-rock type of limit cycle oscillation. The wing rocking motion may be actively suppressed, however, through the use of a rate-feedback control law and antisymmetrically deflected leading edge flaps. The descriptions of the conical Euler flow solver and the free-to-roll analysis are presented. Results are also presented which give insight into the flow physics associated with unsteady vortical flows about forced and free-to-roll delta wings, including the active roll suppression of this wing-rock phenomenon.

  17. Swim stress, motion, and deformation of active matter: effect of an external field.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Sho C; Brady, John F

    2014-12-21

    We analyze the stress, dispersion, and average swimming speed of self-propelled particles subjected to an external field that affects their orientation and speed. The swimming trajectory is governed by a competition between the orienting influence (i.e., taxis) associated with the external (e.g., magnetic, gravitational, thermal, nutrient concentration) field versus the effects that randomize the particle orientations (e.g., rotary Brownian motion and/or an intrinsic tumbling mechanism like the flagella of bacteria). The swimmers' motion is characterized by a mean drift velocity and an effective translational diffusivity that becomes anisotropic in the presence of the orienting field. Since the diffusivity yields information about the micromechanical stress, the anisotropy generated by the external field creates a normal stress difference in the recently developed "swim stress" tensor [Takatori, Yan, and Brady, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014]. This property can be exploited in the design of soft, compressible materials in which their size, shape, and motion can be manipulated and tuned by loading the material with active swimmers. Since the swimmers exert different normal stresses in different directions, the material can compress/expand, elongate, and translate depending on the external field strength. Such an active system can be used as nano/micromechanical devices and motors. Analytical solutions are corroborated by Brownian dynamics simulations. PMID:25330273

  18. Motion analysis of the glenohumeral joint during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Lovern, B; Stroud, L A; Ferran, N A; Evans, S L; Evans, R O; Holt, C A

    2010-12-01

    The shoulder complex has a larger range of motion (ROM) than any other joint complex in the human body, leaving it prone to numerous injuries. Objective kinematic analysis could yield useful functional insights that may assist clinical practice. Non-invasive optoelectronic motion analysis techniques have been used to assess the shoulders of five healthy subjects performing ROM tasks and 10 functional tasks of daily living. The four most demanding tasks - touching the side and back of the head, brushing the opposite side of the head, lifting an object to shoulder height and lifting an object to head height, required 78%, 60%, 61% and 71%, respectively, of the glenohumeral elevation necessary for full abduction in the scapular plane for the 10 shoulders. This has implications for clinical practice where maximum arm elevation is commonly used to determine a patient's ability to return to work and other everyday activities. PMID:21153974

  19. Willingness to Take PrEP and Potential for Risk Compensation Among Highly Sexually Active Gay and Bisexual Men.

    PubMed

    Grov, Christian; Whitfield, Thomas H F; Rendina, H Jonathon; Ventuneac, Ana; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2015-12-01

    Once-daily Truvada (Emtricitabine/Tenofovir) as a method of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is one of the most promising biomedical interventions to eliminate new HIV infections; however, uptake among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men has been slow amidst growing concern in popular/social media that PrEP use will result in reduced condom use (i.e., risk compensation). We investigated demographic, behavioral, and psychosocial differences in willingness to use PrEP as well as the perceived impact of PrEP on participants' condom use in a sample of 206 highly sexually active HIV-negative gay and bisexual men. Nearly half (46.1 %) said they would be willing to take PrEP if it were provided at no cost. Although men willing to take PrEP (vs. others) reported similar numbers of recent casual male partners (<6 weeks), they had higher odds of recent receptive condomless anal sex (CAS)-i.e., those already at high risk of contracting HIV were more willing to take PrEP. Neither age, race/ethnicity, nor income were associated with willingness to take PrEP, suggesting equal acceptability among subpopulations that are experiencing disparities in HIV incidence. There was limited evidence to suggest men would risk compensate. Only 10 % of men who had not engaged in recent CAS felt that PrEP would result in them starting to have CAS. Men who had not tested for HIV recently were also significantly more likely than others to indicate willingness to take PrEP. Offering PrEP to men who test infrequently may serve to engage them more in routine HIV/STI testing and create a continued dialogue around sexual health between patient and provider in order to prevent HIV infection. PMID:25735243

  20. A probabilistic description of the bed load sediment flux: 2. Particle activity and motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseberry, John C.; Schmeeckle, Mark W.; Furbish, David Jon

    2012-09-01

    High-speed imaging of coarse sand particles transported as bed load over a planar bed reveals that the particle activity, the solid volume of particles in motion per unit streambed area, fluctuates as particles respond to near-bed fluid turbulence while simultaneously interacting with the bed. The relative magnitude of these fluctuations systematically varies with the size of the sampling area. The particle activity within a specified sampling area is distributed in a manner that is consistent with the existence of an ensemble of configurations of particle positions wherein certain configurations are preferentially selected or excluded by the turbulence structure, manifest as patchiness of active particles. The particle activity increases with increasing bed stress far faster than does the average particle velocity, so changes in the transport rate with changing stress are dominated by changes in the activity, not velocity. The probability density functions of the streamwise and cross-stream particle velocities are exponential-like and lack heavy tails. Plots of the mean squared particle displacement versus time may ostensibly indicate non-Fickian diffusive behavior while actually reflecting effects of correlated random walks associated with intrinsic periodicities in particle motions, not anomalous diffusion. The probability density functions of the particle hop distance (start-to-stop) and the associated travel time are gamma-like, which provides the empirical basis for showing that particle disentrainment rates vary with hop distance and travel time.

  1. Rotational motion and evidence for oligomeric structures of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-activated ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, W; Sarzala, M G; Chapman, D

    1979-01-01

    The rotational motion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-activated ATPase (ATP phosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.3) has been investigated by measuring the decay of laser flash-induced dichroism with the covalently attached triplet probe eosin isothiocyanate. The Arrhenius plot for rotational mobility indicates two discontinuities at approximately 15 degrees C and approximately 35 degrees C. The experimental data are rationalized in terms of a sudden conformeric change in the ATPase at 15 degrees C and a temperature-dependent equilibrium existing between the conformationally altered ATPase and oligomeric forms of it in the temperature range 15-35 degrees C. The enzymatic activity, as indicated by a discontinuity in the Arrhenius plot for the rate of ATP hydrolysis, appears to be sensitive only to the change at 15 degrees C. There is a strong correlation between the activation energy below 15 degrees C for rotational motion (33.6 +/- 2.2 kcal/mol) and enzymatic activity (34 +/- 4 kcal/mol). PMID:158763

  2. Predicting muscle activation patterns from motion and anatomy: modelling the skull of Sphenodon (Diapsida: Rhynchocephalia)

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Neil; Jones, Marc E. H.; Evans, Susan E.; Shi, JunFen; O'Higgins, Paul; Fagan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between skull shape and the forces generated during feeding is currently under widespread scrutiny and increasingly involves the use of computer simulations such as finite element analysis. The computer models used to represent skulls are often based on computed tomography data and thus are structurally accurate; however, correctly representing muscular loading during food reduction remains a major problem. Here, we present a novel approach for predicting the forces and activation patterns of muscles and muscle groups based on their known anatomical orientation (line of action). The work was carried out for the lizard-like reptile Sphenodon (Rhynchocephalia) using a sophisticated computer-based model and multi-body dynamics analysis. The model suggests that specific muscle groups control specific motions, and that during certain times in the bite cycle some muscles are highly active whereas others are inactive. The predictions of muscle activity closely correspond to data previously recorded from live Sphenodon using electromyography. Apparent exceptions can be explained by variations in food resistance, food size, food position and lower jaw motions. This approach shows considerable promise in advancing detailed functional models of food acquisition and reduction, and for use in other musculoskeletal systems where no experimental determination of muscle activity is possible, such as in rare, endangered or extinct species. PMID:19474084

  3. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-04-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by unattached chromosomes, but that randomly directed active forces applied to the telomeres speed up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions.

  4. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Gagel, Bernd . E-mail: BGagel@UKAachen.de; Demirel, Cengiz M.P.; Kientopf, Aline; Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Stanzel, Sven; Breuer, Christian; Asadpour, Branka; Jansen, Thomas; Holy, Richard; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Eble, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins.

  5. Compensating linkage for main rotor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffery, P. A. E.; Huber, R. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A compensating linkage for the rotor control system on rotary wing aircraft is described. The main rotor and transmission are isolated from the airframe structure by clastic suspension. The compensating linkage prevents unwanted signal inputs to the rotor control system caused by relative motion of the airframe structure and the main rotor and transmission.

  6. The aspartyl protease DDI2 activates Nrf1 to compensate for proteasome dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Shun; Irie, Taro; Hirayama, Shoshiro; Sakurai, Yasuyuki; Yashiroda, Hideki; Naguro, Isao; Ichijo, Hidenori; Hamazaki, Jun; Murata, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    In response to proteasome dysfunction, mammalian cells upregulate proteasome gene expression by activating Nrf1. Nrf1 is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident transcription factor that is continually retrotranslocated and degraded by the proteasome. Upon proteasome inhibition, Nrf1 escapes degradation and is cleaved to become active. However, the processing enzyme for Nrf1 remains obscure. Here we show that the aspartyl protease DNA-damage inducible 1 homolog 2 (DDI2) is required to cleave and activate Nrf1. Deletion of DDI2 reduced the cleaved form of Nrf1 and increased the full-length cytosolic form of Nrf1, resulting in poor upregulation of proteasomes in response to proteasome inhibition. These defects were restored by adding back wild-type DDI2 but not protease-defective DDI2. Our results provide a clue for blocking compensatory proteasome synthesis to improve cancer therapies targeting proteasomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18357.001 PMID:27528193

  7. Development of Kinematic Graphs of Median Nerve during Active Finger Motion: Implications of Smartphone Use

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Certain hand activities cause deformation and displacement of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel due to the gliding motion of tendons surrounding it. As smartphone usage escalates, this raises the public’s concern whether hand activities while using smartphones can lead to median nerve problems. Objective The aims of this study were to 1) develop kinematic graphs and 2) investigate the associated deformation and rotational information of median nerve in the carpal tunnel during hand activities. Methods Dominant wrists of 30 young adults were examined with ultrasonography by placing a transducer transversely on their wrist crease. Ultrasound video clips were recorded when the subject performing 1) thumb opposition with the wrist in neutral position, 2) thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation and 3) pinch grip with the wrist in neutral position. Six still images that were separated by 0.2-second intervals were then captured from the ultrasound video for the determination of 1) cross-sectional area (CSA), 2) flattening ratio (FR), 3) rotational displacement (RD) and 4) translational displacement (TD) of median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and these collected information of deformation, rotational and displacement of median nerve were compared between 1) two successive time points during a single hand activity and 2) different hand motions at the same time point. Finally, kinematic graphs were constructed to demonstrate the mobility of median nerve during different hand activities. Results Performing different hand activities during this study led to a gradual reduction in CSA of the median nerve, with thumb opposition together with the wrist in ulnar deviation causing the greatest extent of deformation of the median nerve. Thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation also led to the largest extent of TD when compared to the other two hand activities of this study. Kinematic graphs showed that the motion pathways of median nerve during

  8. Photovoltaic solar system connected to the electric power grid operating as active power generator and reactive power compensator

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, Fabio L.; Moraes, Adelio J.; Guimaraes, Geraldo C.; Sanhueza, Sergio M.R.; Vaz, Alexandre R.

    2010-07-15

    In the case of photovoltaic (PV) systems acting as distributed generation (DG) systems, the DC energy that is produced is fed to the grid through the power-conditioning unit (inverter). The majority of contemporary inverters used in DG systems are current source inverters (CSI) operating at unity power factor. If, however, we assume that voltage source inverters (VSI) can replace CSIs, we can generate reactive power proportionally to the remaining unused capacity at any given time. According to the theory of instantaneous power, the inverter reactive power can be regulated by changing the amplitude of its output voltage. In addition, the inverter active power can be adjusted by modifying the phase angle of its output voltage. Based on such theory, both the active power supply and the reactive power compensation (RPC) can be carried out simultaneously. When the insolation is weak or the PV modules are inoperative at night, the RPC feature of a PV system can still be used to improve the inverter utilisation factor. Some MATLAB simulation results are included here to show the feasibility of the method. (author)

  9. Pitching-motion-activated flapping foil near solid walls for power extraction: A numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Qiu, Y. L.; Shu, C.; Zhao, N.

    2014-08-01

    A numerical investigation on the power extraction of a pitching-motion-activated flapping foil near solid walls is performed by using an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method in this study. The flapping motions of the foil include a forced pitching component and an induced plunging component. The foil is placed either near a solid wall or between two parallel plane walls. Compared to previous work on the flapping foil for power extraction, the effect of the walls is first considered in this work. At a Reynolds number of 1100 and with the position of the foil pitching axis at third chord, the influences of the mechanical parameters (such as damping coefficient and spring constant) of the foil, the amplitude and frequency of the pitching motion and the clearance between the foil pitching axis and the wall on the power extraction performance of the flapping foil are systematically evaluated. Compared to the situation of free stream, the power extraction performance of the foil near the wall is improved. For given amplitude and frequency, as the clearance decreases the net power extraction efficiency improves. Moreover, as the foil is placed near one wall, there is a transverse shift to the plunging motion that consequently weakens the improvement of net power extraction efficiency. In contrast, the shift can be significantly eliminated as the foil is placed between two walls, which can further improve the net power extraction efficiency. In addition, it is found that the efficiency improvement is essentially from the increased power extraction, which is due to the generation of high lift force.

  10. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  11. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain. PMID:27417592

  12. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain.

  13. Driving Method for Compensating Reliability Problem of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Transistors and Image Sticking Phenomenon in Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Min-Seok; Jo, Yun-Rae; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a driving method for compensating the electrical instability of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors (TFTs) and the luminance degradation of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices for large active matrix OLED (AMOLED) displays. The proposed driving method senses the electrical characteristics of a-Si:H TFTs and OLEDs using current integrators and compensates them by an external compensation method. Threshold voltage shift is controlled a using negative bias voltage. After applying the proposed driving method, the measured error of the maximum emission current ranges from -1.23 to +1.59 least significant bit (LSB) of a 10-bit gray scale under the threshold voltage shift ranging from -0.16 to 0.17 V.

  14. Three-directional motion-compensation mask-based novel look-up table on graphics processing units for video-rate generation of digital holographic videos of three-dimensional scenes.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-Woo; Kim, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2016-01-20

    A three-directional motion-compensation mask-based novel look-up table method is proposed and implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for video-rate generation of digital holographic videos of three-dimensional (3D) scenes. Since the proposed method is designed to be well matched with the software and memory structures of GPUs, the number of compute-unified-device-architecture kernel function calls can be significantly reduced. This results in a great increase of the computational speed of the proposed method, allowing video-rate generation of the computer-generated hologram (CGH) patterns of 3D scenes. Experimental results reveal that the proposed method can generate 39.8 frames of Fresnel CGH patterns with 1920×1080 pixels per second for the test 3D video scenario with 12,088 object points on dual GPU boards of NVIDIA GTX TITANs, and they confirm the feasibility of the proposed method in the practical application fields of electroholographic 3D displays. PMID:26835954

  15. Vibration Control For Ultraprecision Motion Machineries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Akira; Miyashita, Masakazu; Yoshioka, Junichi; Hashimoto, Fukuo

    1987-08-01

    Development of ultraprecision machines requires motion mechanisms with dynamic characteristics being sufficiently resistive to environmental disturbances as well as vibration control devices isolating from them. In the paper active application of frictional forces to the machines are proposed in viewpoint of this point. Further, new strategies for various problems resulting from application of frictional forces are also proposed for linear feed mechanism and the test results are shown. They are load compensation unit, composite bearing guideway and force operation feed mechanism.

  16. Space active optics: in situ compensation of lightweight primary mirrors' deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Lemaitre, G.

    2010-12-01

    The need for both high quality images and light structures is a constant concern in the conception of space telescopes. The goal here is to determine how an active optics system could be embarked on a satellite in order to correct the wave front deformations of the optical train. The optical aberrations appearing in a space environment are due to mirrors' deformations, with three main origins: the thermal variations, the weightlessness conditions and the use of large weightlighted primary mirrors. We are developing a model of deformable mirror as minimalist as possible, especially in term of number of actuators, which is able to correct the first Zernike polynomials in a specified range of amplitude and precision. Flight constraints as weight, volume and power consumption are considered. Firstly, such a system is designed according to the equations from the elasticity theory: we determine the geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the mirror, the location of the forces to be applied and the way to apply them. Then the concept is validated with a Finite Element Analysis, allowing to optimize the system by taking into account parameters absent from the theory. At the end, the mirror will be realized and characterized in a representative optical configuration.

  17. Compensating for the absence of selenocysteine in high-molecular weight thioredoxin reductases: the electrophilic activation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lothrop, Adam P; Snider, Gregg W; Flemer, Stevenson; Ruggles, Erik L; Davidson, Ronald S; Lamb, Audrey L; Hondal, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TR) is a pyridine disulfide oxidoreductase that uses the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) in place of the more commonly used amino acid cysteine (Cys). Selenium is a Janus-faced element because it is both highly nucleophilic and highly electrophilic. Cys orthologs of Sec-containing enzymes may compensate for the absence of a Sec residue by making the active site Cys residue more (i) nucleophilic, (ii) electrophilic, or (iii) reactive by increasing both S-nucleophilicity and S-electrophilicity. It has already been shown that the Cys ortholog TR from Drosophila melanogaster (DmTR) has increased S-nucleophilicity [Gromer, S., Johansson, L., Bauer, H., Arscott, L. D., Rauch, S., Ballou, D. P., Williams, C. H., Jr., Schrimer, R. H., and Arnér, E. S (2003) Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: Why selenoproteins? Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 12618-12623]. Here we present evidence that DmTR also enhances the electrophilicity of Cys490 through the use of an "electrophilic activation" mechanism. This mechanism is proposed to work by polarizing the disulfide bond that occurs between Cys489 and Cys490 in the C-terminal redox center by the placement of a positive charge near Cys489. This polarization renders the sulfur atom of Cys490 electron deficient and enhances the rate of thiol/disulfide exchange that occurs between the N- and C-terminal redox centers. Our hypothesis was developed by using a strategy of homocysteine (hCys) for Cys substitution in the Cys-Cys redox dyad of DmTR to differentiate the function of each Cys residue. The results show that hCys could substitute for Cys490 with little loss of thioredoxin reductase activity, but that substitution of hCys for Cys489 resulted in a 238-fold reduction in activity. We hypothesize that replacement of Cys489 with hCys destroys an interaction between the sulfur atom of Cys489 and His464 crucial for the proposed electrophilic activation mechanism. This electrophilic activation

  18. Semi-active control of the rocking motion of monolithic art objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceravolo, Rosario; Pecorelli, Marica Leonarda; Zanotti Fragonara, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The seismic behaviour of many art objects and obelisks can be analysed in the context of the seismic response of rigid blocks. Starting from the pioneering works by Housner, a large number of analytical studies of the rigid block dynamics were proposed. In fact, despite its apparent simplicity, the motion of a rigid block involves a number of complex dynamic phenomena such as impacts, sliding, uplift and geometric nonlinearities. While most of the current strategies to avoid toppling consist in preventing rocking motion, in this paper a novel semi-active on-off control strategy for protecting monolithic art objects was investigated. The control procedure under study follows a feedback-feedforward scheme that is realised by switching the stiffness of the anchorages located at the two lower corner of the block between two values. Overturning spectra have been calculated in order to clarify the benefits of applying a semi-active control instead of a passive control strategy. In accordance with similar studies, the numerical investigation took into account the dynamic response of blocks with different slenderness and size subject to one-sine pulse excitation.

  19. Reliability of the universal goniometer for assessing active cervical range of motion in asymptomatic healthy persons

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad Nazim; Bandpei, Mohammad A. Mohseni; Ali, Mudassar; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine within-rater and between-rater reliability of the universal goniometer (UG) for measuring active cervical range of motion (ACROM) in asymptomatic healthy subjects. Methods: Nineteen healthy subjects were tested in an identical seated position. Two raters used UG to measure active cervical movements of flexion, extension, right side flexion, left side flexion, right rotation and left rotation. Each motion was measured twice by each of the two raters and was re-measured all over again after one week. Data analysis was performed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The results demonstrated excellent within-session (ICC2,1 = 0.83 to 0.98) and between-session (ICC2,2 = 0.79 to 0.97) intra-rater reliability and excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC2,2 = 0.79 to 0.92). Conclusion: Considering above results it is concluded that UG is a reliable tool for assessing ACROM in a clinical setting for healthy subjects. PMID:27182261

  20. Multisensory integration in early vestibular processing in mice: the encoding of passive vs. active motion.

    PubMed

    Medrea, Ioana; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2013-12-01

    The mouse has become an important model system for studying the cellular basis of learning and coding of heading by the vestibular system. Here we recorded from single neurons in the vestibular nuclei to understand how vestibular pathways encode self-motion under natural conditions, during which proprioceptive and motor-related signals as well as vestibular inputs provide feedback about an animal's movement through the world. We recorded neuronal responses in alert behaving mice focusing on a group of neurons, termed vestibular-only cells, that are known to control posture and project to higher-order centers. We found that the majority (70%, n = 21/30) of neurons were bimodal, in that they responded robustly to passive stimulation of proprioceptors as well as passive stimulation of the vestibular system. Additionally, the linear summation of a given neuron's vestibular and neck sensitivities predicted well its responses when both stimuli were applied simultaneously. In contrast, neuronal responses were suppressed when the same motion was actively generated, with the one striking exception that the activity of bimodal neurons similarly and robustly encoded head on body position in all conditions. Our results show that proprioceptive and motor-related signals are combined with vestibular information at the first central stage of vestibular processing in mice. We suggest that these results have important implications for understanding the multisensory integration underlying accurate postural control and the neural representation of directional heading in the head direction cell network of mice. PMID:24089394

  1. Compensating for the Absence of Selenocysteine in High-Molecular Weight Thioredoxin Reductases: The Electrophilic Activation Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TR) is a pyridine disulfide oxidoreductase that uses the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) in place of the more commonly used amino acid cysteine (Cys). Selenium is a Janus-faced element because it is both highly nucleophilic and highly electrophilic. Cys orthologs of Sec-containing enzymes may compensate for the absence of a Sec residue by making the active site Cys residue more (i) nucleophilic, (ii) electrophilic, or (iii) reactive by increasing both S-nucleophilicity and S-electrophilicity. It has already been shown that the Cys ortholog TR from Drosophila melanogaster (DmTR) has increased S-nucleophilicity [Gromer, S., Johansson, L., Bauer, H., Arscott, L. D., Rauch, S., Ballou, D. P., Williams, C. H., Jr., Schrimer, R. H., and Arnér, E. S (2003) Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: Why selenoproteins? Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 12618–12623]. Here we present evidence that DmTR also enhances the electrophilicity of Cys490 through the use of an “electrophilic activation” mechanism. This mechanism is proposed to work by polarizing the disulfide bond that occurs between Cys489 and Cys490 in the C-terminal redox center by the placement of a positive charge near Cys489. This polarization renders the sulfur atom of Cys490 electron deficient and enhances the rate of thiol/disulfide exchange that occurs between the N- and C-terminal redox centers. Our hypothesis was developed by using a strategy of homocysteine (hCys) for Cys substitution in the Cys-Cys redox dyad of DmTR to differentiate the function of each Cys residue. The results show that hCys could substitute for Cys490 with little loss of thioredoxin reductase activity, but that substitution of hCys for Cys489 resulted in a 238-fold reduction in activity. We hypothesize that replacement of Cys489 with hCys destroys an interaction between the sulfur atom of Cys489 and His464 crucial for the proposed electrophilic activation mechanism. This electrophilic

  2. Intracellular shunting of O2− contributes to charge compensation and preservation of neutrophil respiratory burst in the absence of voltage-gated proton channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Decleva, Eva; Menegazzi, Renzo; Fasolo, Alba; Defendi, Federica; Sebastianutto, Michele; Dri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Proton efflux via voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) is considered to mediate the charge compensation necessary to preserve NADPH oxidase activity during the respiratory burst. Using the Hv1 inhibitor Zn2+, we found that the PMA-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils is inhibited when assessed as extracellular production of O2− and H2O2, in accordance with literature studies, but, surprisingly, unaffected when measured as oxygen consumption or total (extracellular plus intracellular) H2O2 production. Furthermore, we show that inhibiting Hv1 with Zn2+ results in an increased production of intracellular ROS. Similar results, i.e. decreased extracellular and increased intracellular ROS production, were obtained using a human granulocyte-like cell line with severely impaired Hv1 expression. Acidic extracellular pH, which dampens proton efflux, also augmented intracellular production of H2O2. Zinc caused an increase in the rate but not in the extent of depolarization and cytosolic acidification indicating that mechanisms other than proton efflux take part in charge compensation. Our results suggest a hitherto unpredicted mechanism of charge compensation whereby, in the absence of proton efflux, part of O2− generated within gp91phox in the plasma membrane is shunted intracellularly down electrochemical gradient to dampen excessive depolarization. This would preserve NADPH oxidase activity under conditions such as the inflammatory exudate in which the acidic pH hinders charge compensation by proton efflux. PMID:23578765

  3. Active and passive Brownian motion of charged particles in two-dimensional plasma models

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkel, Joern; Ebeling, Werner; Trigger, Sergey A.

    2004-10-01

    The dynamics of charged Coulomb grains in a plasma is numerically and analytically investigated. Analogous to recent experiments, it is assumed that the grains are trapped in an external parabolic field. Our simulations are based on a Langevin model, where the grain-plasma interaction is realized by a velocity-dependent friction coefficient and a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. In addition to the ordinary case of positive (passive) friction between grains and plasma, we also discuss the effects of negative (active) friction. The latter case seems particularly interesting, since recent analytical calculations have shown that friction coefficients with negative parts may appear in some models of ion absorption by grains as well as in models of ion-grain scattering. Such negative friction may cause active Brownian motions of the grains. As our computer simulations show, the influence of negative friction leads to the formation of various stationary modes (rotations, oscillations), which, to some extent, can also be estimated analytically.

  4. Effect of motion smoothness on brain activity while observing a dance: An fMRI study using a humanoid robot.

    PubMed

    Miura, Naoki; Sugiura, Motoaki; Takahashi, Makoto; Sassa, Yuko; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Sato, Shigeru; Horie, Kaoru; Nakamura, Katsuki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2010-01-01

    Motion smoothness is critical in transmitting implicit information of body action, such as aesthetic qualities in dance performances. We expected that the perception of motion smoothness would be characterized by great intersubject variability deriving from differences in personal backgrounds and attitudes toward expressive body actions. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a humanoid robot to investigate the effects of the motion smoothness of expressive body actions and the intersubject variability due to personal attitudes on perceptions during dance observation. The effect of motion smoothness was analyzed by both conventional subtraction analysis and functional connectivity analyses that detect cortical networks reflecting intersubject variability. The results showed that the cortical networks of motion- and body-sensitive visual areas showed increases in activity in areas corresponding with motion smoothness, but the intersubject variability of personal attitudes toward art did not influence these active areas. In contrast, activation of cortical networks, including the parieto-frontal network, has large intersubject variability, and this variability is associated with personal attitudes about the consciousness of art. Thus, our results suggest that activity in the cortical network involved in understanding action is influenced by personal attitudes about the consciousness of art during observations of expressive body actions. PMID:19585386

  5. Optogenetic Perturbation of Neural Activity with Laser Illumination in Semi-intact Drosophila Larvae in Motion

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Teruyuki; Fushiki, Akira; Nose, Akinao; Kohsaka, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila larval locomotion is a splendid model system in developmental and physiological neuroscience, by virtue of the genetic accessibility of the underlying neuronal components in the circuits1-6. Application of optogenetics7,8 in the larval neural circuit allows us to manipulate neuronal activity in spatially and temporally patterned ways9-13. Typically, specimens are broadly illuminated with a mercury lamp or LED, so specificity of the target neurons is controlled by binary gene expression systems such as the Gal4-UAS system14,15. In this work, to improve the spatial resolution to "sub-genetic resolution", we locally illuminated a subset of neurons in the ventral nerve cord using lasers implemented in a conventional confocal microscope. While monitoring the motion of the body wall of the semi-intact larvae, we interactively activated or inhibited neural activity with channelrhodopsin16,17 or halorhodopsin18-20, respectively. By spatially and temporally restricted illumination of the neural tissue, we can manipulate the activity of specific neurons in the circuit at a specific phase of behavior. This method is useful for studying the relationship between the activities of a local neural assembly in the ventral nerve cord and the spatiotemporal pattern of motor output. PMID:23851598

  6. Monitoring volcanic activities using correlation patterns between infrasound and ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, M.; Takeo, M.; Yokoo, A.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a simple method to distinguish infrasonic signals from wind noise using a cross-correlation function of signals from a microphone and a co-located seismometer. The method makes use of a particular feature of the cross-correlation function of vertical ground motion generated by infrasound, and the infrasound itself. Contribution of wind noise to the correlation function is effectively suppressed by separating the microphone and the seismometer by several meters because the correlation length of wind noise is much shorter than wavelengths of infrasound. The method is tested with data from volcanoes, and demonstrates that the method effectively detects not only the main eruptions, but also minor activity generating weak infrasound hardly visible in the wave traces. In addition, the correlation function gives more information about volcanic activity than infrasound alone. The correlation pattern changes when the spectral feature of the infrasound and/or the seismic wave changes and the relative strength of infrasound and seismic wave changes, both of which are expected to be accompanied by change in eruptive activity. Therefore, a graphical presentation of temporal variation in the cross-correlation function enables to see qualitative changes of eruptive activities at a glance. This method is particularly useful when available sensors are limited, and will extend the utility of a single microphone and seismometer in monitoring and understanding volcanic activity. The method is used to analyze sequences of two recent eruptions of Asama and Shinmoe-dake volcanoes, Japan.

  7. Thermal and Kinetic Properties of Motions in a Prominence Activation and Nearby Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese; Landi, E.

    2005-01-01

    We perform a quantitative analysis of the thermal properties of a prominence activation and motions in a nearby loop. In order to make measurements of the quickly moving features seen in prominences in the UV we use the SOHO/SUMER spectrograph to take a time series of exposures from a single pointing position, providing a measurement of spectral line properties as a function of time and position along the slit. The lines observed cover a broad range of temperatures from 80,000 - 1.6 million K. These measurements are combined with TRACE movies in transition region and coronal temperature bands to obtain more complete information concerning prominence structure and motions. The resulting observations allow us to analyze the thermal and kinetic energy of the moving sources as functions of time. The loop and prominence are most apparent in lines formed at temperatures below 250,000 K. We find that in most cases the temperature distribution of plasma in a moving feature changes relatively little over time periods of about 20 minutes.

  8. Efficiency improvement of a new vertical axis wind turbine by individual active control of blade motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, In Seong; Min, Seung Yong; Jeong, In Oh; Lee, Yun Han; Kim, Seung Jo

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, a research for the performance improvement of the straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine is described. To improve the performance of the power generation system, which consists of several blades rotating about axis in parallel direction, the cycloidal blade system and the individual active blade control system are adopted, respectively. Both methods are variable pitch system. For cycloidal wind turbine, aerodynamic analysis is carried out by changing pitch angle and phase angle based on the cycloidal motion according to the change of wind speed and wind direction, and control mechanism using the cycloidal blade system is realized for 1kw class wind turbine. By this method, electrical power is generated about 30% higher than wind turbine using fixed pitch angle method. And for more efficient wind turbine, individual pitch angle control of each blade is studied. By maximizing the tangential force in each rotating blade at the specific rotating position, optimal pitch angle variation is obtained. And several airfoil shapes of NACA 4-digit and NACA 6-series are studied. Aerodynamic analysis shows performance improvement of 60%. To realize this motion, sensing and actuating system is designed.

  9. Cystometric parameters and the activity of signaling proteins in association with the compensation or decompensation of bladder function in an animal experimental model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bo-Hwa; Jin, Long-Hu; Kim, Khae-Hawn; Kang, Sung-An; Kang, Ju-Hee; Yoon, Sang-Min; Park, Chang-Shin; Lee, Tack

    2013-12-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether the degree of detrusor contractility is associated with the compensation or decompensation of bladder function depending on the residual volume (RV) during the first two weeks after the onset of partial bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). Moreover, we also examined whether the degree of the phosphorylation and expression of signaling proteins [AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), extracellular signal‑regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase C (PKC)] is associated with the prevalence of compensation or decompensation of bladder function. Twenty-seven female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly assigned to either the sham-operated group (n=7) or the group with partial bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) (n=20). We then measured cystometric parameters from three reproducible micturition cycles and averaged the results for a comparison between the two groups. Based on a cut-off value of a mean RV% of 25%, we subdivided our experimental animals into two subgroups: the subgroup with bladder compensation (mean RV%, <25%) and the subgroup with bladder decompensation (mean RV%, >25%). Our results indicated that the degree of detrusor overactivity (DO) was associated with the compensation or decompensation of bladder function depending on the RV during the first two weeks after the onset of BOO in an animal experimental model of partial BOO. Moreover, we also demonstrate that AMPK and ERK1/2 are involved in the compensation or decompensation of bladder function. Furthermore, our results suggest that PKC is not involved in two-phase bladder contraction. Alterations in the activities of signaling proteins, such as AMPK and ERK1/2 may prove to be helpful in the treatment of patients with voiding difficulty. PMID:24085268

  10. Control of a Virtual Vehicle Influences Postural Activity and Motion Sickness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Xiao; Yoshida, Ken; Stoffregen, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Everyday experience suggests that drivers are less susceptible to motion sickness than passengers. In the context of inertial motion (i.e., physical displacement), this effect has been confirmed in laboratory research using whole body motion devices. We asked whether a similar effect would occur in the context of simulated vehicles in a visual…

  11. Dopamine Activation Preserves Visual Motion Perception Despite Noise Interference of Human V5/MT

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Nada; Fu, Richard Z.; Abou-El-Ela Bourquin, Bilal; Bhrugubanda, Vamsee; Schultz, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    When processing sensory signals, the brain must account for noise, both noise in the stimulus and that arising from within its own neuronal circuitry. Dopamine receptor activation is known to enhance both visual cortical signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and visual perceptual performance; however, it is unknown whether these two dopamine-mediated phenomena are linked. To assess this, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to visual cortical area V5/MT to reduce the SNR focally and thus disrupt visual motion discrimination performance to visual targets located in the same retinotopic space. The hypothesis that dopamine receptor activation enhances perceptual performance by improving cortical SNR predicts that dopamine activation should antagonize TMS disruption of visual perception. We assessed this hypothesis via a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with the dopamine receptor agonists cabergoline (a D2 agonist) and pergolide (a D1/D2 agonist) administered in separate sessions (separated by 2 weeks) in 12 healthy volunteers in a William's balance-order design. TMS degraded visual motion perception when the evoked phosphene and the visual stimulus overlapped in time and space in the placebo and cabergoline conditions, but not in the pergolide condition. This suggests that dopamine D1 or combined D1 and D2 receptor activation enhances cortical SNR to boost perceptual performance. That local visual cortical excitability was unchanged across drug conditions suggests the involvement of long-range intracortical interactions in this D1 effect. Because increased internal noise (and thus lower SNR) can impair visual perceptual learning, improving visual cortical SNR via D1/D2 agonist therapy may be useful in boosting rehabilitation programs involving visual perceptual training. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we address the issue of whether dopamine activation improves visual perception despite increasing sensory noise in the visual cortex

  12. Relationship between active cervical range of motion and flexion-relaxation ratio in asymptomatic computer workers.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu; Park, Se-Yeon; Lee, Mi-Ra

    2011-01-01

    A high prevalence and incidence of neck and shoulder pain is present in the working population, especially sedentary workers. Recent findings have indicated that the flexion-relaxation (FR) ratio in the cervical erector spinae (CES) muscles might be a significant criteria of neuromuscular impairment and function. Additionally, the active cervical range of motion (ROM) is frequently used for discriminating between individuals with pain and those who are asymptomatic. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the active cervical ROM and the FR ratio in a sample of regular visual display terminal (VDT) workers. In total, 20 asymptomatic male VDT workers were recruited. Active cervical ROM was measured by a cervical ROM (CROM) instrument. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to collect myoelectrical signals from the CES muscles, and the FR ratio was calculated for statistical analysis. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quantify the linear relationship between the active cervical ROM and the FR ratio. The values obtained for the FR ratio in the right CES muscles correlated significantly with the active cervical ROM measured in flexion (r=0.73, p<0.01), left lateral flexion (r=0.64, p<0.01), and left rotation (r=0.60, p<0.01). Flexion (r=0.74, p<0.01) and right lateral flexion (r=0.61, p<0.01) positively correlated with the left FR ratio. Extension and right rotation showed either a very weak or no correlation with the mean value of the right and left FR ratio. Our findings suggested that the cervical FR ratio had a positive correlation with cervical movements, and that changes of the activation patterns in CES demonstrated as cervical FR ratio are associated with reduction of the cervical range of motion including flexion and lateral flexion. In addition, muscular dysfunction of the CES could occur in regular computer workers prior to occurrence of pain; this means that the FR ratio could be used to evaluate the potential

  13. Spinal Motion and Muscle Activity during Active Trunk Movements – Comparing Sheep and Humans Adopting Upright and Quadrupedal Postures

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Stephanie; Licka, Theresia F.

    2016-01-01

    Sheep are used as models for the human spine, yet comparative in vivo data necessary for validation is limited. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare spinal motion and trunk muscle activity during active trunk movements in sheep and humans. Three-dimensional kinematic data as well as surface electromyography (sEMG) of spinal flexion and extension was compared in twenty-four humans in upright (UR) and 4-point kneeling (KN) postures and in 17 Austrian mountain sheep. Kinematic markers were attached over the sacrum, posterior iliac spines, and spinous and transverse processes of T5, T8, T11, L2 and L5 in humans and over the sacrum, tuber sacrale, T5, T8, T12, L3 and L7 in sheep. The activity of erector spinae (ES), rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus externus (OE), and obliquus internus (OI) were collected. Maximum sEMG (MOE) was identified for each muscle and trial, and reported as a percentage (MOE%) of the overall maximally observed sEMG from all trials. Spinal range of motion was significantly smaller in sheep compared to humans (UR / KN) during flexion (sheep: 6–11°; humans 12–34°) and extension (sheep: 4°; humans: 11–17°). During extension, MOE% of ES was greater in sheep (median: 77.37%) than UR humans (24.89%), and MOE% of OE and OI was greater in sheep (OE 76.20%; OI 67.31%) than KN humans (OE 21.45%; OI 19.34%), while MOE% of RA was lower in sheep (21.71%) than UR humans (82.69%). During flexion, MOE% of RA was greater in sheep (83.09%) than humans (KN 47.42%; UR 41.38%), and MOE% of ES in sheep (45.73%) was greater than KN humans (14.45%), but smaller than UR humans (72.36%). The differences in human and sheep spinal motion and muscle activity suggest that caution is warranted when ovine data are used to infer human spine biomechanics. PMID:26741136

  14. Monitoring volcanic activity using correlation patterns between infrasound and ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, M.; Takeo, M.; Yokoo, A.; Oikawa, J.; Ohminato, T.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a simple method to distinguish infrasonic signals from wind noise using a cross-correlation function of signals from a microphone and a collocated seismometer. The method makes use of a particular feature of the cross-correlation function of vertical ground motion generated by infrasound, and the infrasound itself. Contribution of wind noise to the correlation function is effectively suppressed by separating the microphone and the seismometer by several meters because the correlation length of wind noise is much shorter than wavelengths of infrasound. The method is applied to data from two recent eruptions of Asama and Shinmoe-dake volcanoes, Japan, and demonstrates that the method effectively detects not only the main eruptions, but also minor activity generating weak infrasound hardly visible in the wave traces. In addition, the correlation function gives more information about volcanic activity than infrasound alone, because it reflects both features of incident infrasonic and seismic waves. Therefore, a graphical presentation of temporal variation in the cross-correlation function enables one to see qualitative changes of eruptive activity at a glance. This method is particularly useful when available sensors are limited, and will extend the utility of a single microphone and seismometer in monitoring volcanic activity.

  15. Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Graeme; Lewis, Jesse S; Gerber, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km(2) of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10-120 cameras) and occasions (20-120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ψ) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with

  16. Aftershock activity of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake determined using the Kathmandu strong motion seismographic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiyanagi, Masayoshi; Takai, Nobuo; Shigefuji, Michiko; Bijukchhen, Subeg; Sasatani, Tsutomu; Rajaure, Sudhir; Dhital, Megh Raj; Takahashi, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics of aftershock activity of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake (Mw 7.8) were evaluated. The mainshock and aftershocks were recorded continuously by the international Kathmandu strong motion seismographic array operated by Hokkaido University and Tribhuvan University. Full waveform data without saturation for all events enabled us to clarify aftershock locations and decay characteristics. The aftershock distribution was determined using the estimated local velocity structure. The hypocenter distribution in the Kathmandu metropolitan region was well determined and indicated earthquakes located shallower than 12 km depth, suggesting that aftershocks occurred at depths shallower than the Himalayan main thrust fault. Although numerical investigation suggested less resolution for the depth component, the regional aftershock epicentral distribution of the entire focal region clearly indicated earthquakes concentrated in the eastern margin of the major slip region of the mainshock. The calculated modified Omori law's p value of 1.35 suggests rapid aftershock decay and a possible high temperature structure in the aftershock region.

  17. X-RAY ACTIVITY PHASED WITH PLANET MOTION IN HD 189733?

    SciTech Connect

    Pillitteri, I.; Guenther, H. M.; Wolk, S. J.; Kashyap, V. L.; Cohen, O.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the follow-up XMM-Newton observation of the planet-hosting star HD 189733 we obtained in 2011 April. We observe a flare just after the secondary transit of the hot Jupiter. This event shares the same phase and many of the characteristics of the flare we observed in 2009. We suggest that a systematic interaction between planet and stellar magnetic fields when the planet passes close to active regions on the star can lead to periodic variability phased with planetary motion. By means of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on board XMM-Newton, we determine that the corona of this star is unusually dense.

  18. Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jesse S.; Gerber, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km2 of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10–120 cameras) and occasions (20–120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ψ) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with

  19. The importance of gradients in particle activity during sediment transport: Insights from a probabilistic description of particle motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furbish, D. J.

    2009-04-01

    Sediment particles transported by rainsplash, by bioturbation, and as bedload in turbulent flows, undergo motions that are quasi-random in magnitude and direction. Moreover, these motions characteristically are intermittent, in that particles are mostly at rest most of the time, and heterogeneous, in that the volumetric or areal concentration of particles in motion at any instant is spatially patchy. These particle motions can be formulated as a stochastic processes involving both advective and dispersive parts. By taking into account the intermittent activity of particles, and separating this activity from the physics of motion in the parametric description of transport, the formulation indicates that gradients in particle activity can have a key role in transport. The formulation illustrates, for example, how the growth of soil mounds beneath desert shrubs involves differential rainsplash that initially causes more grains to be splashed inward beneath protective shrub canopies than outward. This ‘harvesting' of nearby soil material, including nutrients, means that shrubs locally participate in regulating the rate sediment transport down a hillslope. With soil bioturbation, spatial variations in the disturbance frequency strongly influence the mixing of soil constituents, including distinct particle fractions (such as specific size or mineral fractions, seeds, or debitage), or elements and compounds adsorbed to particles. The formulation also provides a probabilistic version of the Exner equation. During bedload transport, gradients in particle activity, through both advective and dispersive effects, may contribute importantly to the local divergence of the particle flux, thereby influencing initial bedform growth.

  20. Dynamic analysis of astronaut motions in microgravity: Applications for Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Dava J.

    1995-01-01

    Simulations of astronaut motions during extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks were performed using computational multibody dynamics methods. The application of computational dynamic simulation to EVA was prompted by the realization that physical microgravity simulators have inherent limitations: viscosity in neutral buoyancy tanks; friction in air bearing floors; short duration for parabolic aircraft; and inertia and friction in suspension mechanisms. These limitations can mask critical dynamic effects that later cause problems during actual EVA's performed in space. Methods of formulating dynamic equations of motion for multibody systems are discussed with emphasis on Kane's method, which forms the basis of the simulations presented herein. Formulation of the equations of motion for a two degree of freedom arm is presented as an explicit example. The four basic steps in creating the computational simulations were: system description, in which the geometry, mass properties, and interconnection of system bodies are input to the computer; equation formulation based on the system description; inverse kinematics, in which the angles, velocities, and accelerations of joints are calculated for prescribed motion of the endpoint (hand) of the arm; and inverse dynamics, in which joint torques are calculated for a prescribed motion. A graphical animation and data plotting program, EVADS (EVA Dynamics Simulation), was developed and used to analyze the results of the simulations that were performed on a Silicon Graphics Indigo2 computer. EVA tasks involving manipulation of the Spartan 204 free flying astronomy payload, as performed during Space Shuttle mission STS-63 (February 1995), served as the subject for two dynamic simulations. An EVA crewmember was modeled as a seven segment system with an eighth segment representing the massive payload attached to the hand. For both simulations, the initial configuration of the lower body (trunk, upper leg, and lower leg) was a neutral

  1. Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2012-12-01

    Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students. PMID:23247874

  2. Muscle activity and hand motion in veterinarians performing laparoscopic training tasks with a box trainer.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Araya, Angelo E; Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Sánchez-Margallo, Juan A; Pérez-Duarte, Francisco J; Martin-Portugués, Idoia Díaz-Güemes; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate muscle activity and hand motion in veterinarians performing a standard set of laparoscopic training tasks. SAMPLE 12 veterinarians with experience performing laparoscopic procedures. PROCEDURES Participants were asked to perform peg transfer, coordination, precision cutting, and suturing tasks in a laparoscopic box trainer. Activity of the right biceps brachii, triceps brachii, forearm flexor, forearm extensor, and trapezius muscles was analyzed by means of surface electromyography. Right hand movements and wrist angle data were registered through the use of a data glove, and risk levels for the wrist joint were determined by use of a modified rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) method. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA with a Bonferroni post hoc test was performed to compare values between tasks. RESULTS Activity in the biceps muscle did not differ significantly among the 4 tasks. Activity in the triceps, forearm flexor, and forearm extensor muscles was significantly higher during precision cutting than during the coordination task. Activity in the trapezius muscle was highest during the suturing task and did not differ significantly among the other 3 tasks. The RULA score was unacceptable (score, 3) for the coordination, peg transfer, and precision cutting tasks but was acceptable (score, 2) for the suturing task. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that the ergonomics of laparoscopic training depended on the tasks performed and the design of the instruments used. Precision cutting and suturing tasks were associated with the highest muscle activity. Acceptable wrist position, as determined with the RULA method, was found with the suturing task, which was performed with an axial-handled instrument. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:186-193). PMID:27027713

  3. Detection of (In)activity Periods in Human Body Motion Using Inertial Sensors: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Alberto; Ramírez, Javier; Górriz, Juan M.; Olivares, Gonzalo; Damas, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Determination of (in)activity periods when monitoring human body motion is a mandatory preprocessing step in all human inertial navigation and position analysis applications. Distinction of (in)activity needs to be established in order to allow the system to recompute the calibration parameters of the inertial sensors as well as the Zero Velocity Updates (ZUPT) of inertial navigation. The periodical recomputation of these parameters allows the application to maintain a constant degree of precision. This work presents a comparative study among different well known inertial magnitude-based detectors and proposes a new approach by applying spectrum-based detectors and memory-based detectors. A robust statistical comparison is carried out by the use of an accelerometer and angular rate signal synthesizer that mimics the output of accelerometers and gyroscopes when subjects are performing basic activities of daily life. Theoretical results are verified by testing the algorithms over signals gathered using an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). Detection accuracy rates of up to 97% are achieved. PMID:22778613

  4. Effectiveness enhancement of a cycloidal wind turbine by individual active control of blade motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, In Seong; Lee, Yun Han; Kim, Seung Jo

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, a research for the effectiveness enhancement of a Cycloidal Wind Turbine by individual active control of blade motion is described. To improve the performance of the power generation system, which consists of several straight blades rotating about axis in parallel direction, the cycloidal blade system and the individual active blade control method are adopted. It has advantages comparing with horizontal axis wind turbine or conventional vertical axis wind turbine because it maintains optimal blade pitch angles according to wind speed, wind direction and rotor rotating speed to produce high electric power at any conditions. It can do self-starting and shows good efficiency at low wind speed and complex wind condition. Optimal blade pitch angle paths are obtained through CFD analysis according to rotor rotating speed and wind speed. The individual rotor blade control system consists of sensors, actuators and microcontroller. To realize the actuating device, servo motors are installed to each rotor blade. Actuating speed and actuating force are calculated to compare with the capacities of servo motor, and some delays of blade pitch angles are corrected experimentally. Performance experiment is carried out by the wind blowing equipment and Labview system, and the rotor rotates from 50 to 100 rpm according to the electric load. From this research, it is concluded that developing new vertical axis wind turbine, Cycloidal Wind Turbine which is adopting individual active blade pitch control method can be a good model for small wind turbine in urban environment.

  5. Wearable motion sensors to continuously measure real-world physical activities

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Rehabilitation for sensorimotor impairments aims to improve daily activities, walking, exercise, and motor skills. Monitoring of practice and measuring outcomes, however, is usually restricted to laboratory-based procedures and self-reports. Mobile health devices may reverse these confounders of daily care and research trials. Recent findings Wearable, wireless motion sensor data, analyzed by activity pattern-recognition algorithms, can describe the type, quantity, and quality of mobility-related activities in the community. Data transmission from sensors to the cell phone and Internet enable continuous monitoring. Remote access to laboratory-quality data about walking speed, duration and distance, gait asymmetry and smoothness of movements, as well as cycling, exercise, and skills practice, opens new opportunities to engage patients in progressive, personalized therapies with feedback about performance. Clinical trial designs will be able to include remote verification of the integrity of complex physical interventions and compliance with practice, as well as capture repeated, ecologically sound, ratio-scale outcome measures. Summary Given the progressively falling cost of miniaturized wearable gyroscopes, accelerometers, and other physiologic sensors, as well as inexpensive data transmission, sensing systems may become as ubiquitous as cell phones for health care. Neurorehabilitation can develop these mobile health platforms for daily care and clinical trials to improve exercise and fitness, skills learning, and physical functioning. PMID:24136126

  6. 12 CFR 7.2011 - Compensation plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation plans. 7.2011 Section 7.2011 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ACTIVITIES AND OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2011 Compensation plans. Consistent with safe and sound banking practices and the compensation provisions of 12 CFR part 30,...

  7. Control of a virtual vehicle influences postural activity and motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao; Yoshida, Ken; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2011-06-01

    Everyday experience suggests that drivers are less susceptible to motion sickness than passengers. In the context of inertial motion (i.e., physical displacement), this effect has been confirmed in laboratory research using whole body motion devices. We asked whether a similar effect would occur in the context of simulated vehicles in a visual virtual environment. We used a yoked control design in which one member of each pair of participants played a driving video game (i.e., drove a virtual automobile). A recording of that performance was viewed (in a separate session) by the other member of the pair. Thus, the two members of each pair were exposed to identical visual motion stimuli, but the risk of behavioral contagion was minimized. Participants who drove the virtual vehicle (drivers) were less likely to report motion sickness than participants who viewed game recordings (passengers). Data on head and torso movement revealed that drivers tended to move more than passengers, and that the movements of drivers were more predictable than the movements of passengers. Before the onset of subjective symptoms of motion sickness movement differed between participants who (later) reported motion sickness and those who did not, consistent with a prediction of the postural instability theory of motion sickness. The results confirm that control is an important factor in the etiology of motion sickness and extend this finding to the control of noninertial virtual vehicles. PMID:21604911

  8. Ground Motion Simulation for a Large Active Fault System using Empirical Green's Function Method and the Strong Motion Prediction Recipe - a Case Study of the Noubi Fault Zone -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, M.; Kumamoto, T.; Fujita, M.

    2005-12-01

    propagation. Moreover, it was clarified that the horizontal velocities by assuming the cascade model was underestimated more than one standard deviation of empirical relation by Si and Midorikawa (1999). The scaling and cascade models showed an approximately 6.4-fold difference for the case, in which the rupture started along the southeastern edge of the Umehara Fault at observation point GIF020. This difference is significantly large in comparison with the effect of different rupture starting points, and shows that it is important to base scenario earthquake assumptions on active fault datasets before establishing the source characterization model. The distribution map of seismic intensity for the 1891 Noubi Earthquake also suggests that the synthetic waveforms in the southeastern Noubi Fault zone may be underestimated. Our results indicate that outer fault parameters (e.g., earthquake moment) related to the construction of scenario earthquakes influence strong motion prediction, rather than inner fault parameters such as the rupture starting point. Based on these methods, we will predict strong motion for approximately 140 to 150 km of the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line.

  9. Evolution of Muscle Activity Patterns Driving Motions of the Jaw and Hyoid during Chewing in Gnathostomes

    PubMed Central

    Konow, Nicolai; Herrel, Anthony; Ross, Callum F.; Williams, Susan H.; German, Rebecca Z.; Sanford, Christopher P. J.; Gintof, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Although chewing has been suggested to be a basal gnathostome trait retained in most major vertebrate lineages, it has not been studied broadly and comparatively across vertebrates. To redress this imbalance, we recorded EMG from muscles powering anteroposterior movement of the hyoid, and dorsoventral movement of the mandibular jaw during chewing. We compared muscle activity patterns (MAP) during chewing in jawed vertebrate taxa belonging to unrelated groups of basal bony fishes and artiodactyl mammals. Our aim was to outline the evolution of coordination in MAP. Comparisons of activity in muscles of the jaw and hyoid that power chewing in closely related artiodactyls using cross-correlation analyses identified reorganizations of jaw and hyoid MAP between herbivores and omnivores. EMG data from basal bony fishes revealed a tighter coordination of jaw and hyoid MAP during chewing than seen in artiodactyls. Across this broad phylogenetic range, there have been major structural reorganizations, including a reduction of the bony hyoid suspension, which is robust in fishes, to the acquisition in a mammalian ancestor of a muscle sling suspending the hyoid. These changes appear to be reflected in a shift in chewing MAP that occurred in an unidentified anamniote stem-lineage. This shift matches observations that, when compared with fishes, the pattern of hyoid motion in tetrapods is reversed and also time-shifted relative to the pattern of jaw movement. PMID:21705368

  10. Cortical activation to object shape and speed of motion during the first year

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Teresa; Hawkins, Laura B.; Hirskkowitz, Amy; Boas, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A great deal is known about the functional organization of cortical networks that mediate visual object processing in the adult. The current research is part of a growing effort to identify the functional maturation of these pathways in the developing brain. The current research used near-infrared spectroscopy to investigate functional activation of the infant cortex during the processing of featural information (shape) and spatiotemporal information (speed of motion) during the first year of life. Our investigation focused on two areas that were implicated in previous studies: anterior temporal cortex and posterior parietal cortex. Neuroimaging data were collected with 207 infants across three age groups: 3 to 6 months (Experiment 1), 7 to 8 months (Experiment 2), and 10 to 12 months (Experiments 3 and 4). The neuroimaging data revealed age-related changes in patterns of activation to shape and speed information, mostly involving posterior parietal areas, some of which were predicted and others that were not. We suggest that these changes reflect age-related differences in the perceptual and/or cognitive processes engaged during the task. PMID:24821531

  11. The Vestibulo-ocular Reflex During Active Head Motion in Chiari II Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Michael S.; Sharpe, James A.; Lillakas, Linda; Dennis, Maureen; Steinbach, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Chiari type II malformation (CII) is a developmental anomaly of the cerebellum and brainstem, which are important structures for processing the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). We investigated the effects of the deformity of CII on the angular VOR during active head motion. Methods Eye and head movements were recorded using an infrared eye tracker and magnetic head tracker in 20 participants with CII [11 males, age range 8-19 years, mean (SD) 14.4 (3.2) years]. Thirty-eight age-matched healthy children and adolescents (21 males) constituted the control group. Participants were instructed to ‘look’ in darkness at the position of their thumb, placed 25 cm away, while they made horizontal and vertical sinusoidal head rotations at frequencies of about 0.5 Hz and 2 Hz. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used to compare the two groups. Results The VOR gains, the ratio of eye to head velocities, were abnormally low in two participants with CII and abnormally high in one participant with CII. Conclusion The majority of participants with CII had normal VOR performance in this investigation. However, the deformity of CII can impair the active angular VOR in some patients with CII. Low gain is attributed to brainstem damage and high gain to cerebellar dysfunction. PMID:18973069

  12. Dynamic behavior of elevator compensating sheave during buffer strike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Okawa, T.

    2016-05-01

    This paper shows an elevator dynamic model that calculates the compensating sheave motion during a buffer strike. Our equivalent 2-degree-of-freedom vibration model of an elevator system, which consists of a car, a compensating sheave, and compensating ropes, can evaluate the dynamic tension of the compensating ropes caused by a buffer strike. The constraint force, which restricts the upward motion of the compensating sheave, is estimated from the dynamic rope tension. The constraint force is represented by the summation of two vibration modes and is the function of the limited distance of the compensating sheave's upward movement. Our formula, which evaluates the maximum constraint force, shows that a shorter limited distance of the compensating sheave increases the constraint force.

  13. A framework for activity detection in wide-area motion imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Reid; Ruggiero, Christy; Morrison, John D.

    2009-05-01

    As wide-area persistent imaging systems become cost effective, increasingly large areas of the earth can be imaged at relatively high frame rates. Efficient exploitation of the large geo-spatial-temporal datasets produced by these systems poses significant technical challenges for image and video analysis and for data mining. Significant progress in image stabilization, moving object detection and tracking, are allowing automated systems to generate hundreds to thousands of vehicle tracks from raw data, with little human intervention. However, tracking performance at this scale is unreliable, and average track length is much smaller than the average vehicle route. These are limiting factors for applications that depend heavily on track identity, i.e. tracking vehicles from their points of origin to their final destination. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a framework for wide-area motion imagery (WAMI) exploitation that minimizes the dependence on track identity. In its current form, this framework takes noisy, incomplete moving object detection tracks as input, and produces a small set of activities (e.g. multi-vehicle meetings) as output. The framework can be used to focus and direct human users and additional computation, and suggests a path towards high-level content extraction by learning from the human-in-the-loop.

  14. Noise-enhanced stability and double stochastic resonance of active Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chunhua; Zhang, Chun; Zeng, Jiakui; Liu, Ruifen; Wang, Hua

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study the transient and resonant properties of active Brownian particles (ABPs) in the Rayleigh-Helmholtz (RH) and Schweitzer-Ebeling-Tilch (SET) models, which is driven by the simultaneous action of multiplicative and additive noise and periodic forcing. It is shown that the cross-correlation between two noises (λ) can break the symmetry of the potential to generate motion of the ABPs. In case of no correlation between two noises, the mean first passage time (MFPT) is a monotonic decrease depending on the multiplicative noise, however in case of correlation between two noises, the MFPT exhibits a maximum, depending on the multiplicative noise for both models, this maximum for MFPT identifies the noise-enhanced stability (NES) effect of the ABPs. By comparing with case of no correlation (λ =0.0 ), we find two maxima in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depending on the cross-correlation intensity, i.e. the double stochastic resonance is shown in both models. For the RH model, the SNR exhibits two maxima depending on the multiplicative noise for small cross-correlation intensity, while in the SET model, it exhibits only a maximum depending on the multiplicative noise. Whether λ =0.0 or not, the MFPT is a monotonic decrease, and the SNR exhibits a maximum, depending on the additive noise in both models.

  15. Stochastic non-circular motion and outflows driven by magnetic activity in the Galactic bulge region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Machida, Mami; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2015-12-01

    By performing a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation for the Milky Way with an axisymmetric gravitational potential, we propose that spatially dependent amplification of magnetic fields possibly explains the observed noncircular motion of the gas in the Galactic centre region. The radial distribution of the rotation frequency in the bulge region is not monotonic in general. The amplification of the magnetic field is enhanced in regions with stronger differential rotation, because magnetorotational instability and field-line stretching are more effective. The strength of the amplified magnetic field reaches ≳0.5 mG, and radial flows of the gas are excited by the inhomogeneous transport of angular momentum through turbulent magnetic field that is amplified in a spatially dependent manner. In addition, the magnetic pressure-gradient force also drives radial flows in a similar manner. As a result, the simulated position-velocity diagram exhibits a time-dependent asymmetric parallelogram-shape owing to the intermittency of the magnetic turbulence; the present model provides a viable alternative to the bar-potential-driven model for the parallelogram shape of the central molecular zone. This is a natural extension into the central few 100 pc of the magnetic activity, which is observed as molecular loops at radii from a few 100 pc to 1 kpc. Furthermore, the time-averaged net gas flow is directed outward, whereas the flows are highly time dependent, which we discuss from a viewpoint of the outflow from the bulge.

  16. Experiments on the motion of gas bubbles in turbulence generated by an active grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poorte, R. E. G.; Biesheuvel, A.

    2002-06-01

    The random motion of nearly spherical bubbles in the turbulent flow behind a grid is studied experimentally. In quiescent water these bubbles rise at high Reynolds number. The turbulence is generated by an active grid of the design of Makita (1991), and can have turbulence Reynolds number R[lambda] of up to 200. Minor changes in the geometry of the grid and in its mode of operation improves the isotropy of the turbulence, compared with that reported by Makita (1991) and Mydlarski & Warhaft (1996). The trajectory of each bubble is measured with high spatial and temporal resolution with a specially developed technique that makes use of a position-sensitive detector. Bubble statistics such as the mean rise velocity and the root-mean-square velocity fluctuations are obtained by ensemble averaging over many identical bubbles. The resulting bubble mean rise velocity is significantly reduced (up to 35%) compared with the quiescent conditions. The vertical bubble velocity fluctuations are found to be non-Gaussian, whereas the horizontal displacements are Gaussian for all times. The diffusivity of bubbles is considerably less than that of fluid particles. These findings are qualitatively consistent with results obtained through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations by Spelt & Biesheuvel (1997).

  17. A framework for activity detection in wide-area motion imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B; Ruggiero, Christy E; Morrison, Jack D

    2009-01-01

    Wide-area persistent imaging systems are becoming increasingly cost effective and now large areas of the earth can be imaged at relatively high frame rates (1-2 fps). The efficient exploitation of the large geo-spatial-temporal datasets produced by these systems poses significant technical challenges for image and video analysis and data mining. In recent years there has been significant progress made on stabilization, moving object detection and tracking and automated systems now generate hundreds to thousands of vehicle tracks from raw data, with little human intervention. However, the tracking performance at this scale, is unreliable and average track length is much smaller than the average vehicle route. This is a limiting factor for applications which depend heavily on track identity, i.e. tracking vehicles from their points of origin to their final destination. In this paper we propose and investigate a framework for wide-area motion imagery (W AMI) exploitation that minimizes the dependence on track identity. In its current form this framework takes noisy, incomplete moving object detection tracks as input, and produces a small set of activities (e.g. multi-vehicle meetings) as output. The framework can be used to focus and direct human users and additional computation, and suggests a path towards high-level content extraction by learning from the human-in-the-loop.

  18. Field-Aligned Current Sheet Motion and Its Correlation with Solar Wind Conditions and Geomagnetic Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Le, G.; Boardsen, S. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2008-05-01

    Field-aligned currents (FACs) are the currents flowing into and out of the ionosphere which connect to the magnetosphere. They provide an essential linkage between the solar wind - magnetosphere system and the ionosphere, and the understanding of these currents is important for global magnetosphere dynamics and space weather prediction. The three spacecraft ST-5 constellation provides an unprecedented opportunity to study in situ FAC dynamics in time scales (10 sec to 10 min) that can not be achieved previously with single spacecraft studies or large-spaced conjugate spacecraft studies. In this study, we use the magnetic field observations during the whole ST-5 mission and their corresponding solar wind conditions to study the dependence of FAC current sheet motion and intensity on solar wind conditions. FAC peak current densities show very good correlations with some solar wind parameters, including IMF Bz, dynamic pressure, Ey, and some IMF angles, but not with other parameters. Instant FAC speeds show generally much weaker dependence on solar wind conditions comparing to FAC peak current densities. This obvious uncorrelation between FAC peak current densities and speeds implies that FAC peak current densities are more consistently controlled by solar wind conditions and geomagnetic activities, while FAC speeds are more oscillatory, sometimes with higher speeds during quieter times and lower speeds during more turbulent times.

  19. A state of reversible compensated ventricular dysfunction precedes pathological remodelling in response to cardiomyocyte-specific activity of angiotensin II type-1 receptor in mice

    PubMed Central

    Frentzou, Georgia A.; Drinkhill, Mark J.; Turner, Neil A.; Ball, Stephen G.; Ainscough, Justin F. X.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac dysfunction is commonly associated with high-blood-pressure-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, in response to aberrant renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity. Ensuing pathological remodelling promotes cardiomyocyte death and cardiac fibroblast activation, leading to cardiac fibrosis. The initiating cellular mechanisms that underlie this progressive disease are poorly understood. We previously reported a conditional mouse model in which a human angiotensin II type-I receptor transgene (HART) was expressed in differentiated cardiomyocytes after they had fully matured, but not during development. Twelve-month-old HART mice exhibited ventricular dysfunction and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with interstitial fibrosis following full receptor stimulation, without affecting blood pressure. Here, we show that chronic HART activity in young adult mice causes ventricular dysfunction without hypertrophy, fibrosis or cardiomyocyte death. Dysfunction correlated with reduced expression of pro-hypertrophy markers and increased expression of pro-angiogenic markers in the cardiomyocytes experiencing increased receptor load. This stimulates responsive changes in closely associated non-myocyte cells, including the downregulation of pro-angiogenic genes, a dampened inflammatory response and upregulation of Tgfβ. Importantly, this state of compensated dysfunction was reversible. Furthermore, increased stimulation of the receptors on the cardiomyocytes caused a switch in the secondary response from the non-myocyte cells. Progressive cardiac remodelling was stimulated through hypertrophy and death of individual cardiomyocytes, with infiltration, proliferation and activation of fibroblast and inflammatory cells, leading to increased angiogenic and inflammatory signalling. Together, these data demonstrate that a state of pre-hypertrophic compensated dysfunction can exist in affected individuals before common markers of heart disease are detectable. The data also suggest that

  20. Personalized Multilayer Daily Life Profiling Through Context Enabled Activity Classification and Motion Reconstruction: An Integrated System Approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, James Y; Wang, Yan; Barrett, Mick; Dobkin, Bruce; Pottie, Greg J; Kaiser, William J

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the daily activity of a physically disabled person in the community would enable healthcare professionals to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of their patients' compliance with recommendations for exercise, fitness, and practice of skilled movements, as well as enable feedback about performance in real-world situations. Based on our early research in in-community activity profiling, we present in this paper an end-to-end system capable of reporting a patient's daily activity at multiple levels of granularity: 1) at the highest level, information on the location categories a patient is able to visit; 2) within each location category, information on the activities a patient is able to perform; and 3) at the lowest level, motion trajectory, visualization, and metrics computation of each activity. Our methodology is built upon a physical activity prescription model coupled with MEMS inertial sensors and mobile device kits that can be sent to a patient at home. A novel context-guided activity-monitoring concept with categorical location context is used to achieve enhanced classification accuracy and throughput. The methodology is then seamlessly integrated with motion reconstruction and metrics computation to provide comprehensive layered reporting of a patient's daily life. We also present an implementation of the methodology featuring a novel location context detection algorithm using WiFi augmented GPS and overlays, with motion reconstruction and visualization algorithms for practical in-community deployment. Finally, we use a series of experimental field evaluations to confirm the accuracy of the system. PMID:25546868

  1. Extremely reduced motion in front of screens: investigating real-world physical activity of adolescents by accelerometry and electronic diary.

    PubMed

    Streb, Judith; Kammer, Thomas; Spitzer, Manfred; Hille, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports accelerometer and electronic dairy data on typical daily activities of 139 school students from grade six and nine. Recordings covered a typical school day for each student and lasted on average for 23 h. Screen activities (watching television and using the computer) are compared to several other activities performed while sitting (e.g., playing, eating, sitting in school, and doing homework). Body movement was continuously recorded by four accelerometers and transformed into a motion sore. Our results show that extremely low motion scores, as if subjects were freezing, emerge to a greater extent in front of screens compared to other investigated activities. Given the substantial amount of time young people spend in front of screens and the rising obesity epidemic, our data suggest a mechanism for the association of screen time and obesity. PMID:25955531

  2. Extremely Reduced Motion in Front of Screens: Investigating Real-World Physical Activity of Adolescents by Accelerometry and Electronic Diary

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Judith; Kammer, Thomas; Spitzer, Manfred; Hille, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports accelerometer and electronic dairy data on typical daily activities of 139 school students from grade six and nine. Recordings covered a typical school day for each student and lasted on average for 23 h. Screen activities (watching television and using the computer) are compared to several other activities performed while sitting (e.g., playing, eating, sitting in school, and doing homework). Body movement was continuously recorded by four accelerometers and transformed into a motion sore. Our results show that extremely low motion scores, as if subjects were freezing, emerge to a greater extent in front of screens compared to other investigated activities. Given the substantial amount of time young people spend in front of screens and the rising obesity epidemic, our data suggest a mechanism for the association of screen time and obesity. PMID:25955531

  3. Vertical crustal motion of active plate convergence in Taiwan derived from tide gauge, altimetry, and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Emmy T. Y.; Chao, Benjamin F.; Chiang, Chieh-Chung; Hwang, Cheinway

    2012-11-01

    Located at the converging junction between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates, the island of Taiwan is subject to an active lithospheric deformation as well as seismicity. Taking the difference between the satellite altimetry data (ALT) that give the absolute sea level variation and the tide gauge data (TG) that record the relative sea level variation, we obtain the absolute vertical crustal motion of the tide gauge sites. We use 20 TG stations along the west and east coasts of Taiwan along with the ALT measurements from the TOPEX/Poseidon-Jason satellites in the nearby waters. The ALT-TG results are compared with vertical GPS measurements in discussing vertical motion. We find a general subsidence of the entire Taiwan coast during the past two decades. The west coast sees no prominent vertical motion but with a severe local subsidence due to the over-withdrawal of groundwater. On the east coast, the ALT-TG results in the northern section demonstrate a northward dipping motion. The elastic thickness of the neighboring oceanic lithosphere modeled as an elastic plate with the flexure of the subducting plate shows that the adjacent Philippine Sea plate should be an old, thick oceanic plate, which could drag the slab into the mantle as manifested in a gentle northward subsidence in the northeast Taiwan. In the southern section of the east coast, the ALT-TG results reveal a segmented or undulating pattern in the vertical-motion rates. Judging from the different behaviors between the co-seismic and interseismic vertical motions marked by the major earthquakes during the studied period, we postulate a temporal saw-tooth scenario for the deformation in phases. It demonstrates the opposite motions under different mechanisms in the frontal sections of the subduction zone, which can be understood with lateral collision and slab dragging subject to varied temporal and spatial dependences.

  4. Compensation effects and relation between the activation energy of spin transition and the hysteresis loop width for an iron(ii) complex.

    PubMed

    Bushuev, Mark B; Pishchur, Denis P; Nikolaenkova, Elena B; Krivopalov, Viktor P

    2016-06-22

    The enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for the cooperative → spin transition (the phase is a mononuclear complex [FeL2](BF4)2, L is 4-(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-methylpyrimidine). The physical origin of this effect is the fact that the → spin transition is the first order phase transition accompanied by noticeable variations in the Tonset↑, ΔH and ΔS values. Higher ΔH and ΔS values are correlated with higher Tonset↑ values. The higher the enthalpy and entropy of the spin transition, the wider the hysteresis loop. The kinetic compensation effect, i.e. a linear relationship between ln A and Ea, was observed for the → spin transition. Moreover, an isokinetic relationship was detected in this system: the Arrhenius lines (ln k vs. 1/T) obtained from magnetochemical data for different samples of the phase undergoing the → transition show a common point of intersection (Tiso = 490 ± 2 K, ln kiso = -6.0 ± 0.2). The validity of this conclusion was confirmed by the Exner-Linert statistical method. This means that the isokinetic relationship and the kinetic compensation effect (ln A vs. Ea) in this system are true ones. The existence of a true kinetic compensation effect is supported independently by the fact that the hysteresis loop width for the cooperative spin transition ↔ increases with increasing activation barrier height. Estimating the energy of excitations for the phase with Tiso ∼ 490 K yields wavenumbers of ca. 340 cm(-1) corresponding to the frequencies of the stretching vibrations of the Fe(LS)-N bonds, i.e. the bonds directly involved in the mechanism of the spin transition. This is the first observation of the kinetic compensation effect (ln A vs. Ea) and the isokinetic relationship for a cooperative spin crossover system showing thermal hysteresis. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that the higher the activation barrier for the spin transition, the wider the hysteresis loop for a

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) Configuration and Data Management Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Schlicher, Bob G

    2006-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involvement in the Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) research with both government agencies and private companies dates back to 1989. The discussion here will focus on the US Army's current need for an automated WIM system to weigh and determine the center-of-balance for military wheeled vehicles and cargo and the expanded uses of WIM data. ORNL is addressing configuration and data management issues as they relate to deployments for both military and humanitarian activities. The transition from the previous WIM Gen I to the current Gen II system illustrates a configuration and data management solution that ensures data integration, integrity, coherence and cost effectiveness. Currently, Army units use portable and fixed scales, tape measures, and calculators to determine vehicle axle, total weights and center of balance for vehicles prior to being transshipped via railcar, ship, or airlifted. Manually weighing and measuring all vehicles subject to these transshipment operations is time-consuming, labor-intensive, hazardous and is prone to human errors (e.g., misreading scales and tape measures, calculating centers of balance and wheel, axle, and vehicle weights, recording data, and transferring data from manually prepared work sheets into an electronic data base and aggravated by adverse weather conditions). Additionally, in the context of the military, the timeliness, safety, success, and effectiveness of airborne heavy-drop operations can be significantly improved by the use of an automated system to weigh and determine center of balance of vehicles while they are in motion. The lack of a standardized airlift-weighing system for joint service use also creates redundant weighing requirements at the cost of scarce resources and time. This case study can be judiciously expanded into commercial operations related to safety and enforcement. The WIM program will provide a means for the Army to automatically identify/weigh and monitor

  6. Naturally-occurring compensated insulin resistance selectively alters glucose transporters in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue without change in AS160 activation

    PubMed Central

    Waller, AP; Kohler, K; Burns, TA; Mudge, MC; Belknap, JK; Lacombe, VA

    2011-01-01

    Although the importance of adipose tissue (AT) glucose transport in regulating whole-body insulin sensitivity is becoming increasingly evident and insulin resistance (IR) has been widely recognized, the underlying mechanisms of IR are still not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to determine the early pathological changes in glucose transport by characterizing the alterations in glucose transporters (GLUT) in multiple visceral and subcutaneous adipose depots in a large animal model of naturally-occurring compensated IR. AT biopsies were collected from horses, which were classified as insulin-sensitive (IS) or compensated IR based on the results of an insulin-modified frequently-sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Protein expression of GLUT4 (major isoform) and GLUT12 (one of the most recently discovered isoforms) were measured by Western blotting in multiple AT depots, as well as AS160 (a potential key player in GLUT trafficking pathway). Using a biotinylated bis-mannose photolabeled technique, active cell surface GLUT content was quantified. Omental AT had the highest total GLUT content compared to other sites during the IS state. IR was associated with a significantly reduced total GLUT4 content in omental AT, without a change in content in other visceral or subcutaneous adipose sites. In addition, active cell surface GLUT-4, but not -12, was significantly lower in AT of IR compared to IS horses, without change in AS160 phosphorylation between groups. Our data suggest that GLUT4, but not GLUT12, is a pathogenic factor in AT during naturally-occurring compensated IR, despite normal AS160 activation. PMID:21352908

  7. Influence of surface active substances on bubble motion and collision with various interfaces.

    PubMed

    Malysa, K; Krasowska, M; Krzan, M

    2005-06-30

    Bubble motion as a function of distance from a point of its detachment and phenomena occurring during the bubble approach and collision with liquid/gas and liquid/solid interfaces in pure water and solutions of various surface active substances are described and discussed. It is showed that presence of surface active substance has a profound influence on values of the terminal velocity and profiles of the local velocity. At low solutions concentrations there are three distinct stages in the bubble motion: (i) a rapid acceleration, (ii) a maximum velocity value followed by its monotonic decrease, and (iii) attainment of the terminal velocity, while at high concentrations (and in pure water) there are only stages (i) and (iii). It is showed that the bubble terminal velocity decreases rapidly at low surfactant concentration, but there can be found some characteristic concentrations (adsorption coverage's) above which the velocity almost stopped to decrease. Immobilization of the bubble surface resulting from adsorption of the surface active substances (surface tension gradients inducement) causes over twofold lowering of the bubble velocity. Presence of the maximum on the local velocity profiles is an indication that a stationary non-uniform distribution of adsorption coverage (needed for immobilization the bubble interface) was not established there. When the rising bubble arrives at liquid/gas interface or liquid/solid interface there can be formed either foam or wetting film or three-phase contact (TPC). It is showed that prior to the foam and/or wetting film formation the bubble colliding with the interfaces can bounce backward and simultaneously its shape pulsates rapidly with a frequency over 1000 Hz. It is rather unexpected that even in the case of the free surface the bubble's shape and consequently its surface area can vary so rapidly. It shows straightforward that on such a rapidly distorted interface the adsorption coverage can be very different from that

  8. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuan; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic 18F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R2 = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast. PMID:24694141

  9. On a chaotic potential at the surface of a compensated semiconductor under conditions of the self-assembly of electrically active defects

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, V. B. Filimonov, A. V.

    2015-09-15

    Natural irregularities of the electric potential on the surface of a semiconductor under conditions of the partial self-assembly of electrically active defects, i.e., on the formation of donor–acceptor pairs in depletion layers, are studied. The amplitude and character of the spatial distribution of the chaotic potential on the surface of a semiconductor in the cases of localized and delocalized states are determined. The dependence of the amplitude of the chaotic potential on the degree of compensation of the semiconductor is obtained.

  10. Hydrostatic Pressure Studies Distinguish Global from Local Protein Motions in C-H Activation by Soybean Lipoxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shenshen; Cattin-Ortolá, Jérôme; Munos, Jeffrey W; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-08-01

    The proposed contributions of distinct classes of local versus global protein motions during enzymatic bond making/breaking processes has been difficult to verify. We employed soybean lipoxygenase-1 as a model system to investigate the impact of high pressure at variable temperatures on the hydrogen-tunneling properties of the wild-type protein and three single-site mutants. For all variants, pressure dramatically elevates the enthalpies of activation for the C-H activation. In contrast, the primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for C-H activation and their corresponding temperature dependencies remain unchanged up to ca. 700 bar. The differential impact of elevated hydrostatic pressure on the temperature dependencies of rate constants versus substrate KIEs provides direct evidence for two distinct classes of protein motions: local, isotope-dependent donor-acceptor distance-sampling modes, and a more global, isotope-independent search for productive protein conformational sub-states. PMID:27348724

  11. Reactive power compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  12. Frames of reference and motion aftereffects.

    PubMed

    Swanston, M T

    1994-01-01

    Evidence concerning the origin of the motion aftereffect (MAE) is assessed in terms of a model of levels of representation in visual motion perception proposed by Wade and Swanston. Very few experiments have been designed so as to permit unambiguous conclusions to be drawn. The requirements for such experiments are identified. Whereas retinocentric motion could in principle give rise to the MAE, data are not available which would enable a conclusion to be drawn. There is good evidence for a patterncentric origin, indicating that the MAE is primarily the result of adaptation in the systems responsible for detecting relative visual motion. There is evidence for a further contribution from the process that compensates retinocentric motion for eye movements, in the form of nonveridical information for eye movements. There may also be an effect at the level at which perceived distance and self-movement information are combined with egocentric motion to give a geocentric representation which provides the basis for reports of phenomenal experience. It is concluded that the MAE can be caused by changes in activity at more than one level of representation, and cannot be ascribed to a single underlying process. PMID:7899042

  13. Fine spatiotemporal activity in contracting myometrium revealed by motion-corrected calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Fiona C; Shmygol, Anatoly; Richardson, Magnus J E

    2014-01-01

    Successful childbirth depends on the occurrence of precisely coordinated uterine contractions during labour. Calcium indicator fluorescence imaging is one of the main techniques for investigating the mechanisms governing this physiological process and its pathologies. The effective spatiotemporal resolution of calcium signals is, however, limited by the motion of contracting tissue: structures of interest in the order of microns can move over a hundred times their width during a contraction. The simultaneous changes in local intensity and tissue configuration make motion tracking a non-trivial problem in image analysis and confound many of the standard techniques. This paper presents a method that tracks local motion throughout the tissue and allows for the almost complete removal of motion artefacts. This provides a stabilized calcium signal down to a pixel resolution, which, for the data examined, is in the order of a few microns. As a byproduct of image stabilization, a complete kinematic description of the contraction–relaxation cycle is also obtained. This contains novel information about the mechanical response of the tissue, such as the identification of a characteristic length scale, in the order of 40–50 μm, below which tissue motion is homogeneous. Applied to our data, we illustrate that the method allows for analyses of calcium dynamics in contracting myometrium in unprecedented spatiotemporal detail. Additionally, we use the kinematics of tissue motion to compare calcium signals at the subcellular level and local contractile motion. The computer code used is provided in a freely modifiable form and has potential applicability to in vivo calcium imaging of neural tissue, as well as other smooth muscle tissue. PMID:25085893

  14. Optical tracking telescope compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbart, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    In order to minimize the effects of parameter variations in the dynamics of an optical tracking telescope, a model referenced parameter adaptive control system is described that - in conjunction with more traditional forms of compensation - achieves a reduction of rms pointing error by more than a factor of six. The adaptive compensation system utilizes open loop compensation, closed loop compensation, and model reference compensation to provide the precise input to force telescope axis velocity to follow the ideal velocity.

  15. Static imaging of motion: motion texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Koichi

    1992-05-01

    This paper describes how motion segmentation can be achieved by analyzing of a single static image that is created from a series of picture frames. The key idea is motion imaging; in other words, motion is expressed in static images by integrating, frame after frame, the spatiotemporal fluctuations of the gradient gray level at each local area. This tends to create blurred or attached line images (images with lines that show the path of movement of an object through space) on moving objects. We call this 'motion texture'. We computed motion texture images based on the animation of a natural scene and on a number of computer synthesized animations containing groups of moving objects (random dots). Moreover, we applied two different texture analyses to the motion textured images for segmentation: a texture analysis based on the local homogeneity of gray level gradation in similarly textured regions and another based on the structural feature of gray level gradation in motion texture. Experiments showed that subjective visual impressions of segmentation were quite different for these animations. The texture segmentation described here successfully grouped moving objects coincident to subjective impressions. In our random dot animations, the density of the basic motion vectors extracted from each pair of successive frames was set at a constant to compensate for the dot grouping effect based on the vector density. The dot appearance period (lifetime) is varied across the animations. In a long lifetime random dot animation, region boundaries can be more clearly perceived than in a short one. The different impressions may be explained by analyzing the motion texture elements, but can not always be represented successfully using the motion vectors between two successive frames whose density is set at a constant between the animations with the different lifetime.

  16. Active control of the attitude motion and structural vibration of a flexible satellite by jet thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mokin

    A Lagrangian formulation is used to obtain the equations of motion of a flexible satellite in a tree-type geometry. The flexible satellite model is the geosynchronous INSAT-II type satellite with a flexible balance beam and a flexible solar panel attached to the rigid main body. In deriving the equations of motion, the orbital motion, the librational motion, and the structural motion of flexible bodies are involved. The assumed-modes method is used to express the deflections of the flexible structures in the form of a finite series of space-dependent admissible functions multiplied by time-dependent amplitudes. The kinetic energy, potential energy, strain energy, and virtual work of the flexible satellite are evaluated as functions of time in terms of the generalized coordinates. Then, by substituting them into Lagrange's equations for discrete systems, the governing equations of motion of the flexible satellite are obtained as a set of second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The attitude motion and the structural motion of the flexible satellite are coupled motions with one another. Uncontrolled dynamics show that the librational and structural motions are oscillatory and undamped motions. The stability and performance of the flexible satellite needs to be improved by designing control systems. A control objective is proposed to improve the stability and performance for pointing accuracy maneuver by controlling the librational motions and flexible modes simultaneously. For the control objective, a control system is synthesized, using feedback linearization control, thrust determination, thrust management, and pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation. Feedback linearization for second-order nonlinear systems is used to obtain a stable feedback control system for the pointing-accuracy control. A stable feedback control system is obtained by adjusting the diagonal matrices of the linear second-order system. Jet thrusters are used as the primary

  17. Parallax-sensitive remapping of visual space in occipito-parietal alpha-band activity during whole-body motion.

    PubMed

    Gutteling, T P; Selen, L P J; Medendorp, W P

    2015-03-01

    Despite the constantly changing retinal image due to eye, head, and body movements, we are able to maintain a stable representation of the visual environment. Various studies on retinal image shifts caused by saccades have suggested that occipital and parietal areas correct for these perturbations by a gaze-centered remapping of the neural image. However, such a uniform, rotational, remapping mechanism cannot work during translations when objects shift on the retina in a more complex, depth-dependent fashion due to motion parallax. Here we tested whether the brain's activity patterns show parallax-sensitive remapping of remembered visual space during whole-body motion. Under continuous recording of electroencephalography (EEG), we passively translated human subjects while they had to remember the location of a world-fixed visual target, briefly presented in front of or behind the eyes' fixation point prior to the motion. Using a psychometric approach we assessed the quality of the memory update, which had to be made based on vestibular feedback and other extraretinal motion cues. All subjects showed a variable amount of parallax-sensitive updating errors, i.e., the direction of the errors depended on the depth of the target relative to fixation. The EEG recordings show a neural correlate of this parallax-sensitive remapping in the alpha-band power at occipito-parietal electrodes. At parietal electrodes, the strength of these alpha-band modulations correlated significantly with updating performance. These results suggest that alpha-band oscillatory activity reflects the time-varying updating of gaze-centered spatial information during parallax-sensitive remapping during whole-body motion. PMID:25505108

  18. Object detection and tracking with active camera on motion vectors of feature points and particle filter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Zhang, Rong-Hua; Shang, Lei; Hu, Eric

    2013-06-01

    A method based on motion vectors of feature points and particle filter has been proposed and developed for an active∕moving camera for object detection and tracking purposes. The object is detected by histogram of motion vectors first, and then, on the basis of particle filter algorithm, the weighing factors are obtained via color information. In addition, re-sampling strategy and surf feature points are used to remedy the drawback of particle degeneration. Experimental results demonstrate the practicability and accuracy of the new method and are presented in the paper. PMID:23822380

  19. Extension of the stability of motions in a combustion chamber by non- linear active control based on hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Knoop, P.; Culick, F.E.C.; Zukoski, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report presents the first quantitative data establishing the details of hysteresis whose existence in dynamical behavior was reported by Sterling and Zukoski. The new idea was demonstrated that the presence of dynamical hysteresis provides opportunity for a novel strategy of active nonlinear control of unsteady motions in combustors. A figure shows the hysteresis exhibited for the amplitude of pressure oscillations as a function of equivalence ratio in a combustor having a recirculation zone, in this case a dump combustor.

  20. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (vts) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the vts derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  1. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (VTS) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the VTS derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  2. Contrast Affects fMRI Activity in Middle Temporal Cortex Related to Center–Surround Interaction in Motion Perception

    PubMed Central

    Turkozer, Halide B.; Pamir, Zahide; Boyaci, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    As the size of a high contrast drifting Gabor patch increases, perceiving its direction of motion becomes harder. However, the same behavioral effect is not observed for a low contrast Gabor patch. Neuronal mechanisms underlying this size–contrast interaction are not well understood. Here using psychophysical methods and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the neural correlates of this behavioral effect. In the behavioral experiments, motion direction discrimination thresholds were assessed for drifting Gabor patches with different sizes and contrasts. Thresholds increased significantly as the size of the stimulus increased for high contrast (65%) but did not change for low contrast (2%) stimuli. In the fMRI experiment, cortical activity was recorded while observers viewed drifting Gabor patches with different contrasts and sizes. We found that the activity in middle temporal (MT) area increased with size at low contrast, but did not change at high contrast. Taken together, our results show that MT activity reflects the size–contrast interaction in motion perception. PMID:27065922

  3. Physics of active jamming during collective cellular motion in a monolayer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Simon; Hannezo, Edouard; Elgeti, Jens; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Gov, Nir S

    2015-12-15

    Although collective cell motion plays an important role, for example during wound healing, embryogenesis, or cancer progression, the fundamental rules governing this motion are still not well understood, in particular at high cell density. We study here the motion of human bronchial epithelial cells within a monolayer, over long times. We observe that, as the monolayer ages, the cells slow down monotonously, while the velocity correlation length first increases as the cells slow down but eventually decreases at the slowest motions. By comparing experiments, analytic model, and detailed particle-based simulations, we shed light on this biological amorphous solidification process, demonstrating that the observed dynamics can be explained as a consequence of the combined maturation and strengthening of cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions. Surprisingly, the increase of cell surface density due to proliferation is only secondary in this process. This analysis is confirmed with two other cell types. The very general relations between the mean cell velocity and velocity correlation lengths, which apply for aggregates of self-propelled particles, as well as motile cells, can possibly be used to discriminate between various parameter changes in vivo, from noninvasive microscopy data. PMID:26627719

  4. Physics of active jamming during collective cellular motion in a monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Simon; Hannezo, Edouard; Elgeti, Jens; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Gov, Nir S.

    2015-01-01

    Although collective cell motion plays an important role, for example during wound healing, embryogenesis, or cancer progression, the fundamental rules governing this motion are still not well understood, in particular at high cell density. We study here the motion of human bronchial epithelial cells within a monolayer, over long times. We observe that, as the monolayer ages, the cells slow down monotonously, while the velocity correlation length first increases as the cells slow down but eventually decreases at the slowest motions. By comparing experiments, analytic model, and detailed particle-based simulations, we shed light on this biological amorphous solidification process, demonstrating that the observed dynamics can be explained as a consequence of the combined maturation and strengthening of cell−cell and cell−substrate adhesions. Surprisingly, the increase of cell surface density due to proliferation is only secondary in this process. This analysis is confirmed with two other cell types. The very general relations between the mean cell velocity and velocity correlation lengths, which apply for aggregates of self-propelled particles, as well as motile cells, can possibly be used to discriminate between various parameter changes in vivo, from noninvasive microscopy data. PMID:26627719

  5. Compensation Review Analyst

    2003-06-03

    COMPERA is a decision support system designed to facilitate the compensation review process. With parameters provided by the user(s), the system generates recommendations for base increases and nonbase compensation that strives to align total compensation with performance compensation targets. The user(s) prescribe(s) compensation targets according to performance (or value of contribution) designators. These targets are presented in look-up tables, which are then used by embedded formulas in the worksheet to determine the recommended compensation formore » each individual.« less

  6. Dynamic isolation via momentum compensation for precision instrument pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, D.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of a momentum-compensated inertially stabilized platform (IPPADS) for carrying scientific instruments is presented, the platform's function as a mechanical diode is explained, and the implications of momentum compensation for platform pointing and cost are discussed. The equations of motion for momentum compensation in the IPPADS five-body system are derived, and the results are used to computer simulate the system under consideration with two examples.

  7. A Short-Term Decrease in Nitrogenase Activity (C2H2 Reduction) Is Induced by Exposure of Soybean Shoots to Their CO2 Compensation Point.

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, R.; Gerbaud, A.; Vidal, D.; Drevon, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Photosynthesis and nitrogenase acetylene-reducing activity (ARA) were measured in soybeans (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) in which the shoots were exposed for 48 h to 60 [mu]L L-1 CO2, a value corresponding to their CO2 compensation point. Six hours after the beginning of the light period at low CO2, the ARA started to decrease, reaching a rate of 50% of the control rate in 14 to 24 h and 20% of the control rate in 34 to 38 h after the beginning of the CO2 treatment. At these times, there was no net photosynthesis, and the transpiration rate was 20% lower than that in the control plants. An increase in the partial pressure of O2 around the nodules alleviated this inhibition of ARA. The maximal ARA achieved at 40 kPaO2 was 3 times higher than that at 20 kPa O2 and similar to the maximal ARA of the control plants. It was argued that the decrease in ARA of soybean exposed to the CO2 compensation point was due to a decrease in the nodule's permeability to O2 diffusion. PMID:12228555

  8. Magnetic particle motions within living cells. Measurement of cytoplasmic viscosity and motile activity.

    PubMed Central

    Valberg, P A; Feldman, H A

    1987-01-01

    Submicrometer magnetic particles, ingested by cells and monitored via the magnetic fields they generate, provide an alternative to optical microscopy for probing movement and viscosity of living cytoplasm, and can be used for cells both in vitro and in vivo. We present methods for preparing lung macrophages tagged with magnetic particles for magnetometric study. Interpretation of the data involves fitting experimental remanent-field decay curves to nonlinear mechanistic models of intracellular particle motion. The model parameters are sensitive to mobility and apparent cytoplasmic viscosity experienced by particle-containing organelles. We present results of parameter estimation for intracellular particle behavior both within control cells and after (a) variable magnetization duration, (b) incubation with cytochalasin D, and (c) particle twisting by external fields. Magnetometric analysis showed cytoplasmic elasticity, dose-dependent motion inhibition by cytochalasin D, and a shear-thinning apparent viscosity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:3676436

  9. Convection Compensated Electrophoretic NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiuhong; Wei, Zhaohui

    2001-06-01

    A novel method of convection compensated ENMR (CC-ENMR) has been developed to detect electrophoretic motion of ionic species in the presence of bulk solution convection. This was accomplished using a gradient moment nulling technique to remove spectral artifacts from heat-induced convection and using the polarity switch of the applied electric field to retain spin phase modulations due to electrophoretic flow. Experiments were carried out with a mixture of 100 mM L-aspartic acid and 100 mM 4,9-dioxa-1,12-dodecanediamine to demonstrate this new method of ENMR. CC-ENMR enhances our previously developed capillary array ENMR (CA-ENMR) in solving the convection problem. The combined CA- and CC-ENMR approach strengthens the potential of multidimensional ENMR in simultaneous structural determination of coexisting proteins and protein conformations in biological buffer solutions of high ionic strength. Structural mapping of interacting proteins during biochemical reactions becomes possible in the future using ENMR techniques, which may have a profound impact on the understanding of biological events, including protein folding, genetic control, and signal transduction in general.

  10. Three statistical experimental designs for enhancing yield of active compounds from herbal medicines and anti-motion sickness bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Cuiping; Zhang, Mei; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since antiquity, Zingiber officinale (ginger), pogostemonis herba, and radix aucklandiae have been used as traditional Chinese medicines to remit gastrointestinal discomfort. Recent evidences also show the efficacy of the three herbal medicines against nausea and vomiting. Objective: To optimize the CO2 supercritical fluid extraction (SFE-CO2) conditions for ginger and the ethanol reflux extraction conditions for radix aucklandiae, control the quality of pogostemonis herba essential oil, and evaluate anti-motion sickness activity of the compound recipes composed of the three herbal medicine extracts. Materials and Methods: Two orthogonal array designs L9 (3)4 were employed to optimize the SFE-CO2 conditions for enhancing yield of 6-gingerol from ginger and the ethanol reflux extraction conditions for enhancing yield of costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone from radix aucklandiae; a uniform design U5(53) was applied for evaluation of anti-motion sickness activity of the compound recipes. Results: Extraction pressure (P < 0.01), extraction temperature and extraction time (P < 0.05) have significant effects on the yield of 6-gingerol from ginger by SFE-CO2; ethanol concentration (P < 0.01) and times of repeating extraction (P < 0.05) have significant effects on the total yield of costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone from radix aucklandiae by ethanol reflux extraction; the anti-motion sickness effects of the optimized compound recipe composed of the three herbal medicine extracts were markedly better than those of dimenhydrinate. Conclusion: The compound recipe composed of ginger, pogostemonis herba, and radix aucklandiae could be developed as a promising anti-motion sickness medicine. PMID:26246716

  11. A motion- and sound-activated, 3D-printed, chalcogenide-based triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Kanik, Mehmet; Say, Mehmet Girayhan; Daglar, Bihter; Yavuz, Ahmet Faruk; Dolas, Muhammet Halit; El-Ashry, Mostafa M; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    A multilayered triboelectric nanogenerator (MULTENG) that can be actuated by acoustic waves, vibration of a moving car, and tapping motion is built using a 3D-printing technique. The MULTENG can generate an open-circuit voltage of up to 396 V and a short-circuit current of up to 1.62 mA, and can power 38 LEDs. The layers of the triboelectric generator are made of polyetherimide nanopillars and chalcogenide core-shell nanofibers. PMID:25722118

  12. Sport for All? Insight into Stratification and Compensation Mechanisms of Sporting Activity in the 27 European Union Member States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Tuyckom, Charlotte; Scheerder, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity is an important public health issue and the benefits of an active lifestyle in relation to well-being and health have been strongly emphasised in recent years in Europe, as well as in most parts of the world. However, previous research has shown that physical activity within Europe and its member states is stratified. The present…

  13. Motion-adaptive compressive coded apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmany, Zachary T.; Oh, Albert; Marcia, Roummel; Willett, Rebecca

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes an adaptive compressive coded aperture imaging system for video based on motion-compensated video sparsity models. In particular, motion models based on optical flow and sparse deviations from optical flow (i.e. salient motion) can be used to (a) predict future video frames from previous compressive measurements, (b) perform reconstruction using efficient online convex programming techniques, and (c) adapt the coded aperture to yield higher reconstruction fidelity in the vicinity of this salient motion.

  14. Using motion-sensor camera technology to infer seasonal activity and thermal niche of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agha, Mickey; Augustine, Benjamin; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Delaney, David F.; Sinervo, Barry; Murphy, Mason O.; Ennen, Joshua R.; Briggs, Jessica R.; Cooper, Robert J.; Price, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between environmental variables and wildlife activity is an important part of effective management. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), an imperiled species of arid environments in the southwest US, may have increasingly restricted windows for activity due to current warming trends. In summer 2013, we deployed 48 motion sensor cameras at the entrances of tortoise burrows to investigate the effects of temperature, sex, and day of the year on the activity of desert tortoises. Using generalized estimating equations, we found that the relative probability of activity was associated with temperature (linear and quadratic), sex, and day of the year. Sex effects showed that male tortoises are generally more active than female tortoises. Temperature had a quadratic effect, indicating that tortoise activity was heightened at a range of temperatures. In addition, we found significant support for interactions between sex and day of the year, and sex and temperature as predictors of the probability of activity. Using our models, we were able to estimate air temperatures and times (days and hours) that were associated with maximum activity during the study. Because tortoise activity is constrained by environmental conditions such as temperature, it is increasingly vital to conduct studies on how tortoises vary their activity throughout the Sonoran Desert to better understand the effects of a changing climate.

  15. The flexion–rotation test performed actively and passively: a comparison of range of motion in patients with cervicogenic headache

    PubMed Central

    Bravo Petersen, Shannon M.; Vardaxis, Vassilios G.

    2015-01-01

    Limitation in cervical spine range of motion (ROM) is one criterion for diagnosis of cervicogenic headaches (CHs). The flexion–rotation test, when performed passively (FRT-P), has been shown to be a useful test in diagnosis of CH. Few investigations have examined the flexion-rotation test when performed actively (FRT-A) by the individual, and no studies have examined the FRT-A in a symptomatic population. The purpose of this study was to compare ROM during the FRT-A and FRT-P in patients with CH and asymptomatic individuals and to compare ROM between sides for these two versions of the test. Twelve patients with CH and 10 asymptomatic participants were included in the study. An eight-camera Motion Analysis system was used to measure head motion relative to the trunk during the FRT-P and the FRT-A. Cervical rotation ROM was measured in a position of full cervical flexion for both tests. No significant difference was observed between right and left sides for cervical rotation ROM during the FRT-P nor the FRT-A when performed by asymptomatic participants. In patients with CH, a significant difference was observed between sides for the FRT-P (P = 0.014); however, the FRT-A failed to reveal bilateral descrepancy in rotation ROM. PMID:26109826

  16. Slew disturbance compensation for multiple payloads of a flexible spacecrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaren, Mark D.; Chu, Peter Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper extends an earlier developed mirror motion compensation (MMC) scheme (Chu, 1989, 1990) which calculates, on-board and in real time, the spacecraft motion induced by a slewing payload, to cases where one of the four conditions of the MMC scheme is not met. The analysis, the design methodology, and a case study related to the application of MMC to compensation for flexibility effects are presented. A sensitivity study is carried out to determine the compensation efficiency when uncertainties exist in parameters of the dynamic interaction model.

  17. Children's Compensations for Poorly Automated Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walczyk, Jeffrey J.; Marsiglia, Cheryl S.; Johns, Amanda K.; Bryan, Keli S.

    2004-01-01

    The compensatory-encoding model (CEM) postulates that readers whose decoding of words or verbal working memory capacities is inefficient can compensate so that literal comprehension of text is not deleteriously affected. However, the use of compensations may draw cognitive resources away from higher level reading activities such as comprehension…

  18. Simulation of selective passive compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Spikings, C.R.; Putley, D. )

    1991-01-01

    Compulsators have attracted a great deal of interest over the last few years as a way of providing repetitive high current millisecond pulses. The compulsator stores energy in a rotational form and works on a similar principle to a conventional alternator except that its internal impedance is reduced through compensating currents allowing greater currents to be drawn. This paper presents the theory behind selective passive compensation and presents some results from the computer simulation of a railgun powered by a selective passive compulsator. These results show that compulsator can be configured to produce flat topped current pulses into a railgun load. A test compulsator with active compensation has previously been designed and built by Culham Laboratory.

  19. Compensation of static deformation and vibrations of antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, Peter; Loecker, Claudius; Algermissen, Stephan; Sekora, Robert

    2012-11-01

    The effect of vibrations and static deformations on aerospace platforms and their influence on the performance of radar, navigation or communication systems are currently studied in the scope of the NATO Research Task Groups SET-131. The deformations may be caused by different effects, e.g. aerodynamic loads, vehicle motion, moving parts such as rudders or turbines, or the impact of a collision. Depending on their strength and the function of the wireless system, they may have a significant impact on the system performance. Structural aspects of the platform such as mechanical or thermal stability, aerodynamics or outer appearance are of great importance. The present paper gives an overview of the scope of work of the group and on-going investigations on system performance analysis and compensation methods such as adaptive signal processing or electronic phase compensation for military key applications such as RADAR, Communication, Electronic Support Measures (ESM) or Command and Control (C2). In addition, the development of an antenna array demonstrator with active vibration compensation using piezo sensors and actuators and control algorithms will be shown, including simulated as well as experimental results.

  20. A naturally occurring nonapeptide functionally compensates for the CP1 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase to modulate aminoacylation activity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Min; Yan, Wei; Liu, Ru-Juan; Wang, Meng; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Wang, En-Duo

    2012-04-15

    aaRSs (aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases) establish the rules of the genetic code by catalysing the formation of aminoacyl-tRNA. The quality control for aminoacylation is achieved by editing activity, which is usually carried out by a discrete editing domain. For LeuRS (leucyl-tRNA synthetase), the CP1 (connective peptide 1) domain is the editing domain responsible for hydrolysing mischarged tRNA. The CP1 domain is universally present in LeuRSs, except MmLeuRS (Mycoplasma mobile LeuRS). The substitute of CP1 in MmLeuRS is a nonapeptide (MmLinker). In the present study, we show that the MmLinker, which is critical for the aminoacylation activity of MmLeuRS, could confer remarkable tRNA-charging activity on the inactive CP1-deleted LeuRS from Escherichia coli (EcLeuRS) and Aquifex aeolicus (AaLeuRS). Furthermore, CP1 from EcLeuRS could functionally compensate for the MmLinker and endow MmLeuRS with post-transfer editing capability. These investigations provide a mechanistic framework for the modular construction of aaRSs and their co-ordination to achieve catalytic efficiency and fidelity. These results also show that the pre-transfer editing function of LeuRS originates from its conserved synthetic domain and shed light on future study of the mechanism. PMID:22292813

  1. Test-retest reliability of an active range of motion test for the shoulder and hip joints by unskilled examiners using a manual goniometer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gil; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze test-retest reliability of an active range of motion test using a manual goniometer by unskilled examiners. [Subjects and Methods] Active range of motion was measured in 30 students attending U university (4 males, 26 females). Range of motion during flexion and extension of the shoulder and hip joints were measured using a manual goniometer. [Results] Flexion and extension of the shoulder joint (ICC=0.906 and ICC=0.808) and (ICC=0.946 and ICC=0. 955) of the hip joint showed excellent reliabilities. [Conclusion] The active range of motion test using a manual goniometer showed very high test-retest reliability in unskilled examiners. When examiners are aware of the method of the test, an objective assessment can be conducted. PMID:27134347

  2. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOEpatents

    Mosher, Dan Michael

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  3. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOEpatents

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  4. Complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC using highly adaptive fast mode decision based on macroblock motion activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdellah, Skoudarli; Mokhtar, Nibouche; Amina, Serir

    2015-11-01

    The H.264/AVC video coding standard is used in a wide range of applications from video conferencing to high-definition television according to its high compression efficiency. This efficiency is mainly acquired from the newly allowed prediction schemes including variable block modes. However, these schemes require a high complexity to select the optimal mode. Consequently, complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC encoder has recently become a very challenging task in the video compression domain, especially when implementing the encoder in real-time applications. Fast mode decision algorithms play an important role in reducing the overall complexity of the encoder. In this paper, we propose an adaptive fast intermode algorithm based on motion activity, temporal stationarity, and spatial homogeneity. This algorithm predicts the motion activity of the current macroblock from its neighboring blocks and identifies temporal stationary regions and spatially homogeneous regions using adaptive threshold values based on content video features. Extensive experimental work has been done in high profile, and results show that the proposed source-coding algorithm effectively reduces the computational complexity by 53.18% on average compared with the reference software encoder, while maintaining the high-coding efficiency of H.264/AVC by incurring only 0.097 dB in total peak signal-to-noise ratio and 0.228% increment on the total bit rate.

  5. A Statistical Analysis of Activity-Based and Traditional Introductory Algebra Physics Using the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trecia Markes, Cecelia

    2006-03-01

    With a three-year FIPSE grant, it has been possible at the University of Nebraska at Kearney (UNK) to develop and implement activity- based introductory physics at the algebra level. It has generally been recognized that students enter physics classes with misconceptions about motion and force. Many of these misconceptions persist after instruction. Pretest and posttest responses on the ``Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation'' (FMCE) are analyzed to determine the effectiveness of the activity- based method of instruction relative to the traditional (lecture/lab) method of instruction. Data were analyzed to determine the following: student understanding at the beginning of the course, student understanding at the end of the course, how student understanding is related to the type of class taken, student understanding based on gender and type of class. Some of the tests used are the t-test, the chi-squared test, and analysis of variance. The results of these tests will be presented, and their implications will be discussed.

  6. Frame rate up conversion via Bayesian motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Ma, Siwei; Gao, Wen

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, a novel block-based motion compensated frame interpolation (MCI) algorithm is proposed to enhance the temporal resolution of video sequences. We formulated motion estimation into MAP framework, and solved it via Bayesian belief propagation. By effectively incorporating a priori knowledge of the motion field and optimizing the whole motion field synchronously, it could derive more accurate motion vectors than traditional methods. Finally, adaptive overlapped block motion compensation (OBMC) is used to reduce blocking artifacts. Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms other methods in both objective and subjective quality.

  7. Robust springback compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleer, Bart; Grimm, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Springback simulation and springback compensation are more and more applied in productive use of die engineering. In order to successfully compensate a tool accurate springback results are needed as well as an effective compensation approach. In this paper a methodology has been introduce in order to effectively compensate tools. First step is the full process simulation meaning that not only the drawing operation will be simulated but also all secondary operations like trimming and flanging. Second will be the verification whether the process is robust meaning that it obtains repeatable results. In order to effectively compensate a minimum clamping concept will be defined. Once these preconditions are fulfilled the tools can be compensated effectively.

  8. Toxic compensation bills.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R C

    1985-01-01

    Congress has demonstrated interest in toxic compensation legislation, but not enough agreement to make significant progress. Advocates of reform claim that the legal system is heavily weighed against victims who seek compensation through the courts. Proposed reforms include a compensation fund and a cause of action in federal court. Critics have questioned whether these changes in the law would represent an improvement. Existing income replacement, medical cost reimbursement, and survivor insurance programs largely cover the losses of individuals with chronic disease. Thus, the need for an additional compensation is not clear. Furthermore, experience with compensation funds such as the Black Lung Fund suggests that political rather than scientific criteria may be used to determine eligibility. Finally, under the proposed financing mechanisms the compensation funds that are being debated would not increase incentives for care in the handling of hazardous wastes or toxic substances. PMID:4085440

  9. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm{sup 3}) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V{sub 20} and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V{sub 20} and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the

  10. Block-like motion of Tibetan Plateau: Evidences from active faults , GPS velocities and recent earthquake slips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Cheng, J.

    2012-12-01

    continuous models have been proposed to explain GPS observations in many active regions. Here we first describe a division of active blocks in the Tibetan plateau and its adjacent regions in detail from recently published and unpublished maps showing distribution of active faults, discuss basic features of boundary faults around the blocks, block-like motions and their interior deformation patterns in the Quaternary. Then we examine present-day vectors and mechanical parameters of the active blocks both from the GPS observations and recent earthquake slips. All these analyses demonstrate that the block-like motion prevail in the Tibetan Plateau.

  11. Flare activity, sunspot motions, and the evolution of vector magnetic fields in Hale region 17244

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidig, Donald F.; Hagyard, Mona J.; Machado, Marcos E.; Smith, Jesse B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic and dynamical circumstances leading to the 1B/M4 flare of November 5, 1980 are studied, and a strong association is found between the buildup of magnetic shear and the onset of flare activity within the active region. The development of shear, as observed directly in vector magnetograms, is consistent in detail with the dynamical history of the active region and identifies the precise location of the optical and hard-X-ray kernels of the flare emission.

  12. Magnetic force driven six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system using a phase compensated velocity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongdae; Park, Kyihwan; Kim, Sangyoo

    2009-04-15

    A six-axis active vibration isolation system (AVIS) is developed using voice coil actuators. Point contact configuration is employed to have an easy assembly of eight voice coil actuators to an upper and a base plates. The velocity sensor, using an electromagnetic principle that is commonly used in the vibration control, is investigated since its phase lead characteristic causes an instability problem for a low frequency vibration. The performances of the AVIS are investigated in the frequency domain and finally validated by comparing with the passive isolation system using the atomic force microscope images.

  13. Application of Hyperelastic-based Active Mesh Model in Cardiac Motion Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Saneie, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nonlinear hyperelastic or viscoelastic nature of soft tissues has an important effect on modeling results. In medical applications, accounting nonlinearity begets an ill posed problem, due to absence of external force. Myocardium can be considered as a hyperelastic material, and variational approaches are proposed to estimate stiffness matrix, which take into account the linear and nonlinear properties of myocardium. By displacement estimation of some points in the four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging series, using a similarity criterion, the elementary deformations are estimated, then using the Moore–Penrose inverse matrix approach, all point deformations are obtained. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion is quantized to mechanically determine local parameters to investigate the cardiac wall functionality. This process was implemented and tested over 10 healthy and 20 patients with myocardial infarction. In all patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The proposed approach was also compared with linear one and the results demonstrated its superiority respect to the linear model. PMID:27563570

  14. Application of Hyperelastic-based Active Mesh Model in Cardiac Motion Recovery.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Saneie, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nonlinear hyperelastic or viscoelastic nature of soft tissues has an important effect on modeling results. In medical applications, accounting nonlinearity begets an ill posed problem, due to absence of external force. Myocardium can be considered as a hyperelastic material, and variational approaches are proposed to estimate stiffness matrix, which take into account the linear and nonlinear properties of myocardium. By displacement estimation of some points in the four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging series, using a similarity criterion, the elementary deformations are estimated, then using the Moore-Penrose inverse matrix approach, all point deformations are obtained. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion is quantized to mechanically determine local parameters to investigate the cardiac wall functionality. This process was implemented and tested over 10 healthy and 20 patients with myocardial infarction. In all patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The proposed approach was also compared with linear one and the results demonstrated its superiority respect to the linear model. PMID:27563570

  15. Using structure-from-motion for monitoring active lava flows and domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mike R.; Robson, Stuart; Varley, Nick

    2016-04-01

    3-D reconstruction software based on structure-from-motion (SfM) algorithms can substantially reduce the requirements and learning curve for generating topographic data from photographs, and thus offers strong potential for data collection in many dynamic environments. Unfortunately, SfM-based software tends not to provide the rigorous metrics that are used to assess the quality of results in conventional photogrammetry software. Here, we use examples of repeat oblique airborne acquisitions from a volcanic dome (Volcán de Colima, Mexico) and terrestrial time-lapse stereo-photography (Mt. Etna, Sicily) to examine the sensitivity of results to imaging characteristics and SfM processing procedures. At Volcán de Colima, photographs were acquired with a relatively favourable convergent geometry, from an opened window in a light aircraft. However, hazards prevent the deployment of ground control, so the derived topographic shape relies entirely on the image tie points generated automatically by the software. In contrast, at Mt. Etna, control targets could be used but, with only two (mildly convergent) cameras, the image geometry is naturally weaker that at Colima. We use both of these cases to explore some of the challenges involved with understanding the error inherent in projects processed using SfM-based approaches. Results are compared with those achieved using a rigorous close-range photogrammetry package.

  16. Myocardial metabolism, perfusion, wall motion and electrical activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The cardiomyopathy of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy originates in the posterobasal left ventricle and extends chiefly to the contiguous lateral wall. Ultrastructural abnormalities in these regions precede connective tissue replacement. We postulated that a metabolic fault coincided with or antedated the subcellular abnormality. Accordingly, regional left ventricular metabolism, perfusion and wall motion were studied using positron computed tomography and metabolic isotopes supplemented by thallium perfusion scans, equilibrium radionuclide angiography and M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography. To complete the assessment, electrocardiograms, vectorcardiograms, 24 hour taped electrocardiograms and chest x-rays were analyzed. Positron computed tomography utilizing F-18 2-fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) provided the first conclusive evidence supporting the hypothesis of a premorphologic regional metabolic fault. Thus, cardiac involvement in duchenne dystrophy emerges as a unique form of heart disease, genetically targeting specific regions of ventricular myocardium for initial metabolic and subcellular changes. Reported ultrastructural abnormalities of the impulse and conduction systems provide, at least in part, a basis for the clinically observed sinus node, intraatrial, internodal, AV nodal and infranodal disorders.

  17. Active Flow Control of the Near Wake of an Axisymmetric Body in Prescribed Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Thomas; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Controlled interactions between fluidic actuators and the cross flow over the aft end of a wire-mounted axisymmetric moving wind tunnel bluff body model are exploited for modification of its near wake and thereby its global unsteady aerodynamic loads. The model is supported by eight servo-controlled wires, each including a miniature inline force transducer for measurements of the time-resolved tension. The body moves along a prescribed trajectory controllable in six degrees of freedom using closed loop feedback from an external camera system. Actuation is effected by an integrated azimuthally-segmented array of four aft-facing synthetic jet modules around the perimeter of the tail end. In the present investigations, the aerodynamic loads are controlled during time-periodic axial and rotational motions with varying reduced frequencies of up to 0.259. It is shown that this flow control approach modifies the near wake and induces aerodynamic loads that are comparable to the baseline model dynamic loads. Control of the model's unsteady aerodynamic characteristics may be adopted for in flight stabilization.

  18. Experimental investigation of irregular motion impact on 4D PET-based particle therapy monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y; Stützer, K; Enghardt, W; Priegnitz, M; Helmbrecht, S; Bert, C; Fiedler, F

    2016-01-21

    Particle therapy positron emission tomography (PT-PET) is an in vivo and non-invasive imaging technique to monitor treatment delivery in particle therapy. The inevitable patient respiratory motion during irradiation causes artefacts and inaccurate activity distribution in PET images. Four-dimensional (4D) maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (4D MLEM) allows for a compensation of these effects, but has up to now been restricted to regular motion for PT-PET investigations. However, intra-fractional motion during treatment might differ from that during acquisition of the 4D-planning CT (e.g. amplitude variation, baseline drift) and therefore might induce inaccurate 4D PET reconstruction results. This study investigates the impact of different irregular analytical one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns on PT-PET imaging by means of experiments with a radioactive source and irradiated moving phantoms. Three sorting methods, namely phase sorting, equal amplitude sorting and event-based amplitude sorting, were applied to manage the PET list-mode data. The influence of these sorting methods on the motion compensating algorithm has been analysed. The event-based amplitude sorting showed a superior performance and it is applicable for irregular motions with ⩽ 4 mm amplitude elongation and drift. For motion with 10 mm baseline drift, the normalised root mean square error was as high as 10.5% and a 10 mm range deviation was observed. PMID:26733104

  19. Experimental investigation of irregular motion impact on 4D PET-based particle therapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Stützer, K.; Enghardt, W.; Priegnitz, M.; Helmbrecht, S.; Bert, C.; Fiedler, F.

    2016-01-01

    Particle therapy positron emission tomography (PT-PET) is an in vivo and non-invasive imaging technique to monitor treatment delivery in particle therapy. The inevitable patient respiratory motion during irradiation causes artefacts and inaccurate activity distribution in PET images. Four-dimensional (4D) maximum likelihood expectation maximisation (4D MLEM) allows for a compensation of these effects, but has up to now been restricted to regular motion for PT-PET investigations. However, intra-fractional motion during treatment might differ from that during acquisition of the 4D-planning CT (e.g. amplitude variation, baseline drift) and therefore might induce inaccurate 4D PET reconstruction results. This study investigates the impact of different irregular analytical one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns on PT-PET imaging by means of experiments with a radioactive source and irradiated moving phantoms. Three sorting methods, namely phase sorting, equal amplitude sorting and event-based amplitude sorting, were applied to manage the PET list-mode data. The influence of these sorting methods on the motion compensating algorithm has been analysed. The event-based amplitude sorting showed a superior performance and it is applicable for irregular motions with  ⩽4 mm amplitude elongation and drift. For motion with 10 mm baseline drift, the normalised root mean square error was as high as 10.5% and a 10 mm range deviation was observed.

  20. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  1. Editorial Commentary: Workers' Compensation and Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Konyves, Arpad

    2016-04-01

    Patients with active claims for workplace injuries will benefit from treatment for femoroacetabular impingement, but improvement is not as good as in the patients with sports-related injuries. Workers' Compensation patients differ from highly motivated athletes. PMID:27039683

  2. Three-dimensional motion estimation using genetic algorithms from image sequence in an active stereo vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipanda, Albert; Ajot, Jerome; Woo, Sanghyuk

    2003-06-01

    This paper proposes a method for estimating 3D rigid motion parameters from an image sequence of a moving object. The 3D surface measurement is achieved using an active stereovision system composed of a camera and a light projector, which illuminates objects to be analyzed by a pyramid-shaped laser beam. By associating the laser rays and the spots in the 2D image, the 3D points corresponding to these spots are reconstructed. Each image of the sequence provides a set of 3D points, which is modeled by a B-spline surface. Therefore, estimating the motion between two images of the sequence boils down to matching two B-spline surfaces. We consider the matching environment as an optimization problem and find the optimal solution using Genetic Algorithms. A chromosome is encoded by concatenating six binary coded parameters, the three angles of rotation and the x-axis, y-axis and z-axis translations. We have defined an original fitness function to calculate the similarity measure between two surfaces. The matching process is performed iteratively: the number of points to be matched grows as the process advances and results are refined until convergence. Experimental results with a real image sequence are presented to show the effectiveness of the method.

  3. Modeling and classifying human activities from trajectories using a class of space-varying parametric motion fields.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Marques, Jorge S; Lemos, João M

    2013-05-01

    Many approaches to trajectory analysis, such as clustering or classification, use probabilistic generative models, thus not requiring trajectory alignment/registration. Switched linear dynamical models (e.g., HMMs) have been used in this context, due to their ability to describe different motion regimes. However, these models are not suitable for handling space-dependent dynamics that are more naturally captured by nonlinear models. As is well known, these are more difficult to identify. In this paper, we propose a new way of modeling trajectories, based on a mixture of parametric motion vector fields that depend on a small number of parameters. Switching among these fields follows a probabilistic mechanism, characterized by a field of stochastic matrices. This approach allows representing a wide variety of trajectories and modeling space-dependent behaviors without using global nonlinear dynamical models. Experimental evaluation is conducted in both synthetic and real scenarios. The latter concerning with human trajectory modeling for activity classification, a central task in video surveillance. PMID:23380856

  4. Ground Motion Polarization in the Damage Zone of the Active, Strike-Slip Mattinata Fault, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pischiutta, M.; Cianfarra, P.; Anselmi, M.; Salvini, F.; Rovelli, A.

    2013-12-01

    We have recently observed the occurrence of directional amplification effects in fault zones using both earthquakes and ambient noise records. In several faults we have found that ground motion polarization tends to have a high angle to cleavages produced by the stress related to the kinematics in the fault damage zone. We thus interpret this effect as due to the higher compliance of the fractured rocks of the damage zone in a direction transversal to the cleavage strike. Here we have tested the technique of the wavefield polarization using ambient vibrations recorded across the seismically active Mattinata Fault, in the Gargano Promontory, Italy. This fault has been chosen for the high number of structural investigations led out so far. The Mattinata Fault outcrops for over 40 km and shows an ondulated trajectory that is characterized by a number of significant tectonic-related morphological features compatible with a general left-lateral strike-slip kinematics. These features include a pull-apart basin and a transpressional zone. The main associated cleavage consists of a marked array of disjunctive, spaced pressure-solution surfaces developed within the 200-300 m wide fault damage zone. In order to relate the orientation of cleavage to the ground motion polarization, we measured 20-50 min of ambient noise at about 30 sites chosen in the fault damage zone close to rock outcrops where also structural geological measurements were carried out. Ground motion polarization is assessed both in the frequency and time domain through the individual-station horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio and covariance-matrix analysis, respectively. Two ambient noise measurements were performed close to permanent broadband stations of the Italian Seismic Telemetric Network. Results are consistent with those inferred on earthquake records at the two permanent stations, confirming that ambient noise yields results consistent with earthquake records as previously observed in other

  5. Activity Classification Using Mobile Phone based Motion Sensing and Distributed Computing.

    PubMed

    Artetxe, Arkaitz; Beristain, Andoni; Kabongo, Luis

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a system that uses the accelerometer embedded in a mobile phone to perform activity recognition, with the purpose of continuously and pervasively monitoring the users' level of physical activity in their everyday life. Several classification algorithms are analysed and their performance measured, based for 6 different activities, namely walking, running, climbing stairs, descending stairs, sitting and standing. Feature selection has also been explored in order to minimize computational load, which is one of the main concerns given the restrictions of smartphones in terms of processor capabilities and specially battery life. PMID:25488205

  6. Activity Monitoring and Motion Classification of the Lizard Chamaeleo jacksonii Using Multiple Doppler Radars

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aditya; Lee, Scott SK; Butler, Marguerite; Lubecke, Victor

    2016-01-01

    We describe a simple, non-contact and efficient tool for monitoring the natural activity of a small lizard (Chamaeleo jacksonii) to yield valuable information about their metabolic activity and energy expenditure. It allows monitoring in a non-confined laboratory environment and uses multiple Doppler radars operating at 10.525 GHz. We developed a classification algorithm that can differentiate between fidgeting and locomotion by processing the quadrature baseband signals from the radars. The results have been verified by visual inspection and indicate that the tool could also be used for automated monitoring of the activities of reptiles and other small animals. PMID:23366934

  7. Temperature-Compensating Inactive Strain Gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas C., Sr.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal contribution to output of active gauge canceled. High-temperature strain gauges include both active gauge wires sensing strains and inactive gauge wires providing compensation for thermal contributions to gauge readings. Inactive-gauge approach to temperature compensation applicable to commercially available resistance-type strain gauges operating at temperatures up to 700 degrees F and to developmental strain gauges operating at temperatures up to 2,000 degrees F.

  8. ERROR COMPENSATOR FOR A POSITION TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, A.H.

    1962-06-12

    A device is designed for eliminating the effect of leadscrew errors in positioning machines in which linear motion of a slide is effected from rotary motion of a leadscrew. This is accomplished by providing a corrector cam mounted on the slide, a cam follower, and a transducer housing rotatable by the follower to compensate for all the reproducible errors in the transducer signal which can be related to the slide position. The transducer has an inner part which is movable with respect to the transducer housing. The transducer inner part is coupled to the means for rotating the leadscrew such that relative movement between this part and its housing will provide an output signal proportional to the position of the slide. The corrector cam and its follower perform the compensation by changing the angular position of the transducer housing by an amount that is a function of the slide position and the error at that position. (AEC)

  9. Active Motion of Hair Bundles Coupled to the Otolithic Membrane in the Frog Sacculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strimbu, C. Elliott; Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    Active hair bundle motility has been proposed to provide the basis for the active process in the auditory organs of non-mammalian vertibrates, and has been extensively studied in mechanically decoupled or free-standing hair bundles from in vitro preparations of the frog sacculus. A number of studies have, however, suggested that cooperativity between hair cells plays an important role in the response of an intact organ. We use a semi-intact in vitro saccular preparation in which the hair cells are coupled and loaded by the otolithic membrane. While the hair bundles do not spontaneously oscillate beneath the membrane, they exhibit active movements in response to transient stimuli, demonstrating that the active process remains operant under these conditions. The coupled system however displays a striking decrease in frequency selectivity compared to freely oscillating bundles.

  10. Worker's Compensation: Will College and University Professors Be Compensated for Mental Injuries Caused by Work-Related Stress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasty, Keith N.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which college faculty may recover compensation for debilitating mental illness resulting from stressful work-related activities is discussed. General requirements for worker's compensation claims, compensability of stress-related mental and physical illnesses, applicability of these standards to college faculty, and the current state…

  11. Comparison of different rowing exercises: trunk muscle activation and lumbar spine motion, load, and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Chad M J; Brown, Stephen H M; McGill, Stuart M

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate 3 different rowing exercises and quantify the muscle activation of the torso and the hip musculature, together with the corresponding spinal loading and stiffness. Seven healthy male subjects from a university population were instrumented to obtain surface electromyography of selected trunk and hip muscles and to obtain spine position using an electromagnetic spine position sensor, together with video analysis to calculate joint moments. The 3 rowing exercises investigated are the inverted row, standing bent-over row, and the standing 1-armed cable row. The inverted row elicited the highest activation of the latissimus dorsi muscles, upper back, and hip extensor muscles. The lower activation of the lumbar erector spinae muscles during the inverted row corresponded to the lower-spine load measured. The standing bent-over row produced large activation symmetrically across the back but produced the largest lumbar spine load. The 1-armed cable row challenged the torsional capabilities of the trunk musculature. Some "core" exercises may be better for rehabilitation (e.g., having the training goals of modest muscle activation with low spine load), while other exercises may be better for athletic training (e.g., resulting in higher muscle activation and larger spine load). When prescribing "core" exercises, those wishing to spare the low back may choose the inverted row given the lowest spine load exercise. The standing bent-over row elicited large muscle activation symmetrically from the upper to lower back, however induced larger spine loads, but not surprisingly the highest spine stiffness. If torsional endurance or strength is the training goal, the 1-armed cable row might be considered. PMID:19620925

  12. Comparison of different rowing exercises: trunk muscle activation and lumbar spine motion, load, and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Chad M J; Brown, Stephen H M; McGill, Stuart M

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate 3 different rowing exercises and quantify the muscle activation of the torso and the hip musculature, together with the corresponding spinal loading and stiffness. Seven healthy men from a university population were instrumented to obtain surface electromyography of selected trunk and hip muscles and to obtain spine position using an electromagnetic spine position sensor, together with video analysis to calculate joint moments. The 3 rowing exercises investigated were the inverted row, standing bent-over row, and standing 1-armed cable row. The inverted row elicited the highest activation of the latissimus dorsi muscles, upper-back, and hip extensor muscles. The lower activation of the lumbar erector spinae muscles during the inverted row corresponded to the lower spine load measured. The standing bent-over row produced large activation symmetrically across the back, but it produced the largest lumbar spine load. The 1-armed cable row challenged the torsional capabilities of the trunk musculature. Some core exercises may be better for rehabilitation (e.g., having the training goals of modest muscle activation with low spine load), whereas other exercises may be better for athletic training (e.g., resulting in higher muscle activation and larger spine load). When prescribing core exercises, those wishing to spare the low back may choose the inverted row, given the lowest spine load exercise. The standing bent-over row elicited large muscle activation symmetrically from the upper to lower back; it induced larger spine loads but also, not surprisingly, the highest spine stiffness. If torsional endurance or strength is the training goal, the 1-armed cable row might be considered. PMID:19197209

  13. The activL® Artificial Disc: a next-generation motion-preserving implant for chronic lumbar discogenic pain

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J; Garcia, Rolando; Miller, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral discs is a leading cause of chronic low back pain in adults. Treatment options for patients with chronic lumbar discogenic pain unresponsive to conservative management include total disc replacement (TDR) or lumbar fusion. Until recently, only two lumbar TDRs had been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration − the Charité Artificial Disc in 2004 and the ProDisc-L Total Disc Replacement in 2006. In June 2015, a next-generation lumbar TDR received Food and Drug Administration approval − the activL® Artificial Disc (Aesculap Implant Systems). Compared to previous-generation lumbar TDRs, the activL® Artificial Disc incorporates specific design enhancements that result in a more precise anatomical match and allow a range of motion that better mimics the healthy spine. The results of mechanical and clinical studies demonstrate that the activL® Artificial Disc results in improved mechanical and clinical outcomes versus earlier-generation artificial discs and compares favorably to lumbar fusion. The purpose of this report is to describe the activL® Artificial Disc including implant characteristics, intended use, surgical technique, postoperative care, mechanical testing, and clinical experience to date. PMID:27274317

  14. A splint for controlled active motion after flexor tendon repair. Design, mechanical testing, and preliminary clinical results.

    PubMed

    Chow, S P; Stephens, M M; Ngai, W K; So, Y C; Pun, W K; Chu, M; Crosby, C

    1990-07-01

    A splint for controlled active motion after flexor tendon repair is described. It incorporates a single core-coated elastic band passing around a palmar pulley and attached proximally to a spring wire. Its mechanical properties were tested against six other systems. The tension in various systems all rose near full extension. However, the palmar pulley, the spring wire, and the elastic band each could lower the tension significantly. When the bending moments at the interphalangeal joints were measured, all systems produced a peak during the latter part of extension. With the palmar pulley, spring wire, and elastic band, the rise was minimal and in fact, the bending moments diminished near full extension. Initial results in 28 flexor tendon repairs using this splint showed less flexion contracture when compared with 78 flexor tendon repairs using a standard rubber band anchored at the wrist. PMID:2380531

  15. Installation of a digital, wireless, strong-motion network for monitoring seismic activity in a western Colorado coal mining region

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Swanson; Collin Stewart; Wendell Koontz

    2007-01-15

    A seismic monitoring network has recently been installed in the North Fork Valley coal mining region of western Colorado as part of a NIOSH mine safety technology transfer project with two longwall coal mine operators. Data recorded with this network will be used to characterize mining related and natural seismic activity in the vicinity of the mines and examine potential hazards due to ground shaking near critical structures such as impoundment dams, reservoirs, and steep slopes. Ten triaxial strong-motion accelerometers have been installed on the surface to form the core of a network that covers approximately 250 square kilometers (100 sq. miles) of rugged canyon-mesa terrain. Spread-spectrum radio networks are used to telemeter continuous streams of seismic waveform data to a central location where they are converted to IP data streams and ported to the Internet for processing, archiving, and analysis. 4 refs.

  16. Development of a wearable motion detector for telemonitoring and real-time identification of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Che-Chang; Hsu, Yeh-Liang

    2009-01-01

    Characteristics of physical activity are indicative of one's mobility level, latent chronic diseases, and aging process. Current research has been oriented to provide quantitative assessment of physical activity with ambulatory monitoring approaches. This study presents the design of a portable microprocessor-based accelerometry measuring device to implement real-time physical activity identification. An algorithm was developed to process real-time tri-axial acceleration signals produced by human movement to identify targeted still postures, postural transitions, and dynamic movements. Fall detection was also featured in this algorithm to meet the increasing needs of elderly care in free-living environments. High identification accuracy was obtained in performance evaluation. This device is technically viable for telemonitoring and real-time identification of physical activity, while providing sufficient information to evaluate a person's activity of daily living and her/his status of physical mobility. Limitations regarding real-time processing and implementation of the system for telemonitoring in the home environment were also observed. PMID:19199849

  17. Compensated High Temperature Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring strain in substrates at high temperatures in which the thermally induced apparent strain is nulled is described. Two gages are used, one active gage and one compensating gage. Both gages are placed on the substrate to be gaged; the active gage is attached such that it responds to mechanical and thermally induced apparent strain while the compensating gage is attached such that it does not respond to mechanical strain and and measures only thermally induced apparent strain. A thermal blanket is placed over the two gages to maintain the gages at the same temperature. The two gages are wired as adjacent arms of a wheatstone bridge which nulls the thermally induced apparent strain giving a true reading of the mechanical strain in the substrate.

  18. Present-day Block Motions and Strain Accumulation on Active Faults in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symithe, S. J.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The quasi-frontal subduction of the north and south American plates under the Lesser Antilles and the left and right lateral strike-slip along the northern and southern margins of the Caribbean plate offer the opportunity to study the transition from subduction to strike-slip between major plates. In addition, the segmentation and degree of interplate coupling at the Lesser Antilles subduction is key to our understanding of the earthquake potential of a subduction whose length is similar to the rupture area of the Mw9.0, 2011, Tohoku earthquake in Japan. We used the block modeling approach described in Meade and Loveless (2009) to test the optimal block geometry for the northern, eastern and southern boundaries of the Caribbean plate. We solved for angular velocities for each block/plate and strain accumulation rates for all major faults in the region. Then we calculated the variations in interplate coupling along the subduction plate boundaries using the accumulated strain rates. We tested 11 different block geometries; they are all based on geological evidences unless they are suggested by discrepancies within the GPS and seismological data or by previously published results. We confirm the existence of the micro Gonave plate. The boundary between the Micro-Gonave plate and the Hispaniola crustal block is better suited along the Haitian-Thrust-Belt instead of the Neiba-Matheux fault. The interseismic GPS velocities do not show evidence for a distinct North Lesser Antilles block. We found a totally uncoupled section of the subduction starting from the Puerto-Rico trench to the end of the Lesser Antilles section. All the relative motion of the Caribbean block is lost aseismically along the boundary of that portion of the subduction. While we found strong coupling along the northern Hispaniola section, most of the deformation on this region is being accumulated along intrablock faults with very low strain (~2mm/yr) along the intraplate subduction interface. We also

  19. Front motion and localized states in an asymmetric bistable activator-inhibitor system with saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Garfinkel, Alan

    2008-03-01

    We study the spatiotemporal properties of coherent states (peaks, holes, and fronts) in a bistable activator-inhibitor system that exhibits biochemical saturated autocatalysis, and in which fronts do not preserve spatial parity symmetry. Using the Gierer-Meinhardt prototype model, we find the conditions in which two distinct pinning regions are formed. The first pinning type is known in the context of variational systems while the second is structurally different due to the presence of a heteroclinic bifurcation between two uniform states. The bifurcation also separates the parameter regions of counterpropagating fronts, leading in turn to the growth or contraction of activator domains. These phenomena expand the range of pattern formation theory and its biomedical applications: activator domain retraction suggests potential therapeutic strategies for patterned pathologies, such as cardiovascular calcification.

  20. Motion sickness is associated with an increase in vestibular modulation of skin but not muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Klingberg, Danielle; Hammam, Elie; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2015-08-01

    We have previously shown that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS), delivered bilaterally at frequencies of 0.08-2.00 Hz, causes a pronounced modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), together with robust frequency-dependent illusions of side-to-side motion. At low frequencies of sGVS (≤0.2 Hz), some subjects report nausea, so we tested the hypothesis that vestibular modulation of MSNA and SSNA is augmented in individuals reporting nausea. MSNA was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the left common peroneal nerve in 22 awake, seated subjects; SSNA was recorded in 14 subjects. Bipolar binaural sGVS (±2 mA, 100 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at 0.08, 0.13, and 0.18 Hz. Nausea was reported by 21 out of 36 subjects (58 %), but across frequencies of sGVS there was no difference in the magnitude of the vestibular modulation of MSNA in subjects who reported nausea (27.1 ± 1.8 %) and those who did not (30.4 ± 2.9 %). This contrasts with the significantly greater vestibular modulation of SSNA with nausea (41.1 ± 2.0 vs. 28.7 ± 3.1 %) and indicates an organ-specific modulation of sympathetic outflow via the vestibular system during motion sickness. PMID:26025612

  1. Meeting Active Start Guidelines in the ADC-Motion Program: Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudisill, Mary E.; Wall, Sarah J.

    2004-01-01

    In order to meet the NASPE (2002) "Active Start" guidelines for preschool age children, it is important to consider a number of factors. Preschoolers should have plenty of unstructured as well as structured (planned) physical play throughout each day. They are quite capable physically and should accumulate considerable practice of their…

  2. Analyzing Science Activities in Force and Motion Concepts: A Design of an Immersion Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayar, Mehmet C.; Aydeniz, Mehmet; Yalvac, Bugrahan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the science activities offered at 7th grade in the Turkish science and technology curriculum along with addressing the curriculum's original intent. We refer to several science education researchers' ideas, including Chinn & Malhotra's (Science Education, 86:175--218, 2002) theoretical framework and…

  3. Happiness in Motion: Emotions, Well-Being, and Active School Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanathan, Subha; O'Brien, Catherine; Faulkner, Guy; Stone, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Background: A pan-Canadian School Travel Planning intervention promoted active school travel (AST). A novel component was exploring emotion, well-being, and travel mode framed by the concept of "sustainable happiness." Relationships between travel mode and emotions, parent perceptions of their child's travel mode on well-being, and…

  4. Transponder-aided joint calibration and synchronization compensation for distributed radar systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High-precision radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation must be provided for distributed radar system due to separate transmitters and receivers. This paper proposes a transponder-aided joint radiometric calibration, motion compensation and synchronization for distributed radar remote sensing. As the transponder signal can be separated from the normal radar returns, it is used to calibrate the distributed radar for radiometry. Meanwhile, the distributed radar motion compensation and synchronization compensation algorithms are presented by utilizing the transponder signals. This method requires no hardware modifications to both the normal radar transmitter and receiver and no change to the operating pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The distributed radar radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation require only one transponder, but the motion compensation requires six transponders because there are six independent variables in the distributed radar geometry. Furthermore, a maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the transponder signal parameters. The proposed methods are verified by simulation results. PMID:25794158

  5. Transponder-Aided Joint Calibration and Synchronization Compensation for Distributed Radar Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High-precision radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation must be provided for distributed radar system due to separate transmitters and receivers. This paper proposes a transponder-aided joint radiometric calibration, motion compensation and synchronization for distributed radar remote sensing. As the transponder signal can be separated from the normal radar returns, it is used to calibrate the distributed radar for radiometry. Meanwhile, the distributed radar motion compensation and synchronization compensation algorithms are presented by utilizing the transponder signals. This method requires no hardware modifications to both the normal radar transmitter and receiver and no change to the operating pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The distributed radar radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation require only one transponder, but the motion compensation requires six transponders because there are six independent variables in the distributed radar geometry. Furthermore, a maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the transponder signal parameters. The proposed methods are verified by simulation results. PMID:25794158

  6. Integration of Canal and Otolith Inputs by Central Vestibular Neurons Is Subadditive for Both Active and Passive Self-Motion: Implication for Perception

    PubMed Central

    Carriot, Jerome; Jamali, Mohsen; Brooks, Jessica X.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, the neural encoding of vestibular information is studied by applying either passive rotations or translations in isolation. However, natural vestibular stimuli are typically more complex. During everyday life, our self-motion is generally not restricted to one dimension, but rather comprises both rotational and translational motion that will simultaneously stimulate receptors in the semicircular canals and otoliths. In addition, natural self-motion is the result of self-generated and externally generated movements. However, to date, it remains unknown how information about rotational and translational components of self-motion is integrated by vestibular pathways during active and/or passive motion. Accordingly, here, we compared the responses of neurons at the first central stage of vestibular processing to rotation, translation, and combined motion. Recordings were made in alert macaques from neurons in the vestibular nuclei involved in postural control and self-motion perception. In response to passive stimulation, neurons did not combine canal and otolith afferent information linearly. Instead, inputs were subadditively integrated with a weighting that was frequency dependent. Although canal inputs were more heavily weighted at low frequencies, the weighting of otolith input increased with frequency. In response to active stimulation, neuronal modulation was significantly attenuated (∼70%) relative to passive stimulation for rotations and translations and even more profoundly attenuated for combined motion due to subadditive input integration. Together, these findings provide insights into neural computations underlying the integration of semicircular canal and otolith inputs required for accurate posture and motor control, as well as perceptual stability, during everyday life. PMID:25716854

  7. Turbulence compensation: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; Schutte, Klamer; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.; van Iersel, Miranda; Doelman, Niek J.

    2012-06-01

    In general, long range visual detection, recognition and identification are hampered by turbulence caused by atmospheric conditions. Much research has been devoted to the field of turbulence compensation. One of the main advantages of turbulence compensation is that it enables visual identification over larger distances. In many (military) scenarios this is of crucial importance. In this paper we give an overview of several software and hardware approaches to compensate for the visual artifacts caused by turbulence. These approaches are very diverse and range from the use of dedicated hardware, such as adaptive optics, to the use of software methods, such as deconvolution and lucky imaging. For each approach the pros and cons are given and it is indicated for which scenario this approach is useful. In more detail we describe the turbulence compensation methods TNO has developed in the last years and place them in the context of the different turbulence compensation approaches and TNO's turbulence compensation roadmap. Furthermore we look forward and indicate the upcoming challenges in the field of turbulence compensation.

  8. Effect of restricted motion in high temperature on enzymatic activity of the pancreas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdusattarov, A.; Smirnova, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of 30 day hypodynamia coupled with high temperature (35-36 C) on enzymatic activity of the pancreas of male adult rats were studied. The test animals were divided into four groups. Group one served as controls (freedom of movement and a temperature of 25-26 C, considered optimal). The remaining animals were divided into three additional groups: Group two freedom of movement but high temperature (35-36 C); group three hypodynamia but an optimal temperature; group four hypodynamia and 35-36 C. Considerable change in the enzymatic activity in the pancreas of the four groups is observed in three experimental groups (two, three, and four) as compared to the control (group one). The results indicate that adaption of the organism to the thermal factor and restricted movement is accompanied by a change in the enzymatic spectrum of the pancreas. With the combined effect of these two stresses under conditions of the adaption of the organism especially sharp shifts occur in the enzymatic activity.

  9. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  10. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Objects in motion attract children. The following activity helps children explore the motion of bodies riding in a vehicle and safely demonstrates the answer to their questions, "Why do I need a seatbelt?" Children will enjoy moving the cup around, even if all they "see" is a cup rather than understanding it represents a car. They will understand…

  11. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  12. Reactive power compensator

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  13. The Oculus Rift: a cost-effective tool for studying visual-vestibular interactions in self-motion perception

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juno; Chung, Charles Y. L.; Nakamura, Shinji; Palmisano, Stephen; Khuu, Sieu K.

    2015-01-01

    For years now, virtual reality devices have been applied in the field of vision science in an attempt to improve our understanding of perceptual principles underlying the experience of self-motion. Some of this research has been concerned with exploring factors involved in the visually-induced illusory perception of self-motion, known as vection. We examined the usefulness of the cost-effective Oculus Rift in generating vection in seated observers. This device has the capacity to display optic flow in world coordinates by compensating for tracked changes in 3D head orientation. We measured vection strength in three conditions of visual compensation for head movement: compensated, uncompensated, and inversely compensated. During presentation of optic flow, the observer was instructed to make periodic head oscillations (±22° horizontal excursions at approximately 0.53 Hz). We found that vection was best in the compensated condition, and was weakest in the inversely compensated condition. Surprisingly, vection was always better in passive viewing conditions, compared with conditions where active head rotations were performed. These findings suggest that vection is highly dependent on interactions between visual, vestibular and proprioceptive information, and may be highly sensitive to limitations of temporal lag in visual-vestibular coupling using this system. PMID:25821438

  14. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  15. Measuring physical activity in older adults: calibrating cut-points for the MotionWatch 8©

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Glenn J.; Falck, Ryan S.; Beets, Michael W.; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Given the world’s aging population, the staggering economic impact of dementia, the lack of effective treatments, and the fact a cure for dementia is likely many years away – there is an urgent need to develop interventions to prevent or at least delay dementia’s progression. Thus, lifestyle approaches to promote healthy aging are an important line of scientific inquiry. Good sleep quality and physical activity (PA) are pillars of healthy aging, and as such, are an increasing focus for intervention studies aimed at promoting health and cognitive function in older adults. However, PA and sleep quality are difficult constructs to evaluate empirically. Wrist-worn actigraphy (WWA) is currently accepted as a valid objective measure of sleep quality. The MotionWatch 8© (MW8) is the latest WWA, replacing the discontinued Actiwatch 4 and Actiwatch 7. In the current study, concurrent measurement of WWA and indirect calorimetry was performed during 10 different activities of daily living for 23 healthy older adults (aged 57–80 years) to determine cut-points for sedentary and moderate-vigorous PA – using receiver operating characteristic curves – with the cut-point for light activity being the boundaries between sedentary and moderate to vigorous PA. In addition, simultaneous multi-unit reliability was determined for the MW8 using inter-class correlations. The current study is the first to validate MW8 activity count cut-points – for sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous PA – specifically for use with healthy older adults. These cut-points provide important context for better interpretation of MW8 activity counts, and a greater understanding of what these counts mean in terms of PA. Hence, our results validate another level of analysis for researchers using the MW8 in studies aiming to examine PA and sleep quality concurrently in older adults. PMID:26379546

  16. Measuring physical activity in older adults: calibrating cut-points for the MotionWatch 8(©).

    PubMed

    Landry, Glenn J; Falck, Ryan S; Beets, Michael W; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Given the world's aging population, the staggering economic impact of dementia, the lack of effective treatments, and the fact a cure for dementia is likely many years away - there is an urgent need to develop interventions to prevent or at least delay dementia's progression. Thus, lifestyle approaches to promote healthy aging are an important line of scientific inquiry. Good sleep quality and physical activity (PA) are pillars of healthy aging, and as such, are an increasing focus for intervention studies aimed at promoting health and cognitive function in older adults. However, PA and sleep quality are difficult constructs to evaluate empirically. Wrist-worn actigraphy (WWA) is currently accepted as a valid objective measure of sleep quality. The MotionWatch 8(©) (MW8) is the latest WWA, replacing the discontinued Actiwatch 4 and Actiwatch 7. In the current study, concurrent measurement of WWA and indirect calorimetry was performed during 10 different activities of daily living for 23 healthy older adults (aged 57-80 years) to determine cut-points for sedentary and moderate-vigorous PA - using receiver operating characteristic curves - with the cut-point for light activity being the boundaries between sedentary and moderate to vigorous PA. In addition, simultaneous multi-unit reliability was determined for the MW8 using inter-class correlations. The current study is the first to validate MW8 activity count cut-points - for sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous PA - specifically for use with healthy older adults. These cut-points provide important context for better interpretation of MW8 activity counts, and a greater understanding of what these counts mean in terms of PA. Hence, our results validate another level of analysis for researchers using the MW8 in studies aiming to examine PA and sleep quality concurrently in older adults. PMID:26379546

  17. Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  18. Perceptual Distortions in Pitch and Time Reveal Active Prediction and Support for an Auditory Pitch-Motion Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Molly J.; McAuley, J. Devin

    2013-01-01

    A number of accounts of human auditory perception assume that listeners use prior stimulus context to generate predictions about future stimulation. Here, we tested an auditory pitch-motion hypothesis that was developed from this perspective. Listeners judged either the time change (i.e., duration) or pitch change of a comparison frequency glide relative to a standard (referent) glide. Under a constant-velocity assumption, listeners were hypothesized to use the pitch velocity (Δf/Δt) of the standard glide to generate predictions about the pitch velocity of the comparison glide, leading to perceptual distortions along the to-be-judged dimension when the velocities of the two glides differed. These predictions were borne out in the pattern of relative points of subjective equality by a significant three-way interaction between the velocities of the two glides and task. In general, listeners’ judgments along the task-relevant dimension (pitch or time) were affected by expectations generated by the constant-velocity standard, but in an opposite manner for the two stimulus dimensions. When the comparison glide velocity was faster than the standard, listeners overestimated time change, but underestimated pitch change, whereas when the comparison glide velocity was slower than the standard, listeners underestimated time change, but overestimated pitch change. Perceptual distortions were least evident when the velocities of the standard and comparison glides were matched. Fits of an imputed velocity model further revealed increasingly larger distortions at faster velocities. The present findings provide support for the auditory pitch-motion hypothesis and add to a larger body of work revealing a role for active prediction in human auditory perception. PMID:23936462

  19. Dynamical Signatures of Collective Quality Grading in a Social Activity: Attendance to Motion Pictures

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Juan V.; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the laws governing people’s decisions and interactions by studying the collective dynamics of a well-documented social activity for which there exist ample records of the perceived quality: the attendance to movie theaters in the US. We picture the flows of attendance as impulses or “shocks” driven by external factors that in turn can create new cascades of attendances through direct recommendations whose effectiveness depends on the perceived quality of the movies. This corresponds to an epidemic branching model comprised of a decaying exponential function determining the time between cause and action, and a cascade of actions triggered by previous ones. We find that the vast majority of the ~3,500 movies studied fit our model remarkably well. From our results, we are able to translate a subjective concept such as movie quality into a probability of the deriving individual activity, and from it we build concrete quantitative predictions. Our analysis opens up the possibility of understanding other collective dynamics for which the perceived quality or appeal of an action is also known. PMID:25612292

  20. Active Brownian motion of emulsion droplets: Coarsening dynamics at the interface and rotational diffusion.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, M; Stark, H

    2016-08-01

    A micron-sized droplet of bromine water immersed in a surfactant-laden oil phase can swim (S. Thutupalli, R. Seemann, S. Herminghaus, New J. Phys. 13 073021 (2011). The bromine reacts with the surfactant at the droplet interface and generates a surfactant mixture. It can spontaneously phase-separate due to solutocapillary Marangoni flow, which propels the droplet. We model the system by a diffusion-advection-reaction equation for the mixture order parameter at the interface including thermal noise and couple it to fluid flow. Going beyond previous work, we illustrate the coarsening dynamics of the surfactant mixture towards phase separation in the axisymmetric swimming state. Coarsening proceeds in two steps: an initially slow growth of domain size followed by a nearly ballistic regime. On larger time scales thermal fluctuations in the local surfactant composition initiates random changes in the swimming direction and the droplet performs a persistent random walk, as observed in experiments. Numerical solutions show that the rotational correlation time scales with the square of the inverse noise strength. We confirm this scaling by a perturbation theory for the fluctuations in the mixture order parameter and thereby identify the active emulsion droplet as an active Brownian particle. PMID:27562831

  1. 29 CFR 541.709 - Motion picture producing industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motion picture producing industry. 541.709 Section 541.709... SALES EMPLOYEES Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.709 Motion picture producing industry... motion picture producing industry who is compensated at a base rate of at least $695 a week (exclusive...

  2. ACTS Rain Fade Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, Thom A.

    1996-01-01

    Performance status of the Adaptive Rain Fade Compensation includes: (1) The rain fade protocol is functional detecting fades, providing an additional 10 dB of margin and seamless transitions to and from coded operation; (2) The stabilization of the link margins and the optimization of rain fade decision thresholds has resulted in improved BER performance; (3) Characterization of the fade compensation algorithm is ongoing.

  3. Error-Compensated Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, Aden B.; Meinel, Marjorie P.; Stacy, John E.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed reflecting telescope includes large, low-precision primary mirror stage and small, precise correcting mirror. Correcting mirror machined under computer control to compensate for error in primary mirror. Correcting mirror machined by diamond cutting tool. Computer analyzes interferometric measurements of primary mirror to determine shape of surface of correcting mirror needed to compensate for errors in wave front reflected from primary mirror and commands position and movement of cutting tool accordingly.

  4. Motion correction in MRI of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godenschweger, F.; Kägebein, U.; Stucht, D.; Yarach, U.; Sciarra, A.; Yakupov, R.; Lüsebrink, F.; Schulze, P.; Speck, O.

    2016-03-01

    Subject motion in MRI is a relevant problem in the daily clinical routine as well as in scientific studies. Since the beginning of clinical use of MRI, many research groups have developed methods to suppress or correct motion artefacts. This review focuses on rigid body motion correction of head and brain MRI and its application in diagnosis and research. It explains the sources and types of motion and related artefacts, classifies and describes existing techniques for motion detection, compensation and correction and lists established and experimental approaches. Retrospective motion correction modifies the MR image data during the reconstruction, while prospective motion correction performs an adaptive update of the data acquisition. Differences, benefits and drawbacks of different motion correction methods are discussed.

  5. Non-equilibrium thermodynamical description of rhythmic motion patterns of active systems: a canonical-dissipative approach.

    PubMed

    Dotov, D G; Kim, S; Frank, T D

    2015-02-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the non-equilibrium thermodynamical variables of a canonical-dissipative limit cycle oscillator describing rhythmic motion patterns of active systems. These variables are statistical entropy, non-equilibrium internal energy, and non-equilibrium free energy. In particular, the expression for the non-equilibrium free energy is derived as a function of a suitable control parameter. The control parameter determines the Hopf bifurcation point of the deterministic active system and describes the effective pumping of the oscillator. In analogy to the equilibrium free energy of the Landau theory, it is shown that the non-equilibrium free energy decays as a function of the control parameter. In doing so, a similarity between certain equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase transitions is pointed out. Data from an experiment on human rhythmic movements is presented. Estimates for pumping intensity as well as the thermodynamical variables are reported. It is shown that in the experiment the non-equilibrium free energy decayed when pumping intensity was increased, which is consistent with the theory. Moreover, pumping intensities close to zero could be observed at relatively slow intended rhythmic movements. In view of the Hopf bifurcation underlying the limit cycle oscillator model, this observation suggests that the intended limit cycle movements were actually more similar to trajectories of a randomly perturbed stable focus. PMID:25619737

  6. Solvent as a probe of active site motion and chemistry during the hydrogen tunnelling reaction in morphinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Hay, Sam; Pudney, Christopher R; Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2008-09-15

    The reductive half-reaction of morphinone reductase involves a hydride transfer from enzyme-bound beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to a flavin mononucleotide (FMN). We have previously demonstrated that this step proceeds via a quantum mechanical tunnelling mechanism. Herein, we probe the effect of the solvent on the active site chemistry. The pK(a) of the reduced FMN N1 is 7.4+/-0.7, based on the pH-dependence of the FMN midpoint potential. We rule out that protonation of the reduced FMN N1 is coupled to the preceding H-transfer as both the rate and temperature-dependence of the reaction are insensitive to changes in solution pH above and below this pK(a). Further, the solvent kinetic isotope effect is approximately 1.0 and both the 1 degrees and 2 degrees KIEs are insensitive to solution pH. The effect of the solvent's dielectric constant is investigated and the rate of H-transfer is found to be unaffected by changes in the dielectric constant between approximately 60 and 80. We suggest that, while there is crystallographic evidence for some water in the active site, the putative promoting motion involved in the H-tunnelling reaction is insensitive to such changes. PMID:18668493

  7. Range of motion and leg rotation affect electromyography activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen M; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-09-01

    Leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed 8 LE REP at their 8 repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP × ROM interaction was detected (p < 0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 (p ≤ 0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p < 0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p < 0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO, the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM. PMID:25148303

  8. Range of motion and leg rotation affect EMG activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-06-30

    The leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed eight LE REP at their 8-repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP x ROM interaction was detected (p<0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 (p<0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p<0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p<0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM, and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM. PMID:24983846

  9. Asymmetric friction of nonmotor MAPs can lead to their directional motion in active microtubule networks.

    PubMed

    Forth, Scott; Hsia, Kuo-Chiang; Shimamoto, Yuta; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2014-04-10

    Diverse cellular processes require microtubules to be organized into distinct structures, such as asters or bundles. Within these dynamic motifs, microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are frequently under load, but how force modulates these proteins' function is poorly understood. Here, we combine optical trapping with TIRF-based microscopy to measure the force dependence of microtubule interaction for three nonmotor MAPs (NuMA, PRC1, and EB1) required for cell division. We find that frictional forces increase nonlinearly with MAP velocity across microtubules and depend on filament polarity, with NuMA's friction being lower when moving toward minus ends, EB1's lower toward plus ends, and PRC1's exhibiting no directional preference. Mathematical models predict, and experiments confirm, that MAPs with asymmetric friction can move directionally within actively moving microtubule pairs they crosslink. Our findings reveal how nonmotor MAPs can generate frictional resistance in dynamic cytoskeletal networks via micromechanical adaptations whose anisotropy may be optimized for MAP localization and function within cellular structures. PMID:24725408

  10. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tempelaere, Christine; Pierrart, Jérome; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Vuillemin, Valérie; Cuénod, Charles-André; Hansen, Ulrich; Mir, Olivier; Skalli, Wafa; Gregory, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases. Methods Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI. Results The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear) and without tears (tendinopathy) (p = 0.012). The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm) than in normals (3.4mm) (p = 0.02). The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm) and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm) shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm) and tendinopathy (4.8mm) shoulders (p = 0.05). Conclusion The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; ‘Looseness’, i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position. PMID:27434235

  11. How faceted liquid droplets grow tails: from surface topology to active motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloutskin, Eli

    Among all possible shapes of a volume V, a sphere has the smallest surface area A. Therefore, liquid droplets are spherical, minimizing their interfacial energy γA for a given interfacial tension γ > 0 . This talk will demonstrate that liquid oil (alkane) droplets in water, stabilized by a common surfactant can be temperature-tuned to adopt icosahedral and other faceted shapes, above the bulk melting temperature of the oil. Although emulsions have been studied for centuries no faceted liquid droplets have ever been reported. The formation of an icosahedral shape is attributed to the interplay between γ and the elastic properties of the interfacial monomolecular layer, which crystallizes here 10-15K above bulk melting, leaving the droplet's bulk liquid. The icosahedral symmetry is dictated by twelve five-fold topological defects, forming within the hexagonally-packed interfacial crystalline monolayer. Moreover, we demonstrate that upon further cooling this `interfacial freezing' effect makes γ transiently switch its sign, leading to a spontaneous splitting of droplets and an active growth of their surface area, reminiscent of the classical spontaneous emulsification, yet driven by completely different physics. The observed phenomena allow deeper insights to be gained into the fundamentals of molecular elasticity and open new vitas for a wide range of novel nanotechnological applications, from self-assembly of complex shapes to new delivery strategies in bio-medicine. Acknowledgment is made to the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for support of this research and to the Kahn Foundation for the purchase of equipment.

  12. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  13. Towards Active Tracking of Beating Heart Motion in the Presence of Arrhythmia for Robotic Assisted Beating Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, E. Erdem; Karimov, Jamshid H.; Liu, Taoming; Bebek, Özkan; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    In robotic assisted beating heart surgery, the control architecture for heart motion tracking has stringent requirements in terms of bandwidth of the motion that needs to be tracked. In order to achieve sufficient tracking accuracy, feed-forward control algorithms, which rely on estimations of upcoming heart motion, have been proposed in the literature. However, performance of these feed-forward motion control algorithms under heart rhythm variations is an important concern. In their past work, the authors have demonstrated the effectiveness of a receding horizon model predictive control-based algorithm, which used generalized adaptive predictors, under constant and slowly varying heart rate conditions. This paper extends these studies to the case when the heart motion statistics change abruptly and significantly, such as during arrhythmias. A feasibility study is carried out to assess the motion tracking capabilities of the adaptive algorithms in the occurrence of arrhythmia during beating heart surgery. Specifically, the tracking performance of the algorithms is evaluated on prerecorded motion data, which is collected in vivo and includes heart rhythm irregularities. The algorithms are tested using both simulations and bench experiments on a three degree-of-freedom robotic test bed. They are also compared with a position-plus-derivative controller as well as a receding horizon model predictive controller that employs an extended Kalman filter algorithm for predicting future heart motion. PMID:25048462

  14. Motion sickness and gastric myoelectric activity as a function of speed of rotation of a circular vection drum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Senqi; Stern, Robert M.; Vasey, Michael W.; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and electrogastrograms (EGGs) were obtained from 60 healthy subjects while they viewed an optokinetic drum rotated at one of four speeds: 15, 30, 60 or 90 deg/s. All subjects experienced vection, illusory self-motion. Motion sickness symptoms increased as drums speed increased up to 60 deg/s. Power, spectral intensity, of the EGG at the tachygastria frequencies (4-9 cpm) was calculated at each drum rotation speed. The correlation between the motion sickness symptoms and the power at 4-9 cpm was significant. Thus, drum rotation speed influenced the spectral power of the EGG at 4-9 cpm, tachygastria, and the intensity of motion sickness symptoms.

  15. The integrated motion measurement simulation for SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaswekar, Prashant; Greiner, Benjamin; Wagner, Jörg

    2014-07-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy SOFIA consists of a B747-SP aircraft, which carries aloft a 2.7-meter reflecting telescope. The image stability goal for SOFIA is 0:2 arc-seconds rms. The performance of the telescope structure is affected by elastic vibrations induced by aeroacoustic and suspension disturbances. Active compensation of such disturbances requires a fast way of estimating the structural motion. Integrated navigation systems are examples of such estimation systems. However they employ a rigid body assumption. A possible extension of these systems to an elastic structure is shown by different authors for one dimensional beam structures taking into account the eigenmodes of the structural system. The rigid body motion as well as the flexible modes of the telescope assembly, however, are coupled among the three axes. Extending a special mathematical approach to three dimensional structures, the aspect of a modal observer based on integrated motion measurement is simulated for SOFIA. It is in general a fusion of different measurement methods by using their benefits and blinding out their disadvantages. There are no mass and stillness properties needed directly in this approach. However, the knowledge of modal properties of the structure is necessary for the implementation of this method. A finite-element model is chosen as a basis to extract the modal properties of the structure.

  16. Workers' Compensation and Teacher Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbet, Michael K.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the Workers' Compensation system and teacher stress to determine if a burned-out teacher should be eligible for Workers' Compensation benefits. Concludes that although most states do not allow Workers' Compensation benefits to burned-out teachers, compensation should be granted because the injuries are real and work-related. (Contains 48…

  17. Automated motion artifact removal for intravital microscopy, without a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matth