Science.gov

Sample records for active muscle fibers

  1. Electrical activation of artificial muscles containing polyacrylonitrile gel fibers.

    PubMed

    Schreyer, H B; Gebhart, N; Kim, K J; Shahinpoor, M

    2000-01-01

    Gel fibers made from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are known to elongate and contract when immersed in caustic and acidic solutions, respectively. The amount of contraction for these pH-activated fibers is 50% or greater, and the strength of these fibers is shown to be comparable to that of human muscle. Despite these attributes, the need of strong acids and bases for actuation has limited the use of PAN gel fibers as linear actuators or artificial muscles. Increasing the conductivity by depositing platinum on the fibers or combining the fibers with graphite fibers has allowed for electrical activation of artificial muscles containing gel fibers when placed in an electrochemical cell. The electrolysis of water in such a cell produces hydrogen ions at an artificial muscle anode, thus locally decreasing the pH and causing the muscle to contract. Reversing the electric field allows the PAN muscle to elongate. A greater than 40% contraction in artificial muscle length in less than 10 min is observed when it is placed as an electrode in a 10 mM NaCl electrolyte solution and connected to a 10 V power supply. These results indicate potential in developing electrically activated PAN muscles and linear actuators, which would be much more applicable than chemically activated muscles. PMID:11710194

  2. Muscle Transcriptional Profile Based on Muscle Fiber, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Du, Yang; Trakooljul, Nares; Brand, Bodo; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly metabolically active tissue that both stores and consumes energy. Important biological pathways that affect energy metabolism and metabolic fiber type in muscle cells may be identified through transcriptomic profiling of the muscle, especially ante mortem. Here, gene expression was investigated in malignant hyperthermia syndrome (MHS)-negative Duroc and Pietrian (PiNN) pigs significantly differing for the muscle fiber types slow-twitch-oxidative fiber (STO) and fast-twitch-oxidative fiber (FTO) as well as mitochondrial activity (succinate-dependent state 3 respiration rate). Longissimus muscle samples were obtained 24 h before slaughter and profiled using cDNA microarrays. Differential gene expression between Duroc and PiNN muscle samples were associated with protein ubiquitination, stem cell pluripotency, amyloid processing, and 3-phosphoinositide biosynthesis and degradation pathways. In addition, weighted gene co-expression network analysis within both breeds identified several co-expression modules that were associated with the proportion of different fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and ATP metabolism. In particular, Duroc results revealed strong correlations between mitochondrion-associated co-expression modules and STO (r = 0.78), fast-twitch glycolytic fiber (r = -0.98), complex I (r=0.72) and COX activity (r = 0.86). Other pathways in the protein-kinase-activity enriched module were positively correlated with STO (r=0.93), while negatively correlated with FTO (r = -0.72). In contrast to PiNN, co-expression modules enriched in macromolecule catabolic process, actin cytoskeleton, and transcription activator activity were associated with fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and metabolic enzyme activities. Our results highlight the importance of mitochondria for the oxidative capacity of porcine muscle and for breed-dependent molecular pathways in muscle cell fibers. PMID:26681915

  3. Calcium transients in asymmetrically activated skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Trube, G; Lopez, J R; Taylor, S R

    1981-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers of the frog Rana temporaria were held just taut and stimulated transversely by unidirectional electrical fields. We observed the reversible effects of stimulus duration (0.1-100 ms) and strength on action potentials, intracellular Ca2+ transients (monitored by aequorin), and contractile force during fixed-end contractions. Long duration stimuli (e.g., 10 ms) induced a maintained depolarization on the cathodal side of a cell and a maintained hyperpolarization on its anodal side. The hyperpolarization of the side facing the anode prevented the action potential from reaching mechanical threshold during strong stimuli. Variation of the duration or strength of a stimulus changed the luminescent response from a fiber injected with aequorin. Thus, the intracellular Ca2+ released during excitation-contraction coupling could be changed by the stimulus parameters. Prolongation of a stimulus at field strengths above 1.1 x rheobase decreased the amplitude of aequorin signals and the force of contractions. The decreases in aequorin and force signals from a given fiber paralleled one another and depended on the stimulus strength, but not on the stimulus polarity. These changes were completely reversible for stimulus strengths up to at least 4.2 x rheobase. The graded decreases in membrane depolarization, aequorin signals, and contractile force were correlated with the previously described folding of myofibrils in fibers allowed to shorten in response to the application of a long duration stimulus. The changes in aequorin signals and force suggest an absence of myofilament activation by Ca2+ in the section of the fiber closest to the anode. The results imply that injected aequorin distributes circumferentially in frog muscle with a coefficient of at least 10(-7) cm2/s, which is not remarkably different from the previously measured coefficient of 5 x 10(-8) cm2/s for its diffusion lengthwise. PMID:6976801

  4. [Muscle fiber atrophy].

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Ikuya

    2012-01-01

    Muscle fibers have been classified into two major forms of red (slow twitch) and white (fast twitch) muscles. The red muscle utilizes lipid as energy source through mitochondrial metabolism and function to sustain the position against gravity (sometimes called as antigravity muscle). Under microgravity the red muscle is selectively involved. In our unloading study by hindlimb suspension experiment on rats, the one of the representative red muscle of soleus muscle underwent rapid atrophy; they reduced their weights about 50% after 2 week-unloading. In addition, myofibrils were occasionally markedly disorganized with selective thin filament loss. Mitochondria in the degenerated area were decreased in number. The white muscle fibers in the soleus muscle had mostly transformed to the red ones. It took about 1 month to recover morphologically. The satellite cell playing a major role in muscle regeneration was not activated. There still remained unsolved what are the mechanosensors to keep muscle function under normal gravity. Dr Nikawa's group proposed that one of ubiquitin ligases, Cbl-b is activated under microgravity and induces muscle fiber degeneration. There might be many factors to induce muscle atrophy and degeneration under microgravity. Further study is necessary to explore the pathomechanism of muscle atrophy in disused and under immobility conditions. PMID:23196603

  5. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  6. Is fast fiber innervation responsible for increased acetylcholinesterase activity in reinnervating soleus muscles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted as to whether the predominantly slow SOL, which is low in AChE activity, is initially reinnervated by axons that originally innervated fast muscle fibers with high AChE activity, such as those of the EDL. Local denervation of the SOL in the guinea pig was performed because this muscle is composed solely of slow (type I) fibers; thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of homologous muscle fast fiber innervation. The overshoot in this preparation was qualitatively similar to that seen with distal denervation in the guinea pig and local and distal denervation in the rat. Thus, initial fast fiber innvervation is not responsible for the patterns of change in AChE activity seen with reinnervation in the SOL. It is concluded that the neural control of AChe is different in these two muscles and may reflect specific differences in the characteristics of AChE regulation in fast and slow muscle.

  7. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types a rat model of critical illness myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Benjamin T.; Confides, Amy L.; Rich, Mark M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40–60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and −8 activities, but not caspase-9 and −12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, −27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types. PMID:25740800

  8. Effect of flying activity on capillary-fiber geometry in pigeon flight muscle.

    PubMed

    Mathieu-Costello, O; Agey, P J; Logemann, R B; Florez-Duquet, M; Bernstein, M H

    1994-02-01

    The effect of flying activity on capillary density and geometry was investigated in pectoralis muscle of 4 wild-caught (W) pigeons (BW 233-348 g) perfusion-fixed in situ and processed for electron microscopy. Morphometric analysis revealed both differences and similarities with similar sampling sites (superficial and deep in central area of right or left pectoralis major muscle, approximately midway along cranio-caudal and lateral axis) in sedentary (S) pigeons. Differences were the greater fractional cross-sectional area of aerobic fibers (W, 82 +/- 2%; S, 63 +/- 6%; p = 0.006) and the greater volume density of mitochondria per volume of fiber (W, 22.0 +/- 1.3%; S, 15.7 +/- 1.7%; p = 0.011) in wild-caught pigeons. While glycolytic fibers were significantly narrower in W, the size of the majority of fibers comprising the muscles, i.e. aerobic fibers, was similar in the two groups. Other similarities were found in capillary-to-fiber ratio (W, 2.0 +/- 0.2; S, 2.1 +/- 0.2) and in the degree of orientation of capillaries in the two groups. In addition, both capillary density at a given fractional cross-sectional area of aerobic fibers and capillary length per fiber volume at a given mitochondrial volume density were similar in the two groups, indicating a proportional increase in capillarity and muscle aerobic capacity in W compared with S. Comparison of capillary numbers around aerobic fibers at a given mitochondrial volume per microns length of fiber showed no difference between W and S groups nor with previous data in muscles with wide differences in fiber size and mitochondrial density such as rat soleus, bat muscles and hummingbird flight muscles. This supported the notion of a tight correlation between capillary numbers around individual fibers and mitochondrial volume per unit length of fiber in aerobic muscles. It also supported the idea that it is the number of capillaries around the fibers rather than diffusion distance which determines O2 flux rates in

  9. Effects of fiber type on force depression after active shortening in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Joumaa, V; Power, G A; Hisey, B; Caicedo, A; Stutz, J; Herzog, W

    2015-07-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate force depression in Type I and Type II muscle fibers. Experiments were performed using skinned fibers from rabbit soleus and psoas muscles. Force depression was quantified after active fiber shortening from an average sarcomere length (SL) of 3.2µ m to an average SL of 2.6 µm at an absolute speed of 0.115f iber length/s and at a relative speed corresponding to 17% of the unloaded shortening velocity (V0) in each type of fibers. Force decay and mechanical work during shortening were also compared between fiber types. After mechanical testing, each fiber was subjected to myosin heavy chain (MHC) analysis in order to confirm its type (Type I expressing MHC I, and Type II expressing MHC IId). Type II fibers showed greater steady-state force depression after active shortening at a speed of 0.115 fiber length/s than Type I fibers (14.5±1.5% versus 7.8±1.7%). Moreover, at this absolute shortening speed, Type I fibers showed a significantly greater rate of force decay during shortening and produced less mechanical work than Type II fibers. When active shortening was performed at the same relative speed (17% V0), the difference in force depression between fiber types was abolished. These results suggest that no intrinsic differences were at the origin of the disparate force depressions observed in Type I and Type II fibers when actively shortened at the same absolute speed, but rather their distinct force-velocity relationships. PMID:26091619

  10. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sarah A.; Sandesara, Pooja B.; Senf, Sarah M.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    Cachexia is characterized by inexorable muscle wasting that significantly affects patient prognosis and increases mortality. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of this muscle wasting is of significant importance. Recent work showed that components of the forkhead box O (FoxO) pathway are increased in skeletal muscle during cachexia. In the current study, we tested the physiological significance of FoxO activation in the progression of muscle atrophy associated with cachexia. FoxO-DNA binding dependent transcription was blocked in the muscles of mice through injection of a dominant negative (DN) FoxO expression plasmid prior to inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells or the induction of sepsis. Expression of DN FoxO inhibited the increased mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, cathepsin L, and/or Bnip3 and inhibited muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis. Interestingly, during control conditions, expression of DN FoxO decreased myostatin expression, increased MyoD expression and satellite cell proliferation, and induced fiber hypertrophy, which required de novo protein synthesis. Collectively, these data show that FoxO-DNA binding-dependent transcription is necessary for normal muscle fiber atrophy during cancer cachexia and sepsis, and further suggest that basal levels of FoxO play an important role during normal conditions to depress satellite cell activation and limit muscle growth.—Reed, S. A., Sandesara, P. B., Senf, S. F., Judge, A. R. Inhibition of FoxO transcriptional activity prevents muscle fiber atrophy during cachexia and induces hypertrophy. PMID:22102632

  11. [A female infant of mitochondrial myopathy with findings of active necrosis and regeneration of muscle fibers].

    PubMed

    Nagaura, T; Sumi, K; Nonaka, I

    1990-04-01

    An 8 year-old female infant with the clinical and pathological characteristics of both progressive muscular dystrophy and mitochondrial myopathy was described. Her maternal cousin had clinical and pathological findings of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Since the patient had markedly elevated serum CK and calf muscle hypertrophy, her muscle was biopsied and she was diagnosed as having female DMD at the age of 5 years. She had generalized tonic-clonic convulsions and alternate hemiconvulsions for recent 4 years which brought her our hospital. On admission, she had mild generalized muscle atrophy and weakness predominantly in the proximal limbs. The lactate and pyruvate levels in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid were elevated, but with no metabolic acidosis. Serum CK was elevated to 4464 IU/L. Brain CT and MRI showed the expanding arachnoid cyst in the left middle fossa of cranium. In the biopsied left biceps crachii muscle, in addition to numerous ragged-red fibers, there were active muscular fiber necrosis and regeneration and interstitial fibrosis similar to those seen in progressive muscular dystrophy. Biochemically, no decrease or defect in the respiratory chain enzymes was detected. On electron microscopy, a large number of fibers contained aggregates of giant mitochondria with proliferated complicated cristae. Scattered throughout were necrotic muscle fibers filled with phagocytes and regenerating fibers. This patient had the diagnostic features of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and progressive muscular dystrophy. We supposed that the patient provided very interesting evidences to study the relationship between mitochondrial myopathy and progressive muscular dystrophy. PMID:2387114

  12. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  13. [Familial spastic paraplegia with syndrome of continuous muscle fiber activity (Isaacs)].

    PubMed

    Yokota, T; Matsunaga, T; Furukawa, T; Tsukagoshi, H

    1989-06-01

    A woman aged fifty-three developed paraparesis at the age of 4, which progressed slowly and required crutches by the age of 30. At the age of 51, muscle stiffness involved bilateral hands and arms gradually. At the age of 53, she suffered from painful spasms in right deltoid muscle. Her two brothers had spastic paraplegia without other neurological deficits. Her paternal grandfather and maternal grandmother were cousins. Slight dementia was noted (WAIS: IQ, 79). Her posture was stiff and muscles of upper limbs were in a persistent contraction; Subcutaneous tissue was thin, and muscles were well-defined and firm. There was moderate muscle weakness of legs and hands. Continuous fasciculations and myokymias were recognized in muscles of the arms and the limb girdles. Muscle tone was considerably increased especially in the bilateral arms. The deep tendon reflexes were exaggerated with extensor plantar responses. Profuse sweating affected palms, soles and backs. No sensory disturbance was appreciated. There was no myotonic responses to percussion of muscles. Following laboratory data were normal; thyroid functions, CSF studies, anti HTLV-I antibody and long chain fatty acid in red blood cells, myelography and brain CT except for increased basal metabolic rate (53%). Electromyographic study in the arms and hands revealed spontaneous motor unit activities including doublets at rest and increased proportion of polyphasic potentials and high amplitude potentials in voluntary contraction. Biopsy of right quadriceps femoris muscle showed hypertrophy of type I fibers and angulated atrophy of type II fibers. Continuous muscle activities in upper limbs did not change at sleep or with intravenous administration of 7 mg diazepam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2803825

  14. The Masticatory Contractile Load Induced Expression and Activation of Akt1/PKBα in Muscle Fibers at the Myotendinous Junction within Muscle-Tendon-Bone Unit

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Yüksel; Klinz, Franz J.; Moghbeli, Mehrnoush; Addicks, Klaus; Raab, Wolfgang H. -M.; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The cell specific detection of enzyme activation in response to the physiological contractile load within muscle-tendon-bone unit is essential for understanding of the mechanical forces transmission from muscle cells via tendon to the bone. The hypothesis that the physiological mechanical loading regulates activation of Akt1/PKBα at Thr308 and at Ser473 in muscle fibers within muscle-tendon-bone unit was tested using quantitative immunohistochemistry, confocal double fluorescence analysis, and immunoblot analysis. In comparison to the staining intensities in peripheral regions of the muscle fibers, Akt1/PKBα was detected with a higher staining intensity in muscle fibers at the myotendinous junction (MTJ) areas. In muscle fibers at the MTJ areas, Akt1/PKBα is dually phosphorylated at Thr308 and Ser473. The immunohistochemical results were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We conclude that contractile load generated by masticatory muscles induces local domain-dependent expression of Akt1/PKBα as well as activation by dually phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473 in muscle fibers at the MTJ areas within muscle-tendon-bone unit. PMID:20454577

  15. Diaphragm Muscle Fiber Weakness and Ubiquitin–Proteasome Activation in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hooijman, Pleuni E.; Beishuizen, Albertus; Witt, Christian C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique M. E.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Manders, Emmy; van Hees, Hieronymus W. H.; van den Brom, Charissa E.; Silderhuis, Vera; Lawlor, Michael W.; Labeit, Siegfried; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Hartemink, Koen J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Heunks, Leo M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in critically ill patients is evident: it prolongs ventilator dependency, and increases morbidity and duration of hospital stay. To date, the nature of diaphragm weakness and its underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. Objectives: We hypothesized that diaphragm muscle fibers of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients display atrophy and contractile weakness, and that the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated in the diaphragm. Methods: We obtained diaphragm muscle biopsies from 22 critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation before surgery and compared these with biopsies obtained from patients during thoracic surgery for resection of a suspected early lung malignancy (control subjects). In a proof-of-concept study in a muscle-specific ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1) knockout mouse model, we evaluated the role of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in the development of contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Measurements and Main Results: Both slow- and fast-twitch diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients had approximately 25% smaller cross-sectional area, and had contractile force reduced by half or more. Markers of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway were significantly up-regulated in the diaphragm of critically ill patients. Finally, MuRF-1 knockout mice were protected against the development of diaphragm contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Conclusions: These findings show that diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients display atrophy and severe contractile weakness, and in the diaphragm of critically ill patients the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated. This study provides rationale for the development of treatment strategies that target the contractility of diaphragm fibers to facilitate weaning. PMID:25760684

  16. Reduction of type IIb myosin and IIB fibers in tibialis anterior muscle of mini-muscle mice from high-activity lines.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Geneviève M; Guderley, Helga; Joanisse, Denis R; Garland, Theodore

    2009-03-01

    Selective breeding of laboratory house mice (Mus domesticus) for high voluntary wheel running has generated four replicate lines that show an almost threefold increase in daily wheel-running distances as compared with four nonselected control lines. An unusual hindlimb "mini-muscle" phenotype (small muscles, increased mitochondrial enzyme levels, disorganized fiber distribution) has increased in frequency in two of the four replicate selected lines. The gene of major effect that accounts for this phenotype is an autosomal recessive that has been mapped to a 2.6335 Mb interval on MMU11, but not yet identified. This study examined the tibialis anterior muscle to determine whether changes in muscle fiber types could explain such modifications in muscle size and properties. Although selected and control lines did not exhibit systematic differences in the fiber types present in the tibialis anterior muscle, as assessed by electrophoresis of myosin heavy chains (MHC) and by histochemistry, mini-muscle mice lacked type IIB fibers and the corresponding MHCs. Mini-muscle tibialis show increased activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase compared with the normally sized muscles, likely the result of the modified fiber types in the muscle. The mini-muscle phenotype is the major means through which selective breeding for high wheel running has modified the functional capacities of the hindlimb muscles, as normally sized tibialis anterior muscles from control and selected lines did not show general differences in their enzymatic capacities, MHC profiles or fiber type composition, with the exception of an elevated hexokinase activity and a reduced GPa activity in the selected lines. PMID:19177556

  17. Skeletal muscle lipid content and oxidative activity in relation to muscle fiber type in aging and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gueugneau, Marine; Coudy-Gandilhon, Cécile; Théron, Laëtitia; Meunier, Bruno; Barboiron, Christiane; Combaret, Lydie; Taillandier, Daniel; Polge, Cécile; Attaix, Didier; Picard, Brigitte; Verney, Julien; Roche, Frédéric; Féasson, Léonard; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Béchet, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of aging is the reduction in skeletal muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia). The metabolic syndrome (MS) is also prevalent in old subjects, but its relevance to skeletal muscle characteristics has poorly been investigated. Immunohistochemical studies were performed with muscle biopsies from young (22 years) and old (73 years) men with and without MS to reveal age-dependent and MS-associated modifications of fiber-type characteristics. Atrophy of type II fibers and altered fiber shape characterized muscle aging in lean healthy men. In contrast, increased cross-sectional area of the most abundant type I and type IIA fibers, and reduced cytochrome c oxidase content in all fiber types, characterized MS. Aging and particularly MS were associated with accumulation of intramyocellular lipid droplets. Although lipids mostly accumulated in type I fibers, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging of intramyocellular lipids did not distinguish fiber types, but clearly separated young, old, and MS subjects. In conclusion, our study suggests that MS in the elderly persons is associated with alterations in skeletal muscle at a fiber-type specific level. Overall, these fiber type-specific modifications may be important both for the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength and for the increased prevalence of MS in elderly subjects. PMID:24939997

  18. The mode of transverse spread of contraction initiated by local activation in single frog muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Sugi, H; Ochi, R

    1967-10-01

    Isolated single frog muscle fibers were locally activated by applying negative current pulses to a pipette whose tip was in contact with the fiber surface. In contrast to the graded inward spread of contraction initiated by a moderate depolarization, the contraction in response to a strong negative current was observed to spread transversely around the whole perimeter but not through the center of the fiber. This response was elicited only with pipettes of more than 6 micro diameter. The response was still present if the sodium of the Ringer solution was replaced by choline, or the chloride was replaced by nitrate or propionate. The duration of the response appeared to be independent of the duration of stimulating current in fresh fibers, while the contraction lasted as long as the current went on in deteriorated fibers. The contraction was first initiated at the area of fiber surface covered by the pipette, and spread around the perimeter of the fiber with a velocity of 0.8-6 cm/sec. Possible mechanisms of the response are discussed in connection with the properties of the transverse tubular system, the possibility of some self-propagating process along the walls of the tubules being suggested. PMID:6064146

  19. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  20. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kieran F.; Pasha, Evan; Doros, Gheorghe; Clark, David J.; Patten, Carolynn; Phillips, Edward M.; Frontera, Walter R.; Fielding, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age-related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~ 3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 ± 4, n = 22, 12 females) would have significantly greater reductions in leg extensor muscle power compared to healthy older adults (74.1 ± 4, n = 26, 12 females). Methods Mid-thigh muscle size and composition were assessed using computed tomography. Neuromuscular activation was quantified using surface electromyography and vastus lateralis single muscle fibers were studied to evaluate intrinsic muscle contractile properties. Results At follow-up, the overall magnitude of muscle power loss was similar between groups: mobility-limited: −8.5% vs. healthy older: −8.8%, P > 0.8. Mobility-limited elders had significant reductions in muscle size (−3.8%, P< 0.01) and strength (−5.9%, P< 0.02), however, these parameters were preserved in healthy older (P ≥ 0.7). Neuromuscular activation declined significantly within healthy older but not in mobility-limited participants. Within both groups, the cross sectional areas of type I and type IIA muscle fibers were preserved while substantial increases in single fiber peak force ( > 30%), peak power (> 200%) and unloaded shortening velocity (>50%) were elicited at follow-up. Conclusion Different physiological mechanisms contribute to the loss of lower extremity muscle power in healthy older and mobility-limited older adults. Neuromuscular changes may be the critical early determinant of muscle power deficits with aging. In response to major whole muscle decrements, major compensatory mechanisms occur within the contractile properties of surviving single muscle fibers in an attempt to restore overall muscle power and function with advancing age. PMID:24122149

  1. Length-dependent Ca2+ activation in skeletal muscle fibers from mammalians.

    PubMed

    Rassier, Dilson E; Minozzo, Fábio C

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypotheses that 1) a decrease in activation of skeletal muscles at short sarcomere lengths (SLs) is caused by an inhibition of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and 2) the decrease in Ca(2+) would be caused by an inhibition of action potential conduction from the periphery to the core of the fibers. Intact, single fibers dissected from the flexor digitorum brevis from mice were activated at different SLs, and intracellular Ca(2+) was imaged with confocal microscopy. Force decreased at SLs shorter than 2.1 μm, while Ca(2+) concentration decreased at SLs below 1.9 μm. The concentration of Ca(2+) at short SL was lower at the core than at the peripheries of the fiber. When the external concentration of Na(+) was decreased in the experimental media, impairing action potential conduction, Ca(2+) gradients were observed in all SLs. When caffeine was used in the experimental media, the gradients of Ca(2+) were abolished. We concluded that there is an inhibition of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) at short SLs, which results from a decreased conduction of action potential from the periphery to the core of the fibers. PMID:27225655

  2. Differences in age-related fiber atrophy between vastii muscles of active subjects: a multichannel surface EMG study.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Dardanello, Davide; Coratella, Giuseppe; Rinaldo, Nicoletta; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to non-invasively determine if vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis obliquus (VM) muscles are equally affected by age-related fiber atrophy. Multichannel surface electromyography was used since it allows to estimate muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV), which has been demonstrated to be related to the size of recruited muscle fibers. Twelve active elderly men (age 69   ±   4 years) and 12 active young men (age 23   ±   2 years) performed isometric knee extension at 30%, 50%, and 70% of maximal voluntary contraction. Electromyographic signals were recorded from VL and VM muscles of the dominant limb using arrays with eight electrodes and CVs were estimated for each contraction. CV estimates showed a different behavior in the two muscles: in VL at 50% and 70% of maximum voluntary contraction they were greater in young than in elderly; whereas such a difference was not observed in VM. This finding suggest that in active elderly VM seems to be less affected by the age-related fibers atrophy than VL. Hence, the common choice of studying VL as a muscle representative of the whole quadriceps could generate misleading findings. Indeed, it seemed that the sarcopenic ageing effects might be heterogeneous within quadriceps muscle. PMID:26057569

  3. Hydrostatic compression in glycerinated rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W; Fortune, N S; Geeves, M A

    1990-01-01

    Glycerinated muscle fibers isolated from rabbit psoas muscle, and a number of other nonmuscle elastic fibers including glass, rubber, and collagen, were exposed to hydrostatic pressures of up to 10 MPa (100 Atm) to determine the pressure sensitivity of their isometric tension. The isometric tension of muscle fibers in the relaxed state (passive tension) was insensitive to increased pressure, whereas the muscle fiber tension in rigor state increased linearly with pressure. The tension of all other fiber types (except rubber) also increased with pressure; the rubber tension was pressure insensitive. The pressure sensitivity of rigor tension was 2.3 kN/m2/MPa and, in comparison with force/extension relation determined at atmospheric pressure, the hydrostatic compression in rigor muscle fibers was estimated to be 0.03% Lo/MPa. As reported previously, the active muscle fiber tension is depressed by increased pressure. The possible underlying basis of the different pressure-dependent tension behavior in relaxed, rigor, and active muscle is discussed. PMID:2275960

  4. Thermal stress and Ca-independent contractile activation in mammalian skeletal muscle fibers at high temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W

    1994-01-01

    Temperature dependence of the isometric tension was examined in chemically skinned, glycerinated, rabbit Psoas, muscle fibers immersed in relaxing solution (pH approximately 7.1 at 20 degrees C, pCa approximately 8, ionic strength 200 mM); the average rate of heating/cooling was 0.5-1 degree C/s. The resting tension increased reversibly with temperature (5-42 degrees C); the tension increase was slight in warming to approximately 25 degrees C (a linear thermal contraction, -alpha, of approximately 0.1%/degree C) but became more pronounced above approximately 30 degrees C (similar behavior was seen in intact rat muscle fibers). The extra tension rise at the high temperatures was depressed in acidic pH and in the presence of 10 mM inorganic phosphate; it was absent in rigor fibers in which the tension decreased with heating (a linear thermal expansion, alpha, of approximately 4 x 10(-5)/degree C). Below approximately 20 degrees C, the tension response after a approximately 1% length increase (complete < 0.5 ms) consisted of a fast decay (approximately 150.s-1 at 20 degrees C) and a slow decay (approximately 10.s-1) of tension. The rate of fast decay increased with temperature (Q10 approximately 2.4); at 35-40 degrees C, it was approximately 800.s-1, and it was followed by a delayed tension rise (stretch-activation) at 30-40.s-1. The linear rise of passive tension in warming to approximately 25 degrees C may be due to increase of thermal stress in titin (connectin)-myosin composite filament, whereas the extra tension above approximately 30 degrees C may arise from cycling cross-bridges; based on previous findings from regulated actomyosin in solution (Fuchs, 1975), it is suggested that heating reversibly inactivates the troponin-tropomyosin control mechanism and leads to Ca-independent thin filament activation at high temperatures. Additionally, we propose that the heating-induced increase of endo-sarcomeric stress within titin-myosin composite filament makes the

  5. Potential and K+ activity in skinned muscle fibers. Evidence against a simple Donnan equilibrium.

    PubMed Central

    Godt, R. E.; Baumgarten, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    It has been suggested that potentials measured with conventional microelectrodes in chemically or mechanically skinned muscle fibers arise from a Donnan equilibrium due to myofilament fixed charges. This hypothesis was tested in mechanically skinned frog (Rana pipiens) semitendinosus fibers by measuring the distribution potential (Ed) between fiber and bath with 3 M KCl-filled microelectrodes and the K+ activity gradient (aik/aok) with K+ ion-selective microelectrodes (KISE). If skinned fibers are a Donnan system, Ed should become more positive as pH is decreased, altering the fixed charge on the myofilaments. Consistent with this expectation, Ed was -4.4, -0.6, and +4.8 mV in ATP-containing solutions and -6.5, -2.2, and +8.4 mV in ATP-free solutions at pH 7, 6, and 5, respectively. Donnan equilibrium also requires that all mobile ionic species be in electrochemical equilibrium. In ATP-containing solutions, this was true for K+ at pH 7. At pH 5, however, KISE indicated that K+ was not in equilibrium; average Ed was 5.9 mV positive to the K+ equilibrium potential, and aik/aok was 1.04, while the Donnan prediction was 0.83. In contrast, KISE measurements in ATP-free solutions indicated that K+ was in equilibrium at all pH studied. Skinned fibers in ATP-containing media are not equilibrium systems because ATPase reactions occur. Under our conditions, frog myofibrils hydrolyze 0.4 and 0.08 mumol ATP/min X mg myofibrillar protein at pH 7 and 5, respectively. It is suggested that in the presence of ATP, Ed is a superposition of Donnan and diffusion potentials, the latter arising from differences in the mobilities of anionic substrate and products that diffuse through the charged myofilament lattice. A coupling to diffusion of K+, the predominant counter ion, is required for macroscopic electroneutrality. This coupling may be the origin of the nonequilibrium K+ distribution. PMID:6230113

  6. Age-related changes in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles: analysis of muscle fibers, muscle fiber proteins, and subneural apparatuses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Taguchi, Aki; Motoyoshi, Kazumi; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Desaki, Junzo

    2013-03-01

    We compared age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of aged and young adult rats by determining the number and diameter of muscle fibers, contractile muscle protein (myosin heavy chain isoforms, MHC) composition, and the morphology of the subneural apparatuses. In aged rats, both the numbers and the diameters of muscle fibers decreased in the cricothyroid (CT) muscle. The number of fibers, but not diameter, decreased in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. In the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle, neither the number nor the diameter of fibers changed significantly. Aging was associated with a decrease in type IIB and an increase in type IIA MHC isoform levels in CT muscle, but no such changes were observed in the TA or PCA muscles. Morphological examination of primary synaptic clefts of the subneural apparatus revealed that aging resulted in decreased labyrinthine and increased depression types in only the CT muscle. In the aged group, morphologically immature subneural apparatuses were found infrequently in the CT muscle, indicating continued tissue remodeling. We suggest, therefore, that age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles primarily involve the CT muscle, whereas the structures of the TA and PCA muscles may better resist aging processes and therefore are less vulnerable to functional impairment. This may reflect differences in their roles; the CT muscle controls the tone of the vocal folds, while the TA and PCA muscles play an essential role in vital activities such as respiration and swallowing. PMID:23100084

  7. Wnt/β-catenin signaling via Axin2 is required for myogenesis and, together with YAP/Taz and Tead1, active in IIa/IIx muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Huraskin, Danyil; Eiber, Nane; Reichel, Martin; Zidek, Laura M; Kravic, Bojana; Bernkopf, Dominic; von Maltzahn, Julia; Behrens, Jürgen; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2016-09-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an important role in myogenic differentiation, but its physiological role in muscle fibers remains elusive. Here, we studied activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in adult muscle fibers and muscle stem cells in an Axin2 reporter mouse. Axin2 is a negative regulator and a target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In adult muscle fibers, Wnt/β-catenin signaling is only detectable in a subset of fast fibers that have a significantly smaller diameter than other fast fibers. In the same fibers, immunofluorescence staining for YAP/Taz and Tead1 was detected. Wnt/β-catenin signaling was absent in quiescent and activated satellite cells. Upon injury, Wnt/β-catenin signaling was detected in muscle fibers with centrally located nuclei. During differentiation of myoblasts expression of Axin2, but not of Axin1, increased together with Tead1 target gene expression. Furthermore, absence of Axin1 and Axin2 interfered with myoblast proliferation and myotube formation, respectively. Treatment with the canonical Wnt3a ligand also inhibited myotube formation. Wnt3a activated TOPflash and Tead1 reporter activity, whereas neither reporter was activated in the presence of Dkk1, an inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling. We propose that Axin2-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling is involved in myotube formation and, together with YAP/Taz/Tead1, associated with reduced muscle fiber diameter of a subset of fast fibers. PMID:27578179

  8. Skeletal muscle fiber type: using insights from muscle developmental biology to dissect targets for susceptibility and resistance to muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Jared; Maves, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are classified into fiber types, in particular, slow twitch versus fast twitch. Muscle fiber types are generally defined by the particular myosin heavy chain isoforms that they express, but many other components contribute to a fiber's physiological characteristics. Skeletal muscle fiber type can have a profound impact on muscle diseases, including certain muscular dystrophies and sarcopenia, the aging-induced loss of muscle mass and strength. These findings suggest that some muscle diseases may be treated by shifting fiber type characteristics either from slow to fast, or fast to slow phenotypes, depending on the disease. Recent studies have begun to address which components of muscle fiber types mediate their susceptibility or resistance to muscle disease. However, for many diseases it remains largely unclear why certain fiber types are affected. A substantial body of work has revealed molecular pathways that regulate muscle fiber type plasticity and early developmental muscle fiber identity. For instance, recent studies have revealed many factors that regulate muscle fiber type through modulating the activity of the muscle regulatory transcription factor MYOD1. Future studies of muscle fiber type development in animal models will continue to enhance our understanding of factors and pathways that may provide therapeutic targets to treat muscle diseases. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:518-534. doi: 10.1002/wdev.230 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27199166

  9. Activation of Na-H exchange by intracellular lithium in barnacle muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Davis, B A; Hogan, E M; Boron, W F

    1992-07-01

    We internally dialyzed single barnacle muscle fibers (BMF) for 90 min with a dialysis fluid (DF) containing no Na+ and either 0 or 100 mM Li+ and measured intracellular pH (pHi) with a microelectrode. During dialysis, the pH 8.0 artificial seawater (ASW) contained neither Na+ nor HCO3-. After we halted dialysis with a Li(+)-free/low-pH DF and allowed pHi to stabilize at approximately 6.8, adding 440 mM Na(+)-10 mM HCO3- to the ASW caused pHi to recover rapidly and stabilize at 7.32. In contrast, when the DF contained 100 mM Li+, pHi stabilized at 7.49. In fibers dialyzed to a pHi of approximately 7.2, Li+ stimulated a component of acid extrusion that was dependent on Na+ but not affected by SITS. Thus Li+ activates a Na(+)-dependent acid-extrusion mechanism other than the well characterized Na(+)-dependent Cl-HCO3 exchanger. To study the Li(+)-activated mechanism, we minimized Na(+)-dependent Cl-HCO3 exchange by raising pHDF to 7.35 and pretreated BMFs with SITS. We found that dialysis with Li+ elicits a Na(+)-dependent pHi increase that is largely blocked by amiloride, consistent with the hypothesis that Li+ activates a latent Na-H exchanger even at a normal pHi. In the absence of Li+, the Na-H exchanger is relatively inactive at pHi 7.35 (net acid-extrusion rate, Jnet = 9.5 microM/min) but modestly stimulated by reducing pHi to 6.8 (Jnet = 64 microM/min). In the presence of Li+, the Na-H exchanger is very active at pHi values of both 7.35 (Jnet = 141 microM/min) and 6.8 (Jnet = 168 microM/min). Thus Li+ alters the pHi sensitivity of the Na-H exchanger. Because the Na-H exchanger is only approximately 6% as active as the Na(+)-dependent Cl-HCO3 exchanger in the absence of Li+ at a pHi of approximately 6.8, we suggest that the major role of the Na-H exchanger may not be in pHi regulation but in another function such as cell-volume regulation. PMID:1322042

  10. Effects of pH on myofibrillar ATPase activity in fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers of the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Potma, E J; van Graas, I A; Stienen, G J

    1994-01-01

    In permeabilized single fibers of fast (psoas) and slow (soleus) muscle from the rabbit, the effect of pH on isometric myofibrillar ATPase activity and force was studied at 15 degrees C, in the pH range 6.4-7.9. ATPase activity was measured photometrically by enzymatic coupling of the regeneration of ATP to the oxidation of NADH, present in the bathing solution. NADH absorbance at 340 nm was determined inside a measuring chamber. To measure ATP turnover in single soleus fibers accurately, a new measuring chamber (volume 4 microliters) was developed that produced a sensitivity approximately 8 times higher than the system previously used. Under control conditions (pH 7.3), the isometric force was 136 and 115 kN/m2 and the ATP turnover was 0.43 and 0.056 mmol per liter fiber volume per second in psoas and soleus fibers, respectively. Over the pH range studied, isometric force increased monotonically by a factor 1.7 for psoas and 1.2 for soleus fibers. In psoas the isometric ATPase activity remained constant, whereas in soleus it slightly decreased with increasing pH. The pH dependency of relative tension cost (isometric ATPase activity divided by force) was practically identical for psoas and soleus fibers. In both cases it decreased by about a factor 0.57 as pH increased from 6.4 to 7.9. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of cross-bridge kinetics. For both fiber types, estimates of the reaction rates and the distribution of cross-bridges and of their pH dependencies were obtained. A remarkable similarity was found between fast- and slow-twitch fibers in the effects of pH on the reaction rate constants. PMID:7696480

  11. Impaired exercise training-induced muscle fiber hypertrophy and Akt/mTOR pathway activation in hypoxemic patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Costes, Frédéric; Gosker, Harry; Feasson, Léonard; Desgeorges, Marine; Kelders, Marco; Castells, Josiane; Schols, Annemie; Freyssenet, Damien

    2015-04-15

    Exercise training (ExTr) is largely used to improve functional capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, ExTr only partially restores muscle function in patients with COPD, suggesting that confounding factors may limit the efficiency of ExTr. In the present study, we hypothesized that skeletal muscle adaptations triggered by ExTr could be compromised in hypoxemic patients with COPD. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained from patients with COPD who were either normoxemic (n = 15, resting arterial Po2 = 68.5 ± 1.5 mmHg) or hypoxemic (n = 8, resting arterial Po2 = 57.0 ± 1.0 mmHg) before and after a 2-mo ExTr program. ExTr induced a significant increase in exercise capacity both in normoxemic and hypoxemic patients with COPD. However, ExTr increased citrate synthase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities only in skeletal muscle of normoxemic patients. Similarly, muscle fiber cross-sectional area and capillary-to-fiber ratio were increased only in patients who were normoxemic. Expression of atrogenes (MuRF1, MAFbx/Atrogin-1) and autophagy-related genes (Beclin, LC3, Bnip, Gabarapl) remained unchanged in both groups. Phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473), GSK-3β (Ser9), and p70S6k (Thr389) was nonsignificantly increased in normoxemic patients in response to ExTr, but it was significantly decreased in hypoxemic patients. We further showed on C2C12 myotubes that hypoxia completely prevented insulin-like growth factor-1-induced phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and p70S6K. Together, our observations suggest a role for hypoxemia in the adaptive response of skeletal muscle of patients with COPD in an ExTr program. PMID:25701004

  12. Muscle fiber type specific activation of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 promoter by a non-canonical E-box.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Kristina; DiMario, Joseph X

    2016-01-22

    Different mechanisms control skeletal muscle fiber type gene expression at specific times in vertebrate development. Embryonic myogenesis leading to formation of primary muscle fibers in avian species is largely directed by myoblast cell commitment to the formation of diverse fiber types. In contrast, development of different secondary fiber types during fetal myogenesis is partly determined by neural influences. In both primary and secondary chicken muscle fibers, differential expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene distinguishes fast from fast/slow muscle fibers. This study focused on the transcriptional regulation of the slow MyHC2 gene in primary myotubes formed from distinct fast/slow and fast myogenic cell lineages. Promoter deletion analyses identified a discrete 86 bp promoter segment that conferred fiber type, lineage-specific gene expression in fast/slow versus fast myoblast derived primary myotubes. Sequence analysis and promoter activity assays determined that this segment contains two functional cis-regulatory elements. One element is a non-canonical E-box, and electromobility shift assays demonstrated that both cis-elements interacted with the E-protein, E47. The results indicate that primary muscle fiber type specific expression of the slow MyHC2 gene is controlled by a novel mechanism involving a transcriptional complex that includes E47 at a non-canonical E-box. PMID:26707643

  13. Activity of creatine kinase in a contracting mammalian muscle of uniform fiber type.

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, E W; Kushmerick, M J; Moerland, T S

    1994-01-01

    We investigated whether the creatine kinase-catalyzed phosphate exchange between PCr and gamma ATP in vivo equilibrated with cellular substrates and products as predicted by in vitro kinetic properties of the enzyme, or was a function of ATPase activity as predicted by obligatory "creatine phosphate shuttle" concepts. A transient NMR spin-transfer method was developed, tested, and applied to resting and stimulated ex vivo muscle, the soleus, which is a cellularly homogeneous slow-twitch mammalian muscle, to measure creatine kinase kinetics. The forward and reverse unidirectional CK fluxes were equal, being 1.6 mM.s-1 in unstimulated muscle at 22 degrees C, and 2.7 mM.s-1 at 30 degrees C. The CK fluxes did not differ during steady-state stimulation conditions giving a 10-fold range of ATPase rates in which the ATP/PCr ratio increased from approximately 0.3 to 1.6. The observed kinetic behavior of CK activity in the muscle was that expected from the enzyme in vitro in a homogeneous solution only if account was taken of inhibition by an anion-stabilized quaternary dead-end enzyme complex: E.Cr.MgADP.anion. The CK fluxes in soleus were not a function of ATPase activity as predicted by obligatory phosphocreatine shuttle models for cellular energetics. PMID:7858128

  14. ROS-Mediated Decline in Maximum Ca2+-Activated Force in Rat Skeletal Muscle Fibers following In Vitro and In Vivo Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Dutka, Travis L.; Verburg, Esther; Larkins, Noni; Hortemo, Kristin H.; Lunde, Per K.; Sejersted, Ole M.; Lamb, Graham D.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesised that normal skeletal muscle stimulated intensely either in vitro or in situ would exhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated contractile apparatus changes common to many pathophysiological conditions. Isolated soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of the rat were bubbled with 95% O2 and stimulated in vitro at 31°C to give isometric tetani (50 Hz for 0.5 s every 2 s) until maximum force declined to ≤30%. Skinned superficial slow-twitch fibers from the SOL muscles displayed a large reduction (∼41%) in maximum Ca2+-activated specific force (Fmax), with Ca2+-sensitivity unchanged. Fibers from EDL muscles were less affected. The decrease in Fmax in SOL fibers was evidently due to oxidation effects on cysteine residues because it was reversed if the reducing agent DTT was applied prior to activating the fiber. The GSH∶GSSG ratio was ∼3-fold lower in the cytoplasm of superficial fibers from stimulated muscle compared to control, confirming increased oxidant levels. The presence of Tempol and L-NAME during in vitro stimulation prevented reduction in Fmax. Skinned fibers from SOL muscles stimulated in vivo at 37°C with intact blood supply also displayed reduction in Fmax, though to a much smaller extent (∼12%). Thus, fibers from muscles stimulated even with putatively adequate O2 supply display a reversible oxidation-induced decrease in Fmax without change in Ca2+-sensitivity, consistent with action of peroxynitrite (or possibly superoxide) on cysteine residues of the contractile apparatus. Significantly, the changes closely resemble the contractile deficits observed in a range of pathophysiological conditions. These findings highlight how readily muscle experiences ROS-related deficits, and also point to potential difficulties when defining muscle performance and fatigue. PMID:22629297

  15. ROS-mediated decline in maximum Ca2+-activated force in rat skeletal muscle fibers following in vitro and in vivo stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dutka, Travis L; Verburg, Esther; Larkins, Noni; Hortemo, Kristin H; Lunde, Per K; Sejersted, Ole M; Lamb, Graham D

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesised that normal skeletal muscle stimulated intensely either in vitro or in situ would exhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated contractile apparatus changes common to many pathophysiological conditions. Isolated soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of the rat were bubbled with 95% O(2) and stimulated in vitro at 31°C to give isometric tetani (50 Hz for 0.5 s every 2 s) until maximum force declined to ≤30%. Skinned superficial slow-twitch fibers from the SOL muscles displayed a large reduction (∼41%) in maximum Ca(2+)-activated specific force (F(max)), with Ca(2+)-sensitivity unchanged. Fibers from EDL muscles were less affected. The decrease in F(max) in SOL fibers was evidently due to oxidation effects on cysteine residues because it was reversed if the reducing agent DTT was applied prior to activating the fiber. The GSH:GSSG ratio was ∼3-fold lower in the cytoplasm of superficial fibers from stimulated muscle compared to control, confirming increased oxidant levels. The presence of Tempol and L-NAME during in vitro stimulation prevented reduction in F(max). Skinned fibers from SOL muscles stimulated in vivo at 37°C with intact blood supply also displayed reduction in F(max), though to a much smaller extent (∼12%). Thus, fibers from muscles stimulated even with putatively adequate O(2) supply display a reversible oxidation-induced decrease in F(max) without change in Ca(2+)-sensitivity, consistent with action of peroxynitrite (or possibly superoxide) on cysteine residues of the contractile apparatus. Significantly, the changes closely resemble the contractile deficits observed in a range of pathophysiological conditions. These findings highlight how readily muscle experiences ROS-related deficits, and also point to potential difficulties when defining muscle performance and fatigue. PMID:22629297

  16. Mitochondrial respiratory activity in porcine longissimus muscle fibers of different pig genetics in relation to their meat quality.

    PubMed

    Werner, C; Natter, R; Schellander, K; Wicke, M

    2010-05-01

    The pig genetics of Duroc, Pietrain (MHS homozygote negative, PiNN), Pietrain (MHS homozygote positive, PiPP) and a F2-Duroc-Pietrain cross-breed were analyzed. The animals had comparable (P>0.05) carcass weights, but the PiPP pigs had higher carcass yield and lean meat values (P<0.05). Considering the meat quality characteristics, the PiPP showed a faster pH drop and higher electrical conductivity, drip loss, shear force as well as lightness and redness values (P<0.05). The PiPP animals had less slow-twitch-oxidative (STO) and more fast-twitch-glycolytic (FTG) muscle fibers, whereas the results of the Duroc animals were converse (P<0.05). The STO and FTG fibers of the PiPP animals were larger than those of the other genetics (P<0.05). The analysis of the mitochondrial respiratory activity (MRA) using permeabilized longissimus muscle fibers resulted in no differences between the pig genetics before and immediately after slaughter. During chilling the MRA decreased in all pigs but to a higher extent in the PiPP pigs (P<0.05). PMID:20374876

  17. Kinetic and physical characterization of force generation in muscle: a laser temperature-jump and length-jump study on activated and contracting rigor fibers.

    PubMed

    Davis, J S; Harrington, W F

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are presented that probe the mechanism of contraction in normal activated muscle fibers and in heated rigor fibers. In activated fibers we subdivide the partial recovery of isometric tension during the Huxley-Simmons phase 2 into temperature-independent and temperature-dependent steps termed, respectively, phase 2fast and phase 2slow. Evidence is presented to show that phase 2fast arises from the perturbation of a damped elastic element in the cross-bridge and that phase 2slow is the manifestation of an endothermic, order-disorder transition responsible for de novo tension generation. These responses are common to both frog and rabbit fibers. The only difference between animals is that the kinetics of phase 2slow appears to scale with the working temperature of the muscle and not absolute temperature. Rigor fibers heated above the working temperature of the muscle contract. Tension generation is, as with activated fibers, endothermic. Tension transients following a laser temperature-jump of activated and heated rigor fibers are virtually indistinguishable on the basis of either the form or magnitude of the response. In length-jump experiments, tension recovery by heated rigor fibers consists of three exponentials with a tension-dependent rate for the medium speed step. Preliminary data indicate that the rigor cross-bridge operates over a distance of between 13.5 and 18 nm. Collectively, these data imply that tension generation in muscle arises from accessible conformational states in the proteins of the cross-bridge alone. ATP hydrolysis in active fibers and the heating of rigor fibers simply serve to shift these intrinsic conformational equilibria towards tension generation. PMID:8109364

  18. Muscle fiber and motor unit behavior in the longest human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harris, A John; Duxson, Marilyn J; Butler, Jane E; Hodges, Paul W; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, Simon C

    2005-09-14

    The sartorius muscle is the longest muscle in the human body. It is strap-like, up to 600 mm in length, and contains five to seven neurovascular compartments, each with a neuromuscular endplate zone. Some of its fibers terminate intrafascicularly, whereas others may run the full length of the muscle. To assess the location and timing of activation within motor units of this long muscle, we recorded electromyographic potentials from multiple intramuscular electrodes along sartorius muscle during steady voluntary contraction and analyzed their activity with spike-triggered averaging from a needle electrode inserted near the proximal end of the muscle. Approximately 30% of sartorius motor units included muscle fibers that ran the full length of the muscle, conducting action potentials at 3.9 +/- 0.1 m/s. Most motor units were innervated within a single muscle endplate zone that was not necessarily near the midpoint of the fiber. As a consequence, action potentials reached the distal end of a unit as late as 100 ms after initiation at an endplate zone. Thus, contractile activity is not synchronized along the length of single sartorius fibers. We postulate that lateral transmission of force from fiber to endomysium and a wide distribution of motor unit endplates along the muscle are critical for the efficient transmission of force from sarcomere to tendon and for the prevention of muscle injury caused by overextension of inactive regions of muscle fibers. PMID:16162934

  19. Mechanisms of nascent fiber formation during avian skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, K. M.; Schultz, E.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined two putative mechanisms of new fiber formation in postnatal skeletal muscle, namely longitudinal fragmentation of existing fibers and de novo formation. The relative contributions of these two mechanisms to fiber formation in hypertrophying anterior latissimus dorsi (ALD) muscle were assessed by quantitative analysis of their nuclear populations. Muscle hypertrophy was induced by wing-weighting for 1 week. All nuclei formed during the weighting period were labeled by continuous infusion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analog, and embryonic-like fibers were identified using an antibody to ventricular-like embryonic (V-EMB) myosin. The number of BrdU-labeled and unlabeled nuclei in V-EMB-positive fibers were counted. Wing-weighting resulted in significant muscle enlargement and the appearance of many V-EMB+ fibers. The majority of V-EMB+ fibers were completely independent of mature fibers and had a nuclear density characteristics of developing fibers. Furthermore, nearly 100% of the nuclei in independent V-EMB+ fibers were labeled. These findings strongly suggest that most V-EMB+ fibers were nascent fibers formed de novo during the weighting period by satellite cell activation and fusion. Nascent fibers were found primarily in the space between fascicles where they formed a complex anastomosing network of fibers running at angles to one another. Although wing-weighting induced an increase in the number of branched fibers, there was no evidence that V-EMB+ fibers were formed by longitudinal fragmentation. The location of newly formed fibers in wing-weighted and regenerating ALD muscle was compared to determine whether satellite cells in the ALD muscle were unusual in that, if stimulated to divide, they would form fibers in the inter- and intrafascicular space. In contrast to wing-weighted muscle, nascent fibers were always found closely associated with necrotic fibers. These results suggest that wing-weighting is not simply another

  20. Glycolytic-to-oxidative fiber-type switch and mTOR signaling activation are early-onset features of SBMA muscle modified by high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Anna; Milioto, Carmelo; Parodi, Sara; Armirotti, Andrea; Borgia, Doriana; Pellegrini, Matteo; Urciuolo, Anna; Molon, Sibilla; Morbidoni, Valeria; Marabita, Manuela; Romanello, Vanina; Gatto, Pamela; Blaauw, Bert; Bonaldo, Paolo; Sambataro, Fabio; Robins, Diane M; Lieberman, Andrew P; Sorarù, Gianni; Vergani, Lodovica; Sandri, Marco; Pennuto, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanism by which expansion of polyglutamine in AR causes muscle atrophy is unknown. Here, we investigated pathological pathways underlying muscle atrophy in SBMA knock-in mice and patients. We show that glycolytic muscles were more severely affected than oxidative muscles in SBMA knock-in mice. Muscle atrophy was associated with early-onset, progressive glycolytic-to-oxidative fiber-type switch. Whole genome microarray and untargeted lipidomic analyses revealed enhanced lipid metabolism and impaired glycolysis selectively in muscle. These metabolic changes occurred before denervation and were associated with a concurrent enhancement of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) expression. At later stages of disease, we detected mitochondrial membrane depolarization, enhanced transcription factor EB (TFEB) expression and autophagy, and mTOR-induced protein synthesis. Several of these abnormalities were detected in the muscle of SBMA patients. Feeding knock-in mice a high-fat diet (HFD) restored mTOR activation, decreased the expression of PGC1α, TFEB, and genes involved in oxidative metabolism, reduced mitochondrial abnormalities, ameliorated muscle pathology, and extended survival. These findings show early-onset and intrinsic metabolic alterations in SBMA muscle and link lipid/glucose metabolism to pathogenesis. Moreover, our results highlight an HFD regime as a promising approach to support SBMA patients. PMID:26971100

  1. Mechanical properties and fiber type composition of chronically inactive muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Monti, R. J.; Vallance, K. A.; Kim, J. A.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    A role for neuromuscular activity in the maintenance of skeletal muscle properties has been well established. However, the role of activity-independent factors is more difficult to evaluate. We have used the spinal cord isolation model to study the effects of chronic inactivity on the mechanical properties of the hindlimb musculature in cats and rats. This model maintains the connectivity between the motoneurons and the muscle fibers they innervate, but the muscle unit is electrically "silent". Consequently, the measured muscle properties are activity-independent and thus the advantage of using this model is that it provides a baseline level (zero activity) from which regulatory factors that affect muscle cell homeostasis can be defined. In the present paper, we will present a brief review of our findings using the spinal cord isolation model related to muscle mechanical and fiber type properties.

  2. Increasing O-GlcNAcylation Level on Organ Culture of Soleus Modulates the Calcium Activation Parameters of Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Montel, Valerie; Berthoin, Serge; Bastide, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    O-N-acetylglucosaminylation is a reversible post-translational modification which presents a dynamic and highly regulated interplay with phosphorylation. New insights suggest that O-GlcNAcylation might be involved in striated muscle physiology, in particular in contractile properties such as the calcium activation parameters. By the inhibition of O-GlcNAcase, we investigated the effect of the increase of soleus O-GlcNAcylation level on the contractile properties by establishing T/pCa relationships. We increased the O-GlcNAcylation level on soleus biopsies performing an organ culture of soleus treated or not with PUGNAc or Thiamet-G, two O-GlcNAcase inhibitors. The enhancement of O-GlcNAcylation pattern was associated with an increase of calcium affinity on slow soleus skinned fibers. Analysis of the glycoproteins pattern showed that this effect is solely due to O-GlcNAcylation of proteins extracted from skinned biopsies. We also characterized the O-GlcNAcylated contractile proteins using a proteomic approach, and identified among others troponin T and I as being O-GlcNAc modified. We quantified the variation of O-GlcNAc level on all these identified proteins, and showed that several regulatory contractile proteins, predominantly fast isoforms, presented a drastic increase in their O-GlcNAc level. Since the only slow isoform of contractile protein presenting an increase of O-GlcNAc level was MLC2, the effect of enhanced O-GlcNAcylation pattern on calcium activation parameters could involve the O-GlcNAcylation of sMLC2, without excluding that an unidentified O-GlcNAc proteins, such as TnC, could be potentially involved in this mechanism. All these data strongly linked O-GlcNAcylation to the modulation of contractile activity of skeletal muscle. PMID:23110217

  3. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  4. Measuring myosin cross-bridge attachment time in activated muscle fibers using stochastic vs. sinusoidal length perturbation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Maughan, David W.; Palmer, Bradley M.

    2011-01-01

    The average time myosin cross bridges remain bound to actin (ton) can be measured by sinusoidal length perturbations (sinusoidal analysis) of striated muscle fibers using recently developed analytic methods. This approach allows measurements of ton in preparations possessing a physiologically relevant myofilament lattice. In this study, we developed an approach to measure ton in 5–10% of the time required for sinusoidal analysis by using stochastic length perturbations (white noise analysis). To compare these methods, we measured the influence of MgATP concentration ([MgATP]) on ton in demembranated myocardial strips from mice, sampling muscle behavior from 0.125 to 200 Hz with a 20-s burst of white noise vs. a 300-s series of sinusoids. Both methods detected a similar >300% increase in ton as [MgATP] decreased from 5 to 0.25 mM, differing by only 3–14% at any [MgATP]. Additional experiments with Drosophila indirect flight muscle fibers demonstrated that faster cross-bridge cycling kinetics permit further reducing of the perturbation time required to measure ton. This reduced sampling time allowed strain-dependent measurements of ton in flight muscle fibers by combining 10-s bursts of white noise during periods of linear shortening and lengthening. Analyses revealed longer ton values during shortening and shorter ton values during lengthening. This asymmetry may provide a mechanism that contributes to oscillatory energy transfer between the flight muscles and thoracic cuticle to power flight. This study demonstrates that white noise analysis can detect underlying molecular processes associated with dynamic muscle contraction comparable to sinusoidal analysis, but in a fraction of the time. PMID:21233339

  5. Assaying Human Myogenic Progenitor Cell Activity by Reconstitution of Muscle Fibers and Satellite Cells in Immunodeficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Parker, Maura H

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the functional myogenic potential of various human cell populations is an important step in the preclinical evaluation of cell transplantation as a means to treat human muscle disease and degeneration. Culture systems allow one to gage the potential of cell populations to proliferate and undergo myogenic differentiation under specific conditions. An in vivo assay evaluates the ability of cells to differentiate and generate muscle fibers within a natural environment, and importantly, evaluates the potential of donor cells to reconstitute the satellite cell niche. In this chapter, we describe a technique for isolating mononuclear cells from human muscle samples, and a method of xenotransplantation for assessing functional myogenic potential in vivo. Briefly, cell populations are injected into the pre-irradiated and regenerating muscle of immunodeficient mice. The injected muscle is frozen at specific time points after injection and cryosections analyzed by immunostaining. The number of human dystrophin-expressing fibers and the number of Pax7(+) human lamin A/C(+) nuclei are determined, which provides a quantitative method of comparing the in vivo functional potential of cell populations. PMID:27492175

  6. Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle Fibers of SOD1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagahisa, Hiroshi; Okabe, Kazuma; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Fujii, Junichi; Miyata, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) knockout (KO) mice are known as an aging model in some aspects, but the damage and regeneration process of each fiber type have not been sufficiently studied. In this study, we investigated the damage and satellite cell state of the gastrocnemius muscle in SOD1 KO mice (6 months old) using immunohistochemical staining and real-time RT-PCR. The proportion of central nuclei-containing Type IIx/b fibers in the deep and superficial portions of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly higher in SOD1 KO than control mice. The number of satellite cells per muscle fiber decreased in all muscle fiber types in the deep portion of the gastrocnemius muscle in SOD1 KO mice. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of Pax7 and myogenin, which are expressed in satellite cells in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation states, significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscle of SOD1 KO mice. Furthermore, mRNA of myosin heavy chain-embryonic, which is expressed in the early phase of muscle regeneration, significantly increased in SOD1 KO mice. It was suggested that muscle is damaged by reactive oxygen species produced in the mitochondrial intermembrane space in Type IIxb fibers, accelerating the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells through growth factors in SOD1 KO mice. PMID:26798428

  7. Transcriptional regulatory circuits controlling muscle fiber type switching.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liang, XiJun; Gan, ZhenJi

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle fitness plays vital roles in human health and disease and is determined by developmental as well as physiological inputs. These inputs control and coordinate muscle fiber programs, including capacity for fuel burning, mitochondrial ATP production, and contraction. Recent studies have demonstrated crucial roles for nuclear receptors and their co-activators, and microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of skeletal muscle energy metabolism and fiber type determination. In this review, we present recent progress in the study of nuclear receptor signaling and miRNA networks in muscle fiber type switching. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of nuclear receptors and miRNAs in disease states that are associated with loss of muscle fitness. PMID:25794945

  8. Cell death regulates muscle fiber number.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, Tatevik; Arya, Richa; Gyonjyan, Seda; Taylor, Barbara; White, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    Cell death can have both cell autonomous and non-autonomous roles in normal development. Previous studies have shown that the central cell death regulators grim and reaper are required for the developmentally important elimination of stem cells and neurons in the developing central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that cell death in the nervous system is also required for normal muscle development. In the absence of grim and reaper, there is an increase in the number of fibers in the ventral abdominal muscles in the Drosophila adult. This phenotype can be partially recapitulated by inhibition of cell death specifically in the CNS, indicating a non-autonomous role for neuronal death in limiting muscle fiber number. We also show that FGFs produced in the cell death defective nervous system are required for the increase in muscle fiber number. Cell death in the muscle lineage during pupal stages also plays a role in specifying fiber number. Our work suggests that FGFs from the CNS act as a survival signal for muscle founder cells. Thus, proper muscle fiber specification requires cell death in both the nervous system and in the developing muscle itself. PMID:27131625

  9. Adaptations of human skeletal muscle fibers to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, M. Kathleen; Allen, David L.; Mohajerani, Laleh; Greenisen, Michael C.; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1995-01-01

    Human skeletal muscle fibers seem to share most of the same interrelationships among myosin ATPase activity, myosin heavy chain (MHC) phenotype, mitochondrial enzyme activities, glycolytic enzyme activities, and cross-sectional area (CSA) as found in rat, cat, and other species. One difference seems to be that fast fibers with high mitochrondrial content occur less frequently in humans than in the rat or cat. Recently, we have reported that the type of MHC expressed and the size of the muscle fibers in humans that have spent 11 days in space change significantly. Specifically, about 8% more fibers express fast MHCs and all phenotypes atrophy in the vastus lateralis (VL) post compared to preflight. In the present paper we examine the relationships among the population of myonuclei, MHC type, and CSA of single human muscle fibers before and after spaceflight. These are the first data that define the relationship among the types of MHC expressed, myonuclei number, and myonuclei domain of single fibers in human muscle. We then compare these data to similar measures in the cat. In addition, the maximal torque that can be generated by the knee extensors and their fatigability before and after spaceflight are examined. These data provide some indication of the potential physiologica consequences of the muscle adaptations that occur in humans in response to spaceflight.

  10. An evaluation of the reliability of muscle fiber cross-sectional area and fiber number measurements in rat skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The reliability of estimating muscle fiber cross-sectional area (measure of muscle fiber size) and fiber number from only a subset of fibers in rat hindlimb muscle cross-sections has not been systematically evaluated. This study examined the variability in mean estimates of fiber cross-s...

  11. Assessment of the Contractile Properties of Permeabilized Skeletal Muscle Fibers.

    PubMed

    Claflin, Dennis R; Roche, Stuart M; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Mendias, Christopher L; Brooks, Susan V

    2016-01-01

    Permeabilized individual skeletal muscle fibers offer the opportunity to evaluate contractile behavior in a system that is greatly simplified, yet physiologically relevant. Here we describe the steps required to prepare, permeabilize and preserve small samples of skeletal muscle. We then detail the procedures used to isolate individual fiber segments and attach them to an experimental apparatus for the purpose of controlling activation and measuring force generation. We also describe our technique for estimating the cross-sectional area of fiber segments. The area measurement is necessary for normalizing the absolute force to obtain specific force, a measure of the intrinsic force-generating capability of the contractile system. PMID:27492182

  12. Effects of Two Different Weight Training Programs on Swimming Performance and Muscle Enzyme Activities and Fiber Type.

    PubMed

    Belfry, Glen R; Noble, Earl G; Taylor, Albert W

    2016-02-01

    The effects of 2 different weight training programs incorporating bench press (BP) and pullover (PO) exercises on swimming performance, power, enzyme activity, and fiber type distribution were studied on 16 men (age = 23 ± 4 years). A 30-second group (n = 6) performed up to 20 repetitions of BP and PO in 30 seconds. The 2-minute group (n = 6) performed a maximum of 80 repetitions of BP and PO in 2 minutes. As participants reached the prescribed 20 or 80 repetitions, the weight was increased 4.5 kg. A third group (n = 4) served as nontraining controls. Exercise groups trained 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Maximal effort swims of 50 and 200 yd were performed before and after training. Training resulted in increases in work on both exercises in both groups pre- to post-training (BP 30 seconds, 722 ± 236-895 ± 250 kg; PO 30 seconds, 586 ± 252-1,090 ± 677 kg; and BP 2 minutes, 1,530 ± 414-1,940 ± 296; PO 2 minutes, 1,212 ± 406-2,348 ± 194, p ≤ 0.05). Swim performances of the 30-second group improved for both the 50-yd (32.0 ± 6.9 seconds, 30.0 ± 5.9 seconds, p ≤ 0.05) and 200-yd swims 200.0 ± 54 seconds, 182 ± 45.1 seconds (p ≤ 0.05), whereas 2-minute training improved only the 200-yd swim (198.3 ± 32.3 seconds, 186.2 ± 32.2 seconds). No changes in swim performance were observed for the control group. Triceps muscle succinate dehydrogenase activities increased (pre 3.48 ± 1.1 μmol · g(-1) wet weight per minute, post 6.25 ± 1.5 μmoles · g(-1) wet weight per minute, p ≤ 0.05) in only the 30-second training group, whereas phosphofructokinase activities and fiber type distribution did not change in either training group. This study has demonstrated that a 30-second 20-repetition weight training program, specific to the swimming musculature without concurrent swim training, improves swimming performances at both 50- and 200-yd distances. PMID:26815172

  13. CYTOLOGICAL STUDIES OF FIBER TYPES IN SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Geraldine F.; Padykula, Helen A.

    1966-01-01

    A comparative investigation of the mammalian diaphragm has revealed a correlation between certain cytological aspects of red and white muscle fibers and functional activity. This skeletal muscle presents the advantage of a similar and constant function among the mammals, but its functional activity varies in a quantitative manner. Both the rate of breathing (and hence the rate of contraction of the diaphragm) and metabolic activity are known to be inversely related to body size; and this study has demonstrated a relationship between cytological characteristics of the diaphragm and body size of the animal. Small fibers rich in mitochondria (red fibers) are characteristic of small mammals, which have high metabolic activity and fast breathing rates; and large fibers with relatively low mitochondrial content predominate in large mammals, which have lower metabolic activity and slower breathing rates. In mammals with body size intermediate between these two groups (including the laboratory rat), the diaphragm consists of varying mixtures of fiber types. In general, the mitochondrial content of diaphragm fibers is inversely related to body size. It appears, then, that the red fiber reflects a high degree of metabolic activity or a relatively high rate of contraction within the range exhibited by this muscle. PMID:5950272

  14. Automated high-content morphological analysis of muscle fiber histology.

    PubMed

    Miazaki, Mauro; Viana, Matheus P; Yang, Zhong; Comin, Cesar H; Wang, Yaming; da F Costa, Luciano; Xu, Xiaoyin

    2015-08-01

    In the search for a cure for many muscular disorders it is often necessary to analyze muscle fibers under a microscope. For this morphological analysis, we developed an image processing approach to automatically analyze and quantify muscle fiber images so as to replace today's less accurate and time-consuming manual method. Muscular disorders, that include cardiomyopathy, muscular dystrophies, and diseases of nerves that affect muscles such as neuropathy and myasthenia gravis, affect a large percentage of the population and, therefore, are an area of active research for new treatments. In research, the morphological features of muscle fibers play an important role as they are often used as biomarkers to evaluate the progress of underlying diseases and the effects of potential treatments. Such analysis involves assessing histopathological changes of muscle fibers as indicators for disease severity and also as a criterion in evaluating whether or not potential treatments work. However, quantifying morphological features is time-consuming, as it is usually performed manually, and error-prone. To replace this standard method, we developed an image processing approach to automatically detect and measure the cross-sections of muscle fibers observed under microscopy that produces faster and more objective results. As such, it is well-suited to processing the large number of muscle fiber images acquired in typical experiments, such as those from studies with pre-clinical models that often create many images. Tests on real images showed that the approach can segment and detect muscle fiber membranes and extract morphological features from highly complex images to generate quantitative results that are readily available for statistical analysis. PMID:26004825

  15. Glutamate-induced sensitization of rat masseter muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Cairns, B E; Gambarota, G; Svensson, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Berde, C B

    2002-01-01

    In rats, intradermal or intraarticular injection of glutamate or selective excitatory amino acid receptor agonists acting at peripheral excitatory amino acid receptors can decrease the intensity of mechanical stimulation required to evoke nocifensive behaviors, an indication of hyperalgesia. Since excitatory amino acid receptors have been found on the terminal ends of cutaneous primary afferent fibers, it has been suggested that increased tissue glutamate levels may have a direct sensitizing effect on primary afferent fibers, in particular skin nociceptors. However, less is known about the effects of glutamate on deep tissue afferent fibers. In the present study, a series of experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of intramuscular injection of glutamate on the excitability and mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers in anesthetized rats of both sexes. Injection of 1.0 M, but not 0.1 M glutamate evoked masseter muscle afferent activity that was significantly greater than that evoked by isotonic saline. The mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers, which was assessed with a Von Frey hair, was reduced by approximately 50% for a period of 30 min after injection of 1.0 M glutamate, but was unaffected by injections of 0.1 M glutamate or isotonic saline. Injection of 25% dextrose, which has the same osmotic strength as 1.0 M glutamate, did not evoke significant activity in or decrease the mechanical threshold of masseter muscle afferent fibers. Magnetic resonance imaging experiments confirmed that injection of 25% dextrose and 1.0 M glutamate produced similar edema volumes in the masseter muscle tissue. Co-injection of 0.1 M kynurenate, an excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, and 1.0 M glutamate attenuated glutamate-evoked afferent activity and prevented glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization. When male and female rats were compared, no difference in the baseline mechanical threshold or in the magnitude of glutamate

  16. Measurement of Maximum Isometric Force Generated by Permeabilized Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Stuart M.; Gumucio, Jonathan P.; Brooks, Susan V.; Mendias, Christopher L.; Claflin, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the contractile properties of chemically skinned, or permeabilized, skeletal muscle fibers offers a powerful means by which to assess muscle function at the level of the single muscle cell. Single muscle fiber studies are useful in both basic science and clinical studies. For basic studies, single muscle fiber contractility measurements allow investigation of fundamental mechanisms of force production, and analysis of muscle function in the context of genetic manipulations. Clinically, single muscle fiber studies provide useful insight into the impact of injury and disease on muscle function, and may be used to guide the understanding of muscular pathologies. In this video article we outline the steps required to prepare and isolate an individual skeletal muscle fiber segment, attach it to force-measuring apparatus, activate it to produce maximum isometric force, and estimate its cross-sectional area for the purpose of normalizing the force produced. PMID:26131687

  17. Elevated nuclear Foxo1 suppresses excitability of skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Schachter, Tova Neustadt; Schneider, Martin F

    2013-09-15

    Forkhead box O 1 (Foxo1) controls the expression of proteins that carry out processes leading to skeletal muscle atrophy, making Foxo1 of therapeutic interest in conditions of muscle wasting. The transcription of Foxo1-regulated proteins is dependent on the translocation of Foxo1 to the nucleus, which can be repressed by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) treatment. The role of Foxo1 in muscle atrophy has been explored at length, but whether Foxo1 nuclear activity affects skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling has not yet been examined. Here, we use cultured adult mouse skeletal muscle fibers to investigate the effects of Foxo1 overexpression on EC coupling. Fibers expressing Foxo1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) exhibit an inability to contract, impaired propagation of action potentials, and ablation of calcium transients in response to electrical stimulation compared with fibers expressing GFP alone. Evaluation of the transverse (T)-tubule system morphology, the membranous system involved in the radial propagation of the action potential, revealed an intact T-tubule network in fibers overexpressing Foxo1-GFP. Interestingly, long-term IGF-1 treatment of Foxo1-GFP fibers, which maintains Foxo1-GFP outside the nucleus, prevented the loss of normal calcium transients, indicating that Foxo1 translocation and the atrogenes it regulates affect the expression of proteins involved in the generation and/or propagation of action potentials. A reduction in the sodium channel Nav1.4 expression in fibers overexpressing Foxo1-GFP was also observed in the absence of IGF-1. We conclude that increased nuclear activity of Foxo1 prevents the normal muscle responses to electrical stimulation and that this indicates a novel capability of Foxo1 to disable the functional activity of skeletal muscle. PMID:23804205

  18. Large fiber size in skeletal muscle is metabolically advantageous

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Dillaman, Richard M.; Kinsey, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fiber size is highly variable, and while diffusion appears to limit maximal fiber size, there is no paradigm for the control of minimal size. The optimal fiber size hypothesis posits that the reduced surface area to volume (SA:V) in larger fibers reduces the metabolic cost of maintaining the membrane potential, and so fibers attain an optimal size that minimizes metabolic cost while avoiding diffusion limitation. Here we examine changes during hypertrophic fiber growth in metabolic cost and activity of the Na+-K+-ATPase in white skeletal muscle from crustaceans and fishes. We provide evidence for a major tenet of the optimal fiber size hypothesis by demonstrating that larger fibers are metabolically cheaper to maintain, and the cost of maintaining the membrane potential is proportional to fiber SA:V. The influence of SA:V on metabolic cost is apparent during growth in 16 species spanning a 20-fold range in fiber size, suggesting that this principle may apply widely. PMID:23851638

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Muscle Fiber Composition Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, Nadia A.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the selective and debilitating atrophy of specific skeletal muscle fiber types that accompanies sustained conditions of microgravity. Since little is currently known about the regulation of fiber-specific gene expression programs in mammalian muscle, elucidation of the basic mechanisms of fiber diversification is a necessary prerequisite to the generation of therapeutic strategies for attenuation of muscle atrophy on earth or in space. Vertebrate skeletal muscle development involves the fusion of undifferentiated mononucleated myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers, with a concomitant activation of muscle-specific genes encoding proteins that form the force-generating contractile apparatus. The regulatory circuitry controlling skeletal muscle gene expression has been well studied in a number of vertebrate animal systems. The goal of this project has been to achieve a similar level of understanding of the mechanisms underlying the further specification of muscles into different fiber types, and the role played by innervation and physical activity in the maintenance and adaptation of different fiber phenotypes into adulthood. Our recent research on the genetic basis of fiber specificity has focused on the emergence of mature fiber types and have implicated a group of transcriptional regulatory proteins, known as E proteins, in the control of fiber specificity. The restriction of E proteins to selected muscle fiber types is an attractive hypothetical mechanism for the generation of muscle fiber-specific patterns of gene expression. To date our results support a model wherein different E proteins are selectively expressed in muscle cells to determine fiber-restricted gene expression. These studies are a first step to define the molecular mechanisms responsible for the shifts in fiber type under conditions of microgravity, and to determine the potential importance of E proteins as

  20. Reduced force of diaphragm muscle fibers in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Manders, Emmy; Bonta, Peter I; Kloek, Jaap J; Symersky, Petr; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Hooijman, Pleuni E; Jasper, Jeff R; Malik, Fady I; Stienen, Ger J M; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; de Man, Frances S; Ottenheijm, Coen A C

    2016-07-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) suffer from inspiratory muscle weakness. However, the pathophysiology of inspiratory muscle dysfunction in PH is unknown. We hypothesized that weakness of the diaphragm, the main inspiratory muscle, is an important contributor to inspiratory muscle dysfunction in PH patients. Our objective was to combine ex vivo diaphragm muscle fiber contractility measurements with measures of in vivo inspiratory muscle function in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) patients. To assess diaphragm muscle contractility, function was studied in vivo by maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) and ex vivo in diaphragm biopsies of the same CTEPH patients (N = 13) obtained during pulmonary endarterectomy. Patients undergoing elective lung surgery served as controls (N = 15). Muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) was determined in cryosections and contractility in permeabilized muscle fibers. Diaphragm muscle fiber CSA was not significantly different between control and CTEPH patients in both slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibers. Maximal force-generating capacity was significantly lower in slow-twitch muscle fibers of CTEPH patients, whereas no difference was observed in fast-twitch muscle fibers. The maximal force of diaphragm muscle fibers correlated significantly with MIP. The calcium sensitivity of force generation was significantly reduced in fast-twitch muscle fibers of CTEPH patients, resulting in a ∼40% reduction of submaximal force generation. The fast skeletal troponin activator CK-2066260 (5 μM) restored submaximal force generation to levels exceeding those observed in control subjects. In conclusion, diaphragm muscle fiber contractility is hampered in CTEPH patients and contributes to the reduced function of the inspiratory muscles in CTEPH patients. PMID:27190061

  1. The muscle fiber type–fiber size paradox: hypertrophy or oxidative metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    van Wessel, T.; de Haan, A.; van der Laarse, W. J.

    2010-01-01

    An inverse relationship exists between striated muscle fiber size and its oxidative capacity. This relationship implies that muscle fibers, which are triggered to simultaneously increase their mass/strength (hypertrophy) and fatigue resistance (oxidative capacity), increase these properties (strength or fatigue resistance) to a lesser extent compared to fibers increasing either of these alone. Muscle fiber size and oxidative capacity are determined by the balance between myofibrillar protein synthesis, mitochondrial biosynthesis and degradation. New experimental data and an inventory of critical stimuli and state of activation of the signaling pathways involved in regulating contractile and metabolic protein turnover reveal: (1) higher capacity for protein synthesis in high compared to low oxidative fibers; (2) competition between signaling pathways for synthesis of myofibrillar proteins and proteins associated with oxidative metabolism; i.e., increased mitochondrial biogenesis via AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates the rate of protein synthesis; (3) relatively higher expression levels of E3-ligases and proteasome-mediated protein degradation in high oxidative fibers. These observations could explain the fiber type–fiber size paradox that despite the high capacity for protein synthesis in high oxidative fibers, these fibers remain relatively small. However, it remains challenging to understand the mechanisms by which contractile activity, mechanical loading, cellular energy status and cellular oxygen tension affect regulation of fiber size. Therefore, one needs to know the relative contribution of the signaling pathways to protein turnover in high and low oxidative fibers. The outcome and ideas presented are relevant to optimizing treatment and training in the fields of sports, cardiology, oncology, pulmonology and rehabilitation medicine. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00421-010-1545-0) contains

  2. Effects of phosphate and ADP on shortening velocity during maximal and submaximal calcium activation of the thin filament in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, J M

    1996-01-01

    The effects of added phosphate and MgADP on unloaded shortening velocity during maximal and submaximal Ca2+ activation of the thin filament were examined in skinned single skeletal fibers from rabbit psoas muscle. During maximal Ca2+ activation, added phosphate (10-30 mM) had no effect on unloaded shortening velocity as determined by the slack-test technique. In fibers activated at submaximal concentrations of Ca2+ in the absence of added phosphate, plots of slack length versus duration of unloaded shortening were biphasic, consisting of an initial high velocity phase of shortening and a subsequent low velocity phase of shortening. Interestingly, in the presence of added phosphate, biphasic slack-test plots were no longer apparent. This result was obtained in control fibers over a range of submaximal Ca2+ concentrations and in maximally Ca2+ activated fibers, which were first treated to partially extract troponin C. Thus, under conditions that favor the appearance of biphasic shortening (i.e., low [Ca2+], troponin C extraction), added phosphate eliminated the low velocity component. In contrast, in fibers activated in the presence of 5 mM added MgADP, biphasic slack-test plots were apparent even during maximal Ca2+ activation. The basis of biphasic shortening is not known but it may be due to the formation of axially compressed cross-bridges that become strained to bear a tension that opposes the relative sliding of the myofilaments. The present findings could be explained if added phosphate and MgADP bind to cross-bridges in a strain-dependent manner. In this case, the results suggest that phosphate inhibits the formation of cross-bridges that bear a compressive strain. Added MgADP, on the other hand, may be expected to detain cross-bridges in strong binding states, thus promoting an increase in the population of cross-bridges bearing a compressive strain. Alterations in the population of strained cross-bridges by added phosphate and MgADP would alter the internal

  3. Evidence for ACTN3 as a Speed Gene in Isolated Human Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Broos, Siacia; Malisoux, Laurent; Theisen, Daniel; van Thienen, Ruud; Ramaekers, Monique; Jamart, Cécile; Deldicque, Louise; Thomis, Martine A.; Francaux, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of α-actinin-3 deficiency due to homozygosity for the ACTN3 577X-allele on contractile and morphological properties of fast muscle fibers in non-athletic young men. Methods A biopsy was taken from the vastus lateralis of 4 RR and 4 XX individuals to test for differences in morphologic and contractile properties of single muscle fibers. The cross-sectional area of the fiber and muscle fiber composition was determined using standard immunohistochemistry analyses. Skinned single muscle fibers were subjected to active tests to determine peak normalized force (P0), maximal unloading velocity (V0) and peak power. A passive stretch test was performed to calculate Young’s Modulus and hysteresis to assess fiber visco-elasticity. Results No differences were found in muscle fiber composition. The cross-sectional area of type IIa and IIx fibers was larger in RR compared to XX individuals (P<0.001). P0 was similar in both groups over all fiber types. A higher V0 was observed in type IIa fibers of RR genotypes (P<0.001) but not in type I fibers. The visco-elasticity as determined by Young’s Modulus and hysteresis was unaffected by fiber type or genotype. Conclusion The greater V0 and the larger fast fiber CSA in RR compared to XX genotypes likely contribute to enhanced whole muscle performance during high velocity contractions. PMID:26930663

  4. Fiber networks amplify active stress.

    PubMed

    Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase P; Lenz, Martin

    2016-03-15

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. Although these fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. Here we theoretically study force transmission in these networks. We find that collective fiber buckling in the vicinity of a local active unit results in a rectification of stress towards strongly amplified isotropic contraction. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. Our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks and shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue. PMID:26921325

  5. Fiber optic biofluorometer for physiological research on muscle slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, Mathias; Dendorfer, Andreas; Werner, Jan; Lambertz, Daniel; Klein, Karl-Friedrich

    2016-03-01

    A focus of research in cell physiology is the detection of Ca2+, NADH, FAD, ATPase activity or membrane potential, only to name a few, in muscle tissues. In this work, we report on a biofluorometer using ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), optical fibers and two photomultipliers (PMTs) using synchronized fluorescence detection with integrated background correction to detect free calcium, Ca2+, in cardiac muscle tissue placed in a horizontal tissue bath and a microscope setup. Fiber optic probes with imaging optics have been designed to transport excitation light from the biofluorometer's light output to a horizontal tissue bath and to collect emission light from a tissue sample of interest to two PMTs allowing either single excitation / single emission or ratiometric, dual excitation / single emission or single excitation / dual emission fluorescence detection of indicator dyes or natural fluorophores. The efficient transport of light from the excitation LEDs to the tissue sample, bleaching effects of the excitation light in both, polymer and fused silica-based fibers will be discussed. Furthermore, a new approach to maximize light collection of the emission light using high NA fibers and high NA coupling optics will be shown. Finally, first results on Ca2+ measurements in cardiac muscle slices in a traditional microscope setup and a horizontal tissue bath using fiber optic probes will be introduced and discussed.

  6. Skeletal muscle fiber, nerve, and blood vessel breakdown in space-flown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Ellis, S.; Bain, J. L.; Slocum, G. R.; Sedlak, F. R.

    1990-01-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses were performed postflight on hind limb skeletal muscles of rats orbited for 12.5 days aboard the unmanned Cosmos 1887 biosatellite and returned to Earth 2 days before sacrifice. The antigravity adductor longus (AL), soleus, and plantaris muscles atrophied more than the non-weight-bearing extensor digitorum longus, and slow muscle fibers were more atrophic than fast fibers. Muscle fiber segmental necrosis occurred selectively in the AL and soleus muscles; primarily, macrophages and neutrophils infiltrated and phagocytosed cellular debris. Granule-rich mast cells were diminished in flight AL muscles compared with controls, indicating the mast cell secretion contributed to interstitial tissue edema. Increased ubiquitination of disrupted myofibrils implicated ubiquitin in myofilament degradation. Mitochondrial content and succinic dehydrogenase activity were normal, except for subsarcolemmal decreases. Myofibrillar ATPase activity of flight AL muscle fibers shifted toward the fast type. Absence of capillaries and extravasation of red blood cells indicated failed microcirculation. Muscle fiber regeneration from activated satellite cells was detected. About 17% of the flight AL end plates exhibited total or partial denervation. Thus, skeletal muscle weakness associated with spaceflight can result from muscle fiber atrophy and segmental necrosis, partial motor denervation, and disruption of the microcirculation.

  7. How muscle fiber lengths and velocities affect muscle force generation as humans walk and run at different speeds.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edith M; Hamner, Samuel R; Seth, Ajay; Millard, Matthew; Delp, Scott L

    2013-06-01

    The lengths and velocities of muscle fibers have a dramatic effect on muscle force generation. It is unknown, however, whether the lengths and velocities of lower limb muscle fibers substantially affect the ability of muscles to generate force during walking and running. We examined this issue by developing simulations of muscle-tendon dynamics to calculate the lengths and velocities of muscle fibers from electromyographic recordings of 11 lower limb muscles and kinematic measurements of the hip, knee and ankle made as five subjects walked at speeds of 1.0-1.75 m s(-1) and ran at speeds of 2.0-5.0 m s(-1). We analyzed the simulated fiber lengths, fiber velocities and forces to evaluate the influence of force-length and force-velocity properties on force generation at different walking and running speeds. The simulations revealed that force generation ability (i.e. the force generated per unit of activation) of eight of the 11 muscles was significantly affected by walking or running speed. Soleus force generation ability decreased with increasing walking speed, but the transition from walking to running increased the force generation ability by reducing fiber velocities. Our results demonstrate the influence of soleus muscle architecture on the walk-to-run transition and the effects of muscle-tendon compliance on the plantarflexors' ability to generate ankle moment and power. The study presents data that permit lower limb muscles to be studied in unprecedented detail by relating muscle fiber dynamics and force generation to the mechanical demands of walking and running. PMID:23470656

  8. Changes in skeletal muscle biochemistry and histology relative to fiber type in rats with heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Duan, C.; Mattson, J. P.; Musch, T. I.

    1997-01-01

    One of the primary consequences of left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) after myocardial infarction is a decrement in exercise capacity. Several factors have been hypothesized to account for this decrement, including alterations in skeletal muscle metabolism and aerobic capacity. The purpose of this study was to determine whether LVD-induced alterations in skeletal muscle enzyme activities, fiber composition, and fiber size are 1) generalized in muscles or specific to muscles composed primarily of a given fiber type and 2) related to the severity of the LVD. Female Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated controls (n = 13) and rats with moderate (n = 10) and severe (n = 7) LVD. LVD was surgically induced by ligating the left main coronary artery and resulted in elevations (P < 0.05) in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (sham, 5 +/- 1 mmHg; moderate LVD, 11 +/- 1 mmHg; severe LVD, 25 +/- 1 mmHg). Moderate LVD decreased the activities of phosphofructokinase (PFK) and citrate synthase in one muscle composed of type IIB fibers but did not modify fiber composition or size of any muscle studied. However, severe LVD diminished the activity of enzymes involved in terminal and beta-oxidation in muscles composed primarily of type I fibers, type IIA fibers, and type IIB fibers. In addition, severe LVD induced a reduction in the activity of PFK in type IIB muscle, a 10% reduction in the percentage of type IID/X fibers, and a corresponding increase in the portion of type IIB fibers. Atrophy of type I fibers, type IIA fibers, and/or type IIB fibers occurred in soleus and plantaris muscles of rats with severe LVD. These data indicate that rats with severe LVD after myocardial infarction exhibit 1) decrements in mitochondrial enzyme activities independent of muscle fiber composition, 2) a reduction in PFK activity in type IIB muscle, 3) transformation of type IID/X to type IIB fibers, and 4) atrophy of type I, IIA, and IIB fibers.

  9. Glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Gaster, M; Handberg, A; Beck-Nielsen, H; Schroder, H D

    2000-09-01

    The present study was initiated to investigate GLUT-1 through -5 expression in developing and mature human skeletal muscle. To bypass the problems inherent in techniques using tissue homogenates, we applied an immunocytochemical approach, employing the sensitive enhanced tyramide signal amplification (TSA) technique to detect the localization of glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle. We found expression of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 in developing human muscle fibers showing a distinct expression pattern. 1) GLUT-1 is expressed in human skeletal muscle cells during gestation, but its expression is markedly reduced around birth and is further reduced to undetectable levels within the first year of life; 2) GLUT-3 protein expression appears at 18 wk of gestation and disappears after birth; and 3) GLUT-4 protein is diffusely expressed in muscle cells throughout gestation, whereas after birth, the characteristic subcellular localization is as seen in adult muscle fibers. Our results show that GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 seem to be of importance during muscle fiber growth and development. GLUT-5 protein was undetectable in fetal and adult skeletal muscle fibers. In adult muscle fibers, only GLUT-4 was expressed at significant levels. GLUT-1 immunoreactivity was below the detection limit in muscle fibers, indicating that this glucose transporter is of minor importance for muscle glucose supply. Thus we hypothesize that GLUT-4 also mediates basal glucose transport in muscle fibers, possibly through constant exposure to tonal contraction and basal insulin levels. PMID:10950819

  10. Muscle fiber type diversification during exercise and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Rizwan; Bhaskaran, Shylesh; Van Remmen, Holly

    2016-09-01

    The plasticity of skeletal muscle can be traced down to extensive metabolic, structural and molecular remodeling at the single fiber level. Skeletal muscle is comprised of different fiber types that are the basis of muscle plasticity in response to various functional demands. Resistance and endurance exercises are two external stimuli that differ in their duration and intensity of contraction and elicit markedly different responses in muscles adaptation. Further, eccentric contractions that are associated with exercise-induced injuries, elicit varied muscle adaptation and regenerative responses. Most adaptive changes are fiber type-specific and are highly influenced by diverse structural, metabolic and functional characteristics of individual fiber types. Regulation of signaling pathways by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress also plays an important role in muscle fiber adaptation during exercise. This review focuses on cellular and molecular responses that regulate the adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise and exercise-related injuries. PMID:27032709

  11. A muscle's force depends on the recruitment patterns of its fibers.

    PubMed

    Wakeling, James M; Lee, Sabrina S M; Arnold, Allison S; de Boef Miara, Maria; Biewener, Andrew A

    2012-08-01

    Biomechanical models of whole muscles commonly used in simulations of musculoskeletal function and movement typically assume that the muscle generates force as a scaled-up muscle fiber. However, muscles are comprised of motor units that have different intrinsic properties and that can be activated at different times. This study tested whether a muscle model comprised of motor units that could be independently activated resulted in more accurate predictions of force than traditional Hill-type models. Forces predicted by the models were evaluated by direct comparison with the muscle forces measured in situ from the gastrocnemii in goats. The muscle was stimulated tetanically at a range of frequencies, muscle fiber strains were measured using sonomicrometry, and the activation patterns of the different types of motor unit were calculated from electromyographic recordings. Activation patterns were input into five different muscle models. Four models were traditional Hill-type models with different intrinsic speeds and fiber-type properties. The fifth model incorporated differential groups of fast and slow motor units. For all goats, muscles and stimulation frequencies the differential model resulted in the best predictions of muscle force. The in situ muscle output was shown to depend on the recruitment of different motor units within the muscle. PMID:22350666

  12. Effects of pressure on equatorial x-ray fiber diffraction from skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, P J; Fortune, N S; Geeves, M A

    1993-01-01

    When skeletal muscle fibers are subjected to a hydrostatic pressure of 10 MPa (100 atmospheres), reversible changes in tension occur. Passive tension from relaxed muscle is unaffected, rigor tension rises, and active tension falls. The effects of pressure on muscle structure are unknown: therefore a pressure-resistant cell for x-ray diffraction has been built, and this paper reports the first study of the low-angle equatorial patterns of pressurized relaxed, rigor, and active muscle fibers, with direct comparisons from the same chemically skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers at 0.1 and 10 MPa. Relaxed and rigor fibers show little change in the intensity of the equatorial reflections when pressurized to 10 MPa, but there is a small, reversible expansion of the lattice of 0.7 and 0.4%, respectively. This shows that the order and stability of the myofilament lattice is undisturbed by this pressure. The rise in rigor tension under pressure is thus probably due to axial shortening of one or more components of the sarcomere. Initial results from active fibers at 0.1 MPa show that when phosphate is added the lattice spacing and equatorial intensities change toward their relaxed values. This indicates cross-bridge detachment, as expected from the reduction in tension that phosphate induces. 10 MPa in the presence of phosphate at 11 degrees C causes tension to fall by a further 12%, but not change is detected in the relative intensity of the reflections, only a small increase in lattice spacing. Thus pressure appears to increase the proportion of attached cross-bridges in a low-force state. PMID:8218906

  13. Modeling the dispersion effects of contractile fibers in smooth muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtada, Sae-Il; Kroon, Martin; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2010-12-01

    Micro-structurally based models for smooth muscle contraction are crucial for a better understanding of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, incontinence and asthma. It is meaningful that models consider the underlying mechanical structure and the biochemical activation. Hence, a simple mechanochemical model is proposed that includes the dispersion of the orientation of smooth muscle myofilaments and that is capable to capture available experimental data on smooth muscle contraction. This allows a refined study of the effects of myofilament dispersion on the smooth muscle contraction. A classical biochemical model is used to describe the cross-bridge interactions with the thin filament in smooth muscles in which calcium-dependent myosin phosphorylation is the only regulatory mechanism. A novel mechanical model considers the dispersion of the contractile fiber orientations in smooth muscle cells by means of a strain-energy function in terms of one dispersion parameter. All model parameters have a biophysical meaning and may be estimated through comparisons with experimental data. The contraction of the middle layer of a carotid artery is studied numerically. Using a tube the relationships between the internal pressure and the stretches are investigated as functions of the dispersion parameter, which implies a strong influence of the orientation of smooth muscle myofilaments on the contraction response. It is straightforward to implement this model in a finite element code to better analyze more complex boundary-value problems.

  14. Extradenticle and homothorax control adult muscle fiber identity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bryantsev, Anton L; Duong, Sandy; Brunetti, Tonya M; Chechenova, Maria B; Lovato, TyAnna L; Nelson, Cloyce; Shaw, Elizabeth; Uhl, Juli D; Gebelein, Brian; Cripps, Richard M

    2012-09-11

    Here we identify a key role for the homeodomain proteins Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) in the specification of muscle fiber fate in Drosophila. exd and hth are expressed in the fibrillar indirect flight muscles but not in tubular jump muscles, and manipulating exd or hth expression converts one muscle type into the other. In the flight muscles, exd and hth are genetically upstream of another muscle identity gene, salm, and are direct transcriptional regulators of the signature flight muscle structural gene, Actin88F. Exd and Hth also impact muscle identity in other somatic muscles of the body by cooperating with Hox factors. Because mammalian orthologs of exd and hth also contribute to muscle gene regulation, our studies suggest that an evolutionarily conserved genetic pathway determines muscle fiber differentiation. PMID:22975331

  15. How muscle fiber lengths and velocities affect muscle force generation as humans walk and run at different speeds

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Edith M.; Hamner, Samuel R.; Seth, Ajay; Millard, Matthew; Delp, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The lengths and velocities of muscle fibers have a dramatic effect on muscle force generation. It is unknown, however, whether the lengths and velocities of lower limb muscle fibers substantially affect the ability of muscles to generate force during walking and running. We examined this issue by developing simulations of muscle–tendon dynamics to calculate the lengths and velocities of muscle fibers from electromyographic recordings of 11 lower limb muscles and kinematic measurements of the hip, knee and ankle made as five subjects walked at speeds of 1.0–1.75 m s−1 and ran at speeds of 2.0–5.0 m s−1. We analyzed the simulated fiber lengths, fiber velocities and forces to evaluate the influence of force–length and force–velocity properties on force generation at different walking and running speeds. The simulations revealed that force generation ability (i.e. the force generated per unit of activation) of eight of the 11 muscles was significantly affected by walking or running speed. Soleus force generation ability decreased with increasing walking speed, but the transition from walking to running increased the force generation ability by reducing fiber velocities. Our results demonstrate the influence of soleus muscle architecture on the walk-to-run transition and the effects of muscle–tendon compliance on the plantarflexors' ability to generate ankle moment and power. The study presents data that permit lower limb muscles to be studied in unprecedented detail by relating muscle fiber dynamics and force generation to the mechanical demands of walking and running. PMID:23470656

  16. Kinematic modeling of single muscle fiber during diaphragm shortening.

    PubMed

    Kyckelhahn, Brian A; Nason, Patricia B; Tidball, James G; Boriek, Aladin M

    2003-03-01

    Understanding the kinematics of the diaphragm muscle at the single fiber level is important in understanding the mechanics of its membrane. Nevertheless, the geometric parameters of single muscle fiber contraction remain poorly understood. We modeled the kinematics of a single muscle fiber of the diaphragm to determine the relationships among fiber shape, perimeter of the fiber cross-section, and apparent surface area of the fiber during muscle shortening. We used the models to identify which constraints on the geometric parameters are most consistent with physiological data on diaphragmatic muscle shortening. Our kinematic models use isovolumic fibers with elliptical cross-sections, and these models have the following properties: (1) constant cross-sectional shape, (2) inextensible cross-sectional perimeter, (3) constant cross-sectional transverse dimension, or (4) constant apparent surface area. These models were investigated during muscle shortening of the diaphragm from functional residual capacity to total lung capacity. The model that matches physiologic data best has zero transverse strain and has a relationship between fiber shape and muscle shortening consistent with published data on single muscle fiber mechanics. PMID:12594994

  17. Muscle organizers in Drosophila: the role of persistent larval fibers in adult flight muscle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, E. R.; Fernandes, J.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    In many organisms muscle formation depends on specialized cells that prefigure the pattern of the musculature and serve as templates for myoblast organization and fusion. These include muscle pioneers in insects and muscle organizing cells in leech. In Drosophila, muscle founder cells have been proposed to play a similar role in organizing larval muscle development during embryogenesis. During metamorphosis in Drosophila, following histolysis of most of the larval musculature, there is a second round of myogenesis that gives rise to the adult muscles. It is not known whether muscle founder cells organize the development of these muscles. However, in the thorax specific larval muscle fibers do not histolyze at the onset of metamorphosis, but instead serve as templates for the formation of a subset of adult muscles, the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs). Because these persistent larval muscle fibers appear to be functioning in many respects like muscle founder cells, we investigated whether they were necessary for DLM development by using a microbeam laser to ablate them singly and in combination. We found that, in the absence of the larval muscle fibers, DLMs nonetheless develop. Our results show that the persistent larval muscle fibers are not required to initiate myoblast fusion, to determine DLM identity, to locate the DLMs in the thorax, or to specify the total DLM fiber volume. However, they are required to regulate the number of DLM fibers generated. Thus, while the persistent larval muscle fibers are not obligatory for DLM fiber formation and differentiation, they are necessary to ensure the development of the correct number of fibers.

  18. Metabolic and morphologic properties of single muscle fibers in the rat after spaceflight, Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miu, B.; Martin, T. P.; Roy, R. R.; Oganov, V.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E.; Marini, J. F.; Leger, J. J.; Bodine-Fowler, S. C.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1990-01-01

    The adaptation of a slow (soleus, Sol) and a fast (medial gastrocnemius, MG) skeletal muscle to spaceflight was studied in five young male rats. The flight period was 12.5 days and the rats were killed approximately 48 h after returning to 1 g. Five other rats that were housed in cages similar to those used by the flight rats were maintained at 1 g for the same period of time to serve as ground-based controls. Fibers were classified as dark or light staining for myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). On the average, the fibers in the Sol of the flight rats atrophied twice as much as those in the MG. Further, the fibers located in the deep (close to the bone and having the highest percentage of light ATPase and high oxidative fibers in the muscle cross section) region of the MG atrophied more than the fibers located in the superficial (away from the bone and having the lowest percentage of light ATPase and high oxidative fibers in the muscle cross-section) region of the muscle. Based on quantitative histochemical assays of single muscle fibers, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity per unit volume was unchanged in fibers of the Sol and MG. However, in the Sol, but not the MG, the total amount of SDH activity in a 10-microns-thick section of a fiber decreased significantly in response to spaceflight. Based on population distributions, it appears that the alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) activities were elevated in the dark ATPase fibers in the Sol, whereas the light fibers in the Sol and both fiber types in the MG did not appear to change. The ratio of GPD to SDH activities increased in the dark (but not light) fibers of the Sol and was unaffected in the MG. Immunohistochemical analyses indicate that approximately 40% of the fibers in the Sol of flight rats expressed a fast myosin heavy chain compared with 22% in control rats. Further, 31% of the fibers in the Sol of flight rats expressed both fast and slow myosin heavy chains compared with 8% in

  19. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 +/- 4, n = 22, 12 females) w...

  20. Ion permeation through single channels activated by acetylcholine in denervated toad sartorius skeletal muscle fibers: effects of alkali cations.

    PubMed

    Quartararo, N; Barry, P H; Gage, P W

    1987-01-01

    The gigaohm seal technique was used to study ion permeation through acetylcholine-activated channels in cell-attached patches of the extrajunctional membrane of chronically denervated, enzyme-treated cells from the sartorius muscle of the toad Bufo marinus. The most frequently occurring channel type (greater than 95% of channel openings), provisionally classified as 'extrajunctional,' had a chord conductance of approximately 25 pS under normal conditions (-70 mV, 11 degrees C, Normal Toad Ringer's). The less frequently observed channel type (less than 5% of channel openings), classified as a 'junctional' type, had a conductance of 35 pS under the same conditions, and a similar null potential. In many patches, a small percentage (usually less than 2%) of openings of the extrajunctional channel displayed a lower conductance state. The shape of the I-V curves obtained for the extrajunctional channel depended on the predominant extracellular cation. For Cs and K, the I-V curves were essentially linear over the voltage range +50 to -150 mV across the patch, suggesting that the potential independent component of the energy profile within the channel was symmetrical. For Li, the I-V curve was very nonlinear, displaying a significant sublinearity at hyperpolarized potentials. Both an electrodiffusion and a symmetrical uniform four-barrier, three-site rate-theory model provided reasonable fits to the data, whereas symmetrical two-barrier, single-site rate-theory models did not. For the alkali cations examined, the relative permeability sequence was PCs greater than PK greater than PNa greater than PLi--a "proportional" selectivity sequence. This was different from the single channel conductance sequence which was found to be gamma K greater than gamma Cs greater than gamma Na greater than gamma Li implying that ions do not move independently through the channel. The relative binding constant sequence for the channel sites was found to be a "polarizability" sequence, i

  1. Neuromuscular organization of the superior longitudinalis muscle in the human tongue. 1. Motor endplate morphology and muscle fiber architecture.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Katrina; Li, Haiyan; Sokoloff, Alan J

    2005-01-01

    Proper tongue function is essential for respiration and mastication, yet we lack basic information on the anatomical organization underlying human tongue movement. Here we use microdissection, acetylcholinesterase histochemistry, silver staining of nerves, alpha bungarotoxin binding and immunohistochemistry to describe muscle fiber architecture and motor endplate (MEP) distribution of the human superior longitudinalis muscle (SL). The human SL extends from tongue base to tongue tip and is composed of fiber bundles that range from 2.8 to 15.7 mm in length. Individual muscle fibers of the SL range from 1.2 to 17.3 mm in length (1.3-18.2% of muscle length). Seventy-one percent of SL fibers have blunt-blunt terminations; the remainder have blunt-taper terminations. Multiple MEPs are present along SL length and dual MEPs are present on some muscle fibers. These data demonstrate that the human SL is a muscle of "in-series" design. We suggest that SL motor units are organized to innervate specific regions of the tongue body and that activation of SL motor units according to anteroposterior location is one strategy employed by the nervous system to control tongue shape and tongue movement. PMID:16439818

  2. Active vs. inactive muscle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may lose 20 to 40 percent of their muscle -- and, along with it, their strength -- as they ... have found that a major reason people lose muscle is because they stop doing everyday activities that ...

  3. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  4. Restricting calcium currents is required for correct fiber type specification in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Nasreen; Dienes, Beatrix; Benedetti, Ariane; Tuluc, Petronel; Szentesi, Peter; Sztretye, Monika; Rainer, Johannes; Hess, Michael W.; Schwarzer, Christoph; Obermair, Gerald J.; Csernoch, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling is independent of calcium influx. In fact, alternative splicing of the voltage-gated calcium channel CaV1.1 actively suppresses calcium currents in mature muscle. Whether this is necessary for normal development and function of muscle is not known. However, splicing defects that cause aberrant expression of the calcium-conducting developmental CaV1.1e splice variant correlate with muscle weakness in myotonic dystrophy. Here, we deleted CaV1.1 (Cacna1s) exon 29 in mice. These mice displayed normal overall motor performance, although grip force and voluntary running were reduced. Continued expression of the developmental CaV1.1e splice variant in adult mice caused increased calcium influx during EC coupling, altered calcium homeostasis, and spontaneous calcium sparklets in isolated muscle fibers. Contractile force was reduced and endurance enhanced. Key regulators of fiber type specification were dysregulated and the fiber type composition was shifted toward slower fibers. However, oxidative enzyme activity and mitochondrial content declined. These findings indicate that limiting calcium influx during skeletal muscle EC coupling is important for the secondary function of the calcium signal in the activity-dependent regulation of fiber type composition and to prevent muscle disease. PMID:26965373

  5. Analysis of muscle fiber clustering in the diaphragm muscle of sarcopenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Greising, Sarah M.; Medina-Martínez, Juan S.; Vasdev, Amrit K.; Sieck, Gary C.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sarcopenia likely comprises muscle fiber denervation and re-innervation, resulting in clustering of muscle fibers of the same type (classified by myosin heavy chain isoform composition). Development of methodology to quantitatively evaluate clustering of muscle fibers according to fiber type is necessary. Methods Fiber type specific immunofluorescence histology was used to quantify fiber clustering in murine diaphragm muscle (n=15) at 6 and 24 months of age. Results With age, fiber type clustering is evidenced by fiber type specific changes in distances between fibers, specifically a 14% decrease to the closest fiber for type I and 24% increase for type IIx and/or IIb fibers (P<0.001). Additionally, a 34% increase to the 3 closest type IIx and/or IIb fibers was found (P<0.001). Discussion This novel method of analyzing fiber type clustering may be useful in examining pathophysiological conditions of motor unit loss in neuromuscular disorders, myopathies, dystrophies, injuries, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:25808550

  6. Gravitational unloading effects on muscle fiber size, phenotype and myonuclear number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Nomura, T.; Kawano, F.; Ishihara, A.; Nonaka, I.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of gravitational unloading with or without intact neural activity and/or tension development on myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition, cross-sectional area (CSA), number of myonuclei, and myonuclear domain (cytoplasmic volume per myonucleus ratio) in single fibers of both slow and fast muscles of rat hindlimbs are reviewed briefly. The atrophic response to unloading is generally graded as follows: slow extensors > fast extensors > fast flexors. Reduction of CSA is usually greater in the most predominant fiber type of that muscle. The percentage of fibers expressing fast MHC isoforms increases in unloaded slow but not fast muscles. Myonuclear number per mm of fiber length and myonuclear domain is decreased in the fibers of the unloaded predominantly slow soleus muscle, but not in the predominantly fast plantaris. Decreases in myonuclear number and domain, however, are observed in plantaris fibers when tenotomy, denervation, or both are combined with hindlimb unloading. All of these results are consistent with the view that a major factor for fiber atrophy is an inhibition or reduction of loading of the hindlimbs. These data also indicate that predominantly slow muscles are more responsive to unloading than predominantly fast muscles. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Differentiation of fast and slow muscle fibers by bioimpedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, M.-V.; Khider, N.; Ribbe, E.; Damez, J.-L.

    2010-04-01

    The differentiation of fast and slow muscle fibers in vivo still requires constraining equipment (ergometer, biopsy ...) and invasive techniques. These fibers conduct the electrical current differently. Therefore the aim of this study is to see if it is possible to differentiate quickly, by bioimpedance, fast and slow fibers, and firstly muscles which are typical composed by slow or fast fibers. To do this, we used a multifrequency impedancemeter Z-Metrix® (BioparHom© Company, France). We collected the electrical characteristics (Longitudinal and Transversal, from 1 to 1000 kHz) for a population of 20 rats aged 70 days, on Soleus muscles (composed principally of slow fibers) and Extensor Digitroum Longus (EDL) muscles (composed principally of fast fibers). We compared the means of alpha (L/T), R (L/T) and X (L/T) with Wilcoxon tests. We obtained non significant differences between electrical data obtained on EDL and Soleus muscles, but we could see differences on graphics representation and with the example of one rat. Therefore, we can assume that differentiation, by bioimpedance, of muscles typed slow and fast fibers, could be possible.

  8. Myosin Isoforms and Contractile Properties of Single Fibers of Human Latissimus Dorsi Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pacelli, Quirico F.; Cancellara, Pasqua; Toniolo, Luana; Moro, Tatiana; Canato, Marta; Miotti, Danilo; Reggiani, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate fiber type distribution and contractile characteristics of Latissimus Dorsi muscle (LDM). Samples were collected from 18 young healthy subjects (9 males and 9 females) through percutaneous fine needle muscle biopsy. The results showed a predominance of fast myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHC) with 42% of MyHC 2A and 25% of MyHC 2X, while MyHC 1 represented only 33%. The unbalance toward fast isoforms was even greater in males (71%) than in females (64%). Fiber type distribution partially reflected MyHC isoform distribution with 28% type 1/slow fibers and 5% hybrid 1/2A fibers, while fast fibers were divided into 30% type 2A, 31% type A/X, 4% type X, and 2% type 1/2X. Type 1/slow fibers were not only less abundant but also smaller in cross-sectional area than fast fibers. During maximal isometric contraction, type 1/slow fibers developed force and tension significantly lower than the two major groups of fast fibers. In conclusion, the predominance of fast fibers and their greater size and strength compared to slow fibers reveal that LDM is a muscle specialized mainly in phasic and powerful activity. Importantly, such specialization is more pronounced in males than in females. PMID:23971027

  9. Effects of chronic centrifugation on skeletal muscle fibers in young developing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Three groups of 30-d old male and female rats were centrifuged for 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks, after which their soleus and plantaris muscles were analysed for changes in proportions of muscle fiber types. The groups were: earth control, maintained at earth gravity without rotation; rotation control, subjected to a gravitational force of 1.05 G and 28 rpm; and rotation experimental, subjected to a gravitational force of 2 G and 28 rpm. Muscle fibers were classified into four fiber types on the basis of actomyosin ATPase activity as slow oxidative, fast oxidative glycolytic and either fast glycolytic (plantaris) or intermediate (soleus). Hypergravity resulted in an increase in slow oxidative fibers in soleus relative to the earth control, but not of females treated similarly. The relationship of body weight to the changes in proportion of slow oxidative fibers is discussed.

  10. The role of nitric oxide in muscle fibers with oxidative phosphorylation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Tengan, Celia H. . E-mail: chtengan@neuro.epm.br; Kiyomoto, Beatriz H.; Godinho, Rosely O.; Gamba, Juliana; Neves, Afonso C.; Schmidt, Beny; Oliveira, Acary S.B.; Gabbai, Alberto A.

    2007-08-03

    NO has been pointed as an important player in the control of mitochondrial respiration, especially because of its inhibitory effect on cytochrome c oxidase (COX). However, all the events involved in this control are still not completely elucidated. We demonstrate compartmentalized abnormalities on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity on muscle biopsies of patients with mitochondrial diseases. NOS activity was reduced in the sarcoplasmic compartment in COX deficient fibers, whereas increased activity was found in the sarcolemma of fibers with mitochondrial proliferation. We observed increased expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in patients and a correlation between nNOS expression and mitochondrial content. Treatment of skeletal muscle culture with an NO donor induced an increase in mitochondrial content. Our results indicate specific roles of NO in compensatory mechanisms of muscle fibers with mitochondrial deficiency and suggest the participation of nNOS in the signaling process of mitochondrial proliferation in human skeletal muscle.

  11. Altered distribution of mitochondria in rat soleus muscle fibers after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Gordon J.; Martin, Thomas P.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V. S.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an exposure to microgravity on the distribution of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity throughout the soleus muscle fibers was investigated by measuring SDH activity throughout the cross section of 20-30 fibers each of the slow-twitch oxidative and fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic types of fibers in rats exposed to 12.5 days in space aboard Cosmos 1887. It was found that, after the spaceflight, the entire regional distribution of SDH activity was significantly altered (as compared to ground controls) in the slow-twitch oxidative fibers, whereas the fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibers from muscles of flown rats exhibited a significantly lower SDH activity only in their subsarcolemmal region.

  12. Improving human skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain fiber typing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Murach, Kevin A; Bagley, James R; McLeland, Kathryn A; Arevalo, Jose A; Ciccone, Anthony B; Malyszek, Kylie K; Wen, Yuan; Galpin, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Single muscle fiber sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is a sensitive technique for determining skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of human biopsy samples. However, the number of fibers suitable to represent fiber type distribution via this method is undefined. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis (VL) of nine resistance-trained males (25 ± 1 year, height = 179 ± 5 cm, mass = 82 ± 8 kg). Single fiber MHC composition was determined via SDS-PAGE. VL fiber type distribution [percent MHC I, I/IIa, IIa, IIa/IIx, and total "hybrids" (i.e. I/IIa + IIa/IIx)] was evaluated according to number of fibers analyzed per person (25 vs. 125). VL fiber type distribution did not differ according to number of fibers analyzed (P > 0.05). VL biopsy fiber type distribution of nine subjects is represented by analyzing 25 fibers per person. These data may help minimize cost, personnel-time, and materials associated with this technique, thereby improving fiber typing efficiency in humans. PMID:26842420

  13. Eccentric contraction-induced injury to type I, IIa, and IIa/IIx muscle fibers of elderly adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscles of old laboratory rodents experience exaggerated force losses after eccentric contractile activity. We extended this line of inquiry to humans and investigated the influence of fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content on the injury process. Skinned muscle fiber segments, prepared from ...

  14. Contractile properties of muscle fibers from the deep and superficial digital flexors of horses

    PubMed Central

    Chase, P. B.; Hermanson, J. W.; Clark, A. N.; Brunet, N. M.; Bertram, J. E. A.

    2010-01-01

    Equine digital flexor muscles have independent tendons but a nearly identical mechanical relationship to the main joint they act upon. Yet these muscles have remarkable diversity in architecture, ranging from long, unipennate fibers (“short” compartment of DDF) to very short, multipennate fibers (SDF). To investigate the functional relevance of the form of the digital flexor muscles, fiber contractile properties were analyzed in the context of architecture differences and in vivo function during locomotion. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fiber type was studied, and in vitro motility assays were used to measure actin filament sliding velocity (Vf). Skinned fiber contractile properties [isometric tension (P0/CSA), velocity of unloaded shortening (VUS), and force-Ca2+ relationships] at both 10 and 30°C were characterized. Contractile properties were correlated with MHC isoform and their respective Vf. The DDF contained a higher percentage of MHC-2A fibers with myosin (heavy meromyosin) and Vf that was twofold faster than SDF. At 30°C, P0/CSA was higher for DDF (103.5 ± 8.75 mN/mm2) than SDF fibers (81.8 ± 7.71 mN/mm2). Similarly, VUS (pCa 5, 30°C) was faster for DDF (2.43 ± 0.53 FL/s) than SDF fibers (1.20 ± 0.22 FL/s). Active isometric tension increased with increasing Ca2+ concentration, with maximal Ca2+ activation at pCa 5 at each temperature in fibers from each muscle. In general, the collective properties of DDF and SDF were consistent with fiber MHC isoform composition, muscle architecture, and the respective functional roles of the two muscles in locomotion. PMID:20702801

  15. Muscle activity pattern dependent pain development and alleviation.

    PubMed

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Søgaard, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Muscle activity is for decades considered to provide health benefits irrespectively of the muscle activity pattern performed and whether it is during e.g. sports, transportation, or occupational work tasks. Accordingly, the international recommendations for public health-promoting physical activity do not distinguish between occupational and leisure time physical activity. However, in this body of literature, attention has not been paid to the extensive documentation on occupational physical activity imposing a risk of impairment of health - in particular musculoskeletal health in terms of muscle pain. Focusing on muscle activity patterns and musculoskeletal health it is pertinent to elucidate the more specific aspects regarding exposure profiles and body regional pain. Static sustained muscle contraction for prolonged periods often occurs in the neck/shoulder area during occupational tasks and may underlie muscle pain development in spite of rather low relative muscle load. Causal mechanisms include a stereotype recruitment of low threshold motor units (activating type 1 muscle fibers) characterized by a lack of temporal as well as spatial variation in recruitment. In contrast during physical activities at leisure and sport the motor recruitment patterns are more dynamic including regularly relatively high muscle forces - also activating type 2 muscles fibers - as well as periods of full relaxation even of the type 1 muscle fibers. Such activity is unrelated to muscle pain development if adequate recovery is granted. However, delayed muscle soreness may develop following intensive eccentric muscle activity (e.g. down-hill skiing) with peak pain levels in thigh muscles 1-2 days after the exercise bout and a total recovery within 1 week. This acute pain profile is in contrast to the chronic muscle pain profile related to repetitive monotonous work tasks. The painful muscles show adverse functional, morphological, hormonal, as well as metabolic characteristics. Of

  16. Interictal conduction slowing in muscle fibers in hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Troni, W; Doriguzzi, C; Mongini, T

    1983-11-01

    Conduction velocity in muscle fibers of the short head of biceps brachii was reduced between attacks in all the affected members of a family suffering from hypokalemic periodic paralysis. This finding represents a further evidence of a primary alteration of sarcolemmal function in this disease. Interictal conduction slowing in muscle fibers is consistent with the prevailing pathophysiologic hypothesis, which considers an increased membrane permeability to sodium ions as the fundamental defect underlying all forms of familial periodic paralysis. PMID:6685247

  17. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers of rats after exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akuzawa, M.; Hataya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers were electron microscopically studied in rats forced to run on the treadmill until all-out. When they were mild and limited to relatively small areas, the reconstruction of filaments ensued within 10 days without infiltration of cells. When they were severe and extensive, phagocytes infiltrated in the lesions and removed degenerative sacroplasmic debris from muscle fibers. A little later, myoblasts appeared and regeneration was accomplished in 30 days in much the same manner as in myogenesis.

  18. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Nicholas L.; Banks, Glen B.; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H. Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K.; Hockenbery, David M.; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I “red” slow twitch and type II “white” fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases. PMID:25548157

  19. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. While fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. I will present a comprehensive theoretical study of force transmission in these networks. I will show that the linear, small-force response of the networks is remarkably simple, as the macroscopic active stress depends only on the geometry of the force-exerting unit. In contrast, as non-linear buckling occurs around these units, local active forces are rectified towards isotropic contraction and strongly amplified. This stress amplification is reinforced by the networks' disordered nature, but saturates for high densities of active units. I will show that our predictions are quantitatively consistent with experiments on reconstituted tissues and actomyosin networks, and that they shed light on the role of the network microstructure in shaping active stresses in cells and tissue.

  20. A New Method for Non-Invasive Estimation of Human Muscle Fiber Type Composition

    PubMed Central

    Baguet, Audrey; Everaert, Inge; Hespel, Peter; Petrovic, Mirko; Achten, Eric; Derave, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been established that excellence in sports with short and long exercise duration requires a high proportion of fast-twitch (FT) or type-II fibers and slow-twitch (ST) or type-I fibers, respectively. Until today, the muscle biopsy method is still accepted as gold standard to measure muscle fiber type composition. Because of its invasive nature and high sampling variance, it would be useful to develop a non-invasive alternative. Methodology Eighty-three control subjects, 15 talented young track-and-field athletes, 51 elite athletes and 14 ex-athletes volunteered to participate in the current study. The carnosine content of all 163 subjects was measured in the gastrocnemius muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Muscle biopsies for fiber typing were taken from 12 untrained males. Principal Findings A significant positive correlation was found between muscle carnosine, measured by 1H-MRS, and percentage area occupied by type II fibers. Explosive athletes had ∼30% higher carnosine levels compared to a reference population, whereas it was ∼20% lower than normal in typical endurance athletes. Similar results were found in young talents and ex-athletes. When active elite runners were ranked according to their best running distance, a negative sigmoidal curve was found between logarithm of running distance and muscle carnosine. Conclusions Muscle carnosine content shows a good reflection of the disciplines of elite track-and-field athletes and is able to distinguish between individual track running distances. The differences between endurance and sprint muscle types is also observed in young talents and former athletes, suggesting this characteristic is genetically determined and can be applied in early talent identification. This quick method provides a valid alternative for the muscle biopsy method. In addition, this technique may also contribute to the diagnosis and monitoring of many conditions and diseases that are

  1. Single muscle fiber proteomics reveals unexpected mitochondrial specialization

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Deshmukh, Atul S; Zeiler, Marlis; Cancellara, Pasqua; Moretti, Irene; Reggiani, Carlo; Schiaffino, Stefano; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are composed of multinucleated cells termed slow or fast fibers according to their contractile and metabolic properties. Here, we developed a high-sensitivity workflow to characterize the proteome of single fibers. Analysis of segments of the same fiber by traditional and unbiased proteomics methods yielded the same subtype assignment. We discovered novel subtype-specific features, most prominently mitochondrial specialization of fiber types in substrate utilization. The fiber type-resolved proteomes can be applied to a variety of physiological and pathological conditions and illustrate the utility of single cell type analysis for dissecting proteomic heterogeneity. PMID:25643707

  2. Differential Responses of Soleus and Plantaris Muscle Fibers to Overloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Fuminori; Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Ohira, Takashi; Nakai, Naoya; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2013-02-01

    Responses of slow and fast fibers in soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats to overloading by the tendon transection of synergists were studied. Overloading-related hypertrophy was noted in the slow fibers of plantaris and soleus, although the magnitude was greater in plantaris. Five genes with minor expression in slow soleus muscle were identified by microarray analysis. Base-line expressions of these genes in slow fibers of plantaris were also low. Further, repressive effects of overloading on these genes were seen in some fast fibers of plantaris, not in whole plantaris and soleus. The data suggested that the repression of particular genes might be related to the pronounced morphological response of fibers expressing type II, including I+II, myosin heavy chain (MyHC), although these genes with lower base-line expression in slow fibers did not respond to overloading.

  3. Adaptation of fibers in fast-twitch muscles of rats to spaceflight and hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bian; Ohira, Yoshi; Roy, Roland R.; Nguyen, Quyet; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Oganov, V.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The adaptation of single fibers in medial gastrocnemius (MG), a fast-twitch extensor, and in tibialis anterior (TA), a fast-twitch flexor, was studied after 14 days of spaceflight onboard Cosmos 2044 or hindlimb suspension. Quantitative myosin ATPase activities of single fibers were measured in flight and suspended rats. Each of the enzyme and size measurements were directly correlated within each fiber with respect to its qualitative myosin ATPase staining properties and its expression of fast, slow, or both myosin heavy chains (MHC). The percentage of slow- and fast-twitch fibers of the MG and TA were found to be unchanged. Mean fiber size of all fibers was unaffected after flight or suspension. The ATPase activity in the MG was higher in flight than in control or suspended rats. In comparison to Cosmos 1887 spaceflight, the adaptations in the muscle fibers of the MG were more moderate.

  4. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R; Olson, Eric N; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure. PMID:23676496

  5. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C.; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C.; Vega, Rick B.; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E.; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R.; Olson, Eric N.; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure. PMID:23676496

  6. Spaceflight and growth effects on muscle fibers in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodine-Fowler, Sue C.; Roy, Roland R.; Rudolph, William; Haque, Naz; Kozlovskaia, Inessa B.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of a 14-day spaceflight onboard Cosmos 2044 on selected morphological and metabolic properties of single muscle fibers was investigated in a nonhuman primate, Macaca mulatta. It is concluded that the 14-day spaceflight had little impact on fiber size in the soleus (S) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles, whereas it appeared to be a slight decrease in sized in the tibialis anterior (TA). The mean fiber size in the postflight biopsies increased relative to preflight values. The mean fiber succinate dehydrogenase activity was found to decrease in the MG, whereas there was no apparent effect of spaceflight on the s and ta muscles. The differences in response of the S, MG, and TA to spaceflight in monkeys vs rats may be related to a species responsiveness to spaceflight, the manner in which the animals were restrained, and/or the possibility that the ankle musculature was able to function against a load while in space.

  7. Specific tension measurements in single soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle fibers of the cat.

    PubMed

    Lucas, S M; Ruff, R L; Binder, M D

    1987-01-01

    Direct measurements of the sizes of and forces produced by single fibers of the cat soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles were made to determine whether or not different fiber types have characteristically distinct specific tensions. Single fibers (5-mm lengths), whose sarcolemmas had been chemically removed using a 5-mM EGTA "skinning" solution, were attached to a photodiode force transducer. Each single fiber was first placed in "relaxing" solution (22 +/- 1 degrees C, pH 7.0, pCa 8), its sarcomere length set at 2.7 micron using its laser diffraction pattern, and its diameter measured using the calibrated graticule of a microscope eyepiece (+/- 2 micron). Subsequently, each fiber was transferred to an activating bathing solution (pCa 3.6) in which the fiber produced its maximum tension. The specific tension values for single soleus muscle fibers displayed a threefold range (1.19 to 3.53 kg/cm2) with a mean value of 2.30 +/- 0.61 (SD) kg/cm2 (N = 42). The medial gastrocnemius fibers studied had a fourfold range in specific tensions (1.05 to 4.47 kg/cm2) and a mean value of 2.42 +/- 0.61 (SD) kg/cm2 (N = 104). Many medial gastrocnemius fibers (N = 64) were type-identified using a standard actomyosin ATPase histochemical assay. Type I medial gastrocnemius fibers had mean specific tension values of 2.45 +/- 0.47 kg/cm2 (N = 18), whereas, type II single fibers had mean specific tension values of 2.43 +/- 0.67 kg/cm2 (N = 46). Our results suggest that there is no significant difference between the specific tensions of the different muscle fiber types within the cat medial gastrocnemius muscle. PMID:2947808

  8. Effect of Strain on Actomyosin Kinetics in Isometric Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Siththanandan, V. B.; Donnelly, J. L.; Ferenczi, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Investigations were conducted into the biochemical and mechanical states of cross-bridges during isometric muscle contraction. Rapid length steps (3 or 6 nm hs−1) were applied to rabbit psoas fibers, permeabilized and isometric, at either 12°C or 20°C. Fibers were activated by photolysis of P3-1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethyl ester of ATP infused into rigor fibers at saturating Ca2+. Sarcomere length, tension, and phosphate release were recorded—the latter using the MDCC-PBP fluorescent probe. A reduction in strain, induced by a rapid release step, produced a short-lived acceleration of phosphate release. Rates of the phosphate transient and that of phases 3 and 4 of tension recovery were unaffected by step size but were elevated at higher temperatures. In contrast the amplitude of the phosphate transient was smaller at 20°C than 12°C. The presence of 0.5 or 1.0 mM added ADP during a release step reduced both the rate of tension recovery and the poststep isometric tension. A kinetic scheme is presented to simulate the observed data and to precisely determine the rate constants for the elementary steps of the ATPase cycle. PMID:16513783

  9. Effects of disuse by limb immobilization on different muscle fiber types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Seider, M. J.; Hugman, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of disuse by limb immobilization on different muscle fiber types are reviewed. It is demonstrated that many changes occurring in atrophying skeletal muscles of young rats can be explained by the duration of the half-lives of muscle proteins. Differences are found to exist in responses of fast- and slow-twitch muscles due to disuse atrophy, and the appearance of plasticity in skeletal muscle begins to occur very soon after changes in the level of contractile activity. Rates of protein degradation increase in slow-twitch muscles at rapidly growing rates after approximately one day of limb immobilization; however, no change in the rates of protein degradation is noted in fast-twitch muscles of young rats.

  10. Caveolae internalization repairs wounded cells and muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Corrotte, Matthias; Almeida, Patricia E; Tam, Christina; Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Millis, Bryan A; Cortez, Mauro; Miller, Heather; Song, Wenxia; Maugel, Timothy K; Andrews, Norma W

    2013-01-01

    Rapid repair of plasma membrane wounds is critical for cellular survival. Muscle fibers are particularly susceptible to injury, and defective sarcolemma resealing causes muscular dystrophy. Caveolae accumulate in dystrophic muscle fibers and caveolin and cavin mutations cause muscle pathology, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show that muscle fibers and other cell types repair membrane wounds by a mechanism involving Ca2+-triggered exocytosis of lysosomes, release of acid sphingomyelinase, and rapid lesion removal by caveolar endocytosis. Wounding or exposure to sphingomyelinase triggered endocytosis and intracellular accumulation of caveolar vesicles, which gradually merged into larger compartments. The pore-forming toxin SLO was directly visualized entering cells within caveolar vesicles, and depletion of caveolin inhibited plasma membrane resealing. Our findings directly link lesion removal by caveolar endocytosis to the maintenance of plasma membrane and muscle fiber integrity, providing a mechanistic explanation for the muscle pathology associated with mutations in caveolae proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00926.001 PMID:24052812

  11. Size and metabolic properties of fibers in rat fast-twitch muscles after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Roland R.; Bello, Maureen A.; Bouissou, Phillip; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1987-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb suspension (HS) on single fibers of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were studied in rats. Fiber area and the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) were determined in tissue sections using an image analysis system. After 28 days of HS, the MG atrophied 28 percent, whereas the TA weight was maintained. Both dark- and light-ATPase fibers in the deep region of the MG had decreased cross-sectional areas following HS, with the atrophic response being twice as great in the light-ATPase fibers than in the dark-ATPase fibers. Following HS, mean SDH activities of both fiber types were significantly lower in the MG and TA than in the CON; by contrast, mean GPD activities were either maintained at the CON level or were higher in both MG and TA muscles. The data suggest an independence of the mechanisms determining the muscle fiber size and the metabolic adaptations associated with HS.

  12. Mitochondrial specialization revealed by single muscle fiber proteomics: focus on the Krebs cycle.

    PubMed

    Schiaffino, S; Reggiani, C; Kostrominova, T Y; Mann, M; Murgia, M

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a highly sensitive mass spectrometry-based proteomic workflow to examine the proteome of single muscle fibers. This study revealed significant differences in the mitochondrial proteome of the four major fiber types present in mouse skeletal muscle. Here, we focus on Krebs cycle enzymes and in particular on the differential distribution of the two mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenases, IDH2 and IDH3. Type 1/slow fibers contain high levels of IDH2 and relatively low levels of IDH3, whereas fast 2X and 2B fibers show an opposite expression pattern. The findings suggest that in skeletal muscle, IDH2 functions in the forward direction of the Krebs cycle and that substrate flux along the cycle occurs predominantly via IDH2 in type 1 fibers and via IDH3 in 2X and 2B fibers. IDH2-mediated conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate leads to the generation of NADPH, which is critical to buffering the H2O2 produced by the respiratory chain. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT), the other major mitochondrial enzyme involved in NADPH generation, is also more abundant in type 1 fibers. We suggest that the continuously active type 1 fibers are endowed with a more efficient H2O2 scavenging capacity to cope with the higher levels of reactive oxygen species production. PMID:26589116

  13. Contraction and AICAR Stimulate IL-6 Vesicle Depletion From Skeletal Muscle Fibers In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzen, Hans P.M.M.; Brandauer, Josef; Schjerling, Peter; Koh, Ho-Jin; Treebak, Jonas T.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Galbo, Henrik; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that interleukin 6 (IL-6) is released from contracting skeletal muscles; however, the cellular origin, secretion kinetics, and signaling mechanisms regulating IL-6 secretion are unknown. To address these questions, we developed imaging methodology to study IL-6 in fixed mouse muscle fibers and in live animals in vivo. Using confocal imaging to visualize endogenous IL-6 protein in fixed muscle fibers, we found IL-6 in small vesicle structures distributed throughout the fibers under basal (resting) conditions. To determine the kinetics of IL-6 secretion, intact quadriceps muscles were transfected with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged IL-6 (IL-6-EGFP), and 5 days later anesthetized mice were imaged before and after muscle contractions in situ. Contractions decreased IL-6-EGFP–containing vesicles and protein by 62% (P < 0.05), occurring rapidly and progressively over 25 min of contraction. However, contraction-mediated IL-6-EGFP reduction was normal in muscle-specific AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2-inactive transgenic mice. In contrast, the AMPK activator AICAR decreased IL-6-EGFP vesicles, an effect that was inhibited in the transgenic mice. In conclusion, resting skeletal muscles contain IL-6–positive vesicles that are expressed throughout myofibers. Contractions stimulate the rapid reduction of IL-6 in myofibers, occurring through an AMPKα2-independent mechanism. This novel imaging methodology clearly establishes IL-6 as a contraction-stimulated myokine and can be used to characterize the secretion kinetics of other putative myokines. PMID:23761105

  14. Conduction velocity along muscle fibers in situ in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cruz Martinez, A; Lopez Terradas, J M

    1990-07-01

    The muscle fibers of the biceps brachii muscle were stimulated distally with low voltage by means of two monopolar needles in 14 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DD). The electric activity was recorded proximally by means of a SFEMG electrode. The mean conduction velocity of 508 muscle fibers in situ (MFCV) calculated with this method shows that MFCV in DD patients (2.38 +/- .94 m/sec) is significantly slower than in 20 control children of the same age (3.24 +/- .53 m/sec). The distribution frequency of MFCV in all fibers tested in healthy children shows a Gaussian distribution (mode = 3.2 m/sec). In DD patients the distribution frequency is bimodal with spikes at 1.2 and 2.4 m/sec. Significant decrease in minimum propagation velocity and increased SD values were other striking results in patients with DD. Slowing and large variation in MFCV were significantly correlated with some findings in a coaxial needle electromyogram, such as long polyphasics and motor unit potentials followed by satellites. Satellites might arise from atrophic muscle fibers with slow conduction velocity. The results of MFCV were supported by the pathologic findings in DD subjects. The reported method for MFCV in situ is reliable and easy to apply in children, has merit for testing the size and function of muscle fiber, and helps to explain some electropathologic features in DD patients. PMID:2164370

  15. Satellite cell depletion prevents fiber hypertrophy in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Egner, Ingrid M; Bruusgaard, Jo C; Gundersen, Kristian

    2016-08-15

    The largest mammalian cells are the muscle fibers, and they have multiple nuclei to support their large cytoplasmic volumes. During hypertrophic growth, new myonuclei are recruited from satellite stem cells into the fiber syncytia, but it was recently suggested that such recruitment is not obligatory: overload hypertrophy after synergist ablation of the plantaris muscle appeared normal in transgenic mice in which most of the satellite cells were abolished. When we essentially repeated these experiments analyzing the muscles by immunohistochemistry and in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we found that overload hypertrophy was prevented in the satellite cell-deficient mice, in both the plantaris and the extensor digitorum longus muscles. We attribute the previous findings to a reliance on muscle mass as a proxy for fiber hypertrophy, and to the inclusion of a significant number of regenerating fibers in the analysis. We discuss that there is currently no model in which functional, sustainable hypertrophy has been unequivocally demonstrated in the absence of satellite cells; an exception is re-growth, which can occur using previously recruited myonuclei without addition of new myonuclei. PMID:27531949

  16. Fiber-type susceptibility to eccentric contraction-induced damage of hindlimb-unloaded rat AL muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayan, K.; Thompson, J. L.; Norenberg, K. M.; Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Slow oxidative (SO) fibers of the adductor longus (AL) were predominantly damaged during voluntary reloading of hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats and appeared explainable by preferential SO fiber recruitment. The present study assessed damage after eliminating the variable of voluntary recruitment by tetanically activating all fibers in situ through the motor nerve while applying eccentric (lengthening) or isometric contractions. Muscles were aldehyde fixed and resin embedded, and semithin sections were cut. Sarcomere lesions were quantified in toluidine blue-stained sections. Fibers were typed in serial sections immunostained with antifast myosin and antitotal myosin (which highlights slow fibers). Both isometric and eccentric paradigms caused fatigue. Lesions occurred only in eccentrically contracted control and HU muscles. Fatigue did not cause lesions. HU increased damage because lesioned- fiber percentages within fiber types and lesion sizes were greater than control. Fast oxidative glycolytic (FOG) fibers were predominantly damaged. In no case did damaged SO fibers predominate. Thus, when FOG, SO, and hybrid fibers are actively lengthened in chronically unloaded muscle, FOG fibers are intrinsically more susceptible to damage than SO fibers. Damaged hybrid-fiber proportions ranged between these extremes.

  17. Niacin supplementation increases the number of oxidative type I fibers in skeletal muscle of growing pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A recent study showed that niacin supplementation counteracts the obesity-induced muscle fiber switching from oxidative type I to glycolytic type II and increases the number of type I fibers in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats. These effects were likely mediated by the induction of key regulators of fiber transition, PGC-1α and PGC-1β, leading to muscle fiber switching and up-regulation of genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid import and oxidation, citrate cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial biogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether niacin supplementation causes type II to type I muscle and changes the metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscles in growing pigs. Results 25 male, 11 wk old crossbred pigs (Danzucht x Pietrain) with an average body weight of 32.8 ± 1.3 (mean ± SD) kg were randomly allocated to two groups of 12 (control group) and 13 pigs (niacin group) which were fed either a control diet or a diet supplemented with 750 mg niacin/kg diet. After 3 wk, the percentage number of type I fibers in three different muscles (M. longissismus dorsi, M. quadriceps femoris, M. gastrocnemius) was greater in the niacin group and the percentage number of type II fibers was lower in the niacin group than in the control group (P < 0.05). The mRNA levels of PGC-1β and genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid catabolism (CACT, FATP1, OCTN2), citrate cycle (SDHA), oxidative phosphorylation (COX4/1, COX6A1), and thermogenesis (UCP3) in M. longissimus dorsi were greater in the niacin group than in the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions The study demonstrates that niacin supplementation induces type II to type I muscle fiber switching, and thereby an oxidative metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscle in pigs. Given that oxidative muscle types tend to develop dark, firm and dry pork in response to intense physical activity and/or high psychological stress levels preslaughter, a niacin

  18. Severely Atrophic Human Muscle Fibers With Nuclear Misplacement Survive Many Years of Permanent Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Likewise in rodents, after complete spinal cord injury (SCI) the lower motor neuron (LMN) denervated human muscle fibers lose completely the myofibrillar apparatus and the coil distribution of myonuclei that are relocated in groups (nuclear clumps) in the center of severely atrophic muscle fibers. Up to two years of LMN denervation the muscle fibers with nuclear clumps are very seldom, but in this cohort of patients the severely atrophic muscle fibers are frequent in muscle biopsies harvested three to six years after SCI. Indeed, the percentage increased to 27 ± 9% (p< 0.001), and then abruptly decreased from the 6th year onward, when fibrosis takes over to neurogenic muscle atrophy. Immunohistochemical analyses shown that nuclear misplacements occurred in both fast and slow muscle fibers. In conclusion, human muscle fibers survive permanent denervation much longer than generally accepted and relocation of nuclei is a general behavior in long term denervated muscle fibers. PMID:27478559

  19. Severely Atrophic Human Muscle Fibers With Nuclear Misplacement Survive Many Years of Permanent Denervation.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut

    2016-06-13

    Likewise in rodents, after complete spinal cord injury (SCI) the lower motor neuron (LMN) denervated human muscle fibers lose completely the myofibrillar apparatus and the coil distribution of myonuclei that are relocated in groups (nuclear clumps) in the center of severely atrophic muscle fibers. Up to two years of LMN denervation the muscle fibers with nuclear clumps are very seldom, but in this cohort of patients the severely atrophic muscle fibers are frequent in muscle biopsies harvested three to six years after SCI. Indeed, the percentage increased to 27 ± 9% (p< 0.001), and then abruptly decreased from the 6th year onward, when fibrosis takes over to neurogenic muscle atrophy. Immunohistochemical analyses shown that nuclear misplacements occurred in both fast and slow muscle fibers. In conclusion, human muscle fibers survive permanent denervation much longer than generally accepted and relocation of nuclei is a general behavior in long term denervated muscle fibers. PMID:27478559

  20. Prostaglandin E2/cyclooxygenase pathway in human skeletal muscle: influence of muscle fiber type and age.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sophia Z; Jemiolo, Bozena; Lavin, Kaleen M; Lester, Bridget E; Trappe, Scott W; Trappe, Todd A

    2016-03-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway regulates skeletal muscle protein turnover and exercise training adaptations. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) define the PGE2/COX pathway enzymes and receptors in human skeletal muscle, with a focus on type I and II muscle fibers; and 2) examine the influence of aging on this pathway. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the soleus (primarily type I fibers) and vastus lateralis (proportionally more type II fibers than soleus) of young men and women (n = 8; 26 ± 2 yr), and from the vastus lateralis of young (n = 8; 25 ± 1 yr) and old (n = 12; 79 ± 2 yr) men and women. PGE2/COX pathway proteins [COX enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2), PGE2 synthases (cPGES, mPGES-1, and mPGES-2), and PGE2 receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4)] were quantified via Western blot. COX-1, cPGES, mPGES-2, and all four PGE2 receptors were detected in all skeletal muscle samples examined. COX-1 (P < 0.1) and mPGES-2 were ∼20% higher, while EP3 was 99% higher and EP4 57% lower in soleus compared with vastus lateralis (P < 0.05). Aging did not change the level of skeletal muscle COX-1, while cPGES increased 45% and EP1 (P < 0.1), EP3, and EP4 decreased ∼33% (P < 0.05). In summary, PGE2 production capacity and receptor levels are different in human skeletal muscles with markedly different type I and II muscle fiber composition. In aging skeletal muscle, PGE2 production capacity is elevated and receptor levels are downregulated. These findings have implications for understanding the regulation of skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise and aging by the PGE2/COX pathway and related inhibitors. PMID:26607246

  1. Measurement of sarcomere shortening in skinned fibers from frog muscle by white light diffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Y E

    1987-01-01

    A new optical-electronic method has been developed to detect striation spacing of single muscle fibers. The technique avoids Bragg-angle and interference-fringe effects associated with laser light diffraction by using polychromatic (white) light. The light is diffracted once by an acousto-optical device and then diffracted again by the muscle fiber. The double diffraction reverses the chromatic dispersion normally obtained with polychromatic light. In frog skinned muscle fibers, active and passive sarcomere shortening were smooth when observed by white light diffraction, whereas steps and pauses occurred in the striation spacing signals obtained with laser illumination. During active contractions skinned fibers shortened at high rates (3-5 microns/s per half sarcomere, 0-5 degrees C) at loads below 5% of isometric tension. Compression of the myofibrillar lateral filament spacing using osmotic agents reduced the shortening velocity at low loads. A hypothesis is presented that high shortening velocities are observed with skinned muscle fibers because the cross-bridges cannot support compressive loads when the filament lattice is swollen. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:3496924

  2. Biochemical adaptations of antigravity muscle fibers to disuse atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Studies are presented in four parts of this report. The four parts include; (1) studies to gain information on the molecular basis of atrophy by antigravity muscle; (2) studies on the work capacity of antigravity muscles during atrophy and during recovery from atrophy; (3) studies on recovery of degenerated antigravity fibers after removal of hind-limb casts; and (4) studies on the atrophy and recovery of bone. The philosophy of these studies was to identify the time sequence of events in the soleus muscle of the rat following immobilization of the hind limbs, so that the length of the soleus muscle within the fixed limb is less than its resting length. In two separate studies, no decline in the weight of the soleus muscle could be detected during the first 72 hours of limb immobilization.

  3. Velocity, force, power, and Ca2+ sensitivity of fast and slow monkey skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Bodine, S. C.; Romatowski, J. G.; Widrick, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we determined the contractile properties of single chemically skinned fibers prepared from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (Sol) muscles of adult male rhesus monkeys and assessed the effects of the spaceflight living facility known as the experiment support primate facility (ESOP). Muscle biopsies were obtained 4 wk before and immediately after an 18-day ESOP sit, and fiber type was determined by immunohistochemical techniques. The MG slow type I fiber was significantly smaller than the MG type II, Sol type I, and Sol type II fibers. The ESOP sit caused a significant reduction in the diameter of type I and type I/II (hybrid) fibers of Sol and MG type II and hybrid fibers but no shift in fiber type distribution. Single-fiber peak force (mN and kN/m2) was similar between fiber types and was not significantly different from values previously reported for other species. The ESOP sit significantly reduced the force (mN) of Sol type I and MG type II fibers. This decline was entirely explained by the atrophy of these fiber types because the force per cross-sectional area (kN/m2) was not altered. Peak power of Sol and MG fast type II fiber was 5 and 8.5 times that of slow type I fiber, respectively. The ESOP sit reduced peak power by 25 and 18% in Sol type I and MG type II fibers, respectively, and, for the former fiber type, shifted the force-pCa relationship to the right, increasing the Ca2+ activation threshold and the free Ca2+ concentration, eliciting half-maximal activation. The ESOP sit had no effect on the maximal shortening velocity (Vo) of any fiber type. Vo of the hybrid fibers was only slightly higher than that of slow type I fibers. This result supports the hypothesis that in hybrid fibers the slow myosin heavy chain would be expected to have a disproportionately greater influence on Vo.

  4. Polarization-sensitive optical projection tomography for muscle fiber imaging.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mengjie; Dong, Di; Zeng, Chaoting; Liang, Xiao; Yang, Xin; Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge; Hui, Hui; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a tool used for three-dimensional imaging of millimeter-scale biological samples, with the advantage of exhibiting isotropic resolution typically in the micron range. OPT can be divided into two types: transmission OPT (tOPT) and emission OPT (eOPT). Compared with eOPT, tOPT discriminates different tissues based on their absorption coefficient, either intrinsic or after specific staining. However, it fails to distinguish muscle fibers whose absorption coefficients are similar to surrounding tissues. To circumvent this problem, in this article we demonstrate a polarization sensitive OPT system which improves the detection and 3D imaging of muscle fibers by using polarized light. We also developed image acquisition and processing protocols that, together with the system, enable the clear visualization of muscles. Experimental results show that the muscle fibers of diaphragm and stomach, difficult to be distinguished in regular tOPT, were clearly displayed in our system, proving its potential use. Moreover, polarization sensitive OPT was fused with tOPT to investigate the stomach tissue comprehensively. Future applications of polarization sensitive OPT could be imaging other fiber-like structures such as myocardium or other tissues presenting high optical anisotropy. PMID:26752330

  5. Polarization-sensitive optical projection tomography for muscle fiber imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mengjie; Dong, Di; Zeng, Chaoting; Liang, Xiao; Yang, Xin; Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge; Hui, Hui; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a tool used for three-dimensional imaging of millimeter-scale biological samples, with the advantage of exhibiting isotropic resolution typically in the micron range. OPT can be divided into two types: transmission OPT (tOPT) and emission OPT (eOPT). Compared with eOPT, tOPT discriminates different tissues based on their absorption coefficient, either intrinsic or after specific staining. However, it fails to distinguish muscle fibers whose absorption coefficients are similar to surrounding tissues. To circumvent this problem, in this article we demonstrate a polarization sensitive OPT system which improves the detection and 3D imaging of muscle fibers by using polarized light. We also developed image acquisition and processing protocols that, together with the system, enable the clear visualization of muscles. Experimental results show that the muscle fibers of diaphragm and stomach, difficult to be distinguished in regular tOPT, were clearly displayed in our system, proving its potential use. Moreover, polarization sensitive OPT was fused with tOPT to investigate the stomach tissue comprehensively. Future applications of polarization sensitive OPT could be imaging other fiber-like structures such as myocardium or other tissues presenting high optical anisotropy. PMID:26752330

  6. Regionalizing muscle activity causes changes to the magnitude and direction of the force from whole muscles—a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Rahemi, Hadi; Nigam, Nilima; Wakeling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can contain neuromuscular compartments that are spatially distinct regions that can receive relatively independent levels of activation. This study tested how the magnitude and direction of the force developed by a whole muscle would change when the muscle activity was regionalized within the muscle. A 3D finite element model of a muscle with its bounding aponeurosis was developed for the lateral gastrocnemius, and isometric contractions were simulated for a series of conditions with either a uniform activation pattern, or regionally distinct activation patterns: in all cases the mean activation from all fibers within the muscle reached 10%. The models showed emergent features of the fiber geometry that matched physiological characteristics: with fibers shortening, rotating to greater pennation, adopting curved trajectories in 3D and changes in the thickness and width of the muscle belly. Simulations were repeated for muscle with compliant, normal and stiff aponeurosis and the aponeurosis stiffness affected the changes to the fiber geometry and the resultant muscle force. Changing the regionalization of the activity resulted to changes in the magnitude, direction and center of the force vector from the whole muscle. Regionalizing the muscle activity resulted in greater muscle force than the simulation with uniform activity across the muscle belly. The study shows how the force from a muscle depends on the complex interactions between the muscle fibers and connective tissues and the region of muscle that is active. PMID:25232341

  7. Tmem2 regulates cell-matrix interactions that are essential for muscle fiber attachment.

    PubMed

    Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Hernandez, Lydia; Wang, Carole; Phan, Jenny; Yelon, Deborah

    2016-08-15

    Skeletal muscle morphogenesis depends upon interactions between developing muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix (ECM) that anchors fibers to the myotendinous junction (MTJ). The pathways that organize the ECM and regulate its engagement by cell-matrix adhesion complexes (CMACs) are therefore essential for muscle integrity. Here, we demonstrate the impact of transmembrane protein 2 (tmem2) on cell-matrix interactions during muscle morphogenesis in zebrafish. Maternal-zygotic tmem2 mutants (MZtmem2) exhibit muscle fiber detachment, in association with impaired laminin organization and ineffective fibronectin degradation at the MTJ. Similarly, disorganized laminin and fibronectin surround MZtmem2 cardiomyocytes, which could account for their hindered movement during cardiac morphogenesis. In addition to ECM defects, MZtmem2 mutants display hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan within the CMAC, which could contribute to the observed fiber detachment. Expression of the Tmem2 ectodomain can rescue aspects of the MZtmem2 phenotype, consistent with a possible extracellular function of Tmem2. Together, our results suggest that Tmem2 regulates cell-matrix interactions by affecting both ECM organization and CMAC activity. These findings evoke possible connections between the functions of Tmem2 and the etiologies of congenital muscular dystrophies, particularly dystroglycanopathies. PMID:27471259

  8. Fiber size, type, and myosin heavy chain content in rhesus hindlimb muscles after 2 weeks at 2 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavakol, Morteza; Roy, Roland R.; Kim, Jung A.; Zhong, Hui; Hodgson, John A.; Hoban-Higgins, Tana M.; Fuller, Charles A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fiber atrophy and an increase in the percentage of fast fibers have been observed in Rhesus leg muscles after spaceflight. Hypothesis: Hypergravity will result in muscle fiber hypertrophy and an increase in the percentage of slow fibers. METHODS: Open muscle biopsies were obtained from Rhesus soleus, medial gastrocnemius (MG), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles before and after 14 d of centrifugation (2 G) and in time-matched controls. Cage activity levels were measured by telemetry. RESULTS: Based on monoclonal antibody binding for myosin heavy chains (MHC), the fastest region of soleus contained a higher proportion of type I+II (27 vs. 13%) and had a tendency for a lower proportion of type I (38 vs. 61%, p = 0.10) fibers after than before centrifugation. There was a higher proportion of type I+II fibers in post- vs. pre-2 G (10 vs. 0.6%) MG biopsies. Fiber type distribution and MHC composition were unaffected in the TA. Overall, mean fiber sizes were unaffected by centrifugation. Average cage activity levels were 36% lower during than before 2 G. CONCLUSIONS: Our hypothesis was rejected. The changes in the proportion of fibers expressing type I MHC are the reverse of that expected with chronic loading of extensors and, paradoxically, are similar to changes observed with chronic unloading, such as occurs during spaceflight, in this primate model. The data are consistent with the observed decrease in total daily activity levels.

  9. Effect of swim exercise training on human muscle fiber function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Costill, D. L.; Gardetto, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of swim exercise training on the human muscle fiber function was investigated in swimmers trained in a typical collegiate swim-training program followed by an intensified 10-day training period. The measured parameters included the peak tension (P0), negative log molar Ca(2+) concentration (pCa)-force, and maximal shortening speed (Vmax) of the slow-twitch type I and fast-twitch type II fibers obtained by biopsy from the deltoid muscle. The P0 values were found to be not altered after either the training or the 10-day intensive program. The type I fibers from the trained swimmers showed pCa-force curves shifted to the right, such that higher free Ca(2+) levels were required to elicit a given percent of P0. The training program significantly increased the Vmax in the type I fibers and decreased that of the type II fibers, and the 10-day intensive training produced a further significant decrease of the type II fibers.

  10. Niacin supplementation induces type II to type I muscle fiber transition in skeletal muscle of sheep

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It was recently shown that niacin supplementation counteracts the obesity-induced muscle fiber transition from oxidative type I to glycolytic type II and increases the number of type I fibers in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats. These effects were likely mediated by the induction of key regulators of fiber transition, PPARδ (encoded by PPARD), PGC-1α (encoded by PPARGC1A) and PGC-1β (encoded by PPARGC1B), leading to type II to type I fiber transition and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative metabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether niacin administration also influences fiber distribution and the metabolic phenotype of different muscles [M. longissimus dorsi (LD), M. semimembranosus (SM), M. semitendinosus (ST)] in sheep as a model for ruminants. For this purpose, 16 male, 11 wk old Rhoen sheep were randomly allocated to two groups of 8 sheep each administered either no (control group) or 1 g niacin per day (niacin group) for 4 wk. Results After 4 wk, the percentage number of type I fibers in LD, SM and ST muscles was greater in the niacin group, whereas the percentage number of type II fibers was less in niacin group than in the control group (P < 0.05). The mRNA levels of PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, and PPARD and the relative mRNA levels of genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid uptake (CPT1B, SLC25A20), tricarboxylic acid cycle (SDHA), mitochondrial respiratory chain (COX5A, COX6A1), and angiogenesis (VEGFA) in LD, SM and ST muscles were greater (P < 0.05) or tended to be greater (P < 0.15) in the niacin group than in the control group. Conclusions The study shows that niacin supplementation induces muscle fiber transition from type II to type I, and thereby an oxidative metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscle in sheep as a model for ruminants. The enhanced capacity of skeletal muscle to utilize fatty acids in ruminants might be particularly useful during metabolic states in which fatty acids are

  11. Muscle fatigue, nNOS and muscle fiber atrophy in limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Corrado; Tasca, Elisabetta; Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Fanin, Marina

    2014-12-01

    Muscle fatigability and atrophy are frequent clinical signs in limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), but their pathogenetic mechanisms are still poorly understood. We review a series of different factors that may be connected in causing fatigue and atrophy, particularly considering the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and additional factors such as gender in different forms of LGMD (both recessive and dominant) underlying different pathogenetic mechanisms. In sarcoglycanopathies, the sarcolemmal nNOS reactivity varied from absent to reduced, depending on the residual level of sarcoglycan complex: in cases with complete sarcoglycan complex deficiency (mostly in beta-sarcoglycanopathy), the sarcolemmal nNOS reaction was absent and it was always associated with early severe clinical phenotype and cardiomyopathy. Calpainopathy, dysferlinopathy, and caveolinopathy present gradual onset of fatigability and had normal sarcolemmal nNOS reactivity. Notably, as compared with caveolinopathy and sarcoglycanopathies, calpainopathy and dysferlinopathy showed a higher degree of muscle fiber atrophy. Males with calpainopathy and dysferlinopathy showed significantly higher fiber atrophy than control males, whereas female patients have similar values than female controls, suggesting a gender difference in muscle fiber atrophy with a relative protection in females. In female patients, the smaller initial muscle fiber size associated to endocrine factors and less physical effort might attenuate gender-specific muscle loss and atrophy. PMID:25873780

  12. Experiment K-6-07. Metabolic and morphologic properties of muscle fibers after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, R.; Miu, B.; Martin, Thomas P.; Roy, R.; Marini, J.; Leger, J. J.; Oganov, V.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E.

    1990-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that the general capability of skeletal muscle to maintain its proteins decreases rapidly in response to space flight. The present findings suggest further that the magnitude of enzymatic and cell volumes changes in response to space flight depend on several factors including the muscle and its fiber type composition. It appears that in order to associate physiological relevance to the observed enzymatic changes, cell volume should be considered also. Although it remains unclear as to the stimulus, or lack of stimulus, that triggers the rapid changes in muscle proteins in response to space flight, ground-based models of muscle atrophy suggest that the reduction in mechanical loading of muscle may be more important than the total amount of activation over a 24-hr period.

  13. Approximating the isometric force-calcium relation of intact frog muscle using skinned fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, D W; Molloy, J E; Brotto, M A; Godt, R E

    1995-01-01

    In previous papers we used estimates of the composition of frog muscle and calculations involving the likely fixed charge density in myofibrils to propose bathing solutions for skinned fibers, which best mimic the normal intracellular milieu of intact muscle fibers. We tested predictions of this calculation using measurements of the potential across the boundary of skinned frog muscle fibers bathed in this solution. The average potential was -3.1 mV, close to that predicted from a simple Donnan equilibrium. The contribution of ATP hydrolysis to a diffusion potential was probably small because addition of 1 mM vanadate to the solution decreased the fiber actomyosin ATPase rate (measured by high-performance liquid chromatography) by at least 73% but had little effect on the measured potential. Using these solutions, we obtained force-pCa curves from mechanically skinned fibers at three different temperatures, allowing the solution pH to change with temperature in the same fashion as the intracellular pH of intact fibers varies with temperature. The bath concentration of Ca2+ required for half-maximal activation of isometric force was 1.45 microM (22 degrees C, pH 7.18), 2.58 microM (16 degrees C, pH 7.25), and 3.36 microM (5 degrees C, pH 7.59). The [Ca2+] at the threshold of activation at 16 degrees C was approximately 1 microM, in good agreement with estimates of threshold [Ca2+] in intact frog muscle fibers. PMID:8534819

  14. Abnormal Skeletal Muscle Regeneration plus Mild Alterations in Mature Fiber Type Specification in Fktn-Deficient Dystroglycanopathy Muscular Dystrophy Mice.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Steven J; Modi, Jill N; Melick, Garrett A; Abousaud, Marin I; Luan, Junna; Fortunato, Marisa J; Beedle, Aaron M

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylated α-dystroglycan provides an essential link between extracellular matrix proteins, like laminin, and the cellular cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. In secondary dystroglycanopathy muscular dystrophy, glycosylation abnormalities disrupt a complex O-mannose glycan necessary for muscle structural integrity and signaling. Fktn-deficient dystroglycanopathy mice develop moderate to severe muscular dystrophy with skeletal muscle developmental and/or regeneration defects. To gain insight into the role of glycosylated α-dystroglycan in these processes, we performed muscle fiber typing in young (2, 4 and 8 week old) and regenerated muscle. In mice with Fktn disruption during skeletal muscle specification (Myf5/Fktn KO), newly regenerated fibers (embryonic myosin heavy chain positive) peaked at 4 weeks old, while total regenerated fibers (centrally nucleated) were highest at 8 weeks old in tibialis anterior (TA) and iliopsoas, indicating peak degeneration/regeneration activity around 4 weeks of age. In contrast, mature fiber type specification at 2, 4 and 8 weeks old was relatively unchanged. Fourteen days after necrotic toxin-induced injury, there was a divergence in muscle fiber types between Myf5/Fktn KO (skeletal-muscle specific) and whole animal knockout induced with tamoxifen post-development (Tam/Fktn KO) despite equivalent time after gene deletion. Notably, Tam/Fktn KO retained higher levels of embryonic myosin heavy chain expression after injury, suggesting a delay or abnormality in differentiation programs. In mature fiber type specification post-injury, there were significant interactions between genotype and toxin parameters for type 1, 2a, and 2x fibers, and a difference between Myf5/Fktn and Tam/Fktn study groups in type 2b fibers. These data suggest that functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan has a unique role in muscle regeneration and may influence fiber type specification post-injury. PMID:26751696

  15. Abnormal Skeletal Muscle Regeneration plus Mild Alterations in Mature Fiber Type Specification in Fktn-Deficient Dystroglycanopathy Muscular Dystrophy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Steven J.; Modi, Jill N.; Melick, Garrett A.; Abousaud, Marin I.; Luan, Junna; Fortunato, Marisa J.; Beedle, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylated α-dystroglycan provides an essential link between extracellular matrix proteins, like laminin, and the cellular cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. In secondary dystroglycanopathy muscular dystrophy, glycosylation abnormalities disrupt a complex O-mannose glycan necessary for muscle structural integrity and signaling. Fktn-deficient dystroglycanopathy mice develop moderate to severe muscular dystrophy with skeletal muscle developmental and/or regeneration defects. To gain insight into the role of glycosylated α-dystroglycan in these processes, we performed muscle fiber typing in young (2, 4 and 8 week old) and regenerated muscle. In mice with Fktn disruption during skeletal muscle specification (Myf5/Fktn KO), newly regenerated fibers (embryonic myosin heavy chain positive) peaked at 4 weeks old, while total regenerated fibers (centrally nucleated) were highest at 8 weeks old in tibialis anterior (TA) and iliopsoas, indicating peak degeneration/regeneration activity around 4 weeks of age. In contrast, mature fiber type specification at 2, 4 and 8 weeks old was relatively unchanged. Fourteen days after necrotic toxin-induced injury, there was a divergence in muscle fiber types between Myf5/Fktn KO (skeletal-muscle specific) and whole animal knockout induced with tamoxifen post-development (Tam/Fktn KO) despite equivalent time after gene deletion. Notably, Tam/Fktn KO retained higher levels of embryonic myosin heavy chain expression after injury, suggesting a delay or abnormality in differentiation programs. In mature fiber type specification post-injury, there were significant interactions between genotype and toxin parameters for type 1, 2a, and 2x fibers, and a difference between Myf5/Fktn and Tam/Fktn study groups in type 2b fibers. These data suggest that functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan has a unique role in muscle regeneration and may influence fiber type specification post-injury. PMID:26751696

  16. Sarcomere length dispersion in single skeletal muscle fibers and fiber bundles.

    PubMed

    Paolini, P J; Sabbadini, R; Roos, K P; Baskin, R J

    1976-08-01

    Light diffraction patterns produced by single skeletal muscle fibers and small fiber bundles of Rana pipiens semitendinosus have been examined at rest and during tetanic contraction. The muscle diffraction patterns were recorded with a vidicon camera interfaced to a minicomputer. Digitized video output was analyzed on-line to determine mean sarcomere length, line intensity, and the distribution of sarcomere lengths. The occurrence of first-order line intensity and peak amplitude maxima at approximately 3.0 mum is interpreted in terms of simple scattering theory. Measurements made along the length of a singel fiber reveal small variations in calculated mean sarcomere length (SD about 1.2%) and its percent dispersion (2.1% +/- 0.8%). Dispersion in small multifiber preparations increases approximately linearly with fiber number (about 0.2% per fiber) to a maximum of 8-10% in large bundles. Dispersion measurements based upon diffraction line analysis are comparable to SDs calculated from length distribution histograms obtained by light micrography of the fiber. First-order line intensity decreases by about 40% during tetanus; larger multifibered bundles exhibit substantial increases in sarcomere dispersion during contraction, but single fibers show no appreciable dispersion change. These results suggest the occurrence of asynchronous static or dynamic axial disordering of thick filaments, with a persistence in long range order of sarcomere spacing during contraction in single fibers. PMID:1084766

  17. Functional properties of slow and fast gastrocnemius muscle fibers after a 17-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Romatowski, J. G.; Norenberg, K. M.; Knuth, S. T.; Bain, J. L.; Riley, D. A.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the effects of a 17-day spaceflight on the contractile properties of individual fast- and slow-twitch fibers isolated from biopsies of the fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle of four male astronauts. Single chemically skinned fibers were studied during maximal Ca2+-activated contractions with fiber myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression subsequently determined by SDS gel electrophoresis. Spaceflight had no significant effect on the mean diameter or specific force of single fibers expressing type I, IIa, or IIa/IIx MHC, although a small reduction in average absolute force (P(o)) was observed for the type I fibers (0.68 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.02 mN, P < 0.05). Subject-by-flight interactions indicated significant intersubject variation in response to the flight, as postflight fiber diameter and P(o) where significantly reduced for the type I and IIa fibers obtained from one astronaut and for the type IIa fibers from another astronaut. Average unloaded shortening velocity [V(o), in fiber lengths (FL)/s] was greater after the flight for both type I (0.60 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.76 +/- 0.02 FL/s) and IIa fibers (2.33 +/- 0.25 vs. 3.10 +/- 0.16 FL/s). Postflight peak power of the type I and IIa fibers was significantly reduced only for the astronaut experiencing the greatest fiber atrophy and loss of P(o). These results demonstrate that 1) slow and fast gastrocnemius fibers show little atrophy and loss of P(o) but increased V(o) after a typical 17-day spaceflight, 2) there is, however, considerable intersubject variation in these responses, possibly due to intersubject differences in in-flight physical activity, and 3) in these four astronauts, fiber atrophy and reductions in P(o) were less for slow and fast fibers obtained from the phasic fast-twitch gastrocnemius muscle compared with slow and fast fibers obtained from the slow antigravity soleus [J. J. Widrick, S. K. Knuth, K. M. Norenberg, J. G. Romatowski, J. L. W. Bain, D. A

  18. Strain-dependent modulation of phosphate transients in rabbit skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Homsher, E; Lacktis, J; Regnier, M

    1997-01-01

    When inorganic phosphate (Pi) is photogenerated from caged Pi during isometric contractions of glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers, the released Pi binds to cross-bridges and reverses the working stroke of cross-bridges. The consequent force decline, the Pi-transient, is exponential and probes the kinetics of the power-stroke and Pi release. During muscle shortening, the fraction of attached cross-bridges and the average strain on them decreases (Ford, L. E., A.F. Huxley, and R.M. Simmons, 1977. Tension responses to sudden length change in stimulated frog muscle fibers near slack length. J. Physiol. (Lond.). 269:441-515; Ford, L. E., A. F. Huxley, and R.M. Simmons, 1985. Tension transients during steady state shortening of frog muscle fibers. J. Physiol. (Lond.). 361:131-150. To learn to what extent the Pi transient is strain dependent, muscle fibers were activated and shortened or lengthened at a fixed velocity during the photogeneration of Pi. The Pi transients observed during changes in muscle length showed three primary characteristics: 1) during shortening the Pi transient rate, Kpi, increased and its amplitude decreased with shortening velocity; Kpi increased linearly with velocity to > 110 s-1 at 0.3 muscle lengths per second (ML/s). 2) At a specific shortening velocity, increases in [Pi] produce increases in Kpi that are nonlinear with [Pi] and approach an asymptote. 3) During forced lengthening Kpi and the amplitude of the Pi transient are little different from the isometric contractions. These data can be approximated by a strain-dependent three-state cross-bridge model. The results show that the power stroke's rate is strain-dependent, and are consistent with biochemical studies indicating that the rate-limiting step at low strains is a transition from a weakly to a strongly bound cross-bridge state. PMID:9083682

  19. Redox regulation of muscle adaptations to contractile activity and aging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide and nitric oxide are generated by skeletal muscle, and these species are increased by contractile activity. Mitochondria have long been assumed to play the primary role in generation of superoxide in muscle, but recent studies indicate that, during contractile activity, membrane-localized NADPH oxidase(s) rapidly generate(s) superoxide that plays a role in redox signaling. This process is important in upregulation of rapid and specific cytoprotective responses that aid maintenance of cell viability following contractile activity, but the overall extent to which redox signaling contributes to regulation of muscle metabolism and homeostasis following contractile activity is currently unclear, as is identification of key redox-sensitive protein targets involved in these processes. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species have also been implicated in the loss of muscle mass and function that occurs with aging, although recent work has questioned whether oxidative damage plays a key role in these processes. A failure of redox signaling occurs in muscle during aging and may contribute to the age-related loss of muscle fibers. Whether such changes in redox signaling reflect primary age-related changes or are secondary to the fundamental mechanisms is unclear. For instance, denervated muscle fibers within muscles from aged rodents or humans appear to generate large amounts of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide that could influence adjacent innervated fibers. Thus, in this instance, a “secondary” source of reactive oxygen species may be potentially generated as a result of a primary age-related pathology (loss of neurons), but, nevertheless, may contribute to loss of muscle mass and function during aging. PMID:25792715

  20. Memristive Model of the Barnacle Giant Muscle Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sah, Maheshwar Pd.; Kim, Hyongsuk; Eroglu, Abdullah; Chua, Leon

    The generation of action potentials (oscillations) in biological systems is a complex, yet poorly understood nonlinear dynamical phenomenon involving ions. This paper reveals that the time-varying calcium ion and the time-varying potassium ion, which are essential for generating action potentials in Barnacle giant muscle fibers are in fact generic memristors in the perspective of electrical circuit theory. We will show that these two ions exhibit all the fingerprints of memristors from the equations of the Morris-Lecar model of the Barnacle giant muscle fibers. This paper also gives a textbook reference to understand the difference between memristor and nonlinear resistor via analysis of the potassium ion-channel memristor and calcium ion-channel nonlinear resistor. We will also present a comprehensive in-depth analysis of the generation of action potentials (oscillations) in memristive Morris-Lecar model using small-signal circuit model and the Hopf bifurcation theorem.

  1. Freezing point and melting point of barnacle muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Caillé, J P

    1983-10-01

    The freezing point and the melting point of myoplasm were measured with two experimental models. In all samples, a supercooled stage was reached by lowering the temperature of the sample to approximately - 7 degrees C, and the freezing of the sample was mechanically induced. The freezing process was associated with a phase transition in the interstices between the contractile filaments. In intact muscle fibers, the freezing point showed a structural component (0.43 degrees C), and the melting point indicated that the intracellular and the extracellular compartments are isotonic. When the sample of myoplasm, previously inserted in a cylindrical cavity was incubated in an electrolyte solution, the freezing point showed a structural component similar to that of the intact muscle fiber, but the melting point was lower than the freezing and the melting points of the embedding solution. This was interpreted as evidence that the counterions around the contractile filaments occupied a nonnegligible fraction of the intracellular compartment. PMID:6640420

  2. Effects of Active Individual Muscle Stretching on Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kouichi; Kodama, Takayuki; Mukaino, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect of active individual muscle stretching (AID) on muscle function. [Subjects] We used the right legs of 40 healthy male students. [Methods] Subjects were divided into an AID group, which performed stretching, and a control group, which did not. We examined and compared muscle function before and after stretching in the AID and control groups using a goniometer and Cybex equipment. [Results] A significant increase in flexibility and a significant decrease in muscle strength output were observed in the AID group after the intervention. [Conclusion] These results suggest that AID induces an increase in flexibility and a temporary decrease in muscle output strength. PMID:24707080

  3. Repeated high-intensity exercise modulates Ca(2+) sensitivity of human skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Gejl, K D; Hvid, L G; Willis, S J; Andersson, E; Holmberg, H-C; Jensen, R; Frandsen, U; Hansen, J; Plomgaard, P; Ørtenblad, N

    2016-05-01

    The effects of short-term high-intensity exercise on single fiber contractile function in humans are unknown. Therefore, the purposes of this study were: (a) to access the acute effects of repeated high-intensity exercise on human single muscle fiber contractile function; and (b) to examine whether contractile function was affected by alterations in the redox balance. Eleven elite cross-country skiers performed four maximal bouts of 1300 m treadmill skiing with 45 min recovery. Contractile function of chemically skinned single fibers from triceps brachii was examined before the first and following the fourth sprint with respect to Ca(2+) sensitivity and maximal Ca(2+) -activated force. To investigate the oxidative effects of exercise on single fiber contractile function, a subset of fibers was incubated with dithiothreitol (DTT) before analysis. Ca(2+) sensitivity was enhanced by exercise in both MHC I (17%, P < 0.05) and MHC II (15%, P < 0.05) fibers. This potentiation was not present after incubation of fibers with DTT. Specific force of both MHC I and MHC II fibers was unaffected by exercise. In conclusion, repeated high-intensity exercise increased Ca(2+) sensitivity in both MHC I and MHC II fibers. This effect was not observed in a reducing environment indicative of an exercise-induced oxidation of the human contractile apparatus. PMID:25944268

  4. Quantitative PCR analysis of laryngeal muscle fiber types

    PubMed Central

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses have shown changes in laryngeal muscle fiber MyHC isoform with denervation. RNA analyses in this setting have not been performed, and understanding RNA levels will allow interventions better designed to reverse processes such as denervation in the future. Total RNA was extracted from bilateral rat thyroarytenoid (TA), posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA), and cricothyroid (CT) muscles in rats. Primers were designed using published MyHC isoform sequences. SYBR Green real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (SYBR-RT-PCR) was used for quantification. The electropherogram showed a clear separation of total RNA to 28S and 18S subunits. Melting curves illustrated single peaks for all type MyHC primers. All MyHC isoforms were identified in all muscles with various degrees of expression. Quantitative PCR is a sensitive method to detect MyHC isoforms in laryngeal muscle. Isoform expression using mRNA analysis was similar to previous analyses but showed some important differences. This technique can be used to quantitatively assess response to interventions targeted to maintain muscle bulk after denervation. PMID:20430402

  5. Fluctuations in tension during contraction of single muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Borejdo, J; Morales, M F

    1977-01-01

    We have searched for fluctuations in the steady-state tension developed by stimulated single muscle fibers. Such tension "noise" is expected to be present as a result of the statistical fluctuations in the number and/or state of myosin cross-bridges interacting with thin filament sites at any time. A sensitive electro-optical tension transducer capable of resolving the expected fluctuations in magnitude and frequency was constructed to search for the fluctuations. The noise was analyzed by computing the power spectra and amplitude of stochastic fluctuations in the photomultiplier counting rate, which was made proportional to muscle force. The optical system and electronic instrumentation together with the minicomputer software are described. Tensions were measured in single skinned glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers in rigor and during contraction and relaxation. The results indicate the presence of fluctuations in contracting muscles and a complete absence of tension noise in eith rigor or relaxation. Also, a numerical method was developed to simulate the power spectra and amplitude of fluctuations, given the rate constants for association and dissociation of the cross-bridges and actin. The simulated power spectra and the frequency distributions observed experimentally are similar. PMID:922123

  6. Effects of Physical Activity and Inactivity on Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanis, Gregory C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the mechanisms by which physical activity and inactivity modify muscle fatigue. It is well known that acute or chronic increases in physical activity result in structural, metabolic, hormonal, neural, and molecular adaptations that increase the level of force or power that can be sustained by a muscle. These adaptations depend on the type, intensity, and volume of the exercise stimulus, but recent studies have highlighted the role of high intensity, short-duration exercise as a time-efficient method to achieve both anaerobic and aerobic/endurance type adaptations. The factors that determine the fatigue profile of a muscle during intense exercise include muscle fiber composition, neuromuscular characteristics, high energy metabolite stores, buffering capacity, ionic regulation, capillarization, and mitochondrial density. Muscle fiber-type transformation during exercise training is usually toward the intermediate type IIA at the expense of both type I and IIx myosin heavy-chain isoforms. High-intensity training results in increases of both glycolytic and oxidative enzymes, muscle capillarization, improved phosphocreatine resynthesis and regulation of K+, H+, and lactate ions. Decreases of the habitual activity level due to injury or sedentary lifestyle result in partial or even compete reversal of the adaptations due to previous training, manifested by reductions in fiber cross-sectional area, decreased oxidative capacity, and capillarization. Complete immobilization due to injury results in markedly decreased force output and fatigue resistance. Muscle unloading reduces electromyographic activity and causes muscle atrophy and significant decreases in capillarization and oxidative enzymes activity. The last part of the review discusses the beneficial effects of intermittent high-intensity exercise training in patients with different health conditions to demonstrate the powerful effect of exercise on health and well being. PMID

  7. Very low force-generating ability and unusually high temperature dependency in hummingbird flight muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Peter J; Welch, Kenneth C; Suarez, Raul K; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2013-06-15

    Hummingbird flight muscle is estimated to have among the highest mass-specific power output among vertebrates, based on aerodynamic models. However, little is known about the fundamental contractile properties of their remarkable flight muscles. We hypothesized that hummingbird pectoralis fibers generate relatively low force when activated in a tradeoff for high shortening speeds associated with the characteristic high wingbeat frequencies that are required for sustained hovering. Our objective was to measure maximal force-generating ability (maximal force/cross-sectional area, Po/CSA) in single, skinned fibers from the pectoralis and supracoracoideus muscles, which power the wing downstroke and upstroke, respectively, in hummingbirds (Calypte anna) and in another similarly sized species, zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), which also has a very high wingbeat frequency during flight but does not perform a sustained hover. Mean Po/CSA in hummingbird pectoralis fibers was very low - 1.6, 6.1 and 12.2 kN m(-2), at 10, 15 and 20°C, respectively. Po/CSA in finch pectoralis fibers was also very low (for both species, ~5% of the reported Po/CSA of chicken pectoralis fast fibers at 15°C). Q10-force (force generated at 20°C/force generated at 10°C) was very high for hummingbird and finch pectoralis fibers (mean=15.3 and 11.5, respectively) compared with rat slow and fast fibers (1.8 and 1.9, respectively). Po/CSA in hummingbird leg fibers was much higher than in pectoralis fibers at each temperature, and the mean Q10-force was much lower. Thus, hummingbird and finch pectoralis fibers have an extremely low force-generating ability compared with other bird and mammalian limb fibers, and an extremely high temperature dependence of force generation. However, the extrapolated maximum force-generating ability of hummingbird pectoralis fibers in vivo (~48 kN m(-2)) is substantially higher than the estimated requirements for hovering flight of C. anna. The unusually low Po

  8. Changes in Quadriceps Muscle Activity During Sustained Recreational Alpine Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich; Seifert, John G.; Wakeling, James M.

    2011-01-01

    During a day of skiing thousands of repeated contractions take place. Previous research on prolonged recreational alpine skiing show that physiological changes occur and hence some level of fatigue is inevitable. In the present paper the effect of prolonged skiing on the recruitment and coordination of the muscle activity was investigated. Six subjects performed 24 standardized runs. Muscle activity during the first two (PREskiing) and the last two (POSTskiing) runs was measured from the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) using EMG and quantified using wavelet and principal component analysis. The frequency content of the EMG signal shifted in seven out of eight cases significantly towards lower frequencies with highest effects observed for RF on outside leg. A significant pronounced outside leg loading occurred during POSTskiing and the timing of muscle activity peaks occurred more towards turn completion. Specific EMG frequency changes were observed at certain time points throughout the time windows and not over the whole double turn. It is suggested that general muscular fatigue, where additional specific muscle fibers have to be recruited due to the reduced power output of other fibers did not occur. The EMG frequency decrease and intensity changes for RF and VL are caused by altered timing (coordination) within the turn towards a most likely more uncontrolled skiing technique. Hence, these data provide evidence to suggest recreational skiers alter their skiing technique before a potential change in muscle fiber recruitment occurs. Key points The frequency content of the EMG signal shifted in seven out of eight cases significantly towards lower frequencies with highest effects observed for RF. General muscular fatigue, where additional specific fibers have to be recruited due to the reduced power output of other fibers, did not occur. A modified skiing style towards a less functional and hence more uncontrolled skiing technique seems to be a key

  9. Endothermic force generation in fast and slow mammalian (rabbit) muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W

    1996-10-01

    Isometric tension responses to rapid temperature jumps (T-jumps) of 3-7 degrees C were examined in single skinned fibers isolated from rabbit psoas (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles. T-jumps were induced by an infrared laser pulse (wavelength 1.32 microns, pulse duration 0.2 ms) obtained from a Nd-YAG laser, which heated the fiber and bathing buffer solution in a 50-microliter trough. After a T-jump, the temperature near the fiber remained constant for approximately 0.5 s, and the temperature could be clamped for longer periods by means of Peltier units assembled on the back trough wall. A T-jump produced a step decrease in tension in both fast and slow muscle fibers in rigor, indicating thermal expansion. In maximally Ca-activated (pCa approximately 4) fibers, the increase of steady tension with heating (3-35 degrees C) was approximately sigmoidal, and a T-jump at any temperature induced a more complex tension transient than in rigor fibers. An initial (small amplitude) step decrease in tension followed by a rapid recovery (tau(1); see Davis and Harrington, 1993) was seen in some records from both fiber types, which presumably was an indirect consequence of thermal expansion. The net rise in tension after a T-jump was biexponential, and its time course was characteristically different in the two fibers. At approximately 12 degrees C the reciprocal time constants for the two exponential components (tau(2) and tau(3), respectively, were approximately 70.s(-1) and approximately 15.s(-1) in fast fibers and approximately 20.s(-1) and approximately 3.s(-1) in slow fibers. In both fibers, tau(2) ("endothermic force regeneration") became faster with an increase in temperature. Furthermore, tau(3) was temperature sensitive in slow fibers but not in fast fibers. The results are compared and contrasted with previous findings from T-jump experiments on fast fibers. It is observed that the fast/slow fiber difference in the rate of endothermic force generation (three- to

  10. Aging Enhances Indirect Flight Muscle Fiber Performance yet Decreases Flight Ability in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark S.; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of aging on Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle from the whole organism to the actomyosin cross-bridge. Median-aged (49-day-old) flies were flight impaired, had normal myofilament number and packing, barely longer sarcomeres, and slight mitochondrial deterioration compared with young (3-day-old) flies. Old (56-day-old) flies were unable to beat their wings, had deteriorated ultrastructure with severe mitochondrial damage, and their skinned fibers failed to activate with calcium. Small-amplitude sinusoidal length perturbation analysis showed median-aged indirect flight muscle fibers developed greater than twice the isometric force and power output of young fibers, yet cross-bridge kinetics were similar. Large increases in elastic and viscous moduli amplitude under active, passive, and rigor conditions suggest that median-aged fibers become stiffer longitudinally. Small-angle x-ray diffraction indicates that myosin heads move increasingly toward the thin filament with age, accounting for the increased transverse stiffness via cross-bridge formation. We propose that the observed protein composition changes in the connecting filaments, which anchor the thick filaments to the Z-disk, produce compensatory increases in longitudinal stiffness, isometric tension, power and actomyosin interaction in aging indirect flight muscle. We also speculate that a lack of MgATP due to damaged mitochondria accounts for the decreased flight performance. PMID:18515368

  11. Aging Enhances Indirect Flight Muscle Fiber Performance yet Decreases Flight Ability in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mark S.; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2008-10-02

    We investigated the effects of aging on Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle from the whole organism to the actomyosin cross-bridge. Median-aged (49-day-old) flies were flight impaired, had normal myofilament number and packing, barely longer sarcomeres, and slight mitochondrial deterioration compared with young (3-day-old) flies. Old (56-day-old) flies were unable to beat their wings, had deteriorated ultrastructure with severe mitochondrial damage, and their skinned fibers failed to activate with calcium. Small-amplitude sinusoidal length perturbation analysis showed median-aged indirect flight muscle fibers developed greater than twice the isometric force and power output of young fibers, yet cross-bridge kinetics were similar. Large increases in elastic and viscous moduli amplitude under active, passive, and rigor conditions suggest that median-aged fibers become stiffer longitudinally. Small-angle x-ray diffraction indicates that myosin heads move increasingly toward the thin filament with age, accounting for the increased transverse stiffness via cross-bridge formation. We propose that the observed protein composition changes in the connecting filaments, which anchor the thick filaments to the Z-disk, produce compensatory increases in longitudinal stiffness, isometric tension, power and actomyosin interaction in aging indirect flight muscle. We also speculate that a lack of MgATP due to damaged mitochondria accounts for the decreased flight performance.

  12. Ultrastructure of skeletal muscle fibers studied by a plunge quick freezing method: myofilament lengths.

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, H; Popp, D; Ouyang, G; Huxley, H E

    1994-01-01

    We have set up a system to rapidly freeze muscle fibers during contraction to investigate by electron microscopy the ultrastructure of active muscles. Glycerinated fiber bundles of rabbit psoas muscles were frozen in conditions of rigor, relaxation, isometric contraction, and active shortening. Freezing was carried out by plunging the bundles into liquid ethane. The frozen bundles were then freeze-substituted, plastic-embedded, and sectioned for electron microscopic observation. X-ray diffraction patterns of the embedded bundles and optical diffraction patterns of the micrographs resemble the x-ray diffraction patterns of unfixed muscles, showing the ability of the method to preserve the muscle ultrastructure. In the optical diffraction patterns layer lines up to 1/5.9 nm-1 were observed. Using this method we have investigated the myofilament lengths and concluded that there are no major changes in length in either the actin or the myosin filaments under any of the conditions explored. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:7918996

  13. Gas7-Deficient Mouse Reveals Roles in Motor Function and Muscle Fiber Composition during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo-Tsang; Chang, Pu-Yuan; Su, Ching-Hua; Chao, Chuck C.-K.; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Background Growth arrest-specific gene 7 (Gas7) has previously been shown to be involved in neurite outgrowth in vitro; however, its actual role has yet to be determined. To investigate the physiological function of Gas7 in vivo, here we generated a Gas7-deficient mouse strain with a labile Gas7 mutant protein whose functions are similar to wild-type Gas7. Methodology/Principal Findings Our data show that aged Gas7-deficient mice have motor activity defects due to decreases in the number of spinal motor neurons and in muscle strength, of which the latter may be caused by changes in muscle fiber composition as shown in the soleus. In cross sections of the soleus of Gas7-deficient mice, gross morphological features and levels of myosin heavy chain I (MHC I) and MHC II markers revealed significantly fewer fast fibers. In addition, we found that nerve terminal sprouting, which may be associated with slow and fast muscle fiber composition, was considerably reduced at neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) during aging. Conclusions/Significance These findings indicate that Gas7 is involved in motor neuron function associated with muscle strength maintenance. PMID:22662195

  14. Fiber type effects on contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 abundance in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Castorena, Carlos M.; Arias, Edward B.; Sharma, Naveen; Bogan, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    To fully understand skeletal muscle at the cellular level, it is essential to evaluate single muscle fibers. Accordingly, the major goals of this study were to determine if there are fiber type-related differences in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle for: 1) contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and/or 2) the abundance of GLUT4 and other metabolically relevant proteins. Paired epitrochlearis muscles isolated from Wistar rats were either electrically stimulated to contract (E-Stim) or remained resting (No E-Stim). Single fibers isolated from muscles incubated with 2-deoxy-d-[3H]glucose (2-DG) were used to determine fiber type [myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform protein expression], 2-DG uptake, and abundance of metabolically relevant proteins, including the GLUT4 glucose transporter. E-Stim, relative to No E-Stim, fibers had greater (P < 0.05) 2-DG uptake for each of the isolated fiber types (MHC-IIa, MHC-IIax, MHC-IIx, MHC-IIxb, and MHC-IIb). However, 2-DG uptake for E-Stim fibers was not significantly different among these five fiber types. GLUT4, tethering protein containing a UBX domain for GLUT4 (TUG), cytochrome c oxidase IV (COX IV), and filamin C protein levels were significantly greater (P < 0.05) in MHC-IIa vs. MHC-IIx, MHC-IIxb, or MHC-IIb fibers. TUG and COX IV in either MHC-IIax or MHC-IIx fibers exceeded values for MHC-IIxb or MHC-IIb fibers. GLUT4 levels for MHC-IIax fibers exceeded MHC-IIxb fibers. GLUT4, COX IV, filamin C, and TUG abundance in single fibers was significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with each other. Differences in GLUT4 abundance among the fiber types were not accompanied by significant differences in contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:25491725

  15. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  16. Titin-based stiffening of muscle fibers in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.; Voermans, Nicol C.; Hudson, Bryan D.; Irving, Thomas; Stienen, Ger J.M.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Granzier, Henk

    2012-05-09

    Tenascin-X (TNX) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein whose absence leads to Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS). TNX-deficient EDS patients present with joint hypermobility and muscle weakness attributable to increased compliance of the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that in response to the increased compliance of the extracellular matrix in TNX-deficient EDS patients, intracellular adaptations take place in the elastic properties of the giant muscle protein titin. We performed extensive single muscle fiber mechanical studies to determine active and passive properties in TNX-deficient EDS patients. Gel-electrophoresis, Western blotting, and microarray studies were used to evaluate titin expression and phosphorylation. X-ray diffraction was used to measure myofilament lattice spacing. Passive tension of muscle fibers from TNX-deficient EDS patients was markedly increased. Myofilament extraction experiments indicated that the increased passive tension is attributable to changes in the properties of the sarcomeric protein titin. Transcript and protein data indicated no changes in titin isoform expression. Instead, differences in posttranslational modifications within titin's elastic region were found. In patients, active tension was not different at maximal activation level, but at submaximal activation level it was augmented attributable to increased calcium sensitivity. This increased calcium sensitivity might be attributable to stiffer titin molecules. In response to the increased compliance of the extracellular matrix in muscle of TNX-deficient EDS patients, a marked intracellular stiffening occurs of the giant protein titin. The stiffening of titin partly compensates for the muscle weakness in these patients by augmenting submaximal active tension generation.

  17. Properties of sodium pumps in internally perfused barnacle muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M T; Blaustein, M P

    1980-02-01

    To study the properties of the Na extrusion mechanism, giant muscle fibers from barnacle (Balanus nubilus) were internally perfused with solutions containing tracer 22Na. In fibers perfused with solutions containing adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and 30 mM Na, the Na efflux into 10 mM K seawater was approximately 25-30 pmol/cm2.s; 70% of this efflux was blocked by 50-100 microM ouabain, and approximately 30% was blocked by removal of external K. The ouabain-sensitive and K-dependent Na effluxes were abolished by depletion of internal ATP and were sigmoid-shaped functions of the internal Na concentration ([Na]i), with half-maxima at [Na]i approximately or equal to 20 mM. These sigmoid functions fit the Hill equation with Hill coefficients of approximately 3.5. Ouabain depolarized ATP-fueled fibers by 1.5-2 mV ([Na]i greater than or equal to 30 mM) but had very little effect on the membrane potential of ATP-depleted fibers; ATP depletion itself caused a 2-2.5-mV depolarization. When fueled fibers were treated with 3,4-diaminopyridine or Ba2+ (to reduce the K conductance and increase membrane resistance), application of ouabain produced a 4-5 mV depolarization. These results indicate that an electrogenic, ATP-dependent Na-K exchange pump is functional in internally perfused fibers; the internal perfusion technique provides a convenient method for performing transport studies that require good intracellular solute control. PMID:7373278

  18. Therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic muscles after local injection of fragmented fibers with loaded traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyan; Wan, Huiying; Xia, Tian; Chen, Maohua; Zhang, Yun; Luo, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-08-14

    Therapeutic angiogenesis remains the most effective method to re-establish a proper blood flow in ischemic tissues. There is a great clinical need to identify an injectable format to achieve a well accumulation following local administration and a sustained delivery of biological factors at the ischemic sites. In the current study, fragmented nanofibers with loaded traditional Chinese medicines, astragaloside IV (AT), the main active ingredient of astragalus, and ferulic acid (FA), the main ingredient of angelica, were proposed to promote the microvessel formation after intramuscular injection into ischemic hindlimbs. Fragmented fibers with average lengths of 5 (FF-5), 20 (FF-20) and 80 μm (FF-80) were constructed by the cryocutting of aligned electrospun fibers. Their dispersion in sodium alginate solution (0.2%) indicated good injectability. After injection into the quadriceps muscles of the hindlimbs, FF-20 and FF-80 fiber fragments showed higher tissue retentions than FF-5, and around 90% of the injected doses were determined after 7 days. On a hindlimb ischemia model established by ligating the femoral arteries, intramuscular injection of the mixtures of FA-loaded and AT-loaded FF-20 fiber fragments substantially reduced the muscle degeneration with minimal fibrosis formation, significantly enhanced the neovessel formation and hindlimb perfusion in the ischemic tissues, and efficiently promoted the limb salvage with few limb losses. Along with the easy manipulation and lower invasiveness for in vivo administration, fragmented fibers should become potential drug carriers for disease treatment, wound recovery and tissue repair after local injection. PMID:26176198

  19. Therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic muscles after local injection of fragmented fibers with loaded traditional Chinese medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiyan; Wan, Huiying; Xia, Tian; Chen, Maohua; Zhang, Yun; Luo, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis remains the most effective method to re-establish a proper blood flow in ischemic tissues. There is a great clinical need to identify an injectable format to achieve a well accumulation following local administration and a sustained delivery of biological factors at the ischemic sites. In the current study, fragmented nanofibers with loaded traditional Chinese medicines, astragaloside IV (AT), the main active ingredient of astragalus, and ferulic acid (FA), the main ingredient of angelica, were proposed to promote the microvessel formation after intramuscular injection into ischemic hindlimbs. Fragmented fibers with average lengths of 5 (FF-5), 20 (FF-20) and 80 μm (FF-80) were constructed by the cryocutting of aligned electrospun fibers. Their dispersion in sodium alginate solution (0.2%) indicated good injectability. After injection into the quadriceps muscles of the hindlimbs, FF-20 and FF-80 fiber fragments showed higher tissue retentions than FF-5, and around 90% of the injected doses were determined after 7 days. On a hindlimb ischemia model established by ligating the femoral arteries, intramuscular injection of the mixtures of FA-loaded and AT-loaded FF-20 fiber fragments substantially reduced the muscle degeneration with minimal fibrosis formation, significantly enhanced the neovessel formation and hindlimb perfusion in the ischemic tissues, and efficiently promoted the limb salvage with few limb losses. Along with the easy manipulation and lower invasiveness for in vivo administration, fragmented fibers should become potential drug carriers for disease treatment, wound recovery and tissue repair after local injection.

  20. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Michael T; Bertram, John E A; Syme, Douglas A; Hermanson, John W; Chase, P Bryant

    2014-10-01

    The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5-16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01-0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002-0.05 Wkg(-1)) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4-7 Hz), SDF (4-5 Hz) and SOL (0.5-1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross-bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. PMID:25293602

  1. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Michael T.; Bertram, John E.A.; Syme, Douglas A.; Hermanson, John W.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5–16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01–0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002–0.05 Wkg−1) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4–7 Hz), SDF (4–5 Hz) and SOL (0.5–1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross‐bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. PMID:25293602

  2. [Physiological features of the wing muscle fibers of Locusta migratoria locusts].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, V V

    1980-01-01

    In bifunctional dorsoventral muscle M-120 of the locust Locusta migratoria migratorioides three groups of fibers have been found which differ with respect to their electrophysiological properties. The evoked fast potentials in the fibers of caudal portion differed from fast potentials observed in the fibers of rostral and intermediate portions of the muscle. In the fibers of the caudal and intermediate portions of muscle, not only fast, but other depolarization potentials were also recorded which differ in the amplitude and duration, as well as the inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. It was shown that fibers in these three parts of the muscle differ in their voltage-current properties. It is concluded that different types of potentials are due to peculiarities of innervation and to structural heterogeneity of muscle fibers. PMID:6247866

  3. Force generation by muscle fibers in rigor: a laser temperature-jump study.

    PubMed

    Davis, J S; Harrington, W F

    1987-02-01

    A clear prediction of the helix-coil model for force generation in muscle is that force should be produced when the equilibrium (helix-coil) of a rigor (or activated) fiber is perturbed by a temperature jump near the melting temperature of the light meromyosin/heavy meromyosin hinge. An infrared, iodine-photodissociation laser was used to heat the fibers by approximately equal to 5 degrees C in under 1 mus. Under ionic conditions where rigor bridges are predominantly associated with the thick filament backbone, an abrupt drop in tension typical of normal thermoelastic expansion was seen. A similar response was observed below 41 degrees C for thick filament-released rigor bridges. Above this temperature, a rubber-like thermoelastic response was obtained typical of a helix-coil transition. At temperatures near 50 degrees C, the amount of force generated by a rigor fiber was large and comparable to that seen for an activated fiber at 5 degrees C. The relaxation spectra of force generation obtained for both systems (rigor and activated) show a step change followed by a biexponential kinetic process. The reciprocal relaxation times and amplitudes for these individual processes in activated and rigor fibers differ only by factors of 2-4. Force generation in the rigor muscle appears to arise from melting in the subfragment 2 hinge region of the myosin molecule since binding of subfragment 2 to the thick filament backbone inhibits force production. No significant force generation was observed following temperature jumps of relaxed fibers. PMID:3469654

  4. Prevention of muscle fibers atrophy during gravitational unloading: The effect of L-arginine administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashkina, N.; Lomonosova, Y.; Shevchenko, T. F.; Bugrova, A. E.; Turtikova, O. V.; Kalamkarov, G. R.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.

    2011-05-01

    Gravitational unloading results in pronounced atrophy of m.soleus. Probably, the output of NO is controlled by the muscle activity. We hypothesized that NO may be involved in the protein metabolism and increase of its concentration in muscle can prevent atrophic changes induced by gravitational unloading. In order to test the hypothesis we applied NO donor L-arginine during gravitational unloading. 2.5-month-old male Wistar rats weighing 220-230g were divided into sedentary control group (CTR, n=7), 14-day hindlimb suspension (HS, n=7), 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-arginine (HSL, n=7) (with a daily supplementation of 500 mg/kg wt L-arginine) and 14 days of hindlimb suspension+ L-NAME (HSN, n=7) (90 mg/kg wt during 14 days). Cross sectional area (CSA) of slow twitch (ST) and fast twitch (FT) soleus muscle fibers decreased by 45% and 28% in the HS group ( p<0.05) and 40% and 25% in the HSN group, as compared to the CTR group ( p<0.05), respectively. CSA of ST and FT muscle fibers were 25% and 16% larger in the HSL group in comparison with the HS group ( p<0.05), respectively. The atrophy of FT muscle fibers in the HSL group was completely prevented since FT fiber CSA had no significant differences from the CTR group. In HS group, the percentage of fibers revealing either gaps/disruption of the dystrophin layer of the myofiber surface membrane increased by 27% and 17%, respectively, as compared to the controls (CTR group, p<0.05). The destructions in dystrophin layer integrity and reductions of desmin content were significantly prevented in HSL group. NO concentration decreased by 60% in the HS group (as well as HSN group) and at the same time no changes were detectable in the HSL group. This fact indicates the compensation of NO content in the unloaded muscle under L-arginine administration. The levels of atrogin-1 mRNA were considerably altered in suspended animals (HS group: plus 27%, HSL group: minus 13%) as compared to the control level. Conclusion: L

  5. Influence of exercise contraction mode and protein supplementation on human skeletal muscle satellite cell content and muscle fiber growth

    PubMed Central

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Riis, Simon; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; de Paoli, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are involved in remodeling and hypertrophy processes of skeletal muscle. However, little knowledge exists on extrinsic factors that influence the content of SCs in skeletal muscle. In a comparative human study, we investigated the muscle fiber type-specific association between emergence of satellite cells (SCs), muscle growth, and remodeling in response to 12 wk unilateral resistance training performed as eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc) resistance training ± whey protein (Whey, 19.5 g protein + 19.5 g glucose) or placebo (Placebo, 39 g glucose) supplementation. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were analyzed for fiber type-specific SCs, myonuclei, and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). Following training, SCs increased with Conc in both type I and type II fibers (P < 0.01) and exhibited a group difference from Ecc (P < 0.05), which did not increase. Myonuclei content in type I fibers increased in all groups (P < 0.01), while a specific accretion of myonuclei in type II fibers was observed in the Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and Placebo-Ecc (P < 0.01) groups. Similarly, whereas type I fiber CSA increased independently of intervention (P < 0.001), type II fiber CSA increased exclusively with Whey-Conc (P < 0.01) and type II fiber hypertrophy correlated with whole muscle hypertrophy exclusively following Conc training (P < 0.01). In conclusion, isolated concentric knee extensor resistance training appears to constitute a stronger driver of SC content than eccentric resistance training while type II fiber hypertrophy was accentuated when combining concentric resistance training with whey protein supplementation. PMID:25103976

  6. Constant Fiber Number During Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Modified Arachidonate Metabolism During Hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G.

    1985-01-01

    A previously documented shift from Type I to IIA predominance of the soleus muscle during rat suspension was further investigated to determine if this shift was by selective reduction of a single fiber type, simultaneous reduction and formation of fibers with different fiber types, or a transformation of fiber type by individual fibers. By partial acid digestion and dissection, average total soleus fiber number was found to be 3022 + or - 80 (SE) and 3008 + or - 64 before and after four-week suspension (n=12). Another area of current research was based on previous studies which indicate that prostaglandins are biosynthesized by skeletal muscle and evoke protein synthesis and degradation.

  7. Sonic hedgehog enhances somite cell viability and formation of primary slow muscle fibers in avian segmented mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Cann, G M; Lee, J W; Stockdale, F E

    1999-09-01

    Primary skeletal muscle fibers first form in the segmented portions of paraxial mesoderm called somites. Although the neural tube and notochord are recognized as crucial in patterning myogenic cell lineages during avian and mammalian somitic myogenesis, the source, identities, and actions of the signals governing this process remain controversial. It has been shown that signals emanating from the ventral neural tube and/or notochord alone or Shh alone serve to activate MyoD expression in somites. However, beyond a role in initiating MyoD expression, little is known about the effects of Shh on primary muscle fiber formation in somites of higher vertebrates. The studies reported here investigate how the ventral neural tube promotes myogenesis and compare the effects of the ventral neural tube with those of purified Shh protein on fiber formation in somites. We show that purified Shh protein mimics actions of the ventral neural tube on somites including initiation of muscle fiber formation, enhancement of numbers of primary muscle fibers, and particularly, the formation of primary fibers that express slow myosin. There is a marked increase in slow myosin expression in fibers in response to Shh as somites mature. The effects of ventral neural tube on fiber formation can be blocked by disrupting the Shh signaling pathway by increasing the activity of somitic cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that apoptosis is a dominant fate of somite cells, but not somitic muscle fibers, when cultured in the absence of the neural tube, and that application of Shh protein to somites reduced apoptosis. The block to apoptosis by Shh is a manifestation of the maturity of the somite with a progressive increase in the block as somites are displaced rostrally from somite III forward. We conclude that purified Shh protein in mimicking the effects of the ventral neural tube on segmented mesoderm can exert pleiotropic effects during primary myogenesis

  8. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  9. Impaired Organization and Function of Myofilaments in Single Muscle Fibers from a Mouse Model of Pompe Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.; Galperin, M; Melvin, G; Horowits, R; Raben, N; Plotz, P; Yu, L

    2010-01-01

    Pompe disease, a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase, is a disorder of glycogen metabolism that can affect infants, children, or adults. In all forms of the disease, there is progressive muscle pathology leading to premature death. The pathology is characterized by accumulation of glycogen in lysosomes, autophagic buildup, and muscle atrophy. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if myofibrillar dysfunction in Pompe disease contributes to muscle weakness beyond that attributed to atrophy. The study was performed on isolated myofibers dissected from severely affected fast glycolytic muscle in the {alpha}-glucosidase knockout mouse model. Psoas muscle fibers were first permeabilized, so that the contractile proteins could be directly relaxed or activated by control of the composition of the bathing solution. When normalized by cross-sectional area, single fibers from knockout mice produced 6.3 N/cm{sup 2} of maximum Ca{sup 2+}-activated tension compared with 12.0 N/cm{sup 2} produced by wild-type fibers. The total protein concentration was slightly higher in the knockout mice, but concentrations of the contractile proteins myosin and actin remained unchanged. Structurally, X-ray diffraction showed that the actin and myosin filaments, normally arranged in hexagonal arrays, were disordered in the knockout muscle, and a lower fraction of myosin cross bridges was near the actin filaments in the relaxed muscle. The results are consistent with a disruption of actin and myosin interactions in the knockout muscles, demonstrating that impaired myofibrillar function contributes to weakness in the diseased muscle fibers.

  10. Effects of concurrent strength and endurance training on genes related to myostatin signaling pathway and muscle fiber responses.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Eduardo O; Tricoli, Valmor; Aoki, Marcelo S; Roschel, Hamilton; Brum, Patrícia C; Bacurau, Aline V N; Silva-Batista, Carla; Wilson, Jacob M; Neves, Manoel; Soares, Antonio G; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Concurrent training (CT) seems to impair training-induced muscle hypertrophy. This study compared the effects of CT, strength training (ST) and interval training (IT) on the muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) response, and on the expression of selected genes involved in the myostatin (MSTN) signaling mRNA levels. Thirty-seven physically active men were randomly divided into 4 groups: CT (n = 11), ST (n = 11), IT (n = 8), and control group (C) (n = 7) and underwent an 8-week training period. Vastus lateralis biopsy muscle samples were obtained at baseline and 48 hours after the last training session. Muscle fiber CSA, selected genes expression, and maximum dynamic ST (1 repetition maximum) were evaluated before and after training. Type IIa and type I muscle fiber CSA increased from pre- to posttest only in the ST group (17.08 and 17.9%, respectively). The SMAD-7 gene expression significantly increased at the posttest in the ST (53.9%) and CT groups (39.3%). The MSTN and its regulatory genes ActIIb, FLST-3, FOXO-3a, and GASP-1 mRNA levels remained unchanged across time and groups. One repetition maximum increased from pre- to posttest in both the ST and CT groups (ST = 18.5%; CT = 17.6%). Our findings are suggestive that MSTN and their regulatory genes at transcript level cannot differentiate muscle fiber CSA responses between CT and ST regimens in humans. PMID:24832980

  11. Crossveinless and the TGFbeta pathway regulate fiber number in the Drosophila adult jump muscle.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Maryann S; Lovato, Candice V; Baca, Erica M; Cripps, Richard M

    2009-04-01

    Skeletal muscles are readily characterized by their location within the body and by the number and composition of their constituent muscle fibers. Here, we characterize a mutation that causes a severe reduction in the number of fibers comprising the tergal depressor of the trochanter muscle (TDT, or jump muscle), which functions in the escape response of the Drosophila adult. The wild-type TDT comprises over 20 large muscle fibers and four small fibers. In crossveinless (cv) mutants, the number of large fibers is reduced by 50%, and the number of small fibers is also occasionally reduced. This reduction in fiber number arises from a reduction in the number of founder cells contributing to the TDT at the early pupal stage. Given the role of cv in TGFbeta signaling, we determined whether this pathway directly impacts TDT development. Indeed, gain- and loss-of-function manipulations in the TGFbeta pathway resulted in dramatic increases and decreases, respectively, in TDT fiber number. By identifying the origins of the TDT muscle, from founder cells specified in the mesothoracic leg imaginal disc, we also demonstrate that the TGFbeta pathway directly impacts the specification of founder cells for the jump muscle. Our studies define a new role for the TGFbeta pathway in the control of specific skeletal muscle characteristics. PMID:19244280

  12. A Physiological Neural Controller of a Muscle Fiber Oculomotor Plant in Horizontal Monkey Saccades

    PubMed Central

    Enderle, John D.

    2014-01-01

    A neural network model of biophysical neurons in the midbrain is presented to drive a muscle fiber oculomotor plant during horizontal monkey saccades. Neural circuitry, including omnipause neuron, premotor excitatory and inhibitory burst neurons, long lead burst neuron, tonic neuron, interneuron, abducens nucleus, and oculomotor nucleus, is developed to examine saccade dynamics. The time-optimal control strategy by realization of agonist and antagonist controller models is investigated. In consequence, each agonist muscle fiber is stimulated by an agonist neuron, while an antagonist muscle fiber is unstimulated by a pause and step from the antagonist neuron. It is concluded that the neural network is constrained by a minimum duration of the agonist pulse and that the most dominant factor in determining the saccade magnitude is the number of active neurons for the small saccades. For the large saccades, however, the duration of agonist burst firing significantly affects the control of saccades. The proposed saccadic circuitry establishes a complete model of saccade generation since it not only includes the neural circuits at both the premotor and motor stages of the saccade generator, but also uses a time-optimal controller to yield the desired saccade magnitude. PMID:24944832

  13. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation. PMID:15532311

  14. Muscle fiber conduction velocity in the diagnosis of sporadic hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, O F; Zwarts, M J; Links, T P; Wintzen, A R

    1992-01-01

    A 6-year-old girl presented with episodes of profound muscle weakness since the age of 2 years. On the basis of decreased ictal serum potassium level and lack of metabolic disorder, primary hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) was diagnosed. Both parents and 3 sibs were unaffected clinically. In all of them asymptomatic heterozygosity was very unlikely by the finding of normal muscle fiber conduction velocities, whereas in the patient interictal muscle fiber conduction velocity was lowered. Determination of muscle fiber conduction velocity can be helpful in documenting sporadic occurrence of HPP. PMID:1324813

  15. Fiber-type composition in the perivertebral musculature of lizards: Implications for the evolution of the diapsid trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Sabine; Schilling, Nadja

    2013-03-01

    The perivertebral musculature of lizards is critical for the stabilization and the mobilization of the trunk during locomotion. Some trunk muscles are also involved in ventilation. This dual function of trunk muscles in locomotion and ventilation leads to a biomechanical conflict in many lizards and constrains their ability to breathe while running ("axial constraint") which likely is reflected by their high anaerobic scope. Furthermore, different foraging and predator-escape strategies were shown to correlate with the metabolic profile of locomotor muscles in lizards. Because knowledge of muscle's fiber-type composition may help to reveal a muscle's functional properties, we investigated the distribution pattern of muscle fiber types in the perivertebral musculature in two small lizard species with a generalized body shape and subjected to the axial constraint (Dipsosaurus dorsalis, Acanthodactylus maculatus) and one species that circumvents the axial constraint by means of gular pumping (Varanus exanthematicus). Additionally, these species differ in their predator-escape and foraging behaviors. Using refined enzyme-histochemical protocols, muscle fiber types were differentiated in serial cross-sections through the trunk, maintaining the anatomical relationships between the skeleton and the musculature. The fiber composition in Dipsosaurus and Acanthodactylus showed a highly glycolytic profile, consistent with their intermittent locomotor style and reliance on anaerobic metabolism during activity. Because early representatives of diapsids resemble these two species in several postcranial characters, we suggest that this glycolytic profile represents the plesiomorphic condition for diapsids. In Varanus, we found a high proportion of oxidative fibers in all muscles, which is in accordance with its high aerobic scope and capability of sustained locomotion. PMID:23115131

  16. Role(s) of gravitational loading during developing period on the growth of rat soleus muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Fuminori; Goto, Katsumasa; Wang, Xiao Dong; Terada, Masahiro; Ohira, Takashi; Nakai, Naoya; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2010-03-01

    Effects of gravitational loading or unloading on the gain of the characteristics in soleus muscle fibers were studied in rats. The tail suspension was performed in newborn rats from postnatal day 4 to month 3, and the reloading was allowed for 3 mo in some rats. Single expression of type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) was observed in approximately 82% of fibers in 3-mo-old controls, but the fibers expressing multiple MHC isoforms were noted in the unloaded rats. Although 97% of fibers in 3-mo-old controls had a single neuromuscular junction at the central region of fiber, fibers with multiple nerve endplates were seen in the unloaded group. Faster contraction speed and lower maximal tension development, even after normalization with fiber size, were observed in the unloaded pure type I MHC fibers. These parameters generally returned to the age-matched control levels after reloading. It was suggested that antigravity-related tonic activity plays an important role in the gain of single neural innervation and of slow contractile properties and phenotype in soleus muscle fibers. PMID:20056853

  17. A viscoplastic model for the active component in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Rubin, M B

    2016-08-01

    The HMK model (Hunter et al. in Prog Biophys Mol Biol 69:289-331, 1998) proposes mechanobiological equations for the influence of intracellular calcium concentration [Formula: see text] on the evolution of bound calcium concentration [Formula: see text] and the tropomyosin kinetics parameter z, which model processes in the active component of the tension in cardiac muscle. The inelastic response due to actin-myosin crossbridge kinetics is modeled in the HMK model with a function Q that depends on the history of the rate of total stretch of the muscle fiber. Here, an alternative model is proposed which models the active component of the muscle fiber as a viscoplastic material. In particular, an evolution equation is proposed for the elastic stretch [Formula: see text] in the active component. Specific forms of the constitutive equations are proposed and used to match experimental data. The proposed viscoplastic formulation allows for separate modeling of three processes: the high rate deactivation of crossbridges causing rapid reduction in active tension; the high but lower rate reactivation of crossbridges causing recovery of active tension; and the low rate relaxation effects characterizing the Hill model of muscles. PMID:26476735

  18. Contractile properties of rat, rhesus monkey, and human type I muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Romatowski, J. G.; Karhanek, M.; Fitts, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that skeletal muscle intrinsic maximal shortening velocity is inversely related to species body mass. However, there is uncertainty regarding the relationship between the contractile properties of muscle fibers obtained from commonly studied laboratory animals and those obtained from humans. In this study we determined the contractile properties of single chemically skinned fibers prepared from rat, rhesus monkey, and human soleus and gastrocnemius muscle samples under identical experimental conditions. All fibers used for analysis expressed type I myosin heavy chain as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allometric coefficients for type I fibers from each muscle indicated that there was little change in peak tension (force/fiber cross-sectional area) across species. In contrast, both soleus and gastrocnemius type I fiber maximal unloaded shortening velocity (Vo), the y-intercept of the force-velocity relationship (Vmax), peak power per unit fiber length, and peak power normalized for fiber length and cross-sectional area were all inversely related to species body mass. The present allometric coefficients for soleus fiber Vo (-0.18) and Vmax (-0.11) are in good agreement with published values for soleus fibers obtained from common laboratory and domesticated mammals. Taken together, these observations suggest that the Vo of slow fibers from quadrupeds and humans scale similarly and can be described by the same quantitative relationships. These findings have implications in the design and interpretation of experiments, especially those that use small laboratory mammals as a model of human muscle function.

  19. Kinetics of the actomyosin ATPase in muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Y E

    1987-01-01

    Many characteristics expected from the cyclic ATPase mechanism of Scheme 1 are apparent in reactions measured directly in muscle fibers. ATP detaches rigor cross-bridges rapidly. Reattachment and force generation are also rapid compared to the overall cycling rate, but reversibility of many of the reactions allows significant population of detached states during contraction. ATP hydrolysis shows rapid, "burst" kinetics and is also readily reversible. Pi is released before ADP in the cycle. Pi release is slow in relaxed fibers but is promoted by the interaction between myosin and actin during contraction. Actomyosin kinetics differ in fibers from the ATPase reaction in solution in that Pi binds more readily to AM' X ADP in fibers, and complex, Ca2+-dependent kinetics are evident for ADP release. These properties suggest that the mechanical driving stroke of the cross-bridge cycle and events during physiological relaxation are closely linked to the product release steps. All of the reactions, except step 7a, in the main pathway for ATP hydrolysis, indicated in Scheme 1 by heavy arrows, are fast compared to the overall cycling rate in isometric contractions. Based on this finding, we expect step 7a (or isomerizations of the flanking states) to be relatively slow (approximately 3 s-1). But neither the rate-limiting reaction, nor the expected major dependence on mechanical load or shortening that would explain the Fenn effect, have actually been detected. Use of the pulse photolysis and oxygen exchange methods with structural and spectroscopic techniques and with perturbations of mechanical strain promise to reveal these aspects of the mechanism. PMID:2952053

  20. Unilateral lower limb suspension does not mimic bed rest or spaceflight effects on human muscle fiber function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Trappe, S. W.; Romatowski, J. G.; Riley, D. A.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    2002-01-01

    We used Ca2+-activated skinned muscle fibers to test the hypothesis that unilateral lower leg suspension (ULLS) alters cross-bridge mechanisms of muscle contraction. Soleus and gastrocnemius biopsies were obtained from eight subjects before ULLS, immediately after 12 days of ULLS (post-0 h), and after 6 h of reambulation (post-6 h). Post-0 h soleus fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) showed significant reductions in diameter, absolute and specific peak Ca2+-activated force, unloaded shortening velocity, and absolute and normalized peak power. Fibers obtained from the gastrocnemius were less affected by ULLS, particularly fibers expressing fast MHC isoforms. Post-6 h soleus fibers produced less absolute and specific peak force than did post-0 h fibers, suggesting that reambulation after ULLS induced cell damage. Like bed rest and spaceflight, ULLS primarily affects soleus over gastrocnemius fibers. However, in contrast to these other models, slow soleus fibers obtained after ULLS showed a decrease in unloaded shortening velocity and a greater reduction in specific force.

  1. Molecular changes in mitochondrial respiratory activity and metabolic enzyme activity in muscle of four pig breeds with distinct metabolic types.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Trakooljul, Nares; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Schellander, Karl; Wicke, Michael; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscles are metabolically active and have market value in meat-producing farm animals. A better understanding of biological pathways affecting energy metabolism in skeletal muscle could advance the science of skeletal muscle. In this study, comparative pathway-focused gene expression profiling in conjunction with muscle fiber typing were analyzed in skeletal muscles from Duroc, Pietrain, and Duroc-Pietrain crossbred pigs. Each breed type displayed a distinct muscle fiber-type composition. Mitochondrial respiratory activity and glycolytic and oxidative enzyme activities were comparable among genotypes, except for significantly lower complex I activity in Pietrain pigs homozygous-positive for malignant hyperthermia syndrome. At the transcriptional level, lactate dehydrogenase B showed breed specificity, with significantly lower expression in Pietrain pigs homozygous-positive for malignant hyperthermia syndrome. A similar mRNA expression pattern was shown for several subunits of oxidative phosphorylation complexes, including complex I, complex II, complex IV, and ATP synthase. Significant correlations were observed between mRNA expression of genes in focused pathways and enzyme activities in a breed-dependent manner. Moreover, expression patterns of pathway-focused genes were well correlated with muscle fiber-type composition. These results stress the importance of regulation of transcriptional rate of genes related to oxidative and glycolytic pathways in the metabolic capacity of muscle fibers. Overall, the results further the breed-specific understanding of the molecular basis of metabolic enzyme activities, which directly impact meat quality. PMID:26759028

  2. Transcriptional regulation and alternative splicing cooperate in muscle fiber-type specification in flies and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Spletter, Maria L.; Schnorrer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Muscles coordinate body movements throughout the animal kingdom. Each skeletal muscle is built of large, multi-nucleated cells, called myofibers, which are classified into several functionally distinct types. The typical fiber-type composition of each muscle arises during development, and in mammals is extensively adjusted in response to postnatal exercise. Understanding how functionally distinct muscle fiber-types arise is important for unraveling the molecular basis of diseases from cardiomyopathies to muscular dystrophies. In this review, we focus on recent advances in Drosophila and mammals in understanding how muscle fiber-type specification is controlled by the regulation of transcription and alternative splicing. We illustrate the cooperation of general myogenic transcription factors with muscle fiber-type specific transcriptional regulators as a basic principle for fiber-type specification, which is conserved from flies to mammals. We also examine how regulated alternative splicing of sarcomeric proteins in both flies and mammals can directly instruct the physiological and biophysical differences between fiber-types. Thus, research in Drosophila can provide important mechanistic insight into muscle fiber specification, which is relevant to homologous processes in mammals and to the pathology of muscle diseases. PMID:24145055

  3. Contractile properties of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenital cleft palates and normal palates of Spanish goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine muscle. It was determined that the muscle fibers of the cleft palate-induced goats were primarily of the type 2 (fast fibers) which fatigue easil...

  4. Muscle activity characterization by laser Doppler Myography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Casaccia, Sara; Marchionni, Paolo; Ercoli, Ilaria; Primo Tomasini, Enrico

    2013-09-01

    Electromiography (EMG) is the gold-standard technique used for the evaluation of muscle activity. This technique is used in biomechanics, sport medicine, neurology and rehabilitation therapy and it provides the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles. Among the parameters measured with EMG, two very important quantities are: signal amplitude and duration of muscle contraction, muscle fatigue and maximum muscle power. Recently, a new measurement procedure, named Laser Doppler Myography (LDMi), for the non contact assessment of muscle activity has been proposed to measure the vibro-mechanical behaviour of the muscle. The aim of this study is to present the LDMi technique and to evaluate its capacity to measure some characteristic features proper of the muscle. In this paper LDMi is compared with standard superficial EMG (sEMG) requiring the application of sensors on the skin of each patient. sEMG and LDMi signals have been simultaneously acquired and processed to test correlations. Three parameters has been analyzed to compare these techniques: Muscle activation timing, signal amplitude and muscle fatigue. LDMi appears to be a reliable and promising measurement technique allowing the measurements without contact with the patient skin.

  5. Ontogenetic changes in skeletal muscle fiber type, fiber diameter and myoglobin concentration in the Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris)

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Colby D.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Fahlman, Andreas; Moore, Michael J.; Willoughby, Darryn S.; Robbins, Kathleen A.; Kanatous, Shane B.; Trumble, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) (NES) are known to be deep, long-duration divers and to sustain long-repeated patterns of breath-hold, or apnea. Some phocid dives remain within the bounds of aerobic metabolism, accompanied by physiological responses inducing lung compression, bradycardia, and peripheral vasoconstriction. Current data suggest an absence of type IIb fibers in pinniped locomotory musculature. To date, no fiber type data exist for NES, a consummate deep diver. In this study, NES were biopsied in the wild. Ontogenetic changes in skeletal muscle were revealed through succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) based fiber typing. Results indicated a predominance of uniformly shaped, large type I fibers and elevated myoglobin (Mb) concentrations in the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of adults. No type II muscle fibers were detected in any adult sampled. This was in contrast to the juvenile animals that demonstrated type II myosin in Western Blot analysis, indicative of an ontogenetic change in skeletal muscle with maturation. These data support previous hypotheses that the absence of type II fibers indicates reliance on aerobic metabolism during dives, as well as a depressed metabolic rate and low energy locomotion. We also suggest that the lack of type IIb fibers (adults) may provide a protection against ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury in vasoconstricted peripheral skeletal muscle. PMID:24959151

  6. Ontogenetic changes in skeletal muscle fiber type, fiber diameter and myoglobin concentration in the Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Moore, Colby D; Crocker, Daniel E; Fahlman, Andreas; Moore, Michael J; Willoughby, Darryn S; Robbins, Kathleen A; Kanatous, Shane B; Trumble, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) (NES) are known to be deep, long-duration divers and to sustain long-repeated patterns of breath-hold, or apnea. Some phocid dives remain within the bounds of aerobic metabolism, accompanied by physiological responses inducing lung compression, bradycardia, and peripheral vasoconstriction. Current data suggest an absence of type IIb fibers in pinniped locomotory musculature. To date, no fiber type data exist for NES, a consummate deep diver. In this study, NES were biopsied in the wild. Ontogenetic changes in skeletal muscle were revealed through succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) based fiber typing. Results indicated a predominance of uniformly shaped, large type I fibers and elevated myoglobin (Mb) concentrations in the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of adults. No type II muscle fibers were detected in any adult sampled. This was in contrast to the juvenile animals that demonstrated type II myosin in Western Blot analysis, indicative of an ontogenetic change in skeletal muscle with maturation. These data support previous hypotheses that the absence of type II fibers indicates reliance on aerobic metabolism during dives, as well as a depressed metabolic rate and low energy locomotion. We also suggest that the lack of type IIb fibers (adults) may provide a protection against ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury in vasoconstricted peripheral skeletal muscle. PMID:24959151

  7. Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Muscle-Like Fibers.

    PubMed

    Goujon, Antoine; Du, Guangyan; Moulin, Emilie; Fuks, Gad; Maaloum, Mounir; Buhler, Eric; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2016-01-11

    An acid-base switchable [c2]daisy chain rotaxane terminated with two 2,6-diacetylamino pyridine units has been self-assembled with a bis(uracil) linker. The complementary hydrogen-bond recognition patterns, together with lateral van der Waals aggregations, result in the hierarchical formation of unidimensional supramolecular polymers associated in bundles of muscle-like fibers. Microscopic and scattering techniques reveal that the mesoscopic structure of these bundles depends on the extended or contracted states that the rotaxanes show within individual polymer chains. The observed local dynamics span over several length scales because of a combination of supramolecular and mechanical bonds. This work illustrates the possibility to modify the hierarchical mesoscopic structuring of large polymeric systems by the integrated actuation of individual molecular machines. PMID:26582752

  8. Overexpression of the Mitochondrial T3 Receptor p43 Induces a Shift in Skeletal Muscle Fiber Types

    PubMed Central

    Casas, François; Pessemesse, Laurence; Grandemange, Stéphanie; Seyer, Pascal; Gueguen, Naïg; Baris, Olivier; Lepourry, Laurence; Cabello, Gérard; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    In previous studies, we have characterized a new hormonal pathway involving a mitochondrial T3 receptor (p43) acting as a mitochondrial transcription factor and consequently stimulating mitochondrial activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. We have established the involvement of this T3 pathway in the regulation of in vitro myoblast differentiation.We have generated mice overexpressing p43 under control of the human α-skeletal actin promoter. In agreement with the previous characterization of this promoter, northern-blot and western-blot experiments confirmed that after birth p43 was specifically overexpressed in skeletal muscle. As expected from in vitro studies, in 2-month old mice, p43 overexpression increased mitochondrial genes expression and mitochondrial biogenesis as attested by the increase of mitochondrial mass and mt-DNA copy number. In addition, transgenic mice had a body temperature 0.8°C higher than control ones and displayed lower plasma triiodothyronine levels. Skeletal muscles of transgenic mice were redder than wild-type animals suggesting an increased oxidative metabolism. In line with this observation, in gastrocnemius, we recorded a strong increase in cytochrome oxidase activity and in mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, we observed that p43 drives the formation of oxidative fibers: in soleus muscle, where MyHC IIa fibers were partly replaced by type I fibers; in gastrocnemius muscle, we found an increase in MyHC IIa and IIx expression associated with a reduction in the number of glycolytic fibers type IIb. In addition, we found that PGC-1α and PPARδ, two major regulators of muscle phenotype were up regulated in p43 transgenic mice suggesting that these proteins could be downstream targets of mitochondrial activity. These data indicate that the direct mitochondrial T3 pathway is deeply involved in the acquisition of contractile and metabolic features of muscle fibers in particular by regulating PGC-1α and PPARδ. PMID:18575627

  9. Forelimb muscle activity during equine locomotion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Simon M; Whitton, R Chris; King, Melissa; Haussler, Kevin K; Kawcak, Chris E; Stover, Susan M; Pandy, Marcus G

    2012-09-01

    Few quantitative data exist to describe the activity of the distal muscles of the equine forelimb during locomotion, and there is an incomplete understanding of the functional roles of the majority of the forelimb muscles. Based on morphology alone it would appear that the larger proximal muscles perform the majority of work in the forelimb, whereas the smaller distal muscles fulfil supplementary roles such as stabilizing the joints and positioning the limb for impact with the ground. We measured the timing and amplitude of the electromyographic activity of the intrinsic muscles of the forelimb in relation to the phase of gait (stance versus swing) and the torque demand placed on each joint during walking, trotting and cantering. We found that all forelimb muscles, except the extensor carpi radialis (ECR), were activated just prior to hoof-strike and deactivated during stance. Only the ECR was activated during swing. The amplitudes of muscle activation typically increased as gait speed increased. However, the amplitudes of muscle activation were not proportional to the net joint torques, indicating that passive structures may also contribute significantly to torque generation. Our results suggest that the smaller distal muscles help to stabilize the forelimb in early stance, in preparation for the passive structures (tendons and ligaments) to be stretched. The distal forelimb muscles remain active throughout stance only during canter, when the net torques acting about the distal forelimb joints are highest. The larger proximal muscles activate in a complex coordination to position and stabilize the shoulder and elbow joints during ground contact. PMID:22875767

  10. New insights into the behavior of muscle during active lengthening.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, D L

    1990-01-01

    A muscle fiber was modeled as a series-connected string of sarcomeres, using an A. V. Hill type model for each sarcomere and allowing for some random variation in the properties of the sarcomeres. Applying stretches to this model led to the prediction that lengthening of active muscle on or beyond the plateau of the length tension curve will take place very nonuniformly, essentially by rapid, uncontrolled elongation of individual sarcomeres, one at a time, in order from the weakest toward the strongest. Such a "popped" sarcomere, at least in a single fiber, will be stretched to a length where there is no overlap between thick and thin filaments, and the tension is borne by passive components. This prediction allows modeling of many results that have previously been inexplicable, notably the permanent extra tension after stretch on the descending limb of the length tension curve, and the continued rise of tension during a continued stretch. PMID:2317547

  11. Morphometric analysis of rat muscle fibers following space flight and hypogravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, L. A.; Castleman, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hypogravity on striate muscles, containing both fast twitch glycolytic and slow twitch oxidative fibers, was studied in rats aboard two Cosmos biosatellites. Results of a computer-assisted image analysis of extensor digitorum muscles from five rats, exposed to 18.5 days of hypogravity and processed for the alkaline ATPase reaction, showed a reduction of the mean fiber diameter (41.32 + or - 0.55 microns), compared to synchronous (46.32 + or - 0.55 microns) and vivarium (49 + or - 0.5 microns) controls. A further experiment studied the ratio of fast to slow twitch fibers in 25 rats exposed to 18.5 days of hypogravity and analyzed at four different periods of recovery following the space flight. Using the previous techniques, the gastrocnemius muscle showed a reduction of the total muscle fiber area in square microns and a reduction in the percentage of slow fibers of flight animals compared to the control animals.

  12. Physiologic, metabolic, and muscle fiber type characteristics of musculus uvulae in sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and in snorers.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Côté, C; Simoneau, J A; Gélinas, Y; St Pierre, S; Leclerc, J; Ferland, R; Marc, I

    1995-01-01

    Upper airway dilator muscles play an important role in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). The mechanical and structural characteristics of these muscles remain unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the physiologic, metabolic, and fiber type characteristics of one upper airway dilator muscle (musculus uvulae, MU) in 11 SAHS and in seven nonapneic snorers. The different analyses were done on MU obtained during uvulo-palato-pharyngoplasty. Snorers and SAHS differed only in their apnea + hypopnea indices (11.5 +/- 5.9 and 34.2 +/- 14.6/h, respectively, mean +/- SD). Absolute twitch and tetanic tension production of MU was significantly greater in SAHS than in snorers while the fatigability index was similar in the two groups. Protein content and anaerobic enzyme activities of MU were significantly greater in SAHS than in snorers; no difference was observed for aerobic enzyme activities. The total muscle fiber cross-sectional area of MU was significantly higher in SAHS (2.2 +/- 0.9 mm2) than in snorers (1.1 +/- 0.7 mm2). The surface occupied by type IIA muscle fibers of MU was larger in SAHS (2.00 +/- 0.96) than in snorers (0.84 +/- 0.63 mm2). We conclude that the capacity for tension production and the anaerobic metabolic activity of MU are greater in SAHS than in snorers. PMID:7814616

  13. Muscle fiber type distribution in climbing Hawaiian gobioid fishes: ontogeny and correlations with locomotor performance.

    PubMed

    Cediel, Roberto A; Blob, Richard W; Schrank, Gordon D; Plourde, Robert C; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2008-01-01

    Three species of Hawaiian amphidromous gobioid fishes are remarkable in their ability to climb waterfalls up to several hundred meters tall. Juvenile Lentipes concolor and Awaous guamensis climb using rapid bursts of axial undulation, whereas juvenile Sicyopterus stimpsoni climb using much slower movements, alternately attaching oral and pelvic sucking disks to the substrate during prolonged bouts of several cycles. Based on these differing climbing styles, we hypothesized that propulsive musculature in juvenile L. concolor and A. guamensis would be dominated by white muscle fibers, whereas S. stimpsoni would exhibit a greater proportion of red muscle fibers than other climbing species. We further predicted that, because adults of these species shift from climbing to burst swimming as their main locomotor behavior, muscle from adult fish of all three species would be dominated by white fibers. To test these hypotheses, we used ATPase assays to evaluate muscle fiber type distribution in Hawaiian climbing gobies for three anatomical regions (midbody, anal, and tail). Axial musculature was dominated by white muscle fibers in juveniles of all three species, but juvenile S. stimpsoni had a significantly greater proportion of red fibers than the other two species. Fiber type proportions of adult fishes did not differ significantly from those of juveniles. Thus, muscle fiber type proportions in juveniles appear to help accommodate differences in locomotor demands among these species, indicating that they overcome the common challenge of waterfall climbing through both diverse behaviors and physiological specializations. PMID:18222661

  14. Catalase-positive microperoxisomes in rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle fiber types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    The size, distribution, and content of catalase-reactive microperoxisomes were investigated cytochemically in three types of muscle fibers from the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of male rats. Muscle fibers were classified on the basis of the mitochondrial content and distribution, the Z-band widths, and the size and shape of myofibrils as the slow-twitch oxidative (SO), the fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and the fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers. It was found that both the EDL and soleus SO fibers possessed the largest microperoxisomes. A comparison of microperoxisome number per muscle fiber area or the microperoxisome area per fiber area revealed following ranking, starting from the largest number and the area-ratio values: soleus SO, EDL SO, EDL FOG, and EDL FG.

  15. Slow to fast alterations in skeletal muscle fibers caused by clenbuterol, a beta(2)-receptor agonist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Easton, Thomas G.; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2)-receptor agonist, clenbuterol, and a beta(2) antagonist, butoxamine, on the skeletal muscle fibers of rats were investigated. It was found that chronic treatment of rats with clenbuterol caused hypertrophy of histochemically identified fast-twitch, but not slow-twitch, fibers within the soleus, while in the extensor digitorum longus the mean areas of both fiber types were increased; in both muscles, the ratio of the number of fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was increased. In contrast, a treatment with butoxamine caused a reduction of the fast-twitch fiber size in both muscles, and the ratio of the fast-twitch to slow-twitch fibers was decreased.

  16. Sarcomere Length and Tension Changes in Tetanized Frog Muscle Fibers after Quick Stretches and Releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugi, Haruo; Kobayashi, Takakazu

    1983-10-01

    The sarcomere length changes in tetanized frog muscle fibers in response to quick fiber length changes were examined along the fiber length with a high-sensitivity laser diffraction technique. The experiments were only performed with muscle fibers in which the uniform orientation and sarcomere length of the component myofibrils were well preserved during a tetanus. When the sarcomere length changes were recorded near the fixed fiber end, the delay of the onset of sarcomere length change in response to the applied fiber length change tended to be longer than that of the onset of tension changes recorded at the fixed fiber end. The magnitude of sarcomere length changes was larger near the moving fiber end than near the fixed fiber end. In the case of quick releases, the resulting sarcomere shortening tended to outlast the fiber shortening, so that the quick tension recovery started during the sarcomere shortening. These results indicate (i) that the tension changes in response to quick fiber length changes may not give direct information about the cross-bridge properties and (ii) that the viscoelastic multisegmental nature of muscle fibers should be taken into consideration in interpreting the tension responses to quick length changes.

  17. Distribution of tropomyosin isoforms in different types of single fibers isolated from bovine skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Oe, M; Ojima, K; Nakajima, I; Chikuni, K; Shibata, M; Muroya, S

    2016-08-01

    To clarify the relationship between myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms and tropomyosin (TPM) isoforms in single fibers, 64 single fibers were isolated from each of bovine three muscles (masseter, semispinalis and semitendinosus). mRNA expressions of MyHC and TPM isoforms were analyzed by real-time PCR. All single fibers from the masseter expressed MyHC-slow. The fibers from the semispinalis expressed both MyHC-slow and 2a. The fibers from the semitendinosus expressed MyHC-slow, 2a and 2x. TPM-1 and TPM-2 were co-expressed in 2a and 2x type fibers, and TPM-2 and TPM-3 were co-expressed in slow type fibers. The expression pattern of TPM isoforms in each fiber type was similar between fibers isolated from different muscles. These results suggest that TPM-1 and TPM-3 isoforms correspond to the function of 2a or 2x type fibers and slow type fibers, respectively, with TPM-2 in common. Furthermore, the patterns of MyHC and TPM isoform combinations did not vary among single fibers isolated from the individual muscles examined. PMID:27105153

  18. Activated Muscle Satellite Cells Chase Ghosts.

    PubMed

    Mourikis, Philippos; Relaix, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    The in vivo behaviors of skeletal muscle stem cells, i.e., satellite cells, during homeostasis and after injury are poorly understood. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Webster et al. (2016) now perform a tour de force intravital microscopic analysis of this population, showing that "ghost fiber" remnants act as scaffolds to guide satellite cell divisions after injury. PMID:26849298

  19. Changes in fiber composition of soleus muscle during rat hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Sweeney, H. L.; Timson, B. F.; Padalino, M.; Dudenhoeffer, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A technique in which the gravitational load in the rear limbs of rats was chronically reduced is used to study soleus muscle atrophy in near-zero-gravity conditions. The results show a decline in the number of fibers in groups that contained the slow isoenzyme of myosin and which were classified as type I. The total number of fibers did not change, and fibers containing the intermediate isoenzyme and those classified as type IIa increased. The results are consistent with either a change in the composition within existing fibers or a simultaneous loss of slow fibers accompanied by de novo synthesis of intermediate and fast fibers.

  20. Overexpression of Striated Muscle Activator of Rho Signaling (STARS) Increases C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marita A.; Della Gatta, Paul A.; Ahmad Mir, Bilal; Kowalski, Greg M.; Kloehn, Joachim; McConville, Malcom J.; Russell, Aaron P.; Lamon, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Background: Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration depend on the activation of satellite cells, which leads to myocyte proliferation, differentiation and fusion with existing muscle fibers. Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly coordinated by a continuum of molecular signaling pathways. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) is an actin binding protein that regulates the transcription of genes involved in muscle cell growth, structure and function via the stimulation of actin polymerization and activation of serum-response factor (SRF) signaling. STARS mediates cell proliferation in smooth and cardiac muscle models; however, whether STARS overexpression enhances cell proliferation and differentiation has not been investigated in skeletal muscle cells. Results: We demonstrate for the first time that STARS overexpression enhances differentiation but not proliferation in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Increased differentiation was associated with an increase in the gene levels of the myogenic differentiation markers Ckm, Ckmt2 and Myh4, the differentiation factor Igf2 and the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) Myf5 and Myf6. Exposing C2C12 cells to CCG-1423, a pharmacological inhibitor of SRF preventing the nuclear translocation of its co-factor MRTF-A, had no effect on myotube differentiation rate, suggesting that STARS regulates differentiation via a MRTF-A independent mechanism. Conclusion: These findings position STARS as an important regulator of skeletal muscle growth and regeneration. PMID:26903873

  1. [Effect of vanadate on Ca++-activation in skeletal muscle].

    PubMed

    Son'kin, B Ia; Bukatina, A E

    1983-01-01

    Vanadate (0.1 mM) reduces tension of glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers, shifts tension--pCa curve to lower pCa, increases the rate constant of delayed tension development and changes dependence of this rate constant on the level of Ca2+-activation. Vanadate influence stops the increase of the rate constant with the rise of Ca++-activated tension. Since actin-myosin-ADP complex is dissociated by vanadate, the muscle performance at low activation levels is supposed to be conditioned largely by the cross-bridges interacting with actin of the actin blocks switched on by myosin-ADP. Kinetics of such cross-bridges differs from that of the cross bridges interacting with actin activated by Ca++ binding to troponin C. PMID:6556917

  2. Independent Active Contraction of Extraocular Muscle Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrew; Yoo, Lawrence; Demer, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Intramuscular innervation of horizontal rectus extraocular muscle (EOMs) is segregated into superior and inferior (transverse) compartments, whereas all EOMs are also divided into global (GL) and orbital (OL) layers with scleral and pulley insertions, respectively. Mechanical independence between both types of compartments has been demonstrated during passive tensile loading. We examined coupling between EOM compartments during active, ex vivo contraction. Methods. Fresh bovine EOMs were removed, and one compartment of each was coated with hydrophobic petrolatum. Contraction of the uncoated compartment was induced by immersion in a solution of 50 mM CaCl2 at 38°C labeled with sodium fluorescein dye, whereas tensions in both compartments were monitored by strain gauges. Control experiments omitted petrolatum so that the entire EOM contracted. After physiological experiments, EOMs were sectioned transversely to demonstrate specificity of CaCl2 permeation by yellow fluorescence dye excited by blue light. Results. In control experiments without petrolatum, both transverse and GL and OL compartments contracted similarly. Selective compartmental omission of petrolatum caused markedly independent compartmental contraction whether measured at the GL or the OL insertions or for transverse compartments at the scleral insertion. Although some CaCl2 spread occurred, mean (±SD) tension in the coated compartments averaged only 10.5 ± 3.3% and 6.0 ± 1.5% in GL/OL and transverse compartments, respectively relative to uncoated compartments. Fluorescein penetration confirmed selective CaCl2 permeation. Conclusions. These data confirm passive tensile findings of mechanical independence of EOM compartments and extend results to active contraction. EOMs behave actively as if composed of mechanically independent parallel fiber bundles having different insertional targets, consistent with the active pulley and transverse compartmental hypotheses. PMID:25503460

  3. Microgravity effects on 'postural' muscle activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layne, Charles S.; Spooner, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neuromuscular activation patterns associated with movements made in microgravity can contribute to muscular atrophy. Using electromyography (EMG) to monitor 'postural' muscles, it was found that free floating arm flexions made in microgravity were not always preceded by neuromuscular activation patterns normally observed during movements made in unit gravity. Additionally, manipulation of foot sensory input during microgravity arm flexion impacted upon anticipatory postural muscle activation.

  4. Composition of psoas major muscle fibers compared among humans, orangutans, and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tadanao

    2002-03-01

    In primate species the m. psoas major, the only muscle simultaneously controlling the spinal column and lower extremity, is expected to reflect morpho-functional adaptation to diversified locomotor behavior. By using histochemical analysis with Sudan black B staining, composition of different types of muscle fibers in the psoas major was compared between 2 Japanese macaques, 2 hamadryas baboons, 2 anubis baboons, 2 orangutans, and 17 humans. The comparison has revealed unique features of this muscle in humans: 1) Type 1 or red fibers are thicker than Type 2 or white fibers in humans but vice versa in nonhumans; 2) among the species examined the number of the muscle fibers per unit cross-sectional area is largest, implying the fibers are thinnest, in humans; 3) frequency of Type 1 fibers is highest in humans, intermediate in monkeys, and lowest in the orangutan, whereas Type 2 fibers show an inverse trend among the species. These results suggest a correspondence in primates between the composition of the psoas major muscle fibers and difference in substrates inhabited as well as in their positional behaviors. PMID:12050900

  5. Experiment K-308: Automatic analysis of muscle fibers from rats subjected to spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Chui, L. A.; Vandermeullen, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The morphology of histochemically prepared muscle sections from the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of flight and vivarium control rats was studied quantitatively. Both fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibers were significantly smaller in flight groups than in control groups. Fibers in group 4F were somewhat larger than in 1F, presumably due to growth after recovery. Fibers in 4V were slightly larger than in 1V, presumably due to age. The slow fibers showed more spaceflight induced size loss than fast fibers, suggesting they suffered more from hypogravity. The proportion of slow fibers was also lower in the flight groups, suggesting spaceflight induced fiber type conversion from slow to fast.

  6. Kinetics of thin filament activation probed by fluorescence of N-((2-(Iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-labeled troponin I incorporated into skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle: implications for regulation of muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B; Chalovich, JM

    1999-01-01

    Making use of troponin with fluorescently labeled troponin I subunit (N-((2-(iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole-troponin I, IANBD-TnI) that had previously been described in solution studies as a probe for thin filament activation (. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 77:7209-7213), we present a new approach that allows the kinetics of thin filament activation to be studied in skinned muscle fibers. After the exchange of native troponin for fluorescently labeled troponin, the fluorescence intensity is sensitive to both changes in calcium concentration and actin attachment of cross-bridges in their strong binding states (. Biophys. J. 77:000-000). Imposing rapid changes in the fraction of strongly attached cross-bridges, e.g., by switching from isometric contraction to high-speed shortening, causes changes in thin filament activation at fixed Ca(2+) concentrations that can be followed by recording fluorescence intensity. Upon changing to high-speed shortening we observed small (<20%) changes in fluorescence that became faster at higher Ca(2+) concentrations. At all Ca(2+) concentrations, these changes are more than 10-fold faster than force redevelopment subsequent to the period of unloaded shortening. We interpret this as an indication that equilibration among different states of the thin filament is rapid and becomes faster as Ca(2+) is raised. Fast equilibration suggests that the rate constant of force redevelopment is not limited by changes in the activation level of thin filaments induced by the isotonic contraction before force redevelopment. Instead, our modeling shows that, in agreement with our previous proposal for the regulation of muscle contraction, a rapid and Ca(2+)-dependent equilibration among different states of the thin filament can fully account for the Ca(2+) dependence of force redevelopment and the fluorescence changes described in this study. PMID:10545369

  7. Ultrastructural study of muscles fibers in tick Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum (Ixodoidea: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Bughdadi, Faisal A

    2010-09-01

    In the present study, ticks were obtained from a colony maintained at 28 degrees C and 75% relative humidity in at the Department of Biology, University College Umm Al-Qura University, Saudi Arabia and the Transmission Electron Microscope technique (TEM) was used to describes the ultrastructure and description of muscle of the of ixodid tick Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum. The results showed that muscles of the unfed ticks Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum in longitudinal sections are spindle-shaped to cylindrical muscle fibers. In the unfed nymph Hyalomma (Hyalomma) anatolicum anatolicum skeletal and visceral muscles are distinguished according to structure, function and position. These muscles include the capitulum, dorsoventral and leg oblique muscles. All muscle fibers are ensheathed (covered by sheath) in a sarcolemma. Their muscle fibers have striated pattern of successive sarcomeres whose thick myosin filaments are surrounded by orbitals of up to 12 thin actin filaments. The cytoplasm of the epidermal cell appears largely devoted with complicated microtubules present in parallel with long axis of adjacent muscle fibers. The cell membrane invaginates into tubular system extending deeply into the sarcoplasm and closely associated to cisternae of sarcoplasmic reticulum. The tubular system and sarcoplasmic reticulum forming two-membered (dyads) are considered to be the main route of calcium ions whose movement are synchronized with the motor impulse to control muscles contraction. In the sarcoplasm two types of muscle fibers are recognized according to thickness and density and mitochondrial size, distribution and population. Both skeletal and visceral muscles are invaginated by tracheoles and innervated by nerve axons containing synaptic vesicles. The actin and myosin filaments are slightly interrupted and the tubular system sarcoplasmic reticulum is well demonstrated. PMID:21313907

  8. The bioelectrical source in computing single muscle fiber action potentials.

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, B K; Wolters, H; Wallinga, W; Rutten, W L; Boom, H B

    1993-01-01

    Generally, single muscle fiber action potentials (SFAPs) are modeled as a convolution of the bioelectrical source (being the transmembrane current) with a weighting or transfer function, representing the electrical volume conduction. In practice, the intracellular action potential (IAP) rather than the transmembrane current is often used as the source, because the IAP is relatively easy to obtain under experimental conditions. Using a core conductor assumption, the transmembrane current equals the second derivative of the IAP. In previous articles, discrepancies were found between experimental and simulated SFAPs. Adaptations in the volume conductor slightly altered the simulation results. Another origin of discrepancy might be an erroneous description of the source. Therefore, in the present article, different sources were studied. First, an analytical description of the IAP was used. Furthermore, an experimental IAP, a special experimental SFAP, and a measured transmembrane current scaled to our experimental situation were applied. The results for the experimental IAP were comparable to those with the analytical IAP. The best agreement between experimental and simulated data was found for a measured transmembrane current as source, but differences are still apparent. PMID:8324186

  9. Active "itch fibers" in chronic pruritus.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, M; Hilliges, M; Schmidt, R; Ørstavik, K; Vahlquist, C; Weidner, C; Handwerker, H O; Torebjörk, H E

    2003-08-26

    An itch-specific neuronal pathway was recently discovered in healthy humans and animals. Here the authors report that activity in this specific pathway coincides with itch under pathophysiologic conditions in a patient with chronic pruritus. Microneurographic recordings from the symptomatic area revealed spontaneous activity in six single C-fiber afferents that had the characteristic features of "itch fibers." Itch may be caused by activity in a specific subpopulation of C-fiber afferents. PMID:12939442

  10. An ultrastructural and histochemical study of the flexor tibialis muscle fiber types in male and female stick insects (Eurycantha calcarata, L).

    PubMed

    Pilehvarian, Ali Asghar

    2015-10-01

    In this study the ultrastructural and histochemical characteristics of the flexor tibialis muscle fibers of the specialized metathoracic legs in the male and those of homologous and unspecialized ones in the female stick insects, Eurycantha calcarata, L, were examined. For the ultrastructural analysis, the muscle was divided longitudinally and vertically to produce a total of 12 sample parts e.g., anterior-dorsal-distal (ADD), posterior-ventral-medial (PVM) and so on. Light and electron microscopes were used to observe the muscle tissue. The methods for myosin adenosine triphosphatase (mATPase) and nicotine adenine dinucleotide- tetrazolium (NADH-TR) staining were modified from the methods of (Stokes et al., '79; Anttila et al., 2009; Anttila and Manttari, 2009). Sections with thickness of 22 μm, were cut from the anterior and the posterior surfaces of the muscle, using a cryostat. The histochemical and ultrastructural results showed that the muscles of both the male and the female were mixtures of physiological fiber types, with predominantly fast fibers. The muscles were composed of fibers with different staining properties for both mATPase and NADH-TR activities. The population of fibers within the muscles was heterogeneous. The differences between the population of the male and that of the female were significant. The means of most criteria e.g., mitochondrial amount and sarcoplasmic reticulum area predicted that the muscle of the male contained more fast fibers than the female. The histochemical examination also showed that the muscle of the male contained more fibers stained darkly for mATPase and lightly for NADH-TR. PMID:26173440

  11. Jaw muscle fiber type distribution in Hawaiian gobioid stream fishes: histochemical correlations with feeding ecology and behavior.

    PubMed

    Maie, Takashi; Meister, Andrew B; Leonard, Gerald L; Schrank, Gordon D; Blob, Richard W; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2011-12-01

    Differences in fiber type distribution in the axial muscles of Hawaiian gobioid stream fishes have previously been linked to differences in locomotor performance, behavior, and diet across species. Using ATPase assays, we examined fiber types of the jaw opening sternohyoideus muscle across five species, as well as fiber types of three jaw closing muscles (adductor mandibulae A1, A2, and A3). The jaw muscles of some species of Hawaiian stream gobies contained substantial red fiber components. Some jaw muscles always had greater proportions of white muscle fibers than other jaw muscles, independent of species. In addition, comparing across species, the dietary generalists (Awaous guamensis and Stenogobius hawaiiensis) had a lower proportion of white muscle fibers in all jaw muscles than the dietary specialists (Lentipes concolor, Sicyopterus stimpsoni, and Eleotris sandwicensis). Among Hawaiian stream gobies, generalist diets may favor a wider range of muscle performance, provided by a mix of white and red muscle fibers, than is typical of dietary specialists, which may have a higher proportion of fast-twitch white fibers in jaw muscles to help meet the demands of rapid predatory strikes or feeding in fast-flowing habitats. PMID:21978841

  12. Contraction-induced injury to single permeabilized muscle fibers from normal and congenitally-clefted goat palates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine (LVP) muscle. It was determined that muscle fiber type, size, and sensitivity to contraction-induced injury was different between cleft palate ind...

  13. Effects of fiber type and diet on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times of skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mardini, I.A.; McCarter, R.J.; Fullerton, G.D.

    1986-03-01

    NMR studies of muscle have typically used muscles of mixed fiber composition and have not taken into account the metabolic state of the host. Samples of psoas (type IIB fibers) and soleus (type I fibers) muscles were obtained from 3 groups of rabbits: group C, fed regular chow; group DK fed a potassium deficient diet; and group HC fed a high cholesterol diet. The T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ relaxation times of psoas and soleus muscles were not significantly different for group C. Following dietary manipulation, (groups KD and HC), however, the relaxation times of the psoas and soleus muscles were significantly different. There was also a significant difference in water content of psoas muscles in groups KD and HC vs. group C but the observed differences in NMR results could be only partially accounted for by the shift in water content. The authors results suggest that (1) changes in ion or cholesterol concentration are capable of inducing changes in water bonding and structuring in muscle tissues; (2) diet must be added to the growing list of environmental factors that can cause NMR contrast changes; (3) selective use of muscles rich in one fiber type or another for NMR measurements could provide either control or diagnostic information, related to changes in body composition.

  14. Sex-Based Differences in Skeletal Muscle Kinetics and Fiber-Type Composition

    PubMed Central

    Haizlip, K. M.; Harrison, B. C.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have identified over 3,000 genes that are differentially expressed in male and female skeletal muscle. Here, we review the sex-based differences in skeletal muscle fiber composition, myosin heavy chain expression, contractile function, and the regulation of these physiological differences by thyroid hormone, estrogen, and testosterone. The findings presented lay the basis for the continued work needed to fully understand the skeletal muscle differences between males and females. PMID:25559153

  15. Effects of estrogen on genioglossal muscle contractile properties and fiber-type distribution in chronic intermittent hypoxia rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Hua; Huang, Yan; Shao, Xiao

    2009-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a highly prevalent disorder that is characterized by recurrent sleep-induced collapse of the upper airway. Genioglossus is an important pharyngeal dilator muscle that helps to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The effect of female hormones on pharyngeal dilator muscle activity may be one possible explanation for the differences observed in the prevalence of OSAHS between genders. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of estrogen on genioglossus activity in rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Eight-wk-old female rats were ovariectomized or sham-operated, received 5-wk of estrogen replacement therapy, and/or were exposed to CIH. The contractile properties of the genioglossus were measured. ATPase staining was performed to determine the per cent fiber-type distribution and to measure the cross-sectional area (CSA) of muscle fibers. Myosin heavy chain phenotypes were determined by gel electrophoresis. Chronic intermittent hypoxia reduced the contractile properties of the genioglossus muscle, decreased the CSA of type IIA fibers, and decreased the proportion of myosin heavy chain IIA, and ovariectomy exacerbated this effect. However, estrogen replacement can partially reverse the effect of CIH in ovariectomized rats. It is concluded that a low female hormone level and CIH may increase fatigue and alter genioglossus structure and function, and may compromise the maintenance of upper airway patency, while estrogen may help to reverse this effect. PMID:20121931

  16. Size and myonuclear domains in Rhesus soleus muscle fibers: short-term spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Talmadge, R. J.; Bodine, S. C.; Fanton, J. W.; Koslovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    The cross-sectional area (CSA), myonuclear number per mm of fiber length, and myonuclear domain (cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus) of mechanically isolated single fibers from biopsies of the soleus muscle of 5 vivarium control, 3 flight simulation and 2 flight (BION 11) Rhesus monkeys (Macaca [correction of Macacca] mulatta) were determined using confocal microscopy before and after a 14-day experimental period. Simulation monkeys were confined in chairs placed in capsules identical to those used during the flight. Fibers were classified as type I, type II or hybrid (containing both types I and II) based on myosin heavy chain (MHC) gel electrophoresis. A majority of the fibers sampled contained only type I MHC, i.e. 89, 62 and 68% for the control, simulation and flight groups, respectively. Most of the remaining fibers were hybrids, i.e. 8, 36 and 32% for the same groups. There were no significant pre-post differences in the fiber type composition for any of the experimental groups. There also were no significant pre-post differences in fiber CSA, myonuclear number or myonuclear domain. There was, however, a tendency for the fibers in the post-flight biopsies to have a smaller mean CSA and myonuclear domain (approximately 10%, p=0.07) than the fibers in the pre-flight biopsy. The combined mean cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus for all muscle fiber phenotypes in the Rhesus soleus muscle was approximately 25,000 micrometers3 and there were no differences in pre-post samples for the control and simulated groups. The cytoplasmic domains tended to be lower (p=0.08) after than before flight. No phenotype differences in cytoplasmic domains were observed. These data suggest that after a relatively short period of actual spaceflight, modest fiber atrophy occurs in the soleus muscle fibers without a concomitant change in myonuclear number.

  17. Fiber size and myosin phenotypes of selected rhesus lower limb muscles after a 14-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bodine, S. C.; Pierotti, D. J.; Talmadge, R. J.; Barkhoudarian, G.; Kim, J.; Fanton, J. W.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsies were taken from the rhesus (Macaca mulatta) soleus (Sol, a slow ankle extensor), medial gastrocnemius (MG, a fast ankle extensor), tibialis anterior (TA, a fast ankle flexor), and vastus lateralis (VL, a fast knee extensor) muscles in vivarium controls (n=5) before and after either a 14-day spaceflight (Bion 11, n=2) or a 14-day ground-based flight simulation (n=3). Myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition (gel electrophoresis), fiber type distribution (immunohistochemistry), and fiber size were determined. Although there were no significant changes, each muscle showed trends towards adaptation.

  18. Idiopathic lactic acidemia with developmental delay and type 1 muscle fiber atrophy: report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Iso, A; Murakami, N; Yoneyama, H; Hanaoka, S; Kurokawa, T; Nonaka, I

    1993-01-01

    Two infants with generalized muscle hypotonia with mild muscle weakness and markedly delayed developmental milestones, had high lactate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from early infancy. Biochemical and morphologic studies of biopsied muscles disclosed no abnormality except for type 1 fiber atrophy, which was quite different from patients with central nervous involvement with type 2 fiber atrophy. In both patients, the disease was not progressive and lactate levels gradually decreased. Although no metabolic defect was found, these patients probably shared common pathogenetic mechanism. PMID:8279656

  19. Multiple isoforms of myofibrillar proteins in crustacean muscle: evidence for two slow fiber types

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Four distinct patterns of myofibrillar proteins, extracted from fast and slow muscles of the lobster, Homarus americanus, are distinguished by different assemblages of regulatory and contractile protein variants. Multiple isoforms of troponin-T, -I, and -C, paramyosin, and myosin light chains occur in six muscles of the claws and abdomen. Analysis of glycerinated fibers from the claws of lobster and land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis, show that more than one isoform is expressed in a single fiber, forming unique assemblages by which subgroups can be discriminated within the broader categories of fast and slow fibers. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Effect of joule temperature jump on tension and stiffness of skinned rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Bershitsky SYu; Tsaturyan, A K

    1989-11-01

    The effects of a temperature jump (T-jump) from 5-7 degrees C to 26-33 degrees C were studied on tension and stiffness of glycerol-extracted fibers from rabbit psoas muscle in rigor and during maximal Ca2+ activation. The T-jump was initiated by passing an alternating current pulse (30 kHz, up to 2.5 kV, duration 0.2 ms) through a fiber suspended in air. In rigor the T-jump induces a drop of both tension and stiffness. During maximal activation, the immediate stiffness dropped by (4.4 +/- 1.6) x 10(-3)/1 degree C (mean + SD) in response to the T-jump, and this was followed by a monoexponential stiffness rise by a factor of 1.59 +/- 0.14 with a rate constant ks = 174 +/- 42 s-1 (mean +/- SD, n = 8). The data show that the fiber stiffness, determined by the cross-bridge elasticity, in both rigor and maximal activation is not rubber-like. In the activated fibers the T-jump induced a biexponential tension rise by a factor of 3.45 +/- 0.76 (mean +/- SD, n = 8) with the rate constants 500-1,000 s-1 for the first exponent and 167 +/- 39 s-1 (mean +/- SD, n = 8) for the second exponent. The data are in accordance with the assumption that the first phase of the tension transient after the T-jump is due to a force-generating step in the attached cross-bridges, whereas the second one is related to detachment and reattachment of cross-bridges. PMID:2605297

  1. Conditional knockout of Mn-SOD targeted to type IIB skeletal muscle fibers increases oxidative stress and is sufficient to alter aerobic exercise capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lustgarten, Michael S.; Jang, Youngmok C.; Liu, Yuhong; Muller, Florian L.; Qi, Wenbo; Steinhelper, Mark; Brooks, Susan V.; Larkin, Lisa; Shimizu, Takahiko; Shirasawa, Takuji; McManus, Linda M.; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Richardson, Arlan

    2009-01-01

    In vitro studies of isolated skeletal muscle have shown that oxidative stress is limiting with respect to contractile function. Mitochondria are a potential source of muscle function-limiting oxidants. To test the hypothesis that skeletal muscle-specific mitochondrial oxidative stress is sufficient to limit muscle function, we bred mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the promoter for the inhibitory subunit of troponin (TnIFast-iCre) with mice containing a floxed Sod2 (Sod2fl/fl) allele. Mn-SOD activity was reduced by 82% in glycolytic (mainly type II) muscle fiber homogenates from young TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice. Furthermore, Mn-SOD content was reduced by 70% only in type IIB muscle fibers. Aconitase activity was decreased by 56%, which suggests an increase in mitochondrial matrix superoxide. Mitochondrial superoxide release was elevated more than twofold by mitochondria isolated from glycolytic skeletal muscle in TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice. In contrast, the rate of mitochondrial H2O2 production was reduced by 33%, and only during respiration with complex II substrate. F2-isoprostanes were increased by 36% in tibialis anterior muscles isolated from TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice. Elevated glycolytic muscle-specific mitochondrial oxidative stress and damage in TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice were associated with a decreased ability of the extensor digitorum longus and gastrocnemius muscles to produce contractile force as a function of time, whereas force production by the soleus muscle was unaffected. TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice ran 55% less distance on a treadmill than wild-type mice. Collectively, these data suggest that elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress and damage in glycolytic muscle fibers are sufficient to reduce contractile muscle function and aerobic exercise capacity. PMID:19776389

  2. Contractile function of single muscle fibers after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardetto, P. R.; Schluter, J. M.; Fitts, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of two weeks of hind-limb suspension (HS) on the functional properties of slow-twitch and fast-twitch single fibers isolated from the predominantly slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch gastrocnemius of the suspended leg of rats were investigated. Single fibers were suspended between a motor arm and force transducer, and, after their functional properties were studied, the fiber type was established by the myosin heavy chain analysis. It was found that, after HS, the greatest decrease in diameter and a reduction in peak tension occurred in slow-twitch fibers from soleus, followed by slow-twitch fibers from gastrocnemius. Fast-twitch fibers from the red gastrocnemius showed a significant reduction in diameter but no change in peak tension. No effect of HS was observed on the diameter of the fast-twitch fibers from the white gastsrocnemius (which is known to contain 87 percent fast glycolytic fibers).

  3. [Muscle enzyme activity and exercise].

    PubMed

    Gojanovic, B; Feihl, F; Gremion, G; Waeber, B

    2009-02-01

    Exercise is classically associated with muscular soreness, presenting one to two days later, delayed onset muscular soreness. Blood muscle enzymes and protein elevations are characteristic, and may cause renal failure. Creatin phosphokinase peak appears on the fourth day and depends on exercise type and individual parameters. This effect is attenuated with repeated bouts, by habituation. Metabolic complications are rare. The knowledge of this reaction, even with common exercises, allows to postpone investigations for a complex metabolic disorder, or to avoid stopping a medication for fear of a side effect, as with statins. Indeed, it is necessary to wait for seven days without any exercise before interpreting an elevated CK result. PMID:19180440

  4. Caloric restriction induces energy-sparing alterations in skeletal muscle contraction, fiber composition and local thyroid hormone metabolism that persist during catch-up fat upon refeeding

    PubMed Central

    De Andrade, Paula B. M.; Neff, Laurence A.; Strosova, Miriam K.; Arsenijevic, Denis; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophélie; Scapozza, Leonardo; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T.; Dulloo, Abdul G.; Dorchies, Olivier M.

    2015-01-01

    Weight regain after caloric restriction results in accelerated fat storage in adipose tissue. This catch-up fat phenomenon is postulated to result partly from suppressed skeletal muscle thermogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated whether the reduced rate of skeletal muscle contraction-relaxation cycle that occurs after caloric restriction persists during weight recovery and could contribute to catch-up fat. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding, in which fat recovery is driven by suppressed thermogenesis, we show that contraction and relaxation of leg muscles are slower after both semistarvation and refeeding. These effects are associated with (i) higher expression of muscle deiodinase type 3 (DIO3), which inactivates tri-iodothyronine (T3), and lower expression of T3-activating enzyme, deiodinase type 2 (DIO2), (ii) slower net formation of T3 from its T4 precursor in muscles, and (iii) accumulation of slow fibers at the expense of fast fibers. These semistarvation-induced changes persisted during recovery and correlated with impaired expression of transcription factors involved in slow-twitch muscle development. We conclude that diminished muscle thermogenesis following caloric restriction results from reduced muscle T3 levels, alteration in muscle-specific transcription factors, and fast-to-slow fiber shift causing slower contractility. These energy-sparing effects persist during weight recovery and contribute to catch-up fat. PMID:26441673

  5. Caloric restriction induces energy-sparing alterations in skeletal muscle contraction, fiber composition and local thyroid hormone metabolism that persist during catch-up fat upon refeeding.

    PubMed

    De Andrade, Paula B M; Neff, Laurence A; Strosova, Miriam K; Arsenijevic, Denis; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophélie; Scapozza, Leonardo; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ruegg, Urs T; Dulloo, Abdul G; Dorchies, Olivier M

    2015-01-01

    Weight regain after caloric restriction results in accelerated fat storage in adipose tissue. This catch-up fat phenomenon is postulated to result partly from suppressed skeletal muscle thermogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated whether the reduced rate of skeletal muscle contraction-relaxation cycle that occurs after caloric restriction persists during weight recovery and could contribute to catch-up fat. Using a rat model of semistarvation-refeeding, in which fat recovery is driven by suppressed thermogenesis, we show that contraction and relaxation of leg muscles are slower after both semistarvation and refeeding. These effects are associated with (i) higher expression of muscle deiodinase type 3 (DIO3), which inactivates tri-iodothyronine (T3), and lower expression of T3-activating enzyme, deiodinase type 2 (DIO2), (ii) slower net formation of T3 from its T4 precursor in muscles, and (iii) accumulation of slow fibers at the expense of fast fibers. These semistarvation-induced changes persisted during recovery and correlated with impaired expression of transcription factors involved in slow-twitch muscle development. We conclude that diminished muscle thermogenesis following caloric restriction results from reduced muscle T3 levels, alteration in muscle-specific transcription factors, and fast-to-slow fiber shift causing slower contractility. These energy-sparing effects persist during weight recovery and contribute to catch-up fat. PMID:26441673

  6. In Vivo Microscopy Reveals Extensive Embedding of Capillaries within the Sarcolemma of Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Brian; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Dao, Lam; Bakalar, Matthew; French, Stephanie; Chess, David J.; Taylor, Joni L.; Picard, Martin; Aponte, Angel; Daniels, Mathew P.; Esfahani, Shervin; Cushman, Samuel; Balaban, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide insight into mitochondrial function in vivo, we evaluated the 3D spatial relationship between capillaries, mitochondria, and muscle fibers in live mice. Methods 3D volumes of in vivo murine Tibialis anterior muscles were imaged by multi-photon microscopy (MPM). Muscle fiber type, mitochondrial distribution, number of capillaries, and capillary-to-fiber contact were assessed. The role of myoglobin-facilitated diffusion was examined in myoglobin knockout mice. Distribution of GLUT4 was also evaluated in the context of the capillary and mitochondrial network. Results MPM revealed that 43.6 ± 3.3% of oxidative fiber capillaries had ≥ 50% of their circumference embedded in a groove in the sarcolemma, in vivo. Embedded capillaries were tightly associated with dense mitochondrial populations lateral to capillary grooves and nearly absent below the groove. Mitochondrial distribution, number of embedded capillaries, and capillary-to-fiber contact were proportional to fiber oxidative capacity and unaffected by myoglobin knockout. GLUT4 did not preferentially localize to embedded capillaries. Conclusions Embedding capillaries in the sarcolemma may provide a regulatory mechanism to optimize delivery of oxygen to heterogeneous groups of muscle fibers. We hypothesize that mitochondria locate to paravascular regions due to myofibril voids created by embedded capillaries, not to enhance the delivery of oxygen to the mitochondria. PMID:25279425

  7. A myostatin inhibitor (propeptide-Fc) increases muscle mass and muscle fiber size in aged mice but does not increase bone density or bone strength.

    PubMed

    Arounleut, Phonepasong; Bialek, Peter; Liang, Li-Fang; Upadhyay, Sunil; Fulzele, Sadanand; Johnson, Maribeth; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Isales, Carlos M; Hamrick, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    Loss of muscle and bone mass with age are significant contributors to falls and fractures among the elderly. Myostatin deficiency is associated with increased muscle mass in mice, dogs, cows, sheep and humans, and mice lacking myostatin have been observed to show increased bone density in the limb, spine, and jaw. Transgenic overexpression of myostatin propeptide, which binds to and inhibits the active myostatin ligand, also increases muscle mass and bone density in mice. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that in vivo inhibition of myostatin using an injectable myostatin propeptide (GDF8 propeptide-Fc) would increase both muscle mass and bone density in aged (24 mo) mice. Male mice were injected weekly (20 mg/kg body weight) with recombinant myostatin propeptide-Fc (PRO) or vehicle (VEH; saline) for four weeks. There was no difference in body weight between the two groups at the end of the treatment period, but PRO treatment significantly increased mass of the tibialis anterior muscle (+ 7%) and increased muscle fiber diameter of the extensor digitorum longus (+ 16%) and soleus (+ 6%) muscles compared to VEH treatment. Bone volume relative to total volume (BV/TV) of the femur calculated by microCT did not differ significantly between PRO- and VEH-treated mice, and ultimate force (Fu), stiffness (S), toughness (U) measured from three-point bending tests also did not differ significantly between groups. Histomorphometric assays also revealed no differences in bone formation or resorption in response to PRO treatment. These data suggest that while developmental perturbation of myostatin signaling through either gene knockout or transgenic inhibition may alter both muscle and bone mass in mice, pharmacological inhibition of myostatin in aged mice has a more pronounced effect on skeletal muscle than on bone. PMID:23832079

  8. An embryonic myosin converter domain influences Drosophila indirect flight muscle stretch activation, power generation and flight

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Newhard, Christopher S.; Ramanath, Seemanti; Sheppard, Debra; Swank, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Stretch activation (SA) is critical to the flight ability of insects powered by asynchronous, indirect flight muscles (IFMs). An essential muscle protein component for SA and power generation is myosin. Which structural domains of myosin are significant for setting SA properties and power generation levels is poorly understood. We made use of the transgenic techniques and unique single muscle myosin heavy chain gene of Drosophila to test the influence of the myosin converter domain on IFM SA and power generation. Replacing the endogenous converter with an embryonic version decreased SA tension and the rate of SA tension generation. The alterations in SA properties and myosin kinetics from the converter exchange caused power generation to drop to 10% of control fiber power when the optimal conditions for control fibers – 1% muscle length (ML) amplitude and 150 Hz oscillation frequency – were applied to fibers expressing the embryonic converter (IFI-EC). Optimizing conditions for IFI-EC fiber power production, by doubling ML amplitude and decreasing oscillation frequency by 60%, improved power output to 60% of optimized control fiber power. IFI-EC flies altered their aerodynamic flight characteristics to better match optimal fiber power generation conditions as wing beat frequency decreased and wing stroke amplitude increased. This enabled flight in spite of the drastic changes to fiber mechanical performance. PMID:24115062

  9. Myosin regulatory light chain modulates the Ca2+ dependence of the kinetics of tension development in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J R; Diffee, G M; Moss, R L

    1996-01-01

    To determine the role of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) in modulating contraction in skeletal muscle, we examined the rate of tension development in bundles of skinned skeletal muscle fibers as a function of the level of Ca(2+) activation after UV flash-induced release of Ca(2+) from the photosensitive Ca(2+) chelator DM-nitrophen. In control fiber bundles, the rate of tension development was highly dependent on the concentration of activator Ca(2+) after the flash. There was a greater than twofold increase in the rate of tension development when the post-flash [Ca(2+)] was increased from the lowest level tested (which produced a steady tension that was 42% of maximum tension) to the highest level (producing 97% of maximum tension). However, when 40-70% of endogenous myosin RLC was extracted from the fiber bundles, tension developed at the maximum rate, regardless of the post-flash concentration of Ca(2+). Thus, the Ca(2+) dependence of the rate of tension development was eliminated by partial extraction of myosin RLC, an effect that was partially reversed by recombination of RLC back into the fiber bundles. The elimination of the Ca(2+) dependence of the kinetics of tension development was specific to the extraction of RLC rather than an artifact of the co-extraction of both RLC and Troponin C, because the rate of tension development was still Ca(2+) dependent, even when nearly 50% of endogenous Troponin C was extracted from fiber bundles fully replete with RLC. Thus, myosin RLC appears to be a key component in modulating Ca(2+) sensitive cross-bridge transitions that limit the rate of force development after photorelease of Ca(2+) in skeletal muscle fibers. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 PMID:9172757

  10. Muscle cell membranes from early degeneration muscle cell fibers in Solenopsis are leaky to lanthanum: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.G.; Davis, W.L.

    1985-06-01

    Lanthanum infusion techniques, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis were utilized to compare the permeability of muscle cell membranes from normal and degenerating muscle fibers of Solenopsis spp. In normal fibers, the electron-dense tracer was limited to components of the sarcotubular system. However, the insemination-induced degeneration of muscle fibers was characterized by the presence of an electron-dense precipitate within the myofibrils and mitochondria as well as in the extramyofibrillar spaces. The electron-dense material was subsequently identified by elemental analysis to be lanthanum. Such data indicate that one of the earliest stages of muscle degeneration involves an alteration in cell membrane permeability.

  11. Muscle metaboreflex activation during dynamic exercise vasoconstricts ischemic active skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Machado, Tiago M; Alvarez, Alberto; Krishnan, Abhinav C; Hanna, Hanna W; Altamimi, Yasir H; Senador, Danielle; Spranger, Marty D; O'Leary, Donal S

    2015-12-15

    Metabolite accumulation due to ischemia of active skeletal muscle stimulates group III/IV chemosensitive afferents eliciting reflex increases in arterial blood pressure and sympathetic activity, termed the muscle metaboreflex. We and others have previously demonstrated sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction of coronary, renal, and forelimb vasculatures with muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA). Whether MMA elicits vasoconstriction of the ischemic muscle from which it originates is unknown. We hypothesized that the vasodilation in active skeletal muscle with imposed ischemia becomes progressively restrained by the increasing sympathetic vasoconstriction during MMA. We activated the metaboreflex during mild dynamic exercise in chronically instrumented canines via graded reductions in hindlimb blood flow (HLBF) before and after α1-adrenergic blockade [prazosin (50 μg/kg)], β-adrenergic blockade [propranolol (2 mg/kg)], and α1 + β-blockade. Hindlimb resistance was calculated as femoral arterial pressure/HLBF. During mild exercise, HLBF must be reduced below a threshold level before the reflex is activated. With initial reductions in HLBF, vasodilation occurred with the imposed ischemia. Once the muscle metaboreflex was elicited, hindlimb resistance increased. This increase in hindlimb resistance was abolished by α1-adrenergic blockade and exacerbated after β-adrenergic blockade. We conclude that metaboreflex activation during submaximal dynamic exercise causes sympathetically mediated α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in ischemic skeletal muscle. This limits the ability of the reflex to improve blood flow to the muscle. PMID:26475591

  12. Clustering of the human skeletal muscle fibers using linear programming and angular Hilbertian metrics.

    PubMed

    Neji, Radhouène; Besbes, Ahmed; Komodakis, Nikos; Deux, Jean-François; Maatouk, Mezri; Rahmouni, Alain; Bassez, Guillaume; Fleury, Gilles; Paragios, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a manifold clustering method fo the classification of fibers obtained from diffusion tensor images (DTI) of the human skeletal muscle. Using a linear programming formulation of prototype-based clustering, we propose a novel fiber classification algorithm over manifolds that circumvents the necessity to embed the data in low dimensional spaces and determines automatically the number of clusters. Furthermore, we propose the use of angular Hilbertian metrics between multivariate normal distributions to define a family of distances between tensors that we generalize to fibers. These metrics are used to approximate the geodesic distances over the fiber manifold. We also discuss the case where only geodesic distances to a reduced set of landmark fibers are available. The experimental validation of the method is done using a manually annotated significant dataset of DTI of the calf muscle for healthy and diseased subjects. PMID:19694249

  13. Post-Exercise Muscle Glycogen Repletion in the Extreme: Effect of Food Absence and Active Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Paul A.; Fairchild, Timothy J.; Ferreira, Luis D.; Bräu, Lambert

    2004-01-01

    Glycogen plays a major role in supporting the energy demands of skeletal muscles during high intensity exercise. Despite its importance, the amount of glycogen stored in skeletal muscles is so small that a large fraction of it can be depleted in response to a single bout of high intensity exercise. For this reason, it is generally recommended to ingest food after exercise to replenish rapidly muscle glycogen stores, otherwise one’s ability to engage in high intensity activity might be compromised. But what if food is not available? It is now well established that, even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. This is facilitated, in part, by the transient dephosphorylation-mediated activation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase. There is also evidence that muscle glycogen synthesis occurs even under conditions conducive to an increased oxidation of lactate post-exercise, such as during active recovery from high intensity exercise. Indeed, although during active recovery glycogen resynthesis is impaired in skeletal muscle as a whole because of increased lactate oxidation, muscle glycogen stores are replenished in Type IIa and IIb fibers while being broken down in Type I fibers of active muscles. This unique ability of Type II fibers to replenish their glycogen stores during exercise should not come as a surprise given the advantages in maintaining adequate muscle glycogen stores in those fibers that play a major role in fight or flight responses. Key Points Even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. During active recovery from exercise, skeletal muscles rich in type II fibers replenish part of their glycogen stores even in the absence of food intake. Post-exercise muscle glycogen synthesis in the

  14. Perilipin 4 in human skeletal muscle: localization and effect of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Pourteymour, Shirin; Lee, Sindre; Langleite, Torgrim M; Eckardt, Kristin; Hjorth, Marit; Bindesbøll, Christian; Dalen, Knut T; Birkeland, Kåre I; Drevon, Christian A; Holen, Torgeir; Norheim, Frode

    2015-01-01

    Perilipins (PLINs) coat the surface of lipid droplets and are important for the regulation of lipid turnover. Knowledge about the physiological role of the individual PLINs in skeletal muscle is limited although lipid metabolism is very important for muscle contraction. To determine the effect of long-term exercise on PLINs expression, 26 middle-aged, sedentary men underwent 12 weeks combined endurance and strength training intervention. Muscle biopsies from m. vastus lateralis and subcutaneous adipose tissue were taken before and after the intervention and total gene expression was measured with deep mRNA sequencing. PLIN4 mRNA exhibited the highest expression of all five PLINs in both tissues, and the expression was significantly reduced after long-term exercise in skeletal muscle. Moreover, PLIN4 mRNA expression levels in muscle correlated with the expression of genes involved in de novo phospholipid biosynthesis, with muscular content of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine, and with the content of subsarcolemmal lipid droplets. The PLIN4 protein was mainly located at the periphery of skeletal muscle fibers, with higher levels in slow-twitch as compared to fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibers. In summary, we report reduced expression of PLIN4 after long-term physical activity, and preferential slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibers and plasma membrane-associated PLIN4 location. PMID:26265748

  15. Suppression of muscle contraction by vanadate. Mechanical and ligand binding studies on glycerol-extracted rabbit fibers.

    PubMed

    Dantzig, J A; Goldman, Y E

    1985-09-01

    The suppression of tension development by orthovanadate (Vi) was studied in mechanical experiments and by measuring the binding of radioactive Vi and nucleotides to glycerol-extracted rabbit muscle fibers. During active contractions, Vi bound to the cross-bridges and suppressed tension with an apparent second-order rate constant of 1.34 X 10(3) M-1s-1. The half-saturation concentration for tension suppression was 94 microM Vi. The incubation of fibers in Vi relaxing or rigor solutions prior to initiation of active contractions had little effect on the initial rise of active tension. The addition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and Vi to fibers in rigor did not cause relaxation. Suppression of tension only developed during cross-bridge cycling. After slow relaxation from rigor in 1 mM Vi and low (50 microM) MgATP concentration (0 Ca2+), radioactive Vi and ADP were trapped within the fiber. This finding indicated the formation of a stable myosin X ADP X Vi complex, as has been reported in biochemical experiments with isolated myosin. Vi and ADP trapped within the fibers were released only by subsequent cross-bridge attachment. Vi and ADP were preferentially trapped under conditions of cross-bridge cycling in the presence of ATP rather than in relaxed fibers or in rigor with ADP. These results indicate that in the normal cross-bridge cycle, inorganic phosphate (Pi) is released from actomyosin before ADP. The resulting actomyosin X ADP intermediate can bind Vi and Pi. This intermediate probably supports force. Vi behaves as a close analogue of Pi in muscle fibers, as it does with isolated actomyosin. PMID:3903036

  16. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  17. Chronic Intrinsic Transient Tracheal Occlusion Elicits Diaphragmatic Muscle Fiber Remodeling in Conscious Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barbara K.; Martin, A. Daniel; Vandenborne, Krista; Darragh, Brittany D.; Davenport, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of inspiratory muscle strength training has increased in clinical medicine, its effect on diaphragm fiber remodeling is not well-understood and no relevant animal respiratory muscle strength training-rehabilitation experimental models exist. We tested the postulate that intrinsic transient tracheal occlusion (ITTO) conditioning in conscious animals would provide a novel experimental model of respiratory muscle strength training, and used significant increases in diaphragmatic fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) as the primary outcome measure. We hypothesized that ITTO would increase costal diaphragm fiber CSA and further hypothesized a greater duration and magnitude of occlusions would amplify remodeling. Methodology/Principal Findings Sprague-Dawley rats underwent surgical placement of a tracheal cuff and were randomly assigned to receive daily either 10-minute sessions of ITTO, extended-duration, 20-minute ITTO (ITTO-20), partial obstruction with 50% of cuff inflation pressure (ITTO-PAR) or observation (SHAM) over two weeks. After the interventions, fiber morphology, myosin heavy chain composition and CSA were examined in the crural and ventral, medial, and dorsal costal regions. In the medial costal diaphragm, with ITTO, type IIx/b fibers were 26% larger in the medial costal diaphragm (p<0.01) and 24% larger in the crural diaphragm (p<0.05). No significant changes in fiber composition or morphology were detected. ITTO-20 sessions also yielded significant increases in medial costal fiber cross-sectional area, but the effects were not greater than those elicited by 10-minute sessions. On the other hand, ITTO-PAR resulted in partial airway obstruction and did not generate fiber hypertrophy. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that the magnitude of the load was more influential in altering fiber cross-sectional area than extended-duration conditioning sessions. The results also indicated that ITTO was associated with type II

  18. Genetic effects of polymorphisms in myogenic regulatory factors on chicken muscle fiber traits.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Qin; Qing, Ying; Zhu, Qing; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Yan; Li, Di-Yan; Liu, Yi-Ping; Yin, Hua-Dong

    2015-06-01

    The myogenic regulatory factors is a family of transcription factors that play a key role in the development of skeletal muscle fibers, which are the main factors to affect the meat taste and texture. In the present study, we performed candidate gene analysis to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MyoD, Myf5, MyoG, and Mrf4 genes using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism in 360 Erlang Mountain Chickens from three different housing systems (cage, pen, and free-range). The general linear model procedure was used to estimate the statistical significance of association between combined genotypes and muscle fiber traits of chickens. Two polymorphisms (g.39928301T>G and g.11579368C>T) were detected in the Mrf4 and MyoD gene, respectively. The diameters of thigh and pectoralis muscle fibers were higher in birds with the combined genotypes of GG-TT and TT-CT (p<0.05). Moreover, the interaction between housing system and combined genotypes has no significant effect on the traits of muscle fiber (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that the combined genotypes of TT-CT and GG-TT might be advantageous for muscle fiber traits, and could be the potential genetic markers for breeding program in Erlang Mountain Chickens. PMID:25925055

  19. Genetic Effects of Polymorphisms in Myogenic Regulatory Factors on Chicken Muscle Fiber Traits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Qin; Qing, Ying; Zhu, Qing; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Yan; Li, Di-Yan; Liu, Yi-Ping; Yin, Hua-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factors is a family of transcription factors that play a key role in the development of skeletal muscle fibers, which are the main factors to affect the meat taste and texture. In the present study, we performed candidate gene analysis to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MyoD, Myf5, MyoG, and Mrf4 genes using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism in 360 Erlang Mountain Chickens from three different housing systems (cage, pen, and free-range). The general linear model procedure was used to estimate the statistical significance of association between combined genotypes and muscle fiber traits of chickens. Two polymorphisms (g.39928301T>G and g.11579368C>T) were detected in the Mrf4 and MyoD gene, respectively. The diameters of thigh and pectoralis muscle fibers were higher in birds with the combined genotypes of GG-TT and TT-CT (p<0.05). Moreover, the interaction between housing system and combined genotypes has no significant effect on the traits of muscle fiber (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that the combined genotypes of TT-CT and GG-TT might be advantageous for muscle fiber traits, and could be the potential genetic markers for breeding program in Erlang Mountain Chickens. PMID:25925055

  20. Mechanical and structural properties underlying contraction of skeletal muscle fibers after partial 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide cross-linking.

    PubMed Central

    Bershitsky, S; Tsaturyan, A; Bershitskaya, O; Mashanov, G; Brown, P; Webb, M; Ferenczi, M A

    1996-01-01

    We show prolonged contraction of permeabilized muscle fibers of the frog during which structural order, as judged from low-angle x-ray diffraction, was preserved by means of partial cross-linking of the fibers using the zero-length cross-linker 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide. Ten to twenty percent of the myosin cross-bridges were cross-linked, allowing the remaining 80-90% to cycle and generate force. These fibers displayed a well-preserved sarcomeric order and mechanical characteristics similar to those of intact muscle fibers. The intensity of the brightest meridional reflection at 14.5 nm, resulting from the projection of cross-bridges evenly spaced along the myofilament length, decreased by 60% as a relaxed fiber was deprived of ATP and entered the rigor state. Upon activation of a rigorized fiber by the addition of ATP, the intensity of this reflection returned to 97% of the relaxed value, suggesting that the overall orientation of cross-bridges in the active muscle was more perpendicular to the filament axis than in rigor. Following a small-amplitude length step applied to the active fibers, the reflection intensity decreased for both releases and stretches. In rigor, however, a small stretch increased the amplitude of the reflection by 35%. These findings show the close link between cross-bridge orientation and tension changes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 PMID:8874020

  1. Study of mitochondrial DNA depletion in muscle by single-fiber polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sciacco, M; Gasparo-Rippa, P; Vu, T H; Tanji, K; Shanske, S; Mendell, J R; Schon, E A; DiMauro, S; Bonilla, E

    1998-11-01

    We studied muscle biopsies from 3 children with a mitochondrial myopathy characterized histochemically by the presence of ragged-red fibers (RRF) and various numbers of cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers. We quantitated the absolute amounts of total mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in isolated normal COX-positive muscle fibers and in COX-negative RRF. There was severe mtDNA depletion in all fibers from the two most severe cases. In the third case mtDNA depletion could not be established with conventional diagnostic tools, but it was documented in single COX-negative fibers; COX-positive fibers showed the same amounts of mtDNA as fibers from aged-matched controls. Our observations indicate that mtDNA single-fiber PCR quantitation is a highly sensitive and specific method for diagnosing cases with focal mtDNA depletion. This method also allows one to correlate amounts of mtDNA with histochemical phenotypes in individual fibers from patients and age-matched controls, thereby providing important information about the functional role of residual mtDNA. PMID:9771659

  2. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    PubMed Central

    Rozand, Vianney; Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M.; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Lepers, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 min each: (i) high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task), (ii) moderate mental exertion (congruent Stroop task), (iii) low mental exertion (watching a movie). In each condition, mental exertion was combined with 10 intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensor muscles (one maximal voluntary contraction every 3 min). Neuromuscular function was assessed using electrical nerve stimulation. Maximal voluntary torque, maximal muscle activation and other neuromuscular parameters were similar across mental exertion conditions and did not change over time. These findings suggest that mental exertion does not affect neuromuscular function during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. PMID:25309404

  3. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  4. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Responses of Electromyogram Activity in Adductor Longus Muscle of Rats to the Altered Gravity Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Takashi; Wang, Xiao Dong; Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Higo, Yoko; Nakai, Naoya; Ochiai, Toshimasa; Gyotoku, Jyunichirou; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Ogura, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Responses of electromyogram (EMG) activities in the rostral and caudal regions of adductor longus (AL) muscle to altered gravity levels during parabolic flight of a jet airplane, as well as hindlimb suspension, were investigated in adult rats. Tonic EMGs in both regions were noted when the rats were exposed to hyper-G, as well as 1-G. The hip joints were adducted and the sedental quadrupedal position was maintained at these G levels. However, the EMG activities in these regions decreased and became phasic, when the hip joints were abducted and extended backward in μ-G environment. Such changes of joint angles caused passive shortening of sarcomeres only in the caudal region of AL. Atrophy and shift toward fast-twitch type were noted in fibers of the caudal region after 16-day unloading. Although fiber transformation was also induced in the rostral region, no atrophy was seen in fast-twitch fibers. The data may suggest that the atrophy and shift of phenotype caused by gravitational unloading in fibers of the caudal region may be related to the decrease in the neural and mechanical activities. Fiber type transformation toward fast-twitch type may be also related to the change of muscle activity from tonic to phasic patterns, which are the typical characteristics of fast-twitch muscle. However, the responses to unloading in fibers of rostral region were not related to the reduction of mechanical load.

  6. Spaceflight effects on single skeletal muscle fiber function in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Desplanches, D.; Romatowski, J. G.; Widrick, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to understand how 14 days of weightlessness alters the cellular properties of individual slow- and fast-twitch muscle fibers in the rhesus monkey. The diameter of the soleus (Sol) type I, medial gastrocnemius (MG) type I, and MG type II fibers from the vivarium controls averaged 60 +/- 1, 46 +/- 2, and 59 +/- 2 microm, respectively. Both a control 1-G capsule sit (CS) and spaceflight (SF) significantly reduced the Sol type I fiber diameter (20 and 13%, respectively) and peak force, with the latter declining from 0.48 +/- 0.01 to 0.31 +/- 0.02 (CS group) and 0.32 +/- 0.01 mN (SF group). When the peak force was expressed as kiloNewtons per square meter (kN/m(2)), only the SF group showed a significant decline. This group also showed a significant 15% drop in peak fiber stiffness that suggests that fewer cross bridges were contracting in parallel. In the MG, SF but not CS depressed the type I fiber diameter and force. Additionally, SF significantly depressed absolute (mN) and relative (kN/m(2)) force in the fast-twitch MG fibers by 30% and 28%, respectively. The Ca(2+) sensitivity of the type I fiber (Sol and MG) was significantly reduced by growth but unaltered by SF. Flight had no significant effect on the mean maximal fiber shortening velocity in any fiber type or muscle. The post-SF Sol type I fibers showed a reduced peak power and, at peak power, an elevated velocity and decreased force. In conclusion, CS and SF caused atrophy and a reduced force and power in the Sol type I fiber. However, only SF elicited atrophy and reduced force (mN) in the MG type I fiber and a decline in relative force (kN/m(2)) in the Sol type I and MG type II fibers.

  7. Comparison of Twice Refocused Spin Echo versus Stimulated Echo Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Tracking Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Andersen, Anders; Feiweier, Thorsten; Damon, Bruce; Hardy, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the precision of measuring the pennation angle and fiber length in the Vastus Lateralis (VL) using two distinctly different diffusion tensor imaging sequences. Materials and Methods We imaged the thigh of ten normal subjects on a 3T MR imager with twice refocused spin echo (TRSE) and stimulated echo (STEAM) DTI-MRI techniques. Both techniques took the same total acquisition time, employed the same diffusion weighting and gradient directions. Using the diffusion tensor images produced by each sequence muscle fiber bundles were tracked from the aponeurosis by following the first eigenvector of the diffusion tensor. From these tracks we calculated the pennation angle and fiber length. Results The STEAM acquisition resulted in significantly higher SNR, lower ADC, higher FA values and longer fibers than the TRSE. Although no difference in the pennation angle between the two acquisitions was found, the TRSE sequence had a significantly greater within subject dispersion in the pennation angle of tracked fibers which may indicate a reduction in the coherence of fiber bundles. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging of muscle using a STEAM acquisition resulted in significant improvements in the SNR and FA, resulting in tracking a larger number of muscle fiber bundles over longer distances and with less within subject dispersion. PMID:24554376

  8. Selective Activation of the Infraspinatus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sung-Min; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Lee, Won-Hwee; Kim, Su-Jung; Park, Kyue-Nam

    2013-01-01

    Context: To improve selective infraspinatus muscle strength and endurance, researchers have recommended selective shoulder external-rotation exercise during rehabilitation or athletic conditioning programs. Although selective strengthening of the infraspinatus muscle is recommended for therapy and training, limited information is available to help clinicians design a selective strengthening program. Objective: To determine the most effective of 4 shoulder external-rotation exercises for selectively stimulating infraspinatus muscle activity while minimizing the use of the middle trapezius and posterior deltoid muscles. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 30 healthy participants (24 men, 6 women; age = 22.6 ± 1.7 years, height = 176.2 ± 4.5 cm, mass = 65.6 ± 7.4 kg) from a university population. Intervention(s): The participants were instructed to perform 4 exercises: (1) prone horizontal abduction with external rotation (PER), (2) side-lying wiper exercise (SWE), (3) side-lying external rotation (SER), and (4) standing external-rotation exercise (STER). Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography signals were recorded from the infraspinatus, middle trapezius, and posterior deltoid muscles. Differences among the exercise positions were tested using a 1-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustment. Results: The infraspinatus muscle activity was greater in the SWE (55.98% ± 18.79%) than in the PER (46.14% ± 15.65%), SER (43.38% ± 22.26%), and STER (26.11% ± 15.00%) (F3,87 = 19.97, P < .001). Furthermore, the SWE elicited the least amount of activity in the middle trapezius muscle (F3,87 = 20.15, P < .001). Posterior deltoid muscle activity was similar in the SWE and SER but less than that measured in the PER and STER (F3,87 = 25.10, P < .001). Conclusions: The SWE was superior to the PER, SER, and STER in maximizing infraspinatus activity with the least

  9. Bion 11 Spaceflight Project: Effect of Weightlessness on Single Muscle Fiber Function in Rhesus Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, Robert H.; Romatowski, Janell G.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; DeLaCruz, Lourdes

    1999-01-01

    Although it is well known that microgravity induces considerable limb muscle atrophy, little is known about how weightlessness alters cell function. In this study, we investigated how weightlessness altered the functional properties of single fast and slow striated muscle fibers. Physiological studies were carried out to test the hypothesis that microgravity causes fiber atrophy, a decreased peak force (Newtons), tension (Newtons/cross-sectional area) and power, an elevated peak rate of tension development (dp/dt), and an increased maximal shortening velocity (V(sub o)) in the slow type I fiber, while changes in the fast-twitch fiber are restricted to atrophy and a reduced peak force. For each fiber, we determined the peak force (P(sub o)), V(sub o), dp/dt, the force-velocity relationship, peak power, the power-force relationship, the force-pCa relationship, and fiber stiffness. Biochemical studies were carried out to assess the effects of weightlessness on the enzyme and substrate profile of the fast- and slow-twitch fibers. We predicted that microgravity would increase resting muscle glycogen and glycolytic metabolism in the slow fiber type, while the fast-twitch fiber enzyme profile would be unaltered. The increased muscle glycogen would in part result from an elevated hexokinase and glycogen synthase. The enzymes selected for study represent markers for mitochondrial function (citrate synthase and 0-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase), glycolysis (Phosphofructokinase and lactate dehydrogenase), and fatty acid transport (Carnitine acetyl transferase). The substrates analyzed will include glycogen, lactate, adenosine triphosphate, and phosphocreatine.

  10. Experiment K-6-21. Effect of microgravity on 1) metabolic enzymes of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers and on 2) metabolic enzymes, neutransmitter amino acids, and neurotransmitter associated enzymes in motor and somatosensory cerebral cortex. Part 1: Metabolic enzymes of individual muscle fibers; part 2: metabolic enzymes of hippocampus and spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O.; Mcdougal, D., Jr.; Nemeth, Patti M.; Maggie, M.-Y. Chi; Pusateri, M.; Carter, J.; Manchester, J.; Norris, Beverly; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The individual fibers of any individual muscle vary greatly in enzyme composition, a fact which is obscured when enzyme levels of a whole muscle are measured. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the changes due to weightless on the enzyme patterns composed by the individual fibers within the flight muscles. In spite of the limitation in numbers of muscles examined, it is apparent that: (1) that the size of individual fibers (i.e., their dry weight) was reduced about a third, (2) that this loss in dry mass was accompanied by changes in the eight enzymes studied, and (3) that these changes were different for the two muscles, and different for the two enzyme groups. In the soleus muscle the absolute amounts of the three enzymes of oxidative metabolism decreased about in proportion to the dry weight loss, so that their concentration in the atrophic fibers was almost unchanged. In contrast, there was little loss among the four enzymes of glycogenolysis - glycolysis so that their concentrations were substantially increased in the atrophic fibers. In the TA muscle, these seven enzymes were affected in just the opposite direction. There appeared to be no absolute loss among the oxidative enzymes, whereas the glycogenolytic enzymes were reduced by nearly half, so that the concentrations of the first metabolic group were increased within the atrophic fibers and the concentrations of the second group were only marginally decreased. The behavior of hexokinase was exceptional in that it did not decrease in absolute terms in either type of muscle and probably increased as much as 50 percent in soleus. Thus, their was a large increase in concentration of this enzyme in the atrophied fibers of both muscles. Another clear-cut finding was the large increase in the range of activities of the glycolytic enzymes among individual fibers of TA muscles. This was due to the emergence of TA fibers with activities for enzymes of this group extending down to levels as low as

  11. Passive stretch reduces calpain activity through nitric oxide pathway in unloaded soleus muscles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng-Tao; Li, Quan; Sheng, Juan-Juan; Chang, Hui; Song, Zhen; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2012-08-01

    Unloading in spaceflight or long-term bed rest induces to pronounced atrophy of anti-gravity skeletal muscles. Passive stretch partially resists unloading-induced atrophy of skeletal muscle, but the mechanism remains elusive. The aims of this study were to investigate the hypotheses that stretch tension might increase protein level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in unloaded skeletal muscle, and then nNOS-derived NO alleviated atrophy of skeletal muscle by inhibiting calpain activity. The tail-suspended rats were used to unload rat hindlimbs for 2 weeks, at the same time, left soleus muscle was stretched by applying a plaster cast to fix the ankle at 35° dorsiflexion. Stretch partially resisted atrophy and inhibited the decreased protein level and activity of nNOS in unloaded soleus muscles. Unloading increased frequency of calcium sparks and elevated intracellular resting and caffeine-induced Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in unloaded soleus muscle fibers. Stretch reduced frequency of calcium sparks and restored intracellular resting and caffeine-induced Ca(2+) concentration to control levels in unloaded soleus muscle fibers. The increased protein level and activity of calpain as well as the higher degradation of desmin induced by unloading were inhibited by stretch in soleus muscles. In conclusion, these results suggest that stretch can preserve the stability of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release channels which prevents the elevated [Ca(2+)]i by means of keeping nNOS activity, and then the enhanced protein level and activity of calpain return to control levels in unloaded soleus muscles. Therefore, stretch can resist in part atrophy of unloaded soleus muscles. PMID:22547201

  12. AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 are costameric proteins: AHNAK1 affects transverse skeletal muscle fiber stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Marg, Andreas; Haase, Hannelore; Neumann, Tanja; Kouno, Michiyoshi; Morano, Ingo

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 are costameric proteins. {yields} Intact membrane repair in AHNAK1-deficient mice. {yields} AHNAK1{sup -/-} single fibers have a higher transverse stiffness. -- Abstract: The AHNAK scaffold PDZ-protein family is implicated in various cellular processes including membrane repair; however, AHNAK function and subcellular localization in skeletal muscle are unclear. We used specific AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 antibodies to analyzed the detailed localization of both proteins in mouse skeletal muscle. Co-localization of AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 with vinculin clearly demonstrates that both proteins are components of the costameric network. In contrast, no AHNAK expression was detected in the T-tubule system. A laser wounding assay with AHNAK1-deficient fibers suggests that AHNAK1 is not involved in membrane repair. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we observed a significantly higher transverse stiffness of AHNAK1{sup -/-} fibers. These findings suggest novel functions of AHNAK proteins in skeletal muscle.

  13. Force generation and work production by covalently cross-linked actin-myosin cross-bridges in rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Bershitsky, S Y; Tsaturyan, A K

    1995-09-01

    To separate a fraction of the myosin cross-bridges that are attached to the thin filaments and that participate in the mechanical responses, muscle fibers were cross-linked with 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide and then immersed in high-salt relaxing solution (HSRS) of 0.6 M ionic strength for detaching the unlinked myosin heads. The mechanical properties and force-generating ability of the cross-linked cross-bridges were tested with step length changes (L-steps) and temperature jumps (T-jumps) from 6-10 degrees C to 30-40 degrees C. After partial cross-linking, when instantaneous stiffness in HSRS was 25-40% of that in rigor, the mechanical behavior of the fibers was similar to that during active contraction. The kinetics of the T-jump-induced tension transients as well as the rate of the fast phase of tension recovery after length steps were close to those in unlinked fibers during activation. Under feedback force control, the T-jump initiated fiber shortening by up to 4 nm/half-sarcomere. Work produced by a cross-linked myosin head after the T-jump was up to 30 x 10(-21) J. When the extent of cross-linking was increased and fiber stiffness in HSRS approached that in rigor, the fibers lost their viscoelastic properties and ability to generate force with a rise in temperature. PMID:8519956

  14. Muscle activation during various hamstring exercises.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Matt J; Hammond, Kelley G; Schilling, Brian K; Ferreria, Lucas C; Reed, Jacob P; Weiss, Lawrence W

    2014-06-01

    The dorsal muscles of the lower torso and extremities have often been denoted the "posterior chain." These muscles are used to support the thoracic and lumbar spine and peripheral joints, including the hip, knee, and ankle on the dorsal aspect of the body. This study investigated the relative muscle activity of the hamstring group and selected surrounding musculature during the leg curl, good morning, glute-ham raise, and Romanian deadlift (RDL). Twelve healthy, weight-trained men performed duplicate trials of single repetitions at 85% 1-repetition maximum for each lift in random order, during which surface electromyography and joint angle data were obtained. Repeated measures analysis of variance across the 4 exercises was performed to compare the activity from the erector spinae (ES), gluteus medius (GMed), semitendinosus (ST), biceps femoris (BF), and medial gastrocnemius (MGas). Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) were noted in eccentric muscle activity between exercise for the MGas (p < 0.027), ST (p < 0.001), BF (p < 0.001), and ES (p = 0.032), and in concentric muscle activity, for the ES (p < 0.001), BF (p = 0.010), ST (p = 0.009), MGas (p < 0.001), and the GMed (p = 0.018). Bonferroni post hoc analysis revealed significant pairwise differences during eccentric actions for the BF, ST, and MGas. Post hoc analysis also revealed significant pairwise differences during concentric actions for the ES, BF, ST, MGas, and GMed. Each of these showed effect sizes that are large or greater. The main findings of this investigation are that the ST is substantially more active than the BF among all exercises, and hamstring activity was maximized in the RDL and glute-ham raise. Therefore, athletes and coaches who seek to maximize the involvement of the hamstring musculature should consider focusing on the glute-ham raise and RDL. PMID:24149748

  15. Comparison of Muscle Fiber and Meat Quality Characteristics in Different Japanese Quail Lines

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Y. M.; Hwang, S.; Lee, K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the growth performance, fiber characteristics of the pectoralis major muscle, and meat quality characteristics in the heavy weight (HW) and random bred control (RBC) quail lines and genders. The HW male exhibited more than two times greater body (245.7 vs 96.1 g, p<0.05) and pectoralis major muscle (PMW; 37.1 vs 11.1 g, p<0.05) weights compared to the RBC female. This growth performance in the HW line was associated with a greater muscle fiber area (1,502 vs 663.0 μm2, p<0.001) compared to the RBC line. Greater muscle mass of the HW male was accompanied by a higher percentage of type IIB fiber compared to the HW female (64.0% vs 51.0%, p<0.05). However, muscle fiber hyperplasia (increase in fiber number) has had a somewhat limited effect on PMW between the two lines. On the other hand, the HW line harboring a higher proportion of type IIB fiber showed rapid pH decline at the early postmortem period (6.23 vs 6.41, p<0.05) and lighter meat surface (53.5 vs 47.3, p<0.05) compared to the RBC line harboring a lower proportion of type IIB fiber. There were no significant differences observed in the measurement of water-holding capacity including drip loss (2.74% vs 3.07%, p>0.05) and cooking loss (21.9% vs 20.4%, p>0.05) between the HW and RBC lines. Therefore, the HW quail line developed by selection from the RBC quail, was slightly different in the meat quality characteristics compared to the RBC line, and a marked difference was found in growth performance between the two quail lines. PMID:27383804

  16. Hierarchically buckled sheath-core fibers for superelastic electronics, sensors, and muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. F.; Fang, S.; Moura, F. A.; Ding, J. N.; Jiang, N.; Di, J.; Zhang, M.; Lepró, X.; Galvão, D. S.; Haines, C. S.; Yuan, N. Y.; Yin, S. G.; Lee, D. W.; Wang, R.; Wang, H. Y.; Lv, W.; Dong, C.; Zhang, R. C.; Chen, M. J.; Yin, Q.; Chong, Y. T.; Zhang, R.; Wang, X.; Lima, M. D.; Ovalle-Robles, R.; Qian, D.; Lu, H.; Baughman, R. H.

    2015-07-01

    Superelastic conducting fibers with improved properties and functionalities are needed for diverse applications. Here we report the fabrication of highly stretchable (up to 1320%) sheath-core conducting fibers created by wrapping carbon nanotube sheets oriented in the fiber direction on stretched rubber fiber cores. The resulting structure exhibited distinct short- and long-period sheath buckling that occurred reversibly out of phase in the axial and belt directions, enabling a resistance change of less than 5% for a 1000% stretch. By including other rubber and carbon nanotube sheath layers, we demonstrated strain sensors generating an 860% capacitance change and electrically powered torsional muscles operating reversibly by a coupled tension-to-torsion actuation mechanism. Using theory, we quantitatively explain the complementary effects of an increase in muscle length and a large positive Poisson’s ratio on torsional actuation and electronic properties.

  17. STRETCHY ELECTRONICS. Hierarchically buckled sheath-core fibers for superelastic electronics, sensors, and muscles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z F; Fang, S; Moura, F A; Ding, J N; Jiang, N; Di, J; Zhang, M; Lepró, X; Galvão, D S; Haines, C S; Yuan, N Y; Yin, S G; Lee, D W; Wang, R; Wang, H Y; Lv, W; Dong, C; Zhang, R C; Chen, M J; Yin, Q; Chong, Y T; Zhang, R; Wang, X; Lima, M D; Ovalle-Robles, R; Qian, D; Lu, H; Baughman, R H

    2015-07-24

    Superelastic conducting fibers with improved properties and functionalities are needed for diverse applications. Here we report the fabrication of highly stretchable (up to 1320%) sheath-core conducting fibers created by wrapping carbon nanotube sheets oriented in the fiber direction on stretched rubber fiber cores. The resulting structure exhibited distinct short- and long-period sheath buckling that occurred reversibly out of phase in the axial and belt directions, enabling a resistance change of less than 5% for a 1000% stretch. By including other rubber and carbon nanotube sheath layers, we demonstrated strain sensors generating an 860% capacitance change and electrically powered torsional muscles operating reversibly by a coupled tension-to-torsion actuation mechanism. Using theory, we quantitatively explain the complementary effects of an increase in muscle length and a large positive Poisson's ratio on torsional actuation and electronic properties. PMID:26206929

  18. Estrogen-related receptor gamma is a key regulator of muscle mitochondrial activity and oxidative capacity.

    PubMed

    Rangwala, Shamina M; Wang, Xiaomei; Calvo, Jennifer A; Lindsley, Loren; Zhang, Yunyu; Deyneko, Galina; Beaulieu, Valerie; Gao, Jiaping; Turner, Gordon; Markovits, Judit

    2010-07-16

    Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma) regulates the perinatal switch to oxidative metabolism in the myocardium. We wanted to understand the significance of induction of ERRgamma expression in skeletal muscle by exercise. Muscle-specific VP16ERRgamma transgenic mice demonstrated an increase in exercise capacity, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and enlarged mitochondria despite lower muscle weights. Furthermore, peak oxidative capacity was higher in the transgenics as compared with control littermates. In contrast, mice lacking one copy of ERRgamma exhibited decreased exercise capacity and muscle mitochondrial function. Interestingly, we observed that increased ERRgamma in muscle generates a gene expression profile that closely overlays that of red oxidative fiber-type muscle. We further demonstrated that a small molecule agonist of ERRbeta/gamma can increase mitochondrial function in mouse myotubes. Our data indicate that ERRgamma plays an important role in causing a shift toward slow twitch muscle type and, concomitantly, a greater capacity for endurance exercise. Thus, the activation of this nuclear receptor provides a potential node for therapeutic intervention for diseases such as obesity, which is associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and a lower type I fiber content in skeletal muscle. PMID:20418374

  19. Estrogen-related Receptor γ Is a Key Regulator of Muscle Mitochondrial Activity and Oxidative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Rangwala, Shamina M.; Wang, Xiaomei; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Lindsley, Loren; Zhang, Yunyu; Deyneko, Galina; Beaulieu, Valerie; Gao, Jiaping; Turner, Gordon; Markovits, Judit

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) regulates the perinatal switch to oxidative metabolism in the myocardium. We wanted to understand the significance of induction of ERRγ expression in skeletal muscle by exercise. Muscle-specific VP16ERRγ transgenic mice demonstrated an increase in exercise capacity, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and enlarged mitochondria despite lower muscle weights. Furthermore, peak oxidative capacity was higher in the transgenics as compared with control littermates. In contrast, mice lacking one copy of ERRγ exhibited decreased exercise capacity and muscle mitochondrial function. Interestingly, we observed that increased ERRγ in muscle generates a gene expression profile that closely overlays that of red oxidative fiber-type muscle. We further demonstrated that a small molecule agonist of ERRβ/γ can increase mitochondrial function in mouse myotubes. Our data indicate that ERRγ plays an important role in causing a shift toward slow twitch muscle type and, concomitantly, a greater capacity for endurance exercise. Thus, the activation of this nuclear receptor provides a potential node for therapeutic intervention for diseases such as obesity, which is associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and a lower type I fiber content in skeletal muscle. PMID:20418374

  20. Interaction between Physical Activity and Smoking on Lung, Muscle, and Bone in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cielen, Nele; Maes, Karen; Heulens, Nele; Troosters, Thierry; Carmeliet, Geert; Janssens, Wim; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine N

    2016-05-01

    Physical inactivity is an important contributor to skeletal muscle weakness, osteoporosis, and weight loss in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the effects of physical inactivity, in interaction with smoking, on lung, muscle, and bone are poorly understood. To address this issue, male mice were randomly assigned to an active (daily running), moderately inactive (space restriction), or extremely inactive group (space restriction followed by hindlimb suspension to mimic bed rest) during 24 weeks and simultaneously exposed to either cigarette smoke or room air. The effects of different physical activity levels and smoking status and their respective interaction were examined on lung function, body composition, in vitro limb muscle function, and bone parameters. Smoking caused emphysema, reduced food intake with subsequent loss of body weight, and fat, lean, and muscle mass, but increased trabecular bone volume. Smoking induced muscle fiber atrophy, which did not result in force impairment. Moderate inactivity only affected lung volumes and compliance, whereas extreme inactivity increased lung inflammation, lowered body and fat mass, induced fiber atrophy with soleus muscle dysfunction, and reduced exercise capacity and all bone parameters. When combined with smoking, extreme inactivity also aggravated lung inflammation and emphysema, and accelerated body and muscle weight loss. This study shows that extreme inactivity, especially when imposed by absolute rest, accelerates lung damage and inflammation. When combined with smoking, extreme inactivity is deleterious for muscle bulk, bone, and lungs. These data highlight that the consequences of physical inactivity during the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease should not be neglected. PMID:26448063

  1. Sexual dimorphism in the histologic organization of the muscle fibers in human tongue.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Deivis; Jotz, Geraldo Pereira; Heck, Layana; Xavier, Léder Leal

    2014-07-01

    Tongue movements are critical for speech, swallowing, and respiration; and tongue dysfunction could lead to dysarthria, dysphagia, and obstructive sleep apnea, respectively. Our current understanding of the contributions of specific tongue muscles (TOs) to precise movement patterns is limited. Likewise, there is still little information regarding the orientation of histologic muscle fibers of the tongue in humans, especially between men and women. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the histologic organization in the tongue of men and women. Ten tongues were studied in human specimens obtained from necropsies (five men and five women). The muscles were analyzed using histology, and the morphometric parameters were measured using Image Pro-Plus Software (Image Pro-Plus 6.0; Media Cybernetics, Silver Spring, MD). Slices were obtained from the anterior, median, and posterior parts of the tongue. We classified and estimated the percentages of transverse (T), oblique (O), and longitudinal (L) fibers in the tongue. To quantify the percentage of fibers in each category in the tongue, the shape coefficient (Shape Z) was estimated. Statistical differences were found between the orientation of the muscle fibers of men and women only for the middle region of the tongue. The middle region of the tongue in women compared with men has a smaller difference in the variation of the percentage of fibers T (P=0.0004), O (P=0.0006), and L (P=0.0013). These morphologic findings are probably related to physiological differences. PMID:24629642

  2. Cytosolic calcium transients are a determinant of contraction-induced HSP72 transcription in single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Stary, Creed M; Hogan, Michael C

    2016-05-15

    The intrinsic activating factors that induce transcription of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in skeletal muscle following exercise remain unclear. We hypothesized that the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with depolarization is a determinant. We utilized intact, single skeletal muscle fibers from Xenopus laevis to test the role of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient and several other exercise-related factors (fatigue, hypoxia, AMP kinase, and cross-bridge cycling) on the activation of HSP72 transcription. HSP72 and HSP60 mRNA levels were assessed with real-time quantitative PCR; cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was assessed with fura-2. Both fatiguing and nonfatiguing contractions resulted in a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. As expected, peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained tightly coupled with peak developed tension in contracting fibers. Pretreatment with N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) resulted in depressed peak developed tension with stimulation, while peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained largely unchanged from control values. Despite excitation-contraction uncoupling, BTS-treated fibers displayed a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. Treatment of fibers with hypoxia (Po2: <3 mmHg) or AMP kinase activation had no effect on HSP72 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the intermittent cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with skeletal muscle depolarization provides a sufficient activating stimulus for HSP72 transcription. Metabolic or mechanical factors associated with fatigue development and cross-bridge cycling likely play a more limited role. PMID:26869714

  3. The Effects of Ligustrazine on the Ca2+ Concentration of Soleus and Gastrocnemius Muscle Fibers in Hindlimb Unloaded Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunfang; Goswami, Nandu; Du, Bei; Hu, Huanxin; Wu, Xue

    Background:Spaceflight or inactivity (bed rest, limb immobilization, hindlimb unloading) causes skeletal muscle atrophy. Recent studies show that an increase in protein degradation is an important mechanism for disuse atrophy. Furthermore, the calcium overload of disuse-atrophied muscle fiber has been shown to initiate the skeletal muscle proteolysis in disuse atrophy. Ligustrazine (tetramethylpyrazine, TMP), one of the important active ingredient extracted from Chuanxiong, has been shown by our group to increase muscle fiber cross-sectional area in atrophied soleus induced by 14 days hindlimb unloading. However, the underlying mechanisms of ligustrazine effects on disuse-atrophied muscle fibers remain unknown. Objective: We investigated the effects of ligustrazine on the cytoplasmic calcium overloading in soleus and gastrocnemius in 14 days hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats. Methods: Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for body mass and randomly assigned to three groups (n=8, each group): 1) synchronous control (CON); HU + intragastric water instillation (HU+W); HU + intragastric 60.0 mg kg-1 ligustrazine instillation (HU+Tmp). Laser scanning confocal microscope assessed the concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium ions. Spaceflight disuse atrophy was simulated by hindlimb unloading, provided by tail suspension. Results: 1) Compared with CON, the concentration of soleus intracellular calcium ion in HU+W and HU+Tmp increased 330% and 86% respectively(P<0.01). Compared with HU+W, the concentration of soleus intracellular calcium ion in HU+Tmp decreased by 130%(P<0.01). 2) Compared with CON, the concentration of gastrocnemius intracellular calcium ion in HU+W and HU+Tmp increased 189.8% and 32.1% respectively(P<0.01). Compared with HU+W, the concentration of gastrocnemius intracellular calcium ion in HU+Tmp decreased by 119.3% (P<0.01). Conclusion: After 14 days of hindlimb unloading, cytoplasmic calcium of soleus (slow-twitch muscle) and gastrocnemius (fast

  4. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  5. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  6. Physical activity-induced remodeling of vasculature in skeletal muscle: role in treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, M Harold

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes and discusses adaptations of skeletal muscle vasculature induced by physical activity and applies this understanding to benefits of exercise in prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Arteriolar trees of skeletal muscle are heterogeneous. Exercise training increases capillary exchange and blood flow capacities. The distribution of vascular adaptation to different types of exercise training are influenced by muscle fiber type composition and fiber recruitment patterns that produce different modes of exercise. Thus training-induced adaptations in vascular structure and vascular control in skeletal muscle are not homogeneously distributed throughout skeletal muscle or along the arteriolar tree within a muscle. Results summarized indicate that similar principles apply to vascular adaptation in skeletal muscle in T2D. It is concluded that exercise training-induced changes in vascular gene expression differ along the arteriolar tree and by skeletal muscle fiber type composition. Results suggest that it is unlikely that hemodynamic forces are the only exercise-induced signals mediating the regulation of vascular gene expression. In patients with T2D, exercise training is perhaps the most effective treatment of the many related symptoms. Training-induced changes in the vasculature and in insulin signaling in the muscle fibers and vasculature augment glucose and insulin delivery as well as glucose uptake. If these adaptations occur in a sufficient amount of muscle mass, exposure to hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia will decrease along with the risk of microvascular complications throughout the body. It is postulated that exercise sessions in programs of sufficient duration, that engage as much skeletal muscle mass as possible, and that recruit as many muscle fibers within each muscle as possible will produce the greatest benefit. The added benefit of combined resistance and aerobic training programs and of high-intensity exercise

  7. Isolation and characterization of an avian slow myosin heavy chain gene expressed during embryonic skeletal muscle fiber formation.

    PubMed

    Nikovits, W; Wang, G F; Feldman, J L; Miller, J B; Wade, R; Nelson, L; Stockdale, F E

    1996-07-19

    We have isolated and begun characterization of the quail slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) 3 gene, the first reported avian slow MyHC gene. Expression of slow MyHC 3 in skeletal muscle is restricted to the embryonic period of development, when the fiber pattern of future fast and slow muscle is established. In embryonic hindlimb development, slow MyHC 3 gene expression coincides with slow muscle fiber formation as distinguished by slow MyHC-specific antibody staining. In addition to expression in embryonic appendicular muscle, slow MyHC 3 is expressed continuously in the atria. Transfection of slow MyHC 3 promoter-reporter constructs into embryonic myoblasts that form slow MyHC-expressing fibers identified two regions regulating expression of this gene in skeletal muscle. The proximal promoter, containing potential muscle-specific regulatory motifs, permits expression of a reporter gene in embryonic slow muscle fibers, while a distal element, located greater than 2600 base pairs upstream, further enhances expression 3-fold. The slow muscle fiber-restricted expression of slow MyHC 3 during embryonic development, and expression of slow MyHC 3 promoter-reporter constructs in embryonic muscle fibers in vitro, makes this gene a useful marker to study the mechanism establishing the slow fiber lineage in the embryo. PMID:8663323

  8. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  9. Smooth Muscle-Like Tissue Constructs with Circumferentially Oriented Cells Formed by the Cell Fiber Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Amy Y.; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  10. Rod distribution and muscle fiber type modification in the progression of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Reed, Umbertina C; Marie, Sueli K; Zanoteli, Edmar; Fireman, Moacir A T; Oliveira, Acary S B; Werneck, Lineu C; Beggs, Alan H; Zatz, Mayana; Vainzof, Mariz

    2003-03-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a structural congenital myopathy associated with the presence of rodlike structures inside the muscle fibers and type I predominance. It may be caused by mutations in at least five genes: slow alpha-tropomyosin 3 (chromosome 1q22-23), nebulin (chromosome 2q21.1-q22), actin (chromosome 1q42), tropomyosin 2 (chromosome 9p13), and troponin T1 (chromosome 19q13.4). The effect of these mutations in the expression of the protein and the mechanism of rod formation is still under investigation. We analyzed the possibility of progressive alterations with time and/or disease evolution, such as transformation of type I to type II fiber and rod pattern and distribution in muscle fibers from patients with nemaline myopathy, through a morphometric and immunohistochemical analysis of different muscle protein isoforms. A tendency of diffuse rods to be organized in the subsarcolemmal region was observed in two patients who were submitted to subsequent biopsies after 10 and 13 years. Additionally, we observed the expression of type II protein isoforms in type I fibers and a higher proportion of type II fibers in the younger patient of a pair of affected sibs, giving further support to the hypothesis of progressive conversion of type II to type I fibers in nemaline myopathy. PMID:12731651

  11. Histochemical responses of human soleus muscle fibers to long-term bedrest with or without countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Y; Yoshinaga, T; Nonaka, I; Ohara, M; Yoshioka, T; Yamashita-Goto, K; Izumi, R; Yasukawa, K; Sekiguchi, C; Shenkman, B S; Kozzlovskaya, I B

    2000-02-01

    Effects of 2- or 4-month bedrest in -6 degrees head-down tilt position with or without countermeasures on the histochemical properties of fiber phenotype and cross-sectional area (CSA) were studied in human soleus. The CSAs in slow fibers decreased approximately 32% during 4-month bedrest. This reduction was normalized after 1-month recovery. Although the reduction of percent slow fibers was not significant statistically, the percent intermediate fibers was significantly elevated 4 months after bedrest. Such shift in fiber type was not normalized following 1-month recovery. Effects of wearing an anti-g Penguin suit which has a modest, but continuous resistance at the knee and ankle (Penguin-1) or with knee resistance without loading on the ankle (Penguin-2) for 10 consecutive hours daily were also investigated during approximately 2 months of bedrest. The subjects performed knee extension and flexion for the last 15 min of each hour while in a supine position in bed. Bedrest-induced fiber atrophy was prevented in the Penguin-1 group but not the Penguin-2 group. Transformation of fiber type was not prevented in either Penguin suit group. It is suggested that long-term bedrest causes an atrophy and a shift of fiber phenotype toward fast-twitch type in human soleus. Data also indicated that loading on the muscle is an effective countermeasure for prevention of fiber atrophy but not fiber-type transformation. PMID:10866696

  12. Protein Supplementation Does Not Further Increase Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Fiber Hypertrophy after Eight Weeks of Resistance Training in Novice Subjects, but Partially Counteracts the Fast-to-Slow Muscle Fiber Transition.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Antonio; Pacelli, Quirico F; Cancellara, Pasqua; Toniolo, Luana; Moro, Tatiana; Canato, Marta; Miotti, Danilo; Neri, Marco; Morra, Aldo; Quadrelli, Marco; Reggiani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The response to resistance training and protein supplementation in the latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) has never been investigated. We investigated the effects of resistance training (RT) and protein supplementation on muscle mass, strength, and fiber characteristics of the LDM. Eighteen healthy young subjects were randomly assigned to a progressive eight-week RT program with a normal protein diet (NP) or high protein diet (HP) (NP 0.85 vs. HP 1.8 g of protein·kg(-1)·day(-1)). One repetition maximum tests, magnetic resonance imaging for cross-sectional muscle area (CSA), body composition, and single muscle fibers mechanical and phenotype characteristics were measured. RT induced a significant gain in strength (+17%, p < 0.0001), whole muscle CSA (p = 0.024), and single muscle fibers CSA (p < 0.05) of LDM in all subjects. Fiber isometric force increased in proportion to CSA (+22%, p < 0.005) and thus no change in specific tension occurred. A significant transition from 2X to 2A myosin expression was induced by training. The protein supplementation showed no significant effects on all measured outcomes except for a smaller reduction of 2X myosin expression. Our results suggest that in LDM protein supplementation does not further enhance RT-induced muscle fiber hypertrophy nor influence mechanic muscle fiber characteristics but partially counteracts the fast-to-slow fiber shift. PMID:27258300

  13. Protein Supplementation Does Not Further Increase Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Fiber Hypertrophy after Eight Weeks of Resistance Training in Novice Subjects, but Partially Counteracts the Fast-to-Slow Muscle Fiber Transition

    PubMed Central

    Paoli, Antonio; Pacelli, Quirico F.; Cancellara, Pasqua; Toniolo, Luana; Moro, Tatiana; Canato, Marta; Miotti, Danilo; Neri, Marco; Morra, Aldo; Quadrelli, Marco; Reggiani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The response to resistance training and protein supplementation in the latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) has never been investigated. We investigated the effects of resistance training (RT) and protein supplementation on muscle mass, strength, and fiber characteristics of the LDM. Eighteen healthy young subjects were randomly assigned to a progressive eight-week RT program with a normal protein diet (NP) or high protein diet (HP) (NP 0.85 vs. HP 1.8 g of protein·kg−1·day−1). One repetition maximum tests, magnetic resonance imaging for cross-sectional muscle area (CSA), body composition, and single muscle fibers mechanical and phenotype characteristics were measured. RT induced a significant gain in strength (+17%, p < 0.0001), whole muscle CSA (p = 0.024), and single muscle fibers CSA (p < 0.05) of LDM in all subjects. Fiber isometric force increased in proportion to CSA (+22%, p < 0.005) and thus no change in specific tension occurred. A significant transition from 2X to 2A myosin expression was induced by training. The protein supplementation showed no significant effects on all measured outcomes except for a smaller reduction of 2X myosin expression. Our results suggest that in LDM protein supplementation does not further enhance RT-induced muscle fiber hypertrophy nor influence mechanic muscle fiber characteristics but partially counteracts the fast-to-slow fiber shift. PMID:27258300

  14. Patterns of muscle activity for digital coarticulation

    PubMed Central

    Winges, Sara A.; Furuya, Shinichi; Faber, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Although piano playing is a highly skilled task, basic features of motor pattern generation may be shared across tasks involving fine movements, such as handling coins, fingering food, or using a touch screen. The scripted and sequential nature of piano playing offered the opportunity to quantify the neuromuscular basis of coarticulation, i.e., the manner in which the muscle activation for one sequential element is altered to facilitate production of the preceding and subsequent elements. Ten pianists were asked to play selected pieces with the right hand at a uniform tempo. Key-press times were recorded along with the electromyographic (EMG) activity from seven channels: thumb flexor and abductor muscles, a flexor for each finger, and the four-finger extensor muscle. For the thumb and index finger, principal components of EMG waveforms revealed highly consistent variations in the shape of the flexor bursts, depending on the type of sequence in which a particular central key press was embedded. For all digits, the duration of the central EMG burst scaled, along with slight variations across subjects in the duration of the interkeystroke intervals. Even within a narrow time frame (about 100 ms) centered on the central EMG burst, the exact balance of EMG amplitudes across multiple muscles depended on the nature of the preceding and subsequent key presses. This fails to support the idea of fixed burst patterns executed in sequential phases and instead provides evidence for neuromuscular coarticulation throughout the time course of a hand movement sequence. PMID:23596338

  15. Active behavior of abdominal wall muscles: Experimental results and numerical model formulation.

    PubMed

    Grasa, J; Sierra, M; Lauzeral, N; Muñoz, M J; Miana-Mena, F J; Calvo, B

    2016-08-01

    In the present study a computational finite element technique is proposed to simulate the mechanical response of muscles in the abdominal wall. This technique considers the active behavior of the tissue taking into account both collagen and muscle fiber directions. In an attempt to obtain the computational response as close as possible to real muscles, the parameters needed to adjust the mathematical formulation were determined from in vitro experimental tests. Experiments were conducted on male New Zealand White rabbits (2047±34g) and the active properties of three different muscles: Rectus Abdominis, External Oblique and multi-layered samples formed by three muscles (External Oblique, Internal Oblique, and Transversus Abdominis) were characterized. The parameters obtained for each muscle were incorporated into a finite strain formulation to simulate active behavior of muscles incorporating the anisotropy of the tissue. The results show the potential of the model to predict the anisotropic behavior of the tissue associated to fibers and how this influences on the strain, stress and generated force during an isometric contraction. PMID:27111629

  16. Intrauterine growth-restricted sheep fetuses exhibit smaller hindlimb muscle fibers and lower proportions of insulin-sensitive Type I fibers near term.

    PubMed

    Yates, Dustin T; Cadaret, Caitlin N; Beede, Kristin A; Riley, Hannah E; Macko, Antoni R; Anderson, Miranda J; Camacho, Leticia E; Limesand, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) reduces muscle mass and insulin sensitivity in offspring. Insulin sensitivity varies among muscle fiber types, with Type I fibers being most sensitive. Differences in fiber-type ratios are associated with insulin resistance in adults, and thus we hypothesized that near-term IUGR sheep fetuses exhibit reduced size and proportions of Type I fibers. Placental insufficiency-induced IUGR fetuses were ∼54% smaller (P < 0.05) than controls and exhibited hypoxemia and hypoglycemia, which contributed to 6.9-fold greater (P < 0.05) plasma norepinephrine and ∼53% lower (P < 0.05) plasma insulin concentrations. IUGR semitendinosus muscles contained less (P < 0.05) myosin heavy chain-I protein (MyHC-I) and proportionally fewer (P < 0.05) Type I and Type I/IIa fibers than controls, but MyHC-II protein concentrations, Type II fibers, and Type IIx fibers were not different. IUGR biceps femoris muscles exhibited similar albeit less dramatic differences in fiber type proportions. Type I and IIa fibers are more responsive to adrenergic and insulin regulation than Type IIx and may be more profoundly impaired by the high catecholamines and low insulin in our IUGR fetuses, leading to their proportional reduction. In both muscles, fibers of each type were uniformly smaller (P < 0.05) in IUGR fetuses than controls, which indicates that fiber hypertrophy is not dependent on type but rather on other factors such as myoblast differentiation or protein synthesis. Together, our findings show that IUGR fetal muscles develop smaller fibers and have proportionally fewer Type I fibers, which is indicative of developmental adaptations that may help explain the link between IUGR and adulthood insulin resistance. PMID:27053651

  17. Mimicking muscle activity with electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lise A.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2011-02-01

    Functional electrical stimulation is a rehabilitation technology that can restore some degree of motor function in individuals who have sustained a spinal cord injury or stroke. One way to identify the spatio-temporal patterns of muscle stimulation needed to elicit complex upper limb movements is to use electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from able-bodied subjects as a template for electrical stimulation. However, this requires a transfer function to convert the recorded (or predicted) EMG signals into an appropriate pattern of electrical stimulation. Here we develop a generalized transfer function that maps EMG activity into a stimulation pattern that modulates muscle output by varying both the pulse frequency and the pulse amplitude. We show that the stimulation patterns produced by this transfer function mimic the active state measured by EMG insofar as they reproduce with good fidelity the complex patterns of joint torque and joint displacement.

  18. Effects of electrical stimulation on histochemical muscle fiber staining, quality, and composition of camel and cattle Longissimus thoracis muscles.

    PubMed

    Kadim, I T; Mahgoub, O; Al-Marzooqi, W; Khalaf, S K; Mansour, M H; Al-Sinani, S S H; Al-Amri, I S

    2009-01-01

    The effects of electrical stimulation on muscle fiber type, meat quality, and composition of Longissimus thoracis muscles from one-humped camels and Dofari Omani cattle of a comparable age range were investigated. A low-voltage electrical stimulation with 90 V, 14 Hz (pulse of 7.5-millisecond duration every 70 milliseconds) 20 min postmortem was applied. Samples from the left muscle were collected from 20 (2 to 3 y) camels and 24 cattle (1 to 3 y). For chemical composition, muscle samples were dried in a freeze dryer, and then ground to determine moisture, protein, fat, and ash. Macro- and micro-minerals were determined using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometer. Quality characteristics of the meat were evaluated using shear force value, pH, sarcomere, myofibrillar fragmentation index, expressed juice, cooking loss percent, and CIE L*, a*, b* color values. Electrical stimulation resulted in a significantly (P < 0.05) more rapid pH fall in the muscle during the first 24 h after slaughter in both species. Muscles from electrically stimulated carcasses had significantly (P < 0.05) lower ultimate pH, longer sarcomere, and lower shear force values than those from nonstimulated carcasses. Lightness (L*), myofibrillar fragmentation, and expressed juice were significantly (P < 0.05) higher for stimulated than for nonstimulated muscles. Muscles of camels had significantly (P < 0.05) higher expressed juice, cooking loss percent, redness color (a*), and lower fat, Mg, K, and P than those from cattle. Electrical stimulation improved quality characteristics of meat from both species. This indicates that meat quality of local camel and cattle can be improved by electrical stimulation and consequently improves their acceptability to consumers and better marketability. PMID:19200120

  19. Actions of chiriquitoxin on frog skeletal muscle fibers and implications for the tetrodotoxin/saxitoxin receptor.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Kao, C Y

    1992-10-01

    Chiriquitoxin (CqTX) from the Costa Rican frog Atelopus chiriquensis differs from tetrodoxin (TTX) only in that a glycine residue replaces a methylene hydrogen of the C-11 hydroxymethyl function. On the voltage-clamped frog skeletal muscle fiber, in addition to blocking the sodium channel and unrelated to such an action, CqTX also slows the activation of the fast potassium current in approximately 40% of the muscle fiber population. At pH 7.25, CqTX is as potent as TTX in blocking the sodium channel, with an ED50 of 3.8 nM. Its ED50's at pH 6.50 and 8.25 are 6.8 and 2.3 nM, contrasted with 3.8 and 4.3 nM for TTX. These differences are attributable to changes in the chemical states in the glycine residue. The equipotency of CqTX with TTX at pH 7.25 is explainable by an intramolecular salt bridge between the amino and carboxyl groups of the glycine function, all other surface groups in TTX and CqTX being the same. From available information on these groups and those in saxitoxin (STX), the TTX/STX binding site is deduced to be in a pocket 9.5 A wide, 6 A high, and 5 A deep. The glycine residue of CqTX probably projects out of the entrance to this pocket. Such a view of the binding site could also account for the actions of STX analogues, including the C-11 sulfated gonyautoxins and the 21-sulfocarbamoyl analogues. In the gonyautoxins the sulfate groups are equivalently placed as the glycine in CqTX, whereas in the sulfocarbamoyl toxins the sulfate groups extend the carbamoyl side-chain, leading to steric hinderance to productive binding. PMID:1334120

  20. RNA Sequencing Reveals a Slow to Fast Muscle Fiber Type Transition after Olanzapine Infusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Christopher J.; Xu, Yuping; Hajnal, Andras; Salzberg, Anna C.; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura

    2015-01-01

    Second generation antipsychotics (SGAs), like olanzapine, exhibit acute metabolic side effects leading to metabolic inflexibility, hyperglycemia, adiposity and diabetes. Understanding how SGAs affect the skeletal muscle transcriptome could elucidate approaches for mitigating these side effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused intravenously with vehicle or olanzapine for 24h using a dose leading to a mild hyperglycemia. RNA-Seq was performed on gastrocnemius muscle, followed by alignment of the data with the Rat Genome Assembly 5.0. Olanzapine altered expression of 1347 out of 26407 genes. Genes encoding skeletal muscle fiber-type specific sarcomeric, ion channel, glycolytic, O2- and Ca2+-handling, TCA cycle, vascularization and lipid oxidation proteins and pathways, along with NADH shuttles and LDH isoforms were affected. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that olanzapine decreased the expression of slower and more oxidative fiber type genes (e.g., type 1), while up regulating those for the most glycolytic and least metabolically flexible, fast twitch fiber type, IIb. Protein turnover genes, necessary to bring about transition, were also up regulated. Potential upstream regulators were also identified. Olanzapine appears to be rapidly affecting the muscle transcriptome to bring about a change to a fast-glycolytic fiber type. Such fiber types are more susceptible than slow muscle to atrophy, and such transitions are observed in chronic metabolic diseases. Thus these effects could contribute to the altered body composition and metabolic disease olanzapine causes. A potential interventional strategy is implicated because aerobic exercise, in contrast to resistance exercise, can oppose such slow to fast fiber transitions. PMID:25893406

  1. Maximal oxygen uptake is proportional to muscle fiber oxidative capacity, from chronic heart failure patients to professional cyclists.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaard, Stephan; de Ruiter, Jo C; Noordhof, Dionne A; Sterrenburg, Renske; Bloemers, Frank W; de Koning, Jos J; Jaspers, Richard T; van der Laarse, Willem J

    2016-09-01

    V̇o2 max during whole body exercise is presumably constrained by oxygen delivery to mitochondria rather than by mitochondria's ability to consume oxygen. Humans and animals have been reported to exploit only 60-80% of their mitochondrial oxidative capacity at maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2 max). However, ex vivo quantification of mitochondrial overcapacity is complicated by isolation or permeabilization procedures. An alternative method for estimating mitochondrial oxidative capacity is via enzyme histochemical quantification of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity. We determined to what extent V̇o2 max attained during cycling exercise differs from mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from SDH activity of vastus lateralis muscle in chronic heart failure patients, healthy controls, and cyclists. V̇o2 max was assessed in 20 healthy subjects and 28 cyclists, and SDH activity was determined from biopsy cryosections of vastus lateralis using quantitative histochemistry. Similar data from our laboratory of 14 chronic heart failure patients and 6 controls were included. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity was predicted from SDH activity using estimated skeletal muscle mass and the relationship between ex vivo fiber V̇o2 max and SDH activity of isolated single muscle fibers and myocardial trabecula under hyperoxic conditions. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from SDH activity was related (r(2) = 0.89, P < 0.001) to V̇o2 max measured during cycling in subjects with V̇o2 max ranging from 9.8 to 79.0 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) V̇o2 max measured during cycling was on average 90 ± 14% of mitochondrial oxidative capacity. We conclude that human V̇o2 max is related to mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from skeletal muscle SDH activity. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity is likely marginally limited by oxygen supply to mitochondria. PMID:27445298

  2. The combined influence of stretch, mobility and electrical stimulation in the prevention of muscle fiber atrophy caused hypokinesia and hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldspink, G.; Goldspink, D.; Loughna, P.

    1984-01-01

    The morphological and biochemical changes which occur in the hind limb muscles of the rat in response to hypokinesia and hypodynamia were investigated. Hind limb cast fixation and suspension techniques were employed to study the musclar atrophy after five days of hypokinesia and hypodynamia induced by suspension, appreciable muscular atrophy was apparent, particularly in the anti-gravity muscles. The effect of passive stretching and electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy was studied. Changes in muscle protein mass were assessed with spectrophotometric and radioactive techniques. Passive stretch is shown to counteract muscle disuse atrophy. The change in the numbers of specific muscle fibers in atrophied muscles is discussed.

  3. Rat soleus muscle fiber responses to 14 days of spaceflight and hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Yoshi; Jiang, Bian; Roy, Roland R.; Oganov, V.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.; Marini, J. F.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    Morphological and enzymatic responses in fibers of different types were studied in rats after 14 days of spaceflight onboard Cosmos 2044 or hindlimb suspension. Fibers were classified as fast-twitch, slow-twitch, or both fast- and slow-twitch on the basis of the type of myosin heavy chains (MHC). Data obtained indicate that during the 14 days of spaceflight or suspension the protein profiles of 9-14 percents of the slow-twitch fibers reconfigured from typical slow-twitch toward fast switch fibers, while all fibers were dramatically losing total protein. These results were consistent with the data obtained from Cosmos 1887 and Skylab 3. It is suggested that effects of spaceflight on skeletal muscle can be attributed to a dramatic reduction in the level and/or pattern of loading.

  4. Orthogonally oriented scaffolds with aligned fibers for engineering intestinal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masae; Lei, Nan Ye; Wang, Qianqian; Wu, Benjamin M.; Dunn, James C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling cellular alignment is critical in engineering intestines with desired structure and function. Although previous studies have examined the directional alignment of cells on the surface (x-y plane) of parallel fibers, quantitative analysis of the cellular alignment inside implanted scaffolds with oriented fibers has not been reported. This study examined the cellular alignment in the x-z and y-z planes of scaffolds made with two layers of orthogonally oriented fibers. The cellular orientation inside implanted scaffolds was evaluated with immunofluorescence. Quantitative analysis of coherency between cell orientation and fiber direction confirmed that cells aligned along the fibers not only on the surface (x-y plane) but also inside the scaffolds (x-z & y-z planes). Our study demonstrated that two layers of orthogonally aligned scaffolds can generate the histological organization of cells similar to that of intestinal circular and longitudinal smooth muscle. PMID:26001072

  5. Expression of Dihydropyridine and Ryanodine Receptors in Type IIA Fibers of Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Anttila, Katja; Mänttäri, Satu; Järvilehto, Matti

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the fiber type specificity of dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in different rat limb muscles was investigated. Western blot and histochemical analyses provided for the first time evidence that the expression of both receptors correlates to a specific myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition. We observed a significant (p=0.01) correlation between DHP as well as Ry receptor density and the expression of MHC IIa (correlation factor r=0.674 and r=0.645, respectively) in one slow-twitch, postural muscle (m. soleus), one mixed, fast-twitch muscle (m. gastrocnemius) and two fast-twitch muscles (m. rectus femoris, m. extensor digitorum longus). The highest DHP and Ry receptor density was found in the white part of m. rectus femoris (0.058±0.0060 and 0.057±0.0158 ODu, respectively). As expected, the highest relative percentage of MHC IIa was also found in the white part of m. rectus femoris (70.0±7.77%). Furthermore, histochemical experiments revealed that the IIA fibers stained most strongly for the fluorophore-conjugated receptor blockers. Our data clearly suggest that the expression of DHPRs and RyRs follows a fiber type-specific pattern, indicating an important role for these proteins in the maintenance of an effective Ca2+ cycle in the fast contracting fiber type IIA. PMID:17576431

  6. Effect of Tongue Exercise on Protrusive Force and Muscle Fiber Area in Aging Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Jackson, Michelle A.; Mann, Laura; Kluender, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related changes in tongue function may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. The authors' purpose was to investigate whether aged rats that have undergone tongue exercise would manifest increased protrusive tongue forces and increased genioglossus (GG) muscle fiber cross-sectional areas. Method: Forty-eight young adult,…

  7. Immobility reduces muscle fiber necrosis in dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Ikezawa, M; Nomura, K; Ito, K; Ozasa, S; Ueno, H; Yoshioka, K; Yano, S; Yamashita, T; Matuskura, M; Miike, T

    2006-08-01

    Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy is a progressive muscle disease, which is caused by the abnormality of dystrophin. Spina bifida is characterized by paralysis of the feet, with most of the upper extremities not being affected. We report here on the first case of Becker muscular dystrophy coinciding with spina bifida. The muscle biopsy specimens of the patient showed dystrophic changes in upper extremities, but clearly less in lower extremities. The results show that the restriction of excessive exercise is important for dystrophin deficiency disease. PMID:16516424

  8. The effect of lattice spacing change on cross-bridge kinetics in chemically skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers. I. Proportionality between the lattice spacing and the fiber width.

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, M; Wray, J S; Zhao, Y

    1993-01-01

    Chemically skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers/bundles were osmotically compressed with a macromolecule dextran T-500 (0-16%, g/100 ml) at 20 degrees C, 200 mM ionic strength, and pH 7.0. The lattice spacing of psoas bundles was measured by equatorial x-ray diffraction studies during relaxation and after rigor induction, and the results were compared with the fiber width measurements by optical microscopy. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether fiber width is a reliable measure of the lattice spacing, and to determine the available spacing for myosin cross-bridges between the thick and thin filaments. We observed that both the lattice spacing and the fiber width decreased with an increase in the dextran concentration during relaxation or after rigor induction, and that the spacing and the fiber width were proportionately related. We further observed that, in the absence of dextran, the lattice spacing (and the fiber width) shrank on a relax-to-rigor transition, whereas in the presence of 16% dextran, the spacing expanded on a relax-to-rigor transition. The cross-over of these plots occurred at the 4-7% dextran concentration. During Ca activation, the fiber width shrank in the absence of dextran, and it slightly expanded in the presence of 14.4% dextran. The degree of expansion was not as large as in the relax-to-rigor transition, and the cross-over occurred at about 11% dextran concentration. We also carried out experiments with dextran T-40 and T-10 to determine the upper limit of the molecular weight that enters the lattice space. We found that the upper limit is about 20 kD. PMID:7679296

  9. Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers from Congenital Cleft Palates and Normal Palates of Spanish Goats

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Michael C.; Weinzweig, Jeffrey; Kuzon, William M.; Panter, Kip E.; Buchman, Steven R.; Faulkner, John A.; Yu, Deborah; Cederna, Paul S.; Larkin, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Analysis of the composition of muscle fibers constituent to a cleft palate could provide significant insight into the cause of velopharyngeal inadequacy. The authors hypothesized that levator veli palatini muscle dysfunction inherent to cleft palates could affect the timing and outcome of cleft palate repair. Methods Single, permeabilized muscle fibers from levator veli palatini muscles of three normal (n = 19 fibers) and three chemically induced congenital cleft palates (n = 21 fibers) of 14-month-old goats were isolated, and contractile properties were evaluated. The maximum isometric force and rate constants of tension redevelopment (ktr) were measured, and the specific force and normalized power were calculated for each fiber. Results The ktr measures indicate that cleft fibers are predominantly fast-fatigable; normal fibers are slow fatigue-resistant: after a 10-minute isometric contraction, fibers from cleft palates had a loss of force 16 percent greater than that from normal palates (p = 0.0001). The cross-sectional areas of the fibers from cleft palates (2750 ± 209 μm2) were greater (p = 0.05) than those from normal palates (2226 ± 143 μm2). Specific forces did not differ between the two groups. Maximum normalized power of fibers from cleft palates (11.05 ± 1.82 W/l) was greater (p = 0.0001) than fibers from normal palates (1.60 ± 0.12 W/l). Conclusions There are clear physiologic differences in single muscle fibers from cleft palates and normal palates: cleft palate fibers are physiologically fast, have greater fatigability, and have greater power production. Detection of functional and/or fiber type differences in muscles of cleft palates may provide preoperative identification of a patient's susceptibility to velopharyngeal inadequacy and permit early surgical intervention to correct this clinical condition. PMID:17440342

  10. [Ultrastructure of the blood vessels and muscle fibers in the skeletal muscle of rats flown on the Kosmos-605 and Kosmos-782 biosatellites].

    PubMed

    Savik, Z F; Rokhlenko, K D

    1981-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to study ultrastructures of the wall of blood vessels and muscle fibers of the red (soleus) and mixed (gastrocnemius) muscles of rats flown on Cosmos-605 for 22.5 days and on Cosmos-782 for 19,5 days and sacrificed 4-6 hours, 48 hours and 25-27 days postflight. It was demonstrated that the orbital flight did not induce significant changes in the ultrastructure of blood vessels of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles but caused atrophy of muscle fibers and reduction of the number of functioning capillaries. Readaptation of the soleus vascular system to 1 g led to degradation of permeability of capillary and venular walls and development of edema of the perivascular connective tissue. This may be one of the factors responsible for dystrophic changes in muscle fibers. PMID:7289571

  11. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Laryngeal Muscle Fiber Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses…

  12. PGC-1α plays a functional role in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis but not fiber-type transformation in mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Tuoyu; Li, Ping; Okutsu, Mitsuharu; Yin, Xinhe; Kwek, Jyeyi; Zhang, Mei

    2010-01-01

    Endurance exercise stimulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) expression in skeletal muscle, and forced expression of PGC-1α changes muscle metabolism and exercise capacity in mice. However, it is unclear if PGC-1α is indispensible for endurance exercise-induced metabolic and contractile adaptations in skeletal muscle. In this study, we showed that endurance exercise-induced expression of mitochondrial enzymes (cytochrome oxidase IV and cytochrome c) and increases of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31)-positive endothelial cells in skeletal muscle, but not IIb-to-IIa fiber-type transformation, were significantly attenuated in muscle-specific Pgc-1α knockout mice. Interestingly, voluntary running effectively restored the compromised mitochondrial integrity and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) protein expression in skeletal muscle in Pgc-1α knockout mice. Thus, PGC-1α plays a functional role in endurance exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis, but not IIb-to-IIa fiber-type transformation in mouse skeletal muscle, and the improvement of mitochondrial morphology and antioxidant defense in response to endurance exercise may occur independently of PGC-1α function. We conclude that PGC-1α is required for complete skeletal muscle adaptations induced by endurance exercise in mice. PMID:20032509

  13. Nuclear microscopy of normal and necrotic skeletal muscle fibers: an intracellular elemental microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Ponraj, D; Makjanic, J; Gopalakrishnakone, P; Watt, F

    1999-12-01

    The in situ total elemental composition and elemental concentrations present in mouse soleus (type I) and gastrocnemius (type IIA) muscle fibers were analyzed by using nuclear microscopy (NM). Elemental changes in necrotic fibers, induced by intramuscular injection with snake venom (Pseudechis australis), were also studied 3 h post-injection. Nuclear microscopy is a new method based on nuclear technology that utilizes the interaction between a million-electron-volt nuclear particle beam and the muscle sample (in the case of the present study). Elemental analysis was done at the parts per million (ppm) level of sensitivity on unfixed, rapidly frozen and unstained single fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers with imaging capabilities of micron spatial resolution and in multi-elemental mode. In total, 12 different intracellular elements were mapped, co-localized and analyzed in single normal and necrotic skeletal muscle fibers from mice. Elements such as potassium, sulfur, phosphorus, chlorine and sodium were found in concentrations from 1000 to 18,000 ppm. Unlike conventional electron-probe X-ray microanalysis, NM also detected and analyzed the trace elements such as magnesium, calcium, iron and zinc that were found in concentrations of 50 to 1000 ppm. Other elements--copper, manganese and rubidium--were also detected in concentrations of less than 50 ppm. The trace elements calcium, iron and zinc were more abundant in the soleus than the gastrocnemius (the level of iron was statistically significant). Calcium, sodium and chlorine were significantly elevated in venom-induced necrotic soleus muscle fibers. PMID:10544505

  14. Oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity of fed and starved rats.

    PubMed

    Kotlar, T J; Borensztajn, J

    1977-10-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was measured at short time intervals in cardiac and skeletal muscles of normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats fed ad libitum or deprived of food. In normal animals fed ad libitum, lipoprotein lipase activities of heart, diaphragm, soleus, and fast-twitch red fibers of the quadriceps muscle showed rhythmic oscillations that appeared to coincide with the nocturnal feeding habits of the animals. During the day (7 A.M. to 7 P.M.), when food consumption by the rats was greatly reduced, lipoprotein lipase activity in all muscles increased, followed by a decline to basal levels during the night. Similar oscillatory changes in lipoprotein lipase activity were observed in the muscles of diabetic rats fed ad libitum. In normal rats deprived of food, however, the oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity were not abolished and persisted for at least 48 h. In diabetic rats starved during a 48-h period, the oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity were markedly altered. In all animals, muscle lipoprotein lipase activities were not correlated to plasma glucagon levels. PMID:143895

  15. Arrest is a regulator of fiber-specific alternative splicing in the indirect flight muscles of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Oas, Sandy T.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster flight muscles are distinct from other skeletal muscles, such as jump muscles, and express several uniquely spliced muscle-associated transcripts. We sought to identify factors mediating splicing differences between the flight and jump muscle fiber types. We found that the ribonucleic acid–binding protein Arrest (Aret) is expressed in flight muscles: in founder cells, Aret accumulates in a novel intranuclear compartment that we termed the Bruno body, and after the onset of muscle differentiation, Aret disperses in the nucleus. Down-regulation of the aret gene led to ultrastructural changes and functional impairment of flight muscles, and transcripts of structural genes expressed in the flight muscles became spliced in a manner characteristic of jump muscles. Aret also potently promoted flight muscle splicing patterns when ectopically expressed in jump muscles or tissue culture cells. Genetically, aret is located downstream of exd (extradenticle), hth (homothorax), and salm (spalt major), transcription factors that control fiber identity. Our observations provide insight into a transcriptional and splicing regulatory network for muscle fiber specification. PMID:25246617

  16. Arrest is a regulator of fiber-specific alternative splicing in the indirect flight muscles of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Oas, Sandy T; Bryantsev, Anton L; Cripps, Richard M

    2014-09-29

    Drosophila melanogaster flight muscles are distinct from other skeletal muscles, such as jump muscles, and express several uniquely spliced muscle-associated transcripts. We sought to identify factors mediating splicing differences between the flight and jump muscle fiber types. We found that the ribonucleic acid-binding protein Arrest (Aret) is expressed in flight muscles: in founder cells, Aret accumulates in a novel intranuclear compartment that we termed the Bruno body, and after the onset of muscle differentiation, Aret disperses in the nucleus. Down-regulation of the aret gene led to ultrastructural changes and functional impairment of flight muscles, and transcripts of structural genes expressed in the flight muscles became spliced in a manner characteristic of jump muscles. Aret also potently promoted flight muscle splicing patterns when ectopically expressed in jump muscles or tissue culture cells. Genetically, aret is located downstream of exd (extradenticle), hth (homothorax), and salm (spalt major), transcription factors that control fiber identity. Our observations provide insight into a transcriptional and splicing regulatory network for muscle fiber specification. PMID:25246617

  17. Trigeminal Proprioception Evoked by Strong Stretching of the Mechanoreceptors in Müller's Muscle Induces Reflex Contraction of the Orbital Orbicularis Oculi Slow-Twitch Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Ryokuya; Ban, Midori; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The mixed orbicularis oculi muscle lacks an intramuscular proprioceptive system such as muscle spindles, to induce reflex contraction of its slow-twitch fibers. We evaluated whether the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle function as extrinsic mechanoreceptors to induce reflex contraction of the slow-twitch fibers of the orbicularis oculi in addition to those of the levator and frontalis muscles. Methods: We evaluated in patients with aponeurosis-disinserted blepharoptosis whether strong stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle from upgaze with unilateral lid load induced reflex contraction of the orbicularis oculi slow-twitch fibers and whether anesthesia of Müller's muscle precluded the contraction. We compared the electromyographic responses of the bilateral orbicularis oculi muscles to unilateral intraoperative direct stimulation of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve with those to unilateral transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. Results: Upgaze with a unilateral 3-g lid load induced reflex contraction of the bilateral orbicularis oculi muscles with ipsilateral dominance. Anesthesia of Müller's muscle precluded the reflex contraction. The orbicularis oculi reflex evoked by stimulation of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve differed from that by electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve in terms of the intensity of current required to induce the reflex, the absence of R1, and duration. Conclusions: The mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle functions as an extramuscular proprioceptive system to induce reflex contraction of the orbital orbicularis oculi slow-twitch fibers. Whereas reflex contraction of the pretarsal orbicularis fast-twitch fibers functions in spontaneous or reflex blinking, that of the orbital orbicularis oculi slow-twitch fibers may factor in grimacing and blepharospasm. PMID:25210572

  18. Unchanged content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers and kinetics after intensified training in trained cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Peter M; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Thomassen, Martin; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined if high intensity training (HIT) could increase the expression of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers causing a faster oxygen uptake () response during intense (INT), but not moderate (MOD), exercise and reduce the slow component and muscle metabolic perturbation during INT. Pulmonary kinetics was determined in eight trained male cyclists (-max: 59 ± 4 (means ± SD) mL min−1 kg−1) during MOD (205 ± 12 W ∼65% -max) and INT (286 ± 17 W ∼85% -max) exercise before and after a 7-week HIT period (30-sec sprints and 4-min intervals) with a 50% reduction in volume. Both before and after HIT the content in fast-twitch fibers of CS (P < 0.05) and COX-4 (P < 0.01) was lower, whereas PFK was higher (P < 0.001) than in slow-twitch fibers. Content of CS, COX-4, and PFK in homogenate and fast-twitch fibers was unchanged with HIT. Maximal activity (μmol g DW−1 min−1) of CS (56 ± 8 post-HIT vs. 59 ± 10 pre-HIT), HAD (27 ± 6 vs. 29 ± 3) and PFK (340 ± 69 vs. 318 ± 105) and the capillary to fiber ratio (2.30 ± 0.16 vs. 2.38 ± 0.20) was unaltered following HIT. kinetics was unchanged with HIT and the speed of the primary response did not differ between MOD and INT. Muscle creatine phosphate was lower (42 ± 15 vs. 66 ± 17 mmol kg DW−1) and muscle lactate was higher (40 ± 18 vs. 14 ± 5 mmol kg DW−1) at 6 min of INT (P < 0.05) after compared to before HIT. A period of intensified training with a volume reduction did not increase the content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch fibers, and did not change kinetics. PMID:26152692

  19. Muscle-fiber conduction velocity during concentric and eccentric actions on a flywheel exercise device.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Marco; Alkner, Björn; Norrbrand, Lena; Farina, Dario; Tesch, Per A

    2006-08-01

    A gravity-independent flywheel exercise device (FWED) has been proven effective as a countermeasure to loss of strength and muscle atrophy induced by simulated microgravity. This study assessed muscle-fiber conduction velocity (CV) and surface EMG instantaneous mean power spectral frequency (iMNF) during brief bouts of fatiguing concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC) exercise on a FWED in order to identify electromyographic (EMG) variables that can be used to provide objective indications of muscle status when exercising with a FWED. Multichannel surface EMG signals were recorded from vastus lateralis and medialis muscles of nine men during: (1) isometric, 60-s action at 50% of maximum voluntary action (MVC); (2) two isometric, linearly increasing force ramps (0-100% MVC); and (3) dynamic CON/ECC coupled actions on the FWED. Muscle-fiber CV and iMNF were computed over time during the three tasks. During ramps, CV, but not iMNF, increased with force (P < 0.001). Conduction velocity and iMNF decreased with the same normalized rate of change in constant-force actions. During CON/ECC actions, the normalized rate of change over time was larger for CV than iMNF (P < 0.05). These results suggest that, during fatiguing, dynamic, variable-force tasks, changes in CV cannot be indirectly inferred by EMG spectral analysis. This underlines the importance of measuring both CV and spectral variables for muscle assessment in dynamic tasks. PMID:16688721

  20. One-dimensional chain of quantum molecule motors as a mathematical physics model for muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Tie-Yan

    2015-12-01

    A quantum chain model of multiple molecule motors is proposed as a mathematical physics theory for the microscopic modeling of classical force-velocity relation and tension transients in muscle fibers. The proposed model was a quantum many-particle Hamiltonian to predict the force-velocity relation for the slow release of muscle fibers, which has not yet been empirically defined and was much more complicated than the hyperbolic relationships. Using the same Hamiltonian model, a mathematical force-velocity relationship was proposed to explain the tension observed when the muscle was stimulated with an alternative electric current. The discrepancy between input electric frequency and the muscle oscillation frequency could be explained physically by the Doppler effect in this quantum chain model. Further more, quantum physics phenomena were applied to explore the tension time course of cardiac muscle and insect flight muscle. Most of the experimental tension transient curves were found to correspond to the theoretical output of quantum two- and three-level models. Mathematical modeling electric stimulus as photons exciting a quantum three-level particle reproduced most of the tension transient curves of water bug Lethocerus maximus. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Foundation for the Central Universities of China.

  1. Effect of 23-day muscle disuse on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ properties and contractility in human type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Lamboley, C R; Wyckelsma, V L; Perry, B D; McKenna, M J; Lamb, G D

    2016-08-01

    Inactivity negatively impacts on skeletal muscle function mainly through muscle atrophy. However, recent evidence suggests that the quality of individual muscle fibers is also altered. This study examined the effects of 23 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) on specific force and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content in individual skinned muscle fibers. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were taken from six young healthy adults prior to and following ULLS. After disuse, the endogenous SR Ca(2+) content was ∼8% lower in type I fibers and maximal SR Ca(2+) capacity was lower in both type I and type II fibers (-11 and -5%, respectively). The specific force, measured in single skinned fibers from three subjects, decreased significantly after ULLS in type II fibers (-23%) but not in type I fibers (-9%). Western blot analyses showed no significant change in the amounts of myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and MHC IIa following the disuse, whereas the amounts of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 1 (SERCA1) and calsequestrin increased by ∼120 and ∼20%, respectively, and the amount of troponin I decreased by ∼21%. These findings suggest that the decline in force and power occurring with muscle disuse is likely to be exacerbated in part by reductions in maximum specific force in type II fibers, and in the amount of releasable SR Ca(2+) in both fiber types, the latter not being attributable to a reduced calsequestrin level. Furthermore, the ∼3-wk disuse in human elicits change in SR properties, in particular a more than twofold upregulation in SERCA1 density, before any fiber-type shift. PMID:27365282

  2. Aging, muscle fiber type, and contractile function in sprint-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Marko T; Cristea, Alexander; Alén, Markku; Häkkinen, Keijo; Sipilä, Sarianna; Mero, Antti; Viitasalo, Jukka T; Larsson, Lars; Suominen, Harri

    2006-09-01

    Biopsy samples were taken from the vastus lateralis of 18- to 84-yr-old male sprinters (n = 91). Fiber-type distribution, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content were identified using ATPase histochemistry and SDS-PAGE. Specific tension and maximum shortening velocity (V(o)) were determined in 144 single skinned fibers from younger (18-33 yr, n = 8) and older (53-77 yr, n = 9) runners. Force-time characteristics of the knee extensors were determined by using isometric contraction. The cross-sectional area of type I fibers was unchanged with age, whereas that of type II fibers was reduced (P < 0.001). With age there was an increased MHC I (P < 0.01) and reduced MHC IIx isoform content (P < 0.05) but no differences in MHC IIa. Specific tension of type I and IIa MHC fibers did not differ between younger and older subjects. V(o) of fibers expressing type I MHC was lower (P < 0.05) in older than in younger subjects, but there was no difference in V(o) of type IIa MHC fibers. An aging-related decline of maximal isometric force (P < 0.001) and normalized rate of force development (P < 0.05) of knee extensors was observed. Normalized rate of force development was positively associated with MHC II (P < 0.05). The sprint-trained athletes experienced the typical aging-related reduction in the size of fast fibers, a shift toward a slower MHC isoform profile, and a lower V(o) of type I MHC fibers, which played a role in the decline in explosive force production. However, the muscle characteristics were preserved at a high level in the oldest runners, underlining the favorable impact of sprint exercise on aging muscle. PMID:16690791

  3. Molecular charge dominates the inhibition of actomyosin in skinned muscle fibers by SH1 peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, P B; Beck, T W; Bursell, J; Kushmerick, M J

    1991-01-01

    It is not definitively known whether the highly conserved region of myosin heavy chain around SH1 (Cys 707) is part of the actin-binding site. We tested this possibility by assaying for competitive inhibition of maximum Ca-activated force production of skinned muscle fibers by synthetic peptides which had sequences derived from the SH1 region of myosin. Force was inhibited by a heptapeptide (IRICRKG) with an apparent K0.5 of about 4 mM. Unloaded shortening velocity of fibers, determined by the slack test, and maximum Ca-activated myofibrillar MgATPase activity were also inhibited by this peptide, but both required higher concentrations. We found that other cationic peptides also inhibited force in a manner that depended on the charge of the peptide; increasing the net positive charge of the peptide increased its efficacy. The inhibition was not significantly affected by altering solution ionic strength (100-200 mM). Disulfide bond formation was not involved in the inhibitory mechanism because a peptide with Thr substituted for Cys was inhibitory in the presence or absence of DTT. Our data demonstrate that the net charge was the predominant molecular characteristic correlated with the ability of peptides from this region of myosin heavy chain to inhibit force production. Thus, the hypothesis that the SH1 region of myosin is an essential part of the force-producing interaction with actin during the cross-bridge cycle (Eto, M., R. Suzuki, F. Morita, H. Kuwayama, N. Nishi, and S. Tokura., 1990, J. Biochem. 108:499-504; Keane et al., 1990, Nature (Lond.). 344:265-268) is not supported. PMID:1912278

  4. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking. PMID:26367642

  5. Actively Q-switched Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. G.; Podivilov, E. V.; Babin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    A new scheme providing actively Q-switched operation of a Raman fiber laser (RFL) has been proposed and tested. The RFL consists of a 1 km single-mode fiber with a switchable loop mirror at one end and an angled cleaved output end. An 1080 nm pulse with microsecond duration is generated at the output by means of acousto-optic switching of the mirror at ~30 kHz in the presence of 6 W backward pumping at 1030 nm. In the proposed scheme, the generated pulse energy is defined by the pump energy distributed along the passive fiber, which amounts to 30 μJ in our case. The available pump energy may be increased by means of fiber lengthening. Pulse shortening is also expected.

  6. Accelerometer based calf muscle pump activity monitoring.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Karol J; O'Keeffe, Derek T; Grace, Pierce A; Lyons, Gerard M

    2005-10-01

    Long distance travel is associated with increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). There is an increased risk of travel related DVT in passengers with a predisposition to thrombosis. Assisting blood circulation in the lower limb will reduce the risk of DVT. Leg exercises are recommended as a DVT preventative measure while flying but this fails to account for a passenger who is distracted by in flight entertainment or who falls asleep for an extended period. A method for monitoring calf muscle pump activity using accelerometers has been developed and evaluated. The proposed technique could be used to alert the traveller that there is a need to exercise their calf muscle, thus reducing the risk of DVT. PMID:16139770

  7. [Changes in cell respiration of postural muscle fibers under long-term gravitational unloading after dietary succinate supplementation].

    PubMed

    Ogneva, I V; Veselova, O M; Larina, I M

    2011-01-01

    The intensity of cell respiration of the rat m. soleus, m. gastrocnemius c.m. and tibialis anterior fibers during 35-day gravitational unloading, with the addition of succinate in the diet at a dosage rate of 50 mg per 1 kg animal weight has been investigated. The gravitational unloading was modeled by antiorthostatic hindlimb suspension. The intensity of cell respiration was estimated by polarography. It was shown that the rate of oxygen consumption by soleus and gastrocnemius fibers on endogenous and exogenous substrates and with the addition of ADP decreases after the discharge. This may be associated with the transition to the glycolytic energy path due to a decrease in the EMG-activity. At the same time, the respiration rate after the addition of exogenous substrates in soleus fibers did not increase, indicating a disturbance in the function of the NCCR-section of the respiratory chain and more pronounced changes in the structure of muscle fibers. In tibialis anterior fibers, no changes in oxygen consumption velocity were observed. The introduction of succinate to the diet of rats makes it possible to prevent the negative effects of hypokinesia, although it reduces the basal level of intensity of cell respiration. PMID:21442893

  8. Thin filament diversity and physiological properties of fast and slow fiber types in astronaut leg muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L W.; Thompson, Joyce L.; Fitts, Robert H.; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Trappe, Scott W.; Trappe, Todd A.; Costill, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Slow type I fibers in soleus and fast white (IIa/IIx, IIx), fast red (IIa), and slow red (I) fibers in gastrocnemius were examined electron microscopically and physiologically from pre- and postflight biopsies of four astronauts from the 17-day, Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Shuttle Transport System-78 mission. At 2.5-microm sarcomere length, thick filament density is approximately 1,012 filaments/microm(2) in all fiber types and unchanged by spaceflight. In preflight aldehyde-fixed biopsies, gastrocnemius fibers possess higher percentages (approximately 23%) of short thin filaments than soleus (9%). In type I fibers, spaceflight increases short, thin filament content from 9 to 24% in soleus and from 26 to 31% in gastrocnemius. Thick and thin filament spacing is wider at short sarcomere lengths. The Z-band lattice is also expanded, except for soleus type I fibers with presumably stiffer Z bands. Thin filament packing density correlates directly with specific tension for gastrocnemius fibers but not soleus. Thin filament density is inversely related to shortening velocity in all fibers. Thin filament structural variation contributes to the functional diversity of normal and spaceflight-unloaded muscles.

  9. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  10. New cell biological applications of the laser microbeam technique: the microdissection and skinning of muscle fibers and the perforation and fusion of sarcolemma vesicles.

    PubMed

    Veigel, C; Steubing, R W; Harim, A; Weber, C; Greulich, K O; Fink, R H

    1994-02-01

    In a novel approach, the laser microbeam technique was used to selectively perforate the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle fibers, to prepare fragments of myofibrillar bundles of very small dimensions, and to induce fusion of sarcolemma vesicles. Using a highly focused UV laser microbeam with an effective beam diameter of down to 0.5 micron, very small (< 3 microns) myofibrillar fragments with an intact sarcomere striation pattern were obtained. When small amounts of Ca2+ were released in the vicinity of such a fragment by laser-photolysis of the photolabile compound Ca(2+)-nitr-7 the bundle shortened due to the development of calcium-activated force. We also show that very small selected areas from myopathic single muscle cells can be dissected with a precision unmatched by other current techniques. The microbeam was also used to remove very small patches of the sarcolemma of murine skeletal muscle fibers so giving diffusional access to the myoplasmic interior and thus resulting in a "skinning" of the fiber. To ensure that such laser-skinned fiber segments were physiologically intact we determined the Ca(2+)-activated force and caffeine-induced Ca(2+)-release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The fibers showed normal characteristics for force production, Ca(2+)-release and uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. To test the effects of the laser microbeam on the muscle membrane directly, we prepared sarcolemma vesicles of skeletal muscle fibers. The vesicles could be selectively perforated with single laser pulses to allow entry of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran as a fluorescent marker. Adjacent vesicles were caused to fuse by a few pulses at low intensity of the laser microbeam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7516289

  11. Voltage-gated and calcium-gated calcium release during depolarization of skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemond, V; Csernoch, L; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-01-01

    The role of elevated intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) in activating calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in skeletal muscle fibers microinjected with strong calcium buffers. After the injection of 3.8 +/- 0.5 mM (mean +/- S.E. of mean, n = 16) BAPTA (1,2-bis[o-aminophenoxy]ethane- N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) or 2.2-2.8 mM fura-2 the normal increase in [Ca2+] during a depolarizing pulse was virtually eliminated. Even though calcium was released from the SR the kinetics of this release were markedly altered: the extensive buffering selectively eliminated the early peak component of SR calcium release with no effect on the maintained steady level. Microinjections of similar volumes but with low concentrations of fura-2 had no significant effect on the release waveform. The calcium released by voltage-dependent activation during depolarization may thus be involved in activating further calcium release, that is, in a calcium-induced calcium release mechanism. PMID:1660317

  12. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the construction of an amplifier and force transducer that can be used to demonstrate electrical activity in nerve and muscle using the gastrocnemius muscle and sciatic nerve of the frog. (MLH)

  13. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8 cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225–230 mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine. PMID:25642040

  14. Stretch and radial compression studies on relaxed skinned muscle fibers of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, D W; Godt, R E

    1979-01-01

    The influence of stretch and radial compression on the width of mechanically skinned fibers from the semitendinosus muscle of the frog (R. pipiens) was examined in relaxing solutions with high-power light microscopy. Fibers were skinned under mineral oil. We find that, after correcting for water uptake in the oil, fiber width increased by an average of 28% upon transfer from oil to relaxing medium, with some tendency for greater swelling at longer sarcomere lengths. Subsequently, fibers were compressed by addition of the long-chain polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-40, number average molecular weight 40,000) to relaxing solutions. Sarcomere length does not appear to be affected by addition of PVP. At any PVP concentration, the inverse square of the fiber width increased smoothly and linearly with increasing stretch for sarcomere lengths between 2.10 and 4.60 micrometer. At any fixed sarcomere length, fiber width decreased linearly with the logarithm of the osmotic compressive pressure exerted by PVP (2-10% concentration). From this logarithmic relation we estimate that the swelling pressure of the intact fiber is 3.40 x 10(3) N/m2, between that of a 2 and a 3% PVP solution. The pressure giving rise to fiber swelling is not due to dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), since the experimental results above were not significantly different after treatment with 0.5% BRIJ-58, a nonionic detergent that disrupts the SR. Swelling may be due simply to elastic structures within the fiber that are constrained in the intact cell. Values of bulk moduli of fibers, calculated from the compression experiments, and preliminary measurements of Young's modulus from stretch experiments, are quantitatively consistent with the idea that skinned fibers behave as nonisotropic elastic bodies. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:318072

  15. Mitochondrial superoxide flashes: metabolic biomarkers of skeletal muscle activity and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lan; Salahura, Gheorghe; Boncompagni, Simona; Kasischke, Karl A.; Protasi, Feliciano; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Dirksen, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial superoxide flashes (mSOFs) are stochastic events of quantal mitochondrial superoxide generation. Here, we used flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers from transgenic mice with muscle-specific expression of a novel mitochondrial-targeted superoxide biosensor (mt-cpYFP) to characterize mSOF activity in skeletal muscle at rest, following intense activity, and under pathological conditions. Results demonstrate that mSOF activity in muscle depended on electron transport chain and adenine nucleotide translocase functionality, but it was independent of cyclophilin-D-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition pore activity. The diverse spatial dimensions of individual mSOF events were found to reflect a complex underlying morphology of the mitochondrial network, as examined by electron microscopy. Muscle activity regulated mSOF activity in a biphasic manner. Specifically, mSOF frequency was significantly increased following brief tetanic stimulation (18.1±1.6 to 22.3±2.0 flashes/1000 μm2·100 s before and after 5 tetani) and markedly decreased (to 7.7±1.6 flashes/1000 μm2·100 s) following prolonged tetanic stimulation (40 tetani). A significant temperature-dependent increase in mSOF frequency (11.9±0.8 and 19.8±2.6 flashes/1000 μm2·100 s at 23°C and 37°C) was observed in fibers from RYR1Y522S/WT mice, a mouse model of malignant hyperthermia and heat-induced hypermetabolism. Together, these results demonstrate that mSOF activity is a highly sensitive biomarker of mitochondrial respiration and the cellular metabolic state of muscle during physiological activity and pathological oxidative stress.—Wei, L., Salahura, G., Boncompagni, S., Kasischke, K. A., Protasi, F., Sheu, S.-S., Dirksen, R. T. Mitochondrial superoxide flashes: metabolic biomarkers of skeletal muscle activity and disease. PMID:21646399

  16. History dependence of human muscle-fiber conduction velocity during voluntary isometric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Lateva, Zoia C.

    2011-01-01

    The conduction velocity (CV) of a muscle fiber is affected by the fiber's discharge history going back ∼1 s. We investigated this dependence by measuring CV fluctuations during voluntary isometric contractions of the human brachioradialis muscle. We recorded electromyogram (EMG) signals simultaneously from multiple intramuscular electrodes, identified potentials belonging to the same motor unit using EMG decomposition, and estimated the CV of each discharge from the interpotential interval. In 12 of 14 subjects, CV increased by ∼10% during the first second after recruitment and then fluctuated by about ±2% in a way that mirrored the fluctuations in the instantaneous firing rate. The CV profile could be precisely described in terms of the discharge history by a simple mathematical model. In the other two subjects, and one subject retested after cooling the arm, the CV fluctuations were inversely correlated with instantaneous firing rate. In all subjects, CV was additionally affected by very short interdischarge intervals (<25 ms): it was increased in doublets at recruitment, but decreased in doublets during continuous firing and after short interdischarge intervals in doubly innervated fibers. CV also exhibited a slow trend of about −0.05%/s that did not depend on the immediate discharge history. We suggest that measurements of CV fluctuations during voluntary contractions, or during stimulation protocols that involve longer and more complex stimulation patterns than are currently being used, may provide a sensitive approach for estimating the dynamic characteristics of ion channels in the human muscle-fiber membrane. PMID:21565985

  17. History dependence of human muscle-fiber conduction velocity during voluntary isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    McGill, Kevin C; Lateva, Zoia C

    2011-09-01

    The conduction velocity (CV) of a muscle fiber is affected by the fiber's discharge history going back ∼1 s. We investigated this dependence by measuring CV fluctuations during voluntary isometric contractions of the human brachioradialis muscle. We recorded electromyogram (EMG) signals simultaneously from multiple intramuscular electrodes, identified potentials belonging to the same motor unit using EMG decomposition, and estimated the CV of each discharge from the interpotential interval. In 12 of 14 subjects, CV increased by ∼10% during the first second after recruitment and then fluctuated by about ±2% in a way that mirrored the fluctuations in the instantaneous firing rate. The CV profile could be precisely described in terms of the discharge history by a simple mathematical model. In the other two subjects, and one subject retested after cooling the arm, the CV fluctuations were inversely correlated with instantaneous firing rate. In all subjects, CV was additionally affected by very short interdischarge intervals (<25 ms): it was increased in doublets at recruitment, but decreased in doublets during continuous firing and after short interdischarge intervals in doubly innervated fibers. CV also exhibited a slow trend of about -0.05%/s that did not depend on the immediate discharge history. We suggest that measurements of CV fluctuations during voluntary contractions, or during stimulation protocols that involve longer and more complex stimulation patterns than are currently being used, may provide a sensitive approach for estimating the dynamic characteristics of ion channels in the human muscle-fiber membrane. PMID:21565985

  18. Helix-coil melting in rigor and activated cross-bridges of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harrington, W F; Ueno, H; Davis, J S

    1988-01-01

    The studies described in this paper focus on the structural stability of the S-2 segment of the myosin cross-bridge in rigor, relaxed and activated muscle. Enzyme-probe observations of myofibrils of rabbit psoas muscle in rigor reveal that the alpha-helical LMM/HMM hinge domain of S-2 undergoes substantial local melting near physiological temperatures when the S-2 portion of the cross-bridge is detached from the thick filament surface. This process is strongly suppressed under ionic conditions where the cross-bridge is bound to the filament backbone. Activation of glycerinated fiber bundles results in a dramatic increase (approximately 100 fold compared to rigor and relaxed fibers) in the rate of chymotryptic cleavage in the hinge domain consistent with an increase in local melting at several sites encompassing this region. Comparative plots of the apparent rate-constant for cleavage within the S-2 hinge and the isometric force generated by active fibers versus [MgATP] give similar profiles suggesting a close coupling between this conformational transition and contractile force. This interpretation appears to be in accord with recent laser T-jump experiments of rigor ("bridges up") and activated psoas muscle fibers which also suggest coupling between melting in S-2 and force generation. PMID:3044019

  19. The fraction of myosin motors that participate in isometric contraction of rabbit muscle fibers at near-physiological temperature.

    PubMed

    Tsaturyan, Andrey K; Bershitsky, Sergey Y; Koubassova, Natalia A; Fernandez, Manuel; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Ferenczi, Michael A

    2011-07-20

    The duty ratio, or the part of the working cycle in which a myosin molecule is strongly attached to actin, determines motor processivity and is required to evaluate the force generated by each molecule. In muscle, it is equal to the fraction of myosin heads that are strongly, or stereospecifically, bound to the thin filaments. Estimates of this fraction during isometric contraction based on stiffness measurements or the intensities of the equatorial or meridional x-ray reflections vary significantly. Here, we determined this value using the intensity of the first actin layer line, A1, in the low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns of permeable fibers from rabbit skeletal muscle. We calibrated the A1 intensity by considering that the intensity in the relaxed and rigor states corresponds to 0% and 100% of myosin heads bound to actin, respectively. The fibers maximally activated with Ca(2+) at 4°C were heated to 31-34°C with a Joule temperature jump (T-jump). Rigor and relaxed-state measurements were obtained on the same fibers. The intensity of the inner part of A1 during isometric contraction compared with that in rigor corresponds to 41-43% stereospecifically bound myosin heads at near-physiological temperature, or an average force produced by a head of ~6.3 pN. PMID:21767493

  20. Stochastic modelling of muscle recruitment during activity.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Saulo; Calvetti, Daniela; Somersalo, Erkki; Viceconti, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Muscle forces can be selected from a space of muscle recruitment strategies that produce stable motion and variable muscle and joint forces. However, current optimization methods provide only a single muscle recruitment strategy. We modelled the spectrum of muscle recruitment strategies while walking. The equilibrium equations at the joints, muscle constraints, static optimization solutions and 15-channel electromyography (EMG) recordings for seven walking cycles were taken from earlier studies. The spectrum of muscle forces was calculated using Bayesian statistics and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, whereas EMG-driven muscle forces were calculated using EMG-driven modelling. We calculated the differences between the spectrum and EMG-driven muscle force for 1-15 input EMGs, and we identified the muscle strategy that best matched the recorded EMG pattern. The best-fit strategy, static optimization solution and EMG-driven force data were compared using correlation analysis. Possible and plausible muscle forces were defined as within physiological boundaries and within EMG boundaries. Possible muscle and joint forces were calculated by constraining the muscle forces between zero and the peak muscle force. Plausible muscle forces were constrained within six selected EMG boundaries. The spectrum to EMG-driven force difference increased from 40 to 108 N for 1-15 EMG inputs. The best-fit muscle strategy better described the EMG-driven pattern (R (2) = 0.94; RMSE = 19 N) than the static optimization solution (R (2) = 0.38; RMSE = 61 N). Possible forces for 27 of 34 muscles varied between zero and the peak muscle force, inducing a peak hip force of 11.3 body-weights. Plausible muscle forces closely matched the selected EMG patterns; no effect of the EMG constraint was observed on the remaining muscle force ranges. The model can be used to study alternative muscle recruitment strategies in both physiological and pathophysiological neuromotor conditions. PMID

  1. Stochastic modelling of muscle recruitment during activity

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Saulo; Calvetti, Daniela; Somersalo, Erkki; Viceconti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Muscle forces can be selected from a space of muscle recruitment strategies that produce stable motion and variable muscle and joint forces. However, current optimization methods provide only a single muscle recruitment strategy. We modelled the spectrum of muscle recruitment strategies while walking. The equilibrium equations at the joints, muscle constraints, static optimization solutions and 15-channel electromyography (EMG) recordings for seven walking cycles were taken from earlier studies. The spectrum of muscle forces was calculated using Bayesian statistics and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, whereas EMG-driven muscle forces were calculated using EMG-driven modelling. We calculated the differences between the spectrum and EMG-driven muscle force for 1–15 input EMGs, and we identified the muscle strategy that best matched the recorded EMG pattern. The best-fit strategy, static optimization solution and EMG-driven force data were compared using correlation analysis. Possible and plausible muscle forces were defined as within physiological boundaries and within EMG boundaries. Possible muscle and joint forces were calculated by constraining the muscle forces between zero and the peak muscle force. Plausible muscle forces were constrained within six selected EMG boundaries. The spectrum to EMG-driven force difference increased from 40 to 108 N for 1–15 EMG inputs. The best-fit muscle strategy better described the EMG-driven pattern (R2 = 0.94; RMSE = 19 N) than the static optimization solution (R2 = 0.38; RMSE = 61 N). Possible forces for 27 of 34 muscles varied between zero and the peak muscle force, inducing a peak hip force of 11.3 body-weights. Plausible muscle forces closely matched the selected EMG patterns; no effect of the EMG constraint was observed on the remaining muscle force ranges. The model can be used to study alternative muscle recruitment strategies in both physiological and pathophysiological neuromotor conditions. PMID:25844155

  2. Resting myoplasmic free calcium in frog skeletal muscle fibers estimated with fluo-3.

    PubMed Central

    Harkins, A B; Kurebayashi, N; Baylor, S M

    1993-01-01

    Fluo-3 is an unusual tetracarboxylate Ca2+ indicator. For recent lots supplied by Molecular Probes Inc. (Eugene, OR), FMAX, the fluorescence intensity of the indicator in its Ca(2+)-bound form, is approximately 200 times that of FMIN, the fluorescence intensity of the indicator in its Ca(2+)-free form. (For earlier lots, impurities may account for the smaller reported values of FMAX/FMIN, 36-40). We have injected fluo-3 from a high-purity lot into intact single fibers from frog muscle and measured the indicator's absorbance and fluorescence signals at rest (A and F, respectively) and changes in absorbance and fluorescence following action potential stimulation (delta A and delta F signals substantially lagged behind that of the myoplasmic free Ca2+ transient. Our analysis of fluo-3's signals from myoplasm therefore focused on information about the level of resting myoplasmic free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]r). From A, delta A, and in vitro estimates of fluo-3's molar extinction coefficients, the change in the fraction of fluo-3 in the Ca(2+)-bound form during activity (delta f) was estimated. From delta f, delta F, and F, the fraction of the indicator in the Ca(2+)-bound form in the resting fiber (fr) was estimated by fr = (delta f x F/delta F) + (1-FMAX/FMIN)-1. Since FMAX/FMIN is large, the contribution of the second term to the estimate of fr is small. At 16 degrees C, the mean value (mean +/- S.E.) of fr was 0.086 +/- 0.004 (N = 15). From two estimates of the apparent dissociation constant of fluo-3 for Ca2+ in the myoplasm, 1.09 and 2.57 microM, the average value of [Ca2+]r is calculated to be 0.10 and 0.24 microM, respectively. The smaller of these estimates lies near the upper end of the range of values for [Ca2+]r in frog fibers (0.02-0.12 microM) estimated by others with aequorin and Ca(2+)-selective electrodes. The larger of the estimates lies within the range of values (0.2-0.3 microM) previously estimated in this laboratory with fura red. We conclude that [Ca2+]r in

  3. Tonic activity in inspiratory muscles during continuous negative airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Meessen, N E; van der Grinten, C P; Folgering, H T; Luijendijk, S C

    1993-05-01

    We studied tonic inspiratory activity (TIA) induced by continuous negative airway pressure (CNAP) in anaesthetized, spontaneously breathing cats. TIA in the diaphragm and parasternal intercostal muscles (ICM) was quantified in response to tracheal pressure (PTR) = -0.3 to -1.2 kPa. To differentiate between reflexes from rapidly adapting receptors (RARs), slowly adapting receptors (SARs) and C-fiber endings different temperatures of the vagus nerves (TVG) were used between 4 and 37 degrees C. At PTR = -1.2 kPa mean TIA values were 41% and 62% of peak inspiratory EMG activity of control breaths for the diaphragm and ICM, respectively. After vagotomy and for TVG < 6 degrees C CNAP did not induce TIA anymore. Changes in inspiratory and expiratory time during vagal cooling down to 4 degrees C confirmed the selective block of conductance in vagal afferents of the three types of lung receptors. We conclude that CNAP-induced TIA results from stimulation of RARs. Our data strongly indicate that stimulation of SARs suppresses TIA, whereas C-fiber endings are not involved in TIA at all. The results suggest that part of the hyperinflation in bronchial asthma may be caused by TIA in response to mechanical stimulation of RARs. PMID:8327788

  4. Slow recovery of the impaired fatigue resistance in postunloading mouse soleus muscle corresponding to decreased mitochondrial function and a compensatory increase in type I slow fibers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Xuequn; Malek, Moh H; Jin, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Unloading or disuse rapidly results in skeletal muscle atrophy, switching to fast-type fibers, and decreased resistance to fatigue. The recovery process is of major importance in rehabilitation for various clinical conditions. Here we studied mouse soleus muscle during 60 days of reloading after 4 wk of hindlimb suspension. Unloading produced significant atrophy of soleus muscle with decreased contractile force and fatigue resistance, accompanied by switches of myosin isoforms from IIa to IIx and IIb and fast troponin T to more low-molecular-weight splice forms. The total mass, fiber size, and contractile force of soleus muscle recovered to control levels after 15 days of reloading. However, the fatigue resistance showed a trend of worsening during this period with significant infiltration of inflammatory cells at days 3 and 7, indicating reloading injuries that were accompanied by active regeneration with upregulations of filamin-C, αB-crystallin, and desmin. The fatigue resistance partially recovered after 30-60 days of reloading. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and mitofusin-2 showed changes parallel to that of fatigue resistance after unloading and during reloading, suggesting a causal role of decreased mitochondrial function. Slow fiber contents in the soleus muscle were increased after 30-60 days of reloading to become significantly higher than the normal level, indicating a secondary adaption to compensate for the slow recovery of fatigue resistance. PMID:26447205

  5. X-ray diffraction of strained muscle fibers in rigor.

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, G R; Podolsky, R J

    1981-01-01

    The effect of strain on the equatorial x-ray diffraction pattern of glycerinated rabbit psoas fibers was studied in the rigor (ATP free) state. Strains between 30 and 100 A per half sarcomere, measured directly by laser diffraction, did not change the intensity ratio, (10)/ . (11). Because the intensity ratio depends on the distribution of mass within the myofilament lattice, the negative result indicates that strain does not change the angle of attachment of the subfragment 1 (S1) moiety of the myosin molecule to the actin filament. The effect of strain on the ordering of the actin filaments also was considered and judged to be negligible. Images PMID:6946493

  6. Intramyocellular lipid dependence on skeletal muscle fiber type and orientation characterized by diffusion tensor imaging and 1H-MRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valaparla, Sunil K.; Gao, Feng; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Clarke, Geoffrey D.

    2014-03-01

    When muscle fibers are aligned with the B0 field, intramyocellular lipids (IMCL), important for providing energy during physical activity, can be resolved in proton magnetic resonance spectra (1H-MRS). Various muscles of the leg differ significantly in their proportion of fibers and angular distribution. This study determined the influence of muscle fiber type and orientation on IMCL using 1H-MRS and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Muscle fiber orientation relative to B0 was estimated by pennation angle (PA) measurements from DTI, providing orientation-specific extramyocellular lipid (EMCL) chemical shift data that were used for subject-specific IMCL quantification. Vastus lateralis (VL), tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SO) muscles of 6 healthy subjects (21-40 yrs) were studied on a Siemens 3T MRI system with a flex 4-channel coil. 1H-MRS were acquired using stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM, TR=3s, TE=270ms). DTI was performed using single shot EPI (b=600s/mm2, 30 directions, TR=4.5s, TE=82ms, and ten×5mm slices) with center slice indexed to the MRS voxel. The average PA's measured from ROI analysis of primary eigenvectors were PA=19.46+/-5.43 for unipennate VL, 15.65+/-3.73 for multipennate SO, and 7.04+/-3.34 for bipennate TA. Chemical shift (CS) was calculated using [3cos2θ-1] dependence: 0.17+/-0.02 for VL, 0.18+/-0.01 for SO and 0.19+/-0.004 ppm for TA. IMCL-CH2 concentrations from spectral analysis were 12.77+/-6.3 for VL, 3.07+/-1.63 for SO and 0.27+/-0.08 mmol/kg ww for TA. Small PA's were measured in TA and large CS with clear separation between EMCL and IMCL peaks were observed. Larger variations in PA were measured VL and SO resulting in an increased overlap of the EMCL on IMCL peaks.

  7. The tropomyosin binding region of cardiac troponin T modulates crossbridge recruitment dynamics in rat cardiac muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Gollapudi, Sampath K; Gallon, Clare E; Chandra, Murali

    2013-05-13

    The cardiac muscle comprises dynamically interacting components that use allosteric/cooperative mechanisms to yield unique heart-specific properties. An essential protein in this allosteric/cooperative mechanism is cardiac muscle troponin T (cTnT), the central region (CR) and the T2 region of which differ significantly from those of fast skeletal muscle troponin T (fsTnT). To understand the biological significance of such sequence heterogeneity, we replaced the T1 or T2 domain of rat cTnT (RcT1 or RcT2) with its counterpart from rat fsTnT (RfsT1or RfsT2) to generate RfsT1-RcT2 and RcT1-RfsT2 recombinant proteins. In addition to contractile function measurements, dynamic features of RfsT1-RcT2- and RcT1-RfsT2-reconstituted rat cardiac muscle fibers were captured by fitting the recruitment-distortion model to the force response of small-amplitude (0.5%) muscle length changes. RfsT1-RcT2 fibers showed a 40% decrease in tension and a 44% decrease in ATPase activity, but RcT1-RfsT2 fibers were unaffected. The magnitude of length-mediated increase in crossbridge (XB) recruitment (E0) decreased by ~33% and the speed of XB recruitment (b) increased by ~100% in RfsT1-RcT2 fibers. Our data suggest the following: (1) the CR of cTnT modulates XB recruitment dynamics; (2) the N-terminal end region of cTnT has a synergistic effect on the ability of the CR to modulate XB recruitment dynamics; (3) the T2 region is important for tuning the Ca(2+) regulation of cardiac thin filaments. The combined effects of CR-tropomyosin interactions and the modulating effect of the N-terminal end of cTnT on CR-tropomyosin interactions may lead to the emergence of a unique property that tunes contractile dynamics to heart rates. PMID:23357173

  8. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity. PMID:26485650

  9. The miRNA Transcriptome Directly Reflects the Physiological and Biochemical Differences between Red, White, and Intermediate Muscle Fiber Types

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jideng; Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Rui; Jin, Long; Tang, Qianzi; Wang, Xun; Jiang, Anan; Hu, Yaodong; Li, Zongwen; Zhu, Li; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Mingzhou; Li, Xuewei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that can regulate their target genes at the post-transcriptional level. Skeletal muscle comprises different fiber types that can be broadly classified as red, intermediate, and white. Recently, a set of miRNAs was found expressed in a fiber type-specific manner in red and white fiber types. However, an in-depth analysis of the miRNA transcriptome differences between all three fiber types has not been undertaken. Herein, we collected 15 porcine skeletal muscles from different anatomical locations, which were then clearly divided into red, white, and intermediate fiber type based on the ratios of myosin heavy chain isoforms. We further illustrated that three muscles, which typically represented each muscle fiber type (i.e., red: peroneal longus (PL), intermediate: psoas major muscle (PMM), white: longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM)), have distinct metabolic patterns of mitochondrial and glycolytic enzyme levels. Furthermore, we constructed small RNA libraries for PL, PMM, and LDM using a deep sequencing approach. Results showed that the differentially expressed miRNAs were mainly enriched in PL and played a vital role in myogenesis and energy metabolism. Overall, this comprehensive analysis will contribute to a better understanding of the miRNA regulatory mechanism that achieves the phenotypic diversity of skeletal muscles. PMID:25938964

  10. Activation of Notch signaling during ex vivo expansion maintains donor muscle cell engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Maura H.; Loretz, Carol; Tyler, Ashlee E.; Duddy, William J.; Hall, John K.; Olwin, Bradley B.; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Storb, Rainer; Tapscott, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation of myogenic stem cells possesses great potential for long-term repair of dystrophic muscle. However, a single donor muscle biopsy is unlikely to provide enough cells to effectively transplant the muscle mass of a patient affected by muscular dystrophy. Expansion of cells ex vivo using traditional culture techniques significantly reduces engraftment potential. We hypothesized that activation of Notch signaling during ex vivo expansion would maintain donor cell engraftment potential. In this study, we expanded freshly isolated canine muscle-derived cells on tissue culture plates coated with Delta-1ext-IgG to activate Notch signaling or with human IgG as a control. A model of canine-to-murine xenotransplantation was used to quantitatively compare canine muscle cell engraftment, and determine if engrafted donor cells could function as satellite cells in vivo. We show that Delta-1ext-IgG inhibited differentiation of canine muscle-derived cells, and increased the level of genes normally expressed in myogenic precursors. Moreover, cells expanded on Delta-1ext-IgG resulted in a significant increase in the number of donor-derived fibers, as compared to cells expanded on human IgG, reaching engraftment levels similar to freshly isolated cells. Importantly, cells expanded on Delta-1ext-IgG engrafted to the recipient satellite cell niche, and contributed to further regeneration. A similar strategy of expanding human muscle-derived cells on Notch ligand might facilitate engraftment and muscle regeneration for patients affected with muscular dystrophy. PMID:22865615

  11. Activation of Notch signaling during ex vivo expansion maintains donor muscle cell engraftment.

    PubMed

    Parker, Maura H; Loretz, Carol; Tyler, Ashlee E; Duddy, William J; Hall, John K; Olwin, Bradley B; Bernstein, Irwin D; Storb, Rainer; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2012-10-01

    Transplantation of myogenic stem cells possesses great potential for long-term repair of dystrophic muscle. However, a single donor muscle biopsy is unlikely to provide enough cells to effectively transplant the muscle mass of a patient affected by muscular dystrophy. Expansion of cells ex vivo using traditional culture techniques significantly reduces engraftment potential. We hypothesized that activation of Notch signaling during ex vivo expansion would maintain donor cell engraftment potential. In this study, we expanded freshly isolated canine muscle-derived cells on tissue culture plates coated with Delta-1(ext) -IgG to activate Notch signaling or with human IgG as a control. A model of canine-to-murine xenotransplantation was used to quantitatively compare canine muscle cell engraftment and determine whether engrafted donor cells could function as satellite cells in vivo. We show that Delta-1(ext) -IgG inhibited differentiation of canine muscle-derived cells and increased the level of genes normally expressed in myogenic precursors. Moreover, cells expanded on Delta-1(ext) -IgG resulted in a significant increase in the number of donor-derived fibers, as compared to cells expanded on human IgG, reaching engraftment levels similar to freshly isolated cells. Importantly, cells expanded on Delta-1(ext) -IgG engrafted to the recipient satellite cell niche and contributed to further regeneration. A similar strategy of expanding human muscle-derived cells on Notch ligand might facilitate engraftment and muscle regeneration for patients affected with muscular dystrophy. PMID:22865615

  12. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution. PMID:27198224

  13. The delayed rectifier potassium conductance in the sarcolemma and the transverse tubular system membranes of mammalian skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quinonez, Marbella

    2012-01-01

    A two-microelectrode voltage clamp and optical measurements of membrane potential changes at the transverse tubular system (TTS) were used to characterize delayed rectifier K currents (IKV) in murine muscle fibers stained with the potentiometric dye di-8-ANEPPS. In intact fibers, IKV displays the canonical hallmarks of KV channels: voltage-dependent delayed activation and decay in time. The voltage dependence of the peak conductance (gKV) was only accounted for by double Boltzmann fits, suggesting at least two channel contributions to IKV. Osmotically treated fibers showed significant disconnection of the TTS and displayed smaller IKV, but with similar voltage dependence and time decays to intact fibers. This suggests that inactivation may be responsible for most of the decay in IKV records. A two-channel model that faithfully simulates IKV records in osmotically treated fibers comprises a low threshold and steeply voltage-dependent channel (channel A), which contributes ∼31% of gKV, and a more abundant high threshold channel (channel B), with shallower voltage dependence. Significant expression of the IKV1.4 and IKV3.4 channels was demonstrated by immunoblotting. Rectangular depolarizing pulses elicited step-like di-8-ANEPPS transients in intact fibers rendered electrically passive. In contrast, activation of IKV resulted in time- and voltage-dependent attenuations in optical transients that coincided in time with the peaks of IKV records. Normalized peak attenuations showed the same voltage dependence as peak IKV plots. A radial cable model including channels A and B and K diffusion in the TTS was used to simulate IKV and average TTS voltage changes. Model predictions and experimental data were compared to determine what fraction of gKV in the TTS accounted simultaneously for the electrical and optical data. Best predictions suggest that KV channels are approximately equally distributed in the sarcolemma and TTS membranes; under these conditions, >70% of IKV

  14. Ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity during manual tracking of a moving visual target.

    PubMed

    Domkin, Dmitry; Forsman, Mikael; Richter, Hans O

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown an association of visual demands during near work and increased activity of the trapezius muscle. Those studies were conducted under stationary postural conditions with fixed gaze and artificial visual load. The present study investigated the relationship between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity across individuals during performance of a natural dynamic motor task under free gaze conditions. Participants (N=11) tracked a moving visual target with a digital pen on a computer screen. Tracking performance, eye refraction and trapezius muscle activity were continuously measured. Ciliary muscle contraction force was computed from eye accommodative response. There was a significant Pearson correlation between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity on the tracking side (0.78, p<0.01) and passive side (0.64, p<0.05). The study supports the hypothesis that high visual demands, leading to an increased ciliary muscle contraction during continuous eye-hand coordination, may increase trapezius muscle tension and thus contribute to the development of musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder area. Further experimental studies are required to clarify whether the relationship is valid within each individual or may represent a general personal trait, when individuals with higher eye accommodative response tend to have higher trapezius muscle activity. PMID:26746010

  15. Ionic contrast terahertz time resolved imaging of frog auricular heart muscle electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Sauviat, Martin-Pierre; Gallot, Guilhem

    2006-10-01

    The authors demonstrate the direct, noninvasive and time resolved imaging of functional frog auricular fibers by ionic contrast terahertz (ICT) near field microscopy. This technique provides quantitative, time-dependent measurement of ionic flow during auricular muscle electrical activity, and opens the way of direct noninvasive imaging of cardiac activity under stimulation. ICT microscopy technique was associated with full three-dimensional simulation enabling to measure precisely the fiber sizes. This technique coupled to waveguide technology should provide the grounds to development of advanced in vivo ion flux measurement in mammalian hearts, allowing the prediction of heart attack from change in K+ fluxes.

  16. The Apparent Rates of Crossbridge Attachment and Detachment Estimated from Atpase Activity in Insect Flight Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Güth, K.; Poole, K. J. V.; Maughan, D.; Kuhn, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    The ATPase activity of single fibers of small fiber bundles (one to three fibers) of insect flight muscle was measured when fibers were repetitively released and restretched by 1.5% of their initial length. The ATPase activity increased with increasing duration of release-restretch pulses applied at a constant repetition frequency, reaching a maximum at a duration of ∼20 ms. For a given duration, the average ATPase activity also increased with increasing frequency of applied length changes and reached a maximum (200% of the isometric ATPase) at a frequency of ∼50 Hz. The data could be fitted to a two-state model in which the apparent rate of crossbridge detachment is enhanced when the crossbridges are mechanically released. Estimates of the apparent rates of attachment and detachment in the isometrically contracting state and of the enhanced detachment rate of unloaded crossbridges were derived from fits to the two-state model. After short pulses of releasing and restretching the fiber the force was low and increased after the restretch in a roughly exponential manner to the initial level. The rate at which force increased after a release-restretch pulse was similar to the sum of the apparent attachment and detachment rates for the isometrically contracting muscle derived from the ATPase activity measurements. PMID:19431712

  17. Differential effects of peroxynitrite on contractile protein properties in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibers of rat.

    PubMed

    Dutka, T L; Mollica, J P; Lamb, G D

    2011-03-01

    Oxidative modification of contractile proteins is thought to be a key factor in muscle weakness observed in many pathophysiological conditions. In particular, peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), a potent short-lived oxidant, is a likely candidate responsible for this contractile dysfunction. In this study ONOO(-) or 3-morpholinosydnonimine (Sin-1, a ONOO(-) donor) was applied to rat skinned muscle fibers to characterize the effects on contractile properties. Both ONOO(-) and Sin-1 exposure markedly reduced maximum force in slow-twitch fibers but had much less effect in fast-twitch fibers. The rate of isometric force development was also reduced without change in the number of active cross bridges. Sin-1 exposure caused a disproportionately large decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, evidently due to coproduction of superoxide, as it was prevented by Tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic. The decline in maximum force with Sin-1 and ONOO(-) treatments could be partially reversed by DTT, provided it was applied before the fiber was activated. Reversal by DTT indicates that the decrease in maximum force was due at least in part to oxidation of cysteine residues. Ascorbate caused similar reversal, further suggesting that the cysteine residues had undergone S-nitrosylation. The reduction in Ca(2+) sensitivity, however, was not reversed by either DTT or ascorbate. Western blot analysis showed cross-linking of myosin heavy chain (MHC) I, appearing as larger protein complexes after ONOO(-) exposure. The findings suggest that ONOO(-) initially decreases maximum force primarily by oxidation of cysteine residues on the myosin heads, and that the accompanying decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity is likely due to other, less reversible actions of hydroxyl or related radicals. PMID:21030671

  18. Transcription Enhancer Factor 1 Binds Multiple Muscle MEF2 and A/T-Rich Elements during Fast-to-Slow Skeletal Muscle Fiber Type Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Karasseva, Natalia; Tsika, Gretchen; Ji, Juan; Zhang, Aijing; Mao, Xiaoqing; Tsika, Richard

    2003-01-01

    In adult mouse skeletal muscle, β-myosin heavy chain (βMyHC) gene expression is primarily restricted to slow type I fibers; however, its expression can be induced in fast type II fibers in response to a sustained increase in load-bearing work (mechanical overload [MOV]). Our previous βMyHC transgenic and protein-DNA interaction studies have identified an A/T-rich element (βA/T-rich −269/−258) that is required for slow muscle expression and which potentiates MOV responsiveness of a 293-bp βMyHC promoter (β293wt). Despite the GATA/MEF2-like homology of this element, we found binding of two unknown proteins that were antigenically distinct from GATA and MEF2 isoforms. By using the βA/T-rich element as bait in a yeast one-hybrid screen of an MOV-plantaris cDNA library, we identified nominal transcription enhancer factor 1 (NTEF-1) as the specific βA/T-rich binding factor. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay analysis confirmed that NTEF-1 represents the enriched binding activity obtained only when the βA/T-rich element is reacted with MOV-plantaris nuclear extract. Moreover, we show that TEF proteins bind MEF2 elements located in the control region of a select set of muscle genes. In transient-coexpression assays using mouse C2C12 myotubes, TEF proteins transcriptionally activated a 293-bp βMyHC promoter devoid of any muscle CAT (MCAT) sites, as well as a minimal thymidine kinase promoter-luciferase reporter gene driven by three tandem copies of the desmin MEF2 or palindromic Mt elements or four tandem βA/T-rich elements. These novel findings suggest that in addition to exerting a regulatory effect by binding MCAT elements, TEF proteins likely contribute to regulation of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle gene networks by binding select A/T-rich and MEF2 elements under basal and hypertrophic conditions. PMID:12861002

  19. Nitrate Intake Promotes Shift in Muscle Fiber Type Composition during Sprint Interval Training in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Stefan; Van Thienen, Ruud; Deldicque, Louise; James, Ruth; Sale, Craig; Bishop, David J.; Hespel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the effect of sprint interval training (SIT) in normoxia, vs. SIT in hypoxia alone or in conjunction with oral nitrate intake, on buffering capacity of homogenized muscle (βhm) and fiber type distribution, as well as on sprint and endurance performance. Methods: Twenty-seven moderately-trained participants were allocated to one of three experimental groups: SIT in normoxia (20.9% FiO2) + placebo (N), SIT in hypoxia (15% FiO2) + placebo (H), or SIT in hypoxia + nitrate supplementation (HN). All participated in 5 weeks of SIT on a cycle ergometer (30-s sprints interspersed by 4.5 min recovery-intervals, 3 weekly sessions, 4–6 sprints per session). Nitrate (6.45 mmol NaNO3) or placebo capsules were administered 3 h before each session. Before and after SIT participants performed an incremental VO2max-test, a 30-min simulated cycling time-trial, as well as a 30-s cycling sprint test. Muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis. Results: SIT decreased the proportion of type IIx muscle fibers in all groups (P < 0.05). The relative number of type IIa fibers increased (P < 0.05) in HN (P < 0.05 vs. H), but not in the other groups. SIT had no significant effect on βhm. Compared with H, SIT tended to enhance 30-s sprint performance more in HN than in H (P = 0.085). VO2max and 30-min time-trial performance increased in all groups to a similar extent. Conclusion: SIT in hypoxia combined with nitrate supplementation increases the proportion of type IIa fibers in muscle, which may be associated with enhanced performance in short maximal exercise. Compared with normoxic training, hypoxic SIT does not alter βhm or endurance and sprinting exercise performance. PMID:27378942

  20. Paraspinal muscle activation in accordance with mechanoreceptors in the intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Eun; Choi, Hae Won

    2013-02-01

    Paraspinal muscle forces were derived computationally based on the hypothesis that the intervertebral disc has a transducer function and the muscle is activated according to a sensor-driving control mechanism. A three-dimensional finite element model of the musculoskeletal system, which consisted of a detailed whole lumbar spine, pelvis, simplified trunk model, and muscles, was developed and combined with an optimization technique to calculate muscle forces in isometric forward flexed and erect standing postures. Minimization of deviations in the nucleus pressure and averaged tensile stress in the annulus fibers at five discs was used for muscle force calculations. The results indicated that all the muscles were properly activated to maintain posture and stabilize the lumbar spine. The nucleus pressure difference was decreased during the iterative calculations and its resulting value at the L4/L5 level was consistent with in vivo measurements. Muscle activation produced vertebra motion, which resulted in a relatively uniform stress distribution in the intervertebral discs. This can minimize the risk of injury at a specific level and increase the ability of the spine to sustain a load. PMID:23513985

  1. Muscle fiber characteristics, satellite cells and soccer performance in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Thomas I; Mandroukas, Athanasios; Vamvakoudis, Efstratios; Kotoglou, Kostas; Ekblom, Björn; Mandroukas, Konstantinos

    2014-09-01

    This study is aimed to examine the muscle fiber type, composition and satellite cells in young male soccer players and to correlate them to cardiorespiratory indices and muscle strength. The participants formed three Groups: Group A (n = 13), 11.2 ± 0.4yrs, Group B (n=10), 13.1 ± 0.5yrs and Group C (n = 9), 15.2 ± 0.6yrs. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. Peak torque values of the quadriceps and hamstrings were recorded and VO2max was measured on the treadmill. Group C had lower type I percentage distribution compared to A by 21.3% (p < 0.01), while the type IIA relative percentage was higher by 18.1% and 18.4% than in Groups A and B (p < 0.05). Groups B and C had higher cross-sectional area (CSA) values in all fiber types than in Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). The number of satellite cells did not differ between the groups. Groups B and C had higher peak torque at all angular velocities and absolute VO2max in terms of ml·min(-1) than Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). It is concluded that the increased percentage of type IIA muscle fibers noticed in Group C in comparison to the Groups A and B should be mainly attributed to the different workload exercise and training programs. The alteration of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms composition even in children is an important mechanism for skeletal muscle characteristics. Finally, CSA, isokinetic muscle strength and VO2max values seems to be expressed according to age. Key PointsFifteen years old soccer players have higher IIA percentage distribution than the younger players by approximately 18%.The age and the training status play a crucial role in muscle fibers co-expression.Specific training in young athletes seems to alter significantly the muscular metabolic profile. PMID:25177173

  2. Muscle Fiber Characteristics, Satellite Cells and Soccer Performance in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Thomas I.; Mandroukas, Athanasios; Vamvakoudis, Efstratios; Kotoglou, Kostas; Ekblom, Björn; Mandroukas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to examine the muscle fiber type, composition and satellite cells in young male soccer players and to correlate them to cardiorespiratory indices and muscle strength. The participants formed three Groups: Group A (n = 13), 11.2 ± 0.4yrs, Group B (n=10), 13.1 ± 0.5yrs and Group C (n = 9), 15.2 ± 0.6yrs. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. Peak torque values of the quadriceps and hamstrings were recorded and VO2max was measured on the treadmill. Group C had lower type I percentage distribution compared to A by 21.3% (p < 0.01), while the type IIA relative percentage was higher by 18.1% and 18.4% than in Groups A and B (p < 0.05). Groups B and C had higher cross-sectional area (CSA) values in all fiber types than in Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). The number of satellite cells did not differ between the groups. Groups B and C had higher peak torque at all angular velocities and absolute VO2max in terms of ml·min-1 than Group A (0.05 < p < 0.001). It is concluded that the increased percentage of type IIA muscle fibers noticed in Group C in comparison to the Groups A and B should be mainly attributed to the different workload exercise and training programs. The alteration of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms composition even in children is an important mechanism for skeletal muscle characteristics. Finally, CSA, isokinetic muscle strength and VO2max values seems to be expressed according to age. Key Points Fifteen years old soccer players have higher IIA percentage distribution than the younger players by approximately 18%. The age and the training status play a crucial role in muscle fibers co-expression. Specific training in young athletes seems to alter significantly the muscular metabolic profile. PMID:25177173

  3. Control of ankle extensor muscle activity in walking cats.

    PubMed

    Hatz, Kathrin; Mombaur, Katja; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2012-11-01

    Our objective was to gain insight into the relative importance of feedforward control and different proprioceptive feedback pathways to ongoing ankle extensor activity during walking in the conscious cat. We asked whether the modulation of stance phase muscle activity is due primarily to proprioceptive feedback and whether the same proprioceptive gains and feedforward commands can automatically generate the muscle activity required for changes in walking slope. To test these hypotheses, we analyzed previously collected muscle activity and mechanics data from cats with an isolated medial gastrocnemius muscle walking along a sloped pegway. Models of proprioceptor dynamics predicted afferent activity from the measured muscle mechanics. We modeled muscle activity as the weighted sum of the activity predicted from the different proprioceptive pathways and a simple model of central drive. We determined the unknown model parameters using optimization procedures that minimized the error between the predicted and measured muscle activity. We found that the modulation of muscle activity within the stance phase and across walking slopes is indeed well described by neural control that employs constant central drive and constant proprioceptive feedback gains. Furthermore, it is force feedback from Ib afferents that is primarily responsible for modulating muscle activity; group II afferent feedback makes a small contribution to tonic activity, and Ia afferent feedback makes no contribution. Force feedback combined with tonic central drive appears to provide a simple control mechanism for automatically compensating for changes in terrain without requiring different commands from the brain or even modification of central nervous system gains. PMID:22933727

  4. Neural factors influence the degeneration of muscle fibers in the chelae of snapping shrimps.

    PubMed

    Young, R E; Wong, A; Pearce, J; Govind, C K

    1996-01-01

    The asymmetric pincer and snapper claws in the snapping shrimp differ in external morphology and musculature. The snapper is a massive claw used for displays and defense; the pincer is small and slender, used for feeding and burrowing. The snapper has only slow muscle fibers; the pincer has both slow and fast. Removal or denervation of the snapper claw induces transformation of the contralateral pincer to a snapper type of claw at the subsequent molt. A removed claw regenerates as a pincer type, as long as the innervation of the remaining claw is intact. Fast muscle fibers, found exclusively in the pincer claw, normally degenerate completely within 10 d after the moult, which transforms the pincer to a snapper. Morphological transformation of the pincer following removal of the snapper claw can occur even if the pincer claw is denervated. Denervation of the pincer, however, delays degeneration of the fast fibers, increasing the estimated half-time of muscle degeneration, for 4.4 +/- 0.2 to 19.5 +/- 0.8. d after the transforming moult. Neural influences therefore are involved both in the determination of the morphology of the claw and in the induction of degenerative changes during the remodeling of an existing claw. PMID:8871972

  5. Circadian force and EMG activity in hindlimb muscles of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, J. A.; Wichayanuparp, S.; Recktenwald, M. R.; Roy, R. R.; McCall, G.; Day, M. K.; Washburn, D.; Fanton, J. W.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Continuous intramuscular electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from the soleus (Sol), medial gastrocnemius (MG), tibialis anterior (TA), and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of Rhesus during normal cage activity throughout 24-h periods and also during treadmill locomotion. Daily levels of MG tendon force and EMG activity were obtained from five monkeys with partial datasets from three other animals. Activity levels correlated with the light-dark cycle with peak activities in most muscles occurring between 08:00 and 10:00. The lowest levels of activity generally occurred between 22:00 and 02:00. Daily EMG integrals ranged from 19 mV/s in one TA muscle to 3339 mV/s in one Sol muscle: average values were 1245 (Sol), 90 (MG), 65 (TA), and 209 (VL) mV/s. The average Sol EMG amplitude per 24-h period was 14 microV, compared with 246 microV for a short burst of locomotion. Mean EMG amplitudes for the Sol, MG, TA, and VL during active periods were 102, 18, 20, and 33 microV, respectively. EMG amplitudes that approximated recruitment of all fibers within a muscle occurred for 5-40 s/day in all muscles. The duration of daily activation was greatest in the Sol [151 +/- 45 (SE) min] and shortest in the TA (61 +/- 19 min). The results show that even a "postural" muscle such as the Sol was active for only approximately 9% of the day, whereas less active muscles were active for approximately 4% of the day. MG tendon forces were generally very low, consistent with the MG EMG data but occasionally reached levels close to estimates of the maximum force generating potential of the muscle. The Sol and TA activities were mutually exclusive, except at very low levels, suggesting very little coactivation of these antagonistic muscles. In contrast, the MG activity usually accompanied Sol activity suggesting that the MG was rarely used in the absence of Sol activation. The results clearly demonstrate a wide range of activation levels among muscles of the same animal as well as among different

  6. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  7. Force generation and temperature-jump and length-jump tension transients in muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Davis, J S; Rodgers, M E

    1995-05-01

    Muscle tension rises with increasing temperature. The kinetics that govern the tension rise of maximally Ca(2+)-activated, skinned rabbit psoas fibers over a temperature range of 0-30 degrees C was characterized in laser temperature-jump experiments. The kinetic response is simple and can be readily interpreted in terms of a basic three-step mechanism of contraction, which includes a temperature-sensitive rapid preequilibrium(a) linked to a temperature-insensitive rate-limiting step and followed by a temperature-sensitive tension-generating step. These data and mechanism are compared and contrasted with the more complex length-jump Huxley-Simmons phases in which all states that generate tension or bear tension are perturbed. The rate of the Huxley-Simmons phase 4 is temperature sensitive at low temperatures but plateaus at high temperatures, indicating a change in rate-limiting step from a temperature-sensitive (phase 4a) to a temperature-insensitive reaction (phase 4b); the latter appears to correlate with the slow, temperature-insensitive temperature-jump relaxation. Phase 3 is absent in the temperature-jump, which excludes it from tension generation. We confirm that de novo tension generation occurs as an order-disorder transition during phase 2slow and the equivalent, temperature-sensitive temperature-jump relaxation. PMID:7612845

  8. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  9. Respiratory muscle activity and oxygenation during sleep in patients with muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    White, J E; Drinnan, M J; Smithson, A J; Griffiths, C J; Gibson, G J

    1995-05-01

    Patients with respiratory muscle weakness show nocturnal hypoventilation, with oxygen desaturation particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but evidence in individuals with isolated bilateral diaphragmatic paresis (BDP) is conflicting. The effect of sleep on relative activity of the different respiratory muscles of such patients and, consequently, the precise mechanisms causing desaturation have not been clarified. We have studied eight patients, four with generalized muscle weakness and four with isolated BDP during nocturnal sleep with measurements including oxygen saturation and surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of various respiratory muscle groups. Nocturnal oxygenation correlated inversely with postural fall in vital capacity, an index of diaphragmatic strength. During REM sleep, hypopnoea and desaturation occurred particularly during periods of rapid eye movements (phasic REM sleep). In most subjects, such events were "central" in type and associated with marked suppression of intercostal muscle activity, but two subjects had recurrent desaturation due to "obstructive" hypopnoea and/or apnoea. Expiratory activity of the external oblique muscle was present whilst awake and during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in seven of the eight subjects in the semirecumbent posture. This probably represents an "accessory inspiratory" effect, which aids passive caudal diaphragmatic motion as the abdominal muscles relax at the onset of inspiration. Expiratory abdominal muscle activity was suppressed in phasic REM sleep, suggesting that loss of this "accessory inspiratory" effect may contribute to "central" hypopnoea. We conclude that, in patients with muscle weakness, nocturnal oxygenation correlates with diaphragmatic strength.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7656954

  10. Sphingomyelinase promotes oxidant production and skeletal muscle contractile dysfunction through activation of NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Loehr, James A.; Abo-Zahrah, Reem; Pal, Rituraj; Rodney, George G.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of sphingomyelinase (SMase) have been detected in a variety of diseases. SMase has been shown to increase muscle derived oxidants and decrease skeletal muscle force; however, the sub-cellular site of oxidant production has not been elucidated. Using redox sensitive biosensors targeted to the mitochondria and NADPH oxidase (Nox2), we demonstrate that SMase increased Nox2-dependent ROS and had no effect on mitochondrial ROS in isolated FDB fibers. Pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown of Nox2 activity prevented SMase induced ROS production and provided protection against decreased force production in the diaphragm. In contrast, genetic overexpression of superoxide dismutase within the mitochondria did not prevent increased ROS production and offered no protection against decreased diaphragm function in response to SMase. Our study shows that SMase induced ROS production occurs in specific sub-cellular regions of skeletal muscle; however, the increased ROS does not completely account for the decrease in muscle function. PMID:25653619

  11. Severe COPD Alters Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity During Knee Extensors Fatiguing Contraction.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Coratella, Giuseppe; Dardanello, Davide; Rinaldo, Nicoletta; Lanza, Massimo; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV), as a sign of fatigue during knee extensor contraction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as compared with healthy controls. Eleven male patients (5 with severe and 6 with moderate COPD; age 67 ± 5 years) and 11 age-matched healthy male controls (age 65 ± 4 years) volunteered for the study. CV was obtained by multichannel surface electromyography (EMG) from the vastus lateralis (VL) and medialis (VM) of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, 30-second duration knee extension at 70% of maximal voluntary contraction. The decline in CV in both the VL and VM was steeper in the severe COPD patients than in healthy controls (for VL: severe COPD vs. controls -0.45 ± 0.07%/s; p < 0.001, and for VM: severe COPD vs. controls -0.54 ± 0.09%/s, p < 0.001). No difference in CV decline was found between the moderate COPD patients and the healthy controls. These findings suggest that severe COPD may impair muscle functions, leading to greater muscular fatigue, as expressed by CV changes. The results may be due to a greater involvement of anaerobic metabolism and a shift towards fatigable type II fibers in the muscle composition of the severe COPD patients. PMID:27007486

  12. The influence of biocomposites containing genetically modified flax fibers on gene expression in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gredes, Tomasz; Kunert-Keil, Christiane; Dominiak, Marzena; Gedrange, Tomasz; Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2010-12-01

    In many studies, natural flax fibers have been proven to be resistant and surgically suitable. Genetically modified flax fibers, derived from transgenic flax expressing three bacterial genes for the synthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB), have better mechanical properties than unmodified flax fibers. The aim of this study was to examine the biocompatibility of composites containing flax fibers from transgenic polyhydroxybutyrate producing (M50) and control (wt-NIKE) plants in a polylactide (PLA) matrix in rat Musculus latissimus dorsi. For this purpose, effects of biocomposites on the expression of growth factors and osteogenic differentiation, in particular the mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, insulin like growth factor 1, insulin like growth factor 2, collagen-1, collagen-2 and myostatin, were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR. The biocomposites did not show any inflammation response after subcutaneous insertion. The results following subcutaneous insertion of PLA alone and PLA-M50 showed no significant changes on the gene expression of all tested genes, whereas PLA-wt-NIKE reduced the mRNA amount of myostatin, VEGFA and IGF2, respectively. It can be asserted that modified flax membranes with PHB and other organic substances have a good biocompatibility to the muscle and they do not disrupt the muscle function. Furthermore, composites from transgenic flax plants producing PHB did not differ from composites of non-transgenic flax plants. PMID:20973615

  13. An image processing approach to analyze morphological features of microscopic images of muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Comin, Cesar Henrique; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yaming; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano; Yang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    We present an image processing approach to automatically analyze duo-channel microscopic images of muscular fiber nuclei and cytoplasm. Nuclei and cytoplasm play a critical role in determining the health and functioning of muscular fibers as changes of nuclei and cytoplasm manifest in many diseases such as muscular dystrophy and hypertrophy. Quantitative evaluation of muscle fiber nuclei and cytoplasm thus is of great importance to researchers in musculoskeletal studies. The proposed computational approach consists of steps of image processing to segment and delineate cytoplasm and identify nuclei in two-channel images. Morphological operations like skeletonization is applied to extract the length of cytoplasm for quantification. We tested the approach on real images and found that it can achieve high accuracy, objectivity, and robustness. PMID:25124286

  14. Microvascular oxygen pressures in muscles comprised of different fiber types: Impact of dietary nitrate supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Scott K.; Holdsworth, Clark T.; Wright, Jennifer L.; Fees, Alex J.; Allen, Jason D.; Jones, Andrew M.; Musch, Timothy I.; Poole, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3−) supplementation via beetroot juice (BR) preferentially improves vascular conductance and O2 delivery to contracting skeletal muscles comprised predominantly of type IIb + d/x (i.e. highly glycolytic) fibers following its reduction to nitrite and nitric oxide (NO). To address the mechanistic basis for NO3− to improve metabolic control we tested the hypothesis that increased NO bioavailability via BR supplementation would elevate microvascular PO2 (PO2mv) in fast twitch but not slow twitch muscle. Twelve young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered BR ([NO3−] 1 mmol/kg/day, n=6) or water (control, n=6) for 5 days. PO2mv (phosphorescence quenching) was measured at rest and during 180s of electrically induced 1-Hz twitch contractions (6–8 V) of the soleus (9% type IIb +d/x) and mixed portion of the gastrocnemius (MG, 91% type IIb + d/x) muscles. In the MG, but not the soleus, BR elevated contracting steady state PO2mv by ~43% (control: 13.7 ± 0.5, BR: 19 ± 1.6 mmHg, (P<0.05). This higher PO2mv represents a greater blood-myocyte O2 driving force during muscle contractions thus providing a potential mechanism by which NO3− supplementation via BR improves metabolic control in fast twitch muscle. Recruitment of higher order type II muscle fibers is thought to play a role in the development of the V.O2 slow component which is inextricably linked to the fatigue process. These data therefore provide a putative mechanism for the BR-induced improvements in high-intensity exercise performance seen in humans. PMID:25280991

  15. Microvascular oxygen pressures in muscles comprised of different fiber types: Impact of dietary nitrate supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Scott K; Holdsworth, Clark T; Wright, Jennifer L; Fees, Alex J; Allen, Jason D; Jones, Andrew M; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation via beetroot juice (BR) preferentially improves vascular conductance and O2 delivery to contracting skeletal muscles comprised predominantly of type IIb + d/x (i.e. highly glycolytic) fibers following its reduction to nitrite and nitric oxide (NO). To address the mechanistic basis for NO3(-) to improve metabolic control we tested the hypothesis that BR supplementation would elevate microvascular PO2 (PO2mv) in fast twitch but not slow twitch muscle. Twelve young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered BR ([NO3(-)] 1 mmol/kg/day, n = 6) or water (control, n = 6) for 5 days. PO2mv (phosphorescence quenching) was measured at rest and during 180 s of electrically-induced 1-Hz twitch contractions (6-8 V) of the soleus (9% type IIb +d/x) and mixed portion of the gastrocnemius (MG, 91% type IIb + d/x) muscles. In the MG, but not the soleus, BR elevated contracting steady state PO2mv by ~43% (control: 14 ± 1, BR: 19 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.05)). This higher PO2mv represents a greater blood-myocyte O2 driving force during muscle contractions thus providing a potential mechanism by which NO3(-) supplementation via BR improves metabolic control in fast twitch muscle. Recruitment of higher order type II muscle fibers is thought to play a role in the development of the VO2 slow component which is inextricably linked to the fatigue process. These data therefore provide a putative mechanism for the BR-induced improvements in high-intensity exercise performance seen in humans. PMID:25280991

  16. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  17. Muscle metaboreceptor modulation of cutaneous active vasodilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Stephens, D. P.; Johnson, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia has been shown to reduce cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) by inhibiting the cutaneous active vasodilator system. METHODS: To identify whether this response was initiated by muscle metaboreceptors, in seven subjects two 3-min bouts of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia were performed, followed by 2 min of postexercise ischemia (PEI). An index of forearm skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) was measured on the contralateral arm at an unblocked site and at a site at which adrenergic vasoconstrictor function was blocked via bretylium iontophoresis to reveal active cutaneous vasodilator function unambiguously. Sweat rate was measured via capacitance hygrometry, CVC was indexed from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean arterial pressure and was expressed as a percentage of maximal CVC at that site. In normothermia, neither isometric exercise nor PEI affected CVC (P > 0.05). RESULTS: The first bout of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia reduced CVC at control sites and this reduction persisted through PEI (pre-exercise: 59.8 +/- 5.4, exercise: 49.8 +/- 4.9, PEI: 49.7 +/- 5.3% of maximum; both P < 0.05), whereas there were no significant changes in CVC at the bretylium treated sites. The succeeding bout of isometric exercise in hyperthermia significantly reduced CVC at both untreated (pre-exercise: 59.0 +/- 4.8, exercise: 47.3 +/- 4.0, PEI: 50.1 +/- 4.1% of maximum; both P < 0.05) and bretylium treated sites (pre-exercise: 61.4 +/- 7.3, exercise: 50.6 +/- 5.1, PEI: 53.9 +/- 6.0% of maximum, both P < 0.05). At both sites, CVC during PEI was lower than during the pre-exercise period (P < 0.05). Sweat rate rose significantly during both bouts of isometric exercise and remained elevated during PEI. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the reduction in CVC during isometric exercise in hyperthermia, including the inhibition of the active vasodilator system, is primarily mediated by muscle

  18. Normal protein content but abnormally inhibited enzyme activity in muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Diana; Zierz, Stephan

    2014-04-15

    The biochemical consequences of the disease causing mutations of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency are still enigmatic. Therefore, CPT II was characterized in muscle biopsies of nine patients with genetically proven muscle CPT II deficiency. Total CPT activity (CPT I+CPT II) of patients was not significantly different from that of controls. Remaining activities upon inhibition by malonyl-CoA and Triton X-100 were significantly reduced in patients. Immunohistochemically CPT II protein was predominantly expressed in type-I-fibers with the same intensity in patients as in controls. Western blot showed the same CPT II staining intensity ratio in patients and controls. CPT I and CPT II protein concentrations estimated by ELISA were not significantly different in patients and in controls. Citrate synthase activity in patients was significantly increased. Total CPT activity significantly correlated with both CPT I and CPT II protein concentrations in patients and controls. This implies (i) that normal total CPT activity in patients with muscle CPT II deficiency is not due to compensatory increase of CPT I activity and that (ii) the mutant CPT II is enzymatically active. The data further support the notion that in muscle CPT II deficiency enzyme activity and protein content are not reduced, but rather abnormally inhibited when fatty acid metabolism is stressed. PMID:24602495

  19. A fully resolved fluid-structure-muscle-activation model for esophageal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Wenjun; Bhalla, Amneet P. S.; Griffith, Boyce E.; Johnson, Mark; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2013-11-01

    Esophageal transport is a mechanical and physiological process that transfers the ingested food bolus from the pharynx to the stomach through a multi-layered esophageal tube. The process involves interactions between the bolus, esophageal wall composed of mucosal, circular muscle (CM) and longitudinal muscle (LM) layers, and neurally coordinated muscle activation including CM contraction and LM shortening. In this work, we present a 3D fully-resolved model of esophageal transport based on the immersed boundary method. The model describes the bolus as a Newtonian fluid, the esophageal wall as a multi-layered elastic tube represented by springs and beams, and the muscle activation as a traveling wave of sequential actuation/relaxation of muscle fibers, represented by springs with dynamic rest lengths. Results on intraluminal pressure profile and bolus shape will be shown, which are qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. Effects of activating CM contraction only, LM shortening only or both, for the bolus transport, are studied. A comparison among them can help to identify the role of each type of muscle activation. The support of grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 from NIH is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  1. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  2. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. PMID:27134409

  3. Effect of Hindlimb Unweighting on Single Soleus Fiber Maximal Shortening Velocity and ATPase Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, K. S.; Fitts, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    This study characterizes the time course of change in single soleus muscle fiber size and function elicited by hindlimb un weighting (HU) and analyzes the extent to which varying durations of HU altered maximal velocity of shortening (V(sub o)), myofibrillar adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase), and relative content of slow and fast myosin in individual soleus fibers. After 1, 2, or 3 weeks of HU, soleus muscle bundles were prepared and stored in skinning solution at -20 C. Single fibers were isolated and mounted between a motor arm and a transducer, and fiber force, V(sub o), and ATPase activity were measured. Fiber myosin content was determined by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate- (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After 1, 2, and 3 weeks of HU, soleus fibers exhibited a progressive reduction in fiber diameter (16, 22, and 42%, respectively) and peak force (42, 48, and 7%, respectively). Peak specific tension was significantly reduced after 1 week of HU (18%) and showed no further change in 2-3 weeks of HU. During 1 and 3 wk of HU, fiber V(sub o) and ATPase showed a significant increase. By 3 week, V(sub o) had increased from 1.32 +/- 0.04 to 2.94 +/- 0.17 fiber lengths/s and fiber ATPase from 291 +/- 16 to 1064 +/- 128 micro-M min(sub -1) mm(sub -3). The percent fibers expressing fast myosin heavy chain increased from 4% to 29% by 3 week of HU, and V(sub o) and ATPase activity within a fiber were highly correlated. However, a large population of fibers after 1, 2, and 3 weeks of HU showed increases in V(sub o) and ATPase but displayed the same myosin protein profile on SDS gels as control fibers. The mechanism eliciting increased fiber V(sub o) and ATPase activity was not obvious but may have been due to increases in fast myosin that went undetected on SDS gels and/or other factors unrelated to the myosin filament.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of active fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung J.; Hwang, Joon S.; Paik, Seung H.

    2003-08-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFC) possess desirable characteristics for smart structure applications. One major advantage of AFC is the ability to create anisotropic laminate layers useful in applications requiring off-axis or twisting motions. AFC is naturally composed of two different constituents: piezoelectric fiber and matrix. Therefore, homogenization method, which is utilized in the analysis of laminated composite material, has been used to characterize the material properties. Using this approach, the global behaviors of the structures are predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. Actually, the failure analysis of AFC requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Therefore, microscopic approach is necessary to predict the behaviors of AFC. In this work, a microscopic approach for the analysis of AFC was performed. Piezoelectric fiber and matrix were modeled separately and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements was utilized. Because fine mesh is essential, high performance computing technology was applied to the solution of the immense degree-of-freedom problem. This approach is called Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of structure. Through the DNS of AFC, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix was analyzed.

  5. Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Fiber Type Assessments in Microbiopsy vs. Bergstrom Percutaneous Sampling of Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Meghan C.; Ramos, Sofhia V.; Turnbull, Patrick C.; Nejatbakhsh, Ali; Baechler, Brittany L.; Tahmasebi, Houman; Laham, Robert; Gurd, Brendon J.; Quadrilatero, Joe; Kane, Daniel A.; Perry, Christopher G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Microbiopsies of human skeletal muscle are increasingly adopted by physiologists for a variety of experimental assays given the reduced invasiveness of this procedure compared to the classic Bergstrom percutaneous biopsy technique. However, a recent report demonstrated lower mitochondrial respiration in saponin-permeabilized muscle fiber bundles (PmFB) prepared from microbiopsies vs. Bergstrom biopsies. We hypothesized that ADP-induced contraction (rigor) of smaller length microbiopsy PmFB causes a greater reduction in maximal respiration vs. Bergstrom, such that respiration could be increased by a myosin II ATPase-inhibitor (Blebbistatin; BLEB). Eleven males and females each received a 2 mm diameter percutaneous microbiopsy and a 5 mm diameter Bergstrom percutaneous biopsy in opposite legs. Glutamate/malate (5/0.5 mM)—supported respiration in microbiopsy PmFB was lower than Bergstrom at submaximal concentrations of ADP. 5 μM BLEB reduced this impairment such that there were no differences relative to Bergstrom ± BLEB. Surprisingly, pyruvate (5 mM)-supported respiration was not different between either biopsy technique ±BLEB, whereas BLEB increased succinate-supported respiration in Bergstrom only. H2O2 emission was lower in microbiopsy PmFB compared to Bergstrom PmFB in the presence of BLEB. Microbiopsies contained fewer type I fibers (37 vs. 47%) and more type IIX fibers (20 vs. 8%) compared to Bergstrom possibly due to sampling site depth and/or longitudinal location. These findings suggest that smaller diameter percutaneous biopsies yield lower glutamate-supported mitochondrial respiratory kinetics which is increased by preventing ADP-induced rigor with myosin inhibition. Microbiopsies of human skeletal muscle can be utilized for assessing mitochondrial respiratory kinetics in PmFB when assay conditions are supplemented with BLEB, but fiber type differences with this method should be considered. PMID:26733870

  6. Effect of experimental muscle pain on maximal voluntary activation of human biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Serajul I; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2011-09-01

    Muscle pain has widespread effects on motor performance, but the effect of pain on voluntary activation, which is the level of neural drive to contracting muscle, is not known. To determine whether induced muscle pain reduces voluntary activation during maximal voluntary contractions, voluntary activation of elbow flexors was assessed with both motor-point stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex. In addition, we performed a psychophysical experiment to investigate the effect of induced muscle pain across a wide range of submaximal efforts (5-75% maximum). In all studies, elbow flexion torque was recorded before, during, and after experimental muscle pain by injection of 1 ml of 5% hypertonic saline into biceps. Injection of hypertonic saline evoked deep pain in the muscle (pain rating ∼5 on a scale from 0 to 10). Experimental muscle pain caused a small (∼5%) but significant reduction of maximal voluntary torque in the motor-point and motor cortical studies (P < 0.001 and P = 0.045, respectively; n = 7). By contrast, experimental muscle pain had no significant effect on voluntary activation when assessed with motor-point and motor cortical stimulation although voluntary activation tested with motor-point stimulation was reduced by ∼2% in contractions after pain had resolved (P = 0.003). Furthermore, induced muscle pain had no significant effect on torque output during submaximal efforts (P > 0.05; n = 6), which suggests that muscle pain did not alter the relationship between the sense of effort and production of voluntary torque. Hence, the present study suggests that transient experimental muscle pain in biceps brachii has a limited effect on central motor pathways. PMID:21737829

  7. Muscle Activation Patterns When Passively Stretching Spastic Lower Limb Muscles of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bar-On, Lynn; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-01-01

    The definition of spasticity as a velocity-dependent activation of the tonic stretch reflex during a stretch to a passive muscle is the most widely accepted. However, other mechanisms are also thought to contribute to pathological muscle activity and, in patients post-stroke and spinal cord injury can result in different activation patterns. In the lower-limbs of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) these distinct activation patterns have not yet been thoroughly explored. The aim of the study was to apply an instrumented assessment to quantify different muscle activation patterns in four lower-limb muscles of children with CP. Fifty-four children with CP were included (males/females n = 35/19; 10.8±3.8 yrs; bilateral/unilateral involvement n =  32/22; Gross Motor Functional Classification Score I–IV) of whom ten were retested to evaluate intra-rater reliability. With the subject relaxed, single-joint, sagittal-plane movements of the hip, knee, and ankle were performed to stretch the lower-limb muscles at three increasing velocities. Muscle activity and joint motion were synchronously recorded using inertial sensors and electromyography (EMG) from the adductors, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius. Muscles were visually categorised into activation patterns using average, normalized root mean square EMG (RMS-EMG) compared across increasing position zones and velocities. Based on the visual categorisation, quantitative parameters were defined using stretch-reflex thresholds and normalized RMS-EMG. These parameters were compared between muscles with different activation patterns. All patterns were dominated by high velocity-dependent muscle activation, but in more than half, low velocity-dependent activation was also observed. Muscle activation patterns were found to be both muscle- and subject-specific (p<0.01). The intra-rater reliability of all quantitative parameters was moderate to good. Comparing RMS-EMG between incremental

  8. a Dynamical Model of Muscle Activation, Fatigue and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing Z.; Yue, Guang H.; Brown, Robert W.

    2001-04-01

    A dynamical model on muscle activation, fatigue, and recovery was developed to provide a theoretical framework for explaining the force produced by muscle(s) during the process of getting activated and fatigued. By simplifying the fatigue effect and the recovery effect as two phenomenological parameters (F, R), we developed a set of dynamical equations to describe the behavior of muscle(s) as a group of motor units under an external drive, e.g., voluntary brain effort. This model provides a macroscopic view for understanding the biophysical mechanisms of voluntary drive, fatigue effect, and recovery in stimulating, limiting and modulating the force output from muscle(s). Agreement between the experimental data and the predicted forces is excellent. This model may also generate new possibilities in clinical and engineering applications. The parameters introduced by this model can serve as good indicators of physical conditions, and may be useful for quantitative diagnosis of certain diseases related to muscles, especially symptoms of fatigue. Inference from the model can clarify a long-debating question regarding the maximal possibility of muscle force production. It can also be used as guideline for simulating real muscle in muscle engineering or design of human-mimic robot.

  9. Skeletal muscle secreted factors prevent glucocorticoid-induced osteocyte apoptosis through activation of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Jähn, K; Lara-Castillo, N; Brotto, L; Mo, C L; Johnson, M L; Brotto, M; Bonewald, L F

    2012-01-01

    It is a widely held belief that the sole effect of muscle on bone is through mechanical loading. However, as the two tissues are intimately associated, we hypothesized that muscle myokines may have positive effects on bone. We found that factors produced by muscle will protect osteocytes from undergoing cell death induced by dexamethasone (dex), a glucocorticoid known to induce osteocyte apoptosis thereby compromising their capacity to regulate bone remodeling. Both the trypan blue exclusion assay for cell death and nuclear fragmentation assay for apoptosis were used. MLO-Y4 osteocytes, primary osteocytes, and MC3T3 osteoblastic cells were protected against dex-induced apoptosis by C2C12 myotube conditioned media (MT-CM) or by CM from ex vivo electrically stimulated, intact extensor digitorum longus (EDL) or soleus muscle derived from 4 month-old mice. C2C12 MT-CM, but not undifferentiated myoblast CM prevented dex-induced cell apoptosis and was potent down to 0.1 % CM. The CM from EDL muscle electrically stimulated tetanically at 80 Hz was more potent (10 fold) in prevention of dex-induced osteocyte death than CM from soleus muscle stimulated at the same frequency or CM from EDL stimulated at 1 Hz. This suggests that electrical stimulation increases production of factors that preserve osteocyte viability and that type II fibers are greater producers than type I fibers. The muscle factor(s) appears to protect osteocytes from cell death through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, as MT-CM induces β-catenin nuclear translocation and β-catenin siRNA abrogated the positive effects of MT-CM on dex-induced apoptosis. We conclude that muscle cells naturally secrete factor(s) that preserve osteocyte viability. PMID:22972510

  10. Neck muscle activity in skydivers during parachute opening shock.

    PubMed

    Lo Martire, R; Gladh, K; Westman, A; Lindholm, P; Nilsson, J; Äng, B O

    2016-03-01

    This observational study investigated skydiver neck muscle activity during parachute opening shock (POS), as epidemiological data recently suggested neck pain in skydivers to be related to POS. Twenty experienced skydivers performed two terminal velocity skydives each. Surface electromyography quantified muscle activity bilaterally from the anterior neck, the upper and lower posterior neck, and the upper shoulders; and two triaxial accelerometers sampled deceleration. Muscle activity was normalized as the percentage of reference maximum voluntary electrical activity (% MVE); and temporal muscle activity onset was related to POS onset. Our results showed that neck muscle activity during POS reached mean magnitudes of 53-104% MVE, often exceeding reference activity in the lower posterior neck and upper shoulders. All investigated muscle areas' mean temporal onsets occurred <50 ms after POS onset (9-34 ms latencies), which is consistent with anticipatory motor control. The high muscle activity observed supports that the neck is under substantial strain during POS, while temporal muscle activation suggests anticipatory motor control to be a strategy used by skydivers to protect the cervical spine from POS. This study's findings contribute to understanding the high rates of POS-related neck pain, and further support the need for evaluation of neck pain preventative strategies. PMID:25754941

  11. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  12. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  13. Insulin-induced redistribution of GLUT4 glucose carriers in the muscle fiber. In search of GLUT4 trafficking pathways.

    PubMed

    Zorzano, A; Muñoz, P; Camps, M; Mora, C; Testar, X; Palacín, M

    1996-01-01

    Insulin rapidly stimulates glucose transport in muscle fiber. This process controls the utilization of glucose in skeletal muscle, and it is deficient in various insulin-resistant states, such as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The effect of insulin on muscle glucose transport is mainly due to the recruitment of GLUT4 glucose carriers to the cell surface of the muscle fiber. There is increasing evidence that the recruitment of GLUT4 carriers triggered by insulin affects selective domains of sarcolemma and transverse tubules. In contrast, GLUT1 is located mainly in sarcolemma and is absent in transverse tubules, and insulin does not alter its cellular distribution in muscle fiber. The differential distribution of GLUT1 and GLUT4 in the cell surface raises new questions regarding the precise endocytic and exocytic pathways that are functional in the muscle fiber. The current view of insulin-induced GLUT4 translocation is based mainly on studies performed in adipocytes. These studies have proposed the existence of intracellular compartments of GLUT4 that respond to insulin in a highly homogeneous manner. However, studies performed in skeletal muscle have identified insulin-sensitive as well as insulin-insensitive intracellular GLUT4-containing membranes. These data open a new perspective on the dynamics of intracellular GLUT4 compartments in insulin-sensitive cells. PMID:8529804

  14. Force enhancement and force depression in a modified muscle model used for muscle activation prediction.

    PubMed

    Kosterina, Natalia; Wang, Ruoli; Eriksson, Anders; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2013-08-01

    This article introduces history-dependent effects in a skeletal muscle model applied to dynamic simulations of musculoskeletal system motion. Force depression and force enhancement induced by active muscle shortening and lengthening, respectively, represent muscle history effects. A muscle model depending on the preceding contractile events together with the current parameters was developed for OpenSim software, and applied in simulations of standing heel-raise and squat movements. Muscle activations were computed using joint kinematics and ground reaction forces recorded from the motion capture of seven individuals. In the muscle-actuated simulations, a modification was applied to the computed activation, and was compared to the measured electromyography data. For the studied movements, the history gives a small but visible effect to the muscular force trace, but some parameter values must be identified before the exact magnitude can be analysed. The muscle model modification improves the existing muscle models and gives a more accurate description of underlying forces and activations in musculoskeletal system movement simulations. PMID:23561824

  15. PPARδ expression is influenced by muscle activity and induces slow muscle properties in adult rat muscles after somatic gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lunde, Ida G; Ekmark, Merete; Rana, Zaheer A; Buonanno, Andres; Gundersen, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    The effects of exercise on skeletal muscle are mediated by a coupling between muscle electrical activity and gene expression. Several activity correlates, such as intracellular Ca2+, hypoxia and metabolites like free fatty acids (FFAs), might initiate signalling pathways regulating fibre-type-specific genes. FFAs can be sensed by lipid-dependent transcription factors of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family. We found that the mRNA for the predominant muscle isoform, PPARδ, was three-fold higher in the slow/oxidative soleus compared to the fast/glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. In histological sections of the soleus, the most oxidative fibres display the highest levels of PPARδ protein. When the soleus muscle was stimulated electrically by a pattern mimicking fast/glycolytic IIb motor units, the mRNA level of PPARδ was reduced to less than half within 24 h. In the EDL, a three-fold increase was observed after slow type I-like electrical stimulation. When a constitutively active form of PPARδ was overexpressed for 14 days in normally active adult fibres after somatic gene transfer, the number of I/IIa hybrids in the EDL more than tripled, IIa fibres increased from 14% to 25%, and IIb fibres decreased from 55% to 45%. The level of succinate dehydrogenase activity increased and size decreased, also when compared to normal fibres of the same type. Thus PPARδ can change myosin heavy chain, oxidative enzymes and size locally in muscle cells in the absence of general exercise. Previous studies on PPARδ in muscle have been performed in transgenic animals where the transgene has been present during muscle development. Our data suggest that PPARδ can mediate activity effects acutely in pre-existing adult fibres, and thus is an important link in excitation–transcription coupling. PMID:17463039

  16. Water in barnacle muscle. III. NMR studies of fresh fibers and membrane-damaged fibers equilibrated with selected solutes.

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, E E; Clark, M E; Hinke, J A; Chapman, N R

    1981-01-01

    Water in barnacle muscle has been studied using NMR techniques. Fresh fibers are compared with membrane-damaged fibers treated with solutes that greatly alter fixed charge and total water content. Both water (97%) and solute (3%) protons are visible in continuous wave spectra of oriented fresh fibers. No local field inhomogeneities were detected, nor are cell solutes significantly bound. In pulse experiments, all cell water is visible and exhibits a single exponential decay. In fresh fibers, T2 approximately or equal to 40 ms; faster decaying signals are assigned to immobile and mobile protons on macromolecules. T1 and T1p are frequency dependent. Using equations derived for a two-compartment model with fast exchange, we calculate the following: tau b, the correlation time for anisotropic rotational motion of bound water; Sb, its order parameter; tau ex, the correlation time for exchange between bound and free fractions; f, the fraction of water bound; and Hr, the grams of water bound per gram of macromolecule. Whereas f varies inversely with total water content, the other parameters are virtually constant, with values: tau b approximately or equal to 1.3 X 10(-8) S; tau ex approximately or equal to 8 X 10(-6) s; Sb approximately or equal to 0.06; and Hr approximately or equal to 0.1g H2O/g macromolecule. Thus, the NMR relaxation detectable properties of water bound to macromolecules are unaffected by solutes that greatly alter the macromolecular surface charge. PMID:7272435

  17. Polynomial Fitting of DT-MRI Fiber Tracts Allows Accurate Estimation of Muscle Architectural Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Bruce M.; Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Ding, Zhaohua

    2012-01-01

    Fiber curvature is a functionally significant muscle structural property, but its estimation from diffusion-tensor MRI fiber tracking data may be confounded by noise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of polynomial fitting of fiber tracts for improving the accuracy and precision of fiber curvature (κ) measurements. Simulated image datasets were created in order to provide data with known values for κ and pennation angle (θ). Simulations were designed to test the effects of increasing inherent fiber curvature (3.8, 7.9, 11.8, and 15.3 m−1), signal-to-noise ratio (50, 75, 100, and 150), and voxel geometry (13.8 and 27.0 mm3 voxel volume with isotropic resolution; 13.5 mm3 volume with an aspect ratio of 4.0) on κ and θ measurements. In the originally reconstructed tracts, θ was estimated accurately under most curvature and all imaging conditions studied; however, the estimates of κ were imprecise and inaccurate. Fitting the tracts to 2nd order polynomial functions provided accurate and precise estimates of κ for all conditions except very high curvature (κ=15.3 m−1), while preserving the accuracy of the θ estimates. Similarly, polynomial fitting of in vivo fiber tracking data reduced the κ values of fitted tracts from those of unfitted tracts and did not change the θ values. Polynomial fitting of fiber tracts allows accurate estimation of physiologically reasonable values of κ, while preserving the accuracy of θ estimation. PMID:22503094

  18. Estimates of activation in arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Singer, H A; Kamm, K E; Murphy, R A

    1986-09-01

    We have previously described the onset of a "latch" state in the swine carotid media after K+ depolarization. This state was characterized by maintained stress after a decrease in shortening velocities and in the level of cross-bridge phosphorylation. The present experiments were designed to determine whether there were changes in other mechanical properties in swine carotid media associated with the onset of the latch state. Medial strips (less than 500 microM thick), incubated in physiological salt solution (PSS) at 37 degrees C at their optimal length (Lo), were subjected to ramp stretches (5.86 mm/s) of 5% Lo. The active stress (Sa) response to stretch was computed by subtraction of the passive element contribution (as determined from identical stretches after 30 min incubation in Ca2+-free PSS) from the total response in the activated muscle. Transitions in the total and active stress responses to stretch were observed in strips stimulated with 109 mM K+ for 1 min or longer and were interpreted as yielding of the contractile apparatus. Active dynamic stiffness (dS/dLo) calculated from the initial 1% Lo portion of the stretch response, correlated linearly with active stress over a wide range. Maximal stress and dynamic stiffness were reached by 1 min and were maintained for at least 30 min in K+-depolarized preparations. However, yield stress increased significantly between 1 and 10 min, and there was a large increase in the length at which yield was observed (1.09 +/- 0.06 to 1.86 +/- 0.10% Lo; n = 9). These increases were maintained between 10 and 30 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3752237

  19. Geometries and applications of active fiber bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglmayr, Josef

    2001-10-01

    Active fiber bundles (FBs) are aimed to model photonic switching and processing in 3-D without the restrictions of the photonic technology. The 2-D photonic architectures are assumed to be implemented by networks of directional couplers (DCs) and Mach-Zehnder interferometers (MZIs), respectively. For the implementation several crucial problems are expected: (1) proper operation of the spatial couplers/switches (nonblocking interconnections) and (2) coupling in the interstage interconnection section mainly caused by parallel and crossing fibers/waveguides (WGs). For the design of proper operating switches (refinement of couplers) the application of decoupling concepts of modern control theory is proposed. The final goal is to translate the refined couplers into integrated photonic architectures rather than into additional lightwave circuits (LWCs) which simply would increase the coupling. The decoupling concepts are reviewed. The paper is an attempt to prepare for applying well-known system engineering concepts to the upcoming technology of photonics.

  20. Effect of unilateral denervation on maximum specific force in rat diaphragm muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Geiger, P C; Cody, M J; Macken, R L; Bayrd, M E; Sieck, G C

    2001-04-01

    We hypothesize that 1) the effect of denervation (DNV) is more pronounced in fibers expressing fast myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms and 2) the effect of DNV on maximum specific force reflects a reduction in MHC content per half sarcomere or the number of cross bridges in parallel. Studies were performed on single Triton X-100-permeabilized fibers activated at a pCa (-log Ca2+ concentration) of 4.0. MHC content per half sarcomere was determined by densitometric analysis of SDS-PAGE gels and comparison to a standard curve of known MHC concentrations. After 2 of wk DNV, the maximum specific force of fibers expressing MHC2X was reduced by approximately 40% (MHC(2B) expression was absent), whereas the maximum specific force of fibers expressing MHC2A and MHC(slow) decreased by only approximately 20%. DNV also reduced the MHC content in fibers expressing MHC2X, with no effect on fibers expressing MHC2A and MHC(slow). When normalized for MHC content per half sarcomere, force generated by DNV fibers expressing MHC2X and MHC2A was decreased compared with control fibers. These results suggest the force per cross bridge is also affected by DNV. PMID:11247914

  1. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei; Ouyang, Pin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  2. Locomotor activity influences muscle architecture and bone growth but not muscle attachment site morphology

    PubMed Central

    Rabey, Karyne N.; Green, David J.; Taylor, Andrea B.; Begun, David R.; Richmond, Brian G.; McFarlin, Shannon C.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to make behavioural inferences from skeletal remains is critical to understanding the lifestyles and activities of past human populations and extinct animals. Muscle attachment site (enthesis) morphology has long been assumed to reflect muscle strength and activity during life, but little experimental evidence exists to directly link activity patterns with muscle development and the morphology of their attachments to the skeleton. We used a mouse model to experimentally test how the level and type of activity influences forelimb muscle architecture of spinodeltoideus, acromiodeltoideus, and superficial pectoralis, bone growth rate and gross morphology of their insertion sites. Over an 11-week period, we collected data on activity levels in one control group and two experimental activity groups (running, climbing) of female wild-type mice. Our results show that both activity type and level increased bone growth rates influenced muscle architecture, including differences in potential muscular excursion (fibre length) and potential force production (physiological cross-sectional area). However, despite significant influences on muscle architecture and bone development, activity had no observable effect on enthesis morphology. These results suggest that the gross morphology of entheses is less reliable than internal bone structure for making inferences about an individual’s past behaviour. PMID:25467113

  3. [Desmin content and transversal stiffness of the left ventricle mouse cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibers after a 30-day space flight on board "BION-M1" biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Ogneva, I V; Maximova, M V; Larina, I M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the transversal stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton and the cytoskeletal protein desmin content in the left ventricle cardiomyocytes, fibers of the mouse soleus and tibialis anterior muscle after a 30-day space flight on board the "BION-M1" biosatellite (Russia, 2013). The dissection was made after 13-16.5 h after landing. The transversal stiffness was measured in relaxed and calcium activated state by, atomic force microscopy. The desmin content was estimated by western blotting, and the expression level of desmin-coding gene was detected using real-time PCR. The results indicate that, the transversal stiffness of the left ventricle cardiomyocytes and fibers of the soleus muscle in relaxed and activated states did not differ from the control. The transversal stiffness of the tibialis muscle fibers in relaxed and activated state was increased in the mice group after space flight. At the same time, in all types of studied tissues the desmin content and the expression level of desmin-coding gene did not differ from the control level. PMID:25730983

  4. Muscle ultrastructural changes from exhaustive exercise performed after prolonged restricted activity and retraining in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Philpott, D.; Pohoska, E.; Olszewska, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of exhaustive treadmill exercise on ultrastructural changes in the quadriceps femoris muscle was studied in 7 normal, healthy dogs, before and after restricted activity (RA), and following a subsequent 2 month treadmill exercise retraining period for the 5 mo group. Mean time to exhaustion in the 2 mo group decreased from 177 + or - 22 min before to 90 + or - 32 min after RA. Retraining increased tolerance to 219 + or - 73 min; 24 pct. above the before RA and 143 pct. above the after RA time. After RA exhaustion time in the 5 mo group was 25 and 45 min. Before RA, pre-exercise muscle structure was normal and post exercise there was only slight swelling of mitochondria. After RA, pre-exercise, numerous glycogen granules and lipid droplets appeared in the muscle fibers, mitochondria were smaller, and sarcoplasmic reticulum channels widened; post exercise these changes were accentuated and some areas were devoid of glycogen, and there was fiber degradation. After 5 mo RA pre-exercise there were more pronounced changes; mitochondria were very small and dense, there were many lipid droplets, myofibrils were often separated, and the fibers appeared edematous and degenerating; post exercise the sarcoplasmic reticulum was swollen, no glycogen was present, and there was marked swelling and deformation of mitochondria. After retraining, both pre-exercise and post exercise there was still evidence of fiber degeneration. Thus, susceptibility of active skeletal muscle structures and subcellular elements, e.g., mitochondria, to the action of damaging factors occurring during exhaustive exercise is enhanced considerably by prolonged disuse.

  5. Altered kinetics of contraction in skeletal muscle fibers containing a mutant myosin regulatory light chain with reduced divalent cation binding.

    PubMed Central

    Diffee, G M; Patel, J R; Reinach, F C; Greaser, M L; Moss, R L

    1996-01-01

    We examined the kinetic properties of rabbit skinned skeletal muscle fibers in which the endogenous myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) was partially replaced with a mutant RLC (D47A) containing a point mutation within the Ca2+/Mg2+ binding site that severely reduced its affinity for divalent cations. We found that when approximately 50% of the endogenous RLC was replaced by the mutant, maximum tension declined to approximately 60% of control and the rate constant of active tension redevelopment (ktr) after mechanical disruption of cross-bridges was reduced to approximately 70% of control. This reduction in ktr was not an indirect effect on kinetics due to a reduced number of strongly bound myosin heads, because when the strongly binding cross-bridge analog N-ethylmaleimide-modified myosin subfragment1 (NEM-S1) was added to the fibers, there was no effect upon maximum ktr. Fiber stiffness declined after D47A exchange in a manner indicative of a decrease in the number of strongly bound cross-bridges, suggesting that the force per cross-bridge was not significantly affected by the presence of D47A RLC. In contrast to the effects on ktr, the rate of tension relaxation in steadily activated fibers after flash photolysis of the Ca2+ chelator diazo-2 increased by nearly twofold after D47A exchange. We conclude that the incorporation of the nondivalent cation-binding mutant of myosin RLC decreases the proportion of cycling cross-bridges in a force-generating state by decreasing the rate of formation of force-generating bridges and increasing the rate of detachment. These results suggest that divalent cation binding to myosin RLC plays an important role in modulating the kinetics of cross-bridge attachment and detachment. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8804617

  6. A three-dimensional muscle activity imaging technique for assessing pelvic muscle function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingchun; Wang, Dan; Timm, Gerald W.

    2010-11-01

    A novel multi-channel surface electromyography (EMG)-based three-dimensional muscle activity imaging (MAI) technique has been developed by combining the bioelectrical source reconstruction approach and subject-specific finite element modeling approach. Internal muscle activities are modeled by a current density distribution and estimated from the intra-vaginal surface EMG signals with the aid of a weighted minimum norm estimation algorithm. The MAI technique was employed to minimally invasively reconstruct electrical activity in the pelvic floor muscles and urethral sphincter from multi-channel intra-vaginal surface EMG recordings. A series of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the present MAI technique. With appropriate numerical modeling and inverse estimation techniques, we have demonstrated the capability of the MAI technique to accurately reconstruct internal muscle activities from surface EMG recordings. This MAI technique combined with traditional EMG signal analysis techniques is being used to study etiologic factors associated with stress urinary incontinence in women by correlating functional status of muscles characterized from the intra-vaginal surface EMG measurements with the specific pelvic muscle groups that generated these signals. The developed MAI technique described herein holds promise for eliminating the need to place needle electrodes into muscles to obtain accurate EMG recordings in some clinical applications.

  7. Patterns of Intersecting Fiber Arrays Revealed in Whole Muscle with Generalized Q-Space Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Erik N.; Hoffman, Matthew P.; Aninwene, George E.; Gilbert, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The multiscale attributes of mammalian muscle confer significant challenges for structural imaging in vivo. To achieve this, we employed a magnetic resonance method, termed “generalized Q-space imaging”, that considers the effect of spatially distributed diffusion-weighted magnetic field gradients and diffusion sensitivities on the morphology of Q-space. This approach results in a subvoxel scaled probability distribution function whose shape correlates with local fiber orientation. The principal fiber populations identified within these probability distribution functions can then be associated by streamline methods to create multivoxel tractlike constructs that depict the macroscale orientation of myofiber arrays. We performed a simulation of Q-space input parameters, including magnetic field gradient strength and direction, diffusion sensitivity, and diffusional sampling to determine the optimal achievable fiber angle separation in the minimum scan time. We applied this approach to resolve intravoxel crossing myofiber arrays in the setting of the human tongue, an organ with anatomic complexity based on the presence of hierarchical arrays of intersecting myocytes. Using parameters defined by simulation, we imaged at 3T the fanlike configuration of the human genioglossus and the laterally positioned merging fibers of the styloglossus, inferior longitudinalis, chondroglossus, and verticalis. Comparative scans of the excised mouse tongue at 7T demonstrated similar midline and lateral crossing fiber patterns, whereas histological analysis confirmed the presence and distribution of these myofiber arrays at the microscopic scale. Our results demonstrate a magnetic resonance method for acquiring and displaying diffusional data that defines highly ordered myofiber patterns in architecturally complex tissue. Such patterns suggest inherent multiscale fiber organization and provide a basis for structure-function analyses in vivo and in model tissues. PMID:26039175

  8. Elevation in heat shock protein 72 mRNA following contractions in isolated single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Stary, Creed M; Walsh, Brandon J; Knapp, Amy E; Brafman, David; Hogan, Michael C

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was 1) to develop a stable model for measuring contraction-induced elevations in mRNA in single skeletal muscle fibers and 2) to utilize this model to investigate the response of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) mRNA following an acute bout of fatiguing contractions. Living, intact skeletal muscle fibers were microdissected from lumbrical muscle of Xenopus laevis and either electrically stimulated for 15 min of tetanic contractions (EX; n=26) or not stimulated to contract (REST; n=14). The relative mean developed tension of EX fibers decreased to 29+/-7% of initial peak tension at the stimulation end point. Following treatment, individual fibers were allowed to recover for 1 (n=9), 2 (n=8), or 4 h (n=9) prior to isolation of total cellular mRNA. HSP72, HSP60, and cardiac alpha-actin mRNA content were then assessed in individual fibers using quantitative PCR detection. Relative HSP72 mRNA content was significantly (P<0.05) elevated at the 2-h postcontraction time point relative to REST fibers when normalized to either HSP60 (18.5+/-7.5-fold) or cardiac alpha-actin (14.7+/-4.3-fold), although not at the 1- or 4-h time points. These data indicate that 1) extraction of RNA followed by relative quantification of mRNA of select genes in isolated single skeletal muscle fibers can be reliably performed, 2) HSP60 and cardiac alpha-actin are suitable endogenous normalizing genes in skeletal muscle following contractions, and 3) a significantly elevated content of HSP72 mRNA is detectable in skeletal muscle 2 h after a single bout of fatiguing contractions, despite minimal temperature changes and without influence from extracellular sources. PMID:18525012

  9. Skeletal muscle fiber type composition and performance during repeated bouts of maximal, concentric contractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, E. B.; Dudley, G. A.; Tesch, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Force output and fatigue and recovery patterns were studied during intermittent short-term exercise. 27 men performed three bouts of 30 maximal unilateral knee extensions on 2 different occasions. Blood flow was maintained or occluded during recovery periods (60 s). Blood flow was restricted by inflating a pneumatic cuff placed around the proximal thigh. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were analyzed for identification of fast twitch (FT) and slow twitch (ST) fibers and relative FT area. Peak torque decreased during each bout of exercise and more when blood flow was restricted during recovery. Initial peak torque (IPT) and average peak torque (APT) decreased over the three exercise bouts. This response was 3 fold greater without than with blood flow during recovery. IPT and APT decreased more in individuals with mainly FT fibers than in those with mainly ST fibers. It is suggested that performance during repeated bouts of maximal concentric contractions differs between individuals with different fiber type composition. Specifically, in high intensity, intermittent exercise with emphasis on anaerobic energy release a high FT composition may not necessarily be advantageous for performance.

  10. Effect of Resistance Training on Capillary Density Around Slow and Fast Twitch Muscle Fibers in Diabetic and Normal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Jahangir; Khazaei, Majid; Shekarchizadeh, Parivash

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is well accepted that skeletal muscle conforms to exercise stimulus by increasing capillary density and angiogenesis, but there is less evidence regarding the effect of resistance training on capillary density in flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and soleus muscle. Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the effect of resistance training on capillary density around soleus and FHL muscles in type 1 diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six male rats were divided into four groups: (1) control; (2) diabetic; (3) diabetic trained and (4) control trained (n = 9 each). A Single intraperitoneal injection of Streptozotocin at a dose of 55 mg/kg was used for induction of diabetes. The rats in the trained group undertook one training session per day for 3 days/week. Training was done with the use of a 1 meter high ladder inclined at 80°. After 4 weeks, the plasma nitrite concentrations were measured. Capillary/fiber ratio was determined around soleus and FHL muscles by immunohistochemistry. Results: Plasma Nitric Oxide (NO) concentration was increased after resistance training in diabetic animals (P < 0.05). Capillary/fiber ratio around the soleus muscle of diabetic group was more than control rats. Resistance training did not alter capillary/fiber ratio in diabetic animals (1.00 ± 0.6 vs. 1.07 ± 0.07, respectively). Capillary/fiber ratio around FHL muscle was significantly different between diabetic and control and did not alter after exercise (diabetes: 1.1702 ± 0.09; diabetic trained: 1.1714 ± 0.08; control: 0.79 ± 0.08; control trained: 0.73 ± 0.03). There was a positive correlation between plasma NO concentration and capillary density in the soleus muscle (R2 = 0.65). Conclusions: Resistance training could not improve capillary/fiber ratio in soleus and FHL muscle of diabetic animals in spite of increase in some angiogenic factors including NO. PMID:26715966

  11. Action Potential-Evoked Calcium Release Is Impaired in Single Skeletal Muscle Fibers from Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quiñonez, Marbella; Shieh, Perry; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Cruz, Daniel; Deng, Mario C.; Vergara, Julio L.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF) has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+) release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. Methods and Findings Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms) was markedly (2.6-fold) and significantly (p<0.05) smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms). This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. Conclusions These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients. PMID:25310188

  12. Functional pools of oxidative and glycolytic fibers in human muscle observed by /sup 31/P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Brown, R.L.; Park, C.R.; McCully, K.; Cohn, M.; Haselgrove, J.; Chance, B.

    1987-12-01

    Quantitative probing of heterogeneous regions in muscle is feasible with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy because of the differentiation of metabolic patterns of glycolytic and oxidative fibers. A differential recruitment of oxidative and glycolytic fibers during exercise was demonstrated in 4 of 10 untrained young men by following changes in phosphate metabolites. Concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), phosphocreatine, and ATP were estimated in the wrist flexor muscles of the forearm at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. At high work levels (40% of maximum strength), two distinct P/sub i/ peaks were observed and identified with P/sub i/ pools at pH 6.9 and pH 5.9-6.4, respectively. These could be accounted for as follows. At the lowest level of work (using 20% of maximum strength), early recruitment primarily of oxidative (type I) and possibly some intermediate (type IIA) muscle fibers occurs with relatively little net lactate production and consequently little decrease in pH. At higher work loads, however, primarily glycolytic (type IIB) muscle fibers are recruited, which have relatively high net lactate production and therefore generate a second pool of P/sub i/ at low pH. These observations indicated exhaustion of glycolytic type IIB fibers, removal of lactate by high local blood flow, and sustained contractions largely by oxidative type I and IIA fibers. A functional differentiation of fiber types could also be demonstrated during recovery if exercise was stopped while two pools of P/sub i/ were still apparent. The potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize oxidative and glycolytic fibers, predict capacity for aerobic performance, and signal the presence of muscle pathology is discussed.

  13. Effect of Expiratory Resistive Loading in Expiratory Muscle Strength Training on Orbicularis Oris Muscle Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Yoshimi; Shuntoh, Hisato; Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of expiratory resistive loading on orbicularis oris muscle activity. [Subjects] Subjects were 23 healthy individuals (11 males, mean age 25.5±4.3 years; 12 females, mean age 25.0±3.0 years). [Methods] Surface electromyography was performed to measure the activity of the orbicularis oris muscle during maximum lip closure and resistive loading at different expiratory pressures. Measurement was performed at 10%, 30%, 50%, and 100% of maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) for all subjects. The t-test was used to compare muscle activity between maximum lip closure and 100% MEP, and analysis of variance followed by multiple comparisons was used to compare the muscle activities observed at different expiratory pressures. [Results] No significant difference in muscle activity was observed between maximum lip closure and 100% MEP. Analysis of variance with multiple comparisons revealed significant differences among the different expiratory pressures. [Conclusion] Orbicularis oris muscle activity increased with increasing expiratory resistive loading. PMID:24648644

  14. Pax7 Reveals a Greater Frequency and Concentration of Satellite Cells at the Ends of Growing Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Allouh, Mohammed Z.; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora; Rosser, Benjamin W.C.

    2008-01-01

    The main sites of longitudinal growth in skeletal muscle are the ends of the fibers. This study tests the hypothesis that satellite cells (SCs) are at a greater frequency (#SC nuclei/all nuclei within basal laminae) and concentration (closer together) within growing fiber ends of posthatch chicken pectoralis. SCs were localized by their Pax7 expression, and fiber ends were identified by their retention of neonatal myosin heavy chains and small cross-sectional profiles. Whereas SC frequency decreased from about 20% at 9 days posthatch to <5% at 115 days, fiber ends retained a frequency of ∼16%. Calculated mean area of sarcolemma per SC revealed higher concentrations of SCs at fiber ends. There was also a strong inverse correlation between SC frequency and fiber profile cross-sectional size throughout development. This study suggests that SCs at fiber ends play a key role in the longitudinal growth of muscle fibers, and that fiber profile size may impact SC distribution. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:77–87, 2008) PMID:17938281

  15. Influence of different control strategies on muscle activation patterns in trunk muscles

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Laura; Anders, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Adequate training of the trunk muscles is essential to prevent low back pain. Although sit‐ups are simple to perform, the perceived high effort is the reason why training the abdominal muscles is seldom continued over a longer period of time. It is well known that the abdominal muscles are inferior to the back muscles in terms of force, but this cannot explain the extreme difference in perceived effort between trunk flexion and extension tasks. Therefore, this study was aimed at the identification of control strategy influences on the muscular stress level. Thirty‐nine subjects were investigated. The performed tasks were restricted to the sagittal plane and were implemented with simulated and realized tilt angles. Subjects were investigated in an upright position with their lower bodies fixed and their upper bodies free. Posture‐controlled tasks involved graded forward and backward tilting, while force‐controlled tasks involved the application of force based on a virtual tilt angle. The Surface EMG (SEMG) was taken from five trunk muscles on both sides. Control strategies seemed to have no systematic influence on the SEMG amplitudes of the back muscles. In contrast, the abdominal muscles exhibited significantly higher stress levels under posture‐controlled conditions without relevantly increasing antagonistic co‐activation of back muscles. The abdominal muscles' relative differences ranged from an average of 20% for the external oblique abdominal muscle to approximately 40% for the rectus abdominal muscle. The perceived high effort expended during sit‐ups can now be explained by the posture‐controlled contractions that are required. PMID:25501425

  16. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Juliette; Lempereur, Mathieu; Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël; Brochard, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity. PMID:27622734

  17. Decoding upper limb residual muscle activity in severe chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; García-Cossio, Eliana; Walter, Armin; Cho, Woosang; Broetz, Doris; Bogdan, Martin; Cohen, Leonardo G; Birbaumer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Objective Stroke is a leading cause of long-term motor disability. Stroke patients with severe hand weakness do not profit from rehabilitative treatments. Recently, brain-controlled robotics and sequential functional electrical stimulation allowed some improvement. However, for such therapies to succeed, it is required to decode patients' intentions for different arm movements. Here, we evaluated whether residual muscle activity could be used to predict movements from paralyzed joints in severely impaired chronic stroke patients. Methods Muscle activity was recorded with surface-electromyography (EMG) in 41 patients, with severe hand weakness (Fugl-Meyer Assessment [FMA] hand subscores of 2.93 ± 2.7), in order to decode their intention to perform six different motions of the affected arm, required for voluntary muscle activity and to control neuroprostheses. Decoding of paretic and nonparetic muscle activity was performed using a feed-forward neural network classifier. The contribution of each muscle to the intended movement was determined. Results Decoding of up to six arm movements was accurate (>65%) in more than 97% of nonparetic and 46% of paretic muscles. Interpretation These results demonstrate that some level of neuronal innervation to the paretic muscle remains preserved and can be used to implement neurorehabilitative treatments in 46% of patients with severe paralysis and extensive cortical and/or subcortical lesions. Such decoding may allow these patients for the first time after stroke to control different motions of arm prostheses through muscle-triggered rehabilitative treatments. PMID:25642429

  18. Altered content of AMP-activated protein kinase isoforms in skeletal muscle from spinal cord injured subjects.

    PubMed

    Kostovski, Emil; Boon, Hanneke; Hjeltnes, Nils; Lundell, Leonidas S; Ahlsén, Maria; Chibalin, Alexander V; Krook, Anna; Iversen, Per Ole; Widegren, Ulrika

    2013-11-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a pivotal regulator of energy homeostasis. Although downstream targets of AMPK are widely characterized, the physiological factors governing isoform expression of this protein kinase are largely unknown. Nerve/contractile activity has a major impact on the metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscle, therefore likely to influence AMPK isoform expression. Spinal cord injury represents an extreme form of physical inactivity, with concomitant changes in skeletal muscle metabolism. We assessed the influence of longstanding and recent spinal cord injury on protein abundance of AMPK isoforms in human skeletal muscle. We also determined muscle fiber type as a marker of glycolytic or oxidative metabolism. In subjects with longstanding complete injury, protein abundance of the AMPKγ3 subunit, as well as myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIa and IIx, were increased, whereas abundance of the AMPKγ1 subunit and MHC I were decreased. Similarly, abundance of AMPKγ3 and MHC IIa proteins were increased, whereas AMPKα2, -β1, and -γ1 subunits and MHC I abundance was decreased during the first year following injury, reflecting a more glycolytic phenotype of the skeletal muscle. However, in incomplete cervical lesions, partial recovery of muscle function attenuated the changes in the isoform profile of AMPK and MHC. Furthermore, exercise training (electrically stimulated leg cycling) partly normalized mRNA expression of AMPK isoforms. Thus, physical activity affects the relative expression of AMPK isoforms. In conclusion, skeletal muscle abundance of AMPK isoforms is related to physical activity and/or muscle fiber type. Thus, physical/neuromuscular activity is an important determinant of isoform abundance of AMPK and MCH. This further underscores the need for physical activity as part of a treatment regimen after spinal cord injury to maintain skeletal muscle metabolism. PMID:24022865

  19. Diet-induced obesity and acute hyperlipidemia reduce IkappaBalpha levels in rat skeletal muscle in a fiber-type dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Bankim A; Dube, John J; Dedousis, Nikolas; Reider, Jodie A; O'Doherty, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Increased activity of proinflammatory/stress pathways has been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in obesity. However, the effects of obesity on the activity of these pathways in skeletal muscle, the major insulin-sensitive tissue by mass, are poorly understood. Furthermore, the mechanisms that activate proinflammatory/stress pathways in obesity are unknown. The present study addressed the effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO; 6 wk of high-fat feeding) and acute (6-h) hyperlipidemia (HL) in rats on activity of IKK/IkappaB/NF-kappaB c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK in three skeletal muscles differing in fiber type [superficial vastus (Vas; fast twitch-glycolytic), soleus (Sol; slow twitch-oxidative), and gastrocnemius (Gas; mixed)]. DIO decreased the levels of the IkappaBalpha in Vas (24 +/- 3%, P = 0.001, n = 8) but not in Sol or Gas compared with standard chow-fed controls. Similar to DIO, HL decreased IkappaBalpha levels in Vas (26 +/- 5%, P = 0.006, n = 6) and in Gas (15 +/- 4%, P = 0.01, n = 7) but not in Sol compared with saline-infused controls. Importantly, the fiber-type-dependent effects on IkappaBalpha levels could not be explained by differential accumulation of triglyceride in Sol and Vas. HL, but not DIO, decreased phospho-p38 MAPK levels in Vas (41 +/- 7% P = 0.004, n = 6) but not in Sol or Gas. Finally, skeletal muscle c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activity was unchanged by DIO or HL. We conclude that diet-induced obesity and acute HL reduce IkappaBalpha levels in rat skeletal muscle in a fiber-type-dependent manner. PMID:16081881

  20. Effects of Mechanical Overloading on the Properties of Soleus Muscle Fibers, with or without Damage in MDX and Wild Type Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Takashi; Oke, Yoshihiko; Nakai, Naoya; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Effects of mechanical overloading on the characteristics of regenerating or not-regenerating soleus muscle fibers were studied. The muscle fibers of mdx mice were characterized by the localization of myonuclei. Muscle damage was also induced in wild type (WT) mice by injection of cardiotoxin (CTX) into soleus muscle. Overloading was applied for 14 days to the left soleus muscle in mdx and intact and CTX-injected WT mice by removing the distal tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. The contralateral muscle served as the normal control. These animals were then allowed ambulation recovery in the cage. Central myonuclei were noted in many fibers of mdx and CTX-injected mice with or without overloading. In general, the fibers with central nuclei were considered as regenerating fibers. The fibers with more central nuclei were increased in mdx mice, but the fibers with more peripheral nuclei were increased in CTX-injected WT mice by overloading. The muscle satellite cells, neuromuscular junctions (NMJ), and myonuclei were stained. Most of the properties, such as number of myonuclei and satellite cells, size of NMJ, and fiber length, were not influenced by mechanical overloading in all mice. Approximately 0.6% branched fibers were seen in the intact soleus of mdx mice, although these fibers were not detected in WT mice. However, the percentage of these fibers was increased by overloading especially in mdx mice (~50% vs. ~2.5% in WT). In CTX-injected WT mice, these fibers were ~15% with or without overloading. The fiber cross sectional area in normal WT, but not in mdx and CTX-injected WT mice, was increased by overloading (p<0.05). These results suggested that the functional overload induced muscle damage in mdx mice, but promoted the regeneration in CTX-injected WT mice.

  1. Size and metabolic properties of single muscle fibers in rat soleus after hindlimb suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauschka, Edward O.; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    1987-01-01

    The effect of 28-day-long hind-limb suspension (HS) combined with 10 daily forceful lengthening contractions of the limb on the morphological and metabolic properties of individual fibers of the soleus was studied in rats, using quantitative histochemical techniques. Compared with nonsuspended controls (CON), soleus wet weights of HS rats were decreased by 49 percent; the fibers staining lightly for myosin ATPase ('light-ATPase' fibers) atrophied more than the 'dark-ATPase' fibers. Single-fiber alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities were higher in HS than in CON rats. Daily forceful lengthening contractions did not prevent the HS-induced changes. The results support the view that the soleus fibers can change from a slow-twitch oxidative to a fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic profile, but rarely to a fast-twitch glycolytic one, and that the SDH and GPD activities per volume of tissue can be increased even when there are severe losses of contractile proteins.

  2. VEGF induces stress fiber formation in fibroblasts isolated from dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Gutpell, Kelly M; Hoffman, Lisa M

    2015-12-01

    Treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to reduce ischemia and enhance both endogenous muscle repair and regenerative cell therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has been widely proposed in recent years. However, the interaction between angiogenesis and fibrosis, a hallmark feature of DMD, remains unclear. To date, it has not been determined whether VEGF exerts a pro-fibrotic effect on DMD-derived fibroblasts, which may contribute to further disease progression. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exogenous VEGF on fibroblast cultures established from a murine model of DMD. Primary fibroblast cultures were established from gastrocnemius and diaphragm muscles of 10 week-old mdx/utrn+/- mice. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was employed to assess changes in transcript expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (Acta2), type-1 collagen (Col1a1), connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf/ccn2) and fibronectin (Fn1). Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis was further employed to visualize changes in protein expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), CTGF/CCN2 and fibronectin. mRNA levels of Col1a1, Ctgf/ccn2, and FN did not increase following treatment with VEGF in fibroblasts derived from either diaphragm or gastrocnemius muscles. Acta2 expression increased significantly in diaphragm-derived fibroblasts following treatment with VEGF. Morphological assessment revealed increased stress fiber formation in VEGF-treated fibroblasts compared to the untreated control fibroblasts. The findings from this study suggest that further investigation into the effect of VEGF on fibroblast function is required prior to the utilization of the growth factor as a treatment for DMD. PMID:26219981

  3. Skeletal muscle myostatin mRNA expression is fiber-type specific and increases during hindlimb unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. J.; Booth, F. W.; Gordon, S. E.

    1999-01-01

    Transgenic mice lacking a functional myostatin (MSTN) gene demonstrate greater skeletal muscle mass resulting from muscle fiber hypertrophy and hyperplasia (McPherron, A. C., A. M. Lawler, and S. -J. Lee. Nature 387: 83-90, 1997). Therefore, we hypothesized that, in normal mice, MSTN may act as a negative regulator of muscle mass. Specifically, we hypothesized that the predominately slow (type I) soleus muscle, which demonstrates greater atrophy than the fast (type II) gastrocnemius-plantaris complex (Gast/PLT), would show more elevation in MSTN mRNA abundance during hindlimb unloading (HU). Surprisingly, MSTN mRNA was not detectable in weight-bearing or HU soleus muscle, which atrophied 42% by the 7th day of HU in female ICR mice. In contrast, MSTN mRNA was present in weight-bearing Gast/PLT muscle and was significantly elevated (67%) at 1 day but not at 3 or 7 days of HU. However, the Gast/PLT muscle had only atrophied 17% by the 7th day of HU. Because the soleus is composed only of type I and IIa fibers, whereas the Gast/PLT expresses type IId/x and IIb in addition to type I and IIa, it was necessary to perform a more careful analysis of the relationship between MSTN mRNA levels and myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform expression (as a marker of fiber type). A significant correlation (r = 0.725, P < 0. 0005) was noted between the percentage of MHC isoform IIb expression and MSTN mRNA abundance in several muscles of the mouse hindlimb. These results indicate that MSTN expression is not strongly associated with muscle atrophy induced by HU; however, it is strongly associated with MHC isoform IIb expression in normal muscle.

  4. Laser ablation of Drosophila embryonic motoneurons causes ectopic innervation of target muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    We have tested the effects of neuromuscular denervation in Drosophila by laser-ablating the RP motoneurons in intact embryos before synaptogenesis. We examined the consequences of this ablation on local synaptic connectivity in both 1st and 3rd instar larvae. We find that the partial or complete loss of native innervation correlates with the appearance of alternate inputs from neighboring motor endings and axons. These collateral inputs are found at ectopic sites on the denervated target muscle fibers. The foreign motor endings are electrophysiologically functional and are observed on the denervated muscle fibers by the 1st instar larval stage. Our data are consistent with the existence of a local signal from the target environment, which is regulated by innervation and influences synaptic connectivity. Our results show that, despite the stereotypy of Drosophila neuromuscular connections, denervation can induce local changes in connectivity in wild-type Drosophila, suggesting that mechanisms of synaptic plasticity may also be involved in normal Drosophila neuromuscular development.

  5. Ephrin-A3 promotes and maintains slow muscle fiber identity during postnatal development and reinnervation.

    PubMed

    Stark, Danny A; Coffey, Nathan J; Pancoast, Hannah R; Arnold, Laura L; Walker, J Peyton D; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; Garcia, Michael L; Cornelison, D D W

    2015-12-01

    Each adult mammalian skeletal muscle has a unique complement of fast and slow myofibers, reflecting patterns established during development and reinforced via their innervation by fast and slow motor neurons. Existing data support a model of postnatal "matching" whereby predetermined myofiber type identity promotes pruning of inappropriate motor axons, but no molecular mechanism has yet been identified. We present evidence that fiber type-specific repulsive interactions inhibit innervation of slow myofibers by fast motor axons during both postnatal maturation of the neuromuscular junction and myofiber reinnervation after injury. The repulsive guidance ligand ephrin-A3 is expressed only on slow myofibers, whereas its candidate receptor, EphA8, localizes exclusively to fast motor endplates. Adult mice lacking ephrin-A3 have dramatically fewer slow myofibers in fast and mixed muscles, and misexpression of ephrin-A3 on fast myofibers followed by denervation/reinnervation promotes their respecification to a slow phenotype. We therefore conclude that Eph/ephrin interactions guide the fiber type specificity of neuromuscular interactions during development and adult life. PMID:26644518

  6. Ephrin-A3 promotes and maintains slow muscle fiber identity during postnatal development and reinnervation

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Danny A.; Coffey, Nathan J.; Pancoast, Hannah R.; Arnold, Laura L.; Walker, J. Peyton D.; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; Garcia, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Each adult mammalian skeletal muscle has a unique complement of fast and slow myofibers, reflecting patterns established during development and reinforced via their innervation by fast and slow motor neurons. Existing data support a model of postnatal "matching" whereby predetermined myofiber type identity promotes pruning of inappropriate motor axons, but no molecular mechanism has yet been identified. We present evidence that fiber type–specific repulsive interactions inhibit innervation of slow myofibers by fast motor axons during both postnatal maturation of the neuromuscular junction and myofiber reinnervation after injury. The repulsive guidance ligand ephrin-A3 is expressed only on slow myofibers, whereas its candidate receptor, EphA8, localizes exclusively to fast motor endplates. Adult mice lacking ephrin-A3 have dramatically fewer slow myofibers in fast and mixed muscles, and misexpression of ephrin-A3 on fast myofibers followed by denervation/reinnervation promotes their respecification to a slow phenotype. We therefore conclude that Eph/ephrin interactions guide the fiber type specificity of neuromuscular interactions during development and adult life. PMID:26644518

  7. Automatic Myonuclear Detection in Isolated Single Muscle Fibers Using Robust Ellipse Fitting and Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hai; Xing, Fuyong; Lee, Jonah D.; Peterson, Charlotte A.; Yang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and robust detection of myonuclei in isolated single muscle fibers is required to calculate myonuclear domain size. However, this task is challenging because: 1) shape and size variations of the nuclei, 2) overlapping nuclear clumps, and 3) multiple z-stack images with out-of-focus regions. In this paper, we have proposed a novel automatic detection algorithm to robustly quantify myonuclei in isolated single skeletal muscle fibers. The original z-stack images are first converted into one all-in-focus image using multi-focus image fusion. A sufficient number of ellipse fitting hypotheses are then generated from them yonuclei contour segments using heteroscedastic errors-invariables (HEIV) regression. A set of representative training samples and a set of discriminative features are selected by a two-stage sparse model. The selected samples with representative features are utilized to train a classifier to select the best candidates. A modified inner geodesic distance based mean-shift clustering algorithm is used to produce the final nuclei detection results. The proposed method was extensively tested using 42 sets of z-stack images containing over 1,500 myonuclei. The method demonstrates excellent results that are better than current state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:26356342

  8. Sliding distance per ATP molecule hydrolyzed by myosin heads during isotonic shortening of skinned muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, H; Goldman, Y E

    1995-01-01

    We measured isotonic sliding distance of single skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle when known and limited amounts of ATP were made available to the contractile apparatus. The fibers were immersed in paraffin oil at 20 degrees C, and laser pulse photolysis of caged ATP within the fiber initiated the contraction. The amount of ATP released was measured by photolyzing 3H-ATP within fibers, separating the reaction products by high-pressure liquid chromatography, and then counting the effluent peaks by liquid scintillation. The fiber stiffness was monitored to estimate the proportion of thick and thin filament sites interacting during filament sliding. The interaction distance, Di, defined as the sliding distance while a myosin head interacts with actin in the thin filament per ATP molecule hydrolyzed, was estimated from the shortening distance, the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed by the myosin heads, and the stiffness. Di increased from 11 to 60 nm as the isotonic tension was reduced from 80% to 6% of the isometric tension. Velocity and Di increased with the concentration of ATP available. As isotonic load was increased, the interaction distance decreased linearly with decrease of the shortening velocity and extrapolated to 8 nm at zero velocity. Extrapolation of the relationship between Di and velocity to saturating ATP concentration suggests that Di reaches 100-190 nm at high shortening velocity. The interaction distance corresponds to the sliding distance while cross-bridges are producing positive (working) force plus the distance while they are dragging (producing negative forces). The results indicate that the working and drag distances increase as the velocity increases. Because Di is larger than the size of either the myosin head or the actin monomer, the results suggest that for each ATPase cycle, a myosin head interacts mechanically with several actin monomers either while working or while producing drag. PMID:8534820

  9. Quasi-elastic light-scattering studies of single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Haskell, R C; Carlson, F D

    1981-01-01

    Measurements were made of the intensity autocorrelation function, g(2)[tau], of light scattered from intact frog muscle fibers. During the tension plateau of an isometric tenanus, scattered field statistics were approximately Gaussian and intensity fluctuations were quasi-stationary. The half time, tau 1/2, for the decay of g(2)[tau] was typically 70 ms at a scattering angle of 30 degrees. The decay rate, 1/tau 1/2, of g(2)[tau] varied roughly linearly with the projection of the scattering vector on the fiber axis. 1/tau 1/2 was greater during the tension creep phase of tetani of highly stretched fibers, but was roughly independent of sarcomere length during the tension plateau. g(2)[tau] measured during rest or on diffraction pattern maxima during isometric contraction were flat with low amplitudes. These results are consistent with a model of a 200-mu m segment of an isometrically contracting fiber in which scattering material possesses relative axial velocities of 1-2 mu m/s accompanied by relative axial displacements greater than 0.1 mu m. The slow (1-2 mu m/s) motion of one portion of the fiber relative to another observed under the microscope (500X) during isometric contraction is consistent with the light-scattering results. Structural fluctuations on the scale of the myofibrillar sarcomere which may arise from asynchronous cycling of cross-bridges must involve relative axial velocities less than 3 mu m/s or relative axial displacements less than 0.05 mu m. PMID:6974014

  10. Effect of spaceflight on the isotonic contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibers in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Romatowski, J. G.; Blaser, C.; De La Cruz, L.; Gettelman, G. J.; Widrick, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments from both Cosmos and Space Shuttle missions have shown weightlessness to result in a rapid decline in the mass and force of rat hindlimb extensor muscles. Additionally, despite an increased maximal shortening velocity, peak power was reduced in rat soleus muscle post-flight. In humans, declines in voluntary peak isometric ankle extensor torque ranging from 15-40% have been reported following long- and short-term spaceflight and prolonged bed rest. Complete understanding of the cellular events responsible for the fiber atrophy and the decline in force, as well as the development of effective countermeasures, will require detailed knowledge of how the physiological and biochemical processes of muscle function are altered by spaceflight. The specific purpose of this investigation was to determine the extent to which the isotonic contractile properties of the slow- and fast-twitch fiber types of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were altered by a 14-day spaceflight.

  11. Activity of calcium activated protease in skeletal muscles and its changes in atrophy and stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Nagainis, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The reduction of protein content in skeletal muscle undergoing disuse-induced atrophy is correlated with accelerated rates of protein degradation and reduced rates of protein synthesis (Goldspink, 1977). It is not known in what manner myofibers are partially disassembled during disuse atrophy to fibers of smaller diameter; nor is it known which proteases are responsible for this morphological change in contractile protein mass. Dayton and colleagues (1975) have suggested that the Ca(2+)-activated protease (CaP) may initiate myofibril degradation. The discovery of a form of CaP that is activatable by nano-molar concentrations of Ca(2+) indicates that CaP activity may be regulated by physiological concentrations of Ca(2+) (Mellgren, 1980). The enhancement of proteolysis by the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, reported by Etlinger (1979), is consistent with a significant role for CaP in protein degradation. It was of interest, therefore, to measure the levels of CaP activity and the CaP inhibitor in extracts obtained from skeletal muscles of rat and chicken limbs undergoing disuse atrophy or stretch hypertrophy, respectively.

  12. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect. PMID:26584054

  13. Acute effects of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ accumulation and contractility in human type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Dutka, T L; Lamboley, C R; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2014-10-01

    Taurine occurs in high concentrations in muscle and is implicated in numerous physiological processes, yet its effects on many aspects of contractility remain unclear. Using mechanically skinned segments of human vastus lateralis muscle fibers, we characterized the effects of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ accumulation and contractile apparatus properties in type I and type II fibers. Prolonged myoplasmic exposure (>10 min) to taurine substantially increased the rate of accumulation of Ca2+ by the SR in both fiber types, with no change in the maximum amount accumulated; no such effect was found with carnosine. SR Ca2+ accumulation was similar with 10 or 20 mM taurine, but was significantly slower at 5 mM taurine. Cytoplasmic taurine (20 mM) had no detectable effects on the responsiveness of the Ca2+ release channels in either fiber type. Taurine caused a small increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus in type I fibers, but type II fibers were unaffected; maximum Ca(2+)-activated force was unchanged in both cases. The effects of taurine on SR Ca2+ accumulation (1) only became apparent after prolonged cytoplasmic exposure, and (2) persisted for some minutes after complete removal of taurine from the cytoplasm, consistent with the hypothesis that the effects were due to an action of taurine from inside the SR. In summary, taurine potentiates the rate of SR Ca2+ uptake in both type I and type II human fibers, possibly via an action from within the SR lumen, with the degree of potentiation being significantly reduced at low physiological taurine levels. PMID:25123198

  14. Gut microbiota can transfer fiber characteristics and lipid metabolic profiles of skeletal muscle from pigs to germ-free mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Honglin; Diao, Hui; Xiao, Yi; Li, Wenxia; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping; Mao, Xiangbing; Luo, Yuheng; Zeng, Benhua; Wei, Hong; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Obesity causes changes in microbiota composition, and an altered gut microbiota can transfer obesity-associated phenotypes from donors to recipients. Obese Rongchang pigs (RP) exhibited distinct fiber characteristics and lipid metabolic profiles in their muscle compared with lean Yorkshire pigs (YP). However, whether RP have a different gut microbiota than YP and whether there is a relationship between the microbiota and muscle properties are poorly understood. The present study was conducted to test whether the muscle properties can be transferred from pigs to germ-free (GF) mice. High-throughput pyrosequencing confirms the presence of distinct core microbiota between pig breeds, with alterations in taxonomic distribution and modulations in β diversity. RP displayed a significant higher Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and apparent genera differences compared with YP. Transplanting the porcine microbiota into GF mice replicated the phenotypes of the donors. RP and their GF mouse recipients exhibited a higher body fat mass, a higher slow-contracting fiber proportion, a decreased fiber size and fast IIb fiber percentage, and enhanced lipogenesis in the gastrocnemius muscle. Furthermore, the gut microbiota composition of colonized mice shared high similarity with their donor pigs. Taken together, the gut microbiota of obese pigs intrinsically influences skeletal muscle development and the lipid metabolic profiles. PMID:27545196

  15. Structure of the cortical cytoskeleton in fibers of postural muscles and cardiomyocytes of mice after 30-day 2-g centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Ogneva, Irina V; Gnyubkin, V; Laroche, N; Maximova, M V; Larina, I M; Vico, L

    2015-03-01

    Altered external mechanical loading during spaceflights causes negative effects on muscular and cardiovascular systems. The aim of the study was estimation of the cortical cytoskeleton statement of the skeletal muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. The state of the cortical cytoskeleton in C57BL6J mice soleus, tibialis anterior muscle fibers, and left ventricle cardiomyocytes was investigated after 30-day 2-g centrifugation ("2-g" group) and within 12 h after its completion ("2-g + 12-h" group). We used atomic force microscopy for estimating cell's transverse stiffness, Western blotting for measuring protein content, and RT-PCR for estimating their expression level. The transverse stiffness significantly decreased in cardiomyocytes (by 16%) and increased in skeletal muscles fibers (by 35% for soleus and by 29% for tibialis anterior muscle fibers) in animals of the 2-g group (compared with the control group). For cardiomyocytes, we found that, in the 2-g + 12-h group, α-actinin-1 content decreased in the membranous fraction (by 27%) and increased in cytoplasmic fraction (by 28%) of proteins (compared with the levels in the 2-g group). But for skeletal muscle fibers, similar changes were noted for α-actinin-4, but not for α-actinin-1. In conclusion, we showed that the different isoforms of α-actinins dissociate from cortical cytoskeleton under increased/decreased of mechanical load. PMID:25539936

  16. Gut microbiota can transfer fiber characteristics and lipid metabolic profiles of skeletal muscle from pigs to germ-free mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Honglin; Diao, Hui; Xiao, Yi; Li, Wenxia; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping; Mao, Xiangbing; Luo, Yuheng; Zeng, Benhua; Wei, Hong; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Obesity causes changes in microbiota composition, and an altered gut microbiota can transfer obesity-associated phenotypes from donors to recipients. Obese Rongchang pigs (RP) exhibited distinct fiber characteristics and lipid metabolic profiles in their muscle compared with lean Yorkshire pigs (YP). However, whether RP have a different gut microbiota than YP and whether there is a relationship between the microbiota and muscle properties are poorly understood. The present study was conducted to test whether the muscle properties can be transferred from pigs to germ-free (GF) mice. High-throughput pyrosequencing confirms the presence of distinct core microbiota between pig breeds, with alterations in taxonomic distribution and modulations in β diversity. RP displayed a significant higher Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and apparent genera differences compared with YP. Transplanting the porcine microbiota into GF mice replicated the phenotypes of the donors. RP and their GF mouse recipients exhibited a higher body fat mass, a higher slow-contracting fiber proportion, a decreased fiber size and fast IIb fiber percentage, and enhanced lipogenesis in the gastrocnemius muscle. Furthermore, the gut microbiota composition of colonized mice shared high similarity with their donor pigs. Taken together, the gut microbiota of obese pigs intrinsically influences skeletal muscle development and the lipid metabolic profiles. PMID:27545196

  17. Breakpoints in ventilation, cerebral and muscle oxygenation, and muscle activity during an incremental cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, Sebastien; Buchheit, Martin; Girard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the breakpoints of cerebral and muscle oxygenation and muscle electrical activity during a ramp exercise in reference to the first and second ventilatory thresholds. Twenty-five cyclists completed a maximal ramp test on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 25 W/min. Expired gazes (breath-by-breath), prefrontal cortex and vastus lateralis (VL) oxygenation [Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)] together with electromyographic (EMG) Root Mean Square (RMS) activity for the VL, rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were continuously assessed. There was a non-linear increase in both cerebral deoxyhemoglobin (at 56 ± 13% of the exercise) and oxyhemoglobin (56 ± 8% of exercise) concomitantly to the first ventilatory threshold (57 ± 6% of exercise, p > 0.86, Cohen's d < 0.1). Cerebral deoxyhemoglobin further increased (87 ± 10% of exercise) while oxyhemoglobin reached a plateau/decreased (86 ± 8% of exercise) after the second ventilatory threshold (81 ± 6% of exercise, p < 0.05, d > 0.8). We identified one threshold only for muscle parameters with a non-linear decrease in muscle oxyhemoglobin (78 ± 9% of exercise), attenuation in muscle deoxyhemoglobin (80 ± 8% of exercise), and increase in EMG activity of VL (89 ± 5% of exercise), RF (82 ± 14% of exercise), and BF (85 ± 9% of exercise). The thresholds in BF and VL EMG activity occurred after the second ventilatory threshold (p < 0.05, d > 0.6). Our results suggest that the metabolic and ventilatory events characterizing this latter cardiopulmonary threshold may affect both cerebral and muscle oxygenation levels, and in turn, muscle recruitment responses. PMID:24782786

  18. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  19. Active musculoskeletal structures equipped with a circulatory system and a network of ionic polymeric gel muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Shahinpoor, M.; Mojarrad, M.

    1994-12-31

    Presented are descriptions of design and fabrication of an active musculoskeletal structure composed of an artificial human skeleton of 5.3 feet in height. This skeletal structure is further equipped with an artificial heart in the form of a multi-channel computer-controlled fluid pump. The fluid pump may be programmed to selectively pump either an acid, a base or de-ionized water to a network of veins that feed a network of pairs of antagonist contractile synthetic muscles. These muscles are manufactured in the laboratory from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber bundles that are specially designed and packaged inside flexible, hyperelastic latex membranes. Each pair of muscles act as a pair of antagonist actuator similar to the biceps and triceps muscles of the human arm. The initial fabrication indicates that it is possible to dynamically control such active musculoskeletal structures. A model is also presented for the dynamic control of such antagonist muscles. The model is intended to be used to study the human musculoskeletal dynamics.

  20. Effect of craniocervical posture on abdominal muscle activities

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jung Gil; Won, Shin Ji; Gak, Hwangbo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the craniocervical posture on abdominal muscle activities in hook-lying position. [Subjects] This study recruited 12 healthy young adults. [Methods] Each subject was asked to adopt a supine position with the hip and knee flexed at 60°. Surface electromyographic signals of transversus abdominis/internal oblique, rectus abdominis, and external oblique in different craniocervical postures (extension, neutral, and flexion) were compared. [Results] The transversus abdominis and rectus abdominis showed increased muscle activities in craniocervical flexion compared to craniocervical extension and neutral position. Greater muscle activities of the external oblique were seen in craniocervical flexion than in craniocervical extension. [Conclusion] Craniocervical flexion was found to be effective to increase the abdominal muscle activities. Consideration of craniocervical posture is recommended when performing trunk stabilization exercises. PMID:27065558

  1. Demonstrating Electrical Activity in Nerve and Muscle. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a demonstration for showing the electrical activity in nerve and muscle including action potentials, refractory period of a nerve, and fatigue. Presents instructions for constructing an amplifier, electronic stimulator, and force transducer. (GS)

  2. Neural control of glutamine synthetase activity in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Feng, B; Konagaya, M; Konagaya, Y; Thomas, J W; Banner, C; Mill, J; Max, S R

    1990-05-01

    The mechanism of glutamine synthetase induction in rat skeletal muscle after denervation or limb immobilization was investigated. Adult male rats were subjected to midthigh section of the sciatic nerve. At 1, 2, and 5 h and 1, 2, and 7 days after denervation, rats were killed and denervated, and contralateral control soleus and plantaris muscles were excised, weighted, homogenized, and assayed for glutamine synthetase. Glutamine synthetase activity increased approximately twofold 1 h after denervation in both muscles. By 7 days postdenervation enzyme activity had increased to three times the control level in plantaris muscle and to four times the control level in soleus muscle. Increased enzyme activity after nerve section was associated with increased maximum velocity with no change in apparent Michaelis constant. Immunotitration with an antiglutamine synthetase antibody suggested that denervation caused an increase in the number of glutamine synthetase molecules in muscle. However, Northern-blot analysis revealed no increase in the steady-state level of glutamine synthetase mRNA after denervation. A mixing experiment failed to yield evidence for the presence of a soluble factor involved in regulating the activity of glutamine synthetase in denervated muscle. A combination of denervation and dexamethasone injections resulted in additive increases in glutamine synthetase. Thus the mechanism underlying increased glutamine synthetase after denervation appears to be posttranscriptional and is distinct from that of the glucocorticoid-mediated glutamine synthetase induction previously described by us. PMID:1970709

  3. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization. PMID:26730390

  4. Compartment calcium model of frog skeletal muscle during activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifan; Olson, Sarah D

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is triggered by a rise in calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration in the myofibrillar space. The objective of this study was to develop a voltage dependent compartment model of Ca(2+) dynamics in frog skeletal muscle fibers. The compartment model corresponds to the myofibrillar space (MS) and a calcium store, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Ca(2+) is released from the SR to the MS based on the voltage and is able to bind to several proteins in the MS. We use a detailed model to account for voltage dependent Ca(2+) release and inactivation. With this model, we are able to match previous experimental data for Ca(2+) release and binding to proteins for an applied (fixed) voltage. We explore the sensitivity of parameters in the model and illustrate the importance of inactivation of the SR; during a long depolarization, the SR must be inactivated in order to achieve realistic Ca(2+) concentrations in the MS. A Hodgkin Huxley type model was also developed to describe voltage at the surface membrane using electrophysiological data from previous experiments. This voltage model was then used as the time dependent voltage to determine Ca(2+) release from the SR. With this fully coupled model, we were able to match previous experimental results for Ca(2+) concentrations for a given applied current. Additionally, we examined simulated Ca(2+) concentrations in the case of twitch and tetanus, corresponding to different applied currents. The developed model is robust and reproduces many aspects of voltage dependent calcium signaling in frog skeletal muscle fibers. This modeling framework provides a platform for future studies of excitation contraction coupling in skeletal muscle fibe