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Sample records for active mutant cam

  1. Activity dependent CAM cleavage and neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Conant, Katherine; Allen, Megan; Lim, Seung T.

    2015-01-01

    Spatially localized proteolysis represents an elegant means by which neuronal activity dependent changes in synaptic structure, and thus experience dependent learning and memory, can be achieved. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that matrix metalloproteinase and adamalysin activity is concentrated at the cell surface, and emerging evidence suggests that increased peri-synaptic expression, release and/or activation of these proteinases occurs with enhanced excitatory neurotransmission. Synaptically expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) could therefore represent important targets for neuronal activity-dependent proteolysis. Several CAM subtypes are expressed at the synapse, and their cleavage can influence the efficacy of synaptic transmission through a variety of non-mutually exclusive mechanisms. In the following review, we discuss mechanisms that regulate neuronal activity-dependent synaptic CAM shedding, including those that may be calcium dependent. We also highlight CAM targets of activity-dependent proteolysis including neuroligin and intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5). We include discussion focused on potential consequences of synaptic CAM shedding, with an emphasis on interactions between soluble CAM cleavage products and specific pre- and post-synaptic receptors. PMID:26321910

  2. L1CAM and its cell-surface mutants: new mechanisms and effects relevant to the physiology and pathology of neural cells

    PubMed Central

    Tagliavacca, Luigina; Colombo, Federico; Racchetti, Gabriella; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2013-01-01

    The L1 syndrome, a genetic disease that affects 1/30 000 newborn males, is sustained by numerous missense mutations of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM), an adhesion surface protein active also in transmembrane signaling, essential for the development and function of neurons. To investigate the cell biology of L1CAM, we employed a high RE1-silencing transcription (factor) clone of the pheochromocytoma PC12 line, defective in L1CAM expression and neurite outgrowth. The clone was transfected with wild-type L1CAM and four missense, disease-inducing point mutants encoding proteins distributed to the cell surface. The mutant-expressing cells, defective in adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and in migration, exhibited unchanged proliferation. The nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth was re-established in defective clone cells transfected with the wild-type and the H210Q and I219T L1CAMs mutants, but not in the others. The stimulated outgrowth was confirmed in a second defective PC12 clone over-expressing the NGF receptor TrkA, treated with NGF and/or a recombinant L1CAM chimera. These results revealed a new function of L1CAM, a positive, robust and dose-dependent modulation of the TrkA receptor activated spontaneously or by NGF. The variable effects observed with the different L1CAM mutants suggest that this function contributes to the marked heterogeneity of symptoms and severity observed in the patients affected by the L1 syndrome. PMID:22973895

  3. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Herter, Susanne; Kranz, David C; Turner, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C–H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations. PMID:26664590

  4. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul P; Eichler, Anja; Herter, Susanne; Kranz, David C; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C-H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations.

  5. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul P; Eichler, Anja; Herter, Susanne; Kranz, David C; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C-H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations. PMID:26664590

  6. GlialCAM, a CLC-2 Cl- Channel Subunit, Activates the Slow Gate of CLC Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jeworutzki, Elena; Lagostena, Laura; Elorza-Vidal, Xabier; López-Hernández, Tania; Estévez, Raúl; Pusch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    GlialCAM, a glial cell adhesion molecule mutated in megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts, targets the CLC-2 Cl- channel to cell contacts in glia and activates CLC-2 currents in vitro and in vivo. We found that GlialCAM clusters all CLC channels at cell contacts in vitro and thus studied GlialCAM interaction with CLC channels to investigate the mechanism of functional activation. GlialCAM slowed deactivation kinetics of CLC-Ka/barttin channels and increased CLC-0 currents opening the common gate and slowing its deactivation. No functional effect was seen for common gate deficient CLC-0 mutants. Similarly, GlialCAM targets the common gate deficient CLC-2 mutant E211V/H816A to cell contacts, without altering its function. Thus, GlialCAM is able to interact with all CLC channels tested, targeting them to cell junctions and activating them by stabilizing the open configuration of the common gate. These results are important to better understand the physiological role of GlialCAM/CLC-2 interaction. PMID:25185546

  7. Transgene expression study of CXCR4 active mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Menka; Afrin, Farhat; Tripathi, Rajendra P; Gangenahalli, Gurudutta

    2014-01-01

    Homing and engraftment, a determining factor in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation success is defined as a process through which hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) lodge recipient bone marrow. SDF-1/CXCR4 axis acts as a principle regulator in homing and engraftment, however, CXCR4 signaling is dependent upon expression of CXCR4 and its ligand SDF-1, which is highly dynamic. Hence, present investigation was aimed to explore the potential of CXCR4 constitutive active mutants (CXCR4-CAMs) in overcoming the limitation of CXCR4 signaling and up-modulate its efficiency in homing and engraftment. Regulated transgene expression study of these mutants revealed their significantly enhanced cell adhesion efficiency to endothelium and extracellular matrix protein. This altogether indicates promising prospects of CXCR4-CAMs in research aimed to improve HSPCs engraftment efficiency. PMID:25482641

  8. Prognostic significance of L1CAM expression and its association with mutant p53 expression in high-risk endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Gool, Inge C; Stelloo, Ellen; Nout, Remi A; Nijman, Hans W; Edmondson, Richard J; Church, David N; MacKay, Helen J; Leary, Alexandra; Powell, Melanie E; Mileshkin, Linda; Creutzberg, Carien L; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Bosse, Tjalling

    2016-02-01

    Studies in early-stage, predominantly low- and intermediate-risk endometrial cancer have demonstrated that L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) overexpression identifies patients at increased risk of recurrence, yet its prognostic significance in high-risk endometrial cancer is unclear. To evaluate this, its frequency, and the relationship of L1CAM with the established endometrial cancer biomarker p53, we analyzed the expression of both markers by immunohistochemistry in a pilot series of 116 endometrial cancers (86 endometrioid, 30 non-endometrioid subtype) with high-risk features (such as high tumor grade and deep myometrial invasion) and correlated results with clinical outcome. We used The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) endometrial cancer series to validate our findings. Using the previously reported cutoff of 10% positive staining, 51/116 (44%) tumors were classified as L1CAM-positive, with no significant association between L1CAM positivity and the rate of distant metastasis (P=0.195). However, increasing the threshold for L1CAM positivity to 50% resulted in a reduction of the frequency of L1CAM-positive tumors to 24% (28/116), and a significant association with the rate of distant metastasis (P=0.018). L1CAM expression was strongly associated with mutant p53 in the high-risk and TCGA series (P<0.001), although a substantial fraction (36% of endometrioid, 10% of non-endometrioid morphology) of p53-mutant endometrial cancers displayed <10% L1CAM positivity. Moreover, 30% of p53-wild-type non-endometrioid endometrial cancers demonstrated diffuse L1CAM staining, suggesting p53-independent mechanisms of L1CAM overexpression. In conclusion, the previously proposed threshold for L1CAM positivity of >10% does not predict prognosis in high-risk endometrial cancer, whereas an alternative threshold (>50%) does. L1CAM expression is strongly, but not universally, associated with mutant p53, and may be strong enough for clinical implementation as prognostic marker in combination

  9. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  10. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculated reactivity networks reveal how cytochrome P450cam and Its T252A mutant select their oxidation pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binju; Li, Chunsen; Dubey, Kshatresh Dutta; Shaik, Sason

    2015-06-17

    Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations address the longstanding-question of a "second oxidant" in P450 enzymes wherein the proton-shuttle, which leads to formation of the "primary-oxidant" Compound I (Cpd I), was severed by mutating the crucial residue (in P450cam: Threonine-252-to-Alanine, hence T252A). Investigating the oxidant candidates Cpd I, ferric hydroperoxide, and ferric hydrogen peroxide (Fe(III)(O2H2)), and their reactions, generates reactivity networks which enable us to rule out a "second oxidant" and at the same time identify an additional coupling pathway that is responsible for the epoxidation of 5-methylenylcamphor by the T252A mutant. In this "second-coupling pathway", the reaction starts with the Fe(III)(O2H2) intermediate, which transforms to Cpd I via a O-O homolysis/H-abstraction mechanism. The persistence of Fe(III)(O2H2) and its oxidative reactivity are shown to be determined by interplay of substrate and protein. The substrate 5-methylenylcamphor prevents H2O2 release, while the protein controls the Fe(III)(O2H2) conversion to Cpd I by nailing-through hydrogen-bonding interactions-the conformation of the HO(•) radical produced during O-O homolysis. This conformation prevents HO(•) attack on the porphyrin's meso position, as in heme oxygenase, and prefers H-abstraction from Fe(IV)OH thereby generating H2O + Cpd I. Cpd I then performs substrate oxidations. Camphor cannot prevent H2O2 release and hence the T252A mutant does not oxidize camphor. This "second pathway" transpires also during H2O2 shunting of the cycle of wild-type P450cam, where the additional hydrogen-bonding with Thr252 prevents H2O2 release, and contributes to a successful Cpd I formation. The present results lead to a revised catalytic cycle of Cytochrome P450cam. PMID:26011529

  11. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculated reactivity networks reveal how cytochrome P450cam and Its T252A mutant select their oxidation pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binju; Li, Chunsen; Dubey, Kshatresh Dutta; Shaik, Sason

    2015-06-17

    Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations address the longstanding-question of a "second oxidant" in P450 enzymes wherein the proton-shuttle, which leads to formation of the "primary-oxidant" Compound I (Cpd I), was severed by mutating the crucial residue (in P450cam: Threonine-252-to-Alanine, hence T252A). Investigating the oxidant candidates Cpd I, ferric hydroperoxide, and ferric hydrogen peroxide (Fe(III)(O2H2)), and their reactions, generates reactivity networks which enable us to rule out a "second oxidant" and at the same time identify an additional coupling pathway that is responsible for the epoxidation of 5-methylenylcamphor by the T252A mutant. In this "second-coupling pathway", the reaction starts with the Fe(III)(O2H2) intermediate, which transforms to Cpd I via a O-O homolysis/H-abstraction mechanism. The persistence of Fe(III)(O2H2) and its oxidative reactivity are shown to be determined by interplay of substrate and protein. The substrate 5-methylenylcamphor prevents H2O2 release, while the protein controls the Fe(III)(O2H2) conversion to Cpd I by nailing-through hydrogen-bonding interactions-the conformation of the HO(•) radical produced during O-O homolysis. This conformation prevents HO(•) attack on the porphyrin's meso position, as in heme oxygenase, and prefers H-abstraction from Fe(IV)OH thereby generating H2O + Cpd I. Cpd I then performs substrate oxidations. Camphor cannot prevent H2O2 release and hence the T252A mutant does not oxidize camphor. This "second pathway" transpires also during H2O2 shunting of the cycle of wild-type P450cam, where the additional hydrogen-bonding with Thr252 prevents H2O2 release, and contributes to a successful Cpd I formation. The present results lead to a revised catalytic cycle of Cytochrome P450cam.

  12. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  13. Validity of PALMS GPS Scoring of Active and Passive Travel Compared to SenseCam

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jordan A.; Jankowska, Marta M.; Meseck, Kristin; Godbole, Suneeta; Natarajan, Loki; Raab, Fredric; Demchak, Barry; Patrick, Kevin; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess validity of the Personal Activity Location Measurement System (PALMS) for deriving time spent walking/running, bicycling, and in vehicle, using SenseCam as the comparison. Methods 40 adult cyclists wore a Qstarz BT-Q1000XT GPS data logger and SenseCam (camera worn around neck capturing multiple images every minute) for a mean of 4 days. PALMS used distance and speed between GPS points to classify whether each minute was part of a trip (yes/no), and if so, the trip mode (walking/running, bicycling, in vehicle). SenseCam images were annotated to create the same classifications (i.e., trip yes/no and mode). 2×2 contingency tables and confusion matrices were calculated at the minute-level for PALMS vs. SenseCam classifications. Mixed-effects linear regression models estimated agreement (mean differences and intraclass correlations [ICCs]) between PALMS and SenseCam with regards to minutes/day in each mode. Results Minute-level sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value were ≥88%, and positive predictive value was ≥75% for non mode-specific trip detection. 72–80% of outdoor walking/running minutes, 73% of bicycling minutes, and 74–76% of in-vehicle minutes were correctly classified by PALMS. For minutes/day, PALMS had a mean bias (i.e., amount of over or under estimation) of 2.4–3.1 minutes (11–15%) for walking/running, 2.3–2.9 minutes (7–9%) for bicycling, and 4.3–5 minutes (15–17%) for vehicle time. ICCs were ≥.80 for all modes. Conclusions PALMS has validity for processing GPS data to objectively measure time walking/running, bicycling, and in vehicle in population studies. Assessing travel patterns is one of many valuable applications of GPS in physical activity research that can improve our understanding of the determinants and health outcomes of active transportation as well as its impact on physical activity. PMID:25010407

  14. [Pigment composition and photosynthetic activity of pea chlorophyll mutants].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea chlorophyll mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 have been studied. The mutants differ from the initial form (pea cultivar Torsdag) in stem and leaf color (light green in the mutant 2004 and yellow-green in the mutant 2014), relative chlorophyll content (approximately 80 and 50%, respectively), and the composition of carotenoids: the mutant 2004 contains a significantly smaller amount of carotene but accumulates more lutein and violaxanthine; in the mutant 2014, the contents of all carotenoids are decreased proportionally to the decrease in chlorophyll content. It is shown that the rates of CO2 assimilation and oxygen production in the mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 plants are reduced. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants is 29-30% lower than in the control plants; in their hybrids, however, it is 1.5-2 higher. It is proposed that both the greater role of dark respiration in gas exchange and the reduced photosynthetic activity in chlorotica mutants are responsible for the decreased phytomass increment in these plants. On the basis of these results, the conclusion is drawn that the mutations chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affect the genes controlling the formation and functioning of various components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  15. Analysis of p53 mutants for transcriptional activity.

    PubMed Central

    Raycroft, L; Schmidt, J R; Yoas, K; Hao, M M; Lozano, G

    1991-01-01

    The wild-type p53 protein functions to suppress transformation, but numerous mutant p53 proteins are transformation competent. To examine the role of p53 as a transcription factor, we made fusion proteins containing human or mouse p53 sequences fused to the DNA binding domain of a known transcription factor, GAL4. Human and mouse wild-type p53/GAL4 specifically transactivated expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter in HeLa, CHO, and NIH 3T3 cells. Several mutant p53 proteins, including a mouse p53 mutant which is temperature sensitive for suppression, were also analyzed. A p53/GAL4 fusion protein with this mutation was also transcriptionally active only at the permissive temperature. Another mutant p53/GAL4 fusion protein analyzed mimics the mutation inherited in Li-Fraumeni patients. This fusion protein was as active as wild-type p53/GAL4 in our assay. Two human p53 mutants that arose from alterations of the p53 gene in colorectal carcinomas were 30- to 40-fold less effective at activating transcription than wild-type p53/GAL4 fusion proteins. Thus, functional wild-type p53/GAL4 fusion proteins activate transcription, while several transformation competent mutants do so poorly or not at all. Only one mutant p53/GAL4 fusion protein remained transcriptionally active. Images PMID:1944276

  16. CAM microkernels

    2009-02-09

    This is a set of microbernels based on the finite-volume dynamics of the Community Atmosphere Models (CAM) version 3.1.p2. Information on CAM can be found at the website: http://www.ccsm.uca.edu.models/atm-cam. CAM consists of public domain software with certain exceptions as outlind on the above website. The microkernles herein are based solely on the public domain portions of CAM and originat from code specifically in the directory: models/atm/cam/src/fv.

  17. Buying CAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meloy, Jim; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between computer-aided design (CAD), computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), and computer numerical control (CNC) computer applications is described. Tips for helping educate the CAM buyer on what to look for and what to avoid when searching for the most appropriate instructional CAM package are provided. (KR)

  18. Loss of TINCR expression promotes proliferation, metastasis through activating EpCAM cleavage in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe-ying; Chang, Ya-ya; Zheng, Lin; Yuan, Li; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Yu-han; Zhang, Wen-juan; Li, Xue-nong

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in kinds of human diseases, including colorectal cancer (CRC). TINCR, a 3.7 kb long non coding RNA, was associated with cell differentiation in keratinocyte and gastric cancer cells. However, little is known about the role of TINCR in regulation CRC progression. Here, we showed that lncRNA TINCR was associated with CRC proliferation and metastasis. TINCR was statistically downregulated in CRC tissues and metastatic CRC cell lines compared with their counterparts. TINCR was reversely correlated with CRC progression and promoted tumor cells growth, metastasis in vivo and in vitro. While overexpression of TINCR had opposite effect. In addition, we also found that TINCR specifically bound to EpCAM through RNA IP and RNA pull down assays. Loss of TINCR promoted hydrolysis of EpCAM and then released EpICD, subsequently, activated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Further studies shown that c-Myc repressed the expression of TINCR through repressing sp1 transcriptive activity, which established a positive feedback loop controlling c-Myc and TINCR expression. These findings elucidate that loss of TINCR expression promotes proliferation and metastasis in CRC and it could be considered as a potential cancer suppressor gene. PMID:27009809

  19. Overview of ChemCam Activities and Discoveries During 4 Years at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, S.; Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.; Cousin, A.

    2016-08-01

    The ChemCam instrument on NASA’s MSL rover has been successfully analyzing materials on the martian surface since the rover’s landing in August 2012. Since then, the rover drove more than 13km and over 330.000 ChemCam LIBS spectra were recorded.

  20. Combined QM/MM calculations of active-site vibrations in binding process of P450cam to putidaredoxin.

    PubMed

    Freindorf, Marek; Shao, Yihan; Kong, Jing; Furlani, Thomas R

    2008-03-01

    Combined QM/MM calculations of the active-site of cytochrome P450cam have been performed before and after the binding of P450cam to putidaredoxin. The calculations were carried out for both a 5-coordinated and a 6-coordinated active-site of cytochrome P450cam, with either a water molecule or a carbon monoxide molecule as a 6th distal ligand. An experimentally observed increase in the Fe-S stretching frequency that occurs after cytochrome P450cam binds to putidaredoxin, has been reproduced in our study. Experimentally observed changes in the Fe-C and C-O vibration frequencies that occur after binding of both proteins, have also been reproduced in our study. The computed increase of the Fe-S and Fe-C stretching frequencies is correlated with a corresponding decrease of the Fe-S and Fe-C interatomic distances. According to our calculations, for the active-site with carbon monoxide in the triplet electronic state, the binding process increases the spin densities on the iron and sulfur atoms, which changes the Fe-C and C-O stretching frequencies in opposite directions, in agreement with experimental data.

  1. AUTONOMOUS AND NONAUTONOMOUS REGULATION OF WNT-MEDIATED NEURONAL POLARITY BY THE C. ELEGANS ROR KINASE CAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shih-Chieh Jason; Gurling, Mark; Kim, Changsung; Craft, Teresa; Forrester, Wayne; Garriga, Gian

    2015-01-01

    Wnts are a conserved family of secreted glycoproteins that regulate various developmental processes in metazoans. Three of the five C. elegans Wnts, CWN-1, CWN-2 and EGL-20, and the sole Wnt receptor of the Ror kinase family, CAM-1, are known to regulate the anterior polarization of the mechanosensory neuron ALM. Here we show that CAM-1 and the Frizzled receptor MOM-5 act in parallel pathways to control ALM polarity. We also show that CAM-1 has two functions in this process: an autonomous signaling function that promotes anterior polarization and a nonautonomous Wnt-antagonistic function that inhibits anterior polarization. These antagonistic activities can account for the weak ALM phenotypes displayed by cam-1 mutants. Our observations suggest that CAM-1 could function as a Wnt receptor in many developmental processes, but the analysis of cam-1 mutants may fail to reveal CAM-1’s role as a receptor in these processes because of its Wnt-antagonistic activity. In this model, loss of CAM-1 results in increased levels of Wnts that act through other Wnt receptors, masking CAM-1’s autonomous role as a Wnt receptor. PMID:25917219

  2. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Flavahan, William A.; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B.; Gillespie, Shawn M.; Venteicher, Andrew S.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Suvà, Mario L.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas1,2. Mutant IDH protein produces a novel onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), that interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5′-methylcytosine hydroxylases3–7. TET enzymes catalyze a key step in the removal of DNA methylation8,9. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP)10,11, though the functional significance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hyper-methylation at CTCF binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to aberrantly interact with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and down-regulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wildtype gliomaspheres up-regulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression. PMID:26700815

  3. Abnormal grooming activity in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Strazielle, C; Lefevre, A; Jacquelin, C; Lalonde, R

    2012-07-15

    Dab1(scm) mutant mice, characterized by cell ectopias and degeneration in cerebellum, hippocampus, and neocortex, were compared to non-ataxic controls for different facets of grooming caused by brief water immersions, as well as some non-grooming behaviors. Dab1(scm) mutants were strongly affected in their quantitative functional parameters, exhibiting higher starting latencies before grooming relative to non-ataxic littermates of the A/A strain, fewer grooming bouts, and grooming components of shorter duration, with an unequal regional distribution targeting almost totally the rostral part (head washing and forelimb licking) of the animal. Only bouts of a single grooming element were preserved. The cephalocaudal order of grooming elements appeared less disorganized, mutant and control mice initiating the grooming with head washing and forelimb licking prior to licking posterior parts. However, mutants differed from controls in that all their bouts were incomplete but uninterrupted, although intergroup difference for percentage of the incorrect transitions was not significant. In contrast to grooming, Dab1(scm) mice ambulated for a longer time. During walking episodes, they exhibited more body scratching than controls, possibly to compensate for the lack of licking different body parts. In conjunction with studies with other ataxic mice, these results indicate that the cerebellar cortex affects grooming activity and is consequently involved in executing various components, but not in its sequential organization, which requires other brain regions such as cerebral cortices or basal ganglia.

  4. CAM and NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    It is believed that tumor development, outgrowth and metastasis are under the surveillance of the immune system. Although both innate and acquired immune systems play roles, innate immunity is the spearhead against tumors. Recent studies have revealed the critical role of natural killer (NK) cells in immune surveillance and that NK cell activity is considerably influenced by various agents, such as environmental factors, stress, foods and drugs. Some of these NK cell stimulants have been used in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) since ancient times. Therefore, the value of CAM should be re-evaluated from this point of view. In this review, we overview the intimate correlation between NK cell functions and CAM agents, and discuss possible underlying mechanisms mediating this. In particular, neuro-immune crosstalk and receptors for CAM agents are the most important and interesting candidates for such mechanisms. PMID:15257322

  5. TBP mutants defective in activated transcription in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, K M; Ricupero-Hovasse, S; Winston, F

    1995-01-01

    The TATA box binding protein (TBP) plays a central and essential role in transcription initiation. At TATA box-containing genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II, TBP binds to the promoter and initiates the assembly of a multiprotein preinitiation complex. Several studies have suggested that binding of TBP to the TATA box is an important regulatory step in transcription initiation in vitro. To determine whether TBP is a target of regulatory factors in vivo, we performed a genetic screen in yeast for TBP mutants defective in activated transcription. One class of TBP mutants identified in this screen comprises inositol auxotrophs that are also defective in using galactose as a carbon source. These phenotypes are due to promoter-specific defects in transcription initiation that are governed by the upstream activating sequence (UAS) and apparently not by the sequence of the TATA element. The finding that these TBP mutants are severely impaired in DNA binding in vitro suggests that transcription initiation at certain genes is regulated at the level of TATA box binding by TBP in vivo. Images PMID:7729424

  6. Incorporation of Advanced Activation Treatments into CESM/CAM5: Model Evaluation and Impacts on Aerosol Indirect Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; He, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in climate science is the influence of aerosols on clouds through indirect effects, especially processes affecting the activation of aerosols into cloud droplets. Aerosol activation parameterizations incorporate much of the complexity of these processes, but the small differences between parameterizations can have a large impact on the spatiotemporal distribution of activated aerosols and the resulting cloud properties. Currently, most models simulate aerosol activation using the Abdul-Razzak and Ghan [2000] (AR-G00) scheme which derives an empiric calculation of the maximum parcel supersaturation based on the regression of numerical parcel calculations. The Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1 within the Community Earth Systems Model version 1.0.5 (CESM/CAM5) is an online-coupled Earth Systems model that simulates the interactions among aerosols, clouds, and radiation. CESM/CAM5 uses the AR-G00 scheme to simulate aerosol activation. In this work, we update CESM/CAM5 by incorporating a series of explicit aerosol activation schemes (Fountoukis and Nenes [2005]; Barahona and Nenes [2007]; Kumar et al. [2009]; and Barahona et al. [2010]) which account for the impacts of insoluble aerosol adsorption, giant cloud condensation nuclei activation kinetics, and entrainment on cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC). CESM/CAM5 results with the empiric and explicit aerosol activation schemes are evaluated against several global datasets including observed low-level CDNC and satellite-derived cloud optical thickness (COT), liquid water path (LWP), and shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF). Globally, the incorporation of all explicit schemes leads to an average increase in column CDNC of 155%, increase (more negative) in SWCF of 13%, and decrease in surface shortwave radiation of -4%. In terms of climate impacts, these schemes result in an annual mean decrease in surface temperature and precipitation of -0.9 K (~0.2%) and -0.04 mm day

  7. Use of DNA sequence and mutant analyses and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to examine the molecular basis of nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase autoinhibition, calmodulin recognition, and activity

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The first primary structure for a nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) has been determined by elucidation of the cDNA sequence encoding the protein kinase from chicken embryo fibroblasts, and insight into the molecular mechanism of calmodulin (CaM) recognition and activation has been obtained by the use of site-specific mutagenesis and suppressor mutant analysis. Treatment of chicken and mouse fibroblasts with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides based on the cDNA sequence results in an apparent decrease in MLCK levels, an altered morphology reminiscent of that seen in v-src-transformed cells, and a possible effect on cell proliferation. nmMLCK is distinct from and larger than smooth muscle MLCK (smMLCK), although their extended DNA sequence identity is suggestive of a close genetic relationship not found with skeletal muscle MLCK. The analysis of 20 mutant MLCKs indicates that the autoinhibitory and CaM recognition activities are centered in distinct but functionally coupled amino acid sequences (residues 1,068-1,080 and 1,082-1,101, respectively). Analysis of enzyme chimeras, random mutations, inverted sequences, and point mutations in the 1,082-1,101 region demonstrates its functional importance for CaM recognition but not autoinhibition. In contrast, certain mutations in the 1,068-1,080 region result in a constitutively active MLCK that still binds CaM. These results suggest that CaM/protein kinase complexes use similar structural themes to transduce calcium signals into selective biological responses, demonstrate a direct link between nmMLCK and non-muscle cell function, and provide a firm basis for genetic studies and analyses of how nmMLCK is involved in development and cell proliferation. PMID:2202734

  8. Incorporation of advanced aerosol activation treatments into CESM/CAM5: model evaluation and impacts on aerosol indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; He, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.

    2014-07-01

    One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in the science of anthropogenic climate change is from aerosol-cloud interactions. The activation of aerosols into cloud droplets is a direct microphysical linkage between aerosols and clouds; parameterizations of this process link aerosol with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the resulting indirect effects. Small differences between parameterizations can have a large impact on the spatiotemporal distributions of activated aerosols and the resulting cloud properties. In this work, we incorporate a series of aerosol activation schemes into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1 within the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM/CAM5) which include factors such as insoluble aerosol adsorption and giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation kinetics to understand their individual impacts on global-scale cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Compared to the existing activation scheme in CESM/CAM5, this series of activation schemes increase the computation time by ~10% but leads to predicted CDNC in better agreement with satellite-derived/in situ values in many regions with high CDNC but in worse agreement for some regions with low CDNC. Large percentage changes in predicted CDNC occur over desert and oceanic regions, owing to the enhanced activation of dust from insoluble aerosol adsorption and reduced activation of sea spray aerosol after accounting for giant CCN activation kinetics. Comparison of CESM/CAM5 predictions against satellite-derived cloud optical thickness and liquid water path shows that the updated activation schemes generally improve the low biases. Globally, the incorporation of all updated schemes leads to an average increase in column CDNC of 150% and an increase (more negative) in shortwave cloud forcing of 12%. With the improvement of model-predicted CDNCs and better agreement with most satellite-derived cloud properties in many regions, the inclusion of these aerosol activation

  9. CI Cam/XTE J0421+560 resides in optical active state since 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goranskij, V. P.; Metlova, N. V.; Metlov, V. G.; Barsukova, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    We perform regular spectral and photometric monitoring of CI Cam since its large outburst in 1998. The last spectrum of the H alpha region was taken on 2016 Oct 09.025 UT very close to the time reported in ATel #9634.

  10. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Crum, Mary A.; Sewell, B. Trevor; Benedik, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme’s thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its kcat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein–protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  11. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Crum, Mary A; Sewell, B Trevor; Benedik, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme's thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its k cat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein-protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  12. RhoA activation and actin reorganization involved in endothelial CAM-mediated endocytosis of anti-PECAM carriers: critical role for tyrosine 686 in the cytoplasmic tail of PECAM-1.

    PubMed

    Garnacho, Carmen; Shuvaev, Vladimir; Thomas, Anu; McKenna, Lindsay; Sun, Jing; Koval, Michael; Albelda, Steven; Muzykantov, Vladimir; Muro, Silvia

    2008-03-15

    Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), a transmembrane glycoprotein involved in leukocyte transmigration, represents a good target for endothelial drug delivery (eg, using antibody-directed nanocarriers, anti-PECAM/NCs). Although endothelial cells do not internalize PECAM antibodies, PECAM-1 engagement by multivalent anti-PECAM conjugates and nanocarriers causes endocytosis via a nonclassic CAM-mediated pathway. We found that endothelial uptake of multivalent anti-PECAM complexes is associated with PECAM-1 phosphorylation. Using model REN cells expressing a series of PECAM-1 deletion and point mutants, we found that the PECAM-1 cytoplasmic domain and, more precisely, PECAM-1 tyrosine 686, is critical in mediating RhoA activation and recruitment of EGFP-RhoA to anti-PECAM/NC binding sites at the plasmalemma, actin polymerization into phalloidin-positive stress fibers, and finally CAM endocytosis of anti-PECAM/NCs. Endothelial targeting and endocytosis of anti-PECAM/NCs were markedly efficient and did not compromise endothelial barrier function in vitro (determined by immunostaining of VE-cadherin and (125)I-albumin transport across endothelial monolayers) or in vivo (determined by electron microscopy imaging of pulmonary capillaries and (125)I-albumin transport from the blood into the lung tissue after intravenous injection of anti-PECAM/NCs in mice). These results reveal PECAM-1 signaling and interactions with the cytoskeleton, which are required for CAM-endocytosis, and may provide safe intra-endothelial drug delivery by anti-PECAM/NCs. PMID:18182571

  13. Conditional deletion of L1CAM in human neurons impairs both axonal and dendritic arborization and action potential generation.

    PubMed

    Patzke, Christopher; Acuna, Claudio; Giam, Louise R; Wernig, Marius; Südhof, Thomas C

    2016-04-01

    Hundreds of L1CAM gene mutations have been shown to be associated with congenital hydrocephalus, severe intellectual disability, aphasia, and motor symptoms. How such mutations impair neuronal function, however, remains unclear. Here, we generated human embryonic stem (ES) cells carrying a conditional L1CAM loss-of-function mutation and produced precisely matching control and L1CAM-deficient neurons from these ES cells. In analyzing two independent conditionally mutant ES cell clones, we found that deletion of L1CAM dramatically impaired axonal elongation and, to a lesser extent, dendritic arborization. Unexpectedly, we also detected an ∼20-50% and ∼20-30% decrease, respectively, in the levels of ankyrinG and ankyrinB protein, and observed that the size and intensity of ankyrinG staining in the axon initial segment was significantly reduced. Overexpression of wild-type L1CAM, but not of the L1CAM point mutants R1166X and S1224L, rescued the decrease in ankyrin levels. Importantly, we found that the L1CAM mutation selectively decreased activity-dependent Na(+)-currents, altered neuronal excitability, and caused impairments in action potential (AP) generation. Thus, our results suggest that the clinical presentations of L1CAM mutations in human patients could be accounted for, at least in part, by cell-autonomous changes in the functional development of neurons, such that neurons are unable to develop normal axons and dendrites and to generate normal APs. PMID:27001749

  14. Conditional deletion of L1CAM in human neurons impairs both axonal and dendritic arborization and action potential generation

    PubMed Central

    Acuna, Claudio; Giam, Louise R.; Wernig, Marius; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of L1CAM gene mutations have been shown to be associated with congenital hydrocephalus, severe intellectual disability, aphasia, and motor symptoms. How such mutations impair neuronal function, however, remains unclear. Here, we generated human embryonic stem (ES) cells carrying a conditional L1CAM loss-of-function mutation and produced precisely matching control and L1CAM-deficient neurons from these ES cells. In analyzing two independent conditionally mutant ES cell clones, we found that deletion of L1CAM dramatically impaired axonal elongation and, to a lesser extent, dendritic arborization. Unexpectedly, we also detected an ∼20–50% and ∼20–30% decrease, respectively, in the levels of ankyrinG and ankyrinB protein, and observed that the size and intensity of ankyrinG staining in the axon initial segment was significantly reduced. Overexpression of wild-type L1CAM, but not of the L1CAM point mutants R1166X and S1224L, rescued the decrease in ankyrin levels. Importantly, we found that the L1CAM mutation selectively decreased activity-dependent Na+-currents, altered neuronal excitability, and caused impairments in action potential (AP) generation. Thus, our results suggest that the clinical presentations of L1CAM mutations in human patients could be accounted for, at least in part, by cell-autonomous changes in the functional development of neurons, such that neurons are unable to develop normal axons and dendrites and to generate normal APs. PMID:27001749

  15. Incorporating an advanced aerosol activation parameterization into WRF-CAM5: Model evaluation and parameterization intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Kai; He, Jian; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Fan, Jiwen; Nenes, Athanasios

    2015-07-22

    Aerosol activation into cloud droplets is an important process that governs aerosol indirect effects. The advanced treatment of aerosol activation by Fountoukis and Nenes (2005) and its recent updates, collectively called the FN series, have been incorporated into a newly developed regional coupled climate-air quality model based on the Weather Research and Forecasting model with the physics package of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (WRF-CAM5) to simulate aerosol-cloud interactions in both resolved and convective clouds. The model is applied to East Asia for two full years of 2005 and 2010. A comprehensive model evaluation is performed for model predictions of meteorological, radiative, and cloud variables, chemical concentrations, and column mass abundances against satellite data and surface observations from air quality monitoring sites across East Asia. The model performs overall well for major meteorological variables including near-surface temperature, specific humidity, wind speed, precipitation, cloud fraction, precipitable water, downward shortwave and longwave radiation, and column mass abundances of CO, SO2, NO2, HCHO, and O3 in terms of both magnitudes and spatial distributions. Larger biases exist in the predictions of surface concentrations of CO and NOx at all sites and SO2, O3, PM2.5, and PM10 concentrations at some sites, aerosol optical depth, cloud condensation nuclei over ocean, cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), cloud liquid and ice water path, and cloud optical thickness. Compared with the default Abdul-Razzack Ghan (2000) parameterization, simulations with the FN series produce ~107–113% higher CDNC, with half of the difference attributable to the higher aerosol activation fraction by the FN series and the remaining half due to feedbacks in subsequent cloud microphysical processes. With the higher CDNC, the FN series are more skillful in simulating cloud water path, cloud optical thickness, downward shortwave radiation

  16. Incorporating an advanced aerosol activation parameterization into WRF-CAM5: Model evaluation and parameterization intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Kai; He, Jian; Leung, L. Ruby; Fan, Jiwen; Nenes, Athanasios

    2015-07-01

    Aerosol activation into cloud droplets is an important process that governs aerosol indirect effects. The advanced treatment of aerosol activation by Fountoukis and Nenes (2005) and its recent updates, collectively called the FN series, have been incorporated into a newly developed regional coupled climate-air quality model based on the Weather Research and Forecasting model with the physics package of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (WRF-CAM5) to simulate aerosol-cloud interactions in both resolved and convective clouds. The model is applied to East Asia for two full years of 2005 and 2010. A comprehensive model evaluation is performed for model predictions of meteorological, radiative, and cloud variables, chemical concentrations, and column mass abundances against satellite data and surface observations from air quality monitoring sites across East Asia. The model performs overall well for major meteorological variables including near-surface temperature, specific humidity, wind speed, precipitation, cloud fraction, precipitable water, downward shortwave and longwave radiation, and column mass abundances of CO, SO2, NO2, HCHO, and O3 in terms of both magnitudes and spatial distributions. Larger biases exist in the predictions of surface concentrations of CO and NOx at all sites and SO2, O3, PM2.5, and PM10 concentrations at some sites, aerosol optical depth, cloud condensation nuclei over ocean, cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), cloud liquid and ice water path, and cloud optical thickness. Compared with the default Abdul-Razzack Ghan (2000) parameterization, simulations with the FN series produce ~107-113% higher CDNC, with half of the difference attributable to the higher aerosol activation fraction by the FN series and the remaining half due to feedbacks in subsequent cloud microphysical processes. With the higher CDNC, the FN series are more skillful in simulating cloud water path, cloud optical thickness, downward shortwave radiation

  17. Chaotic Convection in CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, D. A.; Branson, M.; Dutta, R.; Jones, T.

    2015-12-01

    It has been suggested that stochastic fluctuations of convective activity can lead to systematic changes in large-scale weather and climate. We present results of recent ensemble-prediction experiments with the super-parameterized version of CAM that provide a new way to explore such effects, without the need for adhoc assumptions about the nature of the stochastic effects.

  18. Structural biology of redox partner interactions in P450cam monooxygenase: a fresh look at an old system.

    PubMed

    Sevrioukova, Irina F; Poulos, Thomas L

    2011-03-01

    The P450cam monooxygenase system consists of three separate proteins: the FAD-containing, NADH-dependent oxidoreductase (putidaredoxin reductase or Pdr), cytochrome P450cam and the 2Fe2S ferredoxin (putidaredoxin or Pdx), which transfers electrons from Pdr to P450cam. Over the past few years our lab has focused on the interaction between these redox components. It has been known for some time that Pdx can serve as an effector in addition to its electron shuttle role. The binding of Pdx to P450cam is thought to induce structural changes in the P450cam active site that couple electron transfer to substrate hydroxylation. The nature of these structural changes has remained unclear until a particular mutant of P450cam (Leu358Pro) was found to exhibit spectral perturbations similar to those observed in wild type P450cam bound to Pdx. The crystal structure of the L358P variant has provided some important insights on what might be happening when Pdx docks. In addition to these studies, many Pdx mutants have been analyzed to identify regions important for electron transfer. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that Pdx residues predicted to be at the P450cam-Pdx interface play different roles in the reduction of ferric P450cam and the ferrous P450-O(2) complex. More recently we have succeeded in obtaining the structure of a chemically cross-linked Pdr-Pdx complex. This fusion protein represents a valid model for the noncovalent Pdr-Pdx complex as it retains the redox activities of native Pdr and Pdx and supports monooxygenase reactions catalyzed by P450cam. The insights gained from these studies will be summarized in this review.

  19. Incorporation of advanced aerosol activation treatments into CESM/CAM5: model evaluation and impacts on aerosol indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; He, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in the science of anthropogenic climate change is from aerosol-cloud interactions. The activation of aerosols into cloud droplets is a direct microphysical link between aerosols and clouds; parameterizations of this process realistically link aerosol with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the resulting indirect effects. Small differences between parameterizations can have a large impact on the spatiotemporal distributions of activated aerosols and the resulting cloud properties. In this work, we incorporate a series of aerosol activation schemes into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1 within the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM/CAM5), which include factors such as insoluble aerosol adsorption, giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation kinetics, and entrainment to understand their individual impacts on global scale cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNCs). Compared to the existing simple activation scheme in CESM/CAM5, this series of schemes predict CDNCs that are typically in better agreement with satellite-derived and observed values. The largest changes in predicted CDNCs occur over desert and oceanic regions, owing to the enhanced activation of dust from insoluble aerosol adsorption and reductions in cloud supersaturation from the intense absorption of water vapor in regions of strong giant CCN emissions (e.g., sea-salt). Comparison of CESM/CAM5 against satellite-derived cloud optical thickness and liquid water path shows that the updated activation schemes improve the low biases in their predictions. Globally, the incorporation of all updated schemes leads to an average increase in column CDNCs of 155%, an increase in shortwave cloud forcing of 13%, and a decrease in surface shortwave radiation of 4%. In terms of meteorological impacts, these updated aerosol activation schemes result in a slight decrease in near-surface temperature of 0.9 °C and precipitation of 0.04 mm day-1

  20. Brain tissue energy dependence of CaM kinase IV cascade activation during hypoxia in the cerebral cortex of newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria; Ashraf, Qazi M; Mishra, Om Prakash

    2011-03-17

    The present study aims to investigate the dependence of CaM kinase IV cascade activation during hypoxia and tests the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of CaM and CaM kinase IV, activation of CaM kinase IV and phosphorylation of CREB protein during hypoxia increases as a function of increase in cerebral tissue hypoxia as measured by decrease in tissue ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr). 3-5 days old newborn piglets were divided into normoxic (Nx, FiO₂ of 0.21 for 1h) and hypoxic (Hx, FiO₂ of 0.07 for 1h) groups. Cerebral tissue hypoxia was documented by determining the levels of high energy phosphates ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr). Cerebral cortical neuronal nuclei were isolated and purified, and tyrosine phosphorylation of calmodulin (Tyr⁹⁹), the activator of CaM kinase IV, and CaM kinase IV determined by Western blot using anti-phospho-(pTyr⁹⁹)-calmodulin, anti-pTyrosine and anti-CaM kinase IV antibodies. The activity of CaM kinase IV and its consequence the phosphorylation of CREB protein at Ser¹³³ were determined. The levels of ATP (μmole/g brain) ranged from 3.48 to 5.28 in Nx, and 0.41 to 2.26 in Hx. The levels of PCr (μmole/g brain) ranged from 2.46 to 3.91 in Nx and 0.72 to 1.20 in Hx. The pTyr⁹⁹ calmodulin (OD x mm²) ranged from 20.35 to 54.47.60 in Nx, and 84.52 to 181.42 in Hx (r²=0.5309 vs ATP and r²=0.6899 vs PCr). Expression of tyrosine phosphorylated CaM kinase IV ranged from 32.86 to 82.46 in Nx and 96.70 to 131.62 in Hx (r²=0.5132 vs ATP and r²=0.4335 vs PCr). The activity of CaM kinase IV (pmole/mg protein/min) ranged from 1263 to 3448 in Nx and 3767 to 6633 in Hx (r²=0.7113 vs ATP and r²=0.6182 vs PCr). The expression of p-CREB at Ser¹³³ ranged from 44.26 to 70.28 in Nx and 82.70 to 182.86 in Hx (r²=0.6621 vs ATP and r²=0.5485 vs PCr). The data show that hypoxia results in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of calmodulin (Tyr⁹⁹), increased tyrosine phosphorylation of CaM kinase IV, increased

  1. Handling and environmental enrichment do not rescue learning and memory impairments in alphaCamKII(T286A) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Need, A C; Giese, K P

    2003-06-01

    Environmental enrichment and postnatal handling have been shown to improve learning and memory in the Morris water maze, and to rescue impairments caused by genetic modification, age or genetic background. Mice with a targeted point mutation that prevents autophosphorylation at threonine-286 of the alpha-isoform of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II have impaired hippocampus-dependent and -independent strategy learning and memory in the water maze. We have investigated whether these impairments can be rescued with a combination of postnatal handling and environmental enrichment in a hybrid genetic background. Severe impairments were seen in acquisition and probe trials in both enriched and nonenriched mutants, indicating that enrichment did not rescue the learning and memory impairments. However, enrichment did rescue a specific performance deficit; enhanced floating behaviour, in the mutants. In summary, we have shown the lack of autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II prevents enrichment-induced rescues of strategy learning and memory impairments. Furthermore, we have established that there are enrichment mechanisms that are independent of this autophosphorylation.

  2. Characterization of Phospho-(Tyrosine)-Mimetic Calmodulin Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stateva, Silviya R.; Salas, Valentina; Benaim, Gustavo; Menéndez, Margarita; Solís, Dolores; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) phosphorylated at different serine/threonine and tyrosine residues is known to exert differential regulatory effects on a variety of CaM-binding enzymes as compared to non-phosphorylated CaM. In this report we describe the preparation and characterization of a series of phospho-(Y)-mimetic CaM mutants in which either one or the two tyrosine residues present in CaM (Y99 and Y138) were substituted to aspartic acid or glutamic acid. It was expected that the negative charge of the respective carboxyl group of these amino acids mimics the negative charge of phosphate and reproduce the effects that distinct phospho-(Y)-CaM species may have on target proteins. We describe some physicochemical properties of these CaM mutants as compared to wild type CaM, after their expression in Escherichia coli and purification to homogeneity, including: i) changes in their electrophoretic mobility in the absence and presence of Ca2+; ii) ultraviolet (UV) light absorption spectra, far- and near-UV circular dichroism data; iii) thermal stability in the absence and presence of Ca2+; and iv) Tb3+-emitted fluorescence upon tyrosine excitation. We also describe some biochemical properties of these CaM mutants, such as their differential phosphorylation by the tyrosine kinase c-Src, and their action as compared to wild type CaM, on the activity of two CaM-dependent enzymes: cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) assayed in vitro. PMID:25830911

  3. Anti-angiogenic activity of gecko aqueous extracts and its macromolecular components in CAM and HUVE-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhen; Huang, Shu-Qiong; Liu, Jian-Ting; Jiang, Gui-Xiang; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Gecko is a kind of traditional Chinese medicine with remarkable antineoplastic activity. However, undefined mechanisms and ambiguity regarding active ingredients limit new drug development from gecko. This study was conducted to assess anti-angiogenic properties of the aqueous extracts of fresh gecko (AG) or macromolecular components separated from AG (M-AG). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) approach was applied to detect the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion of the tumor cells treated with AG or M-AG. The effect of AG or M-AG on vascular endothelial cell proliferation and migratory ability was analyzed by tetrazolium dye colorimetric method, transwell and wound-healing assays. Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays were used to ensure the anti-angiogenic activity of M-AG in vivo. The results showed that AG or M-AG inhibited the VEGF secretion of tumor cells, the relative inhibition rates of AG and M-AG being 27.2% and 53.2% respectively at a concentration of 20 μL/mL. AG and M-AG inhibited the vascular endothelial (VE) cell proliferation with IC50 values of 11.5 ± 0.5 μL/mL and 12.9 ± 0.4 μL/mL respectively. The VE cell migration potential was inhibited significantly (p<0.01) by the AG (≥ 24 μL/mL) or M-AG (≥ 12 μL/ mL) treatment. In vivo, neovascularization of CAM treated with M-AG was inhibited significantly (p<0.05) at a concentration of 0.4 μL/mL. This study provided evidence that anti-angiogenesis is one of the anti-tumor mechanisms of AG and M-AG, with the latter as a promising active component.

  4. Mutant strains of Tetrahymena thermophila defective in thymidine kinase activity: Biochemical and genetic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, K.V.; Pearlman, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    Three mutant strains, one conditional, of Tetrahymena thermophila were defective in thymidine phosphorylating activity in vivo and in thymidine kinase activity in vitro. Nucleoside phosphotransferase activity in mutant cell extracts approached wild-type levels, suggesting that thymidine kinase is responsible for most, if not all, thymidine phosphorylation in vivo. Thymidine kinase activity in extracts of the conditional mutant strain was deficient when the cells were grown or assayed or both at the permissive temperature, implying a structural enzyme defect. Analysis of the reaction products from in vitro assays with partially purified enzymes showed that phosphorylation by thymidine kinase and nucleoside phosphotransferase occurred at the 5' position. Genetic analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was recessive and that mutations in each of the three mutant strains did not complement, suggesting allelism.

  5. CAM Coordinator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodel, Lee J.

    The technical implementation and operation of the Comprehensive Achievement Monitoring (CAM) system are discussed in this manual. It is written as a guide for those responsible for implementing CAM and for processing CAM-related work requests. Subjects covered include: CAM system operation summary: objectives and test items; conferencing with the…

  6. Biotransformation of the sesquiterpene (+)-valencene by cytochrome P450cam and P450BM-3.

    PubMed

    Sowden, Rebecca J; Yasmin, Samina; Rees, Nicholas H; Bell, Stephen G; Wong, Luet-Lok

    2005-01-01

    The sesquiterpenoids are a large class of naturally occurring compounds with biological functions and desirable properties. Oxidation of the sesquiterpene (+)-valencene by wild type and mutants of P450cam from Pseudomonas putida, and of P450BM-3 from Bacillus megaterium, have been investigated as a potential route to (+)-nootkatone, a fine fragrance. Wild type P450cam did not oxidise (+)-valencene but the mutants showed activities up to 9.8 nmol (nmol P450)(-1) min(-1), with (+)-trans-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone constituting >85% of the products. Wild type P450BM-3 and mutants had higher activities (up to 43 min(-1)) than P450cam but were much less selective. Of the many products, cis- and trans-(+)-nootkatol, (+)-nootkatone, cis-(+)-valencene-1,10-epoxide, trans-(+)-nootkaton-9-ol, and (+)-nootkatone-13S,14-epoxide were isolated from whole-cell reactions and characterised. The selectivity patterns suggest that (+)-valencene has one binding orientation in P450cam but multiple orientations in P450BM-3. PMID:15602599

  7. Ecophysiology of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM)

    PubMed Central

    LÜTTGE, ULRICH

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Scope Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) as an ecophysiological modification of photosynthetic carbon acquisition has been reviewed extensively before. Cell biology, enzymology and the flow of carbon along various pathways and through various cellular compartments have been well documented and discussed. The present attempt at reviewing CAM once again tries to use a different approach, considering a wide range of inputs, receivers and outputs. • Input Input is given by a network of environmental parameters. Six major ones, CO2, H2O, light, temperature, nutrients and salinity, are considered in detail, which allows discussion of the effects of these factors, and combinations thereof, at the individual plant level (‘physiological aut‐ecology’). • Receivers Receivers of the environmental cues are the plant types genotypes and phenotypes, the latter including morphotypes and physiotypes. CAM genotypes largely remain ‘black boxes’, and research endeavours of genomics, producing mutants and following molecular phylogeny, are just beginning. There is no special development of CAM morphotypes except for a strong tendency for leaf or stem succulence with large cells with big vacuoles and often, but not always, special water storage tissues. Various CAM physiotypes with differing degrees of CAM expression are well characterized. • Output Output is the shaping of habitats, ecosystems and communities by CAM. A number of systems are briefly surveyed, namely aquatic systems, deserts, salinas, savannas, restingas, various types of forests, inselbergs and paramós. • Conclusions While quantitative census data for CAM diversity and biomass are largely missing, intuition suggests that the larger CAM domains are those systems which are governed by a network of interacting stress factors requiring versatile responses and not systems where a single stress factor strongly prevails. CAM is noted to be a strategy for variable, flexible and plastic

  8. Copper-induced activation of TRP channels promotes extracellular calcium entry, activation of CaMs and CDPKs, copper entry and membrane depolarization in Ulva compressa

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Melissa; González, Alberto; Sáez, Claudio A.; Morales, Bernardo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify channels involved in membrane depolarization, Ulva compressa was incubated with agonists of TRP channels C5, A1 and V1, and the level of intracellular calcium was detected. Agonists of TRPC5, A1 and V1 induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9, and 11 min of exposure, respectively, and antagonists of TRPC5, A1, and V1 corresponding to SKF-96365 (SKF), HC-030031 (HC), and capsazepin (CPZ), respectively, inhibited calcium increases indicating that functional TRPs exist in U. compressa. In addition, copper excess induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9, and 12 min which were inhibited by SKF, HC, and CPZ, respectively, indicating that copper activate TRPC5, A1, and V1 channels. Moreover, copper-induced calcium increases were inhibited by EGTA, a non-permeable calcium chelating agent, but not by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium ATPase, indicating that activation of TRPs leads to extracellular calcium entry. Furthermore, copper-induced calcium increases were not inhibited by W-7, an inhibitor of CaMs, and staurosporine, an inhibitor of CDPKs, indicating that extracellular calcium entry did not require activation of CaMs and CDPKs. In addition, copper induced membrane depolarization events at 4, 8, and 11 min and these events were inhibited by SKF, HC, CPZ, and bathocuproine, a specific copper chelating agent, indicating that copper entry through TRP channels leads to membrane depolarization. Moreover, membrane depolarization events were inhibited by W-7 and staurosporine, indicating that activation of CaMs and CDPKs is required to allow copper entry through TRPs. Interestingly, copper-induced calcium increases and depolarization events were light-dependent and were inhibited by DCMU, an inhibitor of photosystem II, and ATP-γ-S, a non-hydrolizable analog of ATP, suggesting that ATP derived from photosynthesis is required to activate TRPs. Thus, light-dependent copper-induced activation TRPC5, A1

  9. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct. PMID:19716523

  10. Consequences of systematic model drift in DYNAMO MJO hindcasts with SP-CAM and CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, Walter M.; Maloney, Eric D.; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2015-09-01

    Hindcast simulations of MJO events during the dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) field campaign are conducted with two models, one with conventional parameterization (CAM5) and a comparable model that utilizes superparameterization (SP-CAM). SP-CAM is shown to produce a qualitatively better reproduction of the fluctuations of precipitation and low-level zonal wind associated with the first two DYNAMO MJO events compared to CAM5. Interestingly, skill metrics using the real-time multivariate MJO index (RMM) suggest the opposite conclusion that CAM5 has more skill than SP-CAM. This inconsistency can be explained by a systematic increase of RMM amplitude with lead time, which results from a drift of the large-scale wind field in SP-CAM that projects strongly onto the RMM index. CAM5 hindcasts exhibit a contraction of the moisture distribution, in which extreme wet and dry conditions become less frequent with lead time. SP-CAM hindcasts better reproduce the observed moisture distribution, but also have stronger drift patterns of moisture budget terms, such as an increase in drying by meridional advection in SP-CAM. This advection tendency in SP-CAM appears to be associated with enhanced off-equatorial synoptic eddy activity with lead time. Systematic drift moisture tendencies in SP-CAM are of similar magnitude to intraseasonal moisture tendencies, and therefore are important for understanding MJO prediction skill.

  11. Schwann cells expressing dismutase active mutant SOD1 unexpectedly slow disease progression in ALS mice

    PubMed Central

    Lobsiger, Christian S.; Boillee, Severine; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Khan, Amir M.; Feltri, M. Laura; Yamanaka, Koji; Cleveland, Don W.

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegeneration in an inherited form of ALS is non-cell-autonomous, with ALS-causing mutant SOD1 damage developed within multiple cell types. Selective inactivation within motor neurons of an ubiquitously expressed mutant SOD1 gene has demonstrated that mutant damage within motor neurons is a determinant of disease initiation, whereas mutant synthesis within neighboring astrocytes or microglia accelerates disease progression. We now report the surprising finding that diminished synthesis (by 70%) within Schwann cells of a fully dismutase active ALS-linked mutant (SOD1G37R) significantly accelerates disease progression, accompanied by reduction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in nerves. Coupled with shorter disease duration in mouse models caused by dismutase inactive versus dismutase active SOD1 mutants, our findings implicate an oxidative cascade during disease progression that is triggered within axon ensheathing Schwann cells and that can be ameliorated by elevated dismutase activity. Thus, therapeutic down-regulation of dismutase active mutant SOD1 in familial forms of ALS should be targeted away from Schwann cells. PMID:19251638

  12. Neurite outgrowth induced by NGF or L1CAM via activation of the TrkA receptor is sustained also by the exocytosis of enlargeosomes.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Federico; Racchetti, Gabriella; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2014-11-25

    NGF binding to its protein kinase receptor TrkA is known to induce neurite outgrowth and neural cell differentiation. The plasma membrane expansion, necessary for the process, was shown to be contributed by the VAMP7-dependent exocytosis of endocytic vesicles. Working with wild-type PC12 (wtPC12), a cell model widely used to investigate NGF-induced neurite outgrowth, we found that a few hours of treatment with the neurotrophin (and to a lower extent with basic FGF and EGF) induces the appearance of enlargeosome vesicles competent for VAMP4-dependent exocytosis abundant in high REST-PC12 clones. Both the neurite length assay and the immunocytochemistry of enlargeosomes exocytosis revealed that activation of TrkA is induced not only by NGF, but also by the L1 adhesion protein, L1CAM, whose soluble construct binds the receptor with submicromolar affinity. In the intact wtPC12, the L1CAM construct induced autophosphorylation and internalization of TrkA followed by the activation of the PI3K, MEK, and PKCγ signaling cascades, analogous to the responses induced by NGF. Down-regulation of either VAMP7 or VAMP4 revealed the coparticipation of the two corresponding vesicles to the outgrowth responses induced by NGF and L1CAM. Finally, mixing experiments of wtPC12 cells rich in TrkA with high REST PC12 cells transfected with L1CAM documented the transactivation of the receptor by the adhesion protein surface-exposed in adjacent cells. In view of the known inhomogeneous surface distribution of both L1CAM and TrkA in various neural cells including neurons, their transcellular binding could be restricted to discrete sites, governing local signaling events distinct from those induced by soluble messengers. PMID:25385598

  13. Characterization and RNA-seq analysis of underperformer, an activation-tagged potato mutant.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Sukhwinder S; Veilleux, Richard E; Dickerman, Allan W; Tang, Guozhu; Flinn, Barry S

    2014-04-01

    The potato cv. Bintje and a Bintje activation-tagged mutant, underperformer (up) were compared. Mutant up plants grown in vitro were dwarf, with abundant axillary shoot growth, greater tuber yield, altered tuber traits and early senescence compared to wild type. Under in vivo conditions, the dwarf and early senescence phenotypes of the mutant remained, but the up plants exhibited a lower tuber yield and fewer axillary shoots compared to wild type. Southern blot analyses indicated a single T-DNA insertion in the mutant, located on chromosome 10. Initial PCR-based gene expression studies indicated transcriptional activation/repression of several genes in the mutant flanking the insertion. The gene immediately flanking the right border of the T-DNA insertion, which encoded an uncharacterized Broad complex, Tramtrac, Bric-a-brac; also known as Pox virus and Zinc finger (BTB/POZ) domain-containing protein (StBTB/POZ1) containing an Armadillo repeat region, was up-regulated in the mutant. Global gene expression comparisons between Bintje and up using RNA-seq on leaves from 60 day-old plants revealed a dataset of over 1,600 differentially expressed genes. Gene expression analyses suggested a variety of biological processes and pathways were modified in the mutant, including carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cell division and cell cycle activity, biotic and abiotic stress responses, and proteolysis.

  14. Arabidopsis CaM1 and CaM4 Promote Nitric Oxide Production and Salt Resistance by Inhibiting S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase via Direct Binding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Peng, Xuan; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Jiaojiao; Zhao, Junfeng; Chen, Kunming; Zhao, Liqun

    2016-01-01

    Salt is a major threat to plant growth and crop productivity. Calmodulin (CaM), the most important multifunctional Ca2+ sensor protein in plants, mediates reactions against environmental stresses through target proteins; however, direct proof of the participation of CaM in salt tolerance and its corresponding signaling pathway in vivo is lacking. In this study, we found that AtCaM1 and AtCaM4 produced salt-responsive CaM isoforms according to real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses; this result was verified based on a phenotypic analysis of salt-treated loss-of-function mutant and transgenic plants. We also found that the level of nitric oxide (NO), an important salt-responsive signaling molecule, varied in response to salt treatment depending on AtCaM1 and AtCaM4 expression. GSNOR is considered as an important and widely utilized regulatory component of NO homeostasis in plant resistance protein signaling networks. In vivo and in vitro protein-protein interaction assays revealed direct binding between AtCaM4 and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), leading to reduced GSNOR activity and an increased NO level. Overexpression of GSNOR intensified the salt sensitivity of cam4 mutant plants accompanied by a reduced internal NO level, whereas a gsnor deficiency increased the salt tolerance of cam4 plants accompanied by an increased internal NO level. Physiological experiments showed that CaM4-GSNOR, acting through NO, reestablished the ion balance to increase plant resistance to salt stress. Together, these data suggest that AtCaM1 and AtCaM4 serve as signals in plant salt resistance by promoting NO accumulation through the binding and inhibition of GSNOR. This could be a conserved defensive signaling pathway in plants and animals. PMID:27684709

  15. Analysis of crystal structure of Arabidopsis MPK6 and generation of its mutants with higher activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Qin, Xinghua; Wu, Juan; Deng, Hongying; Li, Yuan; Yang, Hailian; Chen, Zhongzhou; Liu, Guoqin; Ren, Dongtao

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, which are the highly conserved signalling modules in eukaryotic organisms, have been shown to play important roles in regulating growth, development, and stress responses. The structures of various MAPKs from yeast and animal have been solved, and structure-based mutants were generated for their function analyses, however, the structures of plant MAPKs remain unsolved. Here, we report the crystal structure of Arabidopsis MPK6 at a 3.0 Å resolution. Although MPK6 is topologically similar to ERK2 and p38, the structures of the glycine-rich loop, MAPK insert, substrate binding sites, and L16 loop in MPK6 show notable differences from those of ERK2 and p38. Based on the structural comparison, we constructed MPK6 mutants and analyzed their kinase activity both in vitro and in planta. MPK6F364L and MPK6F368L mutants, in which Phe364 and Phe368 in the L16 loop were changed to Leu, respectively, acquired higher intrinsic kinase activity and retained the normal MAPKK activation property. The expression of MPK6 mutants with basal activity is sufficient to induce camalexin biosynthesis; however, to induce ethylene and leaf senescence, the expression of MPK6 mutants with higher activity is required. The results suggest that these mutants can be used to analyze the specific biological functions of MPK6. PMID:27160427

  16. The Z CamPaign Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Mike

    2011-05-01

    The Z CamPaign is an observing project designed to acquire enough detailed, long-tem data to unambiguously classify dwarf novae as bona fide members of the Z Cam sub-type or not. Because the defining characteristic of all Z Cam dwarf novae are "standstills", a temporary period of relative quiet between maximum and minimum light, we are monitoring these systems for this specific activity. Amateur astronomers are gathering all the data with backyard telescopes as part of an AAVSO Cataclysmic Variable Section observing initiative. We will discuss the organization, science goals, and present early results of the Z CamPaign.

  17. The Z CamPaign Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, M.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) The Z CamPaign is an observing project designed to acquire enough detailed, long-term data to unambiguously classify dwarf novae as bona fide members of the Z Cam sub-type or not. Because the defining characteristic of all Z Cam dwarf novae are "standstills," a temporary period of relative quiet between maximum and minimum light, we are monitoring these systems for this specific activity. Amateur astronomers are gathering all the data with backyard telescopes as part of an AAVSO Cataclysmic Variable Section observing initiative. We will discuss the organization, science goals, and present early results of the Z CamPaign.

  18. Hypoxia differentially regulates the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases. Role of Ca2+/CaM in the activation of MAPK and p38 gamma.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxic/ischemic trauma is a primary factor in the pathology of various vascular, pulmonary, and cerebral disease states. Yet, the signaling mechanisms by which cells respond and adapt to changes in oxygen levels are not clearly established. The effects of hypoxia on the stress- and mitogen-activated protein kinase (SAPK and MAPK) signaling pathways were studied in PC12 cells. Exposure to moderate hypoxia (5% O2) was found to progressively stimulate phosphorylation and activation of p38 gamma in particular, and also p38 alpha, two isoforms of the p38 family of stress-activated protein kinases. In contrast, hypoxia had no effect on enzyme activity of p38 beta, p38 beta 2, p38 delta, or on JNK, another stress-activated protein kinase. Prolonged hypoxia also induced phosphorylation and activation of p42/p44 MAPK, although this activation was modest when compared to NGF and UV-induced activation. We further showed that activation of p38 gamma and MAPK during hypoxia requires calcium, as treatment with Ca(2+)-free media or the calmodulin antagonist, W13, blocked the activation of p38 gamma and MAPK, respectively. These studies demonstrate that an extremely typical physiological stress (hypoxia) causes selective activation of specific elements of the SAPKs and MAPKs, and identifies Ca+2/CaM as a critical upstream activator. PMID:10849670

  19. A Genetic Determinant in Streptococcus gordonii Challis Encodes a Peptide with Activity Similar to That of Enterococcal Sex Pheromone cAM373, Which Facilitates Intergeneric DNA Transfer▿

    PubMed Central

    Vickerman, M. M.; Flannagan, S. E.; Jesionowski, A. M.; Brossard, K. A.; Clewell, D. B.; Sedgley, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis strains secrete multiple peptides representing different sex pheromones that induce mating responses by bacteria carrying specific conjugative plasmids. The pheromone cAM373, which induces a response by the enterococcal plasmid pAM373, has been of interest because a similar activity is also secreted by Streptococcus gordonii and Staphylococcus aureus. The potential to facilitate intergeneric DNA transfer from E. faecalis is of concern because of extensive multiple antibiotic resistance, including vancomycin resistance, that has emerged among enterococci in recent years. Here, we characterize the related pheromone determinant in S. gordonii and show that the peptide it encodes, gordonii-cAM373, does indeed induce transfer of plasmid DNA from E. faecalis into S. gordonii. The streptococcal determinant camG encodes a lipoprotein with a leader sequence, the last 7 residues of which represent the gordonii-cAM373 heptapeptide SVFILAA. Synthetic forms of the peptide had activity similar to that of the enterococcal cAM373 AIFILAS. The lipoprotein moiety bore no resemblance to the lipoprotein encoded by E. faecalis. We also identified determinants in S. gordonii encoding a signal peptidase and an Eep-like zinc metalloprotease (lspA and eep, respectively) similar to those involved in processing certain pheromone precursors in E. faecalis. Mutations generated in camG, lspA, and eep each resulted in the ablation of gordonii-cAM373 activity in culture supernatants. This is the first genetic analysis of a potential sex pheromone system in a commensal oral streptococcal species, which may have implications for intergeneric gene acquisition in oral biofilms. PMID:20233933

  20. Mutants with enhanced nitrogenase activity in hydroponic Azospirillum brasilense-wheat associations.

    PubMed

    Pereg Gerk, L; Gilchrist, K; Kennedy, I R

    2000-05-01

    The effect of a mutation affecting flocculation, differentiation into cyst-like forms, and root colonization on nitrogenase expression by Azospirillum brasilense is described. The gene flcA of strain Sp7 restored these phenotypes in spontaneous mutants of both strains Sp7 and Sp245. Employing both constitutive pLA-lacZ and nifH-lacZ reporter fusions expressed in situ, the colony morphology, colonization pattern, and potential for nitrogenase activity of spontaneous mutants and flcA Tn5-induced mutants were established. The results of this study show that the ability of Sp7 and Sp245 mutant strains to remain in a vegetative form improved their ability to express nitrogenase activity in association with wheat in a hydroponic system. Restoring the cyst formation and colonization pattern to the spontaneous mutant Sp7-S reduced nitrogenase activity rates in association with plants to that of the wild-type Sp7. Although Tn5-induced flcA mutants showed higher potentials for nitrogenase expression than Sp7, their potentials were lower than that of Sp7-S, indicating that other factors in this strain contribute to its exceptional nitrogenase activity rates on plants. The lack of lateral flagella is not one of these factors, as Sp7-PM23, a spontaneous mutant impaired in swarming and lateral-flagellum production but not in flocculation, showed wild-type nitrogenase activity and expression. The results also suggest factors of importance in evolving an effective symbiosis between Azospirillum and wheat, such as increasing the availability of microaerobic niches along the root, increased supply of carbon sources by the plant, and the retention of the bacterial cells in vegetative form for faster metabolism.

  1. Mutants with Enhanced Nitrogenase Activity in Hydroponic Azospirillum brasilense-Wheat Associations

    PubMed Central

    Pereg Gerk, Lily; Gilchrist, Kate; Kennedy, Ivan R.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of a mutation affecting flocculation, differentiation into cyst-like forms, and root colonization on nitrogenase expression by Azospirillum brasilense is described. The gene flcA of strain Sp7 restored these phenotypes in spontaneous mutants of both strains Sp7 and Sp245. Employing both constitutive pLA-lacZ and nifH-lacZ reporter fusions expressed in situ, the colony morphology, colonization pattern, and potential for nitrogenase activity of spontaneous mutants and flcA Tn5-induced mutants were established. The results of this study show that the ability of Sp7 and Sp245 mutant strains to remain in a vegetative form improved their ability to express nitrogenase activity in association with wheat in a hydroponic system. Restoring the cyst formation and colonization pattern to the spontaneous mutant Sp7-S reduced nitrogenase activity rates in association with plants to that of the wild-type Sp7. Although Tn5-induced flcA mutants showed higher potentials for nitrogenase expression than Sp7, their potentials were lower than that of Sp7-S, indicating that other factors in this strain contribute to its exceptional nitrogenase activity rates on plants. The lack of lateral flagella is not one of these factors, as Sp7-PM23, a spontaneous mutant impaired in swarming and lateral-flagellum production but not in flocculation, showed wild-type nitrogenase activity and expression. The results also suggest factors of importance in evolving an effective symbiosis between Azospirillum and wheat, such as increasing the availability of microaerobic niches along the root, increased supply of carbon sources by the plant, and the retention of the bacterial cells in vegetative form for faster metabolism. PMID:10788397

  2. Unglycosylated recombinant human glutathione peroxidase 3 mutant from Escherichia coli is active as a monomer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Yu, Yang; Xing, Ruiqing; Guo, Xiao; Liu, Dali; Wei, Jingyan; Song, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) is a glycosylated member of GPx family and can catalyze the reaction of different types of peroxides with GSH to form their corresponding alcohols in vitro. The active center of GPx3 is selenocysteine (Sec), which is incorporated into proteins by a specific mechanism. In this study, we prepared a recombinant human GPx3 (rhGPx3) mutant with all Cys changed to Ser from a Cys auxotrophic strain of E. coli, BL21(DE3)cys. Although lacking post-translational modification, rhGPx3 mutant still retained the ability to reduce H2O2 and PLPC-OOH. Study on the quaternary structure suggested that rhGPx3 mutant existed as a monomer in solution, which is different from native tetrameric GPx3. Loss of the catalytic activity was considered to be attributed to both the absence of glycosylation and the failure of the tetramer. Further analysis was performed to compare the structures of rhGPx3 and GPx4 mutant, which were quite similar except for oligomerization loop. The differences of amino acid composition and electrostatic potentials on the oligomerization loop may affect the binding of large substrates to rhGPx3 mutant. This research provides an important foundation for biosynthesis of functionally selenium-containing GPx3 mutant in E.coli. PMID:25331785

  3. Enhanced dimerization drives ligand-independent activity of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Christopher C.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Karedla, Narain; Steinkamp, Mara P.; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Hlavacek, William S.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/erbB1/Her1) are often associated with tumorigenesis. In particular, a number of EGFR mutants that demonstrate ligand-independent signaling are common in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including kinase domain mutations L858R (also called L834R) and exon 19 deletions (e.g., ΔL747-P753insS), which collectively make up nearly 90% of mutations in NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms by which these mutations confer constitutive activity remain unresolved. Using multiple subdiffraction-limit imaging modalities, we reveal the altered receptor structure and interaction kinetics of NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants. We applied two-color single quantum dot tracking to quantify receptor dimerization kinetics on living cells and show that, in contrast to wild-type EGFR, mutants are capable of forming stable, ligand-independent dimers. Two-color superresolution localization microscopy confirmed ligand-independent aggregation of EGFR mutants. Live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the L858R kinase mutation alters ectodomain structure such that unliganded mutant EGFR adopts an extended, dimerization-competent conformation. Finally, mutation of the putative dimerization arm confirmed a critical role for ectodomain engagement in ligand-independent signaling. These data support a model in which dysregulated activity of NSCLC-associated kinase mutants is driven by coordinated interactions involving both the kinase and extracellular domains that lead to enhanced dimerization. PMID:26337388

  4. Engineered epidermal growth factor mutants with faster binding on-rates correlate with enhanced receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Jennifer L.; Lui, Bertrand H.; Beck, Stayce E.; Lee, Stephen S.; Ly, Daphne P.; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, George P.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate critical cell signaling pathways, yet the properties of their cognate ligands that influence receptor activation are not fully understood. There is great interest in parsing these complex ligand-receptor relationships using engineered proteins with altered binding properties. Here we focus on the interaction between two engineered epidermal growth factor (EGF) mutants and the EGF receptor (EGFR), a model member of the RTK superfamily. We found that EGF mutants with faster kinetic on-rates stimulate increased EGFR activation compared to wild-type EGF. These findings support previous predictions that faster association rates correlate with enhanced receptor activity. PMID:21439278

  5. Isolation and characterization of pediocin AcH chimeric protein mutants with altered bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Miller, K W; Schamber, R; Osmanagaoglu, O; Ray, B

    1998-06-01

    A collection of pediocin AcH amino acid substitution mutants was generated by PCR random mutagenesis of DNA encoding the bacteriocin. Mutants were isolated by cloning mutagenized DNA into an Escherichia coli malE plasmid that directs the secretion of maltose binding protein-pediocin AcH chimeric proteins and by screening transformant colonies for bactericidal activity against Lactobacillus plantarum NCDO955 (K. W. Miller, R. Schamber, Y. Chen, and B. Ray, 1998. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:14-20, 1998). In all, 17 substitution mutants were isolated at 14 of the 44 amino acids of pediocin AcH. Seven mutants (N5K, C9R, C14S, C14Y, G37E, G37R, and C44W) were completely inactive against the pediocin AcH-sensitive strains L. plantarum NCDO955, Listeria innocua Lin11, Enterococcus faecalis M1, Pediococcus acidilactici LB42, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides Ly. A C24S substitution mutant constructed by other means also was inactive against these bacteria. Nine other mutants (K1N, W18R, I26T, M31T, A34D, N41K, H42L, K43N, and K43E) retained from <1% to approximately 60% of wild-type activity when assayed against L. innocua Lin11. One mutant, K11E, displayed approximately 2. 8-fold-higher activity against this indicator. About one half of the mutations mapped to amino acids that are conserved in the pediocin-like family of bacteriocins. All four cysteines were found to be required for activity, although only C9 and C14 are conserved among pediocin-like bacteriocins. Several basic amino acids as well as nonpolar amino acids located within the hydrophobic C-terminal region also were found to be important. The mutations are discussed in the context of structural models that have been proposed for the bacteriocin.

  6. Reduced enzyme activity and starch level in an induced mutant of chloroplast phosphoglucose isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.W.; Gottlieb, L.D.; Pichersky, E.

    1986-06-01

    Ethyl methane sulfonate treatment was used to induce a mutation in the nuclear gene encoding the chloroplast isozyme of phosphoglucose isomerase in Clarkia xantiana. The mutation, which proved allelic to wild type activity, was backcrossed to wild type for five generations so that the two could be compared in a near isogenic background. An immunological analysis showed that the mutant, when homozygous, reduced the activity of the isozyme by about 50%. In contrast to wild type, the mutant showed little change in leaf starch level over a diurnal period or following a 72-hour continuous light treatment. By the end of the diurnal light period, the mutant accumulated only about 60% as much starch as wild type. However, mutant leaves had an increased sucrose level presumably because photosynthate was directly exported from the chloroplasts. The mutant also exhibited reduced leaf weight. These changes in metabolism and growth suggest that the wild type level of plastid phosphoglucose isomerase activity is necessary to achieve wild type carbohydrate status.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L. ) Heynh lacking ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tsanpiao; Caspar, T.; Somerville, C.; Preiss, J. )

    1988-04-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana lacking ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity (EC 2.7.7.27) was isolated (from a mutagenized population of plants) by screening for the absence of leaf starch. The mutant grows as vigorously as the wild type in continuous light but more slowly than the wild type in a 12 hours light/12 hours dark photoperiod. Genetic analysis showed that the deficiency of both starch and ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity were attributable to a single, nuclear, recessive mutation at a locus designated adg1. The absence of starch in the mutant demonstrates that starch synthesis in the chloroplast is entirely dependent on a pathway involving ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase. Analysis of leaf extracts by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Western blotting experiments using antibodies specific for spinach ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase showed that two proteins, present in the wild type, were absent from the mutant. The heterozygous F{sub 1} progeny of a cross between the mutant and wild type had a specific activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase indistinguishable from the wild type. These observations suggest that the mutation in the adg1 gene in TL25 might affect a regulatory locus.

  8. Ribosome display for selection of active dihydrofolate reductase mutants using immobilized methotrexate on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumio; Ebihara, Takashi; Mie, Masayasu; Yanagida, Yasuko; Endo, Yaeta; Kobatake, Eiry; Aizawa, Masuo

    2002-03-01

    Ribosome display was applied to the selection of an enzyme. As a model, we selected and amplified the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene by ribosome display utilizing a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system based on binding affinity to its substrate analog, methotrexate, immobilized on agarose beads. After three rounds of selection, the DHFR gene could be effectively selected and preferentially amplified from a small proportion in a mixture also containing competitive genes. Active enzymes were expressed and amplified and by sequence analysis, four mutants of DHFR were identified. These mutants showed as much activity as the wild-type enzyme.

  9. L1-CAM and N-CAM: From Adhesion Proteins to Pharmacological Targets.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Federico; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2015-11-01

    L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) and neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM), key members of the immunoglobulin-like CAM (Ig-CAM) family, were first recognized to play critical roles in surface interactions of neurons, by binding with each other and with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Subsequently, adhesion was recognized to include signaling due to both activation of β-integrin, with the generation of intracellular cascades, and integration with the surface cytoskeleton. The importance of the two Ig-CAMs was revealed by their activation of the tyrosine kinase receptors of fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF). Based on these complex signaling properties, L1-CAM and N-CAM have become of great potential pharmacological interest in neurons and cancers. Treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and cognitive deficits of neurons is aimed to increase the cell Ig-CAM tone, possibly provided by synthetic/mimetic peptides. In cancer cells, where Ig-CAMs are often overexpressed, the proteins are employed for prognosis. The approaches to therapy are based on protein downregulation, antibodies, and adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:26478212

  10. VARIABLE-THROW CAM

    DOEpatents

    Godsil, E.C.; Robinson, E.Y.

    1963-07-16

    A variable-throw cam comprising inner and outer eccentric sleeves which are adjustably locked together is described. The cam throw is varied by unlocking the inner and outer sleeves, rotating the outer sleeve relative to the inner one until the desired throw is obtained, and locking the sleeves together again. The cam is useful in applications wherein a continuously-variable throw is required, e.g., ram-and-die pressing operations, cyclic fatigue testing of materials, etc. (AEC)

  11. Photoproduction of Hydrogen by Sulfur-Deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants with Impaired Photosystem II Photochemical Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, V. V.; Kosourov, S.; Krendeleva, T. E.; Semin, B. K.; Kukarskikh, G. P.; Rubin, A. B.; Sayre, R. T.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Seibert, M.

    2007-01-01

    Photoproduction of H2 was examined in a series of sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii D1-R323 mutants with progressively impaired PSII photochemical activity. In the R323H, R323D, and R323E D1 mutants, replacement of arginine affects photosystem II (PSII) function, as demonstrated by progressive decreases in O2-evolving activity and loss of PSII photochemical activity. Significant changes in PSII activity were found when the arginine residue was replaced by negatively charged amino acid residues (R323D and R323E). However, the R323H (positively charged or neutral, depending on the ambient pH) mutant had minimal changes in PSII activity. The R323H, R323D, and R323E mutants and the pseudo-wild-type (pWt) with restored PSII function were used to study the effects of sulfur deprivation on H2-production activity. All of these mutants exhibited significant changes in the normal parameters associated with the H2-photoproduction process, such as a shorter aerobic phase, lower accumulation of starch, a prolonged anaerobic phase observed before the onset of H2-production, a shorter duration of H2-production, lower H2 yields compared to the pWt control, and slightly higher production of dark fermentation products such as acetate and formate. The more compromised the PSII photochemical activity, the more dramatic was the effect of sulfur deprivation on the H2-production process, which depends both on the presence of residual PSII activity and the amount of stored starch.

  12. Photoproduction of hydrogen by sulfur-deprived C. reinhardtii mutants with impaired photosystem II photochemical activity.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Valeria V; Kosourov, Sergey; Krendeleva, Tatiana E; Semin, Boris K; Kukarskikh, Galina P; Rubin, Andrei B; Sayre, Richard T; Ghirardi, Maria L; Seibert, Michael

    2007-10-01

    Photoproduction of H2 was examined in a series of sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii D1-R323 mutants with progressively impaired PSII photochemical activity. In the R323H, R323D, and R323E D1 mutants, replacement of arginine affects photosystem II (PSII) function, as demonstrated by progressive decreases in O2-evolving activity and loss of PSII photochemical activity. Significant changes in PSII activity were found when the arginine residue was replaced by negatively charged amino acid residues (R323D and R323E). However, the R323H (positively charged or neutral, depending on the ambient pH) mutant had minimal changes in PSII activity. The R323H, R323D, and R323E mutants and the pseudo-wild-type (pWt) with restored PSII function were used to study the effects of sulfur deprivation on H2-production activity. All of these mutants exhibited significant changes in the normal parameters associated with the H2-photoproduction process, such as a shorter aerobic phase, lower accumulation of starch, a prolonged anaerobic phase observed before the onset of H2-production, a shorter duration of H2-production, lower H2 yields compared to the pWt control, and slightly higher production of dark fermentation products such as acetate and formate. The more compromised the PSII photochemical activity, the more dramatic was the effect of sulfur deprivation on the H2-production process, which depends both on the presence of residual PSII activity and the amount of stored starch. PMID:17701084

  13. Temperature-sensitive retinoid isomerase activity of RPE65 mutants associated with Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songhua; Hu, Jane; Jin, Robin J.; Aiyar, Ashok; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Bok, Dean; Jin, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    RPE65 is a membrane-associated retinoid isomerase involved in the visual cycle responsible for sustaining vision. Many mutations in the human RPE65 gene are associated with distinct forms of retinal degenerative diseases. The pathogenic mechanisms for most of these mutations remain poorly understood. Here, we show that three Leber congenital amaurosis -associated RPE65 mutants (R91W, Y249C and R515W) undergo rapid proteasomal degradation mediated by the 26 S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 13 (PSMD13) in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. These mutant proteins formed cytosolic inclusion bodies or high molecular weight complexes via disulfide bonds. The mutations are mapped on non-active sites but severely reduced isomerase activity of RPE65. At 30°C, however, the enzymatic function and membrane-association of the mutant RPE65s are significantly rescued possibly due to proper folding. In addition, PSMD13 displayed a drastically decreased effect on degradation of the mutant proteins in the cells grown at 30°C. These results suggest that PSMD13 plays a critical role in regulating pathogenicity of the mutations and the molecular basis for the PSMD13-mediated rapid degradation and loss of function of the mutants is misfolding of RPE65. PMID:25752820

  14. Constitutive asymmetric dimerization drives oncogenic activation of epidermal growth factor receptor carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants

    PubMed Central

    Park, Angela K.J.; Francis, Joshua M.; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Joon-Oh; Cho, Jeonghee

    2015-01-01

    Genomic alterations targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) gene have been strongly associated with cancer pathogenesis. The clinical effectiveness of EGFR targeted therapies, including small molecules directed against the kinase domain such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib, have been proven successful in treating non-small cell lung cancer patients with tumors harboring EGFR kinase domain mutations. Recent large-scale genomic studies in glioblastoma and lung cancer have identified an additional class of oncogenic mutations caused by the intragenic deletion of carboxy-terminal coding regions. Here, we report that combinations of exonic deletions of exon 25 to 28 lead to the oncogenic activation of EGF receptor in the absence of ligand and consequent cellular transformation, indicating a significant role of C-terminal domain in modulating EGFR activation. Furthermore, we show that the oncogenic activity of the resulting C-terminal deletion mutants are efficiently inhibited by EGFR-targeted drugs including erlotinib, afatinib, dacomitinib as well as cetuximab, expanding the therapeutic rationale of cancer genome-based EGFR targeted approaches. Finally, in vivo and in vitro preclinical studies demonstrate that constitutive asymmetric dimerization in mutant EGFR is a key mechanism for oncogenic activation and tumorigenesis by C-terminal deletion mutants. Therefore, our data provide compelling evidence for oncogenic activation of C-terminal deletion mutants at the molecular level and we propose that C-terminal deletion status of EGFR can be considered as a potential genomic marker for EGFR-targeted therapy. PMID:25826094

  15. Olesoxime suppresses calpain activation and mutant huntingtin fragmentation in the BACHD rat.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Laura E; Weber, Jonasz J; Wlodkowski, Tanja T; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Michaud, Magali; Calaminus, Carsten; Eckert, Schamim H; Gaca, Janett; Weiss, Andreas; Magg, Janine C D; Jansson, Erik K H; Eckert, Gunter P; Pichler, Bernd J; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca M; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu P

    2015-12-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal human neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which translates into a mutant huntingtin protein. A key event in the molecular pathogenesis of Huntington's disease is the proteolytic cleavage of mutant huntingtin, leading to the accumulation of toxic protein fragments. Mutant huntingtin cleavage has been linked to the overactivation of proteases due to mitochondrial dysfunction and calcium derangements. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of olesoxime, a mitochondria-targeting, neuroprotective compound, in the BACHD rat model of Huntington's disease. BACHD rats were treated with olesoxime via the food for 12 months. In vivo analysis covered motor impairments, cognitive deficits, mood disturbances and brain atrophy. Ex vivo analyses addressed olesoxime's effect on mutant huntingtin aggregation and cleavage, as well as brain mitochondria function. Olesoxime improved cognitive and psychiatric phenotypes, and ameliorated cortical thinning in the BACHD rat. The treatment reduced cerebral mutant huntingtin aggregates and nuclear accumulation. Further analysis revealed a cortex-specific overactivation of calpain in untreated BACHD rats. Treated BACHD rats instead showed significantly reduced levels of mutant huntingtin fragments due to the suppression of calpain-mediated cleavage. In addition, olesoxime reduced the amount of mutant huntingtin fragments associated with mitochondria, restored a respiration deficit, and enhanced the expression of fusion and outer-membrane transport proteins. In conclusion, we discovered the calpain proteolytic system, a key player in Huntington's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, as a target of olesoxime. Our findings suggest that olesoxime exerts its beneficial effects by improving mitochondrial function, which results in reduced calpain activation. The observed alleviation of behavioural and neuropathological phenotypes encourages further

  16. Mechanism of the Anticoagulant Activity of Thrombin Mutant W215A/E217A

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Prafull S.; Page, Michael J.; Chen, Zhiwei; Bush-Pelc, Leslie; Di Cera, Enrico

    2009-09-15

    The thrombin mutant W215A/E217A (WE) is a potent anticoagulant both in vitro and in vivo. Previous x-ray structural studies have shown that WE assumes a partially collapsed conformation that is similar to the inactive E* form, which explains its drastically reduced activity toward substrate. Whether this collapsed conformation is genuine, rather than the result of crystal packing or the mutation introduced in the critical 215-217 {beta}-strand, and whether binding of thrombomodulin to exosite I can allosterically shift the E* form to the active E form to restore activity toward protein C are issues of considerable mechanistic importance to improve the design of an anticoagulant thrombin mutant for therapeutic applications. Here we present four crystal structures of WE in the human and murine forms that confirm the collapsed conformation reported previously under different experimental conditions and crystal packing. We also present structures of human and murine WE bound to exosite I with a fragment of the platelet receptor PAR1, which is unable to shift WE to the E form. These structural findings, along with kinetic and calorimetry data, indicate that WE is strongly stabilized in the E* form and explain why binding of ligands to exosite I has only a modest effect on the E*-E equilibrium for this mutant. The E* {yields} E transition requires the combined binding of thrombomodulin and protein C and restores activity of the mutant WE in the anticoagulant pathway.

  17. A cytochrome c mutant with high electron transfer and antioxidant activities but devoid of apoptogenic effect.

    PubMed Central

    Abdullaev, Ziedulla Kh; Bodrova, Marina E; Chernyak, Boris V; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kluck, Ruth M; Pereverzev, Mikhail O; Arseniev, Alexander S; Efremov, Roman G; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Mokhova, Elena N; Newmeyer, Donald D; Roder, Heinrich; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2002-01-01

    A cytochrome c mutant lacking apoptogenic function but competent in electron transfer and antioxidant activities has been constructed. To this end, mutant species of horse and yeast cytochromes c with substitutions in the N-terminal alpha-helix or position 72 were obtained. It was found that yeast cytochrome c was much less effective than the horse protein in activating respiration of rat liver mitoplasts deficient in endogenous cytochrome c as well as in inhibition of H(2)O(2) production by the initial segment of the respiratory chain of intact rat heart mitochondria. The major role in the difference between the horse and yeast proteins was shown to be played by the amino acid residue in position 4 (glutamate in horse, and lysine in yeast; horse protein numbering). A mutant of the yeast cytochrome c containing K4E and some other "horse" modifications in the N-terminal alpha-helix, proved to be (i) much more active in electron transfer and antioxidant activity than the wild-type yeast cytochrome c and (ii), like the yeast cytochrome c, inactive in caspase stimulation, even if added in 400-fold excess compared with the horse protein. Thus this mutant seems to be a good candidate for knock-in studies of the role of cytochrome c-mediated apoptosis, in contrast with the horse K72R, K72G, K72L and K72A mutant cytochromes that at low concentrations were less active in apoptosis than the wild-type, but were quite active when the concentrations were increased by a factor of 2-12. PMID:11879204

  18. Autolysis of Microbial Cells: Salt Activation of Autolytic Enzymes in a Mutant of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Richard W.; Chatterjee, Anadi N.; Young, Frank E.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of various salts on the autolysis of cell wall of a ribitol teichoic acid-deficient mutant of Staphylococcus aureus H (strain 52A5 carrying tar-1) was compared with the parent strain. In the presence of high concentrations of certain salts such as 1.0 m NaCl, the mutant undergoes autolysis with the release of osmotically sensitive spheroplasts. The parent strain is not affected by these conditions. The stimulation of lysis is related to an activation of N-acylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase. Images PMID:4591480

  19. Understanding protein lids: kinetic analysis of active hinge mutants in triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Sampson, N S

    1999-08-31

    In previous work we tested what three amino acid sequences could serve as a protein hinge in triosephosphate isomerase [Sun, J., and Sampson, N. S. (1998) Protein Sci. 7, 1495-1505]. We generated a genetic library encoding all 8000 possible 3 amino acid combinations at the C-terminal hinge and selected for those combinations of amino acids that formed active mutants. These mutants were classified into six phylogenetic families. Two families resembled wild-type hinges, and four families represented new types of hinges. In this work, the kinetic characteristics and thermal stabilities of mutants representing each of these families were determined in order to understand what properties make an efficient protein hinge, and why all of the families are not observed in nature. From a steady-state kinetic analysis of our mutants, it is clear that the partitioning between protonation of intermediate to form product and intermediate release from the enzyme surface to form methylglyoxal (a decomposition product) is not affected. The two most impaired mutants undergo a change in rate-limiting step from enediol formation to dihydroxyacetone phosphate binding. Thus, it appears that k(cat)/K(m)'s are reduced relative to wild type as a result of slower Michaelis complex formation and dissociation, rather than increased loop opening speed.

  20. Flexibility in Anaerobic Metabolism as Revealed in a Mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Lacking Hydrogenase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dubini, A.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Grossman, A. R.; Posewitz, M. C.

    2009-03-13

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has a network of fermentation pathways that become active when cells acclimate to anoxia. Hydrogenase activity is an important component of this metabolism, and we have compared metabolic and regulatory responses that accompany anaerobiosis in wild-type C. reinhardtii cells and a null mutant strain for the HYDEF gene (hydEF-1 mutant), which encodes an [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation protein. This mutant has no hydrogenase activity and exhibits elevated accumulation of succinate and diminished production of CO2 relative to the parental strain during dark, anaerobic metabolism. In the absence of hydrogenase activity, increased succinate accumulation suggests that the cells activate alternative pathways for pyruvate metabolism, which contribute to NAD(P)H reoxidation, and continued glycolysis and fermentation in the absence of O2. Fermentative succinate production potentially proceeds via the formation of malate, and increases in the abundance of mRNAs encoding two malateforming enzymes, pyruvate carboxylase and malic enzyme, are observed in the mutant relative to the parental strain following transfer of cells from oxic to anoxic conditions. Although C. reinhardtii has a single gene encoding pyruvate carboxylase, it has six genes encoding putative malic enzymes. Only one of the malic enzyme genes, MME4, shows a dramatic increase in expression (mRNA abundance) in the hydEF-1 mutant during anaerobiosis. Furthermore, there are marked increases in transcripts encoding fumarase and fumarate reductase, enzymes putatively required to convert malate to succinate. These results illustrate the marked metabolic flexibility of C. reinhardtii and contribute to the development of an informed model of anaerobic metabolism in this and potentially other algae.

  1. Characterization of Bacillus licheniformis 6346 Mutants Which Have Altered Lytic Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, C. W.; Rogers, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    Two groups of mutants altered in lytic enzyme activities have been isolated from Bacillus licheniformis 6346 MH-1 by screening clones for halo production in agar plates containing cell wall conjugated with Procion brilliant red. In the first group which produced halos during colony formation, two were shown to contain three- and eightfold more muramyl-l-alanine amidase than the parent. These strains liberated amidase and intracellular α-glucosidase into the culture medium during exponential growth in liquid medium. Isolated walls had a normal qualitative composition and in autolysing liberated N-terminal amino acids and reducing groups. Wall preparations from the second group of mutants which did not produce halos lysed very poorly at pH 9.5, the optimal pH for amidase activity, and poorly at pH 5.5 even though they had similar endo-N-acetylglucosaminidase activities to the parent. Two of these strains that were also deficient in phosphoglucomutase had only 3 to 5% of the membrane-bound amidase activity compared with that in the parent. Cell walls of the phosphoglucomutase-deficient mutants treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate to inactivate endogenous lytic enzymes were dissolved at 10% of the rate of those from the parent by added amidase, but their sensitivities to lysozyme were similar. Those from one mutant had 10 to 20% of the amidase-binding capacity of parent walls, whereas its isolated mucopeptide was essentially inactive in this respect. The failure of these phosphoglucomutase-deficient mutants to autolyse is likely to be due to the combined effects of both low amidase activity and resistant walls. As a result, daughter cells are unable to separate and long chains are formed during exponential growth. PMID:4828303

  2. Combination therapy for KIT-mutant mast cells: targeting constitutive NFAT and KIT activity.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Alison C; Klug, Lillian R; Patterson, Janice; Griffith, Diana J; Beadling, Carol; Town, Ajia; Heinrich, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    Resistant KIT mutations have hindered the development of KIT kinase inhibitors for treatment of patients with systemic mastocytosis. The goal of this research was to characterize the synergistic effects of a novel combination therapy involving inhibition of KIT and calcineurin phosphatase, a nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) regulator, using a panel of KIT-mutant mast cell lines. The effects of monotherapy or combination therapy on the cellular viability/survival of KIT-mutant mast cells were evaluated. In addition, NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity was monitored in a representative cell line to evaluate the mechanisms responsible for the efficacy of combination therapy. Finally, shRNA was used to stably knockdown calcineurin expression to confirm the role of calcineurin in the observed synergy. The combination of a KIT inhibitor and a calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor (CNPI) synergized to reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis in six distinct KIT-mutant mast cell lines. Both KIT inhibitors and CNPIs were found to decrease NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity. NFAT-specific inhibitors induced similar synergistic apoptosis induction as CNPIs when combined with a KIT inhibitor. Notably, NFAT was constitutively active in each KIT-mutant cell line tested. Knockdown of calcineurin subunit PPP3R1 sensitized cells to KIT inhibition and increased NFAT phosphorylation and cytoplasmic localization. Constitutive activation of NFAT appears to represent a novel and targetable characteristic of KIT-mutant mast cell disease. Our studies suggest that combining KIT inhibition with NFAT inhibition might represent a new treatment strategy for mast cell disease.

  3. Bacteriorhodopsin mutants containing single substitutions of serine or threonine residues are all active in proton translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Marti, T.; Otto, H.; Mogi, T.; Roesselet, S.J.H.; Heyn, M.P.; Khorana, H.G. )

    1991-04-15

    To study their role in proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin, 22 serine and threonine residues presumed to be located within and near the border of the transmembrane segments have been individually replaced by alanine or valine, respectively. Thr-89 was substituted by alanine, valine, and aspartic acid, and Ser-141 by alanine and cysteine. Most of the mutants showed essentially wild-type phenotype with regard to chromophore regeneration and absorption spectrum. However, replacement of Thr-89 by Val and of Ser-141 by Cys caused striking blue shifts of the chromophore by 100 and 80 nm, respectively. All substitutions of Thr-89 regenerated the chromophore at least 10-fold faster with 13-cis retinal than with all-trans retinal. The substitutions at positions 89, 90, and 141 also showed abnormal dark-light adaptation, suggesting interactions between these residues and the retinylidene chromophore. Proton pumping measurements revealed 60-75% activity for mutants of Thr-46, -89, -90, -205, and Ser-226, and about 20% for Ser-141----Cys, whereas the remaining mutants showed normal pumping. Kinetic studies of the photocycle and of proton release and uptake for mutants in which proton pumping was reduced revealed generally little alterations. The reduced activity in several of these mutants is most likely due to a lower percentage of all-trans retinal in the light-adapted state. In the mutants Thr-46----Val and Ser-226----Ala the decay of the photointer-mediate M was significantly accelerated, indicating an interaction between these residues and Asp-96 which reprotonates the Schiff base. Our results show that no single serine or threonine residue is obligatory for proton pumping.

  4. Free energy simulations of active-site mutants of dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Doron, Dvir; Stojković, Vanja; Gakhar, Lokesh; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Kohen, Amnon; Major, Dan Thomas

    2015-01-22

    This study employs hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to investigate the effect of mutations of the active-site residue I14 of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) on the hydride transfer. Recent kinetic measurements of the I14X mutants (X = V, A, and G) indicated slower hydride transfer rates and increasingly temperature-dependent kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with systematic reduction of the I14 side chain. The QM/MM simulations show that when the original isoleucine residue is substituted in silico by valine, alanine, or glycine (I14V, I14A, and I14G DHFR, respectively), the free energy barrier height of the hydride transfer reaction increases relative to the wild-type enzyme. These trends are in line with the single-turnover rate measurements reported for these systems. In addition, extended dynamics simulations of the reactive Michaelis complex reveal enhanced flexibility in the mutants, and in particular for the I14G mutant, including considerable fluctuations of the donor-acceptor distance (DAD) and the active-site hydrogen bonding network compared with those detected in the native enzyme. These observations suggest that the perturbations induced by the mutations partly impair the active-site environment in the reactant state. On the other hand, the average DADs at the transition state of all DHFR variants are similar. Crystal structures of I14 mutants (V, A, and G) confirmed the trend of increased flexibility of the M20 and other loops. PMID:25382260

  5. World survey of CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatvany, J.; Merchant, M. E.; Rathmill, K.; Yoshikawa, H.

    The worldwide state of the art and development trends in CAM are surveyed, emphasizing flexible manufacturing systems (FMS), robotics, computer-aided process planning, and computer-aided scheduling. The use of FMS, NC machine tools, DNC systems, and unmanned and nearly unmanned factories, are discussed as the state of the art in the USA, Japan, Western Europe and Eastern Europe. For the same areas, trends are projected, including the use of graphics and languages in CAM, and metamorphic machine tools. A Delphi-type forecast and its conclusions are presented. A CAM system for manufacture is projected for 1985, the use of robots equalling humans in assembly capability for 1990, and the fifty percent replacement of direct labor in automobile final assembly by programmable automation by 1995. An attempt is made to outline a methodical approach to forecasting the development of CAM over the next 10-15 years. Key issues in CAM proliferation, including financial and social aspects, are addressed.

  6. [Studies on construction of artificial mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA and their biological activity].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bo; Chen, Ji-Shuang; Zhang, Hua-Rong

    2005-08-01

    Based on the full length cDNA clone of a Cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA, which was 369nt in size, artificial mutants were developed by the method of error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling. The new satellite cDNAs were transcribed in vitro into ssRNA and pseudo-recombined with a helper Cucumber mosaic virus, which contains no satellite RNA. Sequence analysis showed that A to T/G or G to A replacement all the four mutants, named MS1, MS5, MS6 and MS11 respectively, and there is no C to G or G to C replacement, but amongst, only the mutants MS11 could replicated when recombined with the helper virus strain. No satellite RNA could be detected by RT-PCR amplification and double-stranded RNA analysis for those pseudo-recombination constitution of Cucumber mosaic virus strain with mutants MS1, MS5 and MS6.Sequence homological comparison showed that the single replacement of mutants MS1, MS5 and MS6 occurred in the highly conservative regions and the T to A replacement of mutant MS11 was located in the normal-variation region. This is the first artificial mutation of satellite RNA of plant RNA viruses. The results indicated that single base in the region of satellite RNA maybe important to maintaining the biological activity of satellite RNA for its replication and stability. The variation and evolution of satellite RNA could be hopefully studied through combination directed evolution by DNA shuffling with pseudo-recombination in vitro.

  7. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-04-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM.

  8. Abelson murine leukemia virus transformation-defective mutants with impaired P120-associated protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, F H; Van de Ven, W J; Stephenson, J R

    1980-01-01

    Several transformation-defective (td) mutants of Abelson murine leukemia virus (AbLV) are described. Cells nonproductively infected with such mutants exhibited a high degree of growth contact inhibition, failed to form colonies in soft agar, lacked rescuable transforming virus, and were as susceptible as uninfected control cells to transformation by wild-type (wt) AbLV pseudotype virus. In addition, each of several td AbLV nonproductively infected cell clones analyzed was found to be nontumorigenic in vivo. Biochemical analysis of td mutant AbLV-infected clones revealed levels of expression of the major AbLV translational product, P120, and a highly related 80,000-Mr AbLV-encoded protein, P80, at concentrations analogous to those in wt AbLV-transformed cells. Although the AbLV-specific 120,000-Mr polyproteins expressed in td mutant AbLV-infected clones were indistinguishable from those in wt AbLV-transformed lines with respect to molecular weight and [35S]methionine tryptic peptide composition, they each differed from wt AbLV P120 in their patterns of post-translational phosphorylation. A previously described AbLV-associated protein kinase activity is shown to recognize as substrate a major tyrosine-specific acceptor site(s) contained within a single well-resolved tryptic peptide common to both AbLV P120 and P80. In vitro [gamma-32P]ATP-mediated labeling of this phosphorylation site was reduced to below detectable levels in td mutant nonproductively infected cell clones. These findings establish that the AbLV-encoded polyprotein P120 and its associated protein kinase activity are involved in AbLV tumorigenesis. Images PMID:6253663

  9. Rational redesign of the biodegradative enzyme cytochrome P450 cam:

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, R.; Paulsen, M.; Bass, M.; Arnold, G.

    1991-03-01

    Cytochromes P450, a superfamily of monooxygenase enzymes present in all kingdoms of living organisms, are very versatile with respect to substrate range and catalytic functionality. Many recalcitrant halogenated hydrocarbons, on DOE sites and throughout the nation, result in serious environmental impact. Cytochromes P450 have been shown to be catalytically capable of, at least partial, dehalogenation of some such compounds. Clearly, however, their active site stereochemistry and related functional components are not well suited for this role because the rates of dehalogenation are generally rather modest. The evolution of modified active site and access channel structures may proceed very slowly if multiple genetic changes are simultaneously required for enzyme adaptation. Since each mutational event is by itself a rare event, a basic premise of our research is that designing multiple changes into an enzyme may be more timely than waiting for them to occur biologically either via natural selection or under laboratory-controlled conditions. Starting with available high-resolution x-ray crystal structures, molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have been used to probe the basic structure/function principles and conformational fluctuations of the biodegradative enzyme, cytochrome P450cam (camphor hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida) and active site mutants, to provide the fundamental understanding necessary for rational engineering of the enzyme for modified substrate specificity. In the present paper, we review our progress to data, in the area of molecular dynamics simulations and active site redesign of P450cam. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Altered motor activity, exploration and anxiety in heterozygous neuregulin 1 mutant mice: implications for understanding schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Karl, T; Duffy, L; Scimone, A; Harvey, R P; Schofield, P R

    2007-10-01

    Human genetic studies have shown that neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a potential susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. Nrg1 influences various neurodevelopmental processes, which are potentially related to schizophrenia. The neurodevelopmental theory of schizophrenia suggests that interactions between genetic and environmental factors are responsible for biochemical alterations leading to schizophrenia. To investigate these interactions and to match experimental design with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we applied a comprehensive behavioural phenotyping strategy for motor activity, exploration and anxiety in a heterozygous Nrg1 transmembrane domain mutant mouse model (Nrg1 HET) using different housing conditions and age groups. We observed a locomotion- and exploration-related hyperactive phenotype in Nrg1 HETs. Increased age had a locomotion- and exploration-inhibiting effect, which was significantly attenuated in mutant mice. Environmental enrichment (EE) had a stimulating influence on locomotion and exploration. The impact of EE was more pronounced in Nrg1 hypomorphs. Our study also showed a moderate task-specific anxiolytic-like phenotype for Nrg1 HETs, which was influenced by external factors. The behavioural phenotype detected in heterozygous Nrg1 mutant mice is not specific to schizophrenia per se, but the increased sensitivity of mutant mice to exogenous factors is consistent with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the neurodevelopmental theory. Our findings reinforce the importance of carefully controlling experimental designs for external factors and of comprehensive, integrative phenotyping strategies. Thus, Nrg1 HETs may, in combination with other genetic and drug models, help to clarify pathophysiological mechanisms behind schizophrenia.

  11. Functional determinants of ras interference 1 mutants required for their inhbitory activity on endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis, Adriana; Giambini, Hugo; Villasana, Zoilmar; Barbieri, M. Alejandro

    2009-03-10

    In this study, we initiated experiments to address the structure-function relationship of Rin1. A total of ten substitute mutations were created, and their effects on Rin1 function were examined. Of the ten mutants, four of them (P541A, E574A, Y577F, T580A) were defective in Rab5 binding, while two other Rin1 mutants (D537A, Y561F) partially interacted with Rab5. Mutations in several other residues (Y506F, Y523F, T572A, Y578F) resulted in partial loss of Rab5 function. Biochemical studies showed that six of them (D537A, P541A, Y561F, E574A, Y577F, T580A) were unable to activate Rab5 in an in vitro assay. In addition, Rin1: D537A and Rin1: Y561F mutants showed dominant inhibition of Rab5 function. Consistent with the biochemical studies, we observed that these two Rin1 mutants have lost their ability to stimulate the endocytosis of EGF, form enlarged Rab5-positive endosomes, or support in vitro endosome fusion. Based on these data, our results showed that mutations in the Vps9 domain of Rin1 lead to a loss-of-function phenotype, indicating a specific structure-function relationship between Rab5 and Rin1.

  12. Hepatitis B virus X protein mutants exhibit distinct biological activities in hepatoma Huh7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaohong; Zhang Shuhui; Lin Jing; Zhang Shunmin; Feitelson, Mark A.; Gao Hengjun; Zhu Minghua

    2008-09-05

    The role of the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the biological impact of hepatitis B virus x gene (HBx) mutation on hepatoma cells, plasmids expressing the full-length HBx or HBx deletion mutants were constructed. The biological activities in these transfectants were analyzed by a series of assays. Results showed that HBx3'-20 and HBx3'-40 amino acid deletion mutants exhibited an increase in cellular proliferation, focus formation, tumorigenicity, and invasive growth and metastasis through promotion of the cell cycle from G0/G1 to the S phase, when compared with the full-length HBx. In contrast, HBx3'-30 amino acid deletion mutant repressed cell proliferation by blocking in G1 phase. The expression of P53, p21{sup WAF1}, p14{sup ARF}, and MDM2 proteins was regulated by expression of HBx mutants. In conclusions, HBx variants showed different effects and functions on cell proliferation and invasion by regulation of the cell cycle progression and its associated proteins expression.

  13. Effects of decreased muscle activity on developing axial musculature in nicb107 mutant zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, T; Schipper, H; van Leeuwen, J L; Kranenbarg, S

    2005-10-01

    The present paper discusses the effects of decreased muscle activity (DMA) on embryonic development in the zebrafish. Wild-type zebrafish embryos become mobile around 18 h post-fertilisation, long before the axial musculature is fully differentiated. As a model for DMA, the nic(b107) mutant was used. In nic(b107) mutant embryos, muscle fibres are mechanically intact and able to contract, but neuronal signalling is defective and the fibres are not activated, rendering the embryos immobile. Despite the immobility, distinguished slow and fast muscle fibres developed at the correct location in the axial muscles, helical muscle fibre arrangements were detected and sarcomere architecture was generated. However, in nic(b107) mutant embryos the notochord is flatter and the cross-sectional body shape more rounded, also affecting muscle fibre orientation. The stacking of sarcomeres and myofibril arrangement show a less regular pattern. Finally, expression levels of several genes were changed. Together, these changes in expression indicate that muscle growth is not impeded and energy metabolism is not changed by the decrease in muscle activity but that the composition of muscle is altered. In addition, skin stiffness is affected. In conclusion, the lack of muscle fibre activity did not prevent the basal muscle components developing but influenced further organisation and differentiation of these components. PMID:16169945

  14. Activation of chitin synthetase in permeabilized cells of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, M P; Correa, J U; Cabib, E

    1982-01-01

    Digitonin treatment at 30 degrees C of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B permeabilized the cells and caused rapid and extensive activation of chitin synthetase in situ. The same result was obtained with a mutant generally defective in vacuolar proteases. By lowering the temperature and using different permeabilization procedures, we showed that increases in permeability and activation are distinct processes. Activation was inhibited by the protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin, but by pepstatin or chymostatin. Metal chelators were also inhibitory, and their effect was reversed by the addition of Ca2+ but not by Mg2+. Antipain added together with Ca2+ after incubation of the cells in the presence of a chelating agent prevented reversal of inhibition, a result that was interpreted as indicating that antipain acts either on the same step affected by Ca2+ or on a subsequent step. Efforts to obtain activation in cell-free extracts were unsuccessful, but it was possible to extract the synthetase, once activated, by breaking permeabilized cells with glass beads. Treatment of the cell-free extracts with trypsin led not only to increased activity of chitin synthetase, but also to a change in the pH-activity curve and a diminished requirement by the enzyme for free N-acetylglucosamine. These observations suggest that the modification undergone by the synthetase during endogenous activation is different from that brought about by trypsin treatment. Images PMID:6216245

  15. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits an Activated FGFR3 Mutant, and Blocks Downstream Signaling in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, April N.; McAndrew, Christopher W.; Donoghue, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations within Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3), a receptor tyrosine kinase, are responsible for human skeletal dysplasias including achondroplasia and the neonatal lethal syndromes, Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) type I and II. Several of these same FGFR3 mutations have also been identified somatically in human cancers, including multiple myeloma, bladder carcinoma and cervical cancer. Based on reports that strongly activated mutants of FGFR3 such as the TDII (K650E) mutant signal preferentially from within the secretory pathway, the inhibitory properties of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), which blocks protein transport through the Golgi, were investigated. NDGA was able to inhibit FGFR3 autophosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, signaling molecules downstream of FGFR3 activation such as STAT1, STAT3 and MAPK were inhibited by NDGA treatment. Using HEK293 cells expressing activated FGFR3-TDII, together with several multiple myeloma cell lines expressing activated forms of FGFR3, NDGA generally resulted in a decrease in MAPK activation by 1 hour, and resulted in increased apoptosis over 24 hours. The effects of NDGA on activated FGFR3 derivatives targeted either to the plasma membrane or the cytoplasm were also examined. These results suggest that inhibitory small molecules such as NDGA that target a specific subcellular compartment may be beneficial in the inhibition of activated receptors such as FGFR3 that signal from the same compartment. PMID:18794123

  16. Human Defensin 5 Disulfide Array Mutants: Disulfide Bond Deletion Attenuates Antibacterial Activity Against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wanniarachchi, Yoshitha A.; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Wan, Andrea; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Human α-defensin 5 (HD5, HD5ox to specify the oxidized and disulfide linked form) is a 32-residue cysteine-rich host-defense peptide, expressed and released by small intestinal Paneth cells, that exhibits antibacterial activity against a number of Gram-negative and –positive bacterial strains. To ascertain the contributions of its disulfide array to structure, antimicrobial activity, and proteolytic stability, a series of HD5 double mutant peptides where pairs of cysteine residues corresponding to native disulfide linkages (Cys3—Cys31, Cys5—Cys20, Cys10—Cys30) were mutated to Ser or Ala residues were overexpressed in E. coli, purified and characterized. A hexa mutant peptide, HD5[Serhexa], where all six native Cys residues are replaced by Ser residues was also evaluated. Removal of a single native S—S linkage influences oxidative folding and regioisomerization, antibacterial activity, Gram-negative bacterial membrane permeabilization, and proteolytic stability. Whereas the majority of the HD5 mutant peptides show low-micromolar activity against Gram-negative E. coli ATCC 25922 in colony counting assays, the wild-type disulfide array is essential for low-micromolar activity against Gram-positive S. aureus ATCC 25923. Removal of a single disulfide bond attenuates the activity observed for HD5ox against this Gram-positive bacterial strain. This observation supports the notion that the HD5ox mechanism of antibacterial action differs for Gram-negative and Gram-positive species (Wei, G.; de Leeuw, E., Pazgier, M., Yuan, W., Zou, G., Wang, J., Ericksen, B., Lu, W.-Y.; Lehrer, R. I.; Lu, W. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 29180-29192), and that the native disulfide array is a requirement for its activity against S. aureus. PMID:21861459

  17. Secretion and activation of the Serratia marcescens hemolysin by structurally defined ShlB mutants.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Avijit; Könninger, Ulrich; Selvam, Arun; Braun, Volkmar

    2014-05-01

    The ShlA hemolysin of Serratia marcescens is secreted across the outer membrane by the ShlB protein; ShlB belongs to the two-partner secretion system (type Vb), a subfamily of the Omp85 outer membrane protein assembly and secretion superfamily. During secretion, ShlA is converted from an inactive non-hemolytic form into an active hemolytic form. The structure of ShlB is predicted to consist of the N-terminal α-helix H1, followed by the two polypeptide-transport-associated domains POTRA P1 and P2, and the β-barrel of 16 β-strands. H1 is inserted into the pore of the β-barrel in the outer membrane; P1 and P2 are located in the periplasm. To obtain insights into the secretion and activation of ShlA by ShlB, we isolated ShlB mutants impaired in secretion and/or activation. The triple H1 P1 P2 mutant did not secrete ShlA. The P1 and P2 deletion derivatives secreted reduced amounts of ShlA, of which P1 showed some hemolysis, whereas P2 was inactive. Deletion of loop 6 (L6), which is conserved among exporters of the Omp85 family, compromised activation but retained low secretion. Secretion-negative mutants generated by random mutagenesis were located in loop 6. The inactive secreted ShlA derivatives were complemented in vitro to active ShlA by an N-terminal ShlA fragment (ShlA242) secreted by ShlB. Deletion of H1 did not impair secretion of hemolytic ShlA. The study defines domains of ShlB which are important for ShlA secretion and activation.

  18. A fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy for rapid isolation of high-lipid Chlamydomonas mutants.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Freeman, Elizabeth S; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in farming algae for the direct production of biofuels and valuable lipids. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the leading model system for studying lipid metabolism in green algae, but current methods for isolating mutants of this organism with a perturbed lipid content are slow and tedious. Here, we present the Chlamydomonas high-lipid sorting (CHiLiS) strategy, which enables enrichment of high-lipid mutants by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of pooled mutants stained with the lipid-sensitive dye Nile Red. This method only takes 5 weeks from mutagenesis to mutant isolation. We developed a staining protocol that allows quantification of lipid content while preserving cell viability. We improved separation of high-lipid mutants from the wild type by using each cell's chlorophyll fluorescence as an internal control. We initially demonstrated 20-fold enrichment of the known high-lipid mutant sta1 from a mixture of sta1 and wild-type cells. We then applied CHiLiS to sort thousands of high-lipid cells from a pool of about 60,000 mutants. Flow cytometry analysis of 24 individual mutants isolated by this approach revealed that about 50% showed a reproducible high-lipid phenotype. We further characterized nine of the mutants with the highest lipid content by flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry lipidomics. All mutants analyzed had a higher triacylglycerol content and perturbed whole-cell fatty acid composition. One arbitrarily chosen mutant was evaluated by microscopy, revealing larger lipid droplets than the wild type. The unprecedented throughput of CHiLiS opens the door to a systems-level understanding of green algal lipid biology by enabling genome-saturating isolation of mutants in key genes.

  19. A fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy for rapid isolation of high-lipid Chlamydomonas mutants

    PubMed Central

    Terashima, Mia; Freeman, Elizabeth S; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in farming algae for the direct production of biofuels and valuable lipids. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the leading model system for studying lipid metabolism in green algae, but current methods for isolating mutants of this organism with a perturbed lipid content are slow and tedious. Here, we present the Chlamydomonas high-lipid sorting (CHiLiS) strategy, which enables enrichment of high-lipid mutants by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of pooled mutants stained with the lipid-sensitive dye Nile Red. This method only takes 5 weeks from mutagenesis to mutant isolation. We developed a staining protocol that allows quantification of lipid content while preserving cell viability. We improved separation of high-lipid mutants from the wild type by using each cell's chlorophyll fluorescence as an internal control. We initially demonstrated 20-fold enrichment of the known high-lipid mutant sta1 from a mixture of sta1 and wild-type cells. We then applied CHiLiS to sort thousands of high-lipid cells from a pool of about 60 000 mutants. Flow cytometry analysis of 24 individual mutants isolated by this approach revealed that about 50% showed a reproducible high-lipid phenotype. We further characterized nine of the mutants with the highest lipid content by flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry lipidomics. All mutants analyzed had a higher triacylglycerol content and perturbed whole-cell fatty acid composition. One arbitrarily chosen mutant was evaluated by microscopy, revealing larger lipid droplets than the wild type. The unprecedented throughput of CHiLiS opens the door to a systems-level understanding of green algal lipid biology by enabling genome-saturating isolation of mutants in key genes. PMID:25267488

  20. A fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy for rapid isolation of high-lipid Chlamydomonas mutants.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Freeman, Elizabeth S; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in farming algae for the direct production of biofuels and valuable lipids. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the leading model system for studying lipid metabolism in green algae, but current methods for isolating mutants of this organism with a perturbed lipid content are slow and tedious. Here, we present the Chlamydomonas high-lipid sorting (CHiLiS) strategy, which enables enrichment of high-lipid mutants by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of pooled mutants stained with the lipid-sensitive dye Nile Red. This method only takes 5 weeks from mutagenesis to mutant isolation. We developed a staining protocol that allows quantification of lipid content while preserving cell viability. We improved separation of high-lipid mutants from the wild type by using each cell's chlorophyll fluorescence as an internal control. We initially demonstrated 20-fold enrichment of the known high-lipid mutant sta1 from a mixture of sta1 and wild-type cells. We then applied CHiLiS to sort thousands of high-lipid cells from a pool of about 60,000 mutants. Flow cytometry analysis of 24 individual mutants isolated by this approach revealed that about 50% showed a reproducible high-lipid phenotype. We further characterized nine of the mutants with the highest lipid content by flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry lipidomics. All mutants analyzed had a higher triacylglycerol content and perturbed whole-cell fatty acid composition. One arbitrarily chosen mutant was evaluated by microscopy, revealing larger lipid droplets than the wild type. The unprecedented throughput of CHiLiS opens the door to a systems-level understanding of green algal lipid biology by enabling genome-saturating isolation of mutants in key genes. PMID:25267488

  1. Gramicidin A Mutants with Antibiotic Activity against Both Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Joo, Yechaan; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-03-17

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have shown potential as alternatives to traditional antibiotics for fighting infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One promising example of this is gramicidin A (gA). In its wild-type sequence, gA is active by permeating the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. However, gA is toxic to human red blood cells at similar concentrations to those required for it to exert its antimicrobial effects. Installing cationic side chains into gA has been shown to lower its hemolytic activity while maintaining the antimicrobial potency. In this study, we present the synthesis and the antibiotic activity of a new series of gA mutants that display cationic side chains. Specifically, by synthesizing alkylated lysine derivatives through reductive amination, we were able to create a broad selection of structures with varied activities towards Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Importantly, some of the new mutants were observed to have an unprecedented activity towards important Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Psuedomonas aeruginosa. PMID:26918268

  2. Gramicidin A Mutants with Antibiotic Activity against Both Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Joo, Yechaan; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-03-17

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have shown potential as alternatives to traditional antibiotics for fighting infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One promising example of this is gramicidin A (gA). In its wild-type sequence, gA is active by permeating the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. However, gA is toxic to human red blood cells at similar concentrations to those required for it to exert its antimicrobial effects. Installing cationic side chains into gA has been shown to lower its hemolytic activity while maintaining the antimicrobial potency. In this study, we present the synthesis and the antibiotic activity of a new series of gA mutants that display cationic side chains. Specifically, by synthesizing alkylated lysine derivatives through reductive amination, we were able to create a broad selection of structures with varied activities towards Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Importantly, some of the new mutants were observed to have an unprecedented activity towards important Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Psuedomonas aeruginosa.

  3. Suppressor Mutations for Presenilin 1 Familial Alzheimer Disease Mutants Modulate γ-Secretase Activities.

    PubMed

    Futai, Eugene; Osawa, Satoko; Cai, Tetsuo; Fujisawa, Tomoya; Ishiura, Shoichi; Tomita, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a multisubunit membrane protein complex containing presenilin (PS1) as a catalytic subunit. Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) mutations within PS1 were analyzed in yeast cells artificially expressing membrane-bound substrate, amyloid precursor protein, or Notch fused to Gal4 transcriptional activator. The FAD mutations, L166P and G384A (Leu-166 to Pro and Gly-384 to Ala substitution, respectively), were loss-of-function in yeast. We identified five amino acid substitutions that suppress the FAD mutations. The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein or Notch was recovered by the secondary mutations. We also found that secondary mutations alone activated the γ-secretase activity. FAD mutants with suppressor mutations, L432M or S438P within TMD9 together with a missense mutation in the second or sixth loops, regained γ-secretase activity when introduced into presenilin null mouse fibroblasts. Notably, the cells with suppressor mutants produced a decreased amount of Aβ42, which is responsible for Alzheimer disease. These results indicate that the yeast system is useful to screen for mutations and chemicals that modulate γ-secretase activity.

  4. [hHO-1 structure prediction and its mutant construct, expression, purification and activity analysis].

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhen Wei; Cui, Wen Jun; Zhou, Wen Pu; Zhang, Xue Hong; Shen, Qing Xiang; Li, Yun Zhu; Yu, Shan Chang

    2004-10-01

    Human Heme Oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism reaction of heme, which directly regulates the concentration of bilirubin in human body. The mutant structure was simulated by Swiss-pdbviewer procedure, which showed that the structure of active pocket was changed distinctly after Ala25 substituted for His25 in active domain, but the mutated enzyme still binded with heme. On the basis of the results, the expression vectors, pBHO-1 and pBHO-1(M), were constructed, induced by IPTG and expressed in E. coli DH5alpha strain. The expression products were purified with 30%-60% saturation (NH4)2SO4 and Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column chromatography. The concentration of hHO-1 in 30%-60% saturation (NH4)2SO4 components and in fractions through twice column chromatography was 3.6-fold and 30-fold higher than that in initial product, respectively. The activity of wild hHO-1 (whHO-1) and mutant hHO-1 (deltahHO-1) showed that the activity of deltahHO-1 was reduced 91.21% compared with that of whHO-1. The study shows that His25 is of importance for the mechanism of hHO-1, and provides the possibility for effectively regulating the activity to exert biological function.

  5. Identification and characterization of barley mutants lacking glycine decarboxylase and carboxyl esterase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, R.; Lewis, K.; Lea, P. )

    1990-05-01

    A barley mutant has been isolated, from a selection of fifty air-sensitive seed-lines, using a standard gel stain technique which lacks carboxyl esterase activity, but has normal levels of carbonic anhydrase. In addition, two barley mutants lacking the ability to convert glycine to serine in the mitochondria, have been characterized. Both plants accumulate glycine in air and are unable to metabolize ({sup 14}C)glycine in the short-term. When ({sup 14}C)glycine was supplied over 2h LaPr 85/55 metabolized 90%, whereas the second mutant (LaPr 87/30) metabolized 10%. Results indicate that the mutation in LaPr 85/55 is almost certainly in the glycine transporter into the mitochondrion. The mutation in LaPr 87/30 has been shown, using western blotting, to be in both the P and H proteins, two of four proteins which comprise glycine decarboxylase (P, H, T and L).

  6. Increased cell surface hydrophobicity of a Serratia marcescens NS 38 mutant lacking wetting activity.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ness, R; Avrahamy, N; Matsuyama, T; Rosenberg, M

    1988-09-01

    The cell surface hydrophobicity of Serratia marcescens appears to be an important factor in its adhesion to and colonization of various interfaces. The cell surface components responsible for mediating the hydrophobicity of S. marcescens have not been completely elucidated, but may include prodigiosin and other factors. In the present report we have investigated the potential role of serratamolide, an amphipathic aminolipid present on the surfaces of certain S. marcescens strains, in modulating cell surface hydrophobicity. The hydrophobic properties of a serratamolide-producing strain (NS 38) were compared with those of a serratamolide-deficient mutant (NS 38-9) by monitoring the kinetics of adhesion to hexadecane. Serratamolide production was monitored by thin-layer chromatography and the wetting activity of washed-cell suspensions on polystyrene. Wild-type NS 38 cells were far less hydrophobic than the serratamolide-deficient mutant cells were; the removal coefficients were 48 min-1 for the mutant, as compared with only 18 min-1 for the wild type. The data suggest that the presence of serratamolide on S. marcescens cells results in a reduction in hydrophobicity, presumably by blocking hydrophobic sites on the cell surface.

  7. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function. We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.

  8. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; et al

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function.more » We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.« less

  9. Activation of Src and transformation by an RPTPα splice mutant found in human tumours

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Yao, Ling; Xu, Rongting; Wu, Huacheng; Wang, Min; White, Brian S; Shalloway, David; Zheng, Xinmin

    2011-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α (RPTPα)-mediated Src activation is required for survival of tested human colon and oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell lines. To explore whether mutated RPTPα participates in human carcinogenesis, we sequenced RPTPα cDNAs from five types of human tumours and found splice mutants in ∼30% of colon, breast, and liver tumours. RPTPα245, a mutant expressed in all three tumour types, was studied further. Although it lacks any catalytic domain, RPTPα245 expression in the tumours correlated with Src tyrosine dephosphorylation, and its expression in rodent fibroblasts activated Src by a novel mechanism. This involved RPTPα245 binding to endogenous RPTPα (eRPTPα), which decreased eRPTPα–Grb2 binding and increased eRPTPα dephosphorylation of Src without increasing non-specific eRPTPα activity. RPTPα245–eRPTPα binding was blocked by Pro210 → Leu/Pro211 → Leu mutation, consistent with the involvement of the structural ‘wedge' that contributes to eRPTPα homodimerization. RPTPα245-induced fibroblast transformation was blocked by either Src or eRPTPα RNAi, indicating that this required the dephosphorylation of Src by eRPTPα. The transformed cells were tumourigenic in nude mice, suggesting that RPTPα245-induced activation of Src in the human tumours may have contributed to carcinogenesis. PMID:21725282

  10. Truncating PREX2 mutations activate its GEF activity and alter gene expression regulation in NRAS-mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Lissanu Deribe, Yonathan; Shi, Yanxia; Rai, Kunal; Nezi, Luigi; Amin, Samir B.; Wu, Chia-Chin; Akdemir, Kadir C.; Mahdavi, Mozhdeh; Peng, Qian; Chang, Qing Edward; Hornigold, Kirsti; Arold, Stefan T.; Welch, Heidi C. E.; Garraway, Levi A.; Chin, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    PREX2 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent Rac-exchange factor 2) is a PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) binding protein that is significantly mutated in cutaneous melanoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Here, genetic and biochemical analyses were conducted to elucidate the nature and mechanistic basis of PREX2 mutation in melanoma development. By generating an inducible transgenic mouse model we showed an oncogenic role for a truncating PREX2 mutation (PREX2E824*) in vivo in the context of mutant NRAS. Using integrative cross-species gene expression analysis, we identified deregulated cell cycle and cytoskeleton organization as significantly perturbed biological pathways in PREX2 mutant tumors. Mechanistically, truncation of PREX2 activated its Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, abolished binding to PTEN and activated the PI3K (phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase)/Akt signaling pathway. We further showed that PREX2 truncating mutations or PTEN deletion induces down-regulation of the tumor suppressor and cell cycle regulator CDKN1C (also known as p57KIP2). This down-regulation occurs, at least partially, through DNA hypomethylation of a differentially methylated region in chromosome 11 that is a known regulatory region for expression of the CDKN1C gene. Together, these findings identify PREX2 as a mediator of NRAS-mutant melanoma development that acts through the PI3K/PTEN/Akt pathway to regulate gene expression of a cell cycle regulator. PMID:26884185

  11. PreCam

    SciTech Connect

    Allam, Sahar S.; Tucker, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) will be taking the next step in probing the properties of Dark Energy and in understanding the physics of cosmic acceleration. A step towards the photometric calibration of DES is to have a quick, bright survey in the DES footprint (PreCam), using a pre-production set of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) CCDs and a set of 100 mm×100 mm DES filters. The objective of the PreCam Survey is to create a network of calibrated DES grizY standard stars that will be used for DES nightly calibrations and to improve the DES global relative calibrations. Here, we describe the first year of PreCam observation, results, and photometric calibrations.

  12. Mutants of lymphotoxin-α with augmented cytotoxic activity via TNFR1 for use in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Tomohiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Narimatsu, Shogo; Ikemizu, Shinji; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Mukai, Yohei; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2013-02-01

    The cytokine lymphotoxin-α (LTα) is a promising candidate for use in cancer therapy. However, the instability of LTαin vivo and the insufficient levels of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1)-mediated bioactivity of LTα limit its therapeutic potential. Here, we created LTα mutants with increased TNFR1-mediated bioactivity by using a phage display technique. We constructed a phage library displaying lysine-deficient structural variants of LTα with randomized amino acid residues. After affinity panning, we screened three clones of lysine-deficient LTα mutant, and identified a LTα mutant with TNFR1-mediated bioactivity that was 32 times that of the wild-type LTα (wtLTα). When compared with wtLTα, the selected clone showed augmented affinity to TNFR1 due to slow dissociation rather than rapid association. In contrast, the mutant showed only 4 times the TNFR2-mediated activity of wtLTα. In addition, the LTα mutant strongly and rapidly activated caspases that induce TNFR1-mediated cell death, whereas the mutant and wtLTα activated nuclear factor-kappa B to a similar extent. Our data suggest that the kinetics of LTα binding to TNFR1 play an important role in signal transduction patterns, and a TNFR1-selective LTα mutant with augmented bioactivity would be a superior candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:23246116

  13. [Pigment accumulation and functional activity of chloroplasts in common Pisum sativum L. mutants with low chlorophyll level (chlorotica)].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 with a low content of chlorophyll were studied. The mutant 2004 has light green leaves and stem, and the mutant 2014 has yellow green leaves and stem. They accumulate approximately 80 and 50% chlorophylls of the parent form of pea Torsdag cv. The content of carotene in carotenoids of the mutant 2004 was much lower, and the accumulation of lutein and violaxanthine was increased. The accumulation of all carotenoids in the mutant 2014 decreased almost proportionally to a decrease in the chlorophyll content. The rate of CO2 evolution in mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 was established to be lower. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants was 29-30% lower as compared to the control, and in hybrid plants it was 1.5-2-fold higher. It is assumed that the increase in the activity of the night-time respiration in gas exchange of chlorotica mutants and the drop of photosynthesis lead to a decrease in biomass increment. The results obtained allow us to conclude that the mutation of chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affects the genes controlling the formation and functioning of different components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  14. Expression and characterization of glycogen synthase kinase-3 mutants and their effect on glycogen synthase activity in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Finkelman, H; Argast, G M; Foord, O; Fischer, E H; Krebs, E G

    1996-01-01

    In these studies we expressed and characterized wild-type (WT) GSK-3 (glycogen synthase kinase-3) and its mutants, and examined their physiological effect on glycogen synthase activity. The GSK-3 mutants included mutation at serine-9 either to alanine (S9A) or glutamic acid (S9E) and an inactive mutant, K85,86MA. Expression of WT and the various mutants in a cell-free system indicated that S9A and S9E exhibit increased kinase activity as compared with WT. Subsequently, 293 cells were transiently transfected with WT GSK-3 and mutants. Cells expressing the S9A mutant exhibited higher kinase activity (2.6-fold of control cells) as compared with cells expressing WT and S9E (1.8- and 2.0-fold, respectively, of control cells). Combined, these results suggest serine-9 as a key regulatory site of GSK-3 inactivation, and indicate that glutamic acid cannot mimic the function of the phosphorylated residue. The GSK-3-expressing cell system enabled us to examine whether GSK-3 can induce changes in the endogenous glycogen synthase activity. A decrease in glycogen synthase activity (50%) was observed in cells expressing the S9A mutant. Similarly, glycogen synthase activity was suppressed in cells expressing WT and the S9E mutant (20-30%, respectively). These studies indicate that activation of GSK-3 is sufficient to inhibit glycogen synthase in intact cells, and provide evidence supporting a physiological role for GSK-3 in regulating glycogen synthase and glycogen metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8816781

  15. Kinetic Characterization of High-Activity Mutants of Human Butyrylcholinesterase for Cocaine Metabolite Norcocaine

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Max; Hou, Shurong; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that cocaine produces the toxic and physiological effects through not only cocaine itself but also norcocaine formed from cocaine oxidation catalyzed by microsomal cytochrome P450 3A4 in the human liver. The catalytic parameters (kcat and KM) of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and its three mutants (i.e. the A199S/S287G/A328W/Y332G, A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/E441D, and A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutants) for norcocaine have been characterized in the present study, for the first time, in comparison with those for cocaine. Based on the obtained kinetic data, wild-type human BChE has a significantly lower catalytic activity for norcocaine (kcat = 2.8 min−1, KM = 15 μM, and kcat/KM = 1.87 × 105 M−1 min−1) compared to its catalytic activity for (−)-cocaine. The BChE mutants examined in this study have considerably improved catalytic activities against both cocaine and norcocaine compared to the wild-type enzyme. Within the enzymes examined in this study, the A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutant (CocH3) is identified as the most efficient enzyme for hydrolyzing both cocaine and norcocaine. CocH3 has a 1080-fold improved catalytic efficiency for norcocaine (kcat = 2610 min−1, KM = 13 μM, and kcat/KM = 2.01 × 108 M−1 min−1) and a 2020-fold improved catalytic efficiency for cocaine. It has been demonstrated that CocH3 as an exogenous enzyme can rapidly metabolize norcocaine, in addition to cocaine, in rats. Further kinetic modeling has suggested that CocH3 with an identical concentration as that of the endogenous BChE in human plasma can effectively eliminate both cocaine and norcocaine in a simplified kinetic model of cocaine abuse. PMID:24125115

  16. Approximated maximum adsorption of His-tagged enzyme/mutants on Ni2+-NTA for comparison of specific activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanli; Long, Gaobo; Yang, Xiaolan; Hu, Xiaolei; Feng, Yiran; Tan, Deng; Xie, Yanling; Pu, Jun; Liao, Fei

    2015-03-01

    By approximating maximum activities of six-histidine (6His)-tagged enzyme/mutants adsorbed on Ni2+-NTA-magnetic-submicron-particle (Ni2+-NTA-MSP), a facile approach was tested for comparing enzyme specific activities in cell lysates. On a fixed quantity of Ni2+-NTA-MSP, the activity of an adsorbed 6His-tagged enzyme/mutant was measured via spectrophotometry; the activity after saturation adsorption (Vs) was predicted from response curve with quantities of total proteins from the same lysate as the predictor; Vs was equivalent of specific activity for comparison. This approach required abundance of a 6His-tagged enzyme/mutant over 3% among total proteins in lysate, an accurate series of quantities of total proteins from the same lysate, the largest activity generated by enzyme occupying over 85% binding sites on Ni2+-NTA-MSP and the minimum activity as absorbance change rates of 0.003 min(-1) for analysis. The prediction of Vs tolerated errors in concentrations of total proteins in lysates and was effective to 6His-tagged alkaline phosphatase and its 6His-tagged mutant in lysates. Notably, of those two 6His-tagged enzymes, Vs was effectively approximated with just one optimized quantity of lysates. Hence, this approach with Ni2+-NTA-MSP worked for comparison of specific activities of 6His-tagged enzyme/mutants in lysates when they had sufficient abundance among proteins and activities of adsorbed enzymes were measurable.

  17. Further studies on O sub 2 -resistant photosynthesis and photorespiration in a tobacco mutant with enhanced catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zelitch, I. )

    1990-02-01

    The increase in net photosynthesis in M{sub 4} progeny of an O{sub 2}-resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutant relative to wild-type plants at 21 and 42% O{sub 2} has been confirmed and further investigated. Self-pollination of an M{sub 3} mutant produced M{sub 4} progeny segregating high catalase phenotypes (average 40% greater than wild type) at a frequency of about 60%. The high catalase phenotype cosegregated precisely with O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis. About 25% of the F{sub 1} progeny of reciprocal crosses between the same M{sub 3} mutant and wild type had high catalase activity, whether the mutant was used as the maternal or paternal parent, indicating nuclear inheritance. In high-catalase mutants the activity of NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase, another peroxisomal enzyme, was the same as wild type. The mutants released 15% less photorespiratory CO{sub 2} as a percent of net photosynthesis in CO{sub 2}-free 21% O{sub 2} and 36% less in CO{sub 2}-free 42% O{sub 2} compared with wild type. The mutant leaf tissue also released less {sup 14}CO{sub 2} per (1-{sup 14}C)glycolate metabolized than wild type in normal air, consistent with less photorespiration in the mutant. The O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis appears to be caused by a decrease in photorespiration especially under conditions of high O{sub 2} where the stoichiometry of CO{sub 2} release per glycolate metabolized is expected to be enhanced. The higher catalase activity in the mutant may decrease the nonenzymatic peroxidation of keto-acids such as hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate by photorespiratory H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  18. Rutger's CAM2000 chip architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Donald E.; Hall, J. Storrs; Miyake, Keith

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the architecture and instruction set of the Rutgers CAM2000 memory chip. The CAM2000 combines features of Associative Processing (AP), Content Addressable Memory (CAM), and Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) in a single chip package that is not only DRAM compatible but capable of applying simple massively parallel operations to memory. This document reflects the current status of the CAM2000 architecture and is continually updated to reflect the current state of the architecture and instruction set.

  19. Dynamical Network of HIV-1 Protease Mutants Reveals the Mechanism of Drug Resistance and Unhindered Activity.

    PubMed

    Appadurai, Rajeswari; Senapati, Sanjib

    2016-03-15

    HIV-1 protease variants resist drugs by active and non-active-site mutations. The active-site mutations, which are the primary or first set of mutations, hamper the stability of the enzyme and resist the drugs minimally. As a result, secondary mutations that not only increase protein stability for unhindered catalytic activity but also resist drugs very effectively arise. While the mechanism of drug resistance of the active-site mutations is through modulating the active-site pocket volume, the mechanism of drug resistance of the non-active-site mutations is unclear. Moreover, how these allosteric mutations, which are 8-21 Å distant, communicate to the active site for drug efflux is completely unexplored. Results from molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the primary mechanism of drug resistance of the secondary mutations involves opening of the flexible protease flaps. Results from both residue- and community-based network analyses reveal that this precise action of protease is accomplished by the presence of robust communication paths between the mutational sites and the functionally relevant regions: active site and flaps. While the communication is more direct in the wild type, it traverses across multiple intermediate residues in mutants, leading to weak signaling and unregulated motions of flaps. The global integrity of the protease network is, however, maintained through the neighboring residues, which exhibit high degrees of conservation, consistent with clinical data and mutagenesis studies. PMID:26892689

  20. RNase-sensitive DNA polymerase activity in cell fractions and mutants of Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.; Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Bhattachryya, J.

    1980-01-01

    RNase-sensitive DNA polymerase activity was tested in different cell fractions of Neurospora crassa cell types and its morphological mutants. This RSDP was found localized in the microsomal pellet fraction and absent in the purified nuclear pellets isolated from different N. crassa cell types: conidia, germinated conidia, and mycelia. This enzyme is capable of synthesizing a DNA product only in the presence of all four deoxyribonucleoside-5'-triphosphates and Mg/sup 2 +/. Removal of RNA from the pellet fraction by RNase strongly inhibited the DNA synthesis. The endogenous synthesis of DNA in the microsomal pellet fraction was associated with the formation of an RNA:DNA hybrid as analyzed by Cs/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ equilibrium density gradient centrifugation. The DNA product after alkali hydrolysis hybridizes with the RNA isolated from the same pellet fraction, as analyzed by elution from hydroxylapatite column at 60 C. This DNA product did not hybridize with poly(A). A few mutants tested showed this RNase-sensitive DNA polymerase activity.

  1. Injection rate control cam

    SciTech Connect

    Perr, J.P.; Liang, E.; Yu, R.C.; Ghuman, A.S.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a cam for controlling the injection rate of fuel in a fuel injection system of an engine. The fuel injection system including a cyclically operating unit injector having a body, an injector plunger mounted for reciprocating movement in the injector body between an advanced position and a retracted portion to pump into the engine during each cycle a variable quantity of fuel up to a maximum quantity under rated engine conditions, and a drive train for converting rotational movement of the cam into reciprocating movement of the pumping plunger depending on the profile of the cam. The cam profile comprises at least a plunger retraction segment and a plunger advancement segment for controlling the velocity if injector plunger retraction and advancement, respectively, the plunger advancement segment including a pre-injection subsequent shaped to cause an initial quantity of fuel to be injected into the engine during each cycle at rated engine conditions while the pre-injection subsegment is in contact with the drive train, and an injection subsegment following the pre-injection subsegment.

  2. Activation of dormant bacterial genes by Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 mutant-type RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Talà, Adelfia; Wang, Guojun; Zemanova, Martina; Okamoto, Susumu; Ochi, Kozo; Alifano, Pietro

    2009-02-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the ability of actinomycetes to produce antibiotics and other bioactive secondary metabolites has been underestimated due to the presence of cryptic gene clusters. The activation of dormant genes is therefore one of the most important areas of experimental research for the discovery of drugs in these organisms. The recent observation that several actinomycetes possess two RNA polymerase beta-chain genes (rpoB) has opened up the possibility, explored in this study, of developing a new strategy to activate dormant gene expression in bacteria. Two rpoB paralogs, rpoB(S) and rpoB(R), provide Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727 with two functionally distinct and developmentally regulated RNA polymerases. The product of rpoB(R), the expression of which increases after transition to stationary phase, is characterized by five amino acid substitutions located within or close to the so-called rifampin resistance clusters that play a key role in fundamental activities of RNA polymerase. Here, we report that rpoB(R) markedly activated antibiotic biosynthesis in the wild-type Streptomyces lividans strain 1326 and also in strain KO-421, a relaxed (rel) mutant unable to produce ppGpp. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the rpoB(R)-specific missense H426N mutation was essential for the activation of secondary metabolism. Our observations also indicated that mutant-type or duplicated, rpoB often exists in nature among rare actinomycetes and will thus provide a basis for further basic and applied research.

  3. Dynamics and Mechanism of Efficient DNA Repair Reviewed by Active-Site Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2010-06-01

    Photolyases repair the UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in damage DNA via a photoreaction which includes a series of light-driven electron transfers between the two-electron-reduced flavin cofactor FADH^- and the dimer. We report here our systematic studies of the repair dynamics in E. coli photolyase with mutation of several active-site residues. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the significant change in the forward electron transfer from the excited FADH^- to the dimer and the back electron transfer from the repaired thymines by mutation of E274A, R226A, R342A, N378S and N378C. We also found that the mutation of E274A accelerates the bond-breaking of the thymine dimer. The dynamics changes are consistent with the quantum yield study of these mutants. These results suggest that the active-site residues play a significant role, structurally and chemically, in the DNA repair photocycle.

  4. Functional reconstitution and channel activity measurements of purified wildtype and mutant CFTR protein.

    PubMed

    Eckford, Paul D W; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2015-03-09

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates.

  5. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  6. Combined inhibition of MEK and Plk1 has synergistic anti-tumor activity in NRAS mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Vujic, I; Sanlorenzo, M; Ma, J; Kim, ST; Kleffel, S; Schatton, T; Rappersberger, K; Gutteridge, R; Ahmad, N; Ortiz/Urda, S

    2015-01-01

    About one third of cancers harbor activating mutations in rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (RAS) oncogenes. In melanoma, aberrant neuroblastoma-RAS (NRAS) signaling fuels tumor progression in about 20% of patients. Current therapeutics for NRAS driven malignancies barely impact overall survival. To date, pathway interference downstream of mutant NRAS seems to be the most promising approach. In this study, data revealed that mutant NRAS induced Plk1 expression, and pharmacologic inhibition of Plk1 stabilized the size of NRAS mutant melanoma xenografts. The combination of MEK and Plk1 inhibitors resulted in a significant growth reduction of NRAS mutant melanoma cells in vitro, and regression of xenografted NRAS mutant melanoma in vivo. Independent cell cycle arrest and increased induction of apoptosis underlies the synergistic effect of this combination. Data further suggest that the p53 signaling pathway is of key importance to the observed therapeutic efficacy. This study provides in vitro, in vivo and first mechanistic data, that a MEK/Plk1 inhibitor combination might be a promising treatment approach for patients with NRAS driven melanoma. Since mutant NRAS signaling is similar across different malignancies, this inhibitor combination could also offer a previously unreported treatment modality for NRAS mutant tumors of other cell origins. PMID:26016894

  7. An ion-current mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia with defects in the primary structure and post-translational N-methylation of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen-Friedman, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    My work on pantophobiac A{sup 2} (pntA{sup 2}), a behavioral mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia, suggest that the Ca{sup ++}-binding protein calmodulin (CaM), and post-translation N-methylation of CaM, are important for Ca{sup ++}-related ion-current function. Calmodulin from wild-type Paramecium has two sites of lysine-N-methylation. Both of these sites are almost fully methylated in vivo; thus wild-type calmodulin is a poor substrate for N-methylation in vitro. In contrast, pntA/{sup 2} CaM can be heavily N-methylated in vitro, suggesting that the mutant calmodulin is under-methylated in vivo. Amino-acid composition analysis showed that CaM lysine 115 is undermethylated in pntA{sup 2}. Once pntA{sup 2} CaM is N-methylated, the (methyl-{sup 3}H) group does not turn over in either wild-type or pntA{sup 2} cytoplasmic fractions. The methylating enzymes in pntA{sup 2} high-speed supernatant fractions are active, but may be less robust than those of the wild type, suggesting a possible control of these enzymes by CaM.

  8. Selective Antitumor Activity of Ibrutinib in EGFR-Mutant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wen; Wang, Michael; Wang, Li; Lu, Haibo; Wu, Shuhong; Dai, Bingbing; Ou, Zhishuo; Zhang, Liang; Heymach, John V.; Gold, Kathryn A.; Minna, John; Roth, Jack A.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Ibrutinib, which irreversibly inhibits Bruton tyrosine kinase, was evaluated for antitumor activity in a panel of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and found to selectively inhibit growth of NSCLC cells carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, including T790M mutant and erlotinib-resistant H1975 cells. Ibrutinib induced dose-dependent inhibition of phosphor-EGFR at both Y1068 and Y1173 sites, suggesting ibrutinib functions as an EGFR inhibitor. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan–Meier estimation and log-rank test. All statistical tests were two-sided. In vivo study showed that ibrutinib statistically significantly suppressed H1975 tumor growth and prolonged survival of the tumor bearing mice (n = 5 per group). The mean survival times for solvent- and erlotinib-treated mice were both 17.8 days (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14.3 to 21.3 days), while the mean survival time for ibrutinib-treated mice was 29.8 days (95% CI = 26.0 to 33.6 days, P = .008). Our results indicate that ibrutinib could be a candidate drug for treatment of EGFR-mutant NSCLC, including erlotinib-resistant tumors. PMID:25214559

  9. Regulation of Nucleotide Metabolism by Mutant p53 Contributes to its Gain-of-Function Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kollareddy, Madhusudhan; Dimitrova, Elizabeth; Vallabhaneni, Krishna C.; Chan, Adriano; Le, Thuc; Chauhan, Krishna M.; Carrero, Zunamys I.; Ramakrishnan, Gopalakrishnan; Watabe, Kounosuke; Haupt, Ygal; Haupt, Sue; Pochampally, Radhika; Boss, Gerard R.; Romero, Damian G.; Radu, Caius G.; Martinez, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutant p53 (mtp53) is an oncogene that drives cancer cell proliferation. Here we report that mtp53 associates with the promoters of numerous nucleotide metabolism genes (NMG). Mtp53 knockdown reduces NMG expression and substantially depletes nucleotide pools, which attenuates GTP dependent protein (GTPase) activity and cell invasion. Addition of exogenous guanosine or GTP restores the invasiveness of mtp53 knockdown cells, suggesting that mtp53 promotes invasion by increasing GTP. Additionally, mtp53 creates a dependency on the nucleoside salvage pathway enzyme deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) for the maintenance of a proper balance in dNTP pools required for proliferation. These data indicate that mtp53 harboring cells have acquired a synthetic sick or lethal phenotype relationship with the nucleoside salvage pathway. Finally, elevated expression of NMG correlates with mutant p53 status and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Thus, mtp53’s control of nucleotide biosynthesis has both a driving and sustaining role in cancer development. PMID:26067754

  10. A Kluyveromyces marxianus 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutant with enhanced activity of xylose utilization.

    PubMed

    Suprayogi, Suprayogi; Nguyen, Minh T; Lertwattanasakul, Noppon; Rodrussamee, Nadchanok; Limtong, Savitree; Kosaka, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Mamoru

    2015-12-01

    Thermotolerant ethanologenic yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus is capable of fermenting various sugars including xylose but glucose represses to hamper the utilization of other sugars. To acquire glucose repression-defective strains, 33 isolates as 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG)-resistant mutants were acquired from about 100 colonies grown on plates containing 2-DOG, which were derived from an efficient strain DMKU 3-1042. According to the characteristics of sugar consumption abilities and cell growth and ethanol accumulation along with cultivation time, they were classified into three groups. The first group (3 isolates) utilized glucose and xylose in similar patterns along with cultivation to those of the parental strain, presumably due to reduction of the uptake of 2-DOG or enhancement of its export. The second group (29 isolates) showed greatly delayed utilization of glucose, presumably by reduction of the uptake or initial catabolism of glucose. The last group, only one isolate, showed enhanced utilization ability of xylose in the presence of glucose. Further analysis revealed that the isolate had a single nucleotide mutation to cause amino acid substitution (G270S) in RAG5 encoding hexokinase and exhibited very low activity of the enzyme. The possible mechanism of defectiveness of glucose repression in the mutant is discussed in this paper. [Int Microbiol 18(4):235-244 (2015)]. PMID:27611676

  11. Absence of cell-surface EpCAM in congenital tufting enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Ulrike; Kuipers, Jeroen; Mueller, James L.; Veenstra-Algra, Anneke; Sivagnanam, Mamata; Giepmans, Ben N.G.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM; CD326) gene are causal for congenital tufting enteropathy (CTE), a disease characterized by intestinal abnormalities resulting in lethal diarrhea in newborns. Why the different mutations all lead to the same disease is not clear. Here, we report that most mutations, including a novel intronic variant, will result in lack of EpCAM's transmembrane domain, whereas two mutations allow transmembrane localization. We find that these mutants are not routed to the plasma membrane, and that truncated mutants are secreted or degraded. Thus, all epcam mutations lead to loss of cell-surface EpCAM, resulting in CTE. PMID:23462293

  12. Partial Agonist and Antagonist Activities of a Mutant Scorpion β-Toxin on Sodium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Karbat, Izhar; Ilan, Nitza; Zhang, Joel Z.; Cohen, Lior; Kahn, Roy; Benveniste, Morris; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion β-toxin 4 from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css4) enhances the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels through a voltage sensor trapping mechanism by binding the activated state of the voltage sensor in domain II and stabilizing it in its activated conformation. Here we describe the antagonist and partial agonist properties of a mutant derivative of this toxin. Substitution of seven different amino acid residues for Glu15 in Css4 yielded toxin derivatives with both increased and decreased affinities for binding to neurotoxin receptor site 4 on sodium channels. Css4E15R is unique among this set of mutants in that it retained nearly normal binding affinity but lost its functional activity for modification of sodium channel gating in our standard electrophysiological assay for voltage sensor trapping. More detailed analysis of the functional effects of Css4E15R revealed weak voltage sensor trapping activity, which was very rapidly reversed upon repolarization and therefore was not observed in our standard assay of toxin effects. This partial agonist activity of Css4E15R is observed clearly in voltage sensor trapping assays with brief (5 ms) repolarization between the conditioning prepulse and the test pulse. The effects of Css4E15R are fit well by a three-step model of toxin action involving concentration-dependent toxin binding to its receptor site followed by depolarization-dependent activation of the voltage sensor and subsequent voltage sensor trapping. Because it is a partial agonist with much reduced efficacy for voltage sensor trapping, Css4E15R can antagonize the effects of wild-type Css4 on sodium channel activation and can prevent paralysis by Css4 when injected into mice. Our results define the first partial agonist and antagonist activities for scorpion toxins and open new avenues of research toward better understanding of the structure-function relationships for toxin action on sodium channel voltage sensors and toward potential toxin

  13. Nitrate reductase activity in heme-deficient mutants of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, K A; Lascelles, J

    1976-01-01

    Mutants H-14 and H-18 of Staphylococcus aureus require hemin for growth on glycerol and other nonfermentable substrates. H-14 also responds to delta-aminolevulinate. Heme-deficient cells grown in the presence of nitrate do not have lactate-nitrate reductase activity but gain this activity when incubated with hemin in buffer and glucose. Lactate-nitrate reductase activity is also restored to the membrane fraction from such cells by incubation with hemin and dithiothreitol; addition of adenosine 5'-triphosphate has no effect upon the restoration. Cells grown with nitrate in the absence of hemin have two to five times more reduced benzyl viologen-nitrate reductase activity than do those grown with hemin. The activity increases throughout the growth period in the absence of hemin, but with hemin present enzyme formation ceases before the end of growth. There was no evidence of enzyme destruction. The distribution of nitrate reductase activity between membrane and cytoplasm was similar in cells grown with and without hemin; 70 to 90% was in the cytoplasm. It is concluded that heme-deficient staphylococci form apo-cytochrome b, which readily combines in vitro with its prosthetic group to restore normal function. The avaliability of the heme prosthetic group influences the formation of nitrate reductase. PMID:1262303

  14. Kinetic characterization of high-activity mutants of human butyrylcholinesterase for the cocaine metabolite norcocaine.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Max; Hou, Shurong; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang

    2014-01-01

    It has been known that cocaine produces its toxic and physiological effects through not only cocaine itself, but also norcocaine formed from cocaine oxidation catalysed by microsomal CYP (cytochrome P450) 3A4 in the human liver. The catalytic parameters (kcat and Km) of human BChE (butyrylcholinesterase) and its three mutants (i.e. A199S/S287G/A328W/Y332G, A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/E441D and A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G) for norcocaine have been characterized in the present study for the first time and compared with those for cocaine. On the basis of the obtained kinetic data, wild-type human BChE has a significantly lower catalytic activity for norcocaine (kcat=2.8 min(-1), Km=15 μM and kcat/Km=1.87 × 10(5) M(-1)·min(-1)) compared with its catalytic activity for (-)-cocaine. The BChE mutants examined in the present study have considerably improved catalytic activities against both cocaine and norcocaine compared with the wild-type enzyme. Within the enzymes examined in the present study, the A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G mutant (CocH3) is identified as the most efficient enzyme for hydrolysing both cocaine and norcocaine. CocH3 has a 1080-fold improved catalytic efficiency for norcocaine (kcat=2610 min(-1), Km=13 μM and kcat/Km=2.01 × 10(8) M(-1)·min(-1)) and a 2020-fold improved catalytic efficiency for cocaine. It has been demonstrated that CocH3 as an exogenous enzyme can rapidly metabolize norcocaine, in addition to cocaine, in rats. Further kinetic modelling has suggested that CocH3 with an identical concentration with that of the endogenous BChE in human plasma can effectively eliminate both cocaine and norcocaine in a simplified kinetic model of cocaine abuse.

  15. RAI1 Transcription Factor Activity Is Impaired in Mutants Associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Canales, Cesar P.; Cao, Lei; Perez, Irene C.; Srivastava, Anand K.; Young, Juan I.; Walz, Katherina

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Magenis Syndrome (SMS) is a complex genomic disorder mostly caused by the haploinsufficiency of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1), located in the chromosomal region 17p11.2. In a subset of SMS patients, heterozygous mutations in RAI1 are found. Here we investigate the molecular properties of these mutated forms and their relationship with the resulting phenotype. We compared the clinical phenotype of SMS patients carrying a mutation in RAI1 coding region either in the N-terminal or the C-terminal half of the protein and no significant differences were found. In order to study the molecular mechanism related to these two groups of RAI1 mutations first we analyzed those mutations that result in the truncated protein corresponding to the N-terminal half of RAI1 finding that they have cytoplasmic localization (in contrast to full length RAI1) and no ability to activate the transcription through an endogenous target: the BDNF enhancer. Similar results were found in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a SMS patient carrying RAI1 c.3103insC, where both mutant and wild type products of RAI1 were detected. The wild type form of RAI1 was found in the chromatin bound and nuclear matrix subcellular fractions while the mutant product was mainly cytoplasmic. In addition, missense mutations at the C-terminal half of RAI1 presented a correct nuclear localization but no activation of the endogenous target. Our results showed for the first time a correlation between RAI1 mutations and abnormal protein function plus they suggest that a reduction of total RAI1 transcription factor activity is at the heart of the SMS clinical presentation. PMID:23028815

  16. Arabidopsis lonely guy (LOG) multiple mutants reveal a central role of the LOG-dependent pathway in cytokinin activation.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Hiroki; Kojima, Mikiko; Kuroha, Takeshi; Ishida, Takashi; Sugimoto, Keiko; Kiba, Takatoshi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Cytokinins are phytohormones that play key roles in the maintenance of stem cell activity in plants. Although alternative single-step and two-step activation pathways for cytokinin have been proposed, the significance of the single-step pathway which is catalyzed by LONELY GUY (LOG), is not fully understood. We analyzed the metabolic flow of cytokinin activation in Arabidopsis log multiple mutants using stable isotope-labeled tracers and characterized the mutants' morphological and developmental phenotypes. In tracer experiments, cytokinin activation was inhibited most pronouncedly by log7, while the other log mutations had cumulative effects. Although sextuple or lower-order mutants did not show drastic phenotypes in vegetative growth, the log1log2log3log4log5log7log8 septuple T-DNA insertion mutant in which the LOG-dependent pathway is impaired, displayed severe retardation of shoot and root growth with defects in the maintenance of the apical meristems. Detailed observation of the mutants showed that LOG7 was required for the maintenance of shoot apical meristem size. LOG7 was also suggested to play a role for normal primary root growth together with LOG3 and LOG4. These results suggest a dominant role of the single-step activation pathway mediated by LOGs for cytokinin production, and overlapping but differentiated functions of the members of the LOG gene family in growth and development.

  17. Next Generation CAD/CAM/CAE Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This document contains presentations from the joint UVA/NASA Workshop on Next Generation CAD/CAM/CAE Systems held at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia on March 18-19, 1997. The presentations focused on current capabilities and future directions of CAD/CAM/CAE systems, aerospace industry projects, and university activities related to simulation-based design. Workshop attendees represented NASA, commercial software developers, the aerospace industry, government labs, and academia. The workshop objectives were to assess the potential of emerging CAD/CAM/CAE technology for use in intelligent simulation-based design and to provide guidelines for focused future research leading to effective use of CAE systems for simulating the entire life cycle of aerospace systems.

  18. Mechanism of Epac activation: structural and functional analyses of Epac2 hinge mutants with constitutive and reduced activities.

    PubMed

    Tsalkova, Tamara; Blumenthal, Donald K; Mei, Fang C; White, Mark A; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2009-08-28

    Epac2 is a member of the family of exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac). Our previous studies suggest a model of Epac activation in which cAMP binding to the enzyme induces a localized "hinge" motion that reorients the regulatory lobe relative to the catalytic lobe without inducing large conformational changes within individual lobes. In this study, we identified the location of the major hinge in Epac2 by normal mode motion correlation and structural alignment analyses. Targeted mutagenesis was then performed to test the functional importance of hinge bending for Epac activation. We show that substitution of the conserved residue phenylalanine 435 with glycine (F435G) facilitates the hinge bending and leads to a constitutively active Epac2 capable of stimulating nucleotide exchange in the absence of cAMP. In contrast, substitution of the same residue with a bulkier side chain, tryptophan (F435W), impedes the hinge motion and results in a dramatic decrease in Epac2 catalytic activity. Structural parameters determined by small angle x-ray scattering further reveal that whereas the F435G mutant assumes a more extended conformation in the absence of cAMP, the F435W mutant is incapable of adopting the fully extended and active conformation in the presence of cAMP. These findings demonstrate the importance of hinge motion in Epac activation. Our study also suggests that phenylalanine at position 435 is the optimal size side chain to keep Epac closed and inactive in the absence of cAMP while still allowing the proper hinge motion for full Epac extension and activation in the presence of cAMP.

  19. Photosystem II Activity of Wild Type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Its Mutants with Different Plastoquinone Pool Redox States.

    PubMed

    Voloshina, O V; Bolychevtseva, Y V; Kuzminov, F I; Gorbunov, M Y; Elanskaya, I V; Fadeev, V V

    2016-08-01

    To assess the role of redox state of photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side electron carriers in PSII photochemical activity, we studied sub-millisecond fluorescence kinetics of the wild type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its mutants with natural variability in the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. In cyanobacteria, dark adaptation tends to reduce PQ pool and induce a shift of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus to State 2, whereas illumination oxidizes PQ pool, leading to State 1 (Mullineaux, C. W., and Holzwarth, A. R. (1990) FEBS Lett., 260, 245-248). We show here that dark-adapted Ox(-) mutant with naturally reduced PQ is characterized by slower QA(-) reoxidation and O2 evolution rates, as well as lower quantum yield of PSII primary photochemical reactions (Fv/Fm) as compared to the wild type and SDH(-) mutant, in which the PQ pool remains oxidized in the dark. These results indicate a large portion of photochemically inactive PSII reaction centers in the Ox(-) mutant after dark adaptation. While light adaptation increases Fv/Fm in all tested strains, indicating PSII activation, by far the greatest increase in Fv/Fm and O2 evolution rates is observed in the Ox(-) mutant. Continuous illumination of Ox(-) mutant cells with low-intensity blue light, that accelerates QA(-) reoxidation, also increases Fv/Fm and PSII functional absorption cross-section (590 nm); this effect is almost absent in the wild type and SDH(-) mutant. We believe that these changes are caused by the reorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus during transition from State 2 to State 1. We propose that two processes affect the PSII activity during changes of light conditions: 1) reversible inactivation of PSII, which is associated with the reduction of electron carriers on the PSII acceptor side in the dark, and 2) PSII activation under low light related to the increase in functional absorption cross-section at 590 nm.

  20. Photosystem II Activity of Wild Type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Its Mutants with Different Plastoquinone Pool Redox States.

    PubMed

    Voloshina, O V; Bolychevtseva, Y V; Kuzminov, F I; Gorbunov, M Y; Elanskaya, I V; Fadeev, V V

    2016-08-01

    To assess the role of redox state of photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side electron carriers in PSII photochemical activity, we studied sub-millisecond fluorescence kinetics of the wild type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its mutants with natural variability in the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. In cyanobacteria, dark adaptation tends to reduce PQ pool and induce a shift of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus to State 2, whereas illumination oxidizes PQ pool, leading to State 1 (Mullineaux, C. W., and Holzwarth, A. R. (1990) FEBS Lett., 260, 245-248). We show here that dark-adapted Ox(-) mutant with naturally reduced PQ is characterized by slower QA(-) reoxidation and O2 evolution rates, as well as lower quantum yield of PSII primary photochemical reactions (Fv/Fm) as compared to the wild type and SDH(-) mutant, in which the PQ pool remains oxidized in the dark. These results indicate a large portion of photochemically inactive PSII reaction centers in the Ox(-) mutant after dark adaptation. While light adaptation increases Fv/Fm in all tested strains, indicating PSII activation, by far the greatest increase in Fv/Fm and O2 evolution rates is observed in the Ox(-) mutant. Continuous illumination of Ox(-) mutant cells with low-intensity blue light, that accelerates QA(-) reoxidation, also increases Fv/Fm and PSII functional absorption cross-section (590 nm); this effect is almost absent in the wild type and SDH(-) mutant. We believe that these changes are caused by the reorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus during transition from State 2 to State 1. We propose that two processes affect the PSII activity during changes of light conditions: 1) reversible inactivation of PSII, which is associated with the reduction of electron carriers on the PSII acceptor side in the dark, and 2) PSII activation under low light related to the increase in functional absorption cross-section at 590 nm. PMID:27677553

  1. Roller Cam Positioners

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Gordon B.

    2010-12-07

    Roller Cam Positioners could support the LCLS undulator sections allowing micron sized alignment adjustment of each undulator in 5 degrees of freedom. The supports are kinematic with the number of degrees of freedom matched to the number of constraints. Ton loads are supported on simple ball bearings. Motion is intrinsically bounded. Positioning mechanisms are based on pure rolling motion with sub-micron hysteresis and micron resolution. This note describes a general purpose positioning mechanism suitable for undulator support.

  2. Enzymatic activity of poliovirus RNA polymerase mutants with single amino acid changes in the conserved YGDD amino acid motif.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, S A; Luo, M; Morrow, C D

    1991-09-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases contain a highly conserved region of amino acids with a core segment composed of the amino acids YGDD which have been hypothesized to be at or near the catalytic active site of the molecule. Six mutations in this conserved YGDD region of the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were made by using oligonucleotide site-directed DNA mutagenesis of the poliovirus cDNA to substitute A, C, M, P, S, or V for the amino acid G. The mutant polymerase genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified RNA polymerases were tested for in vitro enzyme activity. Two of the mutant RNA polymerases (those in which the glycine residue was replaced with alanine or serine) exhibited in vitro enzymatic activity ranging from 5 to 20% of wild-type activity, while the remaining mutant RNA polymerases were inactive. Alterations in the in vitro reaction conditions by modification of temperature, metal ion concentration, or pH resulted in no significant differences in the activities of the mutant RNA polymerases relative to that of the wild-type enzyme. An antipeptide antibody directed against the wild-type core amino acid segment containing the YGDD region of the poliovirus polymerase reacted with the wild-type recombinant RNA polymerase and to a limited extent with the two enzymatically active mutant polymerases; the antipeptide antibody did not react with the mutant RNA polymerases which did not have in vitro enzyme activity. These results are discussed in the context of secondary-structure predictions for the core segment containing the conserved YGDD amino acids in the poliovirus RNA polymerase. PMID:1651402

  3. A cyclic AMP receptor protein mutant that constitutively activates an Escherichia coli promoter disrupted by an IS5 insertion.

    PubMed

    Podolny, V; Lin, E C; Hochschild, A

    1999-12-01

    Previously an Escherichia coli mutant that had acquired the ability to grow on propanediol as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated. This phenotype is the result of the constitutive expression of the fucO gene (in the fucAO operon), which encodes one of the enzymes in the fucose metabolic pathway. The mutant was found to bear an IS5 insertion in the intergenic regulatory region between the divergently oriented fucAO and fucPIK operons. Though expression of the fucAO operon was constitutive, the fucPIK operon became noninducible such that the mutant could no longer grow on fucose. A fucose-positive revertant which was found to contain a suppressor mutation in the crp gene was selected. Here we identify this crp mutation, which results in a single amino acid substitution (K52N) that has been proposed previously to uncover a cryptic activating region in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). We show that the mutant CRP constitutively activates transcription from both the IS5-disrupted and the wild-type fucPIK promoters, and we identify the CRP-binding site that is required for this activity. Our results show that the fucPIK promoter, a complex promoter which ordinarily depends on both CRP and the fucose-specific regulator FucR for its activation, can be activated in the absence of FucR by a mutant CRP that uses three, rather than two, activating regions to contact RNA polymerase. For the IS5-disrupted promoter, which retains a single CRP-binding site, the additional activating region of the mutant CRP evidently compensates for the lack of upstream regulatory sequences. PMID:10601201

  4. Telomerase reactivation in cancers: Mechanisms that govern transcriptional activation of the wild-type vs. mutant TERT promoters.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghui; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2016-03-14

    Transcriptional activation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene is a rate-limiting determinant in the reactivation of telomerase expression in cancers. TERT promoter mutations represent one of the fundamental mechanisms of TERT reactivation in cancer development. We review recent studies that elucidate the molecular mechanisms underscoring activation of mutant TERT promoters.

  5. Isolation and characterization of Clostridium acetobutylicum mutants with enhanced amylolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Annous, B.A.; Blascheck, H.P. )

    1991-09-01

    Several schemes have been proposed for the fermentative production of butanol from various low-cost substrates. One of these economically viable approaches depends on use of a stable, high-yielding strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum, low-cost corn substrate and an increased market for butanol. Results from various laboratories suggested that amylolytic enzyme biosynthesis in C. acetobutylicum is subject to catabolite repression by glucose and induction by starch. In this study Clostridium acetobutylicum mutants BA 101 (hyperamylolytic) and BA 105 (catabolite derepressed) were isolated by using N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine together with selective enrichment on the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose. Amylolytic enzyme production by C. acetobutylicum BA 101 was 1.8- and 2.5-fold higher than that of the ATCC 824 strain grown in starch and glucose, respectively. C. acetobutylicum BA 105 produced 6.5-fold more amylolytic activity on glucose relative to that of the wild-type strain. The addition of glucose at time zero to starch-based P2 medium reduced the total amylolytic activities of C. acetobutylicum BA 101 and BA 105 and 82 and 25%, respectively, as compared with the activities of the same strains grown on starch alone. Localization studies demonstrated that the amylolytic activities of C. acetobutylicum BA 101 and BA 105 were primarily extracellular on all carbohydrates tested.

  6. Altered chloroplast structure and function in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity have altered chloroplast membrane lipid composition. This caused an increase in the number of regions of appressed membrane per chloroplast and a decrease in the average number of thylakoid membranes in the appressed regions. The net effect was a significant decrease in the ratio of appressed to nonappressed membranes. A comparison of 77 K fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoid membranes from the mutant and wild type indicated that the ultrastructural changes were associated with an altered distribution of excitation energy transfer from antenna chlorophyll to photosystem II and photosystem I in the mutant. The changes in leaf lipid composition did not significantly affect growth or development of the mutant under standard conditions. However, at temperatures above 28{degree}C the mutant grew slightly more rapidly than the wild type, and measurements of temperature-induced fluorescence yield enhancement suggested an increased thermal stability of the photosynthetic apparatus of the mutant. These effects are consistent with other evidence suggesting that membrane lipid composition is an important determinant of chloroplast structure but has relatively minor direct effects on the function of the membrane proteins associated with photosynthetic electron transport.

  7. RhoGEF Specificity Mutants Implicate RhoA as a Target for Dbs Transforming Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li; Rossman, Kent L.; Mahon, Gwendolyn M.; Worthylake, David K.; Korus, Malgorzata; Sondek, John; Whitehead, Ian P.

    2002-01-01

    Dbs is a Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) that exhibits transforming activity when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Like many RhoGEFs, the in vitro catalytic activity of Dbs is not limited to a single substrate. It can catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP on RhoA and Cdc42, both of which are expressed in most cell types. This lack of substrate specificity, which is relatively common among members of the RhoGEF family, complicates efforts to determine the molecular basis of their transforming activity. We have recently determined crystal structures of several RhoGEFs bound to their cognate GTPases and have used these complexes to predict structural determinants dictating the specificities of coupling between RhoGEFs and GTPases. Guided by this information, we mutated Dbs to alter significantly its relative exchange activity for RhoA versus Cdc42 and show that the transformation potential of Dbs correlates with exchange on RhoA but not Cdc42. Supporting this conclusion, oncogenic Dbs activates endogenous RhoA but not endogenous Cdc42 in NIH 3T3 cells. Similarly, a competitive inhibitor that blocks RhoA activation also blocks Dbs-mediated transformation. In conclusion, this study highlights the usefulness of specificity mutants of RhoGEFs as tools to genetically dissect the multiple signaling pathways potentially activated by overexpressed or oncogenic RhoGEFs. These ideas are exemplified for Dbs, which is strongly implicated in the transformation of NIH 3T3 cells via RhoA and not Cdc42. PMID:12215546

  8. Cam impingement of the hip: a risk factor for hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Agricola, Rintje; Waarsing, Jan H; Arden, Nigel K; Carr, Andrew J; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Thomas, Geraint E; Weinans, Harrie; Glyn-Jones, Sion

    2013-10-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is characterized by abnormal contact between the proximal femur and the acetabulum. Two subtypes have been described: pincer impingement, caused by an overcovered acetabulum; and cam impingement, which occurs as a result of an aspherical femoral head (cam abnormality). A strong correlation exists between cam impingement and the subsequent development of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Major cam abnormalities confer a high risk of OA. However, the association between cam abnormalities and the pathology of OA has been difficult to compare between studies, as different methods have been used to define the abnormality. Cam abnormalities are acquired during skeletal growth and could be influenced by high impact sporting activities. Preventative treatments aiming to reduce the incidence of cam abnormalities and subsequent OA could, therefore, be developed. In this Perspective, we discuss the current understanding of FAI, focusing on cam abnormalities and their association with OA.

  9. SWI/SNF mutant cancers depend upon catalytic and non–catalytic activity of EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kimberly H.; Kim, Woojin; Howard, Thomas P.; Vazquez, Francisca; Tsherniak, Aviad; Wu, Jennifer N.; Wang, Weishan; Haswell, Jeffrey R.; Walensky, Loren D.; Hahn, William C.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Roberts, Charles W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cancer genome sequencing has recently revealed that genes encoding subunits of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes are frequently mutated across a wide variety of cancers, and several subunits of the complex have been shown to have bona fide tumor suppressor activity1. However, whether mutations in SWI/SNF subunits result in shared dependencies is unknown. Here we show that EZH2, a catalytic subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is essential in all tested cancer cell lines and xenografts harboring mutations of the SWI/SNF subunits ARID1A, PBRM1, and SMARCA4, which are several of the most frequently mutated SWI/SNF subunits in human cancer but that co–occurrence of a Ras pathway mutation correlates with abrogation of this dependence. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that SWI/SNF mutant cancer cells are primarily dependent upon a non–catalytic role of EZH2 in stabilization of the PRC2 complex, and only partially dependent on EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity. These results not only reveal a shared dependency of cancers with genetic alterations in SWI/SNF subunits, but also suggest that EZH2 enzymatic inhibitors now in clinical development may not fully suppress the oncogenic activity of EZH2. PMID:26552009

  10. Balance between synaptic versus extrasynaptic NMDA receptor activity influences inclusions and neurotoxicity of mutant huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Shu-ichi; Pouladi, Mahmoud A.; Talantova, Maria; Yao, Dongdong; Xia, Peng; Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E.; Zaidi, Rameez; Clemente, Arjay; Kaul, Marcus; Graham, Rona K.; Zhang, Dongxian; Chen, H.-S. Vincent; Tong, Gary; Hayden, Michael R.; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2009-01-01

    The neurodegenerative disorder Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene, resulting in loss of striatal and cortical neurons. Although, the gene product is widely expressed, it remains unclear why neurons are selectively targeted. Here, we demonstrate the relationship between synaptic and extrasynaptic activity, inclusion formation of mutant huntingtin protein (mtHtt), and neuronal survival. Synaptic NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activity induces mtHtt inclusions via a TCP1 ring complex (TRiC)-dependent mechanism, rendering neurons more resistant to mtHtt-mediated cell death. In contrast, stimulation of extrasynaptic NMDARs increases vulnerability of mtHtt-neurons to cell death by impairing a neuroprotective CREB—PGC-1α cascade and increasing the small guanine nucleotide-binding protein Rhes, which is known to sumoylate and disaggregate mtHtt. Treatment of transgenic YAC128 HD mice with low-dose memantine blocks extrasynaptic (but not synaptic) NMDARs and ameliorates neuropathological and behavioral manifestations. By contrast, high-dose memantine also blocks synaptic NMDAR activity, decreases neuronal inclusions, and worsens these outcomes. Our findings offer a rational therapeutic approach for protecting susceptible neurons in HD. PMID:19915593

  11. SWI/SNF-mutant cancers depend on catalytic and non-catalytic activity of EZH2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kimberly H; Kim, Woojin; Howard, Thomas P; Vazquez, Francisca; Tsherniak, Aviad; Wu, Jennifer N; Wang, Weishan; Haswell, Jeffrey R; Walensky, Loren D; Hahn, William C; Orkin, Stuart H; Roberts, Charles W M

    2015-12-01

    Human cancer genome sequencing has recently revealed that genes that encode subunits of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes are frequently mutated across a wide variety of cancers, and several subunits of the complex have been shown to have bona fide tumor suppressor activity. However, whether mutations in SWI/SNF subunits result in shared dependencies is unknown. Here we show that EZH2, a catalytic subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is essential in all tested cancer cell lines and xenografts harboring mutations of the SWI/SNF subunits ARID1A, PBRM1, and SMARCA4, which are several of the most frequently mutated SWI/SNF subunits in human cancer, but that co-occurrence of a Ras pathway mutation is correlated with abrogation of this dependence. Notably, we demonstrate that SWI/SNF-mutant cancer cells are primarily dependent on a non-catalytic role of EZH2 in the stabilization of the PRC2 complex, and that they are only partially dependent on EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity. These results not only reveal a shared dependency of cancers with genetic alterations in SWI/SNF subunits, but also suggest that EZH2 enzymatic inhibitors now in clinical development may not fully suppress the oncogenic activity of EZH2.

  12. Transcriptional activation by TFIIB mutants that are severely impaired in interaction with promoter DNA and acidic activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, S; Struhl, K

    1997-01-01

    Biochemical experiments indicate that the general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) can interact directly with acidic activation domains and that activators can stimulate transcription by increasing recruitment of TFIIB to promoters. For promoters at which recruitment of TFIIB to promoters is limiting in vivo, one would predict that transcriptional activity should be particularly sensitive to TFIIB mutations that decrease the association of TFIIB with promoter DNA and/or with activation domains; i.e., such TFIIB mutations should exacerbate a limiting step that occurs in wild-type cells. Here, we describe mutations on the DNA-binding surface of TFIIB that severely affect both TATA-binding protein (TBP)-TFIIB-TATA complex formation and interaction with the VP16 activation domain in vitro. These TFIIB mutations affect the stability of the TBP-TFIIB-TATA complex in vivo because they are synthetically lethal in combination with TBP mutants impaired for TFIIB binding. Interestingly, these TFIIB derivatives support viability, and they efficiently respond to Gal4-VP16 and natural acidic activators in different promoter contexts. These results suggest that in vivo, recruitment of TFIIB is not generally a limiting step for acidic activators. However, one TFIIB derivative shows reduced transcription of GAL4, suggesting that TFIIB may be limiting at a subset of promoters in vivo. PMID:9372910

  13. Activated mutant of Galpha(12) enhances the hyperosmotic stress response of NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Dermott, J M; Wadsworth, S J; van Rossum, G D; Dhanasekaran, N

    2001-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G protein G12 stimulates diverse physiological responses including the activities of Na+/H+ exchangers and Jun kinases. We have observed that the expression of the constitutively activated, GTPase-deficient mutant of Galpha(12) (Galpha(12)QL) accelerates the hyperosmotic response of NIH3T3 cells as monitored by the hyperosmotic stress-stimulated activity of JNK1. The accelerated response appears to be partly due to the increased basal activity of JNK since cell lines-such as NIH3T3 cells expressing JNK1-in which JNK activity is elevated, show a similar response. NIH3T3 cells expressing Galpha(12)QL also display heightened sensitivity to hyperosmotic stress. This is in contrast to JNK1-NIH3T3 cells that failed to enhance sensitivity although they do exhibit an accelerated hyperosmotic response. Reasoning that the increased sensitivity seen in Galpha(12)QL cells is due to a signaling component other than JNK, the effect of dimethyamiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchanger in this response, was assessed. Treatment of vector control NIH3T3 cells with 50 microM dimethylamiloride potently inhibited their hyperosmotic response whereas the response was only partially inhibited in Galpha(12)QL-NIH3T3 cells. These results, for the first time, identify that NHEs are upstream of the JNK module in the hyperosmotic stress-signaling pathway and that Galpha(12) can enhance this response by modulating either or both of these components namely, JNKs and NHEs in NIH3T3 cells. PMID:11180393

  14. Membrane translocation of TRPC6 channels and endothelial migration are regulated by calmodulin and PI3 kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Rosenbaum, Michael A.; Sinharoy, Pritam; Damron, Derek S.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Graham, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation products, including lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), activate canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) channels leading to inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) migration in vitro and delayed EC healing of arterial injuries in vivo. The precise mechanism through which lysoPC activates TRPC6 channels is not known, but calmodulin (CaM) contributes to the regulation of TRPC channels. Using site-directed mutagenesis, cDNAs were generated in which Tyr99 or Tyr138 of CaM was replaced with Phe, generating mutant CaM, Phe99-CaM, or Phe138-CaM, respectively. In ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe99-CaM, but not in ECs transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe138-CaM, the lysoPC-induced TRPC6-CaM dissociation and TRPC6 externalization was disrupted. Also, the lysoPC-induced increase in intracellular calcium concentration was inhibited in ECs transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-myc-His-Phe99-CaM. Blocking phosphorylation of CaM at Tyr99 also reduced CaM association with the p85 subunit and subsequent activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). This prevented the increase in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and the translocation of TRPC6 to the cell membrane and reduced the inhibition of EC migration by lysoPC. These findings suggest that lysoPC induces CaM phosphorylation at Tyr99 by a Src family kinase and that phosphorylated CaM activates PI3K to produce PIP3, which promotes TRPC6 translocation to the cell membrane. PMID:26858457

  15. Two types of RAS mutants that dominantly interfere with activators of RAS.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, V; Wei, W; Ballester, R; Camonis, J; Mi, S; Van Aelst, L; Wigler, M; Broek, D

    1994-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ras1 regulates both sexual development (conjugation and sporulation) and cellular morphology. Two types of dominant interfering mutants were isolated in a genetic screen for ras1 mutants that blocked sexual development. The first type of mutation, at Ser-22, analogous to the H-rasAsn-17 mutant (L. A. Feig and G. M. Cooper, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:3235-3243, 1988), blocked only conjugation, whereas a second type of mutation, at Asp-62, interfered with conjugation, sporulation, and cellular morphology. Analogous mutations at position 64 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAS2 or position 57 of human H-ras also resulted in dominant interfering mutants that interfered specifically and more profoundly than mutants of the first type with RAS-associated pathways in both S. pombe or S. cerevisiae. Genetic evidence indicating that both types of interfering mutants function upstream of RAS is provided. Biochemical evidence showing that the mutants are altered in their interaction with the CDC25 class of exchange factors is presented. We show that both H-rasAsn-17 and H-rasTyr-57, compared with wild-type H-ras, are defective in their guanine nucleotide-dependent release from human cdc25 and that this defect is more severe for the H-rasTyr-57 mutant. Such a defect would allow the interfering mutants to remain bound to, thereby sequestering RAS exchange factors. The more severe interference phenotype of this novel interfering mutant suggests that it functions by titrating out other positive regulators of RAS besides those encoded by ste6 and CDC25. Images PMID:8196614

  16. Cam drive internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Vadnjal, I.

    1993-06-01

    A cam drive internal combustion engine is described, comprising, a cylindrical crank case housing, and an axle co-axially directed through the crank case housing, and a cam ring fixedly mounted to the axle medially of the axle in an orthogonal relationship relative thereto, and a predetermined number of first cylinder bores positioned in an equally spaced annular array on a first side of the cam ring, and second cylinder bores positioned on a second side of the cam ring within the crank case housing, with said second cylinder bores defining a number equal to the predetermined number, wherein each cylinder bore of said first set of cylinders bores is co axially aligned with one of said cylinder bores of said second set of cylinder bores, and the first set of cylinder bores each include a first piston reciprocatably mounted there within, and the second set of cylinder bores include a second piston reciprocatably mounted there within, and the first set of pistons each include a first piston rod, and the second set of pistons each include a second piston rod, wherein the first piston rods and second piston rod are arranged parallel relative to the axle, and the first piston rods include rollers mounted thereon, and the second piston rods include second rollers mounted thereon, the cam ring including a first cam surface rotatably mounting the first rollers, and the cam ring further including a second cam surface mounting the second cam rollers rotatably thereon.

  17. Choline Kinase β Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Phosphocholine, Elevated Osteoclast Activity, and Low Bone Mass*

    PubMed Central

    Kular, Jasreen; Tickner, Jennifer C.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Viola, Helena M.; Abel, Tamara; Lim, Bay Sie; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Honghui; Cook, Robert; Hool, Livia C.; Zheng, Ming Hao; Xu, Jiake

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of bone homeostasis requires tight coupling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. However, the precise molecular mechanism(s) underlying the differentiation and activities of these specialized cells are still largely unknown. Here, we identify choline kinase β (CHKB), a kinase involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, as a novel regulator of bone homeostasis. Choline kinase β mutant mice (flp/flp) exhibit a systemic low bone mass phenotype. Consistently, osteoclast numbers and activity are elevated in flp/flp mice. Interestingly, osteoclasts derived from flp/flp mice exhibit reduced sensitivity to excessive levels of extracellular calcium, which could account for the increased bone resorption. Conversely, supplementation of cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine in vivo and in vitro, a regimen that bypasses CHKB deficiency, restores osteoclast numbers to physiological levels. Finally, we demonstrate that, in addition to modulating osteoclast formation and function, loss of CHKB corresponds with a reduction in bone formation by osteoblasts. Taken together, these data posit CHKB as a new modulator of bone homeostasis. PMID:25451916

  18. CAM versus nucleoplasty.

    PubMed

    Marín, F Z

    2005-01-01

    In recent years the general trend in spinal surgery has been reduction and minimalization. In general, all these have shown a moderate or good clinical result but they have been associated with serious sequelae. Plasma-mediated electrosurgery, widely used in other medical fields, has demonstrated to be well suited for this new indication. To perform the Nucleoplasty (Coblation) and the CAM (Coblation-Assisted Microdiscectomy) is use the Perc-DLE SpineWand connected to a System 2000 generator (ArthoCare Corp., Sunnyvale, CA) was used. The device functions via plasma-mediated electrosurgery (Coblation) and differs from traditional electrosurgery. From a small sample 64 operated patients with contained disc herniation were analysed and classified into those who underwent percutaneous disc decompression (PDD) using coblation technology and patients who underwent CAM. All patients who presented with PDD were considered candidates for open surgery but all of them opted for the new technique. There was no contraindication. They had discogenic low back pain and/or leg pain and the procedure was performed on an outpatient basis. Follow-up data was of 1 to 12 months. Patients' gender distribution for PDD was 65% (41.6) male, 35% (22.4) female with a mean age of 43 years. The average duration of pain before nucleoplasty was of 18 months and none of them had previous lumbar surgery. At 6 to 12 months, 80% of the patients demonstrated an improvement in pain scores (75% very good, 5% good, 15% improved but not good, and 5% no effect). None of the patients was worse. Results indicate that Nucleoplasty may be an efficacious minimally invasive technique for the treatment of symptoms associated with contained herniated disc. However, randomized controlled studies are required to know with more precision the role of this procedure. CAM procedure (13 cases) is an excellent method in cases of root compression that needs liberation or in spine stenosis. PMID:15830980

  19. Calcium binding decreases the stokes radius of calmodulin and mutants R74A, R90A, and R90G.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, B R; Shea, M A

    1996-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an intracellular cooperative calcium-binding protein essential for activating many diverse target proteins. Biophysical studies of the calcium-induced conformational changes of CaM disagree on the structure of the linker between domains and possible orientations of the domains. Molecular dynamics studies have predicted that Ca4(2+)CaM is in equilibrium between an extended and compact conformation and that Arg74 and Arg90 are critical to the compaction process. In this study gel permeation chromatography was used to resolve calcium-induced changes in the hydrated shape of CaM at pH 7.4 and 5.6. Results showed that mutation of Arg 74 to Ala increases the R(s) as predicted; however, the average separation of domains in Ca4(2+)-CaM was larger than predicted by molecular dynamics. Mutation of Arg90 to Ala or Gly affected the dimensions of apo-CaM more than those of Ca4(2+)-CaM. Calcium binding to CaM and mutants (R74A-CaM, R90A-CaM, and R90G-CaM) lowered the Stokes radius (R(s)). Differences between R(s) values reported here and Rg values determined by small-angle x-ray scattering studies illustrate the importance of using multiple techniques to explore the solution properties of a flexible protein such as CaM. Images FIGURE 2 SCHEME 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:8968610

  20. Improvement of depressive behaviors by nefiracetam is associated with activation of CaM kinases in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Feng; Nakano, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Yui; Shioda, Norifumi; Lu, Ying-Mei; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2009-04-10

    Olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice exhibit depressive-like behaviors as assessed by the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swim test (FST). Interestingly, chronic intraperitoneal administration (1 mg/kg/day) of nefiracetam (DM-9384), a prototype cognitive enhancer, significantly improved depressive-like behaviors as well as spatial reference memory assessed by Y-maze task. As previously reported (Moriguchi, S., Han, F., Nakagawasai, O., Tadano, T., Fukunaga, K., 2006. Decreased calcium/calmoculin-dependent protein kinase II and protein kinase C activities mediate impairment of hippocampal long-term potentiation in the olfactory bulbectomized mice. J. Neurochem. 97, 22-29), decreased activities of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the hippocampal CA1 region and amygdala were observed in OBX mice. Nefiracetam treatment (1 mg/kg/day) significantly elevated CaMKII but not ERK activities in the amygdala, prefrontal cortex and hippocampal CA1 regions. In addition, we found an elevation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex but not in the hippocampal CA1 region. Increased CREB phosphorylation was associated with activation of CaMKI and CaMKIV as well as CaMKII in these regions. Taken together, in addition to CaMKII, CaMKI and CaMKIV activation mediated by nefiracetam treatment might mediate CREB phosphorylation following chronic nefiracetam treatment, thereby eliciting an anti-depressive and cognition-enhancing effect on OBX mice.

  1. Hydraulic involute cam actuator

    DOEpatents

    Love, Lonnie J.; Lind, Randall F.

    2011-11-01

    Mechanical joints are provided in which the angle between a first coupled member and a second coupled member may be varied by mechanical actuators. In some embodiments the angle may be varied around a pivot axis in one plane and in some embodiments the angle may be varied around two pivot axes in two orthogonal planes. The joints typically utilize a cam assembly having two lobes with an involute surface. Actuators are configured to push against the lobes to vary the rotation angle between the first and second coupled member.

  2. Modification of Lipid A Biosynthesis in Neisseria meningitidis lpxL Mutants: Influence on Lipopolysaccharide Structure, Toxicity, and Adjuvant Activity

    PubMed Central

    van der Ley, Peter; Steeghs, Liana; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; ten Hove, Jan; Zomer, Bert; van Alphen, Loek

    2001-01-01

    Two genes homologous to lpxL and lpxM from Escherichia coli and other gram-negative bacteria, which are involved in lipid A acyloxyacylation, were identified in Neisseria meningitidis strain H44/76 and insertionally inactivated. Analysis by tandem mass spectrometry showed that one of the resulting mutants, termed lpxL1, makes lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with penta- instead of hexa-acylated lipid A, in which the secondary lauroyl chain is specifically missing from the nonreducing end of the GlcN disaccharide. Insertional inactivation of the other (lpxL2) gene was not possible in wild-type strain H44/76 expressing full-length immunotype L3 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but could be readily achieved in a galE mutant expressing a truncated oligosaccharide chain. Structural analysis of lpxL2 mutant lipid A showed a major tetra-acylated species lacking both secondary lauroyl chains and a minor penta-acylated species. The lpxL1 mutant LPS has retained adjuvant activity similar to wild-type meningococcal LPS when used for immunization of mice in combination with LPS-deficient outer membrane complexes from N. meningitidis but has reduced toxicity as measured in a tumor necrosis factor alpha induction assay with whole bacteria. In contrast, both adjuvant activity and toxicity of the lpxL2 mutant LPS are strongly reduced. As the combination of reduced toxicity and retained adjuvant activity has not been reported before for either lpxL or lpxM mutants from other bacterial species, our results demonstrate that modification of meningococcal lipid A biosynthesis can lead to novel LPS species more suitable for inclusion in human vaccines. PMID:11553534

  3. Compensatory premotor activity during affective face processing in subclinical carriers of a single mutant Parkin allele

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Benjamin; Pohl, Anna; Münte, Thomas; Pramstaller, Peter; Klein, Christine; Binkofski, Ferdinand

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease suffer from significant motor impairments and accompanying cognitive and affective dysfunction due to progressive disturbances of basal ganglia–cortical gating loops. Parkinson's disease has a long presymptomatic stage, which indicates a substantial capacity of the human brain to compensate for dopaminergic nerve degeneration before clinical manifestation of the disease. Neuroimaging studies provide evidence that increased motor-related cortical activity can compensate for progressive dopaminergic nerve degeneration in carriers of a single mutant Parkin or PINK1 gene, who show a mild but significant reduction of dopamine metabolism in the basal ganglia in the complete absence of clinical motor signs. However, it is currently unknown whether similar compensatory mechanisms are effective in non-motor basal ganglia–cortical gating loops. Here, we ask whether asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers show altered patterns of brain activity during processing of facial gestures, and whether this might compensate for latent facial emotion recognition deficits. Current theories in social neuroscience assume that execution and perception of facial gestures are linked by a special class of visuomotor neurons (‘mirror neurons’) in the ventrolateral premotor cortex/pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44/6). We hypothesized that asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers would show increased activity in this area during processing of affective facial gestures, replicating the compensatory motor effects that have previously been observed in these individuals. Additionally, Parkin mutation carriers might show altered activity in other basal ganglia–cortical gating loops. Eight asymptomatic heterozygous Parkin mutation carriers and eight matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging and a subsequent facial emotion recognition task. As predicted, Parkin mutation carriers showed significantly stronger

  4. Altered calmodulin activity in fluphenazine-resistant mutant strains. Pleiotropic effect on development and cellular organization in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Kurn, N; Sela, B A

    1981-12-01

    Genetically altered calmodulin activity in spontaneously derived mutant strains, which were selected for resistance to the toxic effect of a specific inhibitor, the phenothiazine drug fluphenazine, is demonstrated. Partially purified calmodulin preparations from wild-type and fluphenazine-resistant strains of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, were tested for the ability to activate Ca2+-ATPase of the erythrocyte membranes, and the inhibition of this stimulatory activity by fluphenazine. Unlike the preparation obtained from wild-type cells, mutant calmodulin is shown to be insensitive to fluphenazine inhibition, in one case, and calmodulin from another strain was found to be inactive in vitro, i.e. it did not activate Ca2+-ATPase. The pleiotropic phenotype of the spontaneously derived mutant strains involved aberrant multicellular organization and hormone-independent commitment of the multipotent asexual reproductive cells, gonodia, to sexual development. These results clearly implicate calmodulin in the control of development and morphogenesis in this simple multicellular eukaryote. In addition, intracellular inhibition of calmodulin in wild-type cells is shown to block the morphogenic process of embryo inversion and to arrest motility. The availability of mutant calmodulin will facilitate further investigation of the role of this ubiquitous regulatory protein in the control of development and differentiation in multicellular eukarytes, as well as the fine structure/function relationship with regard to calmodulin modulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. PMID:6459931

  5. Inhibition of Cancer-Associated Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenases: Synthesis, Structure–Activity Relationship, and Selective Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequently found in certain cancers such as glioma. Different from the wild-type (WT) IDH1, the mutant enzymes catalyze the reduction of α-ketoglutaric acid to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D2HG), leading to cancer initiation. Several 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one compounds were identified to be inhibitors of IDH1(R132H). A total of 61 derivatives were synthesized, and their structure–activity relationships were investigated. Potent IDH1(R132H) inhibitors were identified with Ki values as low as 140 nM, while they possess weak or no activity against WT IDH1. Activities of selected compounds against IDH1(R132C) were found to be correlated with their inhibitory activities against IDH1(R132H), as well as cellular production of D2HG, with R2 of 0.83 and 0.73, respectively. Several inhibitors were found to be permeable through the blood–brain barrier in a cell-based model assay and exhibit potent and selective activity (EC50 = 0.26–1.8 μM) against glioma cells with the IDH1 R132H mutation. PMID:25271760

  6. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases. PMID:26850319

  7. Conformational Transitions in Human AP Endonuclease 1 and Its Active Site Mutant during Abasic Site Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2010-01-01

    AP endonuclease 1 (APE 1) is a crucial enzyme of the base excision repair pathway (BER) in human cells. APE1 recognizes apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and makes a nick in the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to them. The conformational dynamics and presteady-state kinetics of wild-type APE1 and its active site mutant, Y171F-P173L-N174K, have been studied. To observe conformational transitions occurring in the APE1 molecule during the catalytic cycle, we detected intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the enzyme under single turnover conditions. DNA duplexes containing a natural AP site, its tetrahydrofuran analogue, or a 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in the same position were used as specific substrates or ligands. The stopped-flow experiments have revealed high flexibility of the APE1 molecule and the complexity of the catalytic process. The fluorescent traces indicate that wild-type APE1 undergoes at least four conformational transitions during the processing of abasic sites in DNA. In contrast, nonspecific interactions of APE1 with undamaged DNA can be described by a two-step kinetic scheme. Rate and equilibrium constants were extracted from the stopped-flow and fluorescence titration data for all substrates, ligands, and products. A replacement of three residues at the enzymatic active site including the replacement of tyrosine 171 with phenylalanine in the enzyme active site resulted in a 2 × 104-fold decrease in the reaction rate and reduced binding affinity. Our data indicate the important role of conformational changes in APE1 for substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:20575528

  8. Novel DNA Motif Binding Activity Observed In Vivo With an Estrogen Receptor α Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A.; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J.; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as “tethering.” Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used “KIKO” mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the “EAAE” ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null–like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo. PMID:24713037

  9. CAM operated fuel valve

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S.T.; Katchka, J.R.

    1991-09-03

    This patent describes improvement in a fuel control valve construction comprising a housing means having an inlet means adapted to be interconnected to a fuel source and a main outlet means adapted to be interconnected to a main burner means, the housing means having a main valve seat for interconnecting the inlet means with the main outlet means, the housing means having a movable main valve member for opening and closing the main valve seat, the housing means having a movable lever operatively associated with the main valve member and having a manually operable actuator means for controlling the operating positions of the lever, the lever having an intermediate cam follower portion and opposed ends disposed on each side of the cam follower portion with one end of the opposed ends being pivotally mounted to the housing means and with the other end of the opposed ends for operating the main valve member, the housing means having biasing means operatively interconnected to the lever to tend to pivot the lever in one direction that opens the main valve member away from its the main valve seat. The improvement comprises; the housing means has a thermostatically controlled means that is operatively associated with the lever and is adapted to engage and hold the lever in a position wherein the main valve member is in a closed condition against its the main valve seat when the thermostatically controlled means is in one operating condition thereof and the actuator means is in the on condition thereof.

  10. A mid-infrared spectroscopic atlas of local active galactic nuclei on sub-arcsecond resolution using GTC/CanariCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Esquej, P.; Roche, P. F.; Ramos Almeida, C.; González-Martín, O.; Packham, C.; Levenson, N. A.; Mason, R. E.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Alvarez, C.; Aretxaga, I.; López-Rodríguez, E.; Colina, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Imanishi, M.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Perlman, E.

    2016-01-01

    We present an atlas of mid-infrared (mid-IR) ˜ 7.5-13 μm spectra of 45 local active galactic nuclei (AGN) obtained with CanariCam on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) as part of an ESO/GTC large programme. The sample includes Seyferts and other low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) at a median distance of 35 Mpc and luminous AGN, namely PG quasars, (U)LIRGs, and radio galaxies (RG) at a median distance of 254 Mpc. To date, this is the largest mid-IR spectroscopic catalogue of local AGN at sub-arcsecond resolution (median 0.3 arcsec). The goal of this work is to give an overview of the spectroscopic properties of the sample. The nuclear 12 μm luminosities of the AGN span more than four orders of magnitude, νL12 μm ˜ 3 × 1041-1046 erg s-1. In a simple mid-IR spectral index versus strength of the 9.7 μm silicate feature diagram most LLAGN, Seyfert nuclei, PG quasars, and RGs lie in the region occupied by clumpy torus model tracks. However, the mid-IR spectra of some might include contributions from other mechanisms. Most (U)LIRG nuclei in our sample have deeper silicate features and flatter spectral indices than predicted by these models suggesting deeply embedded dust heating sources and/or contribution from star formation. The 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature is clearly detected in approximately half of the Seyfert nuclei, LLAGN, and (U)LIRGs. While the RG, PG quasars, and (U)LIRGs in our sample have similar nuclear νL12 μm, we do not detect nuclear PAH emission in the RGs and PG quasars.

  11. The Activity of Nodules of the Supernodulating Mutant Mtsunn Is not Limited by Photosynthesis under Optimal Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants. PMID:24727372

  12. The activity of nodules of the supernodulating mutant Mtsunn is not limited by photosynthesis under optimal growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Ricardo A; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-04-10

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants.

  13. Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain folate metabolism and pseudouridine synthase gene mutants modulate macrophage caspase-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Ulland, Tyler K; Janowski, Ann M; Buchan, Blake W; Faron, Matthew; Cassel, Suzanne L; Jones, Bradley D; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of the disease tularemia. Escape of F. tularensis from the phagosome into the cytosol of the macrophage triggers the activation of the AIM2 inflammasome through a mechanism that is not well understood. Activation of the AIM2 inflammasome results in autocatalytic cleavage of caspase-1, resulting in the processing and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18, which play a crucial role in innate immune responses to F. tularensis. We have identified the 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cycloligase gene (FTL_0724) as being important for F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) virulence. Infection of mice in vivo with a F. tularensis LVS FTL_0724 mutant resulted in diminished mortality compared to infection of mice with wild-type LVS. The FTL_0724 mutant also induced increased inflammasome-dependent IL-1β and IL-18 secretion and cytotoxicity in macrophages in vitro. In contrast, infection of macrophages with a F. tularensis LVS rluD pseudouridine synthase (FTL_0699) mutant resulted in diminished IL-1β and IL-18 secretion from macrophages in vitro compared to infection of macrophages with wild-type LVS. In addition, the FTL_0699 mutant was not attenuated in vivo. These findings further illustrate that F. tularensis LVS possesses numerous genes that influence its ability to activate the inflammasome, which is a key host strategy to control infection with this pathogen in vivo.

  14. Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain Folate Metabolism and Pseudouridine Synthase Gene Mutants Modulate Macrophage Caspase-1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ulland, Tyler K.; Janowski, Ann M.; Buchan, Blake W.; Faron, Matthew; Cassel, Suzanne L.; Jones, Bradley D.

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of the disease tularemia. Escape of F. tularensis from the phagosome into the cytosol of the macrophage triggers the activation of the AIM2 inflammasome through a mechanism that is not well understood. Activation of the AIM2 inflammasome results in autocatalytic cleavage of caspase-1, resulting in the processing and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18, which play a crucial role in innate immune responses to F. tularensis. We have identified the 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cycloligase gene (FTL_0724) as being important for F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) virulence. Infection of mice in vivo with a F. tularensis LVS FTL_0724 mutant resulted in diminished mortality compared to infection of mice with wild-type LVS. The FTL_0724 mutant also induced increased inflammasome-dependent IL-1β and IL-18 secretion and cytotoxicity in macrophages in vitro. In contrast, infection of macrophages with a F. tularensis LVS rluD pseudouridine synthase (FTL_0699) mutant resulted in diminished IL-1β and IL-18 secretion from macrophages in vitro compared to infection of macrophages with wild-type LVS. In addition, the FTL_0699 mutant was not attenuated in vivo. These findings further illustrate that F. tularensis LVS possesses numerous genes that influence its ability to activate the inflammasome, which is a key host strategy to control infection with this pathogen in vivo. PMID:23115038

  15. CAD/CAM data management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, O. H.

    1984-01-01

    The role of data base management in CAD/CAM, particularly for geometric data is described. First, long term and short term objectives for CAD/CAM data management are identified. Second, the benefits of the data base management approach are explained. Third, some of the additional work needed in the data base area is discussed.

  16. Analysis of Polygenic Mutants Suggests a Role for Mediator in Regulating Transcriptional Activation Distance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Reavey, Caitlin T.; Hickman, Mark J.; Dobi, Krista C.; Botstein, David; Winston, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Studies of natural populations of many organisms have shown that traits are often complex, caused by contributions of mutations in multiple genes. In contrast, genetic studies in the laboratory primarily focus on studying the phenotypes caused by mutations in a single gene. However, the single mutation approach may be limited with respect to the breadth and degree of new phenotypes that can be found. We have taken the approach of isolating complex, or polygenic mutants in the lab to study the regulation of transcriptional activation distance in yeast. While most aspects of eukaryotic transcription are conserved from yeast to human, transcriptional activation distance is not. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the upstream activating sequence (UAS) is generally found within 450 base pairs of the transcription start site (TSS) and when the UAS is moved too far away, activation no longer occurs. In contrast, metazoan enhancers can activate from as far as several hundred kilobases from the TSS. Previously, we identified single mutations that allow transcription activation to occur at a greater-than-normal distance from the GAL1 UAS. As the single mutant phenotypes were weak, we have now isolated polygenic mutants that possess strong long-distance phenotypes. By identification of the causative mutations we have accounted for most of the heritability of the phenotype in each strain and have provided evidence that the Mediator coactivator complex plays both positive and negative roles in the regulation of transcription activation distance. PMID:26281848

  17. Analysis of Polygenic Mutants Suggests a Role for Mediator in Regulating Transcriptional Activation Distance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Reavey, Caitlin T; Hickman, Mark J; Dobi, Krista C; Botstein, David; Winston, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Studies of natural populations of many organisms have shown that traits are often complex, caused by contributions of mutations in multiple genes. In contrast, genetic studies in the laboratory primarily focus on studying the phenotypes caused by mutations in a single gene. However, the single mutation approach may be limited with respect to the breadth and degree of new phenotypes that can be found. We have taken the approach of isolating complex, or polygenic mutants in the lab to study the regulation of transcriptional activation distance in yeast. While most aspects of eukaryotic transcription are conserved from yeast to human, transcriptional activation distance is not. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the upstream activating sequence (UAS) is generally found within 450 base pairs of the transcription start site (TSS) and when the UAS is moved too far away, activation no longer occurs. In contrast, metazoan enhancers can activate from as far as several hundred kilobases from the TSS. Previously, we identified single mutations that allow transcription activation to occur at a greater-than-normal distance from the GAL1 UAS. As the single mutant phenotypes were weak, we have now isolated polygenic mutants that possess strong long-distance phenotypes. By identification of the causative mutations we have accounted for most of the heritability of the phenotype in each strain and have provided evidence that the Mediator coactivator complex plays both positive and negative roles in the regulation of transcription activation distance.

  18. Prenatal interaction of mutant DISC1 and immune activation produces adult psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Abazyan, B.; Nomura, J.; Kannan, G.; Ishizuka, K.; Tamashiro, K. L. K.; Nucifora, F.; Pogorelov, V.; Ladenheim, B.; Yang, C.; Krasnova, I. N.; Cadet, J. L.; Pardo, C.; Mori, S.; Kamiya, A.; Vogel, M.; Sawa, A.; Ross, C. A.; Pletnikov, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene-environment interactions (GEI) are involved in the pathogenesis of mental diseases. We evaluated interaction between mutant human Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (mhDISC1) and maternal immune activation implicated in schizophrenia and mood disorders. Methods Pregnant mice were treated with saline or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) at gestation day 9. Levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured in fetal and adult brains, expression of mhDISC1, endogenous DISC1, LIS1, NDEL1, gp130, Grb2, and GSK-3β were assessed in cortical samples of newborn mice. Tissue content of monoamines, volumetric brain abnormalities, dendritic spine density in the hippocampus and various domains of the mouse behavior repertoire were evaluated in adult male mice. Results Prenatal interaction produced anxiety, depression-like responses, and altered pattern of social behavior. These behaviors were accompanied by decreased reactivity of the HPA axis, attenuated 5-HT neurotransmission in the hippocampus, reduced enlargement of lateral ventricles, decreased volumes of amygdala and periaqueductal gray matter and density of spines on dendrites of granule cells of the hippocampus. Prenatal interaction modulated secretion of inflammatory cytokines in fetal brains, levels of mhDISC1, endogenous mouse DISC1, and GSK-3β. The behavioral effects of GEI were observed only if mhDISC1 was expressed throughout the life span. Conclusions Prenatal immune activation interacted with mhDISC1 to produce the neurobehavioral phenotypes that were not seen in untreated mhDISC1 mice and that resemble aspects of major mental illnesses, including mood disorders. We propose that our DISC1 mouse model is a valuable system to study the molecular pathways underlying GEI relevant to mental illnesses. PMID:21130225

  19. Cytotoxicity of lawsone and cytoprotective activity of antioxidants in catalase mutant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sauriasari, Rani; Wang, Da-Hong; Takemura, Yoko; Tsutsui, Ken; Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Sano, Kuniaki; Horita, Masako; Wang, Bing-Ling; Ogino, Keiki

    2007-06-01

    Lawsone is an active naphthoquinone derivative isolated from henna (Lawsonia inermis L.), a widely used hair dye. Previous study on the toxicity of lawsone remains unclear since the involvement of oxidative stress and the kind of ROS (reactive oxygen species) involved have not been fully resolved yet. This present study reports the cytotoxic effects of lawsone and henna. We carried out CAT assay (a zone of inhibition test of bacterial growth and colony-forming efficiency test of transformant Escherichia coli strains that express mammalian catalase gene derived from normal catalase mice (Cs(a)) and catalase-deficient mutant mice (Cs(b))), Ames mutagenicity assay and H(2)O(2) generation assay. Lawsone generated H(2)O(2) slightly in phosphate buffer system and was not mutagenic in Ames assay using TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102, both in the absence and presence of metabolic activation. Lawsone exposure inhibited the growth of both Cs(a) and Cs(b) strains in a dose-dependent manner. Mean zone diameter for Cs(a) was 9.75+/-0.96 mm and 12.75+/-1.5 mm for Cs(b). Natural henna leaves did not show toxic effects, whereas two out of four samples of marketed henna products were shown toxicity effects. Catalase abolished zone of inhibition (ZOI) of marketed henna products, eliminated ZOI of lawsone in a dose-dependent manner and low concentration of exogenous MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD eliminated the toxicity. Histidine and DTPA, the metal chelator; BHA and low concentration of capsaicin, the inducer of NADH-quinone reductase, effectively protected Cs(a) and Cs(b) against lawsone in this study. We suggest that lawsone cytotoxicity is probably mediated, at least in part, by the release of O(2)(-), H(2)O(2) and OH(-). PMID:17442476

  20. Metabolism of hydroxypyruvate in a mutant of barley lacking NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase, an important photorespiratory enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.J.S.; Blackwell, R.D.; Lea, P.J. )

    1989-09-01

    A mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), LaPr 88/29, deficient in NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been isolated. The activities of both NADH (5%) and NADPH-dependent (19%) HPR were severely reduced in this mutant compared to the wild type. Although lacking an enzyme in the main carbon pathway of photorespiration, this mutant was capable of CO{sub 2} fixation rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type, in normal atmospheres and 50% O{sub 2}. There also appeared to be little disruption to the photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{sup 14}C)serine feeding were similar in both mutant and wild-type leaves. When leaves of LaPr 88/29 were fed either ({sup 14}C)serine or {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, the accumulation of radioactivity was in serine and not in hydroxypyruvate, although the mutant was still able to metabolize over 25% of the supplied ({sup 14}C)serine into sucrose. After 3 hours in air the soluble amino acid pool was almost totally dominated by serine and glycine. LaPr 88/29 has also been used to show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-dependent HPR activity is due to the NADH-dependent enzyme. We also suggest that the alternative NADPH activity can metabolize a proportion, but not all, of the hydroxypyruvate produced during photorespiration and may thus form a useful backup to the NADH-dependent enzyme under conditions of maximal photorespiration.

  1. Lack of enzyme activity in GBA2 mutants associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia/cerebellar ataxia (SPG46).

    PubMed

    Sultana, Saki; Reichbauer, Jennifer; Schüle, Rebecca; Mochel, Fanny; Synofzik, Matthis; van der Spoel, Aarnoud C

    2015-09-11

    Glucosylceramide is a membrane glycolipid made up of the sphingolipid ceramide and glucose, and has a wide intracellular distribution. Glucosylceramide is degraded to ceramide and glucose by distinct, non-homologous enzymes, including glucocerebrosidase (GBA), localized in the endolysosomal pathway, and β-glucosidase 2 (GBA2), which is associated with the plasma membrane and/or the endoplasmic reticulum. It is well established that mutations in the GBA gene result in endolysosomal glucosylceramide accumulation, which triggers Gaucher disease. In contrast, the biological significance of GBA2 is less well understood. GBA2-deficient mice present with male infertility, but humans carrying mutations in the GBA2 gene are affected with a combination of cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, as well as with thin corpus callosum and cognitive impairment (SPastic Gait locus #46, SPG46). To improve our understanding of the biochemical consequences of the GBA2 mutations, we have evaluated five nonsense and five missense GBA2 mutants for their enzyme activity. In transfected cells, the mutant forms of GBA2 were present in widely different amounts, ranging from overabundant to very minor, compared to the wild type enzyme. Nevertheless, none of the GBA2 mutant cDNAs raised the enzyme activity in transfected cells, in contrast to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that SPG46 patients have a severe deficit in GBA2 activity, because the GBA2 mutants are intrinsically inactive and/or reduced in amount. This assessment of the expression levels and enzyme activities of mutant forms of GBA2 offers a first insight in the biochemical basis of the complex pathologies seen in SPG46.

  2. [Role of RNA-polymerase in gene activity regulation of E. coli RNA-polymerase mutants with a pleiotropic effect. I. Physiological and biochemical studies].

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, S G; Arutiunian, A V; Ozolin', O N; Oganesian, M G

    1979-01-01

    Four Rifr-mutants of E. coli B/r (rpo B401, rpo B402, rpo B403, rpo B409) which differ from the wild strain in one or more phenotypic properties besides rifampicin resistance were obtained. Transfer of the mutant Rifr-alleles into the parent strain gives the latter all the properties of the mutant. This indicates that the new properties are due to the pleiotropic effect of Rifr-mutations. Biochemical studies of the properties of RNA-polymerases from the mutants and the parent showed that some new properties of the mutants could not be explained by the appearance of analogous properties in the mutant RNA-polymerase itself. They seem to be caused by alteration in functional activity of the mutant enzyme, particulary, alteration of its control properties during transcription. The function of the beta-subunit in genetic transcription is discussed.

  3. Mitochondrial respiration in ME-CAM, PEPCK-CAM, and C₃ succulents: comparative operation of the cytochrome, alternative, and rotenone-resistant pathways.

    PubMed

    Peckmann, Klaus; von Willert, Dieter J; Martin, Craig E; Herppich, Werner B

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondria are important in the function and control of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) during organic acid accumulation at night and acid decarboxylation in the day. In plants of the malic enzyme-(ME) type and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase- (PEPCK) type, mitochondria may exert their role in the control of the diurnal rhythm of malic and citric acids to a differential degree. In plants of both CAM types, the oxidative capacity of mitochondria, as well as the activity of CAM-linked mitochondrial enzymes, and of the alternative and the rotenone-resistant pathways of substrate oxidation were compared. Furthermore, a C₃ succulent was included, as well as both C₃ and CAM forms of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum during a salt-induced C₃-to-CAM shift. Mitochondria of PEPCK-type CAM plants exhibited a lower activity of malate oxidation, ratio of malate to succinate oxidation, and activity of mitochondrial NAD-ME. With the exception of Kalanchoë daigremontiana, leaf mitochondria of all other CAM species were highly sensitive to cyanide (80-100%), irrespective of the oxidant used. This indicates that the alternative oxidase is not of general importance in CAM. By contrast, rotenone-insensitive substrate oxidation was very high (50-90%) in all CAM species. This is the first comparison of the rotenone-insensitive pathway of respiration in plants with different CAM-types. The results of this study confirm that mitochondria are involved in the control of CAM to different degrees in the two CAM types, and they highlight the multiple roles of mitochondria in CAM.

  4. Inhibition of HSP90 by AUY922 Preferentially Kills Mutant KRAS Colon Cancer Cells by Activating Bim through ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun Yan; Guo, Su Tang; Wang, Jia Yu; Liu, Fen; Zhang, Yuan Yuan; Yari, Hamed; Yan, Xu Guang; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Xu Dong; Jiang, Chen Chen

    2016-03-01

    Oncogenic mutations of KRAS pose a great challenge in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Here we report that mutant KRAS colon cancer cells are nevertheless more susceptible to apoptosis induced by the HSP90 inhibitor AUY922 than those carrying wild-type KRAS. Although AUY922 inhibited HSP90 activity with comparable potency in colon cancer cells irrespective of their KRAS mutational statuses, those with mutant KRAS were markedly more sensitive to AUY922-induced apoptosis. This was associated with upregulation of the BH3-only proteins Bim, Bik, and PUMA. However, only Bim appeared essential, in that knockdown of Bim abolished, whereas knockdown of Bik or PUMA only moderately attenuated apoptosis induced by AUY922. Mechanistic investigations revealed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was responsible for AUY922-induced upregulation of Bim, which was inhibited by a chemical chaperone or overexpression of GRP78. Conversely, siRNA knockdown of GRP78 or XBP-1 enhanced AUY922-induced apoptosis. Remarkably, AUY922 inhibited the growth of mutant KRAS colon cancer xenografts through activation of Bim that was similarly associated with ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that AUY922 is a promising drug in the treatment of mutant KRAS colon cancers, and the agents that enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of Bim may be useful to improve the therapeutic efficacy.

  5. Characterization of Arabidopsis fluoroacetate-resistant mutants reveals the principal mechanism of acetate activation for entry into the glyoxylate cycle.

    PubMed

    Turner, James E; Greville, Karen; Murphy, Elaine C; Hooks, Mark A

    2005-01-28

    The toxic acetate analogue monofluoroacetic acid was employed to isolate Arabidopsis tDNA-tagged plants deficient in their ability to utilize or sense acetate. Several tDNA-tagged lines were isolated, including two that were determined to be allelic to an EMS-mutagenized line denoted acn1 for ac non-utilizing. Following conventions, the tDNA-tagged mutants were designated acn1-2 and acn1-3. Both mutants displayed identical behavior to acn1-1 on a variety of fluorinated and nonfluorinated organic acids, indicating that resistance was specific to fluoroacetate. Thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR identified the sites of tDNA insertion in both mutants to be within different exons in a gene, which encoded a protein containing an AMP-binding motif. Reverse transcription-PCR confirmed that the gene was not expressed in the mutants, and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR showed that the gene is expressed in imbibed seeds and increases in amount during establishment. The wild type AMP-binding protein cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the expressed protein was purified by nickel chelate chromatography. The enzyme was identified as an acyl-CoA synthetase that was more active with acetate than butyrate and was not active with fatty acids longer than C-4. The enzyme was localized to peroxisomes by enzymatic analysis of organellar fractions isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Labeling studies with [(14)C]acetate showed that acn1 seedlings, like those of the isocitrate lyase mutant icl-1 (isocitrate lyase), are compromised in carbohydrate synthesis, indicating that this enzyme is responsible for activating exogenous acetate to the coenzyme A form for entry into the glyoxylate cycle.

  6. Mutant activin-like kinase 2 in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva are activated via T203 by BMP type II receptors.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Mai; Ohte, Satoshi; Osawa, Kenji; Miyamoto, Arei; Tsukamoto, Sho; Mizuta, Takato; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Suda, Naoto; Katagiri, Takenobu

    2015-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a genetic disorder characterized by progressive heterotopic ossification in soft tissues, such as the skeletal muscles. FOP has been shown to be caused by gain-of-function mutations in activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)-2, which is a type I receptor for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). In the present study, we examined the molecular mechanisms that underlie the activation of intracellular signaling by mutant ALK2. Mutant ALK2 from FOP patients enhanced the activation of intracellular signaling by type II BMP receptors, such as BMPR-II and activin receptor, type II B, whereas that from heart disease patients did not. This enhancement was dependent on the kinase activity of the type II receptors. Substitution mutations at all nine serine and threonine residues in the ALK2 glycine- and serine-rich domain simultaneously inhibited this enhancement by the type II receptors. Of the nine serine and threonine residues in ALK2, T203 was found to be critical for the enhancement by type II receptors. The T203 residue was conserved in all of the BMP type I receptors, and these residues were essential for intracellular signal transduction in response to ligand stimulation. The phosphorylation levels of the mutant ALK2 related to FOP were higher than those of wild-type ALK2 and were further increased by the presence of type II receptors. The phosphorylation levels of ALK2 were greatly reduced in mutants carrying a mutation at T203, even in the presence of type II receptors. These findings suggest that the mutant ALK2 related to FOP is enhanced by BMP type II receptors via the T203-regulated phosphorylation of ALK2.

  7. Development of photochemical activity in relation to pigment and membrane protein accumulation in chloroplasts of barley and its virescens mutant.

    PubMed

    Kyle, D J; Zalik, S

    1982-06-01

    The development of photochemical activity in relation to pigment and membrane protein accumulation in chloroplasts of greening wild-type barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Gateway) and its virescens mutant were studied. The rate of chlorophyll accumulation per plastid was faster in the wild-type than in the mutant seedlings upon illumination after 6 days of etiolation, but was not different after 8 days. Although the protein content per plastid did not vary during greening, there was a change in the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel polypeptide profiles. High molecular weight proteins of 96,000 and 66,000 decreased whereas those at 34,000, 27,000 and 22,000 increased in relative quantity as a function of greening. The fully greened mutant seedlings were not deficient in the light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex (LHC) or the reaction centers of photosystem I and photosystem II. Photosystem I-associated photochemical activities appeared within the first hour of plastid development and photosystem II associated activities and O(2) evolution within the next 6 hours. In all cases, the developmental rates per unit protein were slower in the mutant following 6 days of etiolation, but no differences between the two genotypes could be seen after 8 days due to a decrease in the developmental rate of the wild-type chloroplasts. An increase in photosynthetic unit size associated with plastid morphogenesis was faster in the wild-type seedlings after 6 days, but again the difference was negligible after 8 days. It was concluded that no single measured photochemical parameter is affected by this mutation, but rather, all aspects of chloroplast development are affected similarly by an overall reduction in the rate of chloroplast morphogenesis. This mutant, therefore, undergoes the normal pattern of proplastid to chloroplast development, but at a markedly reduced rate.

  8. Rad Pole Cam Development

    SciTech Connect

    Heckendorn, F. M.; Odell, D. M. C; Harpring, L. J.; Peterson, K. D.

    2005-10-05

    The RadPoleCam was developed to provide Department Of Energy (DOE) first responders the capability to assess the radiological and visual condition of remote or inaccessible locations. Real time gamma isotopic identification is provided to the first responder in the form of audio feedback (i.e. spoken through head phones) from a gamma detector mounted on a collapsible pole that can extend from 1 to 9 meters (6 to 29 feet). Simultaneously, selectable direct and side looking visual images are provided from the 5cm (2in) diameter, waterproof probe tip. The lightweight, self contained, ruggedized, system will provide a rapidly deployable field system for visual and radiological search and assessment of confined spaces and extended reach locations.

  9. Bacteriorhodopsin mutants containing single tyrosine to phenylalanine substitutions are all active in proton translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Mogi, T; Stern, L J; Hackett, N R; Khorana, H G

    1987-01-01

    To study the possible role of the tyrosine residues in proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin, we have replaced these residues individually by phenylalanine. The required codon changes were introduced in the bacterioopsin gene by replacement of appropriate restriction fragments by synthetic counterparts containing the desired nucleotide changes. The denatured opsin polypeptides obtained by expression of the mutant genes in Escherichia coli were purified and treated with a mixture of detergents, phospholipids, and retinal in a previously established renaturation procedure. All of the mutant proteins folded to regenerate bacteriorhodopsin-like chromophores. Three mutants with tyrosine to phenylalanine substitutions at positions 57, 83, and 185 regenerated the chromophore more slowly than the wild-type protein, and two of these mutants, Phe-57 and -83, showed slightly blue-shifted chromophores. When reconstituted into liposomes all of the mutant proteins with single Tyr----Phe substitutions pumped protons at rates and levels comparable to those of the wild-type bacteriorhodopsin. We conclude that single substitutions of tyrosine by phenylalanine do not affect folding, retinal binding, or light-dependent proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:3039495

  10. Detailed conformation dynamics and activation process of wild type c-Abl and T315I mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Hua; Liu, Qian

    2014-10-01

    Bcr-Abl is an important target for therapy against chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The synergistic effect between myristyl pocket and the ATP pocket has been found. But its detailed information based on molecular level still has not been achieved. In this study, conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) and target molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations were performed to explore the effect of T315I mutation on dynamics and activation process of Abl containing the N-terminal cap (Ncap). The CMD simulation results reveal the increasing flexibility of ATP pocket in kinase domain (KD) after T315I mutation which confirms the disability of ATP-pocket inhibitors to the Abl-T315I mutant. On the contrary, the T315I mutation decreased the flexibility of remote helix αI which suggests the synergistic effect between them. The mobility of farther regions containing Ncap, SH3, SH2 and SH2-KD linker were not affected by T315I mutation. The TMD simulation results show that the activation process of wild type Abl and Abl-T315I mutant experienced global conformation change. Their differences were elucidated by the activation motion of subsegments including A-loop, P-loop and Ncap. Besides, the T315I mutation caused decreasing energy barrier and increasing intermediate number in activation process, which results easier activation process. The TMD and CMD results indicate that a drug targeting only the ATP pocket is not enough to inhibit the Abl-T315I mutant. An effective way to inhibit the abnormal activity of Abl-T315I mutant is to combine the ATP-pocket inhibitors with inhibitors binding at non-ATP pockets mainly related to Ncap, SH2-KD linker and myristyl pocket.

  11. Flight and seizure motor patterns in Drosophila mutants: simultaneous acoustic and electrophysiological recordings of wing beats and flight muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Atulya; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tethered flies allow studies of biomechanics and electrophysiology of flight control. We performed microelectrode recordings of spikes in an indirect flight muscle (the dorsal longitudinal muscle, DLMa) coupled with acoustic analysis of wing beat frequency (WBF) via microphone signals. Simultaneous electrophysiological recording of direct and indirect flight muscles has been technically challenging; however, the WBF is thought to reflect in a one-to-one relationship with spiking activity in a subset of direct flight muscles, including muscle m1b. Therefore, our approach enables systematic mutational analysis for changes in temporal features of electrical activity of motor neurons innervating subsets of direct and indirect flight muscles. Here, we report the consequences of specific ion channel disruptions on the spiking activity of myogenic DLMs (firing at ∼5 Hz) and the corresponding WBF (∼200 Hz). We examined mutants of the genes enconding: 1) voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (cacophony, cac), 2) Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (slowpoke, slo), and 3) voltage-gated K(+) channels (Shaker, Sh) and their auxiliary subunits (Hyperkinetic, Hk and quiver, qvr). We found flight initiation in response to an air puff was severely disrupted in both cac and slo mutants. However, once initiated, slo flight was largely unaltered, whereas cac displayed disrupted DLM firing rates and WBF. Sh, Hk, and qvr mutants were able to maintain normal DLM firing rates, despite increased WBF. Notably, defects in the auxiliary subunits encoded by Hk and qvr could lead to distinct consequences, that is, disrupted DLM firing rhythmicity, not observed in Sh. Our mutant analysis of direct and indirect flight muscle activities indicates that the two motor activity patterns may be independently modified by specific ion channel mutations, and that this approach can be extended to other dipteran species and additional motor programs, such as electroconvulsive stimulation-induced seizures.

  12. Activation of the Ano1 (TMEM16A) chloride channel by calcium is not mediated by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuai; Zhu, Jinqiu; Qu, Zhiqiang; Cui, Yuan-Yuan; Hartzell, H Criss

    2014-02-01

    The Ca(2+)-activated Cl channel anoctamin-1 (Ano1; Tmem16A) plays a variety of physiological roles, including epithelial fluid secretion. Ano1 is activated by increases in intracellular Ca(2+), but there is uncertainty whether Ca(2+) binds directly to Ano1 or whether phosphorylation or additional Ca(2+)-binding subunits like calmodulin (CaM) are required. Here we show that CaM is not necessary for activation of Ano1 by Ca(2+) for the following reasons. (a) Exogenous CaM has no effect on Ano1 currents in inside-out excised patches. (b) Overexpression of Ca(2+)-insensitive mutants of CaM have no effect on Ano1 currents, whereas they eliminate the current mediated by the small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK2) channel. (c) Ano1 does not coimmunoprecipitate with CaM, whereas SK2 does. Furthermore, Ano1 binds very weakly to CaM in pull-down assays. (d) Ano1 is activated in excised patches by low concentrations of Ba(2+), which does not activate CaM. In addition, we conclude that reversible phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is not required for current activation by Ca(2+) because the current can be repeatedly activated in excised patches in the absence of ATP or other high-energy compounds. Although Ano1 is blocked by the CaM inhibitor trifluoperazine (TFP), we propose that TFP inhibits the channel in a CaM-independent manner because TFP does not inhibit Ano1 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of excised patches. These experiments lead us to conclude that CaM is not required for activation of Ano1 by Ca(2+). Although CaM is not required for channel opening by Ca(2+), work of other investigators suggests that CaM may have effects in modulating the biophysical properties of the channel.

  13. Active site mutants of Escherichia coli dethiobiotin synthetase: effects of mutations on enzyme catalytic and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Sandalova, T; Lohman, K; Lindqvist, Y; Rendina, A R

    1997-04-22

    Five active site residues, Thr11, Glu12, Lys15, Lys37, and Ser41, implicated by the protein crystal structure studies of Escherichia coli DTBS, were mutated to determine their function in catalysis and substrate binding. Nine mutant enzymes, T11V, E12A, E12D, K15Q, K37L, K37Q, K37R, S41A, and S41C, were overproduced in an E. coli strain lacking a functional endogenous DTBS gene and purified to homogeneity. Replacement of Thr11 with valine resulted in a 24,000-fold increase in the Km(ATP) with little or no change in the Kd(ATP), KM(DAPA) and DTBS k(cat), suggesting an essential role for this residue in the steady-state affinity for ATP. The two Glu12 mutants showed essentially wild-type DTBS activity (slightly elevated k(cat)'s). Unlike wild-type DTBS, E12A had the same apparent KM(DAPA) at subsaturating and saturating ATP concentrations, indicating a possible role for Glu12 in the binding synergy between DAPA and ATP. The mutations in Lys15 and Lys37 resulted in loss of catalytic activity (0.01% and <0.9% of wild-type DTBS k(cat) for K15Q and the Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and higher KM's for both DAPA (40-fold and >100-fold higher than wild-type for the K15Q and Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and ATP (1800-fold and >10-fold higher than wild-type for K15Q and the K37 mutant enzymes, respectively). These results strongly suggest that Lys15 and Lys37 are crucial to both catalysis and substrate binding. S41A and S41C had essentially the same k(cat) as wild-type and had moderate increases in the DAPA and ATP KM and Kd (ATP) values. Replacement of Ser41 with cysteine resulted in larger effects than replacement with alanine. These data suggest that the H-bond between N7 of DAPA and the Ser41 side chain is not very important for catalysis. The catalytic behavior of these mutant enzymes was also studied by pulse-chase experiments which produced results consistent with the steady-state kinetic analyses. X-ray crystallographic studies of four mutant enzymes, S

  14. Structure and function of chicken interleukin-1 beta mutants: uncoupling of receptor binding and in vivo biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Ting; Huang, Wen-Yang; Chen, Ting; Salawu, Emmanuel Oluwatobi; Wang, Dongli; Lee, Yi-Zong; Chang, Yuan-Yu; Yang, Lee-Wei; Sue, Shih-Che; Wang, Xinquan; Yin, Hsien-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-binding and subsequent signal-activation of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) are essential to immune and proinflammatory responses. We mutated 12 residues to identify sites important for biological activity and/or receptor binding. Four of these mutants with mutations in loop 9 (T117A, E118K, E118A, E118R) displayed significantly reduced biological activity. Neither T117A nor E118K mutants substantially affected receptor binding, whereas both mutants lack the IL-1β signaling in vitro but can antagonize wild-type (WT) IL-1β. Crystal structures of T117A, E118A, and E118K revealed that the secondary structure or surface charge of loop 9 is dramatically altered compared with that of wild-type chicken IL-1β. Molecular dynamics simulations of IL-1β bound to its receptor (IL-1RI) and receptor accessory protein (IL-1RAcP) revealed that loop 9 lies in a pocket that is formed at the IL-1RI/IL-1RAcP interface. This pocket is also observed in the human ternary structure. The conformations of above mutants in loop 9 may disrupt structural packing and therefore the stability in a chicken IL-1β/IL-1RI/IL-1RAcP signaling complex. We identify the hot spots in IL-1β that are essential to immune responses and elucidate a mechanism by which IL-1β activity can be inhibited. These findings should aid in the development of new therapeutics that neutralize IL-1 activity. PMID:27278931

  15. Role of ELA region in auto-activation of mutant KIT receptor: a molecular dynamics simulation insight.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    KIT receptor is the prime target in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GISTs) therapy. Second generation inhibitor, Sunitinib, binds to an inactivated conformation of KIT receptor and stabilizes it in order to prevent tumor formation. Here, we investigated the dynamic behavior of wild type and mutant D816H KIT receptor, and emphasized the extended A-loop (EAL) region (805-850) by conducting molecular dynamics simulation (∼100 ns). We analyzed different properties such as root mean square cutoff or deviation, root mean square fluctuation, radius of gyration, solvent-accessible surface area, hydrogen bonding network analysis, and essential dynamics. Apart from this, clustering and cross-correlation matrix approach was used to explore the conformational space of the wild type and mutant EAL region of KIT receptor. Molecular dynamics analysis indicated that mutation (D816H) was able to alter intramolecular hydrogen bonding pattern and affected the structural flexibility of EAL region. Moreover, flexible secondary elements, specially, coil and turns were dominated in EAL region of mutant KIT receptor during simulation. This phenomenon increased the movement of EAL region which in turn helped in shifting the equilibrium towards the active kinase conformation. Our atomic investigation of mutant KIT receptor which emphasized on EAL region provided a better insight into the understanding of Sunitinib resistance mechanism of KIT receptor and would help to discover new therapeutics for KIT-based resistant tumor cells in GIST therapy.

  16. Membrane Composition and Physiological Activity of Plastids from an Oenothera Plastome Mutator-Induced Chloroplast Mutant 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ellen M.; Sears, Barbara B.

    1990-01-01

    Plastids were isolated from a plastome mutator-induced mutant (pm7) of Oenothera hookeri and were analyzed for various physiological and biochemical attributes. No photosynthetic electron transport activity was detected in the mutant plastids. This is consistent with previous ultrastructural analysis showing the absence of thylakoid membranes in the pm7 plastids and with the observation of aberrant processing and accumulation of chloroplast proteins in the mutant. In comparison to wild type, the mutant tissue lacks chlorophyll, and has significant differences in levels of four fatty acids. The analyses did not reveal any differences in carotenoid levels nor in the synthesis of several chloroplast lipids. The consequences of the altered composition of the chloroplast membrane are discussed in terms of their relation to the aberrant protein processing of the pm7 plastids. The pigment, fatty acid, and lipid measurements were also performed on two distinct nuclear genotypes (A/A and A/C) which differ in their compatibility with the plastid genome (type I) contained in these lines. In these cases, only chlorophyll concentrations differed significantly. PMID:16667256

  17. [Study of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus].

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Urusov, F A; Romanova, N I; Shmel'kova, A O; Kim, A I

    2012-11-01

    Transpositions of the gypsy retrotransposon in the Drosophila melanogaster genome are controlled by the flamenco locus, which is represented as an accumulation of defective copies of transposable elements. In the present work, genetic control by the flamenco locus of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon from the gypsy group was studied. Tissue-specific expression of Tirant was detected in the tissues of ovaries in a strain mutant for the flamenco locus. Tirant was found to be transpositionally active in isogenic D. melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus. The sites of two new insertions have been localized by the method of subtractive hybridization. It has been concluded from the results obtained that the flamenco locus is involved in the genetic control of Tirant transpositions. PMID:23297482

  18. Characterization of an activation-tagged mutant uncovers a role of GLABRA2 in anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xianling; Hu, Qingnan; Dai, Xuemei; Tian, Hainan; Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Mao, Tonglin; Chen, Jin-Gui; Wang, Shucai

    2015-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, anthocyanin biosynthesis is controlled by a MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) transcriptional activator complex. The MBW complex activates the transcription of late biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway, leading to the production of anthocyanins. A similar MBW complex regulates epidermal cell fate by activating the transcription of GLABRA2 (GL2), a homeodomain transcription factor required for trichome formation in shoots and non-hair cell formation in roots. Here we provide experimental evidence to show that GL2 also plays a role in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. From an activation-tagged mutagenized population of Arabidopsis plants, we isolated a dominant, gain-of-function mutant with reduced anthocyanins. Molecular cloning revealed that this phenotype is caused by an elevated expression of GL2, thus the mutant was named gl2-1D. Consistent with the view that GL2 acts as a negative regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis, gl2-1D seedlings accumulated less whereas gl2-3 seedlings accumulated more anthocyanins in response to sucrose. Gene expression analysis indicated that expression of late, but not early, biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway was dramatically reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants. Further analysis showed that expression of some MBW component genes involved in the regulation of late biosynthesis genes was reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants, and chromatin immunoprecipitation results indicated that some MBW component genes are targets of GL2. We also showed that GL2 functions as a transcriptional repressor. Taken together, these results indicate that GL2 negatively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by directly repressing the expression of some MBW component genes. PMID:26017690

  19. Relationship between in vitro enhanced nitrogenase activity of an Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 mutant and its growth-promoting activities in situ.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Samanta Bolzan; Roesch, Luiz Fernando Wurdig; Zanettini, Maria Helena Bodanese; Passaglia, Luciane Maria Pereira

    2006-07-01

    In this work, we further analyzed an Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 mutant (Sp7::Tn5-33) showing a pleiotrophic phenotype due to a Tn5 insertion into an open reading frame of 840 bp (orf280). The deduced amino acid sequence of this region has high similarity to a family of universal stress proteins. Because the most interesting property exhibited by the Sp7::Tn5-33 mutant was an enhanced in vitro nitrogen fixation activity, we addressed the question of whether it could benefit the host plant. We found that the increased nitrogenase activity at the free-living state of the mutant bacterium was correlated with an increased production of the nitrogenase reductase protein (NifH), in amounts approximately 1.5 times higher than the wild type. The mutant strain exhibited the same level of auxin production and the same colonization pattern of wheat roots as the wild type. We also observed that Sp7::Tn5-33 increased the total plant dry weight, although the N content did not differ significantly between wheat plants inoculated with mutant or wild-type strains.

  20. Activation of two mutant androgen receptors from human prostatic carcinoma by adrenal androgens and metabolic derivatives of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Culig, Z; Stober, J; Gast, A; Peterziel, H; Hobisch, A; Radmayr, C; Hittmair, A; Bartsch, G; Cato, A C; Klocker, H

    1996-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central regulatory role in prostatic carcinoma and is a target of androgen ablation therapy. Recent detection of mutant receptors in tumor specimens suggest a contribution of AR alterations to progression towards androgen independence. In a specimen derived from metastatic prostate cancer we have reported a point mutation in the AR gene that leads to a single amino acid exchange in the ligand binding domain of the receptor. Another amino acid exchange resulting from a point mutation was also identified 15 amino acids away from our mutation. This mutation was detected in the AR gene isolated from an organ-confined prostatic tumor. Here we report the functional characterization of the two mutant receptors in the presence of adrenal androgens and testosterone metabolites. These studies were performed by cotransfecting androgen-responsive reporter genes and either the wild-type or mutant AR expression vectors into receptor negative DU-145 and CV-1 cells. The indicator genes used consisted of the promoter of the androgen-inducible prostate-specific antigen gene or the C' Delta9 enhancer fragment from the promoter of the mouse sex-limited protein driving the expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene. Cotransfection-transactivation assays revealed that the adrenal androgen androstenedione and two products of testosterone metabolism, androsterone and androstandiol, induced reporter gene activity more efficiently in the presence of the mutant receptors than in the presence of the wild-type receptor. No difference between wild-type and mutant receptors was observed in the presence of the metabolite androstandione. The interaction of receptor-hormone complexes with target DNA was studied in vitro by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Dihydrotestosterone and the synthetic androgen mibolerone induced a faster migrating complex with all receptors, whereas the androgen metabolite androstandione induced this

  1. ChemCam video footage

    NASA Video Gallery

    ChemCam is a rock-zapping laser instrument that can hit rocks with a laser then observes the flash through a telescope and analyzes the spectrum of light to identify the chemical elements in the ta...

  2. Resin-composite Blocks for Dental CAD/CAM Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ruse, N.D.; Sadoun, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. PMID:25344335

  3. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    PubMed

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials.

  4. Allele-specific silencing of mutant p53 attenuates dominant-negative and gain-of-function activities

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Swathi V.; Parrales, Alejandro; Begani, Priya; Narkar, Akshay; Adhikari, Amit S.; Martinez, Luis A.; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Many p53 hotspot mutants not only lose the transcriptional activity, but also show dominant-negative (DN) and oncogenic gain-of-function (GOF) activities. Increasing evidence indicates that knockdown of mutant p53 (mutp53) in cancer cells reduces their aggressive properties, suggesting that survival and proliferation of cancer cells are, at least partially, dependent on the presence of mutp53. However, these p53 siRNAs can downregulate both wild-type p53 (wtp53) and mutp53, which limits their therapeutic applications. In order to specifically deplete mutp53, we have developed allele-specific siRNAs against p53 hotspot mutants and validated their biological effects in the absence or presence of wtp53. First, the mutp53-specific siRNAs selectively reduced protein levels of matched p53 mutants with minimal reduction in wtp53 levels. Second, downregulation of mutp53 in cancer cells expressing a mutp53 alone (p53mut) resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation and migration. Third, transfection of mutp53-specific siRNAs in cancer cells expressing both wtp53 and mutp53 also reduced cell proliferation and migration with increased transcripts of p53 downstream target genes, which became further profound when cells were treated with an MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3a or a chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. These results indicate that depletion of mutp53 by its specific siRNA restored endogenous wtp53 activity in cells expressing both wtp53 and mutp53. This is the first study demonstrating biological effects and therapeutic potential of allele-specific silencing of mutp53 by mutp53-specific siRNAs in cancer cells expressing both wtp53 and mutp53, thus providing a novel strategy towards targeted cancer therapies. PMID:26700961

  5. Compliance assurance monitoring (CAM) plans/illustrations for control devices with prevalent applicability

    SciTech Connect

    Ziolkowski, T.S.; Levy, J.A. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    The Compliance Assurance Monitoring (CAM) rule was promulgated on October 22, 1997 as 62 FR 54899. This rule generally requires that Title V facilities with active control devices apply CAM to pollutant-specific emission units to ensure that Federally enforceable emissions limitations are being met. At Title V permit renewal, smaller sources at Title V facilities also may become subject to CAM. EPA has published a draft Technical Guidance Document (TGD) for CAM (revised draft dated August 1998). This document contains applicability information, flow diagrams, indicator range development approach data, measurement system data, sample CAM plans, sample CAM illustrations, and other guidelines useful in meeting the CAM requirements for control devices on applicable pollutant-specific emission units. This poster paper illustrates CAM plans and provides illustrations of control devices likely to have prevalent CAM applicability. The poster contains a clear applicability diagram of the CAM requirements which guides the reader to other diagrams showing apparent CAM applicability for key major industry sources. Within the identified industrial sources, the most prevalent control devices have been researched and CAM plan elements displayed along with a short bibliography of references used to identify indicators and indicator ranges. Control devices currently not covered in the TGD are covered in this poster paper in addition to a couple of examples from the TGD (e.g., condensers, baghouses/dust collectors). Emphasis is given to control devices likely to be covered under CAM which have not been covered in the TGD. Examples of such control devices include sulfur recovery plant tail gas units and flue gas desulfurization units. Additionally, this poster paper graphically demonstrates a recommended approach to CAM plan development in a step-by-step manner with an explanation provided for each step.

  6. Computational characterization for catalytic activities of human CD38's wild type, E226 and E146 mutants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, My H; Dang, Van U; Luu, Boi V

    2010-06-01

    A series of the complexes of human CD38's wild type, E226 and E146 mutants as well have been simulated. The biosoftwares well simulate the penetration of nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide (NAD) into the active site. The nicotinamide end of NAD penetrates deep into the active site consistent with cleavage of the nicotinamide-glycosidic bond which is the first step of catalysis creating a Michaelis complex regarded as the intermediate product of NAD cyclase and hydrolysis reaction. The breaking down hydrogen bond between 2'-3' OH ribosyl and the residues replaced Glu(226) makes NAD to be less constrained in active site and nicotinamide (NA) becomes more difficult to be cleaved and eliminates the mutant catalytic activities. The large majority of the substrate NAD is hydrolyzed to ADPR while the conversion of NAD to cADPR is not the dominant reaction catalyzed by wild-type human CD38. The more strongly kept ribosyl group by hydrogen bonds the more NADase and the less cyclase activity. Breaking hydrogen bonds of ribosyl 2'- and 3'-OH by mutation will loosen it to promote the cyclase. The cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose (cADPR) could also penetrate deeply into active site to make some hydrogen bonds with Glu(146) and Glu(226); however, its docking poses are affected by a residue located at the entrance of the catalytic pocket (Lys(129)). These results are in good agreement with the previous crystallographic analysis and the experiments quantified the catalytic activities of human CD38 and its mutants.

  7. Cam-controlled boring bar

    DOEpatents

    Glatthorn, Raymond H.

    1986-01-01

    A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

  8. Molecular determinants for the high constitutive activity of the human histamine H4 receptor: functional studies on orthologues and mutants

    PubMed Central

    Wifling, D; Löffel, K; Nordemann, U; Strasser, A; Bernhardt, G; Dove, S; Seifert, R; Buschauer, A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Some histamine H4 receptor ligands act as inverse agonists at the human H4 receptor (hH4R), a receptor with exceptionally high constitutive activity, but as neutral antagonists or partial agonists at the constitutively inactive mouse H4 receptor (mH4R) and rat H4 receptor (rH4R). To study molecular determinants of constitutive activity, H4 receptor reciprocal mutants were constructed: single mutants: hH4R-F169V, mH4R-V171F, hH4R-S179A, hH4R-S179M; double mutants: hH4R-F169V+S179A, hH4R-F169V+S179M and mH4R-V171F+M181S. Experimental Approach Site-directed mutagenesis with pVL1392 plasmids containing hH4 or mH4 receptors were performed. Wild-type or mutant receptors were co-expressed with Gαi2 and Gβ1γ2 in Sf9 cells. Membranes were studied in saturation and competition binding assays ([3H]-histamine), and in functional [35S]-GTPγS assays with inverse, partial and full agonists of the hH4 receptor. Key Results Constitutive activity decreased from the hH4 receptor via the hH4R-F169V mutant to the hH4R-F169V+S179A and hH4R-F169V+S179M double mutants. F169 alone or in concert with S179 plays a major role in stabilizing a ligand-free active state of the hH4 receptor. Partial inverse hH4 receptor agonists like JNJ7777120 behaved as neutral antagonists or partial agonists at species orthologues with lower or no constitutive activity. Some partial and full hH4 receptor agonists showed decreased maximal effects and potencies at hH4R-F169V and double mutants. However, the mutation of S179 in the hH4 receptor to M as in mH4 receptor or A as in rH4 receptor did not significantly reduce constitutive activity. Conclusions and Implications F169 and S179 are key amino acids for the high constitutive activity of hH4 receptors and may also be of relevance for other constitutively active GPCRs. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update published in volume 170 issue 1. To view the other articles in this issue visit

  9. EpCAM modulates NF-κB signaling and interleukin-8 expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sankpal, Narendra V; Fleming, Timothy P; Gillanders, William E

    2013-04-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a 40-kD type I transmembrane protein that is overexpressed in human epithelial cancers and is currently the target of molecular therapy based on its overexpression at the cell surface. Recently, we and others have shown a role for EpCAM in cell signaling and carcinogenesis, and EpCAM expression seems to promote breast cancer invasion. Interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL-8) is an inflammatory cytokine that has recently been shown to modulate breast cancer invasion and angiogenesis. In preliminary experiments, we identified a correlation between EpCAM and IL-8 expression in primary human breast cancers. Specific ablation of EpCAM in breast cancer cell lines results in decreased IL-8 expression, and IL-8 contributes to EpCAM-dependent breast cancer invasion. Specific ablation of EpCAM is also associated with decreased NF-κB transcription factor activity, decreased phosphorylation of the NF-κB family member RELA, and increased IκBα protein expression. EpCAM modulates IL-8 expression at baseline, and following IL-1β stimulation, which is known to be a potent inducer of NF-κB in breast cancer. In functional rescue experiments, specific ablation of RELA or forced expression of the NF-κB inhibitor protein IκBα prevented EpCAM-dependent rescue of IL-8 promoter activity. These studies show for the first time that EpCAM can modulate NF-κB transcription factor activity and IL-8 expression in breast cancer and confirm the role of EpCAM signaling in modulating breast cancer invasion. Further study is required to define the molecular mechanism(s) of EpCAM signaling in breast cancer and to direct the rational development of molecular therapies targeting EpCAM.

  10. Activation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae filamentation/invasion pathway by osmotic stress in high-osmolarity glycogen pathway mutants.

    PubMed

    Davenport, K D; Williams, K E; Ullmann, B D; Gustin, M C

    1999-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are frequently used signal transduction mechanisms in eukaryotes. Of the five MAPK cascades in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the high-osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway functions to sense and respond to hypertonic stress. We utilized a partial loss-of-function mutant in the HOG pathway, pbs2-3, in a high-copy suppressor screen to identify proteins that modulate growth on high-osmolarity media. Three high-copy suppressors of pbs2-3 osmosensitivity were identified: MSG5, CAK1, and TRX1. Msg5p is a dual-specificity phosphatase that was previously demonstrated to dephosphorylate MAPKs in yeast. Deletions of the putative MAPK targets of Msg5p revealed that kss1delta could suppress the osmosensitivity of pbs2-3. Kss1p is phosphorylated in response to hyperosmotic shock in a pbs2-3 strain, but not in a wild-type strain nor in a pbs2-3 strain overexpressing MSG5. Both TEC1 and FRE::lacZ expressions are activated in strains lacking a functional HOG pathway during osmotic stress in a filamentation/invasion-pathway-dependent manner. Additionally, the cellular projections formed by a pbs2-3 mutant on high osmolarity are absent in strains lacking KSS1 or STE7. These data suggest that the loss of filamentation/invasion pathway repression contributes to the HOG mutant phenotype.

  11. Mutant SPTLC1 dominantly inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase activity in vivo and confers an age-dependent neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McCampbell, Alexander; Truong, David; Broom, Daniel C; Allchorne, Andrew; Gable, Ken; Cutler, Roy G; Mattson, Mark P; Woolf, Clifford J; Frosch, Matthew P; Harmon, Jeffrey M; Dunn, Teresa M; Brown, Robert H

    2005-11-15

    Mutations in enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism and trafficking cause a variety of neurological disorders, but details of the molecular pathophysiology remain obscure. SPTLC1 encodes one subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in sphingolipid synthesis. Mutations in SPTLC1 cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (type I) (HSAN1), an adult onset, autosomal dominant neuropathy. HSAN1 patients have reduced SPT activity. Expression of mutant SPTLC1 in yeast and mammalian cell cultures dominantly inhibits SPT activity. We created transgenic mouse lines that ubiquitously overexpress either wild-type (SPTLC1(WT)) or mutant SPTLC1 (SPTLC1(C133W)). We report here that SPTLC1(C133W) mice develop age-dependent weight loss and mild sensory and motor impairments. Aged SPTLC1(C133W) mice lose large myelinated axons in the ventral root of the spinal cord and demonstrate myelin thinning. There is also a loss of large myelinated axons in the dorsal roots, although the unmyelinated fibers are preserved. In the dorsal root ganglia, IB4 staining is diminished, whereas expression of the injury-induced transcription factor ATF3 is increased. These mice represent a novel mouse model of peripheral neuropathy and confirm the link between mutant SPT and neuronal dysfunction. PMID:16210380

  12. DICER-LIKE3 activity in Physcomitrella patens DICER-LIKE4 mutants causes severe developmental dysfunction and sterility.

    PubMed

    Arif, M Asif; Fattash, Isam; Ma, Zhaorong; Cho, Sung Hyun; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Axtell, Michael J; Frank, Wolfgang

    2012-11-01

    Trans-acting small interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs) are plant-specific siRNAs released from TAS precursor transcripts after microRNA-dependent cleavage, conversion into double-stranded RNA, and Dicer-dependent phased processing. Like microRNAs (miRNAs), ta-siRNAs direct site-specific cleavage of target RNAs at sites of extensive complementarity. Here, we show that the DICER-LIKE 4 protein of Physcomitrella patens (PpDCL4) is essential for the biogenesis of 21 nucleotide (nt) ta-siRNAs. In ΔPpDCL4 mutants, off-sized 23 and 24-nt ta-siRNAs accumulated as the result of PpDCL3 activity. ΔPpDCL4 mutants display severe abnormalities throughout Physcomitrella development, including sterility, that were fully reversed in ΔPpDCL3/ΔPpDCL4 double-mutant plants. Therefore, PpDCL3 activity, not loss of PpDCL4 function per se, is the cause of the ΔPpDCL4 phenotypes. Additionally, we describe several new Physcomitrella trans-acting siRNA loci, three of which belong to a new family, TAS6. TAS6 loci are typified by sliced miR156 and miR529 target sites and are in close proximity to PpTAS3 loci.

  13. Activation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae filamentation/invasion pathway by osmotic stress in high-osmolarity glycogen pathway mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, K. D.; Williams, K. E.; Ullmann, B. D.; Gustin, M. C.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are frequently used signal transduction mechanisms in eukaryotes. Of the five MAPK cascades in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the high-osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway functions to sense and respond to hypertonic stress. We utilized a partial loss-of-function mutant in the HOG pathway, pbs2-3, in a high-copy suppressor screen to identify proteins that modulate growth on high-osmolarity media. Three high-copy suppressors of pbs2-3 osmosensitivity were identified: MSG5, CAK1, and TRX1. Msg5p is a dual-specificity phosphatase that was previously demonstrated to dephosphorylate MAPKs in yeast. Deletions of the putative MAPK targets of Msg5p revealed that kss1delta could suppress the osmosensitivity of pbs2-3. Kss1p is phosphorylated in response to hyperosmotic shock in a pbs2-3 strain, but not in a wild-type strain nor in a pbs2-3 strain overexpressing MSG5. Both TEC1 and FRE::lacZ expressions are activated in strains lacking a functional HOG pathway during osmotic stress in a filamentation/invasion-pathway-dependent manner. Additionally, the cellular projections formed by a pbs2-3 mutant on high osmolarity are absent in strains lacking KSS1 or STE7. These data suggest that the loss of filamentation/invasion pathway repression contributes to the HOG mutant phenotype.

  14. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase is necessary but not sufficient for proliferation of human thyroid epithelial cells induced by mutant Ras.

    PubMed

    Gire, V; Marshall, C J; Wynford-Thomas, D

    1999-08-26

    Given the high frequency of ras oncogene activation in several common human cancers, its signal pathways are an important target for novel therapy. For practical reasons, however, these have been studied mainly in the context of transformation of established fibroblast cell lines, whereas ras acts at an earlier stage in human tumorigenesis and predominantly on epithelial cells. Here we have developed a more directly relevant model - human primary thyroid epithelial cells - which are a major target of naturally-occurring Ras mutation, and in which expression of mutant Ras in culture induces clonal expansion without morphological transformation, closely reproducing the phenotype of the corresponding tumour in vivo. Transient or stable expression of mutant H-ras (by scrapeloading or retroviral infection) at levels which stimulated proliferation induced sustained activation and translocation of MAP kinase (MAPK) in these cells. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway at the level of MAPKK, by expression of a dominant-negative mutant or by the pharmacological inhibitor PD98059, efficiently blocked the proliferative response. Conversely, selective activation of MAPK by a constitutively-active MAPKK1 mutant failed to mimic the action of Ras and, although this was achievable with activated Raf, micro-injection of anti-ras antibodies showed that this still required endogenous wild-type Ras function. In contrast to recent results obtained with a rodent thyroid cell line (WRT), therefore, activation of the MAPK pathway is necessary, but not sufficient, for the proliferogenic action of mutant Ras on primary human thyroid cells. These data emphasize the unreliability of extrapolation from cell lines and establish the feasibility of using a more representative human epithelial model for Ras signalling studies.

  15. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Meena S.; Ma Shuangge; Jagsi, Reshma; Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan; Higgins, Susan A.; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Lloyd, Shane; Peschel, Richard; Gaudreau, Bryant; Rockwell, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast

  16. The diageotropica mutant of tomato lacks high specific activity auxin binding sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rayle, D. L.; Lomax, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tomato plants homozygous for the diageotropica (dgt) mutation exhibit morphological and physiological abnormalities which suggest that they are unable to respond to the plant growth hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid). The photoaffinity auxin analog [3H]5N3-IAA specifically labels a polypeptide doublet of 40 and 42 kilodaltons in membrane preparations from stems of the parental variety, VFN8, but not from stems of plants containing the dgt mutation. In roots of the mutant plants, however, labeling is indistinguishable from that in VFN8. These data suggest that the two polypeptides are part of a physiologically important auxin receptor system, which is altered in a tissue-specific manner in the mutant.

  17. Comparative mutant prevention concentration and antibacterial activity of fluoroquinolones against Escherichia coli in diarrheic buffalo calves.

    PubMed

    Beri, Supriya; Sidhu, Pritam K; Kaur, Gurpreet; Chandra, Mudit; Rampal, Satyavan

    2015-10-01

    Owing to emerging threat of antimicrobial resistance, mutant prevention concentration (MPC) is considered as an important parameter to evaluate the antimicrobials for their capacity to restrict/allow the emergence of resistant mutants. Therefore, MPCs of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and norfloxacin were determined against Escherichia coli isolates of diarrheic buffalo calves. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were also established. The MICs of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and norfloxacin were 0·009, 0·022, 0·024, 0·028, and 0·036 μg/ml, respectively. The MBCs obtained were very close to the MICs of respective drugs that suggested a bactericidal mode of action of antimicrobials. The MPCs (μg/ml) of ciprofloxacin (4·2×MIC), moxifloxacin (4·8×MIC), and norfloxacin (5·1×MIC) were approximately equal but slightly lower than enrofloxacin (7·6×MIC) and levofloxacin (8·5×MIC) against clinical isolates of E. coli. The MPC data suggested that enrofloxacin has the potential for restricting the selection of E. coli mutants during treatment at appropriate dosing.

  18. A baker's yeast mutant (fil1) with a specific, partially inactivating mutation in adenylate cyclase maintains a high stress resistance during active fermentation and growth.

    PubMed

    Van Dijck, P; Ma, P; Versele, M; Gorwa, M F; Colombo, S; Lemaire, K; Bossi, D; Loïez, A; Thevelein, J M

    2000-10-01

    The initiation of fermentation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is associated with a rapid drop in stress resistance. This is disadvantageous for several biotechnological applications, e.g. the preparation of freeze doughs. We have isolated mutants in a laboratory strain which are deficient in fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance ('fil' mutants) using a heat shock selection protocol. We show that the fil1 mutant contains a mutation in the CYR1 gene which encodes adenylate cyclase. It causes a change at position 1682 of glutamate into lysine and results in a tenfold drop in adenylate cyclase activity. The fil1 mutant displays a reduction in the glucose-induced cAMP increase, trehalase activation and loss of heat resistance. Interestingly, the fil1 mutant shows the same growth and fermentation rate as the wild type strain, as opposed to other mutants with reduced activity of the cAMP pathway. Introduction of the fil1 mutation in the vigorous Y55 strain and cultivation of the mutant under pilot scale conditions resulted in a yeast that displayed a higher freeze and drought resistance during active fermentation compared to the wild type Y55 strain. These results show that high stress resistance and high fermentation activity are compatible biological properties. Isolation of fil-type mutations appears a promising avenue for development of industrial yeast strains with improved stress resistance during active fermentation.

  19. A baker's yeast mutant (fil1) with a specific, partially inactivating mutation in adenylate cyclase maintains a high stress resistance during active fermentation and growth.

    PubMed

    Van Dijck, P; Ma, P; Versele, M; Gorwa, M F; Colombo, S; Lemaire, K; Bossi, D; Loïez, A; Thevelein, J M

    2000-10-01

    The initiation of fermentation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is associated with a rapid drop in stress resistance. This is disadvantageous for several biotechnological applications, e.g. the preparation of freeze doughs. We have isolated mutants in a laboratory strain which are deficient in fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance ('fil' mutants) using a heat shock selection protocol. We show that the fil1 mutant contains a mutation in the CYR1 gene which encodes adenylate cyclase. It causes a change at position 1682 of glutamate into lysine and results in a tenfold drop in adenylate cyclase activity. The fil1 mutant displays a reduction in the glucose-induced cAMP increase, trehalase activation and loss of heat resistance. Interestingly, the fil1 mutant shows the same growth and fermentation rate as the wild type strain, as opposed to other mutants with reduced activity of the cAMP pathway. Introduction of the fil1 mutation in the vigorous Y55 strain and cultivation of the mutant under pilot scale conditions resulted in a yeast that displayed a higher freeze and drought resistance during active fermentation compared to the wild type Y55 strain. These results show that high stress resistance and high fermentation activity are compatible biological properties. Isolation of fil-type mutations appears a promising avenue for development of industrial yeast strains with improved stress resistance during active fermentation. PMID:11075928

  20. Improvement of erythrose reductase activity, deletion of by-products and statistical media optimization for enhanced erythritol production from Yarrowia lipolytica mutant 49.

    PubMed

    Ghezelbash, Gholam Reza; Nahvi, Iraj; Emamzadeh, Rahman

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to produce erythritol by Yarrowia lipolytica mutant without any by-products. Mutants of Y. lipolytica were generated by ultra-violet for enhancing erythrose reductase (ER) activity and erythritol production. The mutants showing the highest ER activity were screened by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride agar plate assay. Productivity of samples was analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with the refractive index detector. One of the mutants named as mutant 49 gave maximum erythritol production without any other by-products (particularly glycerol). Erythritol production and specific ER activity in mutant 49 increased to 1.65 and 1.47 times, respectively, in comparison with wild-type strain. The ER gene of wild and mutant strains was sequenced and analyzed. A general comparison of wild and mutant gene sequences showed the replacement of Asp(270) with Glu(270) in ER protein. In order to enhance erythritol production, we used a three component-three level-one response Box-Behnken of response surface methodology model. The optimum medium composition for erythritol production was found to be (g/l) glucose 279.49, ammonium sulfate 9.28, and pH 5.41 with 39.76 erythritol production.

  1. The Anti-Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Quinolone WCK 771 Has Potent Activity against Sequentially Selected Mutants, Has a Narrow Mutant Selection Window against Quinolone-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Preferentially Targets DNA Gyrase▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Sachin S.; Mundkur, Lakshmi A.; Gupte, Shrikant V.; Patel, Mahesh V.; Khorakiwala, Habil F.

    2006-01-01

    WCK 771 is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone with enhanced activity against quinolone-resistant staphylococci. To understand the impact of the target-level interactions of WCK 771 on its antistaphylococcal pharmacodynamic properties, we determined the MICs for genetically defined mutants and studied the mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs), the frequency of mutation, and the cidality against the wild type and double mutants. There was a twofold increase in the MICs of WCK 771 for single gyrA mutants, indicating that DNA gyrase is its primary target. All first- and second-step mutants selected by WCK 771 revealed gyrA and grlA mutations, respectively. The MICs of WCK 771 and clinafloxacin were found to be superior to those of other quinolones against strains with double and triple mutations. WCK 771 was also cidal for high-density double mutants at low concentrations. WCK 771 and clinafloxacin showed narrow mutant selection windows compared to those of the other quinolones. Against a panel of 50 high-level quinolone-resistant clinical isolates of staphylococci (ciprofloxacin MIC ≥ 16 μg/ml), the WCK 771 MPCs were ≤2 μg/ml for 68% of the strains and ≤4 μg/ml for 28% of the strains. Our results demonstrate that gyrA is the primary target of WCK 771 and that it has pharmacodynamic properties remarkably different from those of quinolones with dual targets (garenoxacin and moxifloxacin) and topoisomerase IV-specific quinolones (trovafloxacin). WCK 771 displayed an activity profile comparable to that of clinafloxacin, a dual-acting quinolone with a high affinity to DNA gyrase. Overall, the findings signify the key role of DNA gyrase in determining the optimal antistaphylococcal features of quinolones. PMID:16940059

  2. The pineapple genome and the evolution of CAM photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Ray; VanBuren, Robert; Wai, Ching Man; Tang, Haibao; Schatz, Michael C.; Bowers, John E.; Lyons, Eric; Wang, Ming-Li; Chen, Jung; Biggers, Eric; Zhang, Jisen; Huang, Lixian; Zhang, Lingmao; Miao, Wenjing; Zhang, Jian; Ye, Zhangyao; Miao, Chenyong; Lin, Zhicong; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Hongye; Yim, Won C.; Priest, Henry D.; Zheng, Chunfang; Woodhouse, Margaret; Edger, Patrick P.; Guyot, Romain; Guo, Hao-Bo; Guo, Hong; Zheng, Guangyong; Singh, Ratnesh; Sharma, Anupma; Min, Xiangjia; Zheng, Yun; Lee, Hayan; Gurtowski, James; Sedlazeck, Fritz J.; Harkess, Alex; McKain, Michael R.; Liao, Zhenyang; Fang, Jingping; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Weichang; Qin, Yuan; Wang, Kai; Chen, Li-Yu; Shirley, Neil; Lin, Yann-Rong; Liu, Li-Yu; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; Wright, Chris L.; Bulone, Vincent; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Heath, Katy; Zee, Francis; Moore, Paul H.; Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Mockler, Todd; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Freeling, Michael; Sankoff, David; Paterson, Andrew H.; Zhu, Xinguang; Yang, Xiaohan; Smith, J. Andrew C.; Cushman, John C.; Paull, Robert E.; Yu, Qingyi

    2016-01-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) is the most economically valuable crop possessing crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), a photosynthetic carbon assimilation pathway with high water use efficiency, and the second most important tropical fruit after banana in terms of international trade. We sequenced the genomes of pineapple varieties ‘F153’ and ‘MD2’, and a wild pineapple relative A. bracteatus accession CB5. The pineapple genome has one fewer ancient whole genome duplications than sequenced grass genomes and, therefore, provides an important reference for elucidating gene content and structure in the last common ancestor of extant members of the grass family (Poaceae). Pineapple has a conserved karyotype with seven pre rho duplication chromosomes that are ancestral to extant grass karyotypes. The pineapple lineage has transitioned from C3 photosynthesis to CAM with CAM-related genes exhibiting a diel expression pattern in photosynthetic tissues using beta-carbonic anhydrase (βCA) for initial capture of CO2. Promoter regions of all three βCA genes contain a CCA1 binding site that can bind circadian core oscillators. CAM pathway genes were enriched with cis-regulatory elements including the morning (CCACAC) and evening (AAAATATC) elements associated with regulation of circadian-clock genes, providing the first link between CAM and the circadian clock regulation. Gene-interaction network analysis revealed both activation and repression of regulatory elements that control key enzymes in CAM photosynthesis, indicating that CAM evolved by reconfiguration of pathways preexisting in C3 plants. Pineapple CAM photosynthesis is the result of regulatory neofunctionalization of preexisting gene copies and not acquisition of neofunctionalized genes via whole genome or tandem gene duplication. PMID:26523774

  3. A roadmap for research on crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) to enhance sustainable food and bioenergy production in a hotter, drier world.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C; Borland, Anne M; Edwards, Erika J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Tuskan, Gerald A; Owen, Nick A; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, J Andrew C; De Paoli, Henrique C; Weston, David J; Cottingham, Robert; Hartwell, James; Davis, Sarah C; Silvera, Katia; Ming, Ray; Schlauch, Karen; Abraham, Paul; Stewart, J Ryan; Guo, Hao-Bo; Albion, Rebecca; Ha, Jungmin; Lim, Sung Don; Wone, Bernard W M; Yim, Won Cheol; Garcia, Travis; Mayer, Jesse A; Petereit, Juli; Nair, Sujithkumar S; Casey, Erin; Hettich, Robert L; Ceusters, Johan; Ranjan, Priya; Palla, Kaitlin J; Yin, Hengfu; Reyes-García, Casandra; Andrade, José Luis; Freschi, Luciano; Beltrán, Juan D; Dever, Louisa V; Boxall, Susanna F; Waller, Jade; Davies, Jack; Bupphada, Phaitun; Kadu, Nirja; Winter, Klaus; Sage, Rowan F; Aguilar, Cristobal N; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2015-08-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a specialized mode of photosynthesis that features nocturnal CO2 uptake, facilitates increased water-use efficiency (WUE), and enables CAM plants to inhabit water-limited environments such as semi-arid deserts or seasonally dry forests. Human population growth and global climate change now present challenges for agricultural production systems to increase food, feed, forage, fiber, and fuel production. One approach to meet these challenges is to increase reliance on CAM crops, such as Agave and Opuntia, for biomass production on semi-arid, abandoned, marginal, or degraded agricultural lands. Major research efforts are now underway to assess the productivity of CAM crop species and to harness the WUE of CAM by engineering this pathway into existing food, feed, and bioenergy crops. An improved understanding of CAM has potential for high returns on research investment. To exploit the potential of CAM crops and CAM bioengineering, it will be necessary to elucidate the evolution, genomic features, and regulatory mechanisms of CAM. Field trials and predictive models will be required to assess the productivity of CAM crops, while new synthetic biology approaches need to be developed for CAM engineering. Infrastructure will be needed for CAM model systems, field trials, mutant collections, and data management. PMID:26153373

  4. A roadmap for research on crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) to enhance sustainable food and bioenergy production in a hotter, drier world.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C; Borland, Anne M; Edwards, Erika J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Tuskan, Gerald A; Owen, Nick A; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, J Andrew C; De Paoli, Henrique C; Weston, David J; Cottingham, Robert; Hartwell, James; Davis, Sarah C; Silvera, Katia; Ming, Ray; Schlauch, Karen; Abraham, Paul; Stewart, J Ryan; Guo, Hao-Bo; Albion, Rebecca; Ha, Jungmin; Lim, Sung Don; Wone, Bernard W M; Yim, Won Cheol; Garcia, Travis; Mayer, Jesse A; Petereit, Juli; Nair, Sujithkumar S; Casey, Erin; Hettich, Robert L; Ceusters, Johan; Ranjan, Priya; Palla, Kaitlin J; Yin, Hengfu; Reyes-García, Casandra; Andrade, José Luis; Freschi, Luciano; Beltrán, Juan D; Dever, Louisa V; Boxall, Susanna F; Waller, Jade; Davies, Jack; Bupphada, Phaitun; Kadu, Nirja; Winter, Klaus; Sage, Rowan F; Aguilar, Cristobal N; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2015-08-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a specialized mode of photosynthesis that features nocturnal CO2 uptake, facilitates increased water-use efficiency (WUE), and enables CAM plants to inhabit water-limited environments such as semi-arid deserts or seasonally dry forests. Human population growth and global climate change now present challenges for agricultural production systems to increase food, feed, forage, fiber, and fuel production. One approach to meet these challenges is to increase reliance on CAM crops, such as Agave and Opuntia, for biomass production on semi-arid, abandoned, marginal, or degraded agricultural lands. Major research efforts are now underway to assess the productivity of CAM crop species and to harness the WUE of CAM by engineering this pathway into existing food, feed, and bioenergy crops. An improved understanding of CAM has potential for high returns on research investment. To exploit the potential of CAM crops and CAM bioengineering, it will be necessary to elucidate the evolution, genomic features, and regulatory mechanisms of CAM. Field trials and predictive models will be required to assess the productivity of CAM crops, while new synthetic biology approaches need to be developed for CAM engineering. Infrastructure will be needed for CAM model systems, field trials, mutant collections, and data management.

  5. Activation of ROS/NF-{kappa}B and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM kinase II are necessary for VCAM-1 induction in IL-1{beta}-treated human tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.-F.; Chang, C.-C.; Lee, I-T.; Lee, C.-W.; Lin, W.-N.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2009-05-15

    Histone acetylation regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in the expression of inflammatory genes, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Oxidative processes have been shown to induce VCAM-1 expression. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying IL-1{beta}-induced VCAM-1 expression in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). Our results showed that IL-1{beta} enhanced HTSMCs-monocyte adhesion through up-regulation of VCAM-1, which was inhibited by pretreatment with selective inhibitors of PKC{alpha} (Goe6976), c-Src (PP1), NADPH oxidase [diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and apocynin (APO)], intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM), PI-PLC (U73122), CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II (KN62), p300 (garcinol), NF-{kappa}B (Bay11-7082), HDAC (trichostatin A), and ROS scavenger [N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)] or transfection with siRNAs of MyD88, PKC{alpha}, Src, p47{sup phox}, p300, and HDAC4. Moreover, IL-1{beta} stimulated NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII phosphorylation through MyD88-dependent PI-PLC/PKC{alpha}/c-Src/ROS and PI-PLC/Ca{sup 2+}/CaM pathways, respectively. Activation of NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII may eventually lead to the acetylation of histone residues and phosphorylation of histone deacetylases. These findings suggested that IL-1{beta} induced VCAM-1 expression via these multiple signaling pathways in HTSMCs. Blockade of these pathways may reduce monocyte adhesion via VCAM-1 suppression and attenuation of the inflammatory responses in airway diseases.

  6. Reduced mutant yield at high doses in the Salmonella/activation assay: the cause is not always toxicity.

    PubMed

    McGregor, D; Prentice, R D; McConville, M; Lee, Y J; Caspary, W J

    1984-01-01

    In the Salmonella/activation assay developed by Ames et al [1973, 1975] toxicity is not measured, though it is recognized by the loss of a cloudy appearance on the plate. One approach to the measurement of toxicity is described here and uses a microscope-linked automated colony counter to estimate the number of microcolonies formed by histidine auxotrophs that stop growing after the depletion of histidine. This technique was used to evaluate the effect of toxicity on the revertant count for 16 mutagens, most of which were chosen because, from previous experience, their dose-response curves manifested a maximum at an intermediate dose tested. One of the sixteen, 2-nitrofluorene, was not toxic up to the maximum dose tested. The relationship between mutation and toxicity for the remaining fifteen allowed them to be grouped into two categories: (1) compounds that induced decreases in survival at the same dose at which the number of mutants decreased, and (2) compounds that induced toxicity, but survival was reduced at dose levels higher than those required to reduce the number of mutants. Possible explanations for this reduction of mutant counts occurring with little apparent concomitant increase in toxicity are examined. These results may be significant for attempts to estimate mutagenic potency and, to a lesser extent, construct mathematical models of the Ames test. PMID:6381041

  7. Increased tolerance to salt stress in OPDA-deficient rice ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE mutants is linked to an increased ROS-scavenging activity

    PubMed Central

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress represents a global constraint for rice, the most important staple food worldwide. Therefore the role of the central stress signal jasmonate for the salt response was analysed in rice comparing the responses to salt stress for two jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis rice mutants (cpm2 and hebiba) impaired in the function of ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) and their wild type. The aoc mutants were less sensitive to salt stress. Interestingly, both mutants accumulated smaller amounts of Na+ ions in their leaves, and showed better scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Leaves of the wild type and JA mutants accumulated similar levels of abscisic acid (ABA) under stress conditions, and the levels of JA and its amino acid conjugate, JA–isoleucine (JA-Ile), showed only subtle alterations in the wild type. In contrast, the wild type responded to salt stress by strong induction of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), which was not observed in the mutants. Transcript levels of representative salinity-induced genes were induced less in the JA mutants. The absence of 12-OPDA in the mutants correlated not only with a generally increased ROS-scavenging activity, but also with the higher activity of specific enzymes in the antioxidative pathway, such as glutathione S-transferase, and fewer symptoms of damage as, for example, indicated by lower levels of malondialdehyde. The data are interpreted in a model where the absence of OPDA enhanced the antioxidative power in mutant leaves. PMID:25873666

  8. Inactivation of PNKP by mutant ATXN3 triggers apoptosis by activating the DNA damage-response pathway in SCA3.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Liu, Yongping; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Fang, Xiang; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana; Chatterjee, Arpita; Zhang, Hang L; Matsuura, Tohru; Choudhary, Sanjeev; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Koeppen, Arnulf H; Maciel, Patricia; Hazra, Tapas K; Sarkar, Partha S

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is an untreatable autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease, and the most common such inherited ataxia worldwide. The mutation in SCA3 is the expansion of a polymorphic CAG tri-nucleotide repeat sequence in the C-terminal coding region of the ATXN3 gene at chromosomal locus 14q32.1. The mutant ATXN3 protein encoding expanded glutamine (polyQ) sequences interacts with multiple proteins in vivo, and is deposited as aggregates in the SCA3 brain. A large body of literature suggests that the loss of function of the native ATNX3-interacting proteins that are deposited in the polyQ aggregates contributes to cellular toxicity, systemic neurodegeneration and the pathogenic mechanism in SCA3. Nonetheless, a significant understanding of the disease etiology of SCA3, the molecular mechanism by which the polyQ expansions in the mutant ATXN3 induce neurodegeneration in SCA3 has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the essential DNA strand break repair enzyme PNKP (polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase) interacts with, and is inactivated by, the mutant ATXN3, resulting in inefficient DNA repair, persistent accumulation of DNA damage/strand breaks, and subsequent chronic activation of the DNA damage-response ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signaling pathway in SCA3. We report that persistent accumulation of DNA damage/strand breaks and chronic activation of the serine/threonine kinase ATM and the downstream p53 and protein kinase C-δ pro-apoptotic pathways trigger neuronal dysfunction and eventually neuronal death in SCA3. Either PNKP overexpression or pharmacological inhibition of ATM dramatically blocked mutant ATXN3-mediated cell death. Discovery of the mechanism by which mutant ATXN3 induces DNA damage and amplifies the pro-death signaling pathways provides a molecular basis for neurodegeneration due to PNKP inactivation in SCA3, and for the first time offers a possible

  9. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 mutant with enhanced competitive colonization ability and improved biocontrol activity against fungal root pathogens.

    PubMed

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Zea-Bonilla, Teresa; Pérez-Jiménez, Rosa María; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2011-08-01

    Motility is one of the most important traits for efficient rhizosphere colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens F113rif (F113). In this bacterium, motility is a polygenic trait that is repressed by at least three independent pathways, including the Gac posttranscriptional system, the Wsp chemotaxis-like pathway, and the SadB pathway. Here we show that the kinB gene, which encodes a signal transduction protein that together with AlgB has been implicated in alginate production, participates in swimming motility repression through the Gac pathway, acting downstream of the GacAS two-component system. Gac mutants are impaired in secondary metabolite production and are unsuitable as biocontrol agents. However, the kinB mutant and a triple mutant affected in kinB, sadB, and wspR (KSW) possess a wild-type phenotype for secondary metabolism. The KSW strain is hypermotile and more competitive for rhizosphere colonization than the wild-type strain. We have compared the biocontrol activity of KSW with those of the wild-type strain and a phenotypic variant (F113v35 [V35]) which is hypermotile and hypercompetitive but is affected in secondary metabolism since it harbors a gacS mutation. Biocontrol experiments in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici/Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) and Phytophthora cactorum/Fragaria vesca (strawberry) pathosystems have shown that the three strains possess biocontrol activity. Biocontrol activity was consistently lower for V35, indicating that the production of secondary metabolites was the most important trait for biocontrol. Strain KSW showed improved biocontrol compared with the wild-type strain, indicating that an increase in competitive colonization ability resulted in improved biocontrol and that the rational design of biocontrol agents by mutation is feasible. PMID:21685161

  10. CAD/CAM for optomechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haiguang; Han, Min

    2003-10-01

    We focus at CAD/CAM for optomechatronics. We have developed a kind of CAD/CAM, which is not only for mechanics but also for optics and electronic. The software can be used for training and education. We introduce mechanical CAD, optical CAD and electrical CAD, we show how to draw a circuit diagram, mechanical diagram and luminous transmission diagram, from 2D drawing to 3D drawing. We introduce how to create 2D and 3D parts for optomechatronics, how to edit tool paths, how to select parameters for process, how to run the post processor, dynamic show the tool path and generate the CNC programming. We introduce the joint application of CAD&CAM. We aim at how to match the requirement of optical, mechanical and electronics.

  11. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions. PMID:25999343

  12. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation*

    PubMed Central

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M. A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine ϵ-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine ϵ-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated ϵ-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. PMID:20675860

  13. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  14. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Louise F; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D G; Manners, John M; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-04-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen PstDC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes.

  15. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Louise F.; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D.G.; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pst DC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes. PMID:26896849

  16. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  17. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  18. Photosystem activity and state transitions of the photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutants with different redox state of the plastoquinone pool.

    PubMed

    Bolychevtseva, Y V; Kuzminov, F I; Elanskaya, I V; Gorbunov, M Y; Karapetyan, N V

    2015-01-01

    To better understand how photosystem (PS) activity is regulated during state transitions in cyanobacteria, we studied photosynthetic parameters of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) in Synechocystis PCC 6803 wild type (WT) and its mutants deficient in oxidases (Ox(-)) or succinate dehydrogenase (SDH(-)). Dark-adapted Ox(-) mutant, lacking the oxidation agents, is expected to have a reduced PQ pool, while in SDH(-) mutant the PQ pool after dark adaptation will be more oxidized due to partial inhibition of the respiratory chain electron carriers. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that control of balance between linear and cyclic electron transport by the redox state of the PQ pool will affect PSII photosynthetic activity during state transition. We found that the PQ pool was reduced in Ox(-) mutant, but oxidized in SDH(-) mutant after prolonged dark adaptation, indicating different states of the photosynthetic apparatus in these mutants. Analysis of variable fluorescence and 77K fluorescence spectra revealed that the WT and SDH(-) mutant were in State 1 after dark adaptation, while the Ox(-) mutant was in State 2. State 2 was characterized by ~1.5 time lower photochemical activity of PSII, as well as high rate of P700 reduction and the low level of P700 oxidation, indicating high activity of cyclic electron transfer around PSI. Illumination with continuous light 1 (440 nm) along with flashes of light 2 (620 nm) allowed oxidation of the PQ pool in the Ox(-) mutant, thus promoting it to State 1, but it did not affect PSII activity in dark adapted WT and SDH(-) mutant. State 1 in the Ox(-) mutant was characterized by high variable fluorescence and P700(+) levels typical for WT and the SDH(-) mutant, indicating acceleration of linear electron transport. Thus, we show that PSII of cyanobacteria has a higher photosynthetic activity in State 1, while it is partially inactivated in State 2. This process is controlled by the redox state of PQ in

  19. Activation of Jun kinase/stress-activated protein kinase by GTPase-deficient mutants of G alpha 12 and G alpha 13.

    PubMed

    Prasad, M V; Dermott, J M; Heasley, L E; Johnson, G L; Dhanasekaran, N

    1995-08-01

    Signal transduction pathways regulated by G12 and G13 heterotrimeric G proteins are largely unknown. Expression of activated, GTPase-deficient mutants of alpha 12 and alpha 13 alter physiological responses such as Na+/H+ exchanger activity, but the effector pathways controlling these responses have not been defined. We have found that the expression of GTPase-deficient mutants of alpha 12 (alpha 12Q229L) or alpha 13 (alpha 13Q226L) leads to robust activation of the Jun kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK) pathway. Inducible alpha 12Q229L and alpha 13Q226L expression vectors stably transfected in NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated JNK/SAPK activation but not extracellular response/mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Transient transfection of alpha 12Q229L and alpha 13Q226L also activated the JNK/SAPK pathway in COS-1 cells. Expression of the GTPase-deficient mutant of alpha q (alpha qQ209L) but not alpha i (alpha iQ205L) or alpha s (alpha sQ227L) was also able to activate the JNK/SAPK pathway. Functional Ras signaling was required for alpha 12Q229L and alpha 13Q226L activation of the JNK/SAPK pathway; expression of competitive inhibitory N17Ras inhibited JNK/SAPK activation in response to both alpha 12Q229L and alpha 13Q226L. The results describe for the first time a Ras-dependent signal transduction pathway involving JNK/SAPK regulated by alpha 12 and alpha 13. PMID:7629196

  20. A pure chloride channel mutant of CLC-5 causes Dent's disease via insufficient V-ATPase activation.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Hideomi; Yamazaki, Osamu; Suzuki, Masashi; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ashida, Akira; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Kaku, Yoshitsugu; Sekine, Takashi; Seki, George; Horita, Shoko

    2016-07-01

    Dent's disease is characterized by defective endocytosis in renal proximal tubules (PTs) and caused by mutations in the 2Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger, CLC-5. However, the pathological role of endosomal acidification in endocytosis has recently come into question. To clarify the mechanism of pathogenesis for Dent's disease, we examined the effects of a novel gating glutamate mutation, E211Q, on CLC-5 functions and endosomal acidification. In Xenopus oocytes, wild-type (WT) CLC-5 showed outward-rectifying currents that were inhibited by extracellular acidosis, but E211Q and an artificial pure Cl(-) channel mutant, E211A, showed linear currents that were insensitive to extracellular acidosis. Moreover, depolarizing pulse trains induced a robust reduction in the surface pH of oocytes expressing WT CLC-5 but not E211Q or E211A, indicating that the E211Q mutant functions as a pure Cl(-) channel similar to E211A. In HEK293 cells, E211A and E211Q stimulated endosomal acidification and hypotonicity-inducible vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) activation at the plasma membrane. However, the stimulatory effects of these mutants were reduced compared with WT CLC-5. Furthermore, gene silencing experiments confirmed the functional coupling between V-ATPase and CLC-5 at the plasma membrane of isolated mouse PTs. These results reveal for the first time that the conversion of CLC-5 from a 2Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger into a Cl(-) channel induces Dent's disease in humans. In addition, defective endosomal acidification as a result of insufficient V-ATPase activation may still be important in the pathogenesis of Dent's disease.

  1. The diageotropica mutant of tomato lacks high specific activity auxin sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, G.R.; Lomax, T.L. ); Rayle, D.L. )

    1989-04-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum, Mill) plants homozygous for the single gene diageotropica (dgt) mutation have reduced shoot growth, abnormal vascular tissue, altered leaf morphology, and lack of lateral root branching. These and other morphological and physiological abnormalities suggest that dgt plants are unable to respond to the plant growth hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA). The photoaffinity auxin analogue {sup 3}H-5N{sub 3}-IAA specifically labels a polypeptide doublet of 40 ad 42 kD in membrane preparations from stems of the parental variety VFN8, but not from stems of dgt. In elongation tests, excised dgt roots respond in the same manner to IAA an VFN8 roots. These data suggest that the two polypeptides are part of a physiologically important auxin receptor system which is altered in a tissue-specific manner in the mutant.

  2. Role of L1CAM in the Regulation of the Canonical Wnt Pathway and Class I MAGE Genes.

    PubMed

    Shkurnikov, M Yu; Knyazev, E N; Wicklein, D; Schumacher, U; Samatov, T R; Tonevitskii, A G

    2016-04-01

    Molecule L1CAM is specific for nerve cells and tumors of various localizations. The expression of L1CAM is significantly higher in melanoma in comparison with benign nevi and correlates with the progress of melanoma and transition from radial to vertical growth. Monoclonal antibodies to L1CAM effectively and specifically attenuate melanoma growth, though stimulates the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. shRNA-mediated knock-down of L1CAM showed the involvement of L1CAM in regulation of activity of the canonical Wnt pathway and expression of genes of class I melanoma-associated antigens (MAGE). PMID:27165065

  3. Pattern and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among pediatric patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jan H; Reuner, Gitta; Kadish, Navah E; Pietz, Joachim; Schubert-Bast, Susanne

    2013-10-01

    high importance of these treatment options for parents. On the other hand, communication concerning CAM with the child neurologist is largely insufficient despite the wish to speak about CAM. Complementary and alternative medicine users' high compliance with conventional treatment and high perceived effectiveness of CAM support an integrative approach to CAM for pediatric patients with epilepsy. Our study implies that in addition to open parent-child neurologist communication, active inquiry on CAM treatments is necessary to enable informed decision making by parents and to establish the suitability of CAM treatment for the patient. Reliable predictors for CAM use, which allow for improved identification of patients with a high likelihood to receive CAM treatment, are the duration of the illness, use of CAM by the parents themselves, and the desire of the parents to receive a holistic and natural treatment for their child.

  4. A constitutively activated mutant of human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC): implication for the mechanism of sGC activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida; Kots, Alexander; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Heterodimeric alphabeta soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a recognized receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and mediates many of its physiological functions. Although it has been clear that the heme moiety coordinated by His-105 of the beta subunit is crucial for mediating the activation of the enzyme by NO, it is not understood whether the heme moiety plays any role in the function of the enzyme in the absence of NO. Here we analyze the effects of biochemical and genetic removal of heme and its reconstitution on the activity of the enzyme. Detergent-induced loss of heme from the wild-type alphabeta enzyme resulted in several-fold activation of the enzyme. This activation was inhibited after hemin reconstitution. A heme-deficient mutant alphabetaCys-105 with Cys substituted for His-105 was constitutively active with specific activity approaching the activity of the wild-type enzyme activated by NO. However, reconstitution of mutant enzyme with heme and/or DTT treatment significantly inhibited the enzyme. Mutant enzyme reconstituted with ferrous heme was activated by NO and CO alone and showed additive effects between gaseous effectors and the allosteric activator 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrim idin-4-ylamine. We propose that the heme moiety through its coordination with His-105 of the beta subunit acts as an endogenous inhibitor of sGC. Disruption of the heme-coordinating bond induced by binding of NO releases the restrictions imposed by this bond and allows the formation of an optimally organized catalytic center in the heterodimer.

  5. IBD and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Go Back Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Email Print + Share Crohn’s disease and ulcerative ... Energy Medicine, and Biologically-Based Practices. Mind-Body Medicine Mind-body medicine is a set of interventions ...

  6. The immune phenotype of AhR null mouse mutants: not a simple mirror of xenobiotic receptor over-activation.

    PubMed

    Esser, Charlotte

    2009-02-15

    Intrinsic and induced cell differentiation and the cellular response to endogenous and exogenous signals are hallmarks of the immune system. Specific and common signalling cascades ensure a highly flexible and adapted response. Increasing evidence suggests that gene modulation by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, is an important part of these processes. For decades the AhR has been studied mainly for its toxic effects after artificial activation by man-made chemical pollutants such as dioxins. These studies gave important, albeit to some extent skewed, evidence for a mechanistic link between the AhR and the immune system. AhR null mutants and other mutants of the AhR signalling pathway have been generated and used to analyse the physiological function of the AhR, including for the developing and antigen-responding immune system. In this review I look at the natural immunological function(s) of the AhR.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an active-site mutant hydantoin racemase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Gavira, Jose Antonio García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.

    2008-01-01

    Crystals of an active-site mutated hydantoin racemase from S. meliloti have been obtained in the presence and absence of d,l-5-isopropyl-hydantoin and characterized by X-ray diffraction. A recombinant active-site mutant of hydantoin racemase (C76A) from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT 4114 (SmeHyuA) has been crystallized in the presence and absence of the substrate d,l-5-isopropyl hydantoin. Crystals of the SmeHyuA mutant suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown using the counter-diffusion method. X-ray data were collected to resolutions of 2.17 and 1.85 Å for the free and bound enzymes, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group R3 and contain two molecules of SmeHyuA per asymmetric unit. The crystals of the free and complexed SmeHyuA have unit-cell parameters a = b = 85.43, c = 152.37 Å and a = b = 85.69, c = 154.38 Å, crystal volumes per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 1.94 and 1.98 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and solvent contents of 36.7 and 37.9%, respectively.

  8. Mutagenesis of the potato ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase and characterization of an allosteric mutant defective in 3-phosphoglycerate activation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, T.W.; Chantler, S.E.; Kahn, M.L.

    1996-02-20

    ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (glucose-1-phosphate adenylytransferase; AD P:{alpha}-D-glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.27) catalyzes a key regulatory step in {alpha}-glucan synthesis in bacteria and higher plants. We have previously shown that the expression of the cDNA sequences of the potato tuber large (LS) and small (SS) subunits yielded a functional heterotetrameric enzyme capable of complementing a mutation in the single AGP (glgC) structural gene of Escherichia coli. This heterologous complementation provides a powerful genetic approach to obtain biochemical information on the specific roles of LS and SS in enzyme function. By mutagenizing the LS cDNA with hydroxylamine and then coexpressing with wild-type SS in an E. coli glgC{sup {minus}} strain, >350 mutant colonies were identified that were impaired in glycogen production. One mutant exhibited enzymatic and antigen levels comparable to the wild-type recombinant enzyme but required 45-fold greater levels of the activator 3-phosphoglycerate for maximum activity. Sequence analysis identified a single nucleotide change that resulted in the change of Pro-52 to Leu. This heterologous genetic system provides and efficient means to identify residues important for catalysis and allosteric functioning and should lead to novel approaches to increase plant productivity. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Mutant LRRK2 toxicity in neurons depends on LRRK2 levels and synuclein but not kinase activity or inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, Gaia; Nakamura, Ken; Cookson, Mark R; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2014-01-01

    By combining experimental neuron models and mathematical tools, we developed a "systems" approach to deconvolve cellular mechanisms of neurodegeneration underlying the most common known cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). Neurons ectopically expressing mutant LRRK2 formed inclusion bodies (IBs), retracted neurites, accumulated synuclein, and died prematurely, recapitulating key features of PD. Degeneration was predicted from the levels of diffuse mutant LRRK2 that each neuron contained, but IB formation was neither necessary nor sufficient for death. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of its kinase activity destabilized LRRK2 and lowered its levels enough to account for the moderate reduction in LRRK2 toxicity that ensued. By contrast, targeting synuclein, including neurons made from PD patient-derived induced pluripotent cells, dramatically reduced LRRK2-dependent neurodegeneration and LRRK2 levels. These findings suggest that LRRK2 levels are more important than kinase activity per se in predicting toxicity and implicate synuclein as a major mediator of LRRK2-induced neurodegeneration.

  10. The inducible CAM plants in putative lunar lander experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlak, Olexii; Zaetz, Iryna; Soldatkin, Olexii; Rogutskyy, Ivan; Danilchenko, Boris; Mikheev, Olexander; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Vidmachenko, Anatolii; Foing, Bernard H.; Kozyrovska, Natalia

    Precursory lunar lander experiments on growing plants in locker-based chambers will increase our understanding of effect of lunar conditions on plant physiology. The inducible CAM (Cras-sulacean Acid Metabolism)-plants are reasonable model for a study of relationships between environmental challenges and changes in plant/bacteria gene expression. In inducible CAM-plants the enzymatic machinery for the environmentally activated CAM switches on from a C3-to a full-CAM mode of photosynthesis in response to any stresses (Winter et al., 2008). In our study, Kalanchoe spp. are shown to be promising candidates for putative lunar experiments as resistant to irradiation and desiccation, especially after inoculation with a bacterial consortium (Boorlak et al., 2010). Within frames of the experiment we expect to get information about the functional activity of CAM-plants, in particular, its organogenesis, photosystem, the circadian regulation of plant metabolism on the base of data gaining with instrumental indications from expression of the reporter genes fused to any genes involved in vital functions of the plant (Kozyrovska et al., 2009). References 1. Winter K., Garcia M., Holtum J. (2008) J. Exp. Bot. 59(7):1829-1840 2. Bourlak O., Lar O., Rogutskyy I., Mikheev A., Zaets I., Chervatyuk N., de Vera J.-P., Danilchenko A.B. Foing B.H., zyrovska N. (2010) Space Sci. Technol. 3. Kozyrovska N.O., Vidmachenko A.P., Foing B.H. et al. Exploration/call/estec/ESA. 2009.

  11. Thioredoxin A Active-Site Mutants Form Mixed Disulfide Dimers That Resemble Enzyme–Substrate Reaction Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Kouwen, Thijs R.H.M.; Andréll, Juni; Schrijver, Rianne; Dubois, Jean-Yves F.; Maher, Megan J.; Iwata, So; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Thioredoxin functions in nearly all organisms as the major thiol–disulfide oxidoreductase within the cytosol. Its prime purpose is to maintain cysteine-containing proteins in the reduced state by converting intramolecular disulfide bonds into dithiols in a disulfide exchange reaction. Thioredoxin has been reported to contribute to a wide variety of physiological functions by interacting with specific sets of substrates in different cell types. To investigate the function of the essential thioredoxin A (TrxA) in the low-GC Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, we purified wild-type TrxA and three mutant TrxA proteins that lack either one or both of the two cysteine residues in the CxxC active site. The pure proteins were used for substrate-binding studies known as “mixed disulfide fishing” in which covalent disulfide-bonded reaction intermediates can be visualized. An unprecedented finding is that both active-site cysteine residues can form mixed disulfides with substrate proteins when the other active-site cysteine is absent, but only the N-terminal active-site cysteine forms stable interactions. A second novelty is that both single-cysteine mutant TrxA proteins form stable homodimers due to thiol oxidation of the remaining active-site cysteine residue. To investigate whether these dimers resemble mixed enzyme–substrate disulfides, the structure of the most abundant dimer, C32S, was characterized by X-ray crystallography. This yielded a high-resolution (1.5Å) X-ray crystallographic structure of a thioredoxin homodimer from a low-GC Gram-positive bacterium. The C32S TrxA dimer can be regarded as a mixed disulfide reaction intermediate of thioredoxin, which reveals the diversity of thioredoxin/substrate-binding modes. PMID:18455736

  12. Mdm2 ligase dead mutants did not act in a dominant negative manner to re-activate p53, but promoted tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Swaroop, Manju; Sun, Yi

    2003-01-01

    Mdm2 (murine double minute 2) is an oncogene, first identified in BALB/c 3T3 cells. Over-expression and gene amplification of Mdm2 were found in a variety of human cancers. Recently, Mdm2 was found to be an E3 ubiquitin ligase that promotes degradation of p53, which contributes significantly to its oncogenic activity. In this study, we test a hypothesis that Mdm2 ligase dead mutants, which retained p53 binding activity but lost degradation activity, would act in a dominant negative manner to re-activate p53, especially upon stressed conditions. Five Mdm2 constructs expressing wild-type and E3 ligase-dead Mdm2 proteins were generated in a Tet-Off system and transfected into MCF-7 breast cancer cells (p53+/+ with Mdm2 overexpression) as well as MCF10A immortalized breast cells (p53+/+ without Mdm2 overexpression) as a normal control. We found that expression of Mdm2 mutants were tightly regulated by doxycycline. Withdrawal of doxycycline in culture medium triggered overexpression of Mdm2 mutants. However, expression of ligase dead mutants in MCF7 and MCF10A cells did not reactivate p53 as shown by a luciferase-reporter transcription assay and Western blot of p53 and its downstream target p21 under either unstressed condition or after exposure to DNA damaging agents. Biologically, over-expression of Mdm2 mutants had no effect on p53-induced apoptosis following DNA damage. Interestingly, over-expression of Mdm2 mutants promoted growth of MCF7 tumor cells probably via a p53-independent mechanism. Over-expression of Mdm2 mutants, however, had no effect on the growth of normal MCF10A cells and did not cause their transformation. Thus, ligase dead mutants of Mdm2 did not act in a dominant negative manner to reactivate p53 and they are not oncogenes in MCF10A cells.

  13. Comparison of the growth promoting activities and toxicities of various auxin analogs on cells derived from wild type and a nonrooting mutant of tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Caboche, M.; Muller, J.F. ); Chanut, F. ); Aranda, G.; Cirakoglu, S. )

    1987-01-01

    A naphthaleneacetic acid tolerant mutant isolated from a mutagenized culture of tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and impaired in root morphogenesis has been previously characterized by genetic analysis. To understand the biochemical basis for naphthaleneacetic acid resistance, cells derived from this mutant and from wild-type tobacco were compared for their ability to respond to various growth regulators. The growth promoting abilities and cytotoxicities of auxin analogs were different for mutant and wild-type cells. These different activities were not correlated with increased rate of conjugation or breakdown of the auxins by mutant cells. These observations, as well as previous studies on the interaction of the mutant with Agrobacterium, suggest that mutant resistance to auxins is not a result of a specific modification of the process by which auxins induce cell killing, but to a more general alteration of the cellular response to auxin. A screening of auxin-related molecules which induce cell death in wild-type cells but not mutant cells without promoting growth in either was performed. p-Bromophenyleacetic acid was found to display these characteristics.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an active-site mutant hydantoin racemase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Gavira, Jose Antonio; García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.

    2008-01-01

    A recombinant active-site mutant of hydantoin racemase (C76A) from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT 4114 (SmeHyuA) has been crystallized in the presence and absence of the substrate d,l-5-isopropyl hydantoin. Crystals of the SmeHyuA mutant suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown using the counter-diffusion method. X-ray data were collected to resolutions of 2.17 and 1.85 Å for the free and bound enzymes, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group R3 and contain two molecules of SmeHyuA per asymmetric unit. The crystals of the free and complexed SmeHyuA have unit-cell parameters a = b = 85.43, c = 152.37 Å and a = b = 85.69, c = 154.38 Å, crystal volumes per protein weight (V M) of 1.94 and 1.98 Å3 Da−1 and solvent contents of 36.7 and 37.9%, respectively. PMID:18097103

  15. Altered regulation of lipid biosynthesis in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in chloroplast glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Browse, J.; Somerville, C. )

    1988-06-01

    The leaf membrane lipids of many plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., are synthesized by two complementary pathways that are associated with the chloroplast and the endoplasmic reticulum. By screening directly for alterations in lipid acyl-group composition, the authors have identified several mutants of Arabidopsis that lack the plastid pathway because of a deficiency in activity of the first enzyme in the plastid pathway of glycerolipid synthesis, acyl-ACP:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. The lesion results in an increased synthesis of lipids by the cytoplasmic pathway that largely compensates for the loss of the plastid pathway and provides nearly normal amounts of all the lipids required for chloroplast biogenesis. However, the fatty acid composition of the leaf membrane lipids of the mutants is altered because the acyltransferases associated with the two pathways normally exhibit different substrate specificities. The remarkable flexibility of the system provides an insight into the nature of the regulatory mechanisms that allocate lipids for membrane biogenesis.

  16. Determination of the catalytic activity of LEOPARD syndrome-associated SHP2 mutants toward parafibromin, a bona fide SHP2 substrate involved in Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Noda, Saori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Takeru; Tanuma, Sei-ichi; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-22

    SHP2, encoded by the PTPN11 gene, is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that plays a key role in the proliferation of cells via RAS-ERK activation. SHP2 also promotes Wnt signaling by dephosphorylating parafibromin. Germline missense mutations of PTPN11 are found in more than half of patients with Noonan syndrome (NS) and LEOPARD syndrome (LS), both of which are congenital developmental disorders with multiple common symptoms. However, whereas NS-associated PTPN11 mutations give rise to gain-of-function SHP2 mutants, LS-associated SHP2 mutants are reportedly loss-of-function mutants. To determine the phosphatase activity of LS-associated SHP2 more appropriately, we performed an in vitro phosphatase assay using tyrosine-phosphorylated parafibromin, a biologically relevant substrate of SHP2 and the positive regulator of Wnt signaling that is activated through SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation. We found that LS-associated SHP2 mutants (Y279C, T468M, Q506P, and Q510E) exhibited a substantially reduced phosphatase activity toward parafibromin when compared with wild-type SHP2. Furthermore, each of the LS-associated mutants displayed a differential degree of decrease in phosphatase activity. Deviation of the SHP2 catalytic activity from a certain range, either too strong or too weak, may therefore lead to similar clinical outcomes in NS and LS, possibly through an imbalanced Wnt signal caused by inadequate dephosphorylation of parafibromin.

  17. A mutant crp allele that differentially activates the operons of the fuc regulon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1988-05-01

    L-Fucose is used by Escherichia coli through an inducible pathway mediated by a fucP-encoded permease, a fucI-encoded isomerase, a fucK-encoded kinase, and a fucA-encoded aldolase. The adolase catalyzes the formation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and L-lactaldehyde. Anaerobically, lactaldehyde is converted by a fucO-encoded oxidoreductase to L-1,2-propanediol, which is excreted. The fuc genes belong to a regulon comprising four linked operons: fucO, fucA, fucPIK, and fucR. The positive regulator encoded by fucR responds to fuculose 1-phosphate as the effector. Mutants serially selected for aerobic growth on propanediol became constitutive in fucO and fucA [fucO(Con) fucA(Con)], but noninducible in fucPIK [fucPIK(Non)]. An external suppressor mutation that restored growth on fucose caused constitutive expression of fucPIK. Results from this study indicate that this suppressor mutation occurred in crp, which encodes the cyclic AMP-binding (or receptor) protein. When the suppressor allele (crp-201) was transduced into wild-type strains, the recipient became fucose negative and fucose sensitive (with glycerol as the carbon and energy source) because of impaired expression of fucA. The fucPIK operon became hyperinducible. The growth rate on maltose was significantly reduced, but growth on L-rhamnose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, glycerol, or glycerol 3-phosphate was close to normal. Lysogenization of fuc+ crp-201 cells by a lambda bacteriophage bearing crp+ restored normal growth ability on fucose. In contrast, lysogenization of [fucO(Con)fucA(Con)fucPIK(Non)crp-201] cells by the same phage retarded their growth on fucose. PMID:2834341

  18. Systematic screening of glycosylation- and trafficking-associated gene knockouts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies mutants with improved heterologous exocellulase activity and host secretion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As a strong fermentator, Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the potential to be an excellent host for ethanol production by consolidated bioprocessing. For this purpose, it is necessary to transform cellulose genes into the yeast genome because it contains no cellulose genes. However, heterologous protein expression in S. cerevisiae often suffers from hyper-glycosylation and/or poor secretion. Thus, there is a need to genetically engineer the yeast to reduce its glycosylation strength and to increase its secretion ability. Results Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene-knockout strains were screened for improved extracellular activity of a recombinant exocellulase (PCX) from the cellulose digesting fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Knockout mutants of 47 glycosylation-related genes and 10 protein-trafficking-related genes were transformed with a PCX expression construct and screened for extracellular cellulase activity. Twelve of the screened mutants were found to have a more than 2-fold increase in extracellular PCX activity in comparison with the wild type. The extracellular PCX activities in the glycosylation-related mnn10 and pmt5 null mutants were, respectively, 6 and 4 times higher than that of the wild type; and the extracellular PCX activities in 9 protein-trafficking-related mutants, especially in the chc1, clc1 and vps21 null mutants, were at least 1.5 times higher than the parental strains. Site-directed mutagenesis studies further revealed that the degree of N-glycosylation also plays an important role in heterologous cellulase activity in S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Systematic screening of knockout mutants of glycosylation- and protein trafficking-associated genes in S. cerevisiae revealed that: (1) blocking Golgi-to-endosome transport may force S. cerevisiae to export cellulases; and (2) both over- and under-glycosylation may alter the enzyme activity of cellulases. This systematic gene-knockout screening approach may serve as a convenient means for

  19. Evidence that Proteosome Inhibitors and Chemical Chaperones Can Rescue the Activity of Retinol Dehydrogenase 12 mutant T49M

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Belyaeva, Olga V.; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2011-01-01

    Retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) is a microsomal enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of all-trans-retinaldehyde to all-trans-retinol when expressed in cells. Mutations in RDH12 cause severe retinal degeneration; however, some of the disease-associated RDH12 mutants retain significant catalytic activity. Our previous study (Lee et al., FEBS Lett. 2010 584:507–10) demonstrated that the catalytically active T49M and I51N variants of RDH12 undergo accelerated degradation through the ubiquitin-proteosome system, which results in reduced levels of these proteins in the cells. Here, we investigated whether stabilization of T49M or I51N RDH12 protein levels through inhibition of proteosome activity or improved folding could rescue their retinaldehyde reductase activity. For the T49M variant, inhibition of proteosome activity resulted in an increased level of T49M protein in the microsomal fraction. The higher level of the T49M variant in microsomes correlated with the higher microsomal retinaldehyde reductase activity. T49M-expressing living cells treated with inhibitors of proteosome activity or with dimethyl sulfoxide exhibited an increase in the conversion of retinaldehyde to retinol, consistent with recovery of functional RDH12 protein. On the other hand, accumulation of the I51N variant in the microsomes did not result in higher retinaldehyde reductase activity of the microsomes or cells. These results provide a proof of concept that, at least in the case of the T49M variant, prevention of accelerated degradation could lead to restoration of its function in the cells. This finding justifies further search for more efficient and clinically relevant compounds for stabilizing the T49M variant activity. PMID:21232531

  20. Enhanced Xylitol Production by Mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus 36907-FMEL1 Due to Improved Xylose Reductase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Seong; Park, Jae-Bum; Jang, Seung-Won; Ha, Suk-Jin

    2015-08-01

    A directed evolution and random mutagenesis were carried out with thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 for efficient xylitol production. The final selected strain, K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1, exhibited 120 and 39 % improvements of xylitol concentration and xylitol yield, respectively, as compared to the parental strain, K. marxianus ATCC 36907. According to enzymatic assays for xylose reductase (XR) activities, XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 was around twofold higher than that from the parental strain. Interestingly, the ratios of NADH-linked and NADPH-linked XR activities were highly changed from 1.92 to 1.30 when K. marxianus ATCC 36907 and K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 were compared. As results of KmXYL1 genes sequencing, it was found that cysteine was substituted to tyrosine at position 36 after strain development which might cause enhanced XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1.

  1. γ-Band deficiency and abnormal thalamocortical activity in P/Q-type channel mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, Rodolfo R.; Choi, Soonwook; Urbano, Francisco J.; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2007-01-01

    Thalamocortical in vivo and in vitro function was studied in mice lacking P/Q-type calcium channels (CaV2.1), in which N-type calcium channels (CaV2.2) supported central synaptic transmission. Unexpectedly, in vitro patch recordings from thalamic neurons demonstrated no γ-band subthreshold oscillation, and voltage-sensitive dye imaging demonstrated an absence of cortical γ-band-dependent columnar activation involving cortical inhibitory interneuron activity. In vivo electroencephalogram recordings showed persistent absence status and a dramatic reduction of γ-band activity. Pharmacological block of T-type calcium channels (CaV3), although not noticeably affecting normal control animals, left the knockout mice in a coma-like state. Hence, although N-type calcium channels can rescue P/Q-dependent synaptic transmission, P/Q calcium channels are essential in the generation of γ-band activity and resultant cognitive function. PMID:17968008

  2. Asymmetric processing of mutant factor X Arg386Cys reveals differences between intrinsic and extrinsic pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Baroni, M; Pavani, G; Pinotti, M; Branchini, A; Bernardi, F; Camire, R M

    2015-10-01

    Alterations in coagulation factor X (FX) activation, mediated by the extrinsic VIIa/tissue factor (FVIIa/TF) or the intrinsic factor IXa/factor VIIIa (FIXa/FVIIIa) complexes, can result in hemorrhagic/prothrombotic tendencies. However, the molecular determinants involved in substrate recognition by these enzymes are poorly defined. Here, we investigated the role of arginine 386 (chymotrypsin numbering c202), a surface-exposed residue on the FX catalytic domain. The naturally occurring FX386Cys mutant and FX386Ala variant were characterized. Despite the unpaired cysteine, recombinant (r)FX386Cys was efficiently secreted (88.6±21.3% of rFXwt) and possessed normal clearance in mice. rFX386Cys was also normally activated by FVIIa/TF and displayed intact amidolytic activity. In contrast, rFX386Cys activation by the FIXa/FVIIIa complex was 4.5-fold reduced, which was driven by a decrease in the kcat (1.6∗10(-4) s(-1) vs 5.8∗10(-4) s(-1), rFXwt). The virtually unaltered Km (70.6 nM vs 55.6nM, rFXwt) suggested no major alterations in the FX substrate exosite. Functional assays in plasma supplemented with rFX386Cys indicated a remarkable reduction in the thrombin generation rate and thus in coagulation efficiency. Consistently, the rFX386Ala variant displayed similar biochemical features suggesting that global changes at position 386 impact the intrinsic pathway activation. These data indicate that the FXArg386 is involved in FIXa/FVIIIa-mediated FX activation and help in elucidating the bleeding tendency associated with the FX386Cys in a rare FX deficiency case. Taking advantage of the unpaired cysteine, the rFX386Cys mutant may be efficiently targeted by thiol-specific ligands and represent a valuable tool to study FX structure-function relationships both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26012870

  3. Synergistic inhibition of T-cell activation by a cell-permeable ZAP-70 mutant and ctCTLA-4

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyun-Do; Choi, Je-Min; Chae, Wook-Jin; Lee, Sang-Kyou

    2009-04-10

    T-cell activation requires TcR-mediated and co-stimulatory signals. ZAP-70 participates in the initial step of TcR signal transduction, while a co-receptor, CTLA-4, inhibits T-cell activation. In previous studies, the overexpression of a ZAP-70 mutant (ZAP-70-Y319F) inhibited the TcR-induced activation of NFAT and IL-2 production, while Hph-1-ctCTLA-4 prevented allergic inflammation. To develop an effective immunosuppressive protein drug that blocks both TcR-mediated and co-stimulatory signaling pathways, a fusion protein of ZAP-70-Y319F and the Hph-1 protein transduction domain was generated. Hph-1-ZAP-70-Y319F inhibited the phosphorylation of ZAP-70-Tyr{sup 319}, LAT-Tyr{sup 191}, and p44/42 MAPK induced by TcR stimulation, NFAT- and AP-1-mediated gene transcription, and the induction of CD69 expression and IL-2 secretion. Hph-1-ZAP-70-Y319F and Hph-1-ctCTLA-4 synergistically inhibited signaling events during T-cell activation. This is the first report to demonstrate the synergistic inhibition of signals transmitted via TcR and its co-stimulatory receptor by cell-permeable forms of intracellular signal mediators.

  4. Functional consequences of EpCam mutation in mice and men.

    PubMed

    Mueller, James L; McGeough, Matthew D; Peña, Carla A; Sivagnanam, Mamata

    2014-02-15

    Congenital tufting enteropathy (CTE) is a severe diarrheal disease of infancy characterized by villous changes and epithelial tufts. We previously identified mutations in epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) as the cause of CTE. We developed an in vivo mouse model of CTE based on EpCAM mutations found in patients with the aim to further elucidate the in vivo role of EpCAM and allow for a direct comparison to human CTE. Using Cre-LoxP recombination technology, we generated a construct lacking exon 4 in Epcam. Epcam(Δ4/Δ4) mice and CTE patient intestinal tissue integrity was analyzed by histology using both light immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Epcam(Δ4/Δ4) mice demonstrate neonatal lethality and growth retardation with pathological features, including epithelial tufts, enterocyte crowding, altered desmosomes, and intercellular gaps, similar to human CTE patients. Mutant EpCAM protein is present at low levels and is mislocalized in the intestine of Epcam(Δ4/Δ4) mice and CTE patients. Deletion of exon 4 was found to decrease expression of both EpCAM and claudin-7 causing a loss of colocalization, functionally disrupting the EpCAM/claudin-7 complex, a finding for the first time confirmed in CTE patients. Furthermore, compared with unaffected mice, mutation of Epcam leads to enhanced permeability and intestinal cell migration, uncovering underlying disease mechanisms.

  5. Increased longevity of some C. elegans mitochondrial mutants explained by activation of an alternative energy-producing pathway.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco; Park, Donha; Riddle, Donald L

    2011-10-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans misc-1 gene encodes a mitochondrial carrier with a role in oxidative stress response. The knock-out mutant has no lifespan phenotype and fails to upregulate the gei-7-mediated glyoxylate shunt, an extra-mitochondrial pathway of energy production. We show that gei-7 is required for the longevity of the mitochondrial mutant clk-1. Our data suggest that only mitochondrial mutants that upregulate gei-7 can achieve longevity.

  6. A roadmap for research on crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) to enhance sustainable food and bioenergy production in a hotter, drier world

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C.; Borland, Anne M.; Edwards, Erika; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Owen, Nick; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, J. Andrew C.; Cestari De Paoli, Henrique; Weston, David; Cottingham, Robert; Hartwell, James; Davis, Sarah C.; Silvera, Katia; Ming, Ray; Schlauch, Karen; Abraham, Paul E.; Stewart, J. Ryan; Guo, Hao -Bo; Nair, Sujithkumar S.; Ranjan, Priya; Palla, Kaitlin J.; Yin, Hengfu; Albion, Rebecca; Ha, Jungmin; Lim, Sung Don; Wone, Bernard W. M.; Yim, Won Cheol; Garcia, Travis; Mayer, Jesse A.; Petereit, Juli; Casey, Erin; Hettich, Robert L.; Ceusters, John; Ranjan, Priya; Palla, Kaitlin J.; Yin, Hengfu; Reyes-Garcia, Casandra; Andrade, Jose Luis; Freschi, Luciano; Beltran, Juan D.; Dever, Louisa V.; Boxall, Susanna F.; Waller, Jade; Davies, Jack; Bupphada, Phaitun; Kadu, Nirja; Winter, Klaus; Sage, Rowan F.; Aguilar, Cristobal N.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry; Holtum, Joseph A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a specialized mode of photosynthesis that features nocturnal CO₂ uptake, facilitates increased water-use efficiency (WUE), and enables CAM plants to inhabit water-limited environments such as semi-arid deserts or seasonally dry forests. Human population growth and global climate change now present challenges for agricultural production systems to increase food, feed, forage, fiber, and fuel production. One approach to meet these challenges is to increase reliance on CAM crops, such as Agave and Opuntia, for biomass production on semi-arid, abandoned, marginal, or degraded agricultural lands. Major research efforts are now underway to assess the productivity of CAM crop species and to harness the WUE of CAM by engineering this pathway into existing food and bioenergy crops. An improved understanding of CAM gained through intensive and expanded research efforts has potential for high returns on research investment in the foreseeable future. To help realize the potential of sustainable dryland agricultural systems, it is necessary to address scientific questions related to the genomic features, regulatory mechanisms, and evolution of CAM; CAM-into-C3 engineering; and the production of CAM crops. Answering these questions requires collaborative efforts to build infrastructure for CAM model systems, field trials, mutant collections, and data management.

  7. CAMS confirmation of previously reported meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Nénon, Q.; Gural, P. S.; Albers, J.; Haberman, B.; Johnson, B.; Holman, D.; Morales, R.; Grigsby, B. J.; Samuels, D.; Johannink, C.

    2016-03-01

    Leading up to the 2015 IAU General Assembly, the International Astronomical Union's Working List of Meteor Showers included 486 unconfirmed showers, showers that are not certain to exist. If confirmed, each shower would provide a record of past comet or asteroid activity. Now, we report that 41 of these are detected in the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) video-based meteor shower survey. They manifest as meteoroids arriving at Earth from a similar direction and orbit, after removing the daily radiant drift due to Earth's motion around the Sun. These showers do exist and, therefore, can be moved to the IAU List of Established Meteor Showers. This adds to 31 previously confirmed showers from CAMS data. For each shower, finding charts are presented based on 230,000 meteors observed up to March of 2015, calculated by re-projecting the drift-corrected Sun-centered ecliptic coordinates into more familiar equatorial coordinates. Showers that are not detected, but should have, and duplicate showers that project to the same Sun-centered ecliptic coordinates, are recommended for removal from the Working List.

  8. The detection of EpCAM(+) and EpCAM(-) circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Sanne; van Dalum, Guus; Lenferink, Aufried T M; Tibbe, Arjan G J; Hiltermann, T Jeroen N; Groen, Harry J M; van Rijn, Cees J M; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2015-07-17

    EpCAM expressing circulating tumor cells, detected by CellSearch, are predictive of short survival in several cancers and may serve as a liquid biopsy to guide therapy. Here we investigate the presence of EpCAM(+) CTC detected by CellSearch and EpCAM(-) CTC discarded by CellSearch, after EpCAM based enrichment. EpCAM(-) CTC were identified by filtration and fluorescent labelling. This approach was validated using different cell lines spiked into blood and evaluated on blood samples of 27 metastatic lung cancer patients. The majority of spiked EpCAM(+) cells could be detected with CellSearch, whereas most spiked cells with EpCAM(low) or EpCAM(-) expression were detected using filtration. Five or more CTC were detected in 15% of the patient samples, this increased to 41% when adding the CTC detected in the discarded blood. The number of patients with CTC and the number of CTC detected were doubled by the presence of EpCAM(-) CTC. In this pilot study, the presence of EpCAM(+) CTC was associated with poor outcome, whereas the EpCAM(-) CTC were not. This observation will need to be confirmed in larger studies and molecular characterization needs to be conducted to elucidate differences between EpCAM(-) and EpCAM(+) CTC.

  9. Glycosynthase activity of Bacillus licheniformis 1,3-1,4-beta-glucanase mutants: specificity, kinetics, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Faijes, Magda; Pérez, Xavi; Pérez, Odette; Planas, Antoni

    2003-11-18

    Glycosynthases are engineered retaining glycosidases devoid of hydrolase activity that efficiently catalyze transglycosylation reactions. The mechanism of the glycosynthase reaction is probed with the E134A mutant of Bacillus licheniformis 1,3-1,4-beta-glucanase. This endo-glycosynthase is regiospecific for formation of a beta-1,4-glycosidic bond with alpha-glycosyl fluoride donors (laminaribiosyl as the minimal donor) and oligosaccharide acceptors containing glucose or xylose on the nonreducing end (aryl monosaccharides or oligosaccharides). The pH dependence of the glycosynthase activity reflects general base catalysis with a kinetic pK(a) of 5.2 +/- 0.1. Kinetics of enzyme inactivation by a water-soluble carbodiimide (EDC) are consistent with modification of an active site carboxylate group with a pK(a) of 5.3 +/- 0.2. The general base is Glu138 (the residue acting as the general acid-base in the parental wild-type enzyme) as probed by preparing the double mutant E134A/E138A. It is devoid of glycosynthase activity, but use of sodium azide as an acceptor not requiring general base catalysis yielded a beta-glycosyl azide product. The pK(a) of Glu138 (kinetic pK(a) on k(cat)/K(M) and pK(a) of EDC inactivation) for the E134A glycosynthase has dropped 1.8 pH units compared to the pK(a) values of the wild type, enabling the same residue to act as a general base in the glycosynthase enzyme. Kinetic parameters of the E134A glycosynthase-catalyzed condensation between Glcbeta4Glcbeta3GlcalphaF (2) as a donor and Glcbeta4Glcbeta-pNP (15) as an acceptor are as follows: k(cat) = 1.7 s(-)(1), K(M)(acceptor) = 11 mM, and K(M)(donor) < 0.3 mM. Donor self-condensation and elongation reactions are kinetically evaluated to establish the conditions for preparative use of the glycosynthase reaction in oligosaccharide synthesis. Yields are 70-90% with aryl monosaccharide and cellobioside acceptors, but 25-55% with laminaribiosides, the lower yields (and lower initial rates) due to

  10. Role of miR-34a as a suppressor of L1CAM in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Uwe; Doberstein, Kai; Rupp, Anne-Kathleen; Bretz, Niko P; Wuttig, Daniela; Kiefel, Helena; Breunig, Christian; Fiegl, Heidi; Müller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Zeillinger, Robert; Schuster, Eva; Zeimet, Alain G; Sültmann, Holger; Altevogt, Peter

    2014-01-30

    L1CAM promotes cell motility, invasion and metastasis formation in various human cancers and can be considered as a driver of tumor progression. Knowledge about genetic processes leading to the presence of L1CAM in cancers is of considerable importance. Experimentally, L1CAM expression can be achieved by various means. Over-expression of the transcription factor SLUG or treatment of cells with TGF-β1 can induce or augment L1CAM levels in cancer cells. Likewise, hypomethylation of the L1CAM promoter on the X chromosome correlates with L1CAM expression. However, presently no mechanisms that might control transcriptional activity are known. Here we have identified miR-34a as a suppressor of L1CAM. We observed that L1CAM positive endometrial carcinoma (EC) cell lines HEC1B and SPAC1L lost L1CAM protein and mRNA by treatment with demethylating agents or knock-down of the DNA-methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1). Concomitantly, several miRNAs were up-regulated. Using miRNA profiling, luciferase reporter assays and mutagenesis, we identified miR-34a as a putative binder to the L1CAM-3'UTR. Over-expression of miR-34a in HEC1B cells blocked L1CAM expression and inhibited cell migration. In ECC1 cells (wildtype p53) the activation of p53 caused miR-34a up-regulation and loss of L1CAM expression that was miR-34a dependent. We observed an inverse correlation between L1CAM and miR-34a levels in EC cell lines. In primary tumor sections areas expressing high amounts of L1CAM had less miR-34a expression than those with low L1CAM levels. Our data suggest that miR-34a can regulate L1CAM expression by targeting L1CAM mRNA for degradation. These findings shed new light on the complex regulation of L1CAM in human tumors. PMID:24497324

  11. Role of miR-34a as a suppressor of L1CAM in endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, Uwe; Doberstein, Kai; Rupp, Anne-Kathleen; Bretz, Niko P.; Wuttig, Daniela; Kiefel, Helena; Breunig, Christian; Fiegl, Heidi; Müller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Zeillinger, Robert; Eva, Heidi; Zeimet, Alain G.; SÜltmann, Holger; Altevogt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    L1CAM promotes cell motility, invasion and metastasis formation in various human cancers and can be considered as a driver of tumor progression. Knowledge about genetic processes leading to the presence of L1CAM in cancers is of considerable importance. Experimentally, L1CAM expression can be achieved by various means. Overexpression of the transcription factor SLUG or treatment of cells with TGF-ß1 can induce or augment L1CAM levels in cancer cells. Likewise, hypomethylation of the L1CAM promoter on the X chromosome correlates with L1CAM expression. However, presently no mechanisms that might control transcriptional activity are known. Here we have identified miR-34a as a suppressor of L1CAM. We observed that L1CAM positive endometrial carcinoma (EC) cell lines HEC1B and SPAC1L lost L1CAM protein and mRNA by treatment with demethylating agents or knock-down of the DNA-methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1). Concomitantly, several miRNAs were up-regulated. Using miRNA profiling, luciferase reporter assays and mutagenesis, we identified miR-34a as a putative binder to the L1CAM-3'UTR. Overexpression of miR-34a in HEC1B cells blocked L1CAM expression and inhibited cell migration. In ECC1 cells (wildtype p53) the activation of p53 caused miR-34a up-regulation and loss of L1CAM expression that was miR-34a dependent. We observed an inverse correlation between L1CAM and miR-34a levels in EC cell lines. In primary tumor sections areas expressing high amounts of L1CAM had less miR-34a expression than those with low L1CAM levels. Our data suggest that miR-34a can regulate L1CAM expression by targeting L1CAM mRNA for degradation. These findings shed new light on the complex regulation of L1CAM in human tumors. PMID:24497324

  12. Correlation of Recombinant Integrase Activity and Functional Preintegration Complex Formation during Acute Infection by Replication-Defective Integrase Mutant Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Koh, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies characterized two types of replication-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase mutants: class I, which are specifically blocked at the integration step, and class II, which harbor additional virion production and/or reverse transcription defects. Class I mutant enzymes supported little if any metal ion-dependent 3′-processing and DNA strand transfer activities in vitro, whereas class II enzymes displayed partial or full catalytic function in studies with simplified assay designs, suggesting that defective interaction(s) with heterologous integrase binding proteins might underlie the class II mutant viral phenotype. To address this hypothesis, class I and II mutant enzymes were interrogated under expanded sets of in vitro conditions. The majority failed to catalyze the concerted integration of two viral DNA ends into target DNA, highlighting defective integrase function as the root cause of most class II in addition to all class I mutant virus infection defects. One mutant protein, K264E, in contrast, could support the wild-type level of concerted integration activity. After accounting for its inherent reverse transcription defect, HIV-1K264E moreover formed preintegration complexes that supported the efficient integration of endogenous viral DNA in vitro and normal levels and sequences of 2-long terminal repeat-containing circle junctions during acute infection. K264E integrase furthermore efficiently interacted in vitro with two heterologous binding partners, LEDGF/p75 and reverse transcriptase. Our results underscore the physiological relevance of concerted integration assays for tests of integrase mutant function and suggest that the K264E mutation disrupts an interaction with an intranuclear integrase binding partner that is important for HIV-1 integration. PMID:22278243

  13. L1CAM in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Altevogt, Peter; Doberstein, Kai; Fogel, Mina

    2016-04-01

    L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is one of the first neural adhesion molecules described with important functions in the development of the nervous system. Subsequent work discovered that L1CAM is expressed in many human cancers and is often associated with bad prognosis. This is most likely due to the motility and invasion promoting function of L1CAM. Here, we describe the path L1CAM has taken from a neural adhesion molecule to a recognized tumor antigen. We summarize the literature on L1CAM expression in cancers and pre-cancerous lesions. We focus on the genetic elements required for its re-expression and highlight preclinical studies for targeted therapy. The data suggest that L1CAM is a valuable diagnostic/prognostic marker and an attractive target for the therapy of several human cancers. PMID:26111503

  14. L1CAM: Cell adhesion and more.

    PubMed

    Samatov, Timur R; Wicklein, Daniel; Tonevitsky, Alexander G

    2016-08-01

    L1CAM is a cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which was originally discovered as a major player in the development of the nervous system. L1CAM was demonstrated to have prognostic value in different cancers and to be a promising target for anti-cancer therapy. Here we overview the present data on L1CAM structure and function, regulation of its expression, role in cancer and therapeutic potential. PMID:27267927

  15. Improving Aerosol Transport to the Arctic in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Rasch, P.; Wang, M.; Liu, X.; Ghan, S.; Qian, Y.; Yoon, J.; Ma, P.; Vinoj, V.

    2011-12-01

    - and high-latitude liquid cloud fraction predicted by CAM5 is a key contributor to excessive removal of aerosols during their transport to the Arctic. Improvement in the treatment of liquid cloud fraction and, therefore, in predicting arctic aerosols may have implications for improving other aspects of CAM5 climate modeling. A newly implemented unified treatment of aerosol vertical transport, activation, and removal in convective clouds reduces the artificially high BC concentrations near the tropopause. This study also has implications for arctic aerosol source attribution and BC/dust deposition onto snow/ice that generates further impacts on global climate.

  16. A starch deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with low ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity lacks one of the two subunits of the enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tsanpiao; Caspar, T.; Somerville, C.R.; Preiss, J. )

    1988-12-01

    A starch deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. has been isolated in which leaf extracts contain only about 5% as much activity of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) as the wild type. A single, nuclear mutation at a previously undescribed locus designated adg2 is responsible for the mutant phenotype. Although the mutant contained only 5% as much ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity as the wild type, it accumulated 40% as much starch when grown in a 12 hour photoperiod. The mutant also contained about 40% as much starch as the wild type when grown in continuous light, suggesting that the rate of synthesis regulates its steady state accumulation. Immunological analysis of leaf extracts using antibodies against the spinach 54 and 51 kilodalton (kD) ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase subunits indicated that the mutant is deficient in a cross-reactive 54 kD polypeptide and has only about 4% as much as the wild type of a cross-reactive 51 kD polypeptide. This result and genetic studies suggested that adg2 is a structural gene which codes for the 54 kD polypeptide, and provides the first functional evidence that the 54 kD polypeptide is a required component of the native ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase enzyme.

  17. Membrane-Associated Proteins of a Lipopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutant of Neisseria meningitidis Activate the Inflammatory Response through Toll-Like Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Ingalls, Robin R.; Lien, Egil; Golenbock, Douglas T.

    2001-01-01

    The recent isolation of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant of Neisseria meningitidis has allowed us to explore the roles of other gram-negative cell wall components in the host response to infection. The experiments in this study were designed to examine the ability of this mutant strain to activate cells. Although it was clearly less potent than the parental strain, we found the LPS-deficient mutant to be a capable inducer of the inflammatory response in monocytic cells, inducing a response similar to that seen with Staphylococcus aureus. Cellular activation by the LPS mutant was related to expression of CD14, a high-affinity receptor for LPS and other microbial products, as well as Toll-like receptor 2, a member of the Toll family of receptors recently implicated in host responses to gram-positive bacteria. In contrast to the parental strain, the synthetic LPS antagonist E5564 did not inhibit the LPS-deficient mutant. We conclude that even in the absence of LPS, the gram-negative cell wall remains a potent inflammatory stimulant, utilizing signaling pathways independent of those involved in LPS signaling. PMID:11254578

  18. Conservative Tryptophan Mutants of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase YopH Exhibit Impaired WPD-Loop Function and Crystallize with Divanadate Esters in Their Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Hengge, Alvan C.; Johnson, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  19. Conservative tryptophan mutants of the protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH exhibit impaired WPD-loop function and crystallize with divanadate esters in their active sites.

    PubMed

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C; Johnson, Sean J

    2015-10-27

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  20. Crystal structures of a marginally active thymidylate synthase mutant, Arg 126-->Glu.

    PubMed Central

    Strop, P.; Changchien, L.; Maley, F.; Montfort, W. R.

    1997-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a long-standing target for anticancer drugs and is of interest for its rich mechanistic features. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of dUMP to dTMP using the co-enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate, and is perhaps the best studied of enzymes that catalyze carbon-carbon bond formation. Arg 126 is found in all TSs but forms only 1 of 13 hydrogen bonds to dUMP during catalysis, and just one of seven to the phosphate group alone. Despite this, when Arg 126 of TS from Escherichia coli was changed to glutamate (R126E), the resulting protein had kcat reduced 2000-fold and Km reduced 600-fold. The crystal structure of R126E was determined under two conditions--in the absence of bound ligand (2.4 A resolution), and with dUMP and the antifolate CB3717 (2.2 A resolution). The first crystals, which did not contain dUMP despite its presence in the crystallization drop, displayed Glu 126 in a position to sterically and electrostatically interfere with binding of the dUMP phosphate. The second crystals contained both dUMP and CB3717 in the active site, but Glu 126 formed three hydrogen bonds to nearby residues (two through water) and was in a position that partially overlapped with the normal phosphate binding site, resulting in a approximately 1 A shift in the phosphate group. Interestingly, the protein displayed the typical ligand-induced conformational change, and the covalent bond to Cys 146 was present in one of the protein's two active sites. PMID:9416600

  1. α2-Null mutant mice have altered levels of neuronal activity in restricted midbrain and limbic brain regions during nicotine withdrawal as demonstrated by cfos expression.

    PubMed

    Upton, Montana; Lotfipour, Shahrdad

    2015-10-15

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the primary binding sites for nicotine within the brain. Using alpha(α)2 nAChR subunit-null mutant mice, the current study evaluates whether the absence of this gene product during mecamylamine-precipitated nicotine withdrawal eliminates neuronal activity within selective midbrain and limbic brain regions, as determined by the expression of the immediate early gene, cfos. Our results demonstrate that nicotine withdrawal enhances neuronal activity within the interpeduncular nucleus and dorsal hippocampus, which is absent in mice null for α2-containing nAChRs. In contrast, we observe that α2-null mutant mice exhibit a suppression of neuronal activity in the dentate gyrus in mice undergoing nicotine withdrawal. Interestingly, α2-null mutant mice display potentiated neuronal activity specifically within the stratum lacunosum moleculare layer of the hippocampus, independent of nicotine withdrawal. Overall, our findings demonstrate that α2-null mutant mice have altered cfos expression in distinct populations of neurons within selective midbrain and limbic brain structures that mediate baseline and nicotine withdrawal-induced neuronal activity.

  2. The M34A mutant of Connexin26 reveals active conductance states in pore-suspending membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gaßmann, Oliver; Kreir, Mohamed; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Pranskevich, Jennifer; Oshima, Atsunori; Röling, Christian; Sosinsky, Gina; Fertig, Niels; Steinem, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Connexin26 (Cx26) is a member of the connexin family, the building blocks for gap junction intercellular channels. These dodecameric assemblies are involved in gap junction-mediated cell-cell communication allowing the passage of ions and small molecules between two neighboring cells. Mutations in Cx26 lead to the disruption of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication with consequences such as hearing loss and skin disorders. We show here that a mutant of Cx26, M34A, forms an active hemichannel in lipid bilayer experiments. A comparison with the Cx26 wild-type is presented. Two different techniques using micro/nano-structured substrates for the formation of pore-suspending lipid membranes are used. We reconstituted the Cx26 wild-type and Cx26M34A into artificial lipid bilayers and observed single channel activity for each technique, with conductance levels of around 35, 70 and 165 pS for the wildtype. The conductance levels of Cx26M34A were found at around 45 and 70 pS. PMID:19236918

  3. Experimental Study on Revetec Engine Cam Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohyeldin Gasim, Maisara; Giok Chui, Lee; Anwar, Khirul Azhar bin

    2012-09-01

    In Revetec engine (three-lobed) cam replaces the crankshaft to convert the reciprocating motion of the engine piston, to a rotating motion in the drive line. Since the cam controls the piston movement, the cam profile has a great effect on engine performance. In this paper an experimental study was done to a (three- lobed) cam with Cycloidal motion profile but with different ratios between the base circle radius of the cam and the radius of the roller follower. DEWESoft was used to find the displacement and the vibration of the piston, and compare the actual results from the test with the theoretical results from the cam profile equation. The results showed that there is a periods of miss contact between the follower and the cam when the ratio between the base circle radius of the cam and the radius of the roller follower is less than a certain value, and also increasing of vibration. The suggested ratio between the cam and follower radius is to be more than 2:1.

  4. The Oncogenic Activity of RET Point Mutants for Follicular Thyroid Cells May Account for the Occurrence of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Patients Affected by Familial Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Rosa Marina; Cirafici, Anna Maria; De Falco, Valentina; Bellantoni, Marie; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo; Carlomagno, Francesca; Picascia, Antonella; Tramontano, Donatella; Tallini, Giovanni; Santoro, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    Activating germ-line point mutations in the RET receptor are responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2-associated medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), whereas somatic RET rearrangements are prevalent in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). Some rare kindreds, carrying point mutations in RET, are affected by both cancer types, suggesting that, under specific circumstances, point mutations in RET can drive the generation of PTC. Here we describe a family whose siblings, affected by both PTC and MTC, carried a germ-line point mutation in the RET extracellular domain, converting cysteine 634 into serine. We tested on thyroid follicular cells the transforming activity of RET(C634S), RET(K603Q), another mutant identified in a kindred with both PTC and MTC, RET(C634R) a commonly isolated allele in MEN2A, RET(M918T) responsible for MEN2B and also identified in kindreds with both PTC and MTC, and RET/PTC1 the rearranged oncogene that characterizes bona fide PTC in patients without MTC. We show that the various RET point mutants, but not wild-type RET, scored constitutive kinase activity and exerted mitogenic effects for thyroid PC Cl 3 cells, albeit at significantly lower levels compared to RET/PTC1. The low mitogenic activity of RET point mutants paralleled their reduced kinase activity compared to RET/PTC. Furthermore, RET point mutants maintained a protein domain, the intracellular juxtamembrane domain, that exerted negative effects on the mitogenic activity. In conclusion, RET point mutants can behave as dominant oncogenes for thyroid follicular cells. Their transforming activity, however, is rather modest, providing a possible explanation for the rare association of MTC with PTC. PMID:15277225

  5. Understanding protein lids: structural analysis of active hinge mutants in triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Kursula, I; Salin, M; Sun, J; Norledge, B V; Haapalainen, A M; Sampson, N S; Wierenga, R K

    2004-04-01

    The conformational switch from open to closed of the flexible loop 6 of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is essential for the catalytic properties of TIM. Using a directed evolution approach, active variants of chicken TIM with a mutated C-terminal hinge tripeptide of loop 6 have been generated (Sun,J. and Sampson,N.S., Biochemistry, 1999, 38, 11474-11481). In chicken TIM, the wild-type C-terminal hinge tripeptide is KTA. Detailed enzymological characterization of six variants showed that some of these (LWA, NPN, YSL, KTK) have decreased catalytic efficiency, whereas others (KVA, NSS) are essentially identical with wild-type. The structural characterization of these six variants is reported. No significant structural differences compared with the wild-type are found for KVA, NSS and LWA, but substantial structural adaptations are seen for NPN, YSL and KTK. These structural differences can be understood from the buried position of the alanine side chain in the C-hinge position 3 in the open conformation of wild-type loop 6. Replacement of this alanine with a bulky side chain causes the closed conformation to be favored, which correlates with the decreased catalytic efficiency of these variants. The structural context of loop 6 and loop 7 and their sequence conservation in 133 wild-type sequences is also discussed. PMID:15166315

  6. Understanding protein lids: structural analysis of active hinge mutants in triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Kursula, I; Salin, M; Sun, J; Norledge, B V; Haapalainen, A M; Sampson, N S; Wierenga, R K

    2004-04-01

    The conformational switch from open to closed of the flexible loop 6 of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is essential for the catalytic properties of TIM. Using a directed evolution approach, active variants of chicken TIM with a mutated C-terminal hinge tripeptide of loop 6 have been generated (Sun,J. and Sampson,N.S., Biochemistry, 1999, 38, 11474-11481). In chicken TIM, the wild-type C-terminal hinge tripeptide is KTA. Detailed enzymological characterization of six variants showed that some of these (LWA, NPN, YSL, KTK) have decreased catalytic efficiency, whereas others (KVA, NSS) are essentially identical with wild-type. The structural characterization of these six variants is reported. No significant structural differences compared with the wild-type are found for KVA, NSS and LWA, but substantial structural adaptations are seen for NPN, YSL and KTK. These structural differences can be understood from the buried position of the alanine side chain in the C-hinge position 3 in the open conformation of wild-type loop 6. Replacement of this alanine with a bulky side chain causes the closed conformation to be favored, which correlates with the decreased catalytic efficiency of these variants. The structural context of loop 6 and loop 7 and their sequence conservation in 133 wild-type sequences is also discussed.

  7. Hazmat Cam Wireless Video System

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin L. Young

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the Hazmat Cam Wireless Video System and its application to emergency response involving chemical, biological or radiological contamination. The Idaho National Laboratory designed the Hazmat Cam Wireless Video System to assist the National Guard Weapons of Mass Destruction - Civil Support Teams during their mission of emergency response to incidents involving weapons of mass destruction. The lightweight, handheld camera transmits encrypted, real-time video from inside a contaminated area, or hot-zone, to a command post located a safe distance away. The system includes a small wireless video camera, a true-diversity receiver, viewing console, and an optional extension link that allows the command post to be placed up to five miles from danger. It can be fully deployed by one person in a standalone configuration in less than 10 minutes. The complete system is battery powered. Each rechargeable camera battery powers the camera for 3 hours with the receiver and video monitor battery lasting 22 hours on a single charge. The camera transmits encrypted, low frequency analog video signals to a true-diversity receiver with three antennas. This unique combination of encryption and transmission technologies delivers encrypted, interference-free images to the command post under conditions where other wireless systems fail. The lightweight camera is completely waterproof for quick and easy decontamination after use. The Hazmat Cam Wireless Video System is currently being used by several National Guard Teams, the US Army, and by fire fighters. The system has been proven to greatly enhance situational awareness during the crucial, initial phase of a hazardous response allowing commanders to make better, faster, safer decisions.

  8. APE1/Ref-1 enhances DNA binding activity of mutant p53 in a redox-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Cun, Yanping; Dai, Nan; Li, Mengxia; Xiong, Chengjie; Zhang, Qinhong; Sui, Jiangdong; Qian, Chengyuan; Wang, Dong

    2014-02-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a dual function protein; in addition to its DNA repair activity, it can stimulate DNA binding activity of numerous transcription factors as a reduction-oxidation (redox) factor. APE1/Ref-1 has been found to be a potent activator of wild-type p53 (wtp53) DNA binding in vitro and in vivo. Although p53 is mutated in most types of human cancer including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), little is known about whether APE1/Ref-1 can regulate mutant p53 (mutp53). Herein, we reported the increased APE1/Ref-1 protein and accumulation of mutp53 in HCC by immunohistochemistry. Of note, it was observed that APE1/Ref-1 high-expression and mutp53 expression were associated with carcinogenesis and progression of HCC. To determine whether APE1/Ref-1 regulates DNA binding of mutp53, we performed electromobility shift assays (EMSAs) and quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays in HCC cell lines. In contrast to sequence-specific and DNA structure-dependent binding of wtp53, reduced mutp53 efficiently bound to nonlinear DNA, but not to linear DNA. Notably, overexpression of APE1/Ref-1 resulted in increased DNA binding activity of mutp53, while downregulation of APE1/Ref-1 caused a marked decrease of mutp53 DNA binding. In addition, APE1/Ref-1 could not potentiate the accumulation of p21 mRNA and protein in mutp53 cells. These data indicate that APE1/Ref-1 can stimulate mutp53 DNA binding in a redox-dependent manner.

  9. Analysis of Distinct Roles of CaMKK Isoforms Using STO-609-Resistant Mutants in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuya; Hiraoka, Yuri; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2015-06-30

    To assess the isoform specificity of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK)-mediated signaling pathway using a CaMKK inhibitor (STO-609) in living cells, we have established A549 cell lines expressing STO-609-resistant mutants of CaMKK isoforms. Following serial mutagenesis studies, we have succeeded in obtaining an STO-609-resistant CaMKKα mutant (Ala292Thr/Leu233Phe) and a CaMKKβ mutant (Ala328Thr/Val269Phe), which showed sensitivity to STO-609 that was 2-3 orders of magnitude lower without an appreciable effect on kinase activity or CaM requirement. These results are consistent with the results obtained for CaMKK activities in the extracts of A549 cells stably expressing the mutants of CaMKK isoforms. Ionomycin-induced 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation at Thr172 in A549 cells expressing either the wild-type or the STO-609-resistant mutant of CaMKKα was completely suppressed by STO-609 treatment but resistant to the inhibitor in the presence of the CaMKKβ mutant (Ala328Thr/Val269Phe). This result strongly suggested that CaMKKβ is responsible for ionomycin-induced AMPK activation, which supported previous reports. In contrast, ionomycin-induced CaMKIV phosphorylation at Thr196 was resistant to STO-609 treatment in A549 cells expressing STO-609-resistant mutants of both CaMKK isoforms, indicating that both CaMKK isoforms are capable of phosphorylating and activating CaMKIV in living cells. Considering these results together, STO-609-resistant CaMKK mutants developed in this study may be useful for distinguishing CaMKK isoform-mediated signaling pathways in combination with the use of an inhibitor compound.

  10. NMR structure of the noncytotoxic α-sarcin mutant Δ(7-22): The importance of the native conformation of peripheral loops for activity

    PubMed Central

    García-Mayoral, Ma Flor; García-Ortega, Lucia; Lillo, Ma Pilar; Santoro, Jorge; Martínez Del Pozo, Álvaro; Gavilanes, José G.; Rico, Manuel; Bruix, Marta

    2004-01-01

    The deletion mutant Δ(7-22) of α-sarcin, unlike its wild-type protein counterpart, lacks the specific ability to degrade rRNA in intact ribosomes and exhibits an increased unspecific ribonuclease activity and decreased interaction with lipid vesicles. In trying to shed light on these differences, we report here on the three-dimensional structure of the Δ(7-22) α-sarcin mutant using NMR methods. We also evaluated its dynamic properties on the basis of theoretical models and measured its correlation time (6.2 nsec) by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The global fold characteristic of ribotoxins is preserved in the mutant. The most significant differences with respect to the α-sarcin structure are concentrated in (1) loop 2, (2) loop 3, which adopts a new orientation, and (3) loop 5, which shows multiple conformations and an altered dynamics. The interactions between loop 5 and the N-terminal hairpin are lost in the mutant, producing increased solvent accessibility of the active-site residues. The degree of solvent exposure of the catalytic His 137 is similar to that shown by His 92 in RNase T1. Additionally, the calculated order parameters of residues belonging to loop 5 in the mutant correspond to an internal dynamic behavior more similar to RNase T1 than α-sarcin. On the other hand, changes in the relative orientation of loop 3 move the lysine-rich region 111–114, crucial for substrate recognition, away from the active site. All of the structural and dynamic data presented here reveal that the mutant is a hybrid of ribotoxins and noncytotoxic ribonucleases, consistent with its biological properties. PMID:15044731

  11. NF-{kappa}B signaling is activated and confers resistance to apoptosis in three-dimensionally cultured EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, Yuji; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Matsukuma, Shoichi; Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR-mutant cells in 3D culture resist EGFR inhibition compared with suspended cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation of I{kappa}B and activation of NF-{kappa}B are observed in 3D-cultured cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting NF-{kappa}B enhances the efficacy of the EGFR inhibitor in 3D-cultured cells. -- Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in suspension undergo apoptosis to a greater extent than adherent cells in a monolayer when EGFR autophosphorylation is inhibited by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This suggests that cell adhesion to a culture dish may activate an anti-apoptotic signaling pathway other than the EGFR pathway. Since the microenvironment of cells cultured in a monolayer are substantially different to that of cells existing in three-dimension (3D) in vivo, we assessed whether two EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, HCC827 and H1975, were more resistant to EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis when cultured in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) as compared with in suspension. The ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant cells in 3D were significantly less sensitive to treatment with WZ4002, an EGFR TKI, than the suspended cells. Further, a marked degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, the inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, was observed only in the 3D-cultured cells, leading to an increase in the activation of NF-{kappa}B. Moreover, the inhibition of NF-{kappa}B with pharmacological inhibitors enhanced EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis in 3D-cultured EGFR-mutant cells. These results suggest that inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling would render ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in vivo more susceptible to EGFR TKI-induced cell death.

  12. An active site mutant of Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase forms new non-natural fatty acids providing insights on the mechanism of the enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    E, Guangqi; Drujon, Thierry; Correia, Isabelle; Ploux, Olivier; Guianvarc'h, Dominique

    2013-12-01

    We have produced and purified an active site mutant of the Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (CFAS) by replacing the strictly conserved G236 within cyclopropane synthases, by a glutamate residue, which corresponds to E146 of the homologous mycolic acid methyltransferase, Hma, producing hydroxymethyl mycolic acids. The G236E CFAS mutant had less than 1% of the in vitro activity of the wild type enzyme. We expressed the G236E CFAS mutant in an E. coli (DE3) strain in which the chromosomal cfa gene had been deleted. After extraction of phospholipids and conversion into the corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), we observed the formation of cyclopropanated FAMEs suggesting that the mutant retained some of the normal activity in vivo. However, we also observed the formation of new C17 methyl-branched unsaturated FAMEs whose structures were determined using GC/MS and NMR analyses. The double bond was located at different positions 8, 9 or 10, and the methyl group at position 10 or 9. Thus, this new FAMEs are likely arising from a 16:1 acyl chain of a phospholipid that had been transformed by the G236E CFAS mutant in vivo. The reaction catalyzed by this G236E CFAS mutant thus starts by the methylation of the unsaturated acyl chain at position 10 or 9 yielding a carbocation at position 9 or 10 respectively. It follows then two competing steps, a normal cyclopropanation or hydride shift/elimination events giving different combinations of alkenes. This study not only provides further evidence that cyclopropane synthases (CSs) form a carbocationic intermediate but also opens the way to CSs engineering for the synthesis of non-natural fatty acids.

  13. Mutant alpha-galactosidase A enzymes identified in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity: biochemical characterization and restoration of normal intracellular processing by 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Satoshi; Chang, Hui-Hwa; Kawasaki, Kunito; Yasuda, Kayo; Wu, Hui-Li; Garman, Scott C; Fan, Jian-Qiang

    2007-09-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-Gal A (alpha-galactosidase A) activity. In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying alpha-Gal A deficiency in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity, enzymes with different missense mutations were purified from transfected COS-7 cells and the biochemical properties were characterized. The mutant enzymes detected in variant patients (A20P, E66Q, M72V, I91T, R112H, F113L, N215S, Q279E, M296I, M296V and R301Q), and those found mostly in mild classic patients (A97V, A156V, L166V and R356W) appeared to have normal K(m) and V(max) values. The degradation of all mutants (except E59K) was partially inhibited by treatment with kifunensine, a selective inhibitor of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) alpha-mannosidase I. Metabolic labelling and subcellular fractionation studies in COS-7 cells expressing the L166V and R301Q alpha-Gal A mutants indicated that the mutant protein was retained in the ER and degraded without processing. Addition of DGJ (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin) to the culture medium of COS-7 cells transfected with a large set of missense mutant alpha-Gal A cDNAs effectively increased both enzyme activity and protein yield. DGJ was capable of normalizing intracellular processing of mutant alpha-Gal A found in both classic (L166V) and variant (R301Q) Fabry disease patients. In addition, the residual enzyme activity in fibroblasts or lymphoblasts from both classic and variant hemizygous Fabry disease patients carrying a variety of missense mutations could be substantially increased by cultivation of the cells with DGJ. These results indicate that a large proportion of mutant enzymes in patients with residual enzyme activity are kinetically active. Excessive degradation in the ER could be responsible for the deficiency of enzyme activity in vivo, and the DGJ approach may be broadly applicable to Fabry disease patients with missense mutations.

  14. Mutant α-galactosidase A enzymes identified in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity: biochemical characterization and restoration of normal intracellular processing by 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Satoshi; Chang, Hui-Hwa; Kawasaki, Kunito; Yasuda, Kayo; Wu, Hui-Li; Garman, Scott C.; Fan, Jian-Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of α-Gal A (α-galactosidase A) activity. In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying α-Gal A deficiency in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity, enzymes with different missense mutations were purified from transfected COS-7 cells and the biochemical properties were characterized. The mutant enzymes detected in variant patients (A20P, E66Q, M72V, I91T, R112H, F113L, N215S, Q279E, M296I, M296V and R301Q), and those found mostly in mild classic patients (A97V, A156V, L166V and R356W) appeared to have normal Km and Vmax values. The degradation of all mutants (except E59K) was partially inhibited by treatment with kifunensine, a selective inhibitor of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) α-mannosidase I. Metabolic labelling and subcellular fractionation studies in COS-7 cells expressing the L166V and R301Q α-Gal A mutants indicated that the mutant protein was retained in the ER and degraded without processing. Addition of DGJ (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin) to the culture medium of COS-7 cells transfected with a large set of missense mutant α-Gal A cDNAs effectively increased both enzyme activity and protein yield. DGJ was capable of normalizing intracellular processing of mutant α-Gal A found in both classic (L166V) and variant (R301Q) Fabry disease patients. In addition, the residual enzyme activity in fibroblasts or lymphoblasts from both classic and variant hemizygous Fabry disease patients carrying a variety of missense mutations could be substantially increased by cultivation of the cells with DGJ. These results indicate that a large proportion of mutant enzymes in patients with residual enzyme activity are kinetically active. Excessive degradation in the ER could be responsible for the deficiency of enzyme activity in vivo, and the DGJ approach may be broadly applicable to Fabry disease patients with missense mutations. PMID:17555407

  15. Different Roles of N-Terminal and C-Terminal Domains in Calmodulin for Activation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lübker, Carolin; Dove, Stefan; Tang, Wei-Jen; Urbauer, Ramona J. Bieber; Moskovitz, Jackob; Urbauer, Jeffrey L.; Seifert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis adenylyl cyclase toxin edema factor (EF) is one component of the anthrax toxin and is essential for establishing anthrax disease. EF activation by the eukaryotic Ca2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM) leads to massive cAMP production resulting in edema. cAMP also inhibits the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase, thus reducing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) used for host defense in activated neutrophils and thereby facilitating bacterial growth. Methionine (Met) residues in CaM, important for interactions between CaM and its binding partners, can be oxidized by ROS. We investigated the impact of site-specific oxidation of Met in CaM on EF activation using thirteen CaM-mutants (CaM-mut) with Met to leucine (Leu) substitutions. EF activation shows high resistance to oxidative modifications in CaM. An intact structure in the C-terminal region of oxidized CaM is sufficient for major EF activation despite altered secondary structure in the N-terminal region associated with Met oxidation. The secondary structures of CaM-mut were determined and described in previous studies from our group. Thus, excess cAMP production and the associated impairment of host defence may be afforded even under oxidative conditions in activated neutrophils. PMID:26184312

  16. Influence of low glycolytic activities in gcr1 and gcr2 mutants on the expression of other metabolic pathway genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiromi; Uemura, Hiroshi

    2005-01-30

    A complex of the transcription factors Gcr1p and Gcr2p coordinately regulates the expression of glycolytic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand the effects of gcr mutations on other metabolic pathways, genome-wide gene expression profiles in gcr1 and gcr2 mutants were examined. The biggest effects of gcr1 and gcr2 mutations were observed on the glycolytic genes and the expressions of most of the glycolytic genes were substantially decreased compared to those in the wild-type strain in both glucose and glycerol+lactate growth conditions. On the other hand, the expressions of genes encoding the TCA cycle and respiration were increased in gcr mutants when the cells were grown in glucose. RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression of SIP4 and HAP5, which are known to affect the expression of some of the gluconeogenic, TCA cycle and respiratory genes, were also increased under this condition. The growth of gcr mutants on glucose was impaired by adding respiration inhibitor antimycin A, whereas the growth of the wild-type strain was not. The conversion of glucose to biomass was higher and, to the contrary, ethanol yield was lower in the gcr2 mutant compared to those in the wild-type strain. These results suggest the possibility that the gcr mutants, in which glycolytic activities are low, changed their metabolic patterns under glucose growth condition to enhance the expression of TCA cycle and respiratory genes to produce more energy.

  17. Biosynthesis of membrane-derived oligosaccharides: characterization of mdoB mutants defective in phosphoglycerol transferase I activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, B J; Bohin, J P; Kennedy, E P

    1984-01-01

    Phosphoglycerol transferase I, an enzyme of the inner, cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli, catalyzes the in vitro transfer of phosphoglycerol residues from phosphatidylglycerol to membrane-derived oligosaccharides or to the model substrate arbutin (p-hydroxyphenyl-beta-D-glucoside). The products are a phosphoglycerol diester derivative of membrane-derived oligosaccharides or arbutin, respectively, and sn-1,2-diglyceride (B. J. Jackson and E. P. Kennedy, J. Biol. Chem. 258:2394-2398, 1983). Because this enzyme has its active site on the outer aspect of the inner membrane, it also catalyzes the transfer of phosphoglycerol residues to arbutin added to the medium (J.-P. Bohin and E. P. Kennedy, J. Biol. Chem. 259:8388-8393, 1984). When strains bearing the dgk mutation, which are defective in the enzyme diglyceride kinase, are grown in medium containing arbutin, they accumulate large amounts of sn-1,2-diglyceride, a product of the phosphoglycerol transferase I reaction. Growth is inhibited under these conditions. A further mutation in such a dgk strain, leading to the loss of phosphoglycerol transferase I activity, should result in the phenotype of arbutin resistance. We have exploited this fact to obtain strains with such mutations, designated mdoB, that map near min 99. Such mutants lack detectable phosphoglycerol transferase I activity, cannot transfer phosphoglycerol residues to arbutin in vivo, and synthesize membrane-derived oligosaccharides devoid of phosphoglycerol residues. These findings offer strong genetic support for the function of phosphoglycerol transferase I in membrane-derived oligosaccharide biosynthesis. PMID:6094515

  18. Shoot-to-Root Signal Transmission Regulates Root Fe(III) Reductase Activity in the dgl Mutant of Pea.

    PubMed

    Grusak, M. A.; Pezeshgi, S.

    1996-01-01

    To understand the root, shoot, and Fe-nutritional factors that regulate root Fe-acquisition processes in dicotyledonous plants, Fe(III) reduction and net proton efflux were quantified in root systems of an Fe-hyperaccumulating mutant (dgl) and a parental (cv Dippes Gelbe Viktoria [DGV]) genotype of pea (Pisum sativum). Plants were grown with (+Fe treated) or without (-Fe treated) added Fe(III)-N,N'-ethylenebis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-glycine] (2 [mu]M); root Fe(III) reduction was measured in solutions containing growth nutrients, 0.1 mM Fe(III)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and 0.1 mM Na2-bathophenanthrolinedisulfonic acid. Daily measurements of Fe(III) reduction (d 10-20) revealed initially low rates in +Fe-treated and -Fe-treated dgl, followed by a nearly 5-fold stimulation in rates by d 15 for both growth types. In DGV, root Fe(III) reductase activity increased only minimally by d 20 in +Fe-treated plants and about 3-fold in -Fe-treated plants, beginning on d 15. Net proton efflux was enhanced in roots of -Fe-treated DGV and both dgl growth types, relative to +Fe-treated DGV. In dgl, the enhanced proton efflux occurred prior to the increase in root Fe(III) reductase activity. Reductase studies using plants with reciprocal shoot:root grafts demonstrated that shoot expression of the dgl gene leads to the generation of a transmissible signal that enhances Fe(III) reductase activity in roots. The dgl gene product may alter or interfere with a normal component of a signal transduction mechanism regulating Fe homeostasis in plants.

  19. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Donate Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) WHAT IS A THYROID NODULE? The term ... type of evaluation. WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  20. IS256 abolishes gelatinase activity and biofilm formation in a mutant of the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis V583.

    PubMed

    Perez, Marta; Calles-Enríquez, Marina; del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-07-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is one of the most controversial species of lactic acid bacteria. Some strains are used as probiotics, while others are associated with severe and life-threatening nosocomial infections. Their pathogenicity depends on the acquisition of multidrug resistance and virulence factors. Gelatinase, which is required in the first steps of biofilm formation, is an important virulence determinant involved in E. faecalis pathogenesis, including endocarditis and peritonitis. The gene that codes for gelatinase (gelE) is controlled by the Fsr quorum-sensing system, whose encoding genes (fsrA, fsrB, fsrC, and fsrD) are located immediately upstream of gelE. The integration of a DNA fragment into the fsr locus of a derived mutant of E. faecalis V583 suppressed the gelatinase activity and prevented biofilm formation. Sequence analysis indicated the presence of IS256 integrated into the fsrC gene at nucleotide position 321. Interestingly, IS256 is also associated with biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus. This is the first description of an insertion sequence that prevents biofilm formation in E. faecalis.

  1. Cell homeostasis in a Leishmania major mutant overexpressing the spliced leader RNA is maintained by an increased proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Juliano S; Ferreira, Tiago R; Defina, Tânia P A; Dossin, Fernando de M; Beattie, Kenneth A; Lamont, Douglas J; Cloutier, Serge; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Schenkman, Sergio; Cruz, Angela K

    2010-10-01

    Although several stage-specific genes have been identified in Leishmania, the molecular mechanisms governing developmental gene regulation in this organism are still not well understood. We have previously reported an attenuation of virulence in Leishmania major and L. braziliensis carrying extra-copies of the spliced leader RNA gene. Here, we surveyed the major differences in proteome and transcript expression profiles between the spliced leader RNA overexpressor and control lines using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and differential display reverse transcription PCR, respectively. Thirty-nine genes related to stress response, cytoskeleton, proteolysis, cell cycle control and proliferation, energy generation, gene transcription, RNA processing and post-transcriptional regulation have abnormal patterns of expression in the spliced leader RNA overexpressor line. The evaluation of proteolytic pathways in the mutant revealed a selective increase of cysteine protease activity and an exacerbated ubiquitin-labeled protein population. Polysome profile analysis and measurement of cellular protein aggregates showed that protein translation in the spliced leader RNA overexpressor line is increased when compared to the control line. We found that L. major promastigotes maintain homeostasis in culture when challenged with a metabolic imbalance generated by spliced leader RNA surplus through modulation of intracellular proteolysis. However, this might interfere with a fine-tuned gene expression control necessary for the amastigote multiplication in the mammalian host.

  2. A mutant leucine aminopeptidase from Streptomyces cinnamoneus with enhanced L-aspartyl L-amino acid methyl ester synthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Arima, Jiro; Kono, Mirai; Kita, Manami; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2012-06-01

    L-aspartyl L-amino acid methyl ester was synthesized using a mutant of a thermostable leucine aminopeptidase from Streptomyces cinnamoneus, D198 K SSAP, obtained in previously. A peptide of high-intensity sweetener, L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, was selected as a model for demonstrating the synthesis of L-aspartyl L-amino acid methyl ester. The hydrolytic activities of D198 K SSAP toward L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine and its methyl ester were, respectively, 74-fold and fourfold higher than those of wild type. Similarly, the initial rate of the enzyme for L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester synthesis was over fivefold higher than that of wild-type SSAP in 90% methanol (v/v) in a one-pot reaction. Furthermore, other L-aspartyl L-amino acid methyl esters were synthesized efficiently using D198 K SSAP. Results show that the substitution of Asp198 of SSAP with Lys is effective for synthesizing L-aspartyl L-amino acid methyl ester.

  3. Nonenzymatic Lipid Peroxidation Reprograms Gene Expression and Activates Defense Markers in Arabidopsis Tocopherol-Deficient Mutants[W

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Scott E.; Mène-Saffrané, Laurent; Farmer, Edward E.; Krischke, Markus; Mueller, Martin J.; DellaPenna, Dean

    2006-01-01

    Tocopherols (vitamin E) are lipophilic antioxidants that are synthesized by all plants and are particularly abundant in seeds. Two tocopherol-deficient mutant loci in Arabidopsis thaliana were used to examine the functions of tocopherols in seedlings: vitamin e1 (vte1), which accumulates the pathway intermediate 2,3-dimethyl-5-phytyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DMPBQ); and vte2, which lacks all tocopherols and pathway intermediates. Only vte2 displayed severe seedling growth defects, which corresponded with massively increased levels of the major classes of nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation products: hydroxy fatty acids, malondialdehyde, and phytoprostanes. In the absence of pathogens, the phytoalexin camalexin accumulated in vte2 seedlings to levels 100-fold higher than in wild-type or vte1 seedlings. Similarly, gene expression profiling in wild-type, vte1, and vte2 seedlings indicated that increased levels of nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation in vte2 corresponded to increased expression of many defense-related genes, which were not induced in vte1. Both biochemical and transcriptional analyses of vte2 seedlings indicate that nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation plays a significant role in modulating plant defense responses. Together, these results establish that tocopherols in wild-type plants or DMPBQ in vte1 plants limit nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation during germination and early seedling development, thereby preventing the inappropriate activation of transcriptional and biochemical defense responses. PMID:17194769

  4. The Wnt Receptor Ryk Reduces Neuronal and Cell Survival Capacity by Repressing FOXO Activity During the Early Phases of Mutant Huntingtin Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Tourette, Cendrine; Farina, Francesca; Vazquez-Manrique, Rafael P.; Orfila, Anne-Marie; Voisin, Jessica; Hernandez, Sonia; Offner, Nicolas; Parker, J. Alex; Menet, Sophie; Kim, Jinho; Lyu, Jungmok; Choi, Si Ho; Cormier, Kerry; Edgerly, Christina K.; Bordiuk, Olivia L.; Smith, Karen; Louise, Anne; Halford, Michael; Stacker, Steven; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Ferrante, Robert J.; Lu, Wange; Neri, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The Wnt receptor Ryk is an evolutionary-conserved protein important during neuronal differentiation through several mechanisms, including γ-secretase cleavage and nuclear translocation of its intracellular domain (Ryk-ICD). Although the Wnt pathway may be neuroprotective, the role of Ryk in neurodegenerative disease remains unknown. We found that Ryk is up-regulated in neurons expressing mutant huntingtin (HTT) in several models of Huntington's disease (HD). Further investigation in Caenorhabditis elegans and mouse striatal cell models of HD provided a model in which the early-stage increase of Ryk promotes neuronal dysfunction by repressing the neuroprotective activity of the longevity-promoting factor FOXO through a noncanonical mechanism that implicates the Ryk-ICD fragment and its binding to the FOXO co-factor β-catenin. The Ryk-ICD fragment suppressed neuroprotection by lin-18/Ryk loss-of-function in expanded-polyQ nematodes, repressed FOXO transcriptional activity, and abolished β-catenin protection of mutant htt striatal cells against cell death vulnerability. Additionally, Ryk-ICD was increased in the nucleus of mutant htt cells, and reducing γ-secretase PS1 levels compensated for the cytotoxicity of full-length Ryk in these cells. These findings reveal that the Ryk-ICD pathway may impair FOXO protective activity in mutant polyglutamine neurons, suggesting that neurons are unable to efficiently maintain function and resist disease from the earliest phases of the pathogenic process in HD. PMID:24960609

  5. The Wnt receptor Ryk reduces neuronal and cell survival capacity by repressing FOXO activity during the early phases of mutant huntingtin pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Tourette, Cendrine; Farina, Francesca; Vazquez-Manrique, Rafael P; Orfila, Anne-Marie; Voisin, Jessica; Hernandez, Sonia; Offner, Nicolas; Parker, J Alex; Menet, Sophie; Kim, Jinho; Lyu, Jungmok; Choi, Si Ho; Cormier, Kerry; Edgerly, Christina K; Bordiuk, Olivia L; Smith, Karen; Louise, Anne; Halford, Michael; Stacker, Steven; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Ferrante, Robert J; Lu, Wange; Neri, Christian

    2014-06-01

    The Wnt receptor Ryk is an evolutionary-conserved protein important during neuronal differentiation through several mechanisms, including γ-secretase cleavage and nuclear translocation of its intracellular domain (Ryk-ICD). Although the Wnt pathway may be neuroprotective, the role of Ryk in neurodegenerative disease remains unknown. We found that Ryk is up-regulated in neurons expressing mutant huntingtin (HTT) in several models of Huntington's disease (HD). Further investigation in Caenorhabditis elegans and mouse striatal cell models of HD provided a model in which the early-stage increase of Ryk promotes neuronal dysfunction by repressing the neuroprotective activity of the longevity-promoting factor FOXO through a noncanonical mechanism that implicates the Ryk-ICD fragment and its binding to the FOXO co-factor β-catenin. The Ryk-ICD fragment suppressed neuroprotection by lin-18/Ryk loss-of-function in expanded-polyQ nematodes, repressed FOXO transcriptional activity, and abolished β-catenin protection of mutant htt striatal cells against cell death vulnerability. Additionally, Ryk-ICD was increased in the nucleus of mutant htt cells, and reducing γ-secretase PS1 levels compensated for the cytotoxicity of full-length Ryk in these cells. These findings reveal that the Ryk-ICD pathway may impair FOXO protective activity in mutant polyglutamine neurons, suggesting that neurons are unable to efficiently maintain function and resist disease from the earliest phases of the pathogenic process in HD.

  6. A roadmap for research on crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) to enhance sustainable food and bioenergy production in a hotter, drier world

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C.; Borland, Anne M.; Edwards, Erika; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Owen, Nick; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, J. Andrew C.; Cestari De Paoli, Henrique; et al

    2015-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a specialized mode of photosynthesis that features nocturnal CO₂ uptake, facilitates increased water-use efficiency (WUE), and enables CAM plants to inhabit water-limited environments such as semi-arid deserts or seasonally dry forests. Human population growth and global climate change now present challenges for agricultural production systems to increase food, feed, forage, fiber, and fuel production. One approach to meet these challenges is to increase reliance on CAM crops, such as Agave and Opuntia, for biomass production on semi-arid, abandoned, marginal, or degraded agricultural lands. Major research efforts are now underway to assess the productivity of CAMmore » crop species and to harness the WUE of CAM by engineering this pathway into existing food and bioenergy crops. An improved understanding of CAM gained through intensive and expanded research efforts has potential for high returns on research investment in the foreseeable future. To help realize the potential of sustainable dryland agricultural systems, it is necessary to address scientific questions related to the genomic features, regulatory mechanisms, and evolution of CAM; CAM-into-C3 engineering; and the production of CAM crops. Answering these questions requires collaborative efforts to build infrastructure for CAM model systems, field trials, mutant collections, and data management.« less

  7. Expression of epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) in chronic (necro-)inflammatory liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Breuhahn, Kai; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Peters, Malte; Prang, Nadja; Töx, Ulrich; Köhne-Volland, Rudolph; Dries, Volker; Schirmacher, Peter; Leo, Eugen

    2006-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) is expressed in a several epithelial tissues and carcinomas, but not on mature hepatocytes. Here, we analysed the expression of Ep-CAM in 230 patients suffering from various liver diseases like chronic hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV infection), chronic autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), hereditary hemochromatosis and dysplastic nodules (DNs) as well as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and cholangiocellular carcinomas (CCCs) by immunohistochemistry. De novo hepatocellular Ep-CAM expression was found in 75.9% of ALD (22/29), 63.6% of HCV (21/33) and 55.6% of each AIH and HBV cases (5/9 and 15/27, respectively). Lower Ep-CAM expression levels were observed for primary sclerosing liver diseases (PBC and PSC) with 25% (3/12) and 7.7% (1/13) of cases. Moreover, only 14.3% of HCCs (9/63) manifested expression, while all CCCs showed strong Ep-CAM expression (5/5). For DNs and hereditary hemochromatosis, Ep-CAM expression was found in 10 and 50% (3/30 and 2/4), respectively. In HBV and HCV, Ep-CAM expression correlated significantly with inflammatory activity as assessed by histological parameters and to the extent of fibrosis. In addition, for HCV also transaminase levels correlated significantly with Ep-CAM expression. Our results indicate that de novo Ep-CAM expression in hepatocytes is frequent in inflammatory liver diseases and is potentially linked to regenerative activity. CCCs and Ep-CAM positive HCCs may represent an attractive target group for Ep-CAM-directed immunotherapies, yet unwanted toxicity may limit the use of such strategies due to Ep-CAM expression in biliary epithelium and several chronic liver diseases such as HBV-and HCV-hepatitis.

  8. miR-21-3p is a positive regulator of L1CAM in several human carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Doberstein, Kai; Bretz, Niko P; Schirmer, Uwe; Fiegl, Heidi; Blaheta, Roman; Breunig, Christian; Müller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Reimer, Dan; Zeimet, Alain G; Altevogt, Peter

    2014-11-28

    Expression of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) occurs frequently in human cancers and is associated with poor prognosis in cancers such as ovarian, endometrial, breast, renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. L1CAM promotes cell motility, invasion, chemoresistance and metastasis formation. Elucidating genetic processes involved in the expression of L1CAM in cancers is of considerable importance. Transcription factors such as SLUG, β-catenin/TCF-LEF, PAX8 and VHL have been implicated in the re-activation of L1CAM in various types of cancers. There is increasing evidence that micro-RNAs can also have strong effects on gene expression. Here we have identified miR-21-3p as a positive regulator of L1CAM expression. Over-expression of miR-21-3p (miR-21*) but not the complementary sequence miR-21-5p (miR-21) could strongly augment L1CAM expression in renal, endometrial and ovarian carcinoma derived cell lines by an unknown mechanism involving transcriptional activation of the L1CAM gene. In patient cohorts from renal, endometrial and ovarian cancers we observed a strong positive correlation of L1CAM and miR-21-3p expressions. Although L1CAM alone was a reliable marker for overall and disease free survival, the combination of L1CAM and miR-21-3p expressions strongly enhanced the predictive power. Our findings shed new light on the complex regulation of L1CAM in cancers and advocate the use of L1CAM/miR-21-3p for diagnostic application. PMID:25149066

  9. Identification of striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) as a novel calmodulin target by a newly developed genome-wide screen.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yusui; Denda, Miwako; Sakane, Kyohei; Ogusu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Sumio; Magari, Masaki; Kanayama, Naoki; Morishita, Ryo; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    To search for novel target(s) of the Ca(2+)-signaling transducer, calmodulin (CaM), we performed a newly developed genome-wide CaM interaction screening of 19,676 GST-fused proteins expressed in human. We identified striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) as a novel CaM target and characterized its CaM binding ability and found that the Ca(2+)/CaM complex interacted stoichiometrically with the N-terminal region (Ala13-Gln35) of STARS in vitro as well as in living cells. Mutagenesis studies identified Ile20 and Trp33 as the essential hydrophobic residues in CaM anchoring. Furthermore, the CaM binding deficient mutant (Ile20Ala, Trp33Ala) of STARS further enhanced its stimulatory effect on SRF-dependent transcriptional activation. These results suggest a connection between Ca(2+)-signaling via excitation-contraction coupling and the regulation of STARS-mediated gene expression in muscles.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus β-Toxin Mutants Are Defective in Biofilm Ligase and Sphingomyelinase Activity, and Causation of Infective Endocarditis and Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alfa; Vu, Bao G; Stach, Christopher S; Merriman, Joseph A; Horswill, Alexander R; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-05-01

    β-Toxin is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus, contributing to colonization and development of disease [Salgado-Pabon, W., et al. (2014) J. Infect. Dis. 210, 784-792; Huseby, M. J., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14407-14412; Katayama, Y., et al. (2013) J. Bacteriol. 195, 1194-1203]. This cytotoxin has two distinct mechanisms of action: sphingomyelinase activity and DNA biofilm ligase activity. However, the distinct mechanism that is most important for its role in infective endocarditis is unknown. We characterized the active site of β-toxin DNA biofilm ligase activity by examining deficiencies in site-directed mutants through in vitro DNA precipitation and biofilm formation assays. Possible conformational changes in mutant structure compared to that of wild-type toxin were assessed preliminarily by trypsin digestion analysis, retention of sphingomyelinase activity, and predicted structures based on the native toxin structure. We addressed the contribution of each mechanism of action to producing infective endocarditis and sepsis in vivo in a rabbit model. The H289N β-toxin mutant, lacking sphingomyelinase activity, exhibited lower sepsis lethality and infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to those of the wild-type toxin. β-Toxin mutants with disrupted biofilm ligase activity did not exhibit decreased sepsis lethality but were deficient in infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to the wild-type protein. Our study begins to characterize the DNA biofilm ligase active site of β-toxin and suggests β-toxin functions importantly in infective endocarditis through both of its mechanisms of action. PMID:27015018

  11. Staphylococcus aureus β-Toxin Mutants Are Defective in Biofilm Ligase and Sphingomyelinase Activity, and Causation of Infective Endocarditis and Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alfa; Vu, Bao G; Stach, Christopher S; Merriman, Joseph A; Horswill, Alexander R; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-05-01

    β-Toxin is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus, contributing to colonization and development of disease [Salgado-Pabon, W., et al. (2014) J. Infect. Dis. 210, 784-792; Huseby, M. J., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14407-14412; Katayama, Y., et al. (2013) J. Bacteriol. 195, 1194-1203]. This cytotoxin has two distinct mechanisms of action: sphingomyelinase activity and DNA biofilm ligase activity. However, the distinct mechanism that is most important for its role in infective endocarditis is unknown. We characterized the active site of β-toxin DNA biofilm ligase activity by examining deficiencies in site-directed mutants through in vitro DNA precipitation and biofilm formation assays. Possible conformational changes in mutant structure compared to that of wild-type toxin were assessed preliminarily by trypsin digestion analysis, retention of sphingomyelinase activity, and predicted structures based on the native toxin structure. We addressed the contribution of each mechanism of action to producing infective endocarditis and sepsis in vivo in a rabbit model. The H289N β-toxin mutant, lacking sphingomyelinase activity, exhibited lower sepsis lethality and infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to those of the wild-type toxin. β-Toxin mutants with disrupted biofilm ligase activity did not exhibit decreased sepsis lethality but were deficient in infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to the wild-type protein. Our study begins to characterize the DNA biofilm ligase active site of β-toxin and suggests β-toxin functions importantly in infective endocarditis through both of its mechanisms of action.

  12. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C.; Adamski, Carolyn J.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn2+-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  13. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C; Adamski, Carolyn J; Gibbs, Richard A; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn(2+)-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  14. Lithium-induced activation of Akt and CaM kinase II contributes to its neuroprotective action in a rat microsphere embolism model.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takuya; Han, Feng; Shioda, Norifumi; Moriguchi, Shigeki; Kasahara, Jiro; Ishiguro, Koichi; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2006-09-01

    Lithium used in bipolar mood disorder therapy protects neurons from brain ischemic cell death. Here, we documented that lithium administration under microsphere-embolism (ME)-induced brain ischemia restored decreased protein kinase B (Akt) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activities 24 h after ischemia in rat brain. Akt activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of its potential targets forkhead transcription factor (FKHR) and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta). In parallel with decreased CaMKII autophosphorylation, we also found marked dephosphorylation of tau proteins 24-72 h after ME. Increased protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity was found 24 h after ME. Inhibition of increased PP2A activity by lithium treatment apparently mediated restored tau phosphorylation. Taken together, activation of Akt and CaMKII by lithium was associated with neuroprotective activity in ME-induced neuronal injury.

  15. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-12

    (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed {approx}100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by the glycine-to-alanine mutation may account for the lowered catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme, which is consistent with the 30 mV lower flavin redox potential. Furthermore, the altered binding mode of the indolelactate substrate may account for its reduced activity compared with octanoate, as observed in the crystalline state.

  16. Suppression of ERK activation in urethral epithelial cells infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its isogenic minD mutant contributes to anti-apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, GuanQun L; Parti, Rajinder P; Dillon, Jo-Anne R

    2015-04-01

    In gonococci-infected transduced human urethral epithelial cells (THUEC), the role of ERK, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), in apoptosis is unknown. We observed lowering of ERK activation in THUEC following infection with anti-apoptosis-inducing Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain CH811. An isogenic cell division mutant of this strain, Ng CJSD1 (minD deficient), which is large and abnormally shaped, reduced ERK phosphorylation levels even more than its parental strain in THUEC. This led to higher anti-apoptosis in mutant-infected cells as compared to the parental strain-infected cells. Our results suggest that N. gonorrhoeae infection reduces ERK activation in THUEC contributing to anti-apoptosis.

  17. The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in children: a telephone-based survey in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence and patterns of CAM use in Korean children via a telephone based survey. We also investigated parent satisfaction, a proxy for their child, with CAM therapy and determined the factors affecting satisfaction with CAM use. Methods This study used a landline telephone-based survey to examine a random sample representative of Korean children, aged 0 to 18 years. We assigned and surveyed 2,000 subjects according to age group, gender, and geographical distributions by proportionate quota and systematic sampling of children throughout Korea in 2010. A household of 1,184 with a 18.6% response rate was projected to yield 2,077 completed data. We performed statistical analyses using sampling weight. Results The prevalence of CAM use was 65.3% for the Korean children in our sample population. The most commonly used CAM category was natural products (89.3%). More than half of CAM user’s parents reported satisfaction with their therapies (52.7%), but only 29.1% among them had consulted a Western trained doctor regarding the CAM therapies used. Doctor visits were associated with lower satisfaction with CAM use but not with consultation rate with a doctor. Conclusions Our study suggests that CAM is widely used among children in Korea. Medical doctors should actively discuss the use of CAM therapies with their patients and provide information on the safety and efficacy of diverse CAM modalities to guide the choices of CAM users. PMID:22515558

  18. SynCAM 1 Adhesion Dynamically Regulates Synapse Number and Impacts Plasticity and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Elissa M.; Krupp, Alexander J.; de Arce, Karen Perez; Ghosh, Ananda K.; Fogel, Adam I.; Boucard, Antony; Südhof, Thomas C.; Stein, Valentin; Biederer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Summary Synaptogenesis is required for wiring neuronal circuits in the developing brain and continues to remodel adult networks. However, the molecules organizing synapse development and maintenance in vivo remain incompletely understood. We now demonstrate that the immunoglobulin adhesion molecule SynCAM 1 dynamically alters synapse number and plasticity. Overexpression of SynCAM 1 in transgenic mice promotes excitatory synapse number, while loss of SynCAM 1 results in fewer excitatory synapses. By turning off SynCAM 1 overexpression in transgenic brains, we show that it maintains the newly induced synapses. SynCAM 1 also functions at mature synapses to alter their plasticity by regulating long-term depression. Consistent with these effects on neuronal connectivity, SynCAM 1 expression affects spatial learning, with knock-out mice learning better. The reciprocal effects of increased SynCAM 1 expression and loss reveal that this adhesion molecule contributes to the regulation of synapse number and plasticity, and impacts how neuronal networks undergo activity-dependent changes. PMID:21145003

  19. A strategic study using mutant-strain entrapment in calcium alginate for the production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with high invertase activity.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Alva, Juan Carlos; Rocha-Leão, Maria Helena Miguez

    2003-08-01

    Entrapped cells and entrapped cells grown inside of a calcium alginate matrix as well as free cells have been investigated using Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strains with regard to their pattern of growth and invertase activity. The repression of invertase by glucose and glucose-consumption ability were considered in the selection process of the mutants. Efficient sucrose bioconversion due to high invertase activity was obtained when entrapped mutant strain Q6R2 cells were grown within calcium alginate gel beads using sucrose plus glucose as the carbon source. Under these conditions, 1 mg (dry weight) of entrapped cells is able to produce 20 micromol of inverted sugar in 3 min (the maximum activity obtained was 20 units x mg(-1)). The experiments were carried out for 6 months without appreciable loss of either bead integrity or invertase activity. The biocatalyst was also stored at 4 degrees C for 6 months without appreciable loss of the invertase activity. This work shows that entrapped yeast cells with a weak ability to consume sugar may be used to produce inverted sugar.

  20. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We’ve also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a “GST-like” S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution. PMID:27499004

  1. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We've also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a "GST-like" S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution. PMID:27499004

  2. Generation, characterization and preclinical studies of a human anti-L1CAM monoclonal antibody that cross-reacts with rodent L1CAM.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seulki; Park, Insoo; Kim, Haejung; Jeong, Mun Sik; Lim, Mooney; Lee, Eung Suk; Kim, Jin Hong; Kim, Semi; Hong, Hyo Jeong

    2016-01-01

    L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is aberrantly expressed in malignant tumors and plays important roles in tumor progression. Thus, L1CAM could serve as a therapeutic target and anti-L1CAM antibodies may have potential as anticancer agents. However, L1CAM is expressed in neural cells and the druggability of anti-L1AM antibody must be validated at the earliest stages of preclinical study. Here, we generated a human monoclonal antibody that is cross-reactive with mouse L1CAM and evaluated its pharmacokinetic properties and anti-tumor efficacy in rodent models. First, we selected an antibody (Ab4) that binds human and mouse L1CAM from the human naïve Fab library using phage display, then increased its affinity 45-fold through mutation of 3 residues in the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) to generate Ab4M. Next, the affinity of Ab4M was increased 1.8-fold by yeast display of single-chain variable fragment containing randomly mutated light chain CDR3 to generate Ab417. The affinities (KD) of Ab417 for human and mouse L1CAM were 0.24 nM and 79.16 pM, respectively. Ab417 specifically bound the Ig5 domain of L1CAM and did not exhibit off-target activity, but bound to the peripheral nerves embedded in normal human tissues as expected in immunohistochemical analysis. In a pharmacokinetics study, the mean half-life of Ab417 was 114.49 h when a single dose (10 mg/kg) was intravenously injected into SD rats. Ab417 significantly inhibited tumor growth in a human cholangiocarcinoma xenograft nude mouse model and did not induce any adverse effect in in vivo studies. Thus, Ab417 may have potential as an anticancer agent. PMID:26785809

  3. Activity of the response regulator CiaR in mutants of Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 altered in acetyl phosphate production

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Patrick; Meiers, Marina; Brückner, Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    The two-component regulatory system (TCS) CiaRH of Streptococcus pneumoniae is implicated in competence, ß-lactam resistance, maintenance of cell integrity, bacteriocin production, host colonization, and virulence. Depending on the growth conditions, CiaR can be highly active in the absence of its cognate kinase CiaH, although phosphorylation of CiaR is required for DNA binding and gene regulation. To test the possibility that acetyl phosphate (AcP) could be the alternative phosphodonor, genes involved in pyruvate metabolism were disrupted to alter cellular levels of acetyl phosphate. Inactivating the genes of pyruvate oxidase SpxB, phosphotransacetylase Pta, and acetate kinase AckA, resulted in very low AcP levels and in strongly reduced CiaR-mediated gene expression in CiaH-deficient strains. Therefore, alternative phosphorylation of CiaR appears to proceed via AcP. The AcP effect on CiaR is not detected in strains with CiaH. Attempts to obtain elevated AcP by preventing its degradation by acetate kinase AckA, were not successful in CiaH-deficient strains with a functional SpxB, the most important enzyme for AcP production in S. pneumoniae. The ciaH-spxB-ackA mutant producing intermediate amounts of AcP could be constructed and showed a promoter activation, which was much higher than expected. Since activation was dependent on AcP, it can apparently be used more efficiently for CiaR phosphorylation in the absence of AckA. Therefore, high AcP levels in the absence of CiaH and AckA may cause extreme overexpression of the CiaR regulon leading to synthetic lethality. AckA is also involved in a regulatory response, which is mediated by CiaH. Addition of acetate to the growth medium switch CiaH from kinase to phosphatase. This switch is lost in the absence of AckA indicating metabolism of acetate is required, which starts with the production of AcP by AckA. Therefore, AckA plays a special regulatory role in the control of the CiaRH TCS. PMID:25642214

  4. A channelopathy mechanism revealed by direct calmodulin activation of TrpV4

    PubMed Central

    Loukin, Stephen H.; Teng, Jinfeng; Kung, Ching

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) regulates varieties of ion channels, including Transient Receptor Potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TrpV4). It has previously been proposed that internal Ca2+ increases TrpV4 activity through Ca2+-CaM binding to a C-terminal Ca2+-CaM binding domain (CBD). We confirmed this model by directly presenting Ca2+-CaM protein to membrane patches excised from TrpV4-expressing oocytes. Over 50 TRPV4 mutations are now known to cause heritable skeletal dysplasia (SD) and other diseases in human. We have previously examined 14 SD alleles and found them to all have gain-of-function effects, with the gain of constitutive open probability paralleling disease severity. Among the 14 SD alleles examined, E797K and P799L are located immediate upstream of the CBD. They not only have increase basal activity, but, unlike the wild-type or other SD-mutant channels examined, they were greatly reduced in their response to Ca2+-CaM. Deleting a 10-residue upstream peptide (Δ795–804) that covers the two SD mutant sites resulted in strong constitutive activity and the complete lack of Ca2+-CaM response. We propose that the region immediately upstream of CBD is an autoinhibitory domain that maintains the closed state through electrostatic interactions, and adjacent detachable Ca2+-CaM binding to CBD sterically interferes with this autoinhibition. This work further supports the notion that TrpV4 mutations cause SD by constitutive leakage. However, the closed conformation is likely destabilized by various mutations by different mechanisms, including the permanent removal of an autoinhibition documented here. PMID:26170305

  5. Differential effects of human L1CAM mutations on complementing guidance and synaptic defects in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kudumala, Sirisha; Freund, Julie; Hortsch, Michael; Godenschwege, Tanja A

    2013-01-01

    A large number of different pathological L1CAM mutations have been identified that result in a broad spectrum of neurological and non-neurological phenotypes. While many of these mutations have been characterized for their effects on homophilic and heterophilic interactions, as well as expression levels in vitro, there are only few studies on their biological consequences in vivo. The single L1-type CAM gene in Drosophila, neuroglian (nrg), has distinct functions during axon guidance and synapse formation and the phenotypes of nrg mutants can be rescued by the expression of human L1CAM. We previously showed that the highly conserved intracellular FIGQY Ankyrin-binding motif is required for L1CAM-mediated synapse formation, but not for neurite outgrowth or axon guidance of the Drosophila giant fiber (GF) neuron. Here, we use the GF as a model neuron to characterize the pathogenic L120V, Y1070C, C264Y, H210Q, E309K and R184Q extracellular L1CAM missense mutations and a L1CAM protein with a disrupted ezrin-moesin-radixin (ERM) binding site to investigate the signaling requirements for neuronal development. We report that different L1CAM mutations have distinct effects on axon guidance and synapse formation. Furthermore, L1CAM homophilic binding and signaling via the ERM motif is essential for axon guidance in Drosophila. In addition, the human pathological H210Q, R184Q and Y1070C, but not the E309K and L120V L1CAM mutations affect outside-in signaling via the FIGQY Ankyrin binding domain which is required for synapse formation. Thus, the pathological phenotypes observed in humans are likely to be caused by the disruption of signaling required for both, guidance and synaptogenesis. PMID:24155914

  6. CAM Photosynthesis in Submerged Aquatic Plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a CO2-concentrating mechanism selected in response to aridity in terrestrial habitats, and, in aquatic environments, to ambient limitations of carbon. Evidence is reviewed for its presence in five genera of aquatic vascular plants, including Isoe??tes, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, Crassula, and Littorella. Initially, aquatic CAM was considered by some to be an oxymoron, but some aquatic species have been studied in sufficient detail to say definitively that they possess CAM photosynthesis. CO2-concentrating mechanisms in photosynthetic organs require a barrier to leakage; e.g., terrestrial C4 plants have suberized bundle sheath cells and terrestrial CAM plants high stomatal resistance. In aquatic CAM plants the primary barrier to CO2 leakage is the extremely high diffusional resistance of water. This, coupled with the sink provided by extensive intercellular gas space, generates daytime CO2(Pi) comparable to terrestrial CAM plants. CAM contributes to the carbon budget by both net carbon gain and carbon recycling, and the magnitude of each is environmentally influenced. Aquatic CAM plants inhabit sites where photosynthesis is potentially limited by carbon. Many occupy moderately fertile shallow temporary pools that experience extreme diel fluctuations in carbon availability. CAM plants are able to take advantage of elevated nighttime CO2 levels in these habitats. This gives them a competitive advantage over non-CAM species that are carbon starved during the day and an advantage over species that expend energy in membrane transport of bicarbonate. Some aquatic CAM plants are distributed in highly infertile lakes, where extreme carbon limitation and light are important selective factors. Compilation of reports on diel changes in titratable acidity and malate show 69 out of 180 species have significant overnight accumulation, although evidence is presented discounting CAM in some. It is concluded that similar proportions of the aquatic

  7. Host range and cell cycle activation properties of polyomavirus large T-antigen mutants defective in pRB binding

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.; Bauer, P.H.; Benjamin, T.L.; Crissman, H.A.; Bradbury, E.M. |

    1994-11-01

    The authors have examined the growth properties of polyomavirus large T-antigen mutants that ar unable to bind pRB, the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. These mutants grow poorly on primary mouse cells yet grow well on NIH 3T3 and other established mouse cell lines. Preinfection of primary baby mouse kidney (BMK) epithelial cells with wild-type simian virus 40 renders these cells permissive to growth of pRB-binding polyomavirus mutants. Conversely, NIH 3T3 cells transfected by and expressing wild-type human pRB become nonpermissive. Primary fibroblasts for mouse embryos that carry a homozygous knockout of the RB gene are permissive, while those from normal littermates are nonpermissive. The host range of polyomavirus pRB-binding mutants is thus determined by expression or lack of expression of functional pRB by the host. These results demonstrate the importance of pRB binding by large T antigen for productive viral infection in primary cells. Failure of pRB-binding mutants to grow well in BMK cells correlates with their failure to induce progression from G{sub 0} or G{sub 1} through the S phase of the cell cycle. Time course studies show delayed synthesis and lower levels of accumulation of large T antigen, viral DNA, and VP1 in mutant compared with wild-type virus-infected BMK cells. These results support a model in which productive infection by polyomavirus in normal mouse cells is tightly coupled to the induction and progression of the cell cycle. 48 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Tedim, Ana P.; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments. PMID:26195514

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Morosini, María Isabel; Tedim, Ana P; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments.

  10. Modulation of endotoxicity of Shigella generalized modules for membrane antigens (GMMA) by genetic lipid A modifications: relative activation of TLR4 and TLR2 pathways in different mutants.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Omar; Pesce, Isabella; Giannelli, Carlo; Aprea, Susanna; Caboni, Mariaelena; Citiulo, Francesco; Valentini, Sara; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; MacLennan, Calman Alexander; D'Oro, Ugo; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2014-09-01

    Outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria are attractive vaccine candidates as they present surface antigens in their natural context. We previously developed a high yield production process for genetically derived particles, called generalized modules for membrane antigens (GMMA), from Shigella. As GMMA are derived from the outer membrane, they contain immunostimulatory components, especially lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We examined ways of reducing their reactogenicity by modifying lipid A, the endotoxic part of LPS, through deletion of late acyltransferase genes, msbB or htrB, in GMMA-producing Shigella sonnei and Shigella flexneri strains. GMMA with resulting penta-acylated lipid A from the msbB mutants showed a 600-fold reduced ability, and GMMA from the S. sonnei ΔhtrB mutant showed a 60,000-fold reduced ability compared with GMMA with wild-type lipid A to stimulate human Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in a reporter cell line. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A showed a marked reduction in induction of inflammatory cytokines (S. sonnei ΔhtrB, 800-fold; ΔmsbB mutants, 300-fold). We found that the residual activity of these GMMA is largely due to non-lipid A-related TLR2 activation. In contrast, in the S. flexneri ΔhtrB mutant, a compensatory lipid A palmitoleoylation resulted in GMMA with hexa-acylated lipid A with ∼10-fold higher activity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells than GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A, mostly due to retained TLR4 activity. Thus, for use as vaccines, GMMA will likely require lipid A penta-acylation. The results identify the relative contributions of TLR4 and TLR2 activation by GMMA, which need to be taken into consideration for GMMA vaccine development.

  11. Rapid binding of a cationic active site inhibitor to wild type and mutant mouse acetylcholinesterase: Brownian dynamics simulation including diffusion in the active site gorge.

    PubMed

    Tara, S; Elcock, A H; Kirchhoff, P D; Briggs, J M; Radic, Z; Taylor, P; McCammon, J A

    1998-12-01

    It is known that anionic surface residues play a role in the long-range electrostatic attraction between acetylcholinesterase and cationic ligands. In our current investigation, we show that anionic residues also play an important role in the behavior of the ligand within the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase. Negatively charged residues near the gorge opening not only attract positively charged ligands from solution to the enzyme, but can also restrict the motion of the ligand once it is inside of the gorge. We use Brownian dynamics techniques to calculate the rate constant kon, for wild type and mutant acetylcholinesterase with a positively charged ligand. These calculations are performed by allowing the ligand to diffuse within the active site gorge. This is an extension of previously reported work in which a ligand was allowed to diffuse only to the enzyme surface. By setting the reaction criteria for the ligand closer to the active site, better agreement with experimental data is obtained. Although a number of residues influence the movement of the ligand within the gorge, Asp74 is shown to play a particularly important role in this function. Asp74 traps the ligand within the gorge, and in this way helps to ensure a reaction.

  12. Design, characterization, and structure of a biologically active single-chain mutant of human IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Landar, A; Curry, B; Parker, M H; DiGiacomo, R; Indelicato, S R; Nagabhushan, T L; Rizzi, G; Walter, M R

    2000-05-26

    A mutant form of human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma SC1) that binds one IFN-gamma receptor alpha chain (IFN-gamma R alpha) has been designed and characterized. IFN-gamma SC1 was derived by linking the two peptide chains of the IFN-gamma dimer by a seven-residue linker and changing His111 in the first chain to an aspartic acid residue. Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that IFN-gamma SC1 forms a 1:1 complex with its high-affinity receptor (IFN-gamma R alpha) with an affinity of 27(+/- 9) nM. The crystal structure of IFN-gamma SC1 has been determined at 2.9 A resolution from crystals grown in 1.4 M citrate solutions at pH 7.6. Comparison of the wild-type receptor-binding domain and the Asp111-containing domain of IFN-gamma SC1 show that they are structurally equivalent but have very different electrostatic surface potentials. As a result, surface charge rather than structural changes is likely responsible for the inability of the His111-->Asp domain of to bind IFN-gamma R alpha. The AB loops of IFN-gamma SC1 adopt conformations similar to the ordered loops of IFN-gamma observed in the crystal structure of the IFN-gamma/IFN-gamma R alpha complex. Thus, IFN-gamma R alpha binding does not result in a large conformational change in the AB loop as previously suggested. The structure also reveals the final six C-terminal amino acid residues of IFN-gamma SC1 (residues 253-258) that have not been observed in any other reported IFN-gamma structures. Despite binding to only one IFN-gamma R alpha, IFN-gamma SC1 is biologically active in cell proliferation, MHC class I induction, and anti-viral assays. This suggests that one domain of IFN-gamma is sufficient to recruit IFN-gamma R alpha and IFN-gamma R beta into a complex competent for eliciting biological activity. The current data are consistent with the main role of the IFN-gamma dimer being to decrease the dissociation constant of IFN-gamma for its cellular receptors.

  13. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, L. W.; Way, J. D.; Vlasse, M.

    2001-01-01

    The CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) project will develop, test, and analyze membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The CAM technology will enable passive separation of these gases, allow energy efficient acquisition and purification of these important resources, and lay the foundation for future unmanned sample return and human space missions. The CAM membranes are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications, such as In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) and In Situ Consumables Production (ISCP).

  14. Results from the CAMS video network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.

    2016-01-01

    A status report is given on results from the CAMS meteoroid orbit and meteoroid spectroscopy survey. The survey detected some 230 meteor showers and shower components throughout the year. 70 of these are already in the IAU list of Established Meteor Showers, after 26 were verified by CAMS. An additional 55 previously known showers in need of confirmation were also validated. 19 new shower components were identified that are still in need of validation. 86 new showers were discovered, 54 of which were also found present in the SonotaCo meteoroid orbit database. There are ongoing efforts to expand the CAMS survey to sites spread in latitude and longitude.

  15. Does Perceived Control Predict Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use Among Patients with Lung Cancer? A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bauml, Joshua; Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey; Garland, Sheila N.; Desai, Krupali; Mao, Jun J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Scant literature exists on the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) among patients with lung cancer. Preliminary data indicates that perceived control is an important factor leading patients to CAM. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between perceived control and CAM use in patients with lung cancer. Methods We performed a cross sectional survey in patients with lung cancer under active treatment and follow-up at the oncology clinic of an academic medical center. Self-reported CAM use was the primary outcome. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the relationship between perceived control and CAM use, controlling for other factors. Results Among 296 participants. 54.4% were female, 83.5% Caucasian, 57.6% ≤65 years old, 52.4% stage IV and 86.4% had Non-small cell lung cancer. 50.9% of patients had used CAM, most commonly vitamins (31.5%), herbs (19.3%), relaxation techniques (16%) and special diets (15.7%). In multivariate analysis, CAM use was associated with having greater perceived control over the cause of cancer (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 2.27, 95% CI 1.35–3.80), age ≤65 (AOR 1.64, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.01–2.67), higher education (AOR 2.17, 95% CI 1.29–3.64), and never having smoked tobacco (AOR 2.39, 95% CI 1.25–4.54). Nearly 60% of patients who used CAM were receiving active treatment. Conclusion Over half of lung cancer patients have used CAM since diagnosis. Greater perceived control over the cause of cancer was associated with CAM use. Given the high prevalence of CAM, it is essential that oncologists caring for patients with lung cancer discuss its use. PMID:24715092

  16. Steady state fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1) and its active site mutants.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence quenching and time resolved fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1), a multitryptophan protein from Leucaena leucocephala and 10 different active site mutants were carried out to investigate tryptophan environment. The enzyme showed highest affinity for feruloyl CoA (K(a)  = 3.72 × 10(5) M(-1)) over other CoA esters and cinnamaldehydes, as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. Quenching of the fluorescence by acrylamide for wild type and active site mutants was collisional with almost 100% of the tryptophan fluorescence accessible under native condition and remained same after denaturation of protein with 6 M GdnHCl. In wild type Ll-CCRH1, the extent of quenching achieved with iodide (f(a) = 1.0) was significantly higher than cesium ions (f(a) = 0.33) suggesting more density of positive charge around surface of trp conformers under native conditions. Denaturation of wild type protein with 6 M GdnHCl led to significant increase in the quenching with cesium (f(a) = 0.54), whereas quenching with iodide ion was decreased (f(a) = 0.78), indicating reorientation of charge density around trp from positive to negative and heterogeneity in trp environment. The Stern-Volmer plots for wild type and mutants Ll-CCRH1 under native and denatured conditions, with cesium ion yielded biphasic quenching profiles. The extent of quenching for cesium and iodide ions under native and denatured conditions observed in active site mutants was significantly different from wild type Ll-CCRH1 under the same conditions. Thus, single substitution type mutations of active site residues showed heterogeneity in tryptophan microenvironment and differential degree of conformation of protein under native or denatured conditions. PMID:24322526

  17. Acquisition of pro-oxidant activity of fALS-linked SOD1 mutants as revealed using circular dichroism and UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimaki, Nobuhiro; Nishiya, Ken; Miura, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu

    2016-11-01

    The acquisition of pro-oxidant activity of the mutated form of human Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) has been investigated to clarify the relationship between mutations in SOD1 and the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Ala4 → Val (A4V) and Gly93 → Ala (G93A) mutants, which are representative ALS-linked SOD1 mutants, have been found to exhibit both the denaturation and the gain of pro-oxidant activity after incubation in the apo-form at a physiological condition of 37 °C and pH 7.4 and the rebinding of Cu2+. These characteristics are similar to those previously reported for the His43 → Arg (H43R) mutant. UV-resonance Raman spectra indicated that the coordination structure of the Cu-binding site catalyzing the oxidation reaction is the same among the denatured A4V, G93A, and H43R. Since wild-type SOD1 does not exhibit the denaturation in its apo-form at 37 °C and pH 7.4, the instability of the protein structure due to mutation can be considered as a significant factor that induces the denaturation and the subsequent pro-oxidant activity.

  18. H11-H12 loop retinoic acid receptor mutants exhibit distinct trans-activating and trans-repressing activities in the presence of natural or synthetic retinoids.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, B; Mouchon, A; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1998-06-30

    Retinoids, such as the naturally occurring all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) and synthetic ligand CD367 modulate ligand-dependent transcription through retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Retinoid binding to RAR is believed to trigger structural transitions in the ligand-binding domain (LBD), leading to helix H1 and helix H12 repositioning and coactivator recruitment and corepressor release. Here, we carried out a detailed mutagenesis analysis of the H11-H12 loop (designated the L box) to study its contribution to hRARalpha activation process. Point mutations that reduced transactivation by atRA also reduced atRA-induced transrepression of AP1 transcription, correlating ligand-induced activation and repression. However, a correlation was not observed with these mutations when tested with another ligand CD367, a synthetic agonist with binding properties identical to those of atRA. Transcription was strongly inhibited in the presence of CD367 for some mutants, thus leading to an inverse agonist activity of this ligand. None of these mutations significantly altered binding affinity for either ligand, indicating that altered transcription was not caused by altered ligand binding by these mutations. Although simple correlations with transcriptional activities were not found, these mutations were also characterized by altered ligand-induced structural transitions, which were distinct for the atRA-hRARalpha or CD367-hRARalpha complexes. These results indicate that amino acids in the L box are involved in specifying trans-repressive and trans-activating properties of the hRARalpha, and support the notion that different agonists induce distinct conformations in the LBD of the receptor.

  19. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-01

    The crystal structure of the G81A mutant form of the chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and of its complexes with two of its substrates reveal productive and non-productive modes of binding for the catalytic reaction. The structure also indicates the role of G81A in lowering the redox potential of the flavin co-factor leading to an ∼200-fold slower catalytic rate of substrate oxidation. (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed ∼100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by

  20. Prenylation of a Rab1B mutant with altered GTPase activity is impaired in cell-free systems but not in intact mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A L; Sheridan, K M; Erdman, R A; Maltese, W A

    1996-09-15

    Previous studies have reached differing conclusions as to whether or not guanine-nucleotide-dependent conformational changes affect the ability of Rab proteins to undergo post-translational modification by Rab:geranylgeranyltransferase (Rab-GGTase). We now show that the ability of a Rab1B mutant [Q67L (Gln-67-->Leu)] with reduced intrinsic GTPase activity to undergo geranylgeranylation in cell-free assays depends on the guanine nucleotide composition of the system. When GTP is the predominant nucleotide in the assay, Rab1BQ67L is a poor substrate. However, when GDP is present and GTP is omitted, prenylation of the Q67L mutant is comparable with that of the wild-type (WT) protein. These studies, coupled with the poor prenylation of Rab1BWT in the presence of the non-hydrolysable GTP analogue guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, support the notion that Rab-GGTase prefers substrates in the GDP conformation. When the abilities of Rab1BQ67L and Rab1BWT to undergo prenylation were compared by metabolic labelling of transiently expressed proteins in cultured human 293 cells, we did not observe a decline in prenylation of the mutant protein as predicted on the basis of the cell-free assays. Moreover, the Q67L mutant was comparable with the wild-type Rab1B in its ability to associate with co-expressed Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors in 293 cells. These findings raise the possibility that unidentified proteins present in intact cells may compensate for the reduced intrinsic GTPase activity of the Q67L mutant, allowing a significant proportion of the nascent Rab1BQ67L to assume a GDP conformation. The differential prenylation of Rab1BQ67L in cell-free systems versus intact cells underscores the importance of evaluating the post-translational modification of specific Rab mutants in vivo, where poorly characterized regulatory proteins may have a significant effect on GTPase activity or nucleotide exchange rates.

  1. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  2. Model Documentation for the MiniCAM

    SciTech Connect

    Brenkert, Antoinette L.; Smith, Steven J.; Kim, Son H.; Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2003-07-17

    The MiniCAM, short for the Mini-Climate Assessment Model, is an integrated assessment model of moderate complexity focused on energy and agriculture sectors. The model produces emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide) and other radiatively important substances such as sulfur dioxide. Through incorporation of the simple climate model MAGICC, the consequences of these emissions for climate change and sea-level rise can be examined. The MiniCAM is designed to be fast and flexible.

  3. CAM and stack air sampler design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.D.

    1994-05-13

    About 128 air samplers and CAMs presently in service to detect and document potential radioactive release from `H` and `F` area tank farm ventilation stacks are scheduled for replacement and/or upgrade by Projects S-5764, S-2081, S-3603, and S-4516. The seven CAMs scheduled to be upgraded by Project S-4516 during 1995 are expected to provide valuable experience for the three remaining projects. The attached document provides design guidance for the standardized High Level Waste air sampling system.

  4. Statistical Shape Modeling of Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Michael D.; Dater, Manasi; Whitaker, Ross; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Peters, Christopher L.; Anderson, Andrew E.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, statistical shape modeling (SSM) was used to quantify three-dimensional (3D) variation and morphologic differences between femurs with and without cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). 3D surfaces were generated from CT scans of femurs from 41 controls and 30 cam FAI patients. SSM correspondence particles were optimally positioned on each surface using a gradient descent energy function. Mean shapes for control and patient groups were defined from the resulting particle configurations. Morphological differences between group mean shapes and between the control mean and individual patients were calculated. Principal component analysis was used to describe anatomical variation present in both groups. The first 6 modes (or principal components) captured statistically significant shape variations, which comprised 84% of cumulative variation among the femurs. Shape variation was greatest in femoral offset, greater trochanter height, and the head-neck junction. The mean cam femur shape protruded above the control mean by a maximum of 3.3 mm with sustained protrusions of 2.5-3.0 mm along the anterolateral head-neck junction and distally along the anterior neck, corresponding well with reported cam lesion locations and soft-tissue damage. This study provides initial evidence that SSM can describe variations in femoral morphology in both controls and cam FAI patients and may be useful for developing new measurements of pathological anatomy. SSM may also be applied to characterize cam FAI severity and provide templates to guide patient-specific surgical resection of bone.

  5. Chiropractic and CAM Utilization: A Descriptive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Dana J; Meeker, William C

    2007-01-01

    Objective To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions Data Sources A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations. Data Selection A total of 137 papers were selected, based upon including information about chiropractic utilization, CAM utilization and low back pain and other conditions. Data Synthesis Information was extracted from each paper addressing use of chiropractic and CAM, and is summarized in tabular form. Results Thematic analysis of the paper topics indicated that there were 5 functional areas covered by the literature: back pain papers, general chiropractic papers, insurance-related papers, general CAM-related papers; and worker's compensation papers. Conclusion Studies looking at chiropractic utilization demonstrate that the rates vary, but generally fall into a range from around 6% to 12% of the population, most of whom seek chiropractic care for low back pain and not for organic disease or visceral dysfunction. CAM is itself used by people suffering from a variety of conditions, though it is often used not as a primary intervention, but rather as an additional form of care. CAM and chiropractic often offer lower costs for comparable results compared to conventional medicine. PMID:17241465

  6. Immunomodulation of Autoimmune Arthritis by Herbal CAM

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Berman, Brian M.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating autoimmune disease of global prevalence. The disease is characterized by synovial inflammation leading to cartilage and bone damage. Most of the conventional drugs used for the treatment of RA have severe adverse reactions and are quite expensive. Over the years, increasing proportion of patients with RA and other immune disorders are resorting to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for their health needs. Natural plant products comprise one of the most popular CAM for inflammatory and immune disorders. These herbal CAM belong to diverse traditional systems of medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, Kampo, and Ayurvedic medicine. In this paper, we have outlined the major immunological pathways involved in the induction and regulation of autoimmune arthritis and described various herbal CAM that can effectively modulate these immune pathways. Most of the information about the mechanisms of action of herbal products in the experimental models of RA is relevant to arthritis patients as well. The study of immunological pathways coupled with the emerging application of genomics and proteomics in CAM research is likely to provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of different CAM modalities. PMID:21234398

  7. Genomic analyses of the CAM plant pineapple.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jisen; Liu, Juan; Ming, Ray

    2014-07-01

    The innovation of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis in arid and/or low CO2 conditions is a remarkable case of adaptation in flowering plants. As the most important crop that utilizes CAM photosynthesis, the genetic and genomic resources of pineapple have been developed over many years. Genetic diversity studies using various types of DNA markers led to the reclassification of the two genera Ananas and Pseudananas and nine species into one genus Ananas and two species, A. comosus and A. macrodontes with five botanical varieties in A. comosus. Five genetic maps have been constructed using F1 or F2 populations, and high-density genetic maps generated by genotype sequencing are essential resources for sequencing and assembling the pineapple genome and for marker-assisted selection. There are abundant expression sequence tag resources but limited genomic sequences in pineapple. Genes involved in the CAM pathway has been analysed in several CAM plants but only a few of them are from pineapple. A reference genome of pineapple is being generated and will accelerate genetic and genomic research in this major CAM crop. This reference genome of pineapple provides the foundation for studying the origin and regulatory mechanism of CAM photosynthesis, and the opportunity to evaluate the classification of Ananas species and botanical cultivars.

  8. Over-expression of an inactive mutant cathepsin D increases endogenous alpha-synuclein and cathepsin B activity in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Donna; Dodson, Matthew; Ouyang, Xiaosen; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël; Liang, Qiuli; Ballestas, Mary E; Fineberg, Naomi; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative movement disorder. The histopathology of Parkinson's disease comprises proteinaceous inclusions known as Lewy bodies, which contains aggregated α-synuclein. Cathepsin D (CD) is a lysosomal protease previously demonstrated to cleave α-synuclein and decrease its toxicity in both cell lines and mouse brains in vivo. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of CD, or introduction of catalytically inactive mutant CD, resulted in decreased CD activity and increased cathepsin B activity, suggesting a possible compensatory response to inhibition of CD activity. However, this increased cathepsin B activity was not sufficient to maintain α-synuclein degradation, as evidenced by the accumulation of endogenous α-synuclein. Interestingly, the levels of LC3, LAMP1, and LAMP2, proteins involved in autophagy-lysosomal activities, as well as total lysosomal mass as assessed by LysoTracker flow cytometry, were unchanged. Neither autophagic flux nor proteasomal activities differs between cells over-expressing wild-type versus mutant CD. These observations point to a critical regulatory role for that endogenous CD activity in dopaminergic cells in α-synuclein homeostasis which cannot be compensated for by increased Cathepsin B. These data support the potential need to enhance CD function in order to attenuate α-synuclein accumulation as a therapeutic strategy against development of synucleinopathy.

  9. Validation of aerosols, reactive gases and greenhouse gases in the CAMS forecasts, analyses and reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskes, Henk; Basart, Sara; Blechschmidt, Anne; Chabrillat, Simon; Clark, Hannah; Cuevas, Emilio; Engelen, Richard; Kapsomenakis, John; Katragkou, Eleni; Mantzius Hansen, Kaj; Niemeijer, Sander; Ramonet, Michel; Schulz, Michael; Sudarchikova, Natalia; Wagner, Annette; Warneke, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The Atmosphere Monitoring Service of the European Copernicus Programme (CAMS) is an operational service providing analyses, reanalyses and daily forecasts of aerosols, reactive gases and greenhouse gases on a global scale, and air quality forecasts and reanalyses on a regional scale. CAMS is based on the systems developed during the European MACC I-II-III (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) research projects. In CAMS data assimilation techniques are applied to combine in-situ and remote sensing observations with global and European-scale models of atmospheric reactive gases, aerosols and greenhouse gases. The global component is based on the Integrated Forecast System of the ECMWF, and the regional component on an ensemble of 7 European air quality models. CAMS is implemented by ECMWF, and the transition from MACC to CAMS is currently being implemented (2015-2016). CAMS has a dedicated validation activity, a partnership of 13 institutes co-ordinated by KNMI, to document the quality of the atmospheric composition products. In our contribution we discuss this validation activity, including the measurement data sets, validation requirements, the operational aspects, the upgrade procedure, the validation reports and scoring methods, and the model configurations and assimilation systems validated. Of special concern are the forecasts of high pollution concentration events (fires, dust storms, air pollution events, volcano ash and SO2). A few interesting validation results will be shown.

  10. Thiopurine S-methyltransferase deficiency: two nucleotide transitions define the most prevalent mutant allele associated with loss of catalytic activity in Caucasians.

    PubMed Central

    Tai, H. L.; Krynetski, E. Y.; Yates, C. R.; Loennechen, T.; Fessing, M. Y.; Krynetskaia, N. F.; Evans, W. E.

    1996-01-01

    The autosomal recessive trait of thiopurine S-methytransferase (TPMT) deficiency is associated with severe hematopoietic toxicity when patients are treated with standard doses of mercaptopurine, azathioprine, or thioguanine. To define the molecular mechanism of this genetic polymorphism, we cloned and characterized the cDNA of a TPMT-deficient patient, which revealed a novel mutant allele (TPMT*3) containing two nucleotide transitions (G460-->A and A719-->G) producing amino acid changes at codons 154 (Ala-->Thr) and 240 (Tyr--> Cys), differing from the rare mutant TPMT allele we previously identified (i.e., TPMT*2 with only G238-->C). Site-directed mutagenesis and heterologous expression established that either TPMT*3 mutation alone leads to a reduction in catalytic activity (G460-->A, ninefold reduction; A719-->G, 1.4-fold reduction), while the presence of both mutations leads to complete loss of activity. Using mutation specific PCR-RFLP analysis, the TPMT*3 allele was detected in genomic DNA from approximately 75 percent of unrelated white subjects with heterozygous phenotypes, indicating that TPMT*3 is the most prevalent mutant allele associated with TPMT-deficiency in Caucasians. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8644731

  11. Activation of smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase by calmodulin. Role of LYS(30) and GLY(40).

    PubMed

    Van Lierop, Jacquelyn E; Wilson, David P; Davis, Jonathan P; Tikunova, Svetlana; Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P; Johnson, J David

    2002-02-22

    Calmodulin (CaM)-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) plays a key role in activation of smooth muscle contraction. A soybean isoform of CaM, SCaM-4 (77% identical to human CaM) fails to activate MLCK, whereas SCaM-1 (90.5% identical to human CaM) is as effective as CaM. We exploited this difference to gain insights into the structural requirements in CaM for activation of MLCK. A chimera (domain I of SCaM-4 and domains II-IV of SCaM-1) behaved like SCaM4, and analysis of site-specific mutants of SCaM-1 indicated that K30E and G40D mutations were responsible for the reduction in activation of MLCK. Competition experiments showed that SCaM-4 binds to the CaM-binding site of MLCK with high affinity. Replacement of CaM in skinned smooth muscle by exogenous CaM or SCaM-1, but not SCaM-4, restored Ca(2+)-dependent contraction. K30E/M36I/G40D SCaM-1 was a poor activator of contraction, but site-specific mutants, K30E, M36I and G40D, each restored Ca(2+)-induced contraction to CaM-depleted skinned smooth muscle, consistent with their capacity to activate MLCK. Interpretation of these results in light of the high-resolution structures of (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM, free and complexed with the CaM-binding domain of MLCK, indicates that a surface domain containing Lys(30) and Gly(40) and residues from the C-terminal domain is created upon binding to MLCK, formation of which is required for activation of MLCK. Interactions between this activation domain and a region of MLCK distinct from the known CaM-binding domain are required for removal of the autoinhibitory domain from the active site, i.e., activation of MLCK, or this domain may be required to stabilize the conformation of (Ca(2+))(4)-CaM necessary for MLCK activation.

  12. A Small Molecule, Which Competes with MAdCAM-1, Activates Integrin α4β7 and Fails to Prevent Mucosal Transmission of SHIV-SF162P3.

    PubMed

    Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Goode, Diana; Kleinbeck, Kyle; Wilk, Jolanta; Frank, Ines; Byrareddy, Siddappa; Arthos, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Zydowsky, Thomas; Gettie, Agegnehu; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal HIV-1 transmission is inefficient. However, certain viral and host characteristics may play a role in facilitating HIV acquisition and systemic expansion. Cells expressing high levels of integrin α4β7 have been implicated in favoring the transmission process and the infusion of an anti-α4β7 mAb (RM-Act-1) prior to, and during a repeated low-dose vaginal challenge (RLDC) regimen with SIVmac251 reduced SIV acquisition and protected the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) in the macaques that acquired SIV. α4β7 expression is required for lymphocyte trafficking to the gut lamina propria and gut inductive sites. Several therapeutic strategies that target α4β7 have been shown to be effective in treating inflammatory conditions of the intestine, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To determine if blocking α4β7 with ELN, an orally available anti-α4 small molecule, would inhibit SHIV-SF162P3 acquisition, we tested its ability to block MAdCAM-1 (α4β7 natural ligand) and HIV-gp120 binding in vitro. We studied the pharmacokinetic profile of ELN after oral and vaginal delivery in macaques. Twenty-six macaques were divided into 3 groups: 9 animals were treated with ELN orally, 9 orally and vaginally and 8 were used as controls. All animals were challenged intra-vaginally with SHIV-SF162P3 using the RLDC regimen. We found that ELN did not protect macaques from SHIV acquisition although it reduced the SHIV-induced inflammatory status during the acute phase of infection. Notably, integrins can exist in different activation states and, comparing the effect of ELN and the anti-α4β7 mAb RM-Act-1 that reduced susceptibility to SIV infection, we determined that ELN induces the active conformation of α4β7, while RM-Act-1 inhibits its activation through an allosteric mechanism. These results suggest that inhibition of α4β7 activation may be necessary to reduce susceptibility to SIV/SHIV infection and highlight the complexity of anti

  13. A Small Molecule, Which Competes with MAdCAM-1, Activates Integrin α4β7 and Fails to Prevent Mucosal Transmission of SHIV-SF162P3

    PubMed Central

    Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Goode, Diana; Kleinbeck, Kyle; Wilk, Jolanta; Frank, Ines; Byrareddy, Siddappa; Arthos, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Zydowsky, Thomas; Gettie, Agegnehu; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal HIV-1 transmission is inefficient. However, certain viral and host characteristics may play a role in facilitating HIV acquisition and systemic expansion. Cells expressing high levels of integrin α4β7 have been implicated in favoring the transmission process and the infusion of an anti-α4β7 mAb (RM-Act-1) prior to, and during a repeated low-dose vaginal challenge (RLDC) regimen with SIVmac251 reduced SIV acquisition and protected the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) in the macaques that acquired SIV. α4β7 expression is required for lymphocyte trafficking to the gut lamina propria and gut inductive sites. Several therapeutic strategies that target α4β7 have been shown to be effective in treating inflammatory conditions of the intestine, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To determine if blocking α4β7 with ELN, an orally available anti-α4 small molecule, would inhibit SHIV-SF162P3 acquisition, we tested its ability to block MAdCAM-1 (α4β7 natural ligand) and HIV-gp120 binding in vitro. We studied the pharmacokinetic profile of ELN after oral and vaginal delivery in macaques. Twenty-six macaques were divided into 3 groups: 9 animals were treated with ELN orally, 9 orally and vaginally and 8 were used as controls. All animals were challenged intra-vaginally with SHIV-SF162P3 using the RLDC regimen. We found that ELN did not protect macaques from SHIV acquisition although it reduced the SHIV-induced inflammatory status during the acute phase of infection. Notably, integrins can exist in different activation states and, comparing the effect of ELN and the anti-α4β7 mAb RM-Act-1 that reduced susceptibility to SIV infection, we determined that ELN induces the active conformation of α4β7, while RM-Act-1 inhibits its activation through an allosteric mechanism. These results suggest that inhibition of α4β7 activation may be necessary to reduce susceptibility to SIV/SHIV infection and highlight the complexity of anti

  14. Isolation of a highly active photosystem II preparation from Synechocystis 6803 using a histidine-tagged mutant of CP 47.

    PubMed

    Bricker, T M; Morvant, J; Masri, N; Sutton, H M; Frankel, L K

    1998-11-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to produce a Synechocystis mutant containing a histidine tag at the C terminus of the CP 47 protein of Photosystem II. This mutant cell line, designated HT-3, exhibited slightly above normal rates of oxygen evolution and appeared to accumulate somewhat more Photosystem II reaction centers than a control strain. A rapidly isolatable (<7 h) oxygen-evolving Photosystem II preparation was prepared from HT-3 using dodecyl-beta-d-maltoside solubilization and Co2+ metal affinity chromatography. This histidine-tagged Photosystem II preparation stably evolved oxygen at a high rate (2440 micromol O2 (mg chl)-1 h-1), exhibited an alpha-band absorption maximum at 674 nm, and was highly enriched in a number of Photosystem II components including cytochrome c550. Fluorescence yield analysis using water or hydroxylamine as an electron donor to the Photosystem II preparation indicated that virtually all of the Photosystem II reaction centers were capable of evolving oxygen. Proteins associated with Photosystem II were highly enriched in this preparation. 3,3',5, 5'-Tetramethylbenzidine staining indicated that the histidine-tagged preparation was enriched in cytochromes c550 and b559 and depleted of cytochrome f. This result was confirmed by optical difference spectroscopy. This histidine-tagged Photosystem II preparation may be very useful for the isolation of Photosystem II preparations from mutants containing lesions in other Photosystem II proteins. PMID:9804889

  15. Structure of solvation water around the active and inactive regions of a type III antifreeze protein and its mutants of lowered activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowska, Joanna; Kuffel, Anna; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Water molecules from the solvation shell of the ice-binding surface are considered important for the antifreeze proteins to perform their function properly. Herein, we discuss the problem whether the extent of changes of the mean properties of solvation water can be connected with the antifreeze activity of the protein. To this aim, the structure of solvation water of a type III antifreeze protein from Macrozoarces americanus (eel pout) is investigated. A wild type of the protein is used, along with its three mutants, with antifreeze activities equal to 54% or 10% of the activity of the native form. The solvation water of the ice-binding surface and the rest of the protein are analyzed separately. To characterize the structure of solvation shell, parameters describing radial and angular characteristics of the mutual arrangement of the molecules were employed. They take into account short-distance (first hydration shell) or long-distance (two solvation shells) effects. The obtained results and the comparison with the results obtained previously for a hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana lead to the conclusion that the structure and amino acid composition of the active region of the protein evolved to achieve two goals. The first one is the modification of the properties of the solvation water. The second one is the geometrical adjustment of the protein surface to the specific crystallographic plane of ice. Both of these goals have to be achieved simultaneously in order for the protein to perform its function properly. However, they seem to be independent from one another in a sense that very small antifreeze activity does not imply that properties of water become different from the ones observed for the wild type. The proteins with significantly lower activity still modify the mean properties of solvation water in a right direction, in spite of the fact that the accuracy of the geometrical match with the ice lattice is lost because of the

  16. Structure of solvation water around the active and inactive regions of a type III antifreeze protein and its mutants of lowered activity.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Joanna; Kuffel, Anna; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2016-08-21

    Water molecules from the solvation shell of the ice-binding surface are considered important for the antifreeze proteins to perform their function properly. Herein, we discuss the problem whether the extent of changes of the mean properties of solvation water can be connected with the antifreeze activity of the protein. To this aim, the structure of solvation water of a type III antifreeze protein from Macrozoarces americanus (eel pout) is investigated. A wild type of the protein is used, along with its three mutants, with antifreeze activities equal to 54% or 10% of the activity of the native form. The solvation water of the ice-binding surface and the rest of the protein are analyzed separately. To characterize the structure of solvation shell, parameters describing radial and angular characteristics of the mutual arrangement of the molecules were employed. They take into account short-distance (first hydration shell) or long-distance (two solvation shells) effects. The obtained results and the comparison with the results obtained previously for a hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana lead to the conclusion that the structure and amino acid composition of the active region of the protein evolved to achieve two goals. The first one is the modification of the properties of the solvation water. The second one is the geometrical adjustment of the protein surface to the specific crystallographic plane of ice. Both of these goals have to be achieved simultaneously in order for the protein to perform its function properly. However, they seem to be independent from one another in a sense that very small antifreeze activity does not imply that properties of water become different from the ones observed for the wild type. The proteins with significantly lower activity still modify the mean properties of solvation water in a right direction, in spite of the fact that the accuracy of the geometrical match with the ice lattice is lost because of the

  17. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Competencies of Nursing Students and Faculty: Results of Integrating CAM Into the Nursing Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Scott, Craig S.; Heitkemper, Margaret M.; Cornman, B. Jane; Lan, Ming-Chih; Bond, Eleanor F.; Swanson, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) R25 Education Grant Program, a faculty development program for integrating CAM into the nursing curriculum was instituted in 2003-2006. The Integrating CAM program comprised a number of elements; the primary strategy included a series of 4-week didactic and experiential summer CAM “camps,” attended by a total of 27 faculty members. Camps were designed to influence faculty integration of CAM material into course offerings. The Integrating CAM program was evaluated via a series of faculty and student surveys regarding CAM competencies, attitudes, and perceptions. For more than half of the faculty (out of the 43 who responded), the program yielded a moderate-to-strong influence on incorporation of CAM material into course content; and moderate-to-great increases in both enthusiasm for CAM and perceived CAM knowledge gains. Students at all levels (undergraduate, masters, doctoral; n = 184) reported that their courses contained CAM content; for 70% of students, their CAM knowledge increased; for 50% of students, level of CAM interest increased. Self-reported student CAM competencies were significantly greater in 2006-2007 (n = 191) than in 2003-2004 (n = 143). Results support the strategy of broadly infusing the nursing curriculum with CAM content via faculty development. PMID:20869029

  18. Acceleration of amyloidogenesis and memory impairment by estrogen deficiency through NF-κB dependent beta-secretase activation in presenilin 2 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chul Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Choi, Min Ki; Choi, Jung Soon; Oh, Ki Wan; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-01

    Nearly 7-10 million people are living with Alzheimer's disease (AD) worldwide. Senile plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Presenilin 2 (PS2) mutations increase Aβ generation in the brains of AD patients. The Aβ is generated through the sequential cleavage of amyloid precursor protein by β- and γ-secretases. Additionally, increasing evidences suggest that estrogen can reduce the development of AD via regulation of β-secretases activity and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) expression. But the underlying correlation mechanism of Aβ generation by PS2 mutations and estrogen remains to be clarified. To investigate the anti-amyloidogenesis effect of estrogen in a PS2 mutative condition, we examined memory impairment in ovariectomized PS2 mutation (N141I) mice in which cognitive function was assessed by the Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. In addition, Western blot analysis, immunostaining, immunofluorescence staining, ELISA and enzyme activity assays were used to examine the degree of Aβ deposition in the brains. In the present study, Aβ accumulated more in the ovariectomized PS2 mutant mice brain, and greatly worsened memory impairment and glial activation as well as neurogenic inflammation. In parallel with increased memory impairment, activity of β-secretase and expression of the BACE1 increased inovariectomized PS2 mutant mice. Much higher activity of NF-κB was observed by EMSA in ovariectomized PS2 mutant mice. In addition, the Aβ level was decreased by treatment of β-estradiol through inhibiting BACE1 expression in PS2 transfacted PC12 cells. These results suggest that mutation of PS2 can lead to NF-κB mediate amyloidogensis, and this effect can be amplified by the absence of estrogen.

  19. A theoretical study of the active sites of papain and S195C rat trypsin: implications for the low reactivity of mutant serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    The serine and cysteine proteinases represent two important classes of enzymes that use a catalytic triad to hydrolyze peptides and esters. The active site of the serine proteinases consists of three key residues, Asp...His...Ser. The hydroxyl group of serine functions as a nucleophile and the imidazole ring of histidine functions as a general acid/general base during catalysis. Similarly, the active site of the cysteine proteinases also involves three key residues: Asn, His, and Cys. The active site of the cysteine proteinases is generally believed to exist as a zwitterion (Asn...His+...Cys-) with the thiolate anion of the cysteine functioning as a nucleophile during the initial stages of catalysis. Curiously, the mutant serine proteinases, thiol subtilisin and thiol trypsin, which have the hybrid Asp...His...Cys triad, are almost catalytically inert. In this study, ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations have been performed on the active sites of papain and the mutant serine proteinase S195C rat trypsin. These calculations predict that the active site of papain exists predominately as a zwitterion (Cys-...His+...Asn). However, similar calculations on S195C rat trypsin demonstrate that the thiol mutant is unable to form a reactive thiolate anion prior to catalysis. Furthermore, structural comparisons between native papain and S195C rat trypsin have demonstrated that the spatial juxtapositions of the triad residues have been inverted in the serine and cysteine proteinases and, on this basis, I argue that it is impossible to convert a serine proteinase to a cysteine proteinase by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:8819168

  20. Downregulation of L1CAM inhibits proliferation, invasion and arrests cell cycle progression in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ben, Qiwen; An, Wei; Fei, Jian; Xu, Maojin; Li, Guixiang; Li, Zhaoshen; Yuan, Yaozong

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the effect of silencing L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) on the proliferation, invasion, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells, and to determine the potential molecular mechanisms that are involved. The human Capan-2 pancreatic cancer cell line was infected with lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to target L1CAM. Cell proliferation and invasion were analyzed using cell counting kit-8 and Transwell assays, respectively, and cell cycle progression and apoptosis were analyzed using flow cytometry. L1CAM protein expression in Capan-2 cells decreased following shRNA-L1CAM infection. Furthermore, knockdown of L1CAM significantly inhibited cell proliferation and reduced the number of invasive cells, while increasing the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase (P<0.05). However, the effect on apoptosis was not identified to be statistically significant. In addition, L1CAM silencing may induce activation of p38/extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2. Downregulation of L1CAM may inhibit proliferation, invasion and arrests cell cycle progression in pancreatic cancer via p38/ERK1/2 signal pathway, and therefore, L1CAM may serve as a potential target for gene therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24660028

  1. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.; Way, J. Douglas; Vlasse, Marcus

    2003-01-01

    The objective of CAM is to develop, test, and analyze thin film membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The membranes are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications that will operate in extraterrestrial environments and support future unmanned and human space missions. A primary application is the Sabatier Electrolysis process that uses Mars atmosphere CO2 as raw material for producing water, oxygen, and methane for rocket fuel and habitat support. Other applications include use as an inlet filter to collect and concentrate Mars atmospheric argon and nitrogen gases for habitat pressurization, and to remove CO2 from breathing gases in Closed Environment Life Support Systems (CELSS). CAM membrane materials include crystalline faujasite (FAU) zeolite and rubbery polymers such as silicone rubber (PDMS) that have been shown in the literature and via molecular simulation to favor adsorption and permeation of CO2 over nitrogen and argon. Pure gas permeation tests using commercial PDMS membranes have shown that both CO2 permeance and the separation factor relative to other gases increase as the temperature decreases, and low (Delta)P(Sub CO2) favors higher separation factors. The ideal CO2/N2 separation factor increases from 7.5 to 17.5 as temperature decreases from 22 C to -30 C. For gas mixtures containing CO2, N2, and Ar, plasticization decreased the separation factors from 4.5 to 6 over the same temperature range. We currently synthesize and test our own Na(+) FAU zeolite membranes using standard formulations and secondary growth methods on porous alumina. Preliminary tests with a Na(+) FAU membrane at 22 C show a He/SF6 ideal separation factor of 62, exceeding the Knudsen diffusion selectivity by an order of magnitude. This shows that the membrane is relatively free from large defects and associated non-selective (viscous flow) transport

  2. Who Uses CAM? A Narrative Review of Demographic Characteristics and Health Factors Associated with CAM Use

    PubMed Central

    Lewith, G. T.

    2010-01-01

    Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) are used by an extensive number of patients in the UK and elsewhere. In order to understand this pattern of behavior, it is helpful to examine the characteristics of people who use CAM. This narrative review collates and evaluates the evidence concerning the demographic characteristics and health status factors associated with CAM use in community-based non-clinical populations. A systematic literature search of computerized databases was conducted, and published research papers which present evidence concerning associations between CAM use and demographic and health characteristics are discussed and evaluated. The evidence suggests that people who use CAM tend to be female, of middle age and have more education. In terms of their health, CAM users tend to have more than one medical condition, but might not be more likely than non-users to have specific conditions such as cancer or to rate their own general health as poor. The multivariate studies that have been conducted suggest that both demographic and health characteristics contribute independently to CAM use. In conclusion, demographic characteristics and factors related to an individual's health status are associated with CAM use. Future research is needed to address methodological limitations in existing studies. PMID:18955327

  3. Lunar PanCam: Adapting ExoMars PanCam for the ESA Lunar Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, A. J.; Griffiths, A. D.; Leff, C. E.; Schmitz, N.; Barnes, D. P.; Josset, J.-L.; Hancock, B. K.; Cousins, C. R.; Jaumann, R.; Crawford, I. A.; Paar, G.; Bauer, A.; the PanCam Team

    2012-12-01

    A scientific camera system would provide valuable geological context from the surface for lunar lander missions. Here, we describe the PanCam instrument from the ESA ExoMars rover and its possible adaptation for the proposed ESA lunar lander. The scientific objectives of the ESA ExoMars rover are designed to answer several key questions in the search for life on Mars. The ExoMars PanCam instrument will set the geological and morphological context for that mission. We describe the PanCam scientific objectives in geology, and atmospheric science, and 3D vision objectives. We also describe the design of PanCam, which includes a stereo pair of Wide Angle Cameras (WACs), each of which has a filter wheel, and a High Resolution Camera for close up investigations. The cameras are housed in an optical bench (OB) and electrical interface is provided via the PanCam Interface Unit (PIU). Additional hardware items include a PanCam Calibration Target (PCT). We also briefly discuss some PanCam testing during field trials. In addition, we examine how such a 'Lunar PanCam' could be adapted for use on the Lunar surface on the proposed ESA lunar lander.

  4. CAM within a field force of countervailing powers: The case of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Joana; Gabe, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the extent to which the position of the medical profession and the state towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners has changed since the late 1990s, taking Portugal as a case study. Using Light's concept of countervailing powers, we consider the alliances, interests, rhetoric and degrees of control between these three actors over time, focussing particularly on the extent to which CAM practitioners have acted as a countervailing force in their relationship with the medical profession and the state. It also brings to the fore the position of supra-state agencies concerning CAM regulation. A critical discourse analysis was conducted on data derived from a systematic search of information dating from the late 1990s up to 2015. Our analysis suggests that CAM has emerged as an active player and a countervailing power in that it has had significant influence on the process of state policy-making. The medical profession, in turn, has moved from rejecting to 'incorporating' CAM, while the state has acted as a 'broker', trying to accommodate the demands and preferences of both actors while simultaneously demonstrating its power and autonomy in shaping health policy. In sum, the history of countermoves of CAM, the medical profession and the state in recasting power relations regarding CAM regulation in Portugal has highlighted the explanatory value of Light's countervailing power theory and the need to move away from a professional dominance and corporatist approach, in which CAM has simply been seen as subjugated to the power of the medical profession and the state.

  5. CAM within a field force of countervailing powers: The case of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Joana; Gabe, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the extent to which the position of the medical profession and the state towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners has changed since the late 1990s, taking Portugal as a case study. Using Light's concept of countervailing powers, we consider the alliances, interests, rhetoric and degrees of control between these three actors over time, focussing particularly on the extent to which CAM practitioners have acted as a countervailing force in their relationship with the medical profession and the state. It also brings to the fore the position of supra-state agencies concerning CAM regulation. A critical discourse analysis was conducted on data derived from a systematic search of information dating from the late 1990s up to 2015. Our analysis suggests that CAM has emerged as an active player and a countervailing power in that it has had significant influence on the process of state policy-making. The medical profession, in turn, has moved from rejecting to 'incorporating' CAM, while the state has acted as a 'broker', trying to accommodate the demands and preferences of both actors while simultaneously demonstrating its power and autonomy in shaping health policy. In sum, the history of countermoves of CAM, the medical profession and the state in recasting power relations regarding CAM regulation in Portugal has highlighted the explanatory value of Light's countervailing power theory and the need to move away from a professional dominance and corporatist approach, in which CAM has simply been seen as subjugated to the power of the medical profession and the state. PMID:26990177

  6. Combined treatment of L1CAM antibodies and cytostatic drugs improve the therapeutic response of pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Heiner; Dieckmann, Chantal; Korniienko, Olena; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Kiefel, Helena; Salnikov, Alexey; Krüger, Achim; Altevogt, Peter; Sebens, Susanne

    2012-06-01

    The adhesion molecule L1CAM (CD171) accounts for enhanced motility, invasiveness and chemoresistance of tumor cells and represents a novel marker for various tumor entities including pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma. Recently, we showed that L1CAM inhibition increases the apoptotic response of tumor cells towards cytostatic drugs pointing to the potential of L1CAM to serve as a chemosensitizer in anti-cancer therapy. Thus, the present study evaluated the therapeutic potential of combined treatment with L1CAM antibodies and chemotherapeutic drugs in pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma model systems in vivo. Two L1CAM-specific antibodies (L1-14.10 and L1-9.3/2a) exhibiting high binding affinity to the L1CAM expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line Colo357 and the ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3ip were used for treatment. The combined therapy of SCID mice with either L1CAM antibody and gemcitabine and paclitaxel, respectively, reduced the growth of subcutaneously grown Colo357 or SKOV3ip tumors more efficiently than treatment with the cytostatic drug alone or in combination with control IgG. This was accompanied by an increased number of apoptotic tumor cells along with an elevated procaspase-8 expression. Furthermore, a lowered activation of NF-κB along with a reduced expression of VEGF and a diminished number of CD31-positive blood vessels were observed in tumors after combined therapy compared to control treatments, while the infiltration of F4/80-positive macrophages increased. Overall, these data provide new insights into the mechanism of the anti-cancer activity of L1CAM-blocking antibodies in vivo and support the suitability of L1CAM as a target for chemosensitization and of L1CAM-interfering antibodies as an appropriate tool to increase the therapeutic response of pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma.

  7. PsbQ (Sll1638) in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is required for photosystem II activity in specific mutants and in nutrient-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Tina C; Shand, Jackie A; Bentley, Fiona K; Eaton-Rye, Julian J

    2005-01-18

    A PsbQ homologue has been found associated with photosystem II complexes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 where it is involved in optimal photoautotrophic growth and water splitting under CaCl(2)-depleted conditions [Thornton, L. E., Ohkawa, H., Roose, J. L., Kashino, Y., Keren, N., and Pakrasi, H. B. (2004) Plant Cell 16, 2164-2175]. By inactivating psbQ in strains carrying photosystem II-specific mutations, we have identified stringent requirements for PsbQ in vivo. Whereas under nutrient-replete conditions the DeltaPsbQ mutant was similar to wild type, a strain lacking PsbQ and PsbV was not photoautotrophic, exhibiting decreased oxygen evolution and decreased photosystem II assembly compared to the DeltaPsbV mutant. Combining the removal of PsbU and PsbQ introduced an altered requirement for Ca(2+) and Cl(-), and photoautotrophic growth of the DeltaPsbQ strain was prevented in nutrient-limiting media depleted in Ca(2+), Cl(-), and iron. Unlike other photosystem II extrinsic proteins PsbQ did not participate in the acquisition of thermotolerance; however, photoautotrophic growth at elevated temperatures was impaired in this mutant. Growth of the DeltaPsbV:DeltaPsbQ mutant was restored at pH 10.0: in contrast, an additional deletion between Arg-384 and Val-392 in the CP47 protein of photosystem II prevented recovery at alkaline pH. When conditions prevented photoautotrophy in strains lacking PsbQ, photoheterotrophic growth was indistinguishable to wild type, indicating that photosystem II had been inactivated. These data substantiate a role for PsbQ in optimizing photosystem II activity in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and establish an absolute requirement for the subunit under specific biochemical and physiological conditions. PMID:15641809

  8. Molecular dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis expansin EXLX1: interaction with substrates and structural basis of the lack of activity of mutants.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rodrigo L; Skaf, Munir S

    2016-02-01

    Expansins are disruptive proteins that loosen growing plant cell walls and can enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The canonical expansin structure consists of one domain responsible for substrate binding (D2) and another domain (D1) of unknown function, but essential for activity. Although the effects of expansins on cell walls and cellulose fibrils are known, the molecular mechanism underlying their biophysical function is poorly understood. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to gain insights into the mechanism of action of the Bacillus subtilis expansin BsEXLX1. We show that BsEXLX1 can slide on the hydrophobic surface of crystalline cellulose via the flat aromatic surface of its binding domain D2, comprised mainly of residues Trp125 and Trp126. Also, we observe that BsEXLX1 can hydrogen bond a free glucan chain in a twisted conformation and that the twisting is chiefly induced by means of residue Asp82 located on D1, which has been shown to be essential for expansin activity. These results suggest that BsEXLX1 could move on the surface of cellulose and disrupt hydrogen bonds by twisting glucan chains. Simulations of the inactive BsEXLX1 mutants Asp82Asn and Tyr73Ala indicate structural alterations around the twisting center in the domain D1, which suggest a molecular basis for the lack of activity of these mutants and corroborate the idea that BsEXLX1 works by inducing twists on glucan chains. Moreover, simulations of the double mutant Asp82Asn/Tyr73Leu predict the recovery of the lost activity of BsEXLX1-Asp82Asn. Our results provide a dynamical view of the expansin-substrate interactions at the molecular scale and help shed light on the expansin mechanism.

  9. ChemCam Passive Reflectance Spectroscopy at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F.; Cloutis, E.; Bender, S.; Blaney, D. L.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Gasnault, O.; Kinch, K. M.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rice, M. S.; Wiens, R. C.; DeFlores, L.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) portion of the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover uses 3 dispersive spectrometers to cover the ultraviolet (240-342 nm), visible (382-469 nm) and visible/near-infrared (474-906 nm) spectral regions at high spectral (<0.5nm) and spatial (0.65mrad) resolution. In active LIBS mode, light emitted from a laser-generated plasma is dispersed onto these spectrometers and used to detect elemental emission lines. Typical observations include 3 msec-exposure 'dark' spectra (acquired with the LIBS laser off) used to remove the background signal from the LIBS measurement. Similar 'passive' observations of the ChemCam calibration target holder can be made at similar times of day and at identical exposure times (to minimize variations from dark current). Because this target exhibits ~95% flat reflectance in the ~400-900 nm region, radiance spectra ratios (surface/calibration target) can be normalized to known calibration target lab spectra to produce relative reflectance spectra (400-900 nm) with an estimated accuracy of 10-20%. Initial results replicated the known spectral shape and overall reflectance values of the ChemCam calibration targets and green color chip on the Mastcam calibration target. Dust contamination was evident, although dust on the ChemCam calibration targets is minimized by their tilted placement on the rover deck. All ChemCam targets that were sunlit during LIBS acquisition (~80% of all measurements) provide 'dark' spectra for which relative reflectance spectra can be obtained. Owing to the dusty nature of the Gale landing sites, passive spectra observed to date exhibit spectral shapes indicative of ferric phases, similar to spectra of palagonitic soils. Most spectra are bracketed in reflectance by typical 'bright' and 'dark' spectra from the OMEGA and CRISM orbital spectrometers. Preliminary Mastcam reflectance spectra are similar, providing additional confidence regarding the

  10. Structure–Activity Relationship of 3,5-Diaryl-2-aminopyridine ALK2 Inhibitors Reveals Unaltered Binding Affinity for Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva Causing Mutants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no effective therapies for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a debilitating and progressive heterotopic ossification disease caused by activating mutations of ACVR1 encoding the BMP type I receptor kinase ALK2. Recently, a subset of these same mutations of ACVR1 have been identified in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) tumors. Here we describe the structure–activity relationship for a series of novel ALK2 inhibitors based on the 2-aminopyridine compound K02288. Several modifications increased potency in kinase, thermal shift, or cell-based assays of BMP signaling and transcription, as well as selectivity for ALK2 versus closely related BMP and TGF-β type I receptor kinases. Compounds in this series exhibited a wide range of in vitro cytotoxicity that was not correlated with potency or selectivity, suggesting mechanisms independent of BMP or TGF-β inhibition. The study also highlights a potent 2-methylpyridine derivative 10 (LDN-214117) with a high degree of selectivity for ALK2 and low cytotoxicity that could provide a template for preclinical development. Contrary to the notion that activating mutations of ALK2 might alter inhibitor efficacy due to potential conformational changes in the ATP-binding site, the compounds demonstrated consistent binding to a panel of mutant and wild-type ALK2 proteins. Thus, BMP inhibitors identified via activity against wild-type ALK2 signaling are likely to be of clinical relevance for the diverse ALK2 mutant proteins associated with FOP and DIPG. PMID:25101911

  11. Structure-activity relationship of 3,5-diaryl-2-aminopyridine ALK2 inhibitors reveals unaltered binding affinity for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva causing mutants.

    PubMed

    Mohedas, Agustin H; Wang, You; Sanvitale, Caroline E; Canning, Peter; Choi, Sungwoon; Xing, Xuechao; Bullock, Alex N; Cuny, Gregory D; Yu, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    There are currently no effective therapies for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a debilitating and progressive heterotopic ossification disease caused by activating mutations of ACVR1 encoding the BMP type I receptor kinase ALK2. Recently, a subset of these same mutations of ACVR1 have been identified in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) tumors. Here we describe the structure-activity relationship for a series of novel ALK2 inhibitors based on the 2-aminopyridine compound K02288. Several modifications increased potency in kinase, thermal shift, or cell-based assays of BMP signaling and transcription, as well as selectivity for ALK2 versus closely related BMP and TGF-β type I receptor kinases. Compounds in this series exhibited a wide range of in vitro cytotoxicity that was not correlated with potency or selectivity, suggesting mechanisms independent of BMP or TGF-β inhibition. The study also highlights a potent 2-methylpyridine derivative 10 (LDN-214117) with a high degree of selectivity for ALK2 and low cytotoxicity that could provide a template for preclinical development. Contrary to the notion that activating mutations of ALK2 might alter inhibitor efficacy due to potential conformational changes in the ATP-binding site, the compounds demonstrated consistent binding to a panel of mutant and wild-type ALK2 proteins. Thus, BMP inhibitors identified via activity against wild-type ALK2 signaling are likely to be of clinical relevance for the diverse ALK2 mutant proteins associated with FOP and DIPG.

  12. Autoinducer-independent mutants of the LuxR transcriptional activator exhibit differential effects on the two lux promoters of Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Sitnikov, D M; Shadel, G S; Baldwin, T O

    1996-10-16

    The LuxR protein is a transcriptional activator which, together with a diffusible small molecule termed the autoinducer [N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homo-serine lactone], represents the primary level of regulation of the bioluminescence genes in Vibrio fischeri. LuxR, in the presence of autoinducer, activates transcription of the luxICDABEG gene cluster and both positively and negatively autoregulates transcription of the divergently oriented luxR gene, activating transcription at low levels of autoinducer, and repressing synthesis at high autoinducer concentration. Seven LuxR point mutants which activate V. fischeri lux transcription in the absence of autoinducer (LuxR*) have been characterized. The LuxR* proteins activated transcription of the bioluminescence genes to levels 1.5-40 times that achieved by wild-type LuxR without autoinducer. All of the LuxR* mutants retained responsiveness to autoinducer. However, in each case the degree of stimulation in response to autoinducer was lower than that observed for wild-type LuxR. The LuxR* proteins retained the requirement for autoinducer for autoregulation of the luxR gene. We propose that the LuxR protein exists in two conformations, an inactive form, and an active form which predominates in the presence of autoinducer. The LuxR* mutations appear to shift the equilibrium distribution of these two forms so as to increase the amount of the active form in the absence of autoinducer, while autoinducer can still convert inactive to active species. The differential effects of the LuxR* proteins at the two lux promoters suggest that LuxR stimulates PluxR transcription by a different mechanism to that used at the PluxI promoter, implying that binding of LuxR to its binding site, known to be necessary for transcriptional activation, may not be sufficient.

  13. Characterization of SynCAM surface trafficking using a SynCAM derived ligand with high homophilic binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Breillat, Christelle; Thoumine, Olivier; Choquet, Daniel . E-mail: Daniel.Choquet@pcs.u-bordeaux2.fr

    2007-08-03

    In order to better probe SynCAM function in neurons, we produced a fusion protein between the extracellular domain of SynCAM1 and the constant fragment of human IgG (SynCAM-Fc). Whether in soluble form or immobilized on latex microspheres, the chimera bound specifically to the surface of hippocampal neurons and recruited endogenous SynCAM molecules. SynCAM-Fc was also used in combination with Quantum Dots to follow the mobility of transfected SynCAM receptors at the neuronal surface. Both immobile and highly mobile SynCAM were found. Thus, SynCAM-Fc behaves as a high affinity ligand that can be used to study the function of SynCAM at the neuronal membrane.

  14. Allele-specific silencing of EEC p63 mutant R304W restores p63 transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, F; Lena, A M; Panatta, E; Nasser, W; Shalom-Feuerstein, R; Candi, E; Melino, G

    2016-01-01

    EEC (ectrodactily-ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate) syndrome is a rare genetic disease, autosomal dominant inherited. It is part of the ectodermal dysplasia disorders caused by heterozygous mutations in TP63 gene. EEC patients present limb malformations, orofacial clefting, skin and skin's appendages defects, ocular abnormalities. The transcription factor p63, encoded by TP63, is a master gene for the commitment of ectodermal-derived tissues, being expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge is critical for vertebrate limb formation and, at a later stage, for skin and skin's appendages development. The ΔNp63α isoform is predominantly expressed in epithelial cells and it is indispensable for preserving the self-renewal capacity of adult stem cells and to engage specific epithelial differentiation programs. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) offers a potential therapy approach for EEC patients by selectively silencing the mutant allele. Here, using a systemic screening based on a dual-luciferase reported gene assay, we have successfully identified specific siRNAs for repressing the EEC-causing p63 mutant, R304W. Upon siRNA treatment, we were able to restore ΔNp63-WT allele transcriptional function in induced pluripotent stem cells that were derived from EEC patient biopsy. This study demonstrates that siRNAs approach is promising and, may pave the way for curing/delaying major symptoms, such as cornea degeneration and skin erosions in young EEC patients. PMID:27195674

  15. Molecular dynamics investigation on the poor sensitivity of A171T mutant NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) for MLN4924.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad; Singh, Amit; Mishra, Abha

    2014-01-01

    MLN4924 is an adenosine sulfamate analog that generates the inhibitory NEDD8-MLN4924 covalent complex. A single nucleotide transition that changes alanine 171 to threonine (A171T) of the NAE subunit UBA3 reduces the enzyme's sensitivity for MLN4924. Our molecular dynamics simulation study revealed that A171T transition brought remarkable conformational changes in enzyme structure (open ATP binding pocket), which reduced the interaction between MLN4924 and ATP binding pocket while wild form completely covered the MLN4924. A total difference of -49.75 kJ/mol was noticed in interaction energy (electrostatic and van der Waals) during simulation between mutant and wild form with MLN4924. Superimposition of final 20 ns mutant structure with reference structure showed significant change in native binding position as compared to wild form. Results were found in coherence with the recently reported in vitro studies which states that A171T transition leads to change in ATP binding pocket structure. PMID:23782099

  16. Interaction of smooth muscle caldesmon with calmodulin mutants.

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, M V; Bushueva, T L; Shirinsky, V P; Lukas, T J; Watterson, D M; Gusev, N B

    1995-02-20

    The interaction of avian smooth muscle caldesmon with calmodulin (CaM) was investigated by studying the ability of selected mutant calmodulins to induce fluorescence changes in caldesmon. Different types of CaM mutants were used including point charge mutants, cluster mutations, and mutations which alter the calcium binding of CaM. The caldesmon binding properties were only slightly affected by E84K-CaM or by the double mutation E84Q/E120Q-CaM. Affinity of calmodulin to caldesmon was decreased 2-4 times by point mutation G33V-CaM, double mutation E84K/E120K-CaM, deletion of residues 82-84, and by cluster mutations DEE118-120-->KKK or EEE82-84-->KKK. Mutations of the first (E31A-CaM) and the second (E67A-CaM) calcium binding sites reduced the affinity of calmodulin to caldesmon by at least 5-fold; in addition these calmodulin mutants exhibited smaller changes in the fluorescence spectra of caldesmon. Simultaneous mutation of the two negatively charged clusters of calmodulin EEE82-84-->KKK and DEE118-120-->KKK resulted in a more than 15-fold decrease in the affinity of calmodulin for caldesmon. The data indicate that charged and uncharged amino acids in both halves of CaM play an important role in the binding of calmodulin to caldesmon, and that Ca2+ binding must be maintained in the amino-terminal sites for maximal interaction with caldesmon.

  17. EpCAM Aptamer-siRNA Chimera Targets and Regress Epithelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Nithya; Kanwar, Jagat R.; Kanwar, Rupinder K.; Sreemanthula, JagadeeshBabu; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Khetan, Vikas; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), a cancer stem cell (CSC) marker is over expressed in epithelial cancers and in retinoblastoma (RB). We fabricated an EpCAM targeting aptamer-siRNA chimera and investigated its anti-tumor property and EpCAM intracellular domain (EpICD) mediated signaling in epithelial cancer. The anti-tumor efficacy of EpCAM aptamer-siEpCAM chimera (EpApt-siEp) was evaluated by qPCR, northern and Western blotting in WERI-Rb1- RB cell line, primary RB tumor cells and in MCF7- breast cancer cell line. Anti-tumor activity of EpApt-siEp was studied in vivo using epithelial cancer (MCF7) mice xenograft model. The mechanism and pathways involved in the anti-tumor activity was further studied using protein arrays and qPCR. EpApt-siEp chimera was processed in vitro by dicer enzyme. Treatment of the WERI-Rb1 and MCF7 cells with EpApt-siEp revealed statistically significant down regulation of EpCAM expression (P<0.005) and concomitant reduction in cellular proliferation. In primary RB cells cultured from RB tumors, EpApt-siEp silenced EpCAM, significantly inhibited (P<0.01) cell proliferation and induced cytotoxicity. Knockdown of EpICD expressed in RB primary tumors led to repression of pluripotency markers, SOX2, OCT4, NANOG, and CD133. In vivo studies showed complete tumor growth regression without any toxicity in animals (P<0.001) and tumor tissues showed significant downregulation (P<0.05) of EpCAM, MRP1, ABCG2, stathmin, survivin and upregulation of ATM (P<0.05) leading to apoptosis by intrinsic pathway with minor alteration in cytokines. Our results revealed that EpApt-siEp potentially eradicated EpCAM positive cancer cells through CSC marker suppression and apoptosis, while sparing normal EpCAM negative adjacent cells. PMID:26176230

  18. Documentary analysis in CAM research: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Dew, Kevin

    2006-03-01

    The analysis of documents can provide insights into important social and political issues related to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This paper identifies some important sources of documents and outlines some of the advantages and disadvantages of using documents in social research. A number of analytic strategies are illustrated with examples to demonstrate the potential for documentary analysis to answer particular CAM-related research questions. These strategies are described as quantitative content analysis, qualitative descriptive analysis, qualitative interpretive analysis and semiotic analysis. It is argued that documents are a convenient source of data and that their analysis can enrich our understanding of CAM. Part 1 covered quantitative and qualitative strategies. Part 2 focuses on semiotic analysis and the methodological strengths and weaknesses of the different strategies.

  19. Documentary analysis in CAM research: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Dew, Kevin

    2005-12-01

    The analysis of documents can provide insights into important social and political issues related to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This paper identifies some important sources of documents and outlines some of the advantages and disadvantages of using documents in social research. A number of analytic strategies are illustrated with examples to demonstrate the potential for documentary analysis to answer particular CAM-related research questions. These strategies are described as quantitative content analysis, qualitative descriptive analysis, qualitative interpretive analysis and semiotic analysis. It is argued that documents are a convenient source of data and that their analysis can enrich our understanding of CAM. Part 1 covers quantitative and qualitative strategies and Part 2 focuses on semiotic analysis.

  20. The Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.; Yucker, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized anatomical man (CAM) model, representing the most detailed and anatomically correct geometrical model of the human body yet prepared, has been developed for use in analyzing radiation dose distribution in man. This model of a 50-percentile standing USAF man comprises some 1100 unique geometric surfaces and some 2450 solid regions. Internal body geometry such as organs, voids, bones, and bone marrow are explicitly modeled. A computer program called CAMERA has also been developed for performing analyses with the model. Such analyses include tracing rays through the CAM geometry, placing results on magnetic tape in various forms, collapsing areal density data from ray tracing information to areal density distributions, preparing cross section views, etc. Numerous computer drawn cross sections through the CAM model are presented.

  1. Effectiveness of CAM therapy: understanding the evidence.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland

    2011-02-01

    By definition, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) attempts to diagnose and treat illnesses in unconventional ways. CAM has been classified as: (1) alternative medical systems (eg, traditional Chinese medicine [including acupuncture], naturopathic medicine, ayurvedic medicine, and homeopathy); (2) biologic-based therapies (eg, herbal, special dietary, and individual biologic treatments); (3) energy therapies (eg, Reiki, therapeutic touch, magnet therapy, Qi Gong, and intercessory prayer); (4) manipulative and body-based systems (eg, chiropractic, osteopathy, and massage); and (5) mind-body interventions (eg, meditation, biofeedback, hypnotherapy, and the relaxation response). This review focuses on how to assess the effectiveness of CAM therapies for chronic musculoskeletal pains, emphasizing the role of specific and nonspecific analgesic mechanisms, including placebo.

  2. Starch mutants of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Wild type Chlamydomonas accumulates starch and triglycerides when grown under nitrogen limiting conditions. Toward elucidation of the mechanisms for control of starch biosynthesis, we isolated mutants impaired int he accumulation of storage carbohydrates. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (strain ya-12) was mutagenized by UV irradiation and colonies were screened by iodine staining after growth in darkness. Mutants, denoted ais for altered in iodine staining, have been characterized by electron microscopy and assays for starch synthease, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), phosphoglucomutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and amylase activities. Transcript analysis of wild type and mutant RNAs with PGI, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, and waxy probes have also been carried out. No deficiencies of any of these components have been detected. Furthermore, long-term cultures of ya-12 and ais-1d in nitrogen-limited chemostats have been studied; starch also does not accumulate in ais-1d under these conditions. Thus, the lesion affects an essential factor of unknown identity that is required for starch synthesis.

  3. Global and local perturbation of the tomato microRNA pathway by a trans-activated DICER-LIKE 1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Arazi, Tzahi

    2014-01-01

    DICER-like 1 (DCL1) is a major player in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and accordingly, its few known loss-of-function mutants are either lethal or display arrested development. Consequently, generation of dcl1 mutants by reverse genetics and functional analysis of DCL1 in late-developing organs are challenging. Here, these challenges were resolved through the unique use of trans-activated RNA interference. Global, as well as organ-specific tomato DCL1 (SlDCL1) silencing was induced by crossing the generated responder line (OP:SlDCL1IR) with the appropriate driver line. Constitutive trans-activation knocked down SlDCL1 levels by ~95%, resulting in severe abnormalities including post-germination growth arrest accompanied by decreased miRNA and 21-nucleotide small RNA levels, but prominently elevated levels of 22-nucleotide small RNAs. The increase in the 22-nucleotide small RNAs was correlated with specific up-regulation of SlDCL2b and SlDCL2d, which are probably involved in their biogenesis. Leaf- and flower-specific OP:SlDCL1IR trans-activation inhibited blade outgrowth, induced premature bud senescence and produced pale petals, respectively, emphasizing the importance of SlDCL1-dependent small RNAs in these processes. Together, these results establish OP:SlDCL1IR as an efficient tool for analysing processes regulated by SlDCL1-mediated gene regulation in tomato. PMID:24376253

  4. Aberrant epilepsy-associated mutant Nav1.6 sodium channel activity can be targeted with cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Patel, Reesha R; Barbosa, Cindy; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay; Cummins, Theodore R

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in brain isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels have been identified in patients with distinct epileptic phenotypes. Clinically, these patients often do not respond well to classic anti-epileptics and many remain refractory to treatment. Exogenous as well as endogenous cannabinoids have been shown to target voltage-gated sodium channels and cannabidiol has recently received attention for its potential efficacy in the treatment of childhood epilepsies. In this study, we further investigated the ability of cannabinoids to modulate sodium currents from wild-type and epilepsy-associated mutant voltage-gated sodium channels. We first determined the biophysical consequences of epilepsy-associated missense mutations in both Nav1.1 (arginine 1648 to histidine and asparagine 1788 to lysine) and Nav1.6 (asparagine 1768 to aspartic acid and leucine 1331 to valine) by obtaining whole-cell patch clamp recordings in human embryonic kidney 293T cells with 200 μM Navβ4 peptide in the pipette solution to induce resurgent sodium currents. Resurgent sodium current is an atypical near threshold current predicted to increase neuronal excitability and has been implicated in multiple disorders of excitability. We found that both mutations in Nav1.6 dramatically increased resurgent currents while mutations in Nav1.1 did not. We then examined the effects of anandamide and cannabidiol on peak transient and resurgent currents from wild-type and mutant channels. Interestingly, we found that cannabidiol can preferentially target resurgent sodium currents over peak transient currents generated by wild-type Nav1.6 as well as the aberrant resurgent and persistent current generated by Nav1.6 mutant channels. To further validate our findings, we examined the effects of cannabidiol on endogenous sodium currents from striatal neurons, and similarly we found an inhibition of resurgent and persistent current by cannabidiol. Moreover, current clamp recordings show that cannabidiol reduces

  5. Georeferencing CAMS data: Polynomial rectification and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinghe

    The Calibrated Airborne Multispectral Scanner (CAMS) is a sensor used in the commercial remote sensing program at NASA Stennis Space Center. In geographic applications of the CAMS data, accurate geometric rectification is essential for the analysis of the remotely sensed data and for the integration of the data into Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The commonly used rectification techniques such as the polynomial transformation and ortho rectification have been very successful in the field of remote sensing and GIS for most remote sensing data such as Landsat imagery, SPOT imagery and aerial photos. However, due to the geometric nature of the airborne line scanner which has high spatial frequency distortions, the polynomial model and the ortho rectification technique in current commercial software packages such as Erdas Imagine are not adequate for obtaining sufficient geometric accuracy. In this research, the geometric nature, especially the major distortions, of the CAMS data has been described. An analytical step-by-step geometric preprocessing has been utilized to deal with the potential high frequency distortions of the CAMS data. A generic sensor-independent photogrammetric model has been developed for the ortho-rectification of the CAMS data. Three generalized kernel classes and directional elliptical basis have been formulated into a rectification model of summation of multisurface functions, which is a significant extension to the traditional radial basis functions. The preprocessing mechanism has been fully incorporated into the polynomial, the triangle-based finite element analysis as well as the summation of multisurface functions. While the multisurface functions and the finite element analysis have the characteristics of localization, piecewise logic has been applied to the polynomial and photogrammetric methods, which can produce significant accuracy improvement over the global approach. A software module has been implemented with full

  6. Ras-mutant cancer cells display B-Raf binding to Ras that activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase and is inhibited by protein kinase A phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanping; Takahashi, Maho; Stork, Philip J S

    2013-09-20

    The small G protein Ras regulates proliferation through activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (ERK) cascade. The first step of Ras-dependent activation of ERK signaling is Ras binding to members of the Raf family of MAP kinase kinase kinases, C-Raf and B-Raf. Recently, it has been reported that in melanoma cells harboring oncogenic Ras mutations, B-Raf does not bind to Ras and does not contribute to basal ERK activation. For other types of Ras-mutant tumors, the relative contributions of C-Raf and B-Raf are not known. We examined non-melanoma cancer cell lines containing oncogenic Ras mutations and express both C-Raf and B-Raf isoforms, including the lung cancer cell line H1299 cells. Both B-Raf and C-Raf were constitutively bound to oncogenic Ras and contributed to Ras-dependent ERK activation. Ras binding to B-Raf and C-Raf were both subject to inhibition by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA. cAMP inhibited the growth of H1299 cells and Ras-dependent ERK activation via PKA. PKA inhibited the binding of Ras to both C-Raf and B-Raf through phosphorylations of C-Raf at Ser-259 and B-Raf at Ser-365, respectively. These studies demonstrate that in non-melanocytic Ras-mutant cancer cells, Ras signaling to B-Raf is a significant contributor to ERK activation and that the B-Raf pathway, like that of C-Raf, is a target for inhibition by PKA. We suggest that cAMP and hormones coupled to cAMP may prove useful in dampening the effects of oncogenic Ras in non-melanocytic cancer cells through PKA-dependent actions on B-Raf as well as C-Raf.

  7. 54 Cam - A new variable star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. S.; Vaucher, C. A.; Eaton, J. A.; Henry, G. W.; Louth, H.; Skillman, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    Differential photometry of the RS CVn-type binary 54 Cam is presented, which shows that the light was variable with a period of 10.163 + or - 0.009 d, and with an amplitude increase from 0.03 to 0.06 m between 1979 and 1980. The photometric period of 10.163 d is 9% shorter than the orbital period of 11.0764 d, and is suggested as an explanation for the radio emission from 54 Cam due to a process of connection, disruption, and reconnection of magnetic field lines.

  8. Enhanced in vitro antiproliferative effects of EpCAM antibody-functionalized paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles in retinoblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Moutushy; Misra, Ranjita; Harilal, Anju; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2011-01-01

    Background To specifically deliver paclitaxel (PTX) to retinoblastoma (RB) cells, the anionic surface-charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs loaded with paclitaxel were conjugated with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody for enhancing site-specific intracellular delivery of paclitaxel against EpCAM overexpressing RB cells. Methods PTX-loaded PLGA NPs were prepared by the oil-in-water single emulsion solvent evaporation method, and the PTX content in NPs was estimated by the reverse phase isocratic mode of high performance liquid chromatography. Ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry was employed for the covalent attachment of monoclonal EpCAM antibody onto the NP surface. In vitro cytotoxicity of native PTX, unconjugated PTX-loaded NPs (PTX-NPs), and EpCAM antibody-conjugated PTX-loaded nanoparticles (PTX-NP-EpCAM) were evaluated on a Y79 RB cell line by a dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, while cellular apoptosis, cysteinyl-aspartic acid protease (caspase)-3 activation, Poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and cell-cycle arrest were quantified by flow cytometry. By employing flow cytometry and fluorescence image analyses, the extent of cellular uptake was comparatively evaluated. Results PTX-NP-EpCAM had superior antiproliferation activity, increased arrested cell population at the G2-M phase, and increased activation of caspase-3, followed by PARP cleavage in parallel with the induction of apoptosis. Increased uptake of PTX-Np-EpCAM by the cells suggests that they were mainly taken up through EpCAM mediated endocytosis. Conclusions EpCAM antibody-functionalized biodegradable NPs for tumor-selective drug delivery and overcoming drug resistance could be an efficient therapeutic strategy for retinoblastoma treatment. PMID:22065926

  9. The vhs1 mutant form of herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff protein retains significant internal ribosome entry site-directed RNA cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, P; Saffran, H A; Smiley, J R

    2001-01-01

    The virion host shutoff (vhs) protein of herpes simplex virus (HSV) triggers global shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated turnover of host and viral mRNAs during HSV infection. As well, it induces endoribonucleolytic cleavage of RNA substrates when produced in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) in vitro translation system. The vhs1 point mutation (Thr 214-->Ile) eliminates vhs function during virus infection and in transiently transfected mammalian cells and was therefore previously considered to abolish vhs activity. Here we demonstrate that the vhs1 mutant protein induces readily detectable endoribonuclease activity on RNA substrates bearing the internal ribosome entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus in the RRL assay system. These data document that the vhs1 mutation does not eliminate catalytic activity and raise the possibility that the vhs-dependent endoribonuclease employs more than one mode of substrate recognition.

  10. Novel pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines as dual Src-Abl inhibitors active against mutant form of Abl and the leukemia K-562 cell line.

    PubMed

    El-Moghazy, Samir M; George, Riham F; Osman, Essam Eldin A; Elbatrawy, Ahmed A; Kissova, Miroslava; Colombo, Ambra; Crespan, Emmanuele; Maga, Giovanni

    2016-11-10

    Some novel 6-substituted pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines 4, 5, 6a-d, 7a-c, 8 and pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrimidines 9a-c, 10a-c, 11, 12a,b, 13a-c and 14 were synthesized and characterized by spectral and elemental analyses. They were screened for their biological activity in vitro against Abl and Src kinases. Compounds 7a and 7b revealed the highest activity against both wild and mutant Abl kinases as well as the Src kinase and the leukemia K-562 cell line. They can be considered as new hits for further structural optimization to obtain better activity.

  11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Treatments and Pediatric Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Joseph M.; Walter, Garry; Soh, Nerissa

    2008-01-01

    Children and adolescents often use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments outside their indications, particularly to lose weight. Some of the herbal remedies and dietary supplements that may of relevance for psychopharmacological practice are discussed with respect to CAM treatments.

  12. Subtle structural changes in the Asp251Gly/Gln307His P450 BM3 mutant responsible for new activity toward diclofenac, tolbutamide and ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, Giovanna; Dell'Angelo, Valentina; Catucci, Gianluca; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2016-07-15

    This paper reports the structure of the double mutant Asp251Gly/Gln307His (named A2) generated by random mutagenesis, able to produce 4'-hydroxydiclofenac, 2-hydroxyibuprofen and 4-hydroxytolbutamide from diclofenac, ibuprofen and tolbutamide, respectively. The 3D structure of the substrate-free mutant shows a conformation similar to the closed one found in the substrate-bound wild type enzyme, but with a higher degree of disorder in the region of the G-helix and F-G loop. This is due to the mutation Asp251Gly that breaks the salt bridge between Aps251 on I-helix and Lys224 on G-helix, allowing the G-helix to move away from I-helix and conferring a higher degree of flexibility to this element. This subtle structural change is accompanied by long-range structural rearrangements of the active site with the rotation of Phe87 and a reorganization of catalytically important water molecules. The impact of these structural features on thermal stability, reduction potential and electron transfer is investigated. The data demonstrate that a single mutation far from the active site triggers an increase in protein flexibility in a key region, shifting the conformational equilibrium toward the closed form that is ready to accept electrons and enter the P450 catalytic cycle as soon as a substrate is accepted. PMID:26718083

  13. Alterations in grooming activity and syntax in heterozygous SERT and BDNF knockout mice: the utility of behavior-recognition tools to characterize mutant mouse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pham, Mimi; Roth, Andrew; Cachat, Jonathan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are key modulators of molecular signaling, cognition and behavior. Although SERT and BDNF mutant mouse phenotypes have been extensively characterized, little is known about their self-grooming behavior. Grooming represents an important behavioral domain sensitive to environmental stimuli and is increasingly used as a model for repetitive behavioral syndromes, such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The present study used heterozygous ((+/-)) SERT and BDNF male mutant mice on a C57BL/6J background and assessed their spontaneous self-grooming behavior applying both manual and automated techniques. Overall, SERT(+/-) mice displayed a general increase in grooming behavior, as indicated by more grooming bouts and more transitions between specific grooming stages. SERT(+/-) mice also aborted more grooming bouts, but showed generally unaltered activity levels in the observation chamber. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice displayed a global reduction in grooming activity, with fewer bouts and transitions between specific grooming stages, altered grooming syntax, as well as hypolocomotion and increased turning behavior. Finally, grooming data collected by manual and automated methods (HomeCageScan) significantly correlated in our experiments, confirming the utility of automated high-throughput quantification of grooming behaviors in various genetic mouse models with increased or decreased grooming phenotypes. Taken together, these findings indicate that mouse self-grooming behavior is a reliable behavioral biomarker of genetic deficits in SERT and BDNF pathways, and can be reliably measured using automated behavior-recognition technology.

  14. A Truncated NLR Protein, TIR-NBS2, Is Required for Activated Defense Responses in the exo70B1 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Marc T.; Vogel, John P.; Liu, Na; Liu, Simu; Zhao, Yaofei; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Tang, Dingzhong

    2015-01-01

    During exocytosis, the evolutionarily conserved exocyst complex tethers Golgi-derived vesicles to the target plasma membrane, a critical function for secretory pathways. Here we show that exo70B1 loss-of-function mutants express activated defense responses upon infection and express enhanced resistance to fungal, oomycete and bacterial pathogens. In a screen for mutants that suppress exo70B1 resistance, we identified nine alleles of TIR-NBS2 (TN2), suggesting that loss-of-function of EXO70B1 leads to activation of this nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR)-like disease resistance protein. This NLR-like protein is atypical because it lacks the LRR domain common in typical NLR receptors. In addition, we show that TN2 interacts with EXO70B1 in yeast and in planta. Our study thus provides a link between the exocyst complex and the function of a ‘TIR-NBS only’ immune receptor like protein. Our data are consistent with a speculative model wherein pathogen effectors could evolve to target EXO70B1 to manipulate plant secretion machinery. TN2 could monitor EXO70B1 integrity as part of an immune receptor complex. PMID:25617755

  15. Summary of second generation alpha CAM testing performed at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.L.; Sisk, D.R.; Goles, R.W.; Swinth, K.L.; Tinker, M.R.; Hickey, E.E.

    1994-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Westinghouse Hanford Company tested six models of commercially available alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs): the Canberra Alpha Sentry, Eberline Alpha 6A-1, Merlin Gerin A-CAM, NE America CAM1A, SAIC/RADeCO Model 452, and Victoreen Model 758. The CAMs were tested for calibration and workmanship, performance in various environments, and human factors for field use.

  16. Gamma Ray Imaging System (GRIS) GammaCam{trademark}. Final report, January 3, 1994--May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the activities undertaken during the development of the Gamma Ray Imaging System (GRIS) program now referred to as the GammaCam{trademark}. The purpose of this program is to develop a 2-dimensional imaging system for gamma-ray energy scenes that may be present in nuclear power plants. The report summarizes the overall accomplishments of the program and the most recent GammaCam measurements made at LANL and Estonia. The GammaCam is currently available for sale from AIL Systems as an off-the-shelf instrument.

  17. Benign synthesis of 2-ethylhexanoic acid by cytochrome P450cam: enzymatic, crystallographic, and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    French, K J; Strickler, M D; Rock, D A; Rock, D A; Bennett, G A; Wahlstrom, J L; Goldstein, B M; Jones, J P

    2001-08-14

    This study examines the ability of P450cam to catalyze the formation of 2-ethylhexanoic acid from 2-ethylhexanol relative to its activity on the natural substrate camphor. As is the case for camphor, the P450cam exhibits stereoselectivity for binding (R)- and (S)-2-ethylhexanol. Kinetic studies indicate (R)-2-ethylhexanoic acid is produced 3.5 times as fast as the (S)-enantiomer. In a racemic mixture of 2-ethylhexanol, P450cam produces 50% more (R)-2-ethylhexanoic acid than (S)-2-ethylhexanoic acid. The reason for stereoselective 2-ethylhexanoic acid production is seen in regioselectivity assays, where (R)-2-ethylhexanoic acid comprises 50% of total products while (S)-2-ethylhexanoic acid comprises only 13%. (R)- and (S)-2-ethylhexanol exhibit similar characteristics with respect to the amount of oxygen and reducing equivalents consumed, however, with (S)-2-ethylhexanol turnover producing more water than the (R)-enantiomer. Crystallographic studies of P450cam with (R)- or (S)-2-ethylhexanoic acid suggest that the (R)-enantiomer binds in a more ordered state. These results indicate that wild-type P450cam displays stereoselectivity toward 2-ethylhexanoic acid synthesis, providing a platform for rational active site design. PMID:11583152

  18. Therapeutic Uses of the WebCam in Child Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chlebowski, Susan; Fremont, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors provide examples for the use of the WebCam as a therapeutic tool in child psychiatry, discussing cases to demonstrate the application of the WebCam, which is most often used in psychiatry training programs during resident supervision and for case presentations. Method: Six cases illustrate the use of the WebCam in individual…

  19. EpCAM proteolysis: new fragments with distinct functions?

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Ulrike; Kuipers, Jeroen; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2013-01-01

    EpCAM [epithelial cell adhesion molecule; CD326 (cluster of differentiation 326)] is highly expressed on epithelium-derived tumours and can play a role in cell proliferation. Recently, RIP (regulated intramembrane proteolysis) has been implicated as the trigger for EpCAM-mediated proliferative signalling. However, RIP does not explain all EpCAM-derived protein fragments. To shed light on how proteolytic cleavage is involved in EpCAM signalling, we characterized the protein biochemically using antibodies binding to three different EpCAM domains. Using a newly generated anti-EpCAM antibody, we find that EpCAM can be cleaved at multiple positions within its ectodomain in addition to described peptides, revealing that EpCAM is processed via distinct proteolytic pathways. Here, we report on four new peptides, but also discuss the previously described cleavage products to provide a comprehensive picture of EpCAM cleavage at multiple positions. The complex regulation of EpCAM might not only result in the absence of full-length EpCAM, but the newly formed EpCAM-derived proteins may have their own signalling properties. PMID:23409978

  20. CAD/CAM. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuleger, Robert

    This high technology training module is an advanced course on computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) for grades 11 and 12. This unit, to be used with students in advanced drafting courses, introduces the concept of CAD/CAM. The content outline includes the following seven sections: (1) CAD/CAM software; (2) computer…

  1. Education and Training Packages for CAD/CAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, I. C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses educational efforts in the fields of Computer Assisted Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Describes two educational training initiatives underway in the United Kingdom, one of which is a resource materials package for teachers of CAD/CAM at the undergraduate level, and the other a training course for managers of CAD/CAM systems. (TW)

  2. Target cell death triggered by cytotoxic T lymphocytes: a target cell mutant distinguishes passive pore formation and active cell suicide mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Ucker, D S; Wilson, J D; Hebshi, L D

    1994-01-01

    The role of the target cell in its own death mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) has been controversial. The ability of the pore-forming granule components of CTL to induce target cell death directly has been taken to suggest an essentially passive role for the target. This view of CTL-mediated killing ascribes to the target the single role of providing an antigenic stimulus to the CTL; this signal results in the vectoral degranulation and secretion of pore-forming elements onto the target. On the other hand, by a number of criteria, target cell death triggered by CTL appears fundamentally different from death resulting from membrane damage and osmotic lysis. CTL-triggered target cell death involves primary internal lesions of the target cell that reflect a physiological cell death process. Orderly nuclear disintegration, including lamin phosphorylation and solubilization, chromatin condensation, and genome digestion, are among the earliest events, preceding the loss of plasma membrane integrity. We have tested directly the involvement of the target cell in its own death by examining whether we could isolate mutants of target cells that have retained the ability to be recognized by and provide an antigenic stimulus to CTL while having lost the capacity to respond by dying. Here, we describe one such mutant, BW87. We have used this CTL-resistant mutant to analyze the mechanisms of CTL-triggered target cell death under a variety of conditions. The identification of a mutable target cell element essential for the cell death response to CTL provides genetic evidence that target cell death reflects an active cell suicide process similar to other physiological cell deaths. PMID:8264610

  3. Correlation between citric acid and nitrate metabolisms during CAM cycle in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana.

    PubMed

    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Tiné, Marco Aurélio Silva; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-12-15

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) confers crucial adaptations for plants living under frequent environmental stresses. A wide metabolic plasticity can be found among CAM species regarding the type of storage carbohydrate, organic acid accumulated at night and decarboxylating system. Consequently, many aspects of the CAM pathway control are still elusive while the impact of this photosynthetic adaptation on nitrogen metabolism has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated a possible link between the CAM cycle and the nitrogen assimilation in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana by simultaneously characterizing the diel changes in key enzyme activities and metabolite levels of both organic acid and nitrate metabolisms. The results revealed that T. pohliana performed a typical CAM cycle in which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase phosphorylation seemed to play a crucial role to avoid futile cycles of carboxylation and decarboxylation. Unlike all other bromeliads previously investigated, almost equimolar concentrations of malate and citrate were accumulated at night. Moreover, a marked nocturnal depletion in the starch reservoirs and an atypical pattern of nitrate reduction restricted to the nighttime were also observed. Since reduction and assimilation of nitrate requires a massive supply of reducing power and energy and considering that T. pohliana lives overexposed to the sunlight, we hypothesize that citrate decarboxylation might be an accessory mechanism to increase internal CO₂ concentration during the day while its biosynthesis could provide NADH and ATP for nocturnal assimilation of nitrate. Therefore, besides delivering photoprotection during the day, citrate might represent a key component connecting both CAM pathway and nitrogen metabolism in T. pohliana; a scenario that certainly deserves further study not only in this species but also in other CAM plants that nocturnally accumulate citrate.

  4. Bridging CAM practice and research: teaching CAM practitioners about research methodology.

    PubMed

    Zick, Suzanna M; Benn, Rita

    2004-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is continuing to provide funds directed to support research in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). CAM providers typically have insufficient knowledge of scientific language or research methodology to develop rigorous proposals. Their ability to contribute meaningfully as advisors, teachers, or research partners in academic settings, is hence limited. To address this issue, we have developed and implemented a 7-week course designed to teach community-based CAM providers: (1) to understand scientific terminology, research design and grantsmanship; (2) to critically evaluate the research literature; and (3) to design pilot studies in areas of their interest. In this article, we describe the recruitment process for selecting course participants, the course design and instructional process and the evaluation results based on qualitative and quantitative methodology. We offer suggestions for developing training opportunities both at the local and national level that would increase the expertise of CAM providers in participating and seeking funded research.

  5. Cam pully and cylinder head arrangement for an overhead cam engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.B.

    1991-01-08

    This patent describes improvement in an air-cooled internal combustion engine. It includes a crankcase, a crankshaft disposed within the crankcase and extending externally of the crankcase, a cylinder extending from the crankcase and having a piston mounted for reciprocation therein and connected to the crankshaft, a cylinder head connected to the cylinder and including an overhead camshaft disposed therein, the camshaft extending externally of the cylinder head, a drive pulley mounted to the crankshaft externally of the crankcases, a cam pulley mounted to the camshaft externally of the cylinder head, drive means positively engaging the drive pulley and the cam pulley for transmitting rotary motion therebetween, and blower means driven by the crankshaft for drawing air in and blowing the air over the cylinder head. The improvement comprises: the cam pulley including means for directing air axially toward the cylinder head upon rotation of the cam pulley.

  6. Some Workplace Effects of CAD and CAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebel, Karl-H.; Ulrich, Erhard

    1987-01-01

    Examines the impact of computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) on employment, work organization, working conditions, job content, training, and industrial relations in several countries. Finds little evidence of negative employment effects since productivity gains are offset by various compensatory factors. (Author/CH)

  7. Online Tobacco Cessation Training and Competency Assessment for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Practitioners: Protocol for the CAM Reach Web Study

    PubMed Central

    Howerter, Amy; Eaves, Emery R; Hall, John R; Buller, David B; Gordon, Judith S

    2016-01-01

    qualitative and quantitative formative research on factors influencing practitioner tobacco cessation clinical behaviors (eg, practice environment, peer social influence, and insurance reimbursement). Results Web-training and competency assessment tool development and study enrollment and training activities are complete (N=203 practitioners enrolled). Training completion rates were lower than expected (36.9%, 75/203), necessitating over enrollment to ensure a sufficient number of training completers. Follow-up data collection is in progress. Data analysis will begin immediately after data collection is complete. Conclusions To realize CAM practitioners’ potential to promote tobacco cessation and use of evidence-based treatments, there is a need to know more about the facilitative and inhibitory factors influencing CAM practitioner tobacco intervention behaviors (eg, social influence and insurance reimbursement). Given marked differences between conventional and CAM practitioners, extant knowledge about factors influencing conventional practitioner adoption of tobacco cessation behaviors cannot be confidently extrapolated to CAM practitioners. The potential impact of this study is to expand tobacco cessation and health promotion infrastructure in a new group of health practitioners who can help combat the continuing epidemic of tobacco use. PMID:26740468

  8. Angelman syndrome-associated ubiquitin ligase UBE3A/E6AP mutants interfere with the proteolytic activity of the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Tomaić, V; Banks, L

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome, a severe neurodevelopmental disease, occurs primarily due to genetic defects, which cause lack of expression or mutations in the wild-type E6AP/UBE3A protein. A proportion of the Angelman syndrome patients bear UBE3A point mutations, which do not interfere with the expression of the full-length protein, however, these individuals still develop physiological conditions of the disease. Interestingly, most of these mutations are catalytically defective, thereby indicating the importance of UBE3A enzymatic activity role in the Angelman syndrome pathology. In this study, we show that Angelman syndrome-associated mutants interact strongly with the proteasome via the S5a proteasomal subunit, resulting in an overall inhibitory effect on the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Our results suggest that mutated catalytically inactive forms of UBE3A may cause defects in overall proteasome function, which could have an important role in the Angelman syndrome pathology. PMID:25633294

  9. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Villin Headpiece nad Mutants with Reduced F-Actin Binding Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meng,J.; Vardar, D.; Wang, Y.; Guo, H.; Head, J.; McKnight, C.

    2005-01-01

    Villin-type headpiece domains are approximately 70 amino acid modular motifs found at the C terminus of a variety of actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins. The headpiece domain of villin, a protein found in the actin bundles of the brush border epithelium, is of interest both as a compact F-actin binding domain and as a model folded protein. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of chicken villin headpiece (HP67) at 1.4 Angstrom resolution as well as two mutants, R37A and W64Y, at 1.45 and 1.5 Angstrom resolution, respectively. Replacement of R37 causes a 5-fold reduction in F-actin binding affinity in sedimentation assays. Replacement of W64 results in a much more drastic reduction in F-actin binding affinity without significant changes in headpiece structure or stability. The detailed comparison of these crystal structures with each other and to our previously determined NMR structures of HP67 and the 35-residue autonomously folding subdomain in villin headpiece, HP35, provides the details of the headpiece fold and further defines the F-actin binding site of villin-type headpiece domains.

  10. Suppression of Erk activation and in vivo growth in esophageal cancer cells by the dominant negative Ras mutant, N116Y.

    PubMed

    Senmaru, N; Shichinohe, T; Takeuchi, M; Miyamoto, M; Sazawa, A; Ogiso, Y; Takahashi, T; Okushiba, S; Takimoto, M; Kato, H; Kuzumaki, N

    1998-10-29

    Our previous studies demonstrated that introduction of a dominant negative H-ras mutant, N116Y, inhibits the growth of various types of cancer cells in vitro. In this study, we tested the efficacy of N116Y in blocking the growth of esophageal cancer cells using an adenoviral vector. Infection with N116Y adenovirus, (AdCMV-N116Y), in which N116Y expression is driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter, significantly reduced the in vitro growth of all esophageal cancer cell lines studied. Esophageal cancer cells that contained wild-type K-ras and H-ras (TE8, SGF3, SGF7) were more sensitive to AdCMV-N116Y than HEC46 cells that expressed mutant K-ras protein. Most importantly, direct injection of AdCMV-N116Y into TE8- or SGF3-induced tumors in nude mice suppressed their growth significantly. To examine the suppressive mechanism of N116Y, cell cycle profile and the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (Erk2) were examined by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis, respectively. In TE8 cells, progression into S phase was clearly blocked after infection with AdCMV-N116Y. Infection with AdCMV-N116Y did not strongly suppress the activation of Erk2 after EGF stimulation in serum-starved HEC46 cells, whereas it completely suppressed activation in TE8, SGF3 and SGF7 cells. Our observations suggest that N116Y reduces growth of human esophageal cancer cells and suppresses the activation of Erk2; they also indicate that N116Y is a potential candidate gene for human esophageal cancer gene therapy.

  11. Mutant p97 exhibits species-specific changes of its ATPase activity and compromises the UBXD9-mediated monomerisation of p97 hexamers.

    PubMed

    Rijal, Ramesh; Arhzaouy, Khalid; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Cross, Megan; Hofmann, Andreas; Schröder, Rolf; Clemen, Christoph S; Eichinger, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    p97 (VCP) is a homo-hexameric triple-A ATPase that exerts a plethora of cellular processes. Heterozygous missense mutations of p97 cause at least five human neurodegenerative disorders. However, the specific molecular consequences of p97 mutations are hitherto widely unknown. Our in silico structural models of human and Dictyostelium p97 showed that the disease-causing human R93C, R155H, and R155C as well as Dictyostelium R154C, E219K, R154C/E219K p97 mutations constitute variations in surface-exposed locations. In-gel ATPase activity measurements of p97 monomers and hexamers revealed significant mutation- and species-specific differences. While all human p97 mutations led to an increase in ATPase activity, no changes could be detected for the Dictyostelium R154C mutant, which is orthologous to human R155C. The E219K mutation led to an almost complete loss of activity, which was partially recuperated in the R154C/E219K double-mutant indicating p97 inter-domain communication. By means of co-immunoprecipitation experiments we identified an UBX-domain containing Dictyostelium protein as a novel p97 interaction partner. We categorized all UBX-domain containing Dictyostelium proteins and named the interaction partner UBXD9. Pull-down assays and surface plasmon resonance analyses of Dictyostelium UBXD9 or the human orthologue TUG/ASPL/UBXD9 demonstrated direct interactions with p97 as well as species-, mutation- and ATP-dependent differences in the binding affinities. Sucrose density gradient assays revealed that both human and Dictyostelium UBXD9 proteins very efficiently disassembled wild-type, but to a lesser extent mutant p97 hexamers into monomers. Our results are consistent with a scenario in which p97 point mutations lead to differences in enzymatic activities and molecular interactions, which in the long-term result in a late-onset and progressive multisystem disease. PMID:27132113

  12. Structural determinants of interaction, trafficking and function in the ClC-2/MLC1 subunit GlialCAM involved in leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Capdevila-Nortes, Xavier; Jeworutzki, Elena; Elorza-Vidal, Xabier; Barrallo-Gimeno, Alejandro; Pusch, Michael; Estévez, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in the genes encoding the astrocytic protein MLC1, the cell adhesion molecule GlialCAM or the Cl− channel ClC-2 underlie human leukodystrophies. GlialCAM binds to itself, to MLC1 and to ClC-2, and directs these proteins to cell–cell contacts. In addition, GlialCAM dramatically activates ClC-2 mediated currents. In the present study, we used mutagenesis studies combined with functional and biochemical analyses to determine which parts of GlialCAM are required to perform these cellular functions. We found that the extracellular domain of GlialCAM is necessary for cell junction targeting and for mediating interactions with itself or with MLC1 and ClC-2. The C-terminus is also necessary for proper targeting to cell–cell junctions but is not required for the biochemical interaction. Finally, we identified the first three amino acids of the transmembrane segment of GlialCAM as being essential for the activation of ClC-2 currents but not for targeting or biochemical interaction. Our results provide new mechanistic insights concerning the regulation of the cell biology and function of MLC1 and ClC-2 by GlialCAM. Key points The extracellular domain of GlialCAM is necessary for its targeting to cell junctions, as well as for interactions with itself and MLC1 and ClC-2. The C-terminus of GlialCAM is not necessary for interaction but is required for targeting to cell junctions. The first three residues of the transmembrane segment of GlialCAM are required for GlialCAM-mediated ClC-2 activation. PMID:26033718

  13. Activation of an EDS1-mediated R-gene pathway in the snc1 mutant leads to constitutive, NPR1-independent pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Clarke, J D; Zhang, Y; Dong, X

    2001-10-01

    The Arabidopsis NPR1 protein is an essential regulatory component of systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Mutations in the NPR1 gene completely block the induction of SAR by signals such as salicylic acid (SA). An Arabidopsis mutant, snc1 (suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1), was isolated in a screen for suppressors of npr1-1. In the npr1-1 background, the snc1 mutation resulted in constitutive resistance to Pseudomonas syringae maculicola ES4326 and Peronospora parasitica Noco2. High levels of SA were detected in the mutant and shown to be required for manifestation of the snc1 phenotype. The snc1 mutation was mapped to the RPP5 resistance (R) gene cluster and the eds1 mutation that blocks RPP5-mediated resistance suppressed snc1. These data suggest that a RPP5-related resistance pathway is activated constitutively in snc1. This pathway does not employ NPR1 but requires the signal molecule SA and the function of EDS1. Moreover, in snc1, constitutive resistance is conferred in the absence of cell death, which is often associated with R-gene mediated resistance.

  14. Structural design, solid-phase synthesis and activity of membrane-anchored β-secretase inhibitors on Aβ generation from wild-type and Swedish-mutant APP.

    PubMed

    Schieb, Heinke; Weidlich, Sebastian; Schlechtingen, Georg; Linning, Philipp; Jennings, Gary; Gruner, Margit; Wiltfang, Jens; Klafki, Hans-Wolfgang; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2010-12-27

    Covalent coupling of β-secretase inhibitors to a raftophilic lipid anchor via a suitable spacer by using solid-phase peptide synthesis leads to tripartite structures displaying substantially improved inhibition of cellular secretion of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Herein, we describe a series of novel tripartite structures, their full characterization by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, and the analysis of their biological activity in cell-based assays. The tripartite structure concept is applicable to different pharmacophores, and the potency in terms of β-secretase inhibition can be optimized by adjusting the spacer length to achieve an optimal distance of the inhibitor from the lipid bilayer. A tripartite structure containing a transition-state mimic inhibitor was found to be less potent on Aβ generation from Swedish-mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) than from the wild-type protein. Moreover, our observations suggest that specific variants of Aβ are generated from wild-type APP but not from Swedish-mutant APP and are resistant to β-secretase inhibition. Efficient inhibition of Aβ secretion by tripartite structures in the absence of appreciable neurotoxicity was confirmed in a primary neuronal cell culture, thus further supporting the concept. PMID:21132705

  15. Activated expression of AtEDT1/HDG11 promotes lateral root formation in Arabidopsis mutant edt1 by upregulating jasmonate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Teng; Xu, Ping; Wang, Yao; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Root architecture is crucial for plants to absorb water and nutrients. We previously reported edt1 (edt1D) mutant with altered root architecture that contributes significantly to drought resistance. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here we report one of the mechanisms underlying EDT1/HDG11-conferred altered root architecture. Root transcriptome comparison between the wild type and edt1D revealed that the upregulated genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling pathway were enriched in edt1D root, which were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Further analysis showed that EDT1/HDG11, as a transcription factor, bound directly to the HD binding sites in the promoters of AOS, AOC3, OPR3, and OPCL1, which encode four key enzymes in JA biosynthesis. We found that the jasmonic acid level was significantly elevated in edt1D root compared with that in the wild type subsequently. In addition, more auxin accumulation was observed in the lateral root primordium of edt1D compared with that of wild type. Genetic analysis of edt1D opcl1 double mutant also showed that HDG11 was partially dependent on JA in regulating LR formation. Taken together, overexpression of EDT1/HDG11 increases JA level in the root of edt1D by directly upregulating the expressions of several genes encoding JA biosynthesis enzymes to activate auxin signaling and promote lateral root formation. PMID:25752924

  16. Paradoxical activation of MEK/ERK signaling induced by B-Raf inhibition enhances DR5 expression and DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, You-Take; Deng, Jiusheng; Yue, Ping; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    B-Raf inhibitors have been used for the treatment of some B-Raf-mutated cancers. They effectively inhibit B-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling in cancers harboring mutant B-Raf, but paradoxically activates MEK/ERK in Ras-mutated cancers. Death receptor 5 (DR5), a cell surface pro-apoptotic protein, triggers apoptosis upon ligation with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or aggregation. This study focused on determining the effects of B-Raf inhibition on DR5 expression and DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells. Using chemical and genetic approaches, we have demonstrated that the B-Raf inhibitor PLX4032 induces DR5 upregulation exclusively in Ras-mutant cancer cells; this effect is dependent on Ras/c-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling activation. PLX4032 induces DR5 expression at transcriptional levels, largely due to enhancing CHOP/Elk1-mediated DR5 transcription. Pre-exposure of Ras-mutated cancer cells to PLX4032 sensitizes them to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; this is also a c-Raf/MEK/ERK-dependent event. Collectively, our findings highlight a previously undiscovered effect of B-Raf inhibition on the induction of DR5 expression and the enhancement of DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells and hence may suggest a novel therapeutic strategy against Ras-mutated cancer cells by driving their death due to DR5-dependent apoptosis through B-Raf inhibition.

  17. Activation of phosphorothionate pesticides based on a cytochrome P450 BM-3 (CYP102 A1) mutant for expanded neurotoxin detection in food using acetylcholinesterase biosensors.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Holger; Schmid, Rolf D; Bachmann, Till T

    2004-03-15

    A novel enzymatic in vitro activation method for phosphorothionates has been developed to allow their detection with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensors. Activation is necessary because this group of insecticides shows nearly no inhibitory effect toward AChE in their pure nonmetabolized form. In contrast, they exert a strong inhibitory effect on AChE after oxidation as it takes place by metabolic activation in higher organisms. Standard chemical methods to oxidize phosphorothionates showed inherent disadvantages that impede their direct use in food analysis. In contrast, a genetically engineered triple mutant of P450 BM-3 (CYP102 A1) could convert the two frequently used insecticides parathion and chlorpyrifos into their oxo variants as was confirmed by GC/MS measurements. The wild-type protein was unable to do so. In the case of chlorpyrifos, the enzymatic activation was as good as the chemical oxidation. In the case of parathion, the P450 activation was more efficient than the oxidation by NBS but neither activation method yielded an AChE inhibition that was as high as with paraoxon. The application of the method to infant food in combination with a disposable AChE biosensor enabled detection of chlorpyrifos and parathion at concentrations down to 20 microg/kg within an overall assay time of 95 min. PMID:15018574

  18. Normal Activation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mutants with Disulfide Cross-links, Insertions, or Deletions in the Extracellular Juxtamembrane Region

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huifang; Abe, Takemoto; Liu, Justin K. H.; Zalivina, Irina; Hohenester, Erhard; Leitinger, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by collagen. DDR activation does not appear to occur by the common mechanism of ligand-induced receptor dimerization: the DDRs form stable noncovalent dimers in the absence of ligand, and ligand-induced autophosphorylation of cytoplasmic tyrosines is unusually slow and sustained. Here we sought to identify functionally important dimer contacts within the extracellular region of DDR1 by using cysteine-scanning mutagenesis. Cysteine substitutions close to the transmembrane domain resulted in receptors that formed covalent dimers with high efficiency, both in the absence and presence of collagen. Enforced covalent dimerization did not result in constitutive activation and did not affect the ability of collagen to induce receptor autophosphorylation. Cysteines farther away from the transmembrane domain were also cross-linked with high efficiency, but some of these mutants could no longer be activated. Furthermore, the extracellular juxtamembrane region of DDR1 tolerated large deletions as well as insertions of flexible segments, with no adverse effect on activation. These findings indicate that the extracellular juxtamembrane region of DDR1 is exceptionally flexible and does not constrain the basal or ligand-activated state of the receptor. DDR1 transmembrane signaling thus appears to occur without conformational coupling through the juxtamembrane region, but requires specific receptor interactions farther away from the cell membrane. A plausible mechanism to explain these findings is signaling by DDR1 clusters. PMID:24671415

  19. Transactivation of the p21 promoter by BRCA1 splice variants in mammary epithelial cells: evidence for both common and distinct activities of wildtype and mutant forms.

    PubMed

    Lu, M; Arrick, B A

    2000-12-14

    We have evaluated the transcriptional activation of a human p21 promoter reporter construct by transfection of BRCA1 expression constructs into tumorigenic and nontumorigenic human breast cell lines. Two cell lines with wildtype p53 (MCF-7 and MCF10A) demonstrated transcriptional activation of the p21 promoter by full-length BRCA1 (BRCA1L) as well as by two splice variants that lack most of exon 11 (BRCA1S and BRCA1S-9,10). In contrast, two cell lines with mutant p53 (MDA-231 and HCC1937) were inactive. Co-transfection of BRCA1L with BRCA1S or BRCA1S-9,10 exhibited synergistic p21 promoter activation, due to augmented expression of the cytomegalovirus promoter-based BRCA1 expression constructs. We examined the transcriptional activity of two known sequence alterations in BRCA1, one that results in a carboxy-terminal truncation of BRCA1 and is clearly pathogenic, and the other a missense mutation that is suspected of predisposing to cancer. Although both mutations have been shown to be defective in some assays of transactivation, we observed both mutations to be fully active in activation of the p21 promoter when incorporated in the full-length BRCA1L. In contrast, these mutations rendered BRCA1S inactive. These observations indicate that such transcriptional assays cannot serve as the basis for a functional appraisal of BRCA1 sequence alterations encountered in the course of genetic testing.

  20. Structure of the Constitutively Active Double Mutant CheY[superscript D13K Y106W] Alone and in Complex with a FliM Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Collin M.; Quillin, Michael L.; Campos, Andres; Lu, Justine; McEvoy, Megan M.; Hausrath, Andrew C.; Westbrook, Edwin M.; Matsumura, Philip; Matthews, Brian W.; Dahlquist, Frederick W.

    2010-11-16

    CheY is a member of the response regulator protein superfamily that controls the chemotactic swimming response of motile bacteria. The CheY double mutant D13K Y106W (CheY**) is resistant to phosphorylation, yet is a highly effective mimic of phosphorylated CheY in vivo and in vitro. The conformational attributes of this protein that enable it to signal in a phosphorylation-independent manner are unknown. We have solved the crystal structure of selenomethionine-substituted CheY** in the presence of its target, a peptide (FliM{sub 16}) derived from the flagellar motor switch, FliM, to 1.5 {angstrom} resolution with an R-factor of 19.6%. The asymmetric unit contains four CheY** molecules, two with FliM{sub 16} bound, and two without. The two CheY** molecules in the asymmetric unit that are bound to FliM{sub 16} adopt a conformation similar to BeF{sub 3}{sup -}-activated wild-type CheY, and also bind FliM{sub 16} in a nearly identical manner. The CheY** molecules that do not bind FliM{sub 16} are found in a conformation similar to unphosphorylated wild-type CheY, suggesting that the active phenotype of this mutant is enabled by a facile interconversion between the active and inactive conformations. Finally, we propose a ligand-binding model for CheY and CheY**, in which Ile95 changes conformation in a Tyr/Trp106-dependent manner to accommodate FliM.

  1. Research on the processing speed of cam grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Baoying; Han, Qiushi

    2010-12-01

    Cam Grinding is a special kind of non-circular machining. The processing speed of cam grinding has a major influence on cam machining precision. In this paper, decomposed the X-axis feed speed and C-axis velocity by the tangential speed and normal speed in accordance with the curvature circle at the point of cam profile grinding. Proposed the cam grinding processing speed model and linear velocity calculation formula, the processing experiment on the CNC camshaft grinding machine results show that the cam grinding speed model is correct. Constant angular speed grinding and constant linear speed grinding are analyzed respectively, which provides a theoretical basis for cam grinding processing speed optimization.

  2. Research on the processing speed of cam grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Baoying; Han, Qiushi

    2011-05-01

    Cam Grinding is a special kind of non-circular machining. The processing speed of cam grinding has a major influence on cam machining precision. In this paper, decomposed the X-axis feed speed and C-axis velocity by the tangential speed and normal speed in accordance with the curvature circle at the point of cam profile grinding. Proposed the cam grinding processing speed model and linear velocity calculation formula, the processing experiment on the CNC camshaft grinding machine results show that the cam grinding speed model is correct. Constant angular speed grinding and constant linear speed grinding are analyzed respectively, which provides a theoretical basis for cam grinding processing speed optimization.

  3. JunoCam: Outreach and Science Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Candice; Ingersoll, Andy; Caplinger, Mike; Ravine, Mike; Orton, Glenn

    2014-11-01

    JunoCam is a visible imager on the Juno spacecraft en route to Jupiter. Although the primary role of the camera is for outreach, science objectives will be addressed too. JunoCam is a wide angle camera (58 deg field of view) with 4 color filters: red, green and blue (RGB) and methane at 889 nm. Juno’s elliptical polar orbit will offer unique views of Jupiter’s polar regions with a spatial scale of ~50 km/pixel. The polar vortex, polar cloud morphology, and winds will be investigated. RGB color mages of the aurora will be acquired. Stereo images and images taken with the methane filter will allow us to estimate cloudtop heights. Resolution exceeds that of Cassini about an hour from closest approach and at closest approach images will have a spatial scale of ~3 km/pixel. JunoCam is a push-frame imager on a rotating spacecraft. The use of time-delayed integration takes advantage of the spacecraft spin to build up signal. JunoCam will acquire limb-to-limb views of Jupiter during a spacecraft rotation, and has the possibility of acquiring images of the rings from in-between Jupiter and the inner edge of the rings. Galilean satellite views will be fairly distant but some images will be acquired. Outer irregular satellites and small ring moons Metis and Adrastea will also be imaged. The theme of our outreach is “science in a fish bowl”, with an invitation to the science community and the public to participate. Amateur astronomers will supply their ground-based images for planning, so that we can predict when prominent atmospheric features will be visible. With the aid of professional astronomers observing at infrared wavelengths, we’ll predict when hot spots will be visible to JunoCam. Amateur image processing enthusiasts are onboard to create image products. Many of the earth flyby image products from Juno’s earth gravity assist were processed by amateurs. Between the planning and products will be the decision-making on what images to take when and why. We

  4. Changes of alternative oxidase activity, capacity and protein content in leaves of Cucumis sativus wild-type and MSC16 mutant grown under different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Ostaszewska, Monika; Galle, Alexander; Flexas, Jaume; Rychter, Anna M; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel

    2009-12-01

    In vitro studies demonstrated that alternative oxidase (AOX) is biochemically regulated by a sulfhydryl-disulfide system, interaction with alpha-ketoacids, ubiquinone pool redox state and protein content among others. However, there is still scarce information about the in vivo regulation of the AOX. Cucumis sativus wild-type (WT) and MSC16 mutant plants were grown under two different light intensities and were used to analyze the relationship between the amount of leaf AOX protein and its in vivo capacity and activity at night and day periods. WT and MSC16 plants presented lower total respiration (V(t)), cytochrome oxidase pathway (COP) activity (v(cyt)) and alternative oxidase pathway (AOP) activity (v(alt)) when grown at low light (LL), although growth light intensity did not change the amount of cytochrome oxidase (COX) nor AOX protein. Changes of v(cyt) related to growing light conditions suggested a substrate availability and energy demand control. On the other hand, the total amount of AOX protein present in the tissue does not play a role in the regulation neither of the capacity nor of the activity of the AOP in vivo. Soluble carbohydrates were directly related to the activity of the AOP. However, although differences in soluble sugar contents mostly regulate the capacity of the AOP at different growth light intensities, additional regulatory mechanisms are necessary to fully explain the observed results.

  5. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics/molecular mechanics (CPMD/MM) simulation study of coupling and uncoupling mechanisms of Cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Lian, Peng; Li, Jue; Wang, Dong-Qi; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2013-07-01

    The relevance of the pathway through which the second proton is delivered to the active site of P450cam and the subsequent coupling/uncoupling reactions has been investigated using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics/molecular mechanics (CPMD/MM) dynamics simulations. Five models have been prepared, representing delivery pathways in the wild-type enzyme and its mutants in which Thr252 mutated into other residues with different side-chain length and hydrophobicity. In the simulations, coupling reaction is observed in the wild-type enzyme (Model A) and its T252S mutant (Model B), while the uncoupling products are obtained in the other three models (C, D, and E). Different from previous studies, a dynamic process of the last stage of coupling/uncoupling was observed. We found that the peroxide bond cleavage in coupling, the Fe-O bond stretching in uncoupling, proton transfer, and electron delivery take place spontaneously. Moreover, besides the intrinsic chemical differences between the two peroxide oxygen atoms, water molecules in the active site and the proton transfer pathway may play an important role in the determination of coupling/uncoupling. We conclude that by maintaining a specific proton transfer channel, Asp251-Thr252 channel, the wild-type enzyme could efficiently deliver the second proton to the ideal position for coupling reaction. PMID:23742631

  6. Stimulation of CAM Photosynthesis in Kalanchoë blossfeldiana by Transferring to Nitrogen-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Koichi

    1988-01-01

    Kalanchoë blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Hikan plants were grown hydroponically with nutrient solution containing 5 millimolar NO3− (or NH4+) for 1 to 2 months and then transferred to nutrient solution containing no nitrogen. CO2 uptake at night, nocturnal increase in titratable acidity, and activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase increased after the transfer. Thus, transfer to nitrogen-deficient conditions stimulates Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM photosynthesis) in K. blossfeldiana. The importance of the plant nitrogen status (nitrogen-withdrawal status) for induction and stimulation of CAM photosynthesis is discussed. PMID:16666163

  7. Activation of R235A mutant orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase by the guanidinium cation: effective molarity of the cationic side chain of Arg-235.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Shonoi A; Amyes, Tina L; Wood, B McKay; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2010-02-01

    The R235A mutation at yeast orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) results in a 1300-fold increase in K(m) and a 14-fold decrease in k(cat) for decarboxylation of orotidine 5'-monophosphate, corresponding to a 5.8 kcal/mol destabilization of the transition state. There is strong activation of this mutant enzyme by added guanidinium cation (Gua(+)): 1 M Gua(+) stabilizes the transition state by ca. 3 kcal/mol. This stabilization is due to the binding of Gua(+) to the binary E(mut) x OMP complex, with a K(d) of 50 mM, to form the 9-fold more reactive ternary E(mut) x OMP x Gua(+) complex. The "effective molarity" of the cationic side chain of Arg-235 at the wild-type enzyme is calculated to be 160 M.

  8. A Friend virus mutant that overcomes Fv-2rr host resistance encodes a small glycoprotein that dimerizes, is processed to cell surfaces, and specifically activates erythropoietin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, S L; Hoatlin, M E; Ferro, F E; Majumdar, M K; Geib, R W; Fox, M T; Kabat, D

    1993-01-01

    The env gene of Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) encodes a membrane glycoprotein (gp55) that is inefficiently (3 to 5%) processed from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to form a larger dimeric plasma membrane derivative (gp55p). Moreover, the SFFV env glycoprotein associates with erythropoietin receptors (EpoR) to cause proliferation of infected erythroblasts [J.-P. Li, A. D. D'Andrea, H. F. Lodish, and D. Baltimore, Nature (London) 343:762-764, 1990]. Interestingly, the mitogenic effect of SFFV is blocked in mice homozygous for the Fv-2r resistance gene, but mutant SFFVs can overcome this resistance. Recent evidence suggested that these mutants contain partial env deletions that truncate the membrane-proximal extracellular domain of the encoded glycoproteins (M. H. Majumdar, C.-L. Cho, M. T. Fox, K. L. Eckner, S. Kozak, D. Kabat, and R. W. Geib, J. Virol. 66:3652-3660, 1992). Mutant BB6, which encodes a gp42 glycoprotein that has a large deletion in this domain, causes erythroblastosis in DBA/2 (Fv-2s) as well as in congenic D2.R (Fv-2r) mice. Analogous to gp55, gp42 is processed inefficiently as a disulfide-bonded dimer to form cell surface gp42p. Retroviral vectors with SFFV and BB6 env genes have no effect on interleukin 3-dependent BaF3 hematopoietic cells, but they cause growth factor independency of BaF3/EpoR cells, a derivative that contains recombinant EpoR. After binding 125I-Epo to surface EpoR on these factor-independent cells and adding the covalent cross-linking reagent disuccinimidyl suberate, complexes that had immunological properties and sizes demonstrating that they consisted of 125I-Epo-gp55p and 125I-Epo-gp42p were isolated from cell lysates. Contrary to a previous report, SFFV or BB6 env glycoproteins did not promiscuously activate other members of the EpoR superfamily. Although the related env glycoproteins encoded by dualtropic murine leukemia viruses formed detectable complexes with EpoR, strong mitogenic signalling did not ensue

  9. Activity of second-generation ALK inhibitors against crizotinib-resistant mutants in an NPM-ALK model compared to EML4-ALK.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Diletta; Ceccon, Monica; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2015-07-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor involved in both solid and hematological tumors. About 80% of ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases are characterized by the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation, encoding for the aberrant fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, whereas 5% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients carry the inv(2)(p21;p23) rearrangement, encoding for the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion. The ALK/c-MET/ROS inhibitor crizotinib successfully improved the treatment of ALK-driven diseases. However, several cases of resistance appeared in NSCLC patients, and ALK amino acid substitutions were identified as a leading cause of resistance to crizotinib. Second-generation ALK inhibitors have been developed in order to overcome crizotinib resistance. In this work, we profiled in vitro the activity of crizotinib, AP26113, ASP3026, alectinib, and ceritinib against six mutated forms of ALK associated with clinical resistance to crizotinib (C1156Y, L1196M, L1152R, G1202R, G1269A, and S1206Y) and provide a classification of mutants according to their level of sensitivity/resistance to the drugs. Since the biological activity of ALK mutations extends beyond the specific type of fusion, both NPM-ALK- and EML4-ALK-positive cellular models were used. Our data revealed that most mutants may be targeted by using different inhibitors. One relevant exception is represented by the G1202R substitution, which was highly resistant to all drugs (>10-fold increased IC50 compared to wild type) and may represent the most challenging mutation to overcome. These results provide a prediction of cross-resistance of known crizotinib-resistant mutations against all second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) clinically available, and therefore could be a useful tool to help clinicians in the management of crizotinib-resistance cases.

  10. Cost reduction advantages of CAD/CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, G. T.

    1983-05-01

    Features of the CAD/CAM system implemented at the General Dynamics Convair division are summarized. CAD/CAM was initiated in 1976 to enhance engineering, manufacturing and quality assurance and thereby the company's competitive bidding position. Numerical models are substituted for hardware models wherever possible and numerical criteria are defined in design for guiding computer-controlled parts manufacturing machines. The system comprises multiple terminals, a data base, digitizer, printers, disk and tape drives, and graphics displays. The applications include the design and manufacture of parts and components for avionics, structures, scientific investigations, and aircraft structural components. Interfaces with other computers allow structural analyses by finite element codes. Although time savings have not been gained compared to manual drafting, components of greater complexity than could have been designed by hand have been designed and manufactured.

  11. CAM/LIFTER forces and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbey, D. J.; Lee, J.; Patterson, D. J.

    1992-02-01

    This report details the procedures used to measure the cam/lifter forces and friction. The present effort employed a Cummins LTA-10, and focuses on measurements and dynamic modeling of the injector train. The program was sponsored by the US Department of Energy in support of advanced diesel engine technology. The injector train was instrumented to record the instantaneous roller speed, roller pin friction torque, pushrod force, injector link force, and cam speed. These measurements, together with lift profiles for pushrod and injector link displacement, enabled the friction work loss in the injector train to be determined. Other significant design criteria such as camshaft roller follower slippage and maximum loads on components were also determined. Future efforts will concentrate on the dynamic model, with tests run as required for correlation.

  12. CAM and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hankey, Alex

    2007-03-01

    In the form of the Transcendental Meditation program CAM offers a method of eliminating deep-rooted stress, the efficacy of which has been demonstrated in several related studies. Any discussion of CAM and post-traumatic stress disorder should include a study of its application to Vietnam War Veterans in which improvements were observed on all variables, and several participants were able to return to work after several years of being unable to hold a job. The intervention has been studied for its impact on brain and autonomic nervous system function. It has been found to be highly effective against other stress-related conditions such as hypertension, and to improve brain coherence-a measure of effective brain function. It should be considered a possible 'new and improved mode of treatment' for PTSD, and further studies of its application made.

  13. Cortical Efferents Lacking Mutant huntingtin Improve Striatal Neuronal Activity and Behavior in a Conditional Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Sánchez, Ana María; Burroughs, Courtney L.; Cavaliere, Stephen; Barton, Scott J.; Chen, Shirley; Yang, X. William

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal electrophysiological activity in the striatum, which receives dense innervation from the cerebral cortex, is believed to set the stage for the behavioral phenotype observed in Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative condition caused by mutation of the huntingtin (mhtt) protein. However, cortical involvement is far from clear. To determine whether abnormal striatal processing can be explained by mhtt alone (cell-autonomous model) or by mhtt in the corticostriatal projection cell–cell interaction model, we used BACHD/Emx1–Cre (BE) mice, a conditional HD model in which full-length mhtt is genetically reduced in cortical output neurons, including those that project to the striatum. Animals were assessed beginning at 20 weeks of age for at least the next 40 weeks, a range over which presymptomatic BACHD mice become symptomatic. Both open-field and nest-building behavior deteriorated progressively in BACHD mice relative to both BE and wild-type (WT) mice. Neuronal activity patterns in the dorsal striatum, which receives input from the primary motor cortex (M1), followed a similar age progression because BACHD activity changed more rapidly than either BE or WT mice. However, in the M1, BE neuronal activity differed significantly from both WT and BACHD. Although abnormal cortical activity in BE mice likely reflects input from mhtt-expressing afferents, including cortical interneurons, improvements in BE striatal activity and behavior suggest a critical role for mhtt in cortical output neurons in shaping the onset and progression of striatal dysfunction. PMID:25762686

  14. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    ‘Hong Anliu’ (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of ‘Anliu’ (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between ‘HAL’ and ‘AL’. Compared with ‘AL’, the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in ‘HAL’. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar H+-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in ‘HAL’. These results implied that ‘HAL’ has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with ‘AL’. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in ‘HAL’. PMID:27385485

  15. Hepatitis B virus PreS2-mutant large surface antigen activates store-operated calcium entry and promotes chromosome instability

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Tim Ting-Chung; Yang, Anderson; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Li, Tian-Neng; Wang, Lyu-Han; Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Hui-Chen; Chen, Linyi; Wang, Wen-Ching; Huang, Wenya; Chang, Chien-Wen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr; Shen, Meng-Ru; Su, Ih-Jen; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a driver of hepatocellular carcinoma, and two viral products, X and large surface antigen (LHBS), are viral oncoproteins. During chronic viral infection, immune-escape mutants on the preS2 region of LHBS (preS2-LHBS) are gain-of-function mutations that are linked to preneoplastic ground glass hepatocytes (GGHs) and early disease onset of hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we show that preS2-LHBS provoked calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and triggered stored-operated calcium entry (SOCE). The activation of SOCE increased ER and plasma membrane (PM) connections, which was linked by ER- resident stromal interaction molecule-1 (STIM1) protein and PM-resident calcium release- activated calcium modulator 1 (Orai1). Persistent activation of SOCE induced centrosome overduplication, aberrant multipolar division, chromosome aneuploidy, anchorage-independent growth, and xenograft tumorigenesis in hepatocytes expressing preS2- LHBS. Chemical inhibitions of SOCE machinery and silencing of STIM1 significantly reduced centrosome numbers, multipolar division, and xenograft tumorigenesis induced by preS2-LHBS. These results provide the first mechanistic link between calcium homeostasis and chromosome instability in hepatocytes carrying preS2-LHBS. Therefore, persistent activation of SOCE represents a novel pathological mechanism in HBV-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:26992221

  16. The pharmacological chaperone isofagomine increases the activity of the Gaucher disease L444P mutant form of beta-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Richie; Benjamin, Elfrida R; Pellegrino, Lee; Schilling, Adriane; Rigat, Brigitte A; Soska, Rebecca; Nafar, Hadis; Ranes, Brian E; Feng, Jessie; Lun, Yi; Powe, Allan C; Palling, David J; Wustman, Brandon A; Schiffmann, Raphael; Mahuran, Don J; Lockhart, David J; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2010-04-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the lysosomal enzyme acid beta-glucosidase (GCase). We have shown previously that the small molecule pharmacological chaperone isofagomine (IFG) binds and stabilizes N370S GCase, resulting in increased lysosomal trafficking and cellular activity. In this study, we investigated the effect of IFG on L444P GCase. Incubation of Gaucher patient-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) or fibroblasts with IFG led to approximately 3.5- and 1.3-fold increases in L444P GCase activity, respectively, as measured in cell lysates. The effect in fibroblasts was increased approximately 2-fold using glycoprotein-enrichment, GCase-immunocapture, or by incubating cells overnight in IFG-free media prior to assay, methods designed to maximize GCase activity by reducing IFG carryover and inhibition in the enzymatic assay. IFG incubation also increased the lysosomal trafficking and in situ activity of L444P GCase in intact cells, as measured by reduction in endogenous glucosylceramide levels. Importantly, this reduction was seen only following three-day incubation in IFG-free media, underscoring the importance of IFG removal to restore lysosomal GCase activity. In mice expressing murine L444P GCase, oral administration of IFG resulted in significant increases (2- to 5-fold) in GCase activity in disease-relevant tissues, including brain. Additionally, eight-week IFG administration significantly lowered plasma chitin III and IgG levels, and 24-week administration significantly reduced spleen and liver weights. Taken together, these data suggest that IFG can increase the lysosomal activity of L444P GCase in cells and tissues. Moreover, IFG is orally available and distributes into multiple tissues, including brain, and may thus merit therapeutic evaluation for patients with neuronopathic and non-neuronopathic Gaucher disease.

  17. Modeled hydraulic redistribution in tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations: the implications of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM).

    PubMed

    Yu, Kailiang; Foster, Adrianna

    2016-04-01

    Past studies have largely focused on hydraulic redistribution (HR) in trees, shrubs, and grasses, and recognized its role in interspecies interactions. HR in plants that conduct crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), however, remains poorly investigated, as does the effect of HR on transpiration in different vegetation associations (i.e., tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations). We have developed a mechanistic model to investigate the net direction and magnitude of HR at the patch scale for tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations at the growing season to yearly timescale. The modeling results show that deep-rooted CAM plants in CAM-grass associations could perform hydraulic lift at a higher rate than trees in tree-grass associations in a relatively wet environment, as explained by a significant increase in grass transpiration rate in the shallow soil layer, balancing a lower transpiration rate by CAM plants. By comparison, trees in tree-CAM associations may perform hydraulic descent at a higher rate than those in tree-grass associations in a dry environment. Model simulations also show that hydraulic lift increases the transpiration of shallow-rooted plants, while hydraulic descent increases that of deep-rooted plants. CAM plants transpire during the night and thus perform HR during the day. Based on these model simulations, we suggest that the ability of CAM plants to perform HR at a higher rate may have different effects on the surrounding plant community than those of plants with C3 or C4 photosynthetic pathways (i.e., diurnal transpiration).

  18. Modeled hydraulic redistribution in tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations: the implications of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM).

    PubMed

    Yu, Kailiang; Foster, Adrianna

    2016-04-01

    Past studies have largely focused on hydraulic redistribution (HR) in trees, shrubs, and grasses, and recognized its role in interspecies interactions. HR in plants that conduct crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), however, remains poorly investigated, as does the effect of HR on transpiration in different vegetation associations (i.e., tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations). We have developed a mechanistic model to investigate the net direction and magnitude of HR at the patch scale for tree-grass, CAM-grass, and tree-CAM associations at the growing season to yearly timescale. The modeling results show that deep-rooted CAM plants in CAM-grass associations could perform hydraulic lift at a higher rate than trees in tree-grass associations in a relatively wet environment, as explained by a significant increase in grass transpiration rate in the shallow soil layer, balancing a lower transpiration rate by CAM plants. By comparison, trees in tree-CAM associations may perform hydraulic descent at a higher rate than those in tree-grass associations in a dry environment. Model simulations also show that hydraulic lift increases the transpiration of shallow-rooted plants, while hydraulic descent increases that of deep-rooted plants. CAM plants transpire during the night and thus perform HR during the day. Based on these model simulations, we suggest that the ability of CAM plants to perform HR at a higher rate may have different effects on the surrounding plant community than those of plants with C3 or C4 photosynthetic pathways (i.e., diurnal transpiration). PMID:26712135

  19. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    2003-01-01

    The CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) project was performed to develop, test, and analyze thin film membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The membranes developed in this project are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications, such as In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) and In Situ Consumables Production (ISCP). These membrane materials may be used in a variety of ISRU systems, for example as the atmospheric inlet filter for an ISPP process to enhance the concentration of CO2 for use as a reactant gas, to passively separate argon and nitrogen trace gases from CO2 for habitat pressurization, to provide a system for removal of CO2 from breathing gases in a closed environment, or within a process stream to selectively separate CO2 from other gaseous components. The membranes identified and developed for CAM were evaluated for use in candidate ISRU processes and other gas separation applications, and will help to lay the foundation for future unmanned sample return and human space missions. CAM is a cooperative project split among three institutions: Lockheed Martin Astronautics (LMA), the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  20. trans-dominant mutants of E1A provide genetic evidence that the zinc finger of the trans-activating domain binds a transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, L C; Ricciardi, R P

    1991-01-01

    The 289R E1A protein of adenovirus stimulates transcription of early viral and certain cellular genes. trans-Activation requires residues 140 to 188, which encompass a zinc finger. Several studies have indicated that trans-activation by E1A is mediated through cellular transcription factors. In particular, the ability of the trans-dominant E1A point mutant hr5 (Ser-185 to Asn) to inhibit wild-type E1A trans-activation was proposed to result from the sequestration of a cellular factor. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we individually replaced every residue within and flanking the trans-activating domain with a conservative amino acid, revealing 16 critical residues. Six of the individual substitutions lying in a contiguous stretch C terminal to the zinc finger (carboxyl region183-188) imparted a trans-dominant phenotype. trans-Dominance was even produced by deletion of the entire carboxyl region183-188. Conversely, an intact finger region147-177 was absolutely required for trans-dominance, since second-site substitution of every critical residue in this region abrogated the trans-dominant phenotype of the hr5 protein. These data indicate that the finger region147-177 bind a limiting cellular transcription factor and that the carboxyl region183-188 provides a separate and essential function. In addition, we show that four negatively charged residues within the trans-activating domain do not comprise a distinct acidic activating region. We present a model in which the trans-activating domain of E1A binds to two different cellular protein targets through the finger and carboxyl regions. Images PMID:1831535

  1. Allosteric mutants show that PrfA activation is dispensable for vacuole escape but required for efficient spread and Listeria survival in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Deshayes, Caroline; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Cain, Robert J; Scortti, Mariela; de las Heras, Aitor; Pietras, Zbigniew; Luisi, Ben F; Núñez Miguel, Ricardo; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator PrfA controls key virulence determinants of the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. PrfA-dependent gene expression is strongly induced within host cells. While the basis of this activation is unknown, the structural homology of PrfA with the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) and the finding of constitutively activated PrfA* mutants suggests it may involve ligand-induced allostery. Here, we report the identification of a solvent-accessible cavity within the PrfA N-terminal domain that may accommodate an activating ligand. The pocket occupies a similar position to the cAMP binding site in Crp but lacks the cyclic nucleotide-anchoring motif and has its entrance on the opposite side of the β-barrel. Site-directed mutations in this pocket impaired intracellular PrfA-dependent gene activation without causing extensive structural/functional alterations to PrfA. Two substitutions, L48F and Y63W, almost completely abolished intracellular virulence gene induction and thus displayed the expected phenotype for allosteric activation-deficient PrfA mutations. Neither PrfAallo substitution affected vacuole escape and initial intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes in epithelial cells and macrophages but caused defective cell-to-cell spread and strong attenuation in mice. Our data support the hypothesis that PrfA is allosterically activated during intracellular infection and identify the probable binding site for the effector ligand. They also indicate that PrfA allosteric activation is not required for early intracellular survival but is essential for full Listeria virulence and colonization of host tissues. PMID:22646689

  2. Interactions of C4 subtype metabolic activities and transport in maize are revealed through the characterization of DCT2 mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C4 photosynthesis is an elaborate set of metabolic pathways that utilize specialized anatomical and biochemical adaptations to concentrate CO2 around RuBisCO. The activities of the C4 pathways are coordinated between two specialized leaf cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS), and rely hea...

  3. Curiosity ChemCam Finds High-Silica Mars Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Frydenvang, Jens

    2015-12-17

    A team of scientists, including one from Los Alamos National Laboratory, has found much higher concentrations of silica at some sites the Curiosity rover has investigated in the past seven months than anywhere else it has visited since landing on Mars 40 months ago. The first discovery was as Curiosity approached the area “Marias Pass,” where a lower geological unit contacts an overlying one. ChemCam, the rover’s laser-firing instrument for checking rock composition from a distance, detected bountiful silica in some targets the rover passed along the way to the contact zone. The ChemCam instrument was developed at Los Alamos in partnership with the French IRAP laboratory in Toulouse and the French Space Agency. “The high silica was a surprise,” said Jens Frydenvang of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Copenhagen, also a Curiosity science team member. “While we’re still working with multiple hypotheses on how the silica got so enriched, these hypotheses all require considerable water activity, and on Earth high silica deposits are often associated with environments that provide excellent support for microbial life. Because of this, the science team agreed to make a rare backtrack to investigate it more.”

  4. The Cam Shell: An Innovative Design With Materials and Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W. Richard; Larsen, Frank M.; Kornienko, Rob

    2003-01-01

    Most of the personal audio and video recording devices currently sold on the open market all require hands to operate. Little consideration was given to designing a hands-free unit. Such a system once designed and made available to the public could greatly benefit mobile police officers, bicyclists, adventurers, street and dirt motorcyclists, horseback riders and many others. With a few design changes water sports and skiing activities could be another large area of application. The cam shell is an innovative design in which an audio and video recording device (such as palm camcorder) is housed in a body-mounted protection system. This system is based on the concept of viewing and recording at the same time. A view cam is attached to a helmet wired to a recording unit encased in a transparent body-mounted protection system. The helmet can also be controlled by remote. The operator will have full control in recording everything. However, the recording unit will be operated completely hands-free. This project will address the design considerations and their effects on material selection and manufacturing. It will enhance the understanding of the structure of materials, and how the structure affects the behavior of the material, and the role that processing play in linking the relationship between structure and properties. A systematic approach to design feasibility study, cost analysis and problem solving will also be discussed.

  5. Status of the CAMS-BeNeLux network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggemans, P.; Johannink, C.; Breukers, M.

    2016-01-01

    An overview is being given of the further expansion of the CAMS@BeNeLux network since previous IMC, July 2015 until May 2016. The weather proved less favorable than in the year before, but thanks to a number of new cameras and extra observing stations, the overall performance of the network remained at the same level in spite of the often poor weather circumstances. This paper compares the Kappa-Cygnids performance of 2015 with the analyses made for the 2014 data, following the same methodology. In 2015 the Kappa Cygnids were remarkable absent which confirms the periodic nature of the abundant Kappa-Cygnids display in 2014. The CAMS@BeNeLux network was the first to draw attention to enhanced activity of the newly discovered Chi Cygnids meteor shower with 5 accurate orbits in the night of 14-15 September 2015. A search through a selection of all orbits of September 2015 yield 71 possible Chi Cygnid orbits of which 18 were selected to calculate the average orbital elements.

  6. Impact of membrane-associated hydrogenases on the F₀F₁-ATPase in Escherichia coli during glycerol and mixed carbon fermentation: ATPase activity and its inhibition by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the mutants lacking hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Blbulyan, Syuzanna; Trchounian, Armen

    2015-08-01

    Escherichia coli is able to ferment glycerol and to produce molecular hydrogen (H2) by four membrane-associated hydrogenases (Hyd) changing activity in response to different conditions. In this study, overall ATPase activity of glycerol alone and mixed carbon sources (glucose and glycerol) fermented E. coli wild type and different Hyd mutants and its inhibition by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) were first investigated. ATPase activity was higher in glycerol fermented wild type cells at pH 7.5 compared to pH 6.5 and pH 5.5; DCCD inhibited markedly ATPase activity at pH 7.5. The ATPase activity at pH 7.5, compared with wild type, was lower in selC and less in hypF single mutants, suppressed in hyaB hybC selC triple mutant. Moreover, total ATPase activity of mixed carbon fermented wild type cells was maximal at pH 7.5 and lowered at pH 5.5. The ATPase activities of hypF and hyaB hybC selC mutants were higher at pH 5.5, compared with wild type; DCCD inhibited markedly ATPase activity of hypF mutant. These results demonstrate that in E. coli during glycerol fermentation the membrane proton-translocating FOF1-ATPase has major input in overall ATPase activity and alkaline pH is more optimal for the FOF1-ATPase operation. Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 are required for the FOF1-ATPase activity upon anaerobic fermentation of glycerol. The impact of Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 on the FOF1-ATPase is more obvious during mixed carbon fermentation at slightly acidic pH.

  7. Constitutive activation of stress-inducible genes in a brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 (bri1) mutant results in higher tolerance to cold.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Beg Hab; Lim, Chan Ju; Lim, Chae Oh; Nam, Kyoung Hee

    2010-02-01

    Many plant hormones are involved in coordinating the growth responses of plants under stress. However, not many mechanistic studies have explored how plants maintain the balance between growth and stress responses. Brassinosteroids (BRs), plant-specific steroid hormones, affect many aspects of plant growth and development over a plant's lifetime. In this study we determined that exogenous treatment of BR helped the plant overcome the cold condition only when pretreated with less than 1 nM, and the brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 (bri1) mutation, which results in defective BR signaling and subsequent dwarfism, generates an increased tolerance to cold. In contrast, BRI1-overexpressing plants were more sensitive to the same stress than wild-type. We found that the bri1 mutant and BRI1-overexpressing transgenic plants contain higher basal level of expression of CBFs/DREB1s than wild-type. However, representative cold stress-related genes were regulated with the same pattern to cold in wild-type, bri1-9 and BRI1 overexpressing plants. To examine the global gene expression and compare the genes that show differential expression pattern in bri1-9 and BRI1-GFP plants other than CBFs/DREB1s, we analyzed differential mRNA expression using the cDNA microarray analysis in the absence of stress. Endogenous expression of both stress-inducible genes as well as genes encoding transcription factors that drive the expression of stress-inducible genes were maintained at higher levels in bri1-9 than either in wild-type or in BRI1 overexpressing plants. This suggests that the bri1-9 mutant could always be alert to stresses that might be exerted at any times by constitutive activation of subsets of defense. PMID:20053182

  8. Camões e a cosmogonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, J. M.

    2003-08-01

    Os Lusíadas, escrito por Luis de Camões em 1572, é um poema épico renascentista e a visão Cosmogônica do autor é apresentada, principalmente, no último canto do poema, quando Tétis mostra ao Gama a Máquina do Mundo. A Cosmogonia de Camões neste poema reflete uma visão de uma época de transição, que ainda não incorporou os elementos da revolução Copernicana. É uma visão Grego- Ptolomaica e também medieval. O poeta guia-se pela tradução e notas feita por Pedro Nunes, inventor do Nonio, do Tratado da Esfera "De Sphaera" do Astrônomo Inglês John Holywood, mais conhecido pelo nome latinizado de Johannes Sacrobosco. Outra provável fonte de Camões, de acordo com Luciano Antonio Pereira da Silva em Astronomia de os Lusíadas, é o "Theoricae novae Planetarum" (1460) do astrólogo Alemão Jorge Purbáquio (1423 - 1461). A Astronomia de Os Lusíadas representa a ciência do tempo de Camões. Camões nunca emprega a palavra constelação e seu catálogo é bastante completo. A Máquina do Mundo tem a Terra no centro. Em redor, em círculos concêntricos, a lua (Diana), Mercúrio, Vênus, o Sol (Febo), Marte, Júpiter e Saturno. Envolvendo estes astros tem o firmamento seguido pelo "Céu Áqueo" ou cristalino, depois o 1o Móbil, esfera que arrasta todas as outras consigo. Este trabalho, multidisciplinar, serve tanto para ensinar aos alunos da Física como das Ciências Humanas, a concepção de mundo do renascimento de uma forma belamente poética em versos decassílabos Este trabalho também ajuda na apreciação do maior clássico da língua portuguesa e mostra como as Ciências e as artes, em geral, estão correlacionadas e refletem a visão de mundo da época em que foi produzida.

  9. cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase HSPDE4D3 mutants which mimic activation and changes in rolipram inhibition triggered by protein kinase A phosphorylation of Ser-54: generation of a molecular model.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, R; Wilkinson, I R; McCallum, J F; Engels, P; Houslay, M D

    1998-01-01

    Ser-13 and Ser-54 were shown to provide the sole sites for the protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the human cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase isoform HSPDE4D3. The ability of PKA to phosphorylate and activate HSPDE4D3 was mimicked by replacing Ser-54 with either of the negatively charged amino acids, aspartate or glutamate, within the consensus motif of RRES54. The PDE4 selective inhibitor rolipram ¿4-[3-(cyclopentoxy)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-pyrrolidone¿ inhibited both PKA-phosphorylated HSPDE4D3 and the Ser-54-->Asp mutant, with an IC50 value that was approximately 8-fold lower than that seen for the non-PKA-phosphorylated enzyme. Lower IC50 values for inhibition by rolipram were seen for a wide range of non-activated residue 54 mutants, except for those which had side-chains able to serve as hydrogen-bond donors, namely the Ser-54-->Thr, Ser-54-->Tyr and Ser-54-->Cys mutants. The Glu-53-->Ala mutant exhibited an activity comparable with that of the PKA phosphorylated native enzyme and the Ser-54-->Asp mutant but, in contrast to the native enzyme, was insensitive to activation by PKA, despite being more rapidly phosphorylated by this protein kinase. The activated Glu-53-->Ala mutant exhibited a sensitivity to inhibition by rolipram which was unchanged from that of the native enzyme. The double mutant, Arg-51-->Ala/Arg-52-->Ala, showed no change in either enzyme activity or rolipram inhibition from the native enzyme and was incapable of providing a substrate for PKA phosphorylation at Ser-54. No difference in inhibition by dipyridamole was seen for the native enzyme and the Ser-54-->Asp and Ser-54-->Ala mutants. A model is proposed which envisages that phosphorylation by PKA triggers at least two distinct conformational changes in HSPDE4D3; one of these gives rise to enzyme activation and another enhances sensitivity to inhibition by rolipram. Activation of HSPDE4D3 by PKA-mediated phosphorylation is suggested to involve disruption of an ion

  10. Activation of the Rcs Signal Transduction System Is Responsible for the Thermosensitive Growth Defect of an Escherichia coli Mutant Lacking Phosphatidylglycerol and Cardiolipin

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Yasuhiro; Yokoyama, Yasuko; Aono, Yoshiko; Kiuchi, Takashi; Kusaka, Jin; Matsumoto, Kouji; Hara, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    The lethal effect of an Escherichia coli pgsA null mutation, which causes a complete lack of the major acidic phospholipids, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin, is alleviated by a lack of the major outer membrane lipoprotein encoded by the lpp gene, but an lpp pgsA strain shows a thermosensitive growth defect. Using transposon mutagenesis, we found that this thermosensitivity was suppressed by disruption of the rcsC, rcsF, and yojN genes, which code for a sensor kinase, accessory positive factor, and phosphotransmitter, respectively, of the Rcs phosphorelay signal transduction system initially identified as regulating the capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) genes. Disruption of the rcsB gene coding for the response regulator of the system also suppressed the thermosensitivity, whereas disruption of cpsE did not. By monitoring the expression of a cpsB′-lac fusion, we showed that the Rcs system is activated in the pgsA mutant and is reverted to a wild-type level by the rcs mutations. These results indicate that envelope stress due to an acidic phospholipid deficiency activates the Rcs phosphorelay system and thereby causes the thermosensitive growth defect independent of the activation of capsule synthesis. PMID:15375134

  11. HMG CoA Lyase (HL): Mutation detection and development of a bacterial expression system for screening the activity of mutant alleles from HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, M.F.; Ashmarina, L.; Poitier, E.

    1994-09-01

    HL catalyzes the last step of ketogenesis, and autosomal recessive HL deficiency in humans can cause episodes of hypoglycemia and coma. Structurally, HL is a dimer of identical 325-residue peptides which requires a reducing environment to maintain activity. We cloned the human and mouse HL cDNAs and genes and have performed mutation analysis on cells from 30 HL-deficient probands. Using SSCP and also genomic Southern analysis we have identified putative mutations on 53/60 alleles of these patients (88%). To date, we have found 20 mutations: 3 large deletions, 4 termination mutations, 5 frameshift mutations, and 8 missense mutations which we suspect to be pathogenic based on evolutionary conservation and/or our previous studies on purified HL protein. We have also identified 3 polymorphic variants. In order to directly test the activity of the missense mutations, we established a pGEX-based system, using a glutathione S transferase (GST)-HL fusion protein. Expressed wild-type GST-HL was insoluble. We previously located a reactive Cys at the C-terminus of chicken HL which is conserved in human HL. We produced a mutant HL peptide, C323S, which replaced Cys323 with Ser. Purified C323S is soluble and has similar kinetics t