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Sample records for active nacl transport

  1. Characteristics of injury and recovery of net NO3- transport of barley seedlings from treatments of NaCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klobus, G.; Ward, M. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    The nature of the injury and recovery of nitrate uptake (net uptake) from NaCl stress in young barley (Hordeum vulgare L, var CM 72) seedlings was investigated. Nitrate uptake was inhibited rapidly by NaCl, within 1 minute after exposure to 200 millimolar NaCl. The duration of exposure to saline conditions determined the time of recovery of NO3- uptake from NaCl stress. Recovery was dependent on the presence of NO3- and was inhibited by cycloheximide, 6-methylpurine, and cerulenin, respective inhibitors of protein, RNA, and sterol/fatty acid synthesis. These inhibitors also prevented the induction of the NO3- uptake system in uninduced seedlings. Uninduced seedlings exhibited endogenous NO3- transport activity that appeared to be constitutive. This constitutive activity was also inhibited by NaCl. Recovery of constitutive NO3- uptake did not require the presence of NO3-.

  2. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of H2O + NaCl from Polarizable Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Mester, Zoltan; Moultos, Othonas A; Economou, Ioannis G; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2015-08-11

    Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain thermodynamic and transport properties of the binary H2O + NaCl system using the polarizable force fields of Kiss and Baranyai ( J. Chem. Phys. 2013 , 138 , 204507 and 2014 , 141 , 114501 ). In particular, liquid densities, electrolyte and crystal chemical potentials of NaCl, salt solubilities, mean ionic activity coefficients, vapor pressures, vapor-liquid interfacial tensions, and viscosities were obtained as functions of temperature, pressure, and salt concentration. We compared the performance of the polarizable force fields against fixed-point-charge (nonpolarizable) models. Most of the properties of interest are better represented by the polarizable models, which also remain physically realistic at elevated temperatures.

  3. Plasma membrane H-ATPase activity is involved in adaptation of tomato calli to NaCl.

    PubMed

    Kerkeb, Loubna; Donaire, Juan Pedro; Rodríguez-Rosales, María Pilar

    2001-04-01

    A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Pera) callus culture tolerant to NaCl was obtained by successive subcultures of NaCl-sensitive calli in medium supplemented with 50 mM NaCl. NaCl-tolerant calli grew better than NaCl-sensitive calli in media supplemented with 50 and 100 mM NaCl. Analysis of callus ion content showed a strong increase in Na+ and Cl- both in NaCl-tolerant and -sensitive calli grown in media containing NaCl for one subculture. Cells from NaCl-tolerant calli showed a higher H+ extrusion activity than those from NaCl-sensitive calli grown for one subculture in the presence of NaCl. The inhibition of H+ extrusion by NaCl-sensitive cells was correlated with an inhibition of microsomal vanadate-sensitive H+-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.35) and ATP-dependent H+ transport, while the stimulation of H+ extrusion by cells tolerant to 50 mM NaCl was correlated with an increase in plasma membrane ATP-dependent H+ transport. The increase of ATP-dependent H+ extrusion in plasma membranes isolated from 50 mM NaCl-tolerant calli was not a result of stimulation of a vanadate-sensitive ATP hydrolytic activity or an increase in passive permeability to H+. Relative to NaCl-sensitive calli, plasma membrane H+-ATPase from calli tolerant to 50 mM NaCl showed a lower Km for Mg2+-ATP. Our results indicate that tolerance of tomato calli to 50 mM NaCl increases the affinity of plasma membrane H+-ATPase for the substrate ATP and stimulates the H+-pumping activity of this enzyme without modifying its phosphohydrolytic activity.

  4. Energy cost of NaCl transport in isolated gills of cutthroat trout.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J D; Iwama, G K

    1999-09-01

    Few studies have made direct estimates of the energy required for ion transport in gills of freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW) fish. Oxygen consumption was measured in excised gill tissue of FW-adapted cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) to estimate the energy cost of NaCl transport in that osmoregulatory organ. Ouabain (0.5 mM) and bafilomycin A1 (1 microM) were used to inhibit the Na+-K+ and H+ pumps, respectively. Both inhibitors significantly decreased gill tissue oxygen consumption, accounting for 37% of total tissue respiration. On a whole mass basis, the cost of NaCl uptake in the FW trout gill was estimated to be 1.8% of whole animal oxygen uptake. An isolated, saline-perfused gill arch preparation was also used to compare gill energetics in FW- and SW-adapted trout. The oxygen consumption of FW gills was significantly (33%) higher than SW gills. On a whole animal basis, total gill oxygen consumption in FW and SW trout accounted for 3.9 and 2.4% of resting metabolic rate, respectively. The results of both experiments suggest that the energy cost of NaCl transport in FW and SW trout gills represents a relatively small (<4%) portion of the animal's total energy budget.

  5. Bulk liquid pertraction of NaCl from aqueous solution using carrier-mediated transport.

    PubMed

    Naim, M M; El-Shafei, A A; Moneer, A A; Elewa, M M; Kandeel, W G

    2015-10-06

    In the present work, removal of NaCl using the bulk liquid membrane (BLM) technique has been investigated, using a simple apparatus for conducting the experiments. Variables investigated were volume ratio of donor phase (DP) to receptor phase (RP), presence of sequestering agent (SA) in RP, type of organic liquid membrane (LM), quantity of mobile carrier (MC) in the LM. Stirring speed and volume of LM were kept constant at 100 rpm and 130 ml, respectively. The mass transfer of NaCl was analysed based on kinetic laws of two consecutive irreversible first-order reactions, and kinetic parameters (k1d, k2m, k2r, [Formula: see text], tmax, [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]) for the transport of NaCl were investigated. The values obtained demonstrate that the process is diffusionally controlled. Results indicate that the membrane entrance and exit rate constants (k1, k2) increase with decreasing DP:RP ratio and with decrease in quantity of MC, and quantity of SA, and the presence of dichloroethane (DCE) is preferred to chloroform (CF) as LM.

  6. "JCE" Classroom Activity Connections: NaCl or CaCl[subscript 2], Smart Polymer Gel Tells More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yueh-Huey; Lin, Jia-Ying; Wang, Yu-Chen; Yaung, Jing-Fun

    2010-01-01

    This classroom activity connection demonstrates the differences between the effects of NaCl (a salt of monovalent metal ions) and CaCl[subscript 2] (a salt of polyvalent metal ions) on swollen superabsorbent polymer gels. Being ionic compounds, NaCl and CaCl[subscript 2] both collapse the swollen polymer gels. The gel contracted by NaCl reswells…

  7. Reverse osmosis transport of alkali halides and nickel salts through cellulose triacetate membranes. Performance prediction from NaCl experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmal, J.D.; Pandya, V.P.; Desai, N.V.; Rangarajan, R. )

    1992-10-01

    The separation of alkali metal halides, nickel chloride, and nickel sulfate was determined for cellulose triacetate reverse osmosis (CTA RO) membranes. From transport analysis, the relative free energy parameters for transport of these salts through CTA membranes were determined. From these relative free energy parameters of salts, the solute separation by CTA membranes could be predicted from RO experiment with NaCl solution. The transport analysis and an illustration of how the concept is useful are presented in this paper.

  8. Interleukin 18 function requires both interleukin 18 receptor and Na-Cl co-transporter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Sun, Chongxiu; Gerdes, Norbert; Liu, Conglin; Liao, Mengyang; Liu, Jian; Shi, Michael A.; He, Aina; Zhou, Yi; Sukhova, Galina K.; Chen, Huimei; Cheng, Xianwu; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Murohara, Toyoaki; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Xiang; Jiang, Mengmeng; Shull, Gary E.; Rogers, Shaunessy; Yang, Chao-Ling; Ke, Qiang; Jelen, Sabina; Bindels, René; Ellison, David H.; Jarolim, Petr; Libby, Peter; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL18) participates in atherogenesis through several putative mechanisms1,2. Interruption of IL18 action reduces atherosclerosis in mice3,4. This study shows that the absence of IL18 receptor (IL18r) does not affect atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe−/−) mice, nor does it affect IL18 cell surface binding or signaling. IL18 antibody-mediated immunoprecipitation identified an interaction between IL18 and Na-Cl co-transporter (NCC), a 12-transmembrane-domain ion transporter protein preferentially expressed in the kidney5. Yet, we find NCC expression and colocalization with IL18r in atherosclerotic lesions and both molecules form a complex. IL18 also binds to the cell surface and induces cell signaling and down-stream cytokine expression in NCC-transfected COS-7 cells that do not express IL18r. In Apoe−/− mice, combined deficiency of IL18r and NCC, but not single deficiency, protects mice from atherosclerosis. Peritoneal macrophages from Apoe−/− mice or those lacking IL18r or NCC respond to IL18 binding or IL18 induction of cell signaling and cytokine and chemokine production, but those with combined deficiency of IL18r and NCC do not. This study identifies NCC as an IL18-binding protein that coordinates with IL18r in cell signaling, inflammatory molecule expression, and experimental atherogenesis. PMID:26099046

  9. Ca(2+)-dependent heat production by rat skeletal muscle in hypertonic media depends on Na(+)-Cl- co-transport stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Chinet, A

    1993-01-01

    1. The rate of energy dissipation (E) in isolated, superfused soleus muscles from young rats was continuously measured under normosmotic and 100-mosM hyperosmotic conditions. The substantial increase of E with respect to basal level in hyperosmolarity (excess E), which is entirely dependent on the presence of extracellular sodium, was largely prevented or inhibited by bumetanide, a potent inhibitor of Na(+)-Cl- co-transport system, or by the removal of chloride from the superfusate (isethionate substitution). Bumetanide or the removal of chloride also acutely decreased basal E, by about 7%. 2. Bumetanide almost entirely suppressed the major, Ca(2+)-dependent part of excess E in hyperosmolarity, as well as the concomitant increase of 45Ca2+ efflux and small increase in resting muscle tension; in contrast, the part of excess E associated with stimulation of Na(+)-H+ exchange in hyperosmolarity was left unmodified. 3. Reduction of 22Na+ influx by bumetanide was more marked in hyperosmolarity than under control conditions, although stimulation of total 22Na+ influx by a 100-mosM stress was not statistically significant. Inhibition of Ca2+ release into the sarcoplasm using dantrolene sodium did not prevent the stimulation of bumetanide-sensitive 22Na+ influx, but rather increased it about fourfold. 4. It is concluded that the largest part of excess E in hyperosmolarity, which is Ca(2+)-dependent energy expenditure, is suppressed when steady-state stimulation of a Na(+)-Cl- co-transport system is inhibited either directly by bumetanide or the removal of extracellular chloride, or indirectly by the blocking of active Na(+)-K+ transport. How the stimulation of Na(+)-Cl- co-transport, by as little as 1 nmol s-1 (g wet muscle weight)-1 during a 100-mosM stress, enhances Ca(2+)-dependent heat by as much as 2.5 mW (g wet muscle weight)-1 remains to be clarified. PMID:8394429

  10. Measurement and Modeling of Mean Activity Coefficients of NaCl in an Aqueous Mixed Electrolyte Solution Containing Glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, Paniz; Dehghani, M. R.; Safahieh, Tina

    2016-08-01

    An electrochemical cell with two ion-selective electrodes (Na+ glass) and (Cl- solid state) was used to measure the mean ionic activity coefficient of NaCl in an aqueous mixture containing NaCl, glycine, and NaNO3 at 308.15 K. The experiments were conducted at fixed molality of NaNO3 (0.1 m) and various molalities of glycine (0-1 m) and NaCl (up to 0.8 m). The experimental data were modeled using a modified version of the Pitzer equation. Finally the activity coefficient ratio of glycine was determined based on the Maxwell equation.

  11. Activation energy of the low-load NaCl transition from nanoindentation loading curves.

    PubMed

    Kaupp, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Access to activation energies E(a) of phase transitions is opened by unprecedented analyses of temperature dependent nanoindentation loading curves. It is based on kinks in linearized loading curves, with additional support by coincidence of kink and electrical conductivity of silicon loading curves. Physical properties of B1, B2, NaCl and further phases are discussed. The normalized low-load transition energy of NaCl (Wtrans/µN) increases with temperature and slightly decreases with load. Its semi-logarithmic plot versus T obtains activation energy E(a)/µN for calculation of the transition work for all interesting temperatures and pressures. Arrhenius-type activation energy (kJ/mol) is unavailable for indentation phase transitions. The E(a) per load normalization proves insensitive to creep-on-load, which excludes normalization to depth or volume for large temperature ranges. Such phase transition E(a)/µN is unprecedented material's property and will be of practical importance for the compatibility of composite materials under impact and further shearing interactions at elevated temperatures.

  12. Mean ionic activity coefficients in aqueous NaCl solutions from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-01-28

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous NaCl solutions of varying concentrations at 298.15 K and 1 bar have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations by gradually turning on the interactions of an ion pair inserted into the solution. Several common non-polarizable water and ion models have been used in the simulations. Gibbs-Duhem equation calculations of the thermodynamic activity of water are used to confirm the thermodynamic consistency of the mean ionic activity coefficients. While the majority of model combinations predict the correct trends in mean ionic activity coefficients, they overestimate their values at high salt concentrations. The solubility predictions also suffer from inaccuracies, with all models underpredicting the experimental values, some by large factors. These results point to the need for further ion and water model development.

  13. Identification of a chloride ion binding site in Na+/Cl -dependent transporters.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lucy R; Tavoulari, Sotiria; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rudnick, Gary; Honig, Barry

    2007-07-31

    The recent determination of the crystal structure of the leucine transporter from Aquifex aeolicus (aaLeuT) has provided significant insights into the function of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. Transport by aaLeuT is Cl(-) independent, whereas many neurotransmitter:sodium symporters from higher organisms depend on Cl(-) ions. However, the only Cl(-) ion identified in the aaLeuT structure interacts with nonconserved residues in extracellular loops, and thus the relevance of this binding site is unclear. Here, we use calculations of pK(A)s and homology modeling to predict the location of a functionally important Cl(-) binding site in serotonin transporter and other Cl(-)-dependent transporters. We validate our model through the site-directed mutagenesis of residues predicted to coordinate the Cl(-) ion and through the observation of sequence conservation patterns in other Cl(-)-dependent transporters. The proposed site is located midway across the membrane and is formed by residues from transmembrane helices 2, 6, and 7. It is close to the Na1 sodium binding site, thus providing an explanation for the coupling of Cl(-) and Na(+) ions during transport. Other implications of the model are also discussed.

  14. Estradiol selectively reduces central neural activation induced by hypertonic NaCl infusion in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexis B; Bass, Eryn E; Fan, Liming; Curtis, Kathleen S

    2012-09-10

    We recently reported that the latency to begin drinking water during slow, intravenous infusion of a concentrated NaCl solution was shorter in estradiol-treated ovariectomized rats compared to oil vehicle-treated rats, despite comparably elevated plasma osmolality. To test the hypothesis that the decreased latency to begin drinking is attributable to enhanced detection of increased plasma osmolality by osmoreceptors located in the CNS, the present study used immunocytochemical methods to label fos, a marker of neural activation. Increased plasma osmolality did not activate the subfornical organ (SFO), organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), or the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in either oil vehicle-treated rats or estradiol-treated rats. In contrast, hyperosmolality increased fos labeling in the area postrema (AP), the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in both groups; however, the increase was blunted in estradiol-treated rats. These results suggest that estradiol has selective effects on the sensitivity of a population of osmo-/Na(+)-receptors located in the AP, which, in turn, alters activity in other central areas associated with responses to increased osmolality. In conjunction with previous reports that hyperosmolality increases blood pressure and that elevated blood pressure inhibits drinking, the current findings of reduced activation in AP, PVN, and RVLM-areas involved in sympathetic nerve activity-raise the possibility that estradiol blunts HS-induced blood pressure changes. Thus, estradiol may eliminate or reduce the initial inhibition of water intake that occurs during increased osmolality, and facilitate a more rapid behavioral response, as we observed in our recent study.

  15. Scanning ion-selective electrode technique and X-ray microanalysis provide direct evidence of contrasting Na+ transport ability from root to shoot in salt-sensitive cucumber and salt-tolerant pumpkin under NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bo; Huang, Yuan; Sun, Jingyu; Xie, Junjun; Niu, Mengliang; Liu, Zhixiong; Fan, Molin; Bie, Zhilong

    2014-12-01

    Grafting onto salt-tolerant pumpkin rootstock can increase cucumber salt tolerance. Previous studies have suggested that this can be attributed to pumpkin roots with higher capacity to limit the transport of Na(+) to the shoot than cucumber roots. However, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the transport of Na(+) in salt-tolerant pumpkin and salt-sensitive cucumber plants under high (200 mM) or moderate (90 mM) NaCl stress. Scanning ion-selective electrode technique showed that pumpkin roots exhibited a higher capacity to extrude Na(+), and a correspondingly increased H(+) influx under 200 or 90 mM NaCl stress. The 200 mM NaCl induced Na(+)/H(+) exchange in the root was inhibited by amiloride (a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter inhibitor) or vanadate [a plasma membrane (PM) H(+) -ATPase inhibitor], indicating that Na(+) exclusion in salt stressed pumpkin and cucumber roots was the result of an active Na(+)/H(+) antiporter across the PM, and the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter system in salt stressed pumpkin roots was sufficient to exclude Na(+) X-ray microanalysis showed higher Na(+) in the cortex, but lower Na(+) in the stele of pumpkin roots than that in cucumber roots under 90 mM NaCl stress, suggesting that the highly vacuolated root cortical cells of pumpkin roots could sequester more Na(+), limit the radial transport of Na(+) to the stele and thus restrict the transport of Na(+) to the shoot. These results provide direct evidence for pumpkin roots with higher capacity to limit the transport of Na(+) to the shoot than cucumber roots.

  16. Effect of NaCl Salts on the Activation Energy of Excited-State Proton Transfer Reaction of Coumarin 183.

    PubMed

    Joung, Joonyoung F; Kim, Sangin; Park, Sungnam

    2015-12-17

    Coumarin 183 (C183) was used as a photoacid to study excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Here, we studied the effect of ions on the ESPT of C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions using a steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) method. The acid dissociation equilibrium of excited-state C183 and the activation energy for the ESPT of C183 were determined as a function of NaCl concentration. The change in the equilibrium constant was found to be correlated with the solvation energy of deprotonated C183. Frequency-resolved TCSPC signals measured at several temperatures were analyzed by using a global fitting analysis method which enabled us to extract all the rate constants involving the ESPT reaction and the spectra of individual species. The activation energy for the ESPT reaction of C183 was highly dependent on NaCl concentration. Quantum chemical calculations were used to calculate the local hydrogen-bond (H-bond) configurations around C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions. It was found that the activation energy for the ESPT was determined by the local H-bond configurations around C183 which were significantly influenced by the dissolved ions.

  17. Investigation of influence of NaOH and NaCl activating solutions on bentonite stabilization in suspension fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Krystyna; Hoffmann, Józef; Mikła, Daniel; Huculak-Mä Czka, Marta; Skut, Jakub

    2010-05-01

    1. INTRODUCTION Regular plants growth and their metabolic activity are determined by the macro- (C, H, O, N, P, S, K, Ca, Mg) and micronutrients (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, B, Mo, Cl, Ni). The role of these elements is very important, the excess as well as the deficiency have the negative influence on their development [1]. In order to increase yields and quality of crops a mineral, organic and mineral-organic fertilizers are applied. In the last years suspension fertilizers have been of great significance, taking the agricultural benefits into consideration. Suspension fertilizers are products of a new generation on account of higher nutrients concentrations than in the majority of other fertilizers, what makes them more efficient. Suspension fertilizers differ from solid fertilizers in more regular distribution on field. Nutrients are more concentrated what is economically relevant on account of the facilitated transportation. Examinations indicated, that nutrients from suspension fertilizers are more available than from solid fertilizers. The high concentration of nutrients in fertilizer is obtained by introducing a substance which holds them regularly in the suspension. Bentonites are the substances used for stabilization of suspension fertilizers most often [2,3]. Bentonites belong to ore of clay minerals, primarily made from minerals of smectite group, montmorillonite especially [4]. Bentonite loams were formulated as a result of Aluminium Silicate-bearing Rocks weathering and subsequent sedimentation in the aqueous environment. Characteristic features of rocks of the smectite group are their ability to absorb water (swelling), to form thixotrophic suspensions which aren't undergoing sedimentation process for a long time; as well as susceptibility to absorb cations and organic substances [4,5]. Therefore investigations have been carried out in order to evaluate the possibility of application of diverse loamy raw materials as suspension stabilizers for fertilizer

  18. CD8+ T cells stimulate Na-Cl co-transporter NCC in distal convoluted tubules leading to salt-sensitive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunmeng; Rafferty, Tonya M.; Rhee, Sung W.; Webber, Jessica S.; Song, Li; Ko, Benjamin; Hoover, Robert S.; He, Beixiang; Mu, Shengyu

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a role for T lymphocytes in hypertension. However, whether T cells contribute to renal sodium retention and salt-sensitive hypertension is unknown. Here we demonstrate that T cells infiltrate into the kidney of salt-sensitive hypertensive animals. In particular, CD8+ T cells directly contact the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) in the kidneys of DOCA-salt mice and CD8+ T cell-injected mice, leading to up-regulation of the Na-Cl co-transporter NCC, p-NCC and the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. Co-culture with CD8+ T cells upregulates NCC in mouse DCT cells via ROS-induced activation of Src kinase, up-regulation of the K+ channel Kir4.1, and stimulation of the Cl− channel ClC-K. The last event increases chloride efflux, leading to compensatory chloride influx via NCC activation at the cost of increasing sodium retention. Collectively, these findings provide a mechanism for adaptive immunity involvement in the kidney defect in sodium handling and the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:28067240

  19. Changes in growth, carbon and nitrogen enzyme activity and mRNA accumulation in the halophilic microalga Dunaliella viridis in response to NaCl stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongmei; Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Nianjun; Sun, Xue

    2016-12-01

    Many species of microalga Dunaliella exhibit a remarkable tolerance to salinity and are therefore ideal for probing the effects of salinity. In this work, we assessed the effects of NaCl stress on the growth, activity and mRNA level of carbon and nitrogen metabolism enzymes of D. viridis. The alga could grow over a salinity range of 0.44 mol L-1 to 3.00 mol L-1 NaCl, but the most rapid growth was observed at 1.00 mol L-1 NaCl, followed by 2.00 mol L-1 NaCl. Paralleling these growth patterns, the highest initial and total Rubisco activities were detected in the presence of 1.00 mol L-1 NaCl, decreasing to 37.33% and 26.39% of those values, respectively, in the presence of 3.00 mol L-1 NaCl, respectively. However, the highest extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity was measured in the presence of 2.00 mol L-1 NaCl, followed by 1.00 mol L-1 NaCl. Different from the two carbon enzymes, nitrate reductase (NR) activity showed a slight change under different NaCl concentrations. At the transcriptional level, the mRNAs of Rubisco large subunit ( rbcL), and small subunit ( rbcS), attained their highest abundances in the presence of 1.00 and 2.00 mol L-1 NaCl, respectively. The CA mRNA accumulation was induced from 0.44 mol L-1 to 3.00 mol L-1 NaCl, but the NR mRNA showed the decreasing tendency with the increasing salinity. In conclusion, the growth and carbon fixation enzyme of Rubisco displayed similar tendency in response to NaCl stress, CA was proved be salt-inducible within a certain salinity range and NR showed the least effect by NaCl in D. viridis.

  20. Transport to Rhebpress activity.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Amanda; Brandt, Marta; Djouder, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPases from the rat sarcoma (Ras) superfamily are a heterogeneous group of proteins of about 21 kDa that act as molecular switches, modulating cell signaling pathways and controlling diverse cellular processes. They are active when bound to guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and inactive when bound to guanosine diphosphate (GDP). Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) is a member of the Ras GTPase superfamily and a key activator of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). We recently determined that microspherule protein 1 (MCRS1) maintains Rheb at lysosomal surfaces in an amino acid-dependent manner. MCRS1 depletion promotes the formation of the GDP-bound form of Rheb, which is then delocalized from the lysosomal platform and transported to endocytic recycling vesicles, leading to mTORC1 inactivation. During this delocalization process, Rheb-GDP remains farnesylated and associated with cellular endomembranes. These findings provide new insights into the regulation of small GTPases, whose activity depends on both their GTP/GDP switch state and their capacity to move between different cellular membrane-bound compartments. Dynamic spatial transport between compartments makes it possible to alter the proximity of small GTPases to their activatory sites depending on the prevailing physiological and cellular conditions.

  1. Effect of NaCl stress on health-promoting compounds and antioxidant activity in the sprouts of three broccoli cultivars.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liping; Yang, Runqiang; Wang, Zhiying; Guo, Qianghui; Gu, Zhenxin

    2014-06-01

    Health-promoting compounds, antioxidant and myrosinase activity in the sprouts of three broccoli cultivars under 40 mM, 80 mM and 160 mM NaCl were investigated. LangYan (LY) sprouts had the richest health-promoting compounds among the evaluated cultivars. Treatment of 40 mM and 80 mM NaCl significantly decreased the content of ascorbic acid and total phenolic as well as antioxidant activity, but did not affect glucoraphanin, sulforaphane and myrosinase activity compared to the control. However, 160 mM NaCl treatment significantly enhanced the level of total phenolic, glucoraphanin, sulforaphane, antioxidant and myrosinase activity, while significantly decreased ascorbic acid content. The results suggest that 160 mM NaCl treatment would enhance antioxidant activity and sulforaphane yield in broccoli sprouts. The health-promoting value of broccoli sprouts depends on plant genotype and could be affected by NaCl stress.

  2. Modeling and dynamics of the inward-facing state of a Na+/Cl- dependent neurotransmitter transporter homologue.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Saher Afshan; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-08-26

    The leucine transporter (LeuT) has recently commanded exceptional attention due mainly to two distinctions; it provides the only crystal structures available for a protein homologous to the pharmacologically relevant neurotransmitter: sodium symporters (NSS), and, it exhibits a hallmark 5-TM inverted repeat ("LeuT-fold"), a fold recently discovered to also exist in several secondary transporter families, underscoring its general role in transporter function. Constructing the transport cycle of "LeuT-fold" transporters requires detailed structural and dynamic descriptions of the outward-facing (OF) and inward-facing (IF) states, as well as the intermediate states. To this end, we have modeled the structurally unknown IF state of LeuT, based on the known crystal structures of the OF state of LeuT and the IF state of vSGLT, a "LeuT-fold" transporter. The detailed methodology developed for the study combines structure-based alignment, threading, targeted MD and equilibrium MD, and can be applied to other proteins. The resulting IF-state models maintain the secondary structural features of LeuT. Water penetration and solvent accessibility calculations show that TM1, TM3, TM6 and TM8 line the substrate binding/unbinding pathway with TM10 and its pseudosymmetric partner, TM5, participating in the extracellular and intracellular halves of the lumen, respectively. We report conformational hotspots where notable changes in interactions occur between the IF and OF states. We observe Na2 exiting the LeuT-substrate- complex in the IF state, mainly due to TM1 bending. Inducing a transition in only one of the two pseudosymmetric domains, while allowing the second to respond dynamically, is found to be sufficient to induce the formation of the IF state. We also propose that TM2 and TM7 may be facilitators of TM1 and TM6 motion. Thus, this study not only presents a novel modeling methodology applied to obtain the IF state of LeuT, but also describes structural elements involved in

  3. Early free access to hypertonic NaCl solution induces a long-term effect on drinking, brain cell activity and gene expression of adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Macchione, A F; Beas, C; Dadam, F M; Caeiro, X E; Godino, A; Ponce, L F; Amigone, J L; Vivas, L

    2015-07-09

    Exposure to an altered osmotic environment during a pre/postnatal period can differentially program the fluid intake and excretion pattern profile in a way that persists until adulthood. However, knowledge about the programming effects on the underlying brain neurochemical circuits of thirst and hydroelectrolyte balance, and its relation with behavioral outputs, is limited. We evaluated whether early voluntary intake of hypertonic NaCl solution may program adult offspring fluid balance, plasma vasopressin, neural activity, and brain vasopressin and angiotensinergic receptor type 1a (AT1a)-receptor gene expression. The manipulation (M) period covered dams from 1 week before conception until offspring turned 1-month-old. The experimental groups were (i) Free access to hypertonic NaCl solution (0.45 M NaCl), food (0.18% NaCl) and water [M-Na]; and (ii) Free access to food and water only [M-Ctrol]. Male offspring (2-month-old) were subjected to iv infusion (0.15 ml/min) of hypertonic (1.5M NaCl), isotonic (0.15M NaCl) or sham infusion during 20 min. Cumulative water intake (140 min) and drinking latency to the first lick were recorded from the start of the infusion. Our results indicate that, after systemic sodium overload, the M-Na group had increased water intake, and diminished neuronal activity (Fos-immunoreactivity) in the subfornical organ (SFO) and nucleus of the solitary tract. They also showed reduced relative vasopressin (AVP)-mRNA and AT1a-mRNA expression at the supraoptic nucleus and SFO, respectively. The data indicate that the availability of a rich source of sodium during the pre/postnatal period induces a long-term effect on drinking, neural activity, and brain gene expression implicated in the control of hydroelectrolyte balance.

  4. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, “The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations,” J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of “solvated ionic radius” assumed by earlier studies.

  5. Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

  6. Activated transport in AMTEC electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1992-01-01

    Transport of alkali, metal atoms through porous cathodes of alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cells is responsible for significant reducible losses in the electrical performance of these cells. Experimental evidence for activated transport of metal atoms at grain surfaces and boundaries within some AMTEC electrodes has been derived from temperature dependent studies as well as from analysis of the detailed frequency dependence of ac impedance results for other electrodes, including thin, mature molybdenum electrodes which exhibit transport dominated by free molecular flow of sodium gas at low frequencies or dc conditions. Activated surface transport will almost always exist in parallel with free molecular flow transport, and the process of alkali atom adsorption/desorption from the electrode surface will invariably be part of the transport process, and possibly a dominant part in some cases. The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of the alkali metal through the electrode in several cases provides an activation energy and preexponential, but at least two activated processes may be operative, and the activation parameters should be expected to depend on the alkali metal activity gradient that the electrode experiences. In the case of Pt/W/Mn electrodes operated for 2500 hours, limiting currents varied with electrode thickness, and the activation parameters could be assigned primarily to the surface/grain boundary diffusion process.

  7. Activation of ion transport systems during cell volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eveloff, J.L.; Warnock, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    This review discusses the activation of transport pathways during volume regulation, including their characteristics, the possible biochemical pathways that may mediate the activation of transport pathways, and the relations between volume regulation and transepithelial transport in renal cells. Many cells regulate their volume when exposed to an anisotonic medium. The changes in cell volume are caused by activation of ion transport pathways, plus the accompanying osmotically driven water movement such that cell volume returns toward normal levels. The swelling of hypertonically shrunken cells is termed regulatory volume increase (RVI) and involves an influx of NaCl into the cell via either activation of Na-Cl, Na-K-2Cl cotransport systems, or Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchangers. The reshrinking of hypotonically swollen cells is termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and involves an efflux of KCl and water from the cell by activation of either separate K/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/ conductances, a K-Cl cotransport system, or parallel K/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchangers. The biochemical mechanisms involved in the activation of transport systems are largely unknown, however, the phosphoinositide pathway may be implicated in RVI; phorbol esters, cGMP, and Ca/sup 2 +/ affect the process of volume regulation. Renal tubular cells, as well as the blood cells that transverse the medulla, are subjected to increasing osmotic gradients from the corticomedullary junction to the papillary tip, as well as changing interstitial and tubule fluid osmolarity, depending on the diuretic state of the animal. Medullary cells from the loop of Henle and the papilla can volume regulate by activating Na-K-2Cl cotransport or Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchange systems.

  8. The effect of lactose, NaCl and an aero/anaerobic environment on the tyrosine decarboxylase activity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Buňková, Leona; Buňka, František; Pollaková, Eva; Podešvová, Tereza; Dráb, Vladimír

    2011-05-27

    The aim of this work was to study, under model conditions, combined effects of the concentration of lactose (0-1% w/v), NaCl (0-2% w/v) and aero/anaerobiosis on the growth and tyramine production in 3 strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and 2 strains of L. lactis subsp. cremoris. The levels of the factors tested were chosen with respect to the conditions which can occur during the real process of natural cheese production, including the culture temperature (10 ± 1°C). In all strains tested, tyrosine decarboxylation was most influenced by NaCl concentration; the highest production of tyramine was obtained within the culture with the highest (2% w/v) salt concentration applied. Two of the strains L. lactis subsp. lactis produced tyramine only in broth with the highest NaCl concentration tested. In the remaining 3 strains of L. lactis, tyramine was detected under all conditions applied. The tested concentration of lactose and aero/anaerobiosis had a less significant effect on tyramine decarboxylation. However, it was also found that at the same concentrations of NaCl and lactose, a higher amount of tyramine was detected under anaerobic conditions. In all strains tested, tyramine decarboxylation started during the active growth phase of the cells.

  9. Assessment of Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Mineral Nutrients in Response to NaCl Stress and its Amelioration Through Glutathione in Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Vinay; Kumar, Dinesh; Agrawal, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Salinity stress has been reckoned as one of the major threat towards crop productivity as it causes significant decline in the yield. The impact of NaCl stress (0, 1, 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg L(-1)) as well as glutathione (10 mg L(-1)) either alone or in combination has been evaluated on the induction of multiple shoots, antioxidant enzymes' activity, lipid peroxidation, relative permeability, concentration of nutrients, photosynthetic pigments, protein and proline content of nodal segments of chickpea after 14 days of culture. The antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR) were found to be increased under salt stress as well as glutathione-supplemented medium. A significant decrease in the concentrations of chlorophylls a, b, total chlorophyll and carotenoid was observed under salt stress. Concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, carbon, magnesium and sulphur showed an initial increase up to 10 mg L(-1) NaCl, but a decline was seen at higher NaCl levels. Proline content and malondialdehyde concentration were found to be increased under salt stress. Three isoforms of SOD, one of CAT and four of GPX were expressed during native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis. However, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the stressed nodal explants revealed the over-expression of several polypeptide bands related to NaCl stress. These findings for the first time suggest that glutathione (GSH) helps in ameliorating NaCl stress in nodal explants of chickpea by manipulating various biochemical and physiological responses of plants.

  10. Activated transport in AMTEC electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.; Underwood, M.L.; O`Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1992-07-01

    Transport of alkali metal atoms through porous cathodes of alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cells is responsible for significant, reducible losses in the electrical performance of these cells. Experimental evidence for activated transport of metal atoms at grain surfaces and boundaries within some AMTEC electrodes has been derived from temperature dependent studies as well as from analysis of the detailed frequency dependence of ac impedance results for other electrodes, including thin, mature molybdenum electrodes which exhibit transport dominated by free molecular flow of sodium gas at low frequencies or dc conditions. Activated surface transport will almost always exist in parallel with free molecular flow transport, and the process of alkali atom adsorption/desorption from the electrode surface will invariably be part of the transport process, and possibly a dominant part in some cases. Little can be learned about the detailed mass transport process from the ac impedance or current voltage curves of an electrode at one set of operating parameters, because the transport process includes a number of important physical parameters that are not all uniquely determined by one experiment. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient of the alkali metal through the electrode in several cases provides an activation energy and pre-exponential, but at least two activated processes may be operative, and the activation parameters should be expected to depend on the alkali metal activity gradient that the electrode experiences. In the case of Pt/W/Mn electrodes operated for 2500 hours, limiting currents varied with electrode thickness, and the activation parameters could be assigned primarily to the surface/grain boundary diffusion process. 17 refs.

  11. Activated transport in AMTEC electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.; Underwood, M.L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1992-01-01

    Transport of alkali metal atoms through porous cathodes of alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cells is responsible for significant, reducible losses in the electrical performance of these cells. Experimental evidence for activated transport of metal atoms at grain surfaces and boundaries within some AMTEC electrodes has been derived from temperature dependent studies as well as from analysis of the detailed frequency dependence of ac impedance results for other electrodes, including thin, mature molybdenum electrodes which exhibit transport dominated by free molecular flow of sodium gas at low frequencies or dc conditions. Activated surface transport will almost always exist in parallel with free molecular flow transport, and the process of alkali atom adsorption/desorption from the electrode surface will invariably be part of the transport process, and possibly a dominant part in some cases. Little can be learned about the detailed mass transport process from the ac impedance or current voltage curves of an electrode at one set of operating parameters, because the transport process includes a number of important physical parameters that are not all uniquely determined by one experiment. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient of the alkali metal through the electrode in several cases provides an activation energy and pre-exponential, but at least two activated processes may be operative, and the activation parameters should be expected to depend on the alkali metal activity gradient that the electrode experiences. In the case of Pt/W/Mn electrodes operated for 2500 hours, limiting currents varied with electrode thickness, and the activation parameters could be assigned primarily to the surface/grain boundary diffusion process. 17 refs.

  12. Urea and NaCl regulate UT-A1 urea transporter in opposing directions via TonEBP pathway during osmotic diuresis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Mi; Kim, Wan-Young; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Jin; Kwon, H Moo; Klein, Janet D; Sands, Jeff M; Kim, Dongun

    2009-01-01

    In our previous studies of varying osmotic diuresis, UT-A1 urea transporter increased when urine and inner medullary (IM) interstitial urea concentration decreased. The purposes of this study were to examine 1) whether IM interstitial tonicity changes with different urine urea concentrations during osmotic dieresis and 2) whether the same result occurs even if the total urinary solute is decreased. Rats were fed a 4% high-salt diet (HSD) or a 5% high-urea diet (HUD) for 2 wk and compared with the control rats fed a regular diet containing 1% NaCl. The urine urea concentration decreased in HSD but increased in HUD. In the IM, UT-A1 and UT-A3 urea transporters, CLC-K1 chloride channel, and tonicity-enhanced binding protein (TonEBP) transcription factor were all increased in HSD and decreased in HUD. Next, rats were fed an 8% low-protein diet (LPD) or a 0.4% low-salt diet (LSD) to decrease the total urinary solute. Urine urea concentration significantly decreased in LPD but significantly increased in LSD. Rats fed the LPD had increased UT-A1 and UT-A3 in the IM base but decreased in the IM tip, resulting in impaired urine concentrating ability. The LSD rats had decreased UT-A1 and UT-A3 in both portions of the IM. CLC-K1 and TonEBP were unchanged by LPD or LSD. We conclude that changes in CLC-K1, UT-A1, UT-A3, and TonEBP play important roles in the renal response to osmotic diuresis in an attempt to minimize changes in plasma osmolality and maintain water homeostasis.

  13. H2O activity in concentrated NaCl solutions at high pressures and temperatures measured by the brucite-periclase equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranovich, L. Y.; Newton, R. C.

    1996-10-01

    H2O activities in concentrated NaCl solutions were measured in the ranges 600° 900° C and 2 15 kbar and at NaCl concentrations up to halite saturation by depression of the brucite (Mg(OH)2) periclase (MgO) dehydration equilibrium. Experiments were made in internally heated Ar pressure apparatus at 2 and 4.2 kbar and in 1.91-cm-diameter piston-cylinder apparatus with NaCl pressure medium at 4.2, 7, 10 and 15 kbar. Fluid compositions in equilibrium with brucite and periclase were reversed to closures of less than 2 mol% by measuring weight changes after drying of punctured Pt capsules. Brucite-periclase equilibrium in the binary system was redetermined using coarsely crystalline synthetic brucite and periclase to inhibit back-reaction in quenching. These data lead to a linear expression for the standard Gibbs free energy of the brucite dehydration reaction in the experimental temperature range: ΔG° (±120J)=73418 134.95 T(K). Using this function as a baseline, the experimental dehydration points in the system MgO-H2O-NaCl lead to a simple systematic relationship of high-temperature H2O activity in NaCl solution. At low pressure and low fluid densities near 2 kbar the H2O activity is closely approximated by its mole fraction. At pressures of 10 kbar and greater, with fluid densities approaching those of condensed H2O, the H2O activity becomes nearly equal to the square of its mole fraction. Isobaric halite saturation points terminating the univariant brucite-periclase curves were determined at each experimental pressure. The five temperature-composition points in the system NaCl-H2O are in close agreement with the halite saturation curves (liquidus curves) given by existing data from differential thermal analysis to 6 kbar. Solubility of MgO in the vapor phase near halite saturation is much less than one mole percent and could not have influenced our determinations. Activity concentration relations in the experimental P-T range may be retrieved for the binary

  14. Experimental Determinations of the Activity-Composition Relations and Phase Equilibria of H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, L.M.; Labotka, T.C.; Blencoe, J.G.; Singh, J.; Horita, J.

    1999-09-12

    An understanding of activity-composition (a/X) relations and phase equilibria for halite-bearing, mixed-species supercritical fluids is critically important in many geological and industrial applications. The authors have performed experiments on the a/X relations and phase equilibria of H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl fluids at 5OO C, 500 bars, to obtain highly accurate and precise data for this ternary system. H{sub 2}O-CO{sub 2}-NaCl samples were reacted at a (H{sub 2}O) = 0.350, 0.425, 0.437, 0.448, 0.560, 0.606, 0.678, 0.798, and 0.841. Results indicate that fluids with these activities lie in the vapor-NaCl two-phase region, and that a fluid with the last value has a composition close to the three-phase (vapor + brine + halite) field. Data from these experiments and NaCl solubility runs also suggest that the vapor comer of the three-phase field lies near X(H{sub 2}O) = 0.760, X(NaCl) = 0.065, which is a significantly more water-rich composition than suggested by the model of [1].

  15. Effects of temperature, pH and NaCl on protease activity in digestive tract of young turbot, Scophthalmus maximus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Muyan; Zhang, Xiumei; Gao, Tianxiang; Chen, Chao

    2006-09-01

    The protease activity in digestive tract of young turbot Scophthalmus maximum was studied, and the optimal pH, temperature and NaCl concentration were determined for different portions of the fish's internal organs. The optimal activity in the fish's stomach was at pH of 2.2, while that in the intestinal extracts was within the alkaline range from 9.5 to 10.0. In hepatopancreas, the optimal pH was in low alkalinity at 8.5. The optimal reaction temperature was above 40°C in stomach, intestine and hepatopancreas. With increasing temperature, the pH value increased in stomach, while in the intestine, an opposite tendency was observed due to combined effect of pH and temperature. NaCl concentration showed inhibitory impact on protein digestion in hepatopancreas. The main protease for protein digestion in turbot seemed to be pepsin. Moreover, the maximum protease activity in different segments of intestine existed in the hindgut.

  16. Active urea transport independent of H+ and Na+ transport in frog skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, I; Dunel-Erb, S; Harvey, B J; Laurent, P; Ehrenfeld, J

    1991-10-01

    We investigated the relationship between H+ secretion (JH), Na+ absorption (JNa), and urea transport (Ju) in skin of frogs (Rana esculenta) adapted to running tap water, NaCl (100 mM), and KCl (100 mM). In addition, cell morphological changes, particularly in the mitochondria-rich cells (MRC), were followed. NaCl adaptation stimulated an active Ju, reduced JNa and JH, and caused a decrease in the apical surface of MRC. After KCl adaptation, JNa and JH were increased and highly correlated, with a twofold increase in Ju, whereas the numerous MRC developed infoldings on their apical membranes. No correlation was found between JH and Ju. Clamping the skins in a range of +/- 50 mV or changing the external pH from 7.4 to 5.4 (at high cellular buffering power) had no effect on Ju. Depolarization of the basolateral membranes (serosal KCl-Ringer) had no effect on Ju. Ju was reversibly blocked by acidification of the cells by oxygen-free solution and sulfhydryl reagents (Hg2+, p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide). Diethylstilbestrol, a proton transport blocker, had no effect on Ju. Apical addition of amiloride and derivatives (phenamil and ethylisopropyl amiloride) reversibly blocked Ju, whereas ouabain had no effect. We conclude that a cation (Na+ or H+)-dependent process is unlikely to exist in R. esculenta skin. A primary active transport in a two-step process is the simplest hypothesis to account for the energy-dependent Ju that develops in NaCl-adapted frogs.

  17. Common folds and transport mechanisms of secondary active transporters.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yigong

    2013-01-01

    Secondary active transporters exploit the electrochemical potential of solutes to shuttle specific substrate molecules across biological membranes, usually against their concentration gradient. Transporters of different functional families with little sequence similarity have repeatedly been found to exhibit similar folds, exemplified by the MFS, LeuT, and NhaA folds. Observations of multiple conformational states of the same transporter, represented by the LeuT superfamily members Mhp1, AdiC, vSGLT, and LeuT, led to proposals that structural changes are associated with substrate binding and transport. Despite recent biochemical and structural advances, our understanding of substrate recognition and energy coupling is rather preliminary. This review focuses on the common folds and shared transport mechanisms of secondary active transporters. Available structural information generally supports the alternating access model for substrate transport, with variations and extensions made by emerging structural, biochemical, and computational evidence.

  18. Political activity for physical activity: health advocacy for active transport

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Effective health advocacy is a priority for efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Local councils are an important audience for this advocacy. The aim of the current study was to describe features of advocacy for active transport via submissions to city council annual plans in New Zealand, and the impact of an information sheet to encourage the health sector to be involved in this process. Written submissions to city council's annual consultation process were requested for 16 city councils over the period of three years (2007/08, 2008/09, and 2009/10). Submissions were reviewed and categories of responses were created. An advocacy information sheet encouraging health sector participation and summarising some of the evidence-base related to physical activity, active transport and health was released just prior to the 2009/10 submission time. Over the period of the study, city councils received 47,392 submissions, 17% of which were related to active transport. Most submissions came from city residents, with a small proportion (2%) from the health sector. The largest category of submissions was in support of pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, design and maintenance of facilities and additional features to support use of these transport modes. Health arguments featured prominently in justifications for active transport initiatives, including concerns about injury risk, obesity, physical inactivity, personal safety and facilities for people with disabilities. There was evidence that the information sheet was utilised by some health sector submitters (12.5%), providing tentative support for initiatives of this nature. In conclusion, the study provides novel information about the current nature of health advocacy for active transport and informs future advocacy efforts about areas for emphasis, such as health benefits of active transport, and potential alliances with other sectors such as environmental sustainability, transport and urban

  19. Energetics of active transport processes.

    PubMed

    Essig, A; Caplan, S R

    1968-12-01

    Discussions of active transport usually assume stoichiometry between the rate of transport J(+) and the metabolic rate J(r). However, the observation of a linear relationship between J(+) and J(r) does not imply a stoichiometric relationship, i.e., complete coupling. Since coupling may possibly be incomplete, we examine systems of an arbitrary degree of coupling q, regarding stoichiometry as a limiting case. We consider a sodium pump, with J(+) and J(r) linear functions of the electrochemical potential difference, -X(+), and the chemical affinity of the metabolic driving reaction, A. The affinity is well defined even for various complex reaction pathways. Incorporation of a series barrier and a parallel leak does not affect the linearity of the composite observable system. The affinity of some region of the metabolic chain may be maintained constant, either by large pools of reactants or by regulation. If so, this affinity can be evaluated by two independent methods. Sodium transport is conveniently characterized by the open-circuit potential (Deltapsi)(I=0) and the natural limits, level flow (J(+))(X+=0), and static head X(0) (+) = (X(+))(J+=0). With high degrees of coupling -X(0) (+)/F approaches the electromotive force E(Na) (Ussing); -X(0) (+)/F cannot be identified with ((RT/F) ln f)(X+=0), where f is the flux ratio. The efficiency eta = -J(+)X(+)/J(r)A is of significance only when appreciable energy is being converted from one form to another. When either J(+) or -X(+) is small eta is low; the significant parameters are then the efficacies epsilon(J+) = J(+)/J(r)A and epsilon(X+) = -X(+)/J(r)A, respectively maximal at level flow and static head. Leak increases both J(+) and epsilon(J+) for isotonic saline reabsorption, but diminishes -X(0) (+) and epsilon(Xfemale symbol). Electrical resistance reflects both passive parameters and metabolism. Various fundamental relations are preserved despite coupling of passive ion and water flows.

  20. Enhanced tolerance to NaCl and LiCl stresses by over-expressing Caragana korshinskii sodium/proton exchanger 1 (CkNHX1) and the hydrophilic C terminus is required for the activity of CkNHX1 in Atsos3-1 mutant and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Da-Hai; Song, Li-Ying; Hu, Jun; Yin, Wei-Bo; Li, Zhi-Guo; Chen, Yu-Hong; Su, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Hu, Zan-Min

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CkNHX1 was isolated from Caragana korshinskii. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CkNHX1 was expressed mainly in roots, and significantly induced by NaCl in stems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of CkNHX1 enhanced the resistance to NaCl and LiCl in yeast and Atsos3-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of CkNHX1-{Delta}C had little effect on NaCl/LiCl tolerance in Atsos3-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-terminal region of CkNHX1 is required for its Na{sup +} and Li{sup +} transporting activity. -- Abstract: Sodium/proton exchangers (NHX antiporters) play important roles in plant responses to salt stress. Previous research showed that hydrophilic C-terminal region of Arabidopsis AtNHX1 negatively regulates the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} transporting activity. In this study, CkNHX1 were isolated from Caragana korshinskii, a pea shrub with high tolerance to salt, drought, and cold stresses. Transcripts of CkNHX1 were detected predominantly in roots, and were significantly induced by NaCl stress in stems. Transgenic yeast and Arabidopsisthalianasos3-1 (Atsos3-1) mutant over-expressing CkNHX1 and its hydrophilic C terminus-truncated derivative, CkNHX1-{Delta}C, were generated and subjected to NaCl and LiCl stresses. Expression of CkNHX1 significantly enhanced the resistance to NaCl and LiCl stresses in yeast and Atsos3-1 mutant. Whereas, compared with expression of CkNHX1, the expression of CkNHX1-{Delta}C had much less effect on NaCl tolerance in Atsos3-1 and LiCl tolerance in yeast and Atsos3-1. All together, these results suggest that the predominant expression of CkNHX1 in roots might contribute to keep C. korshinskii adapting to the high salt condition in this plant's living environment; CkNHX1 could recover the phenotype of Atsos3-1 mutant; and the hydrophilic C-terminal region of CkNHX1 should be required for Na{sup +}/H{sup +} and Li{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanging activity of CkNHX1.

  1. Changes in phytochemicals, anti-nutrients and antioxidant activity in leafy vegetables by microwave boiling with normal and 5% NaCl solution.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shrawan; Swain, S; Singh, D R; Salim, K M; Nayak, Dipak; Roy, S Dam

    2015-06-01

    The present study investigated the changes in phytochemicals and antioxidant activities in 25 leafy vegetables with two common boiling practices viz., with 5% NaCl solution (BSW) and normal water (BNW) in a domestic microwave oven. Fresh samples (100g) were rich in polyphenols (58.8-296.9mg), tannin (402.0-519.4mg), flavonoids (148.9-614.4mg), carotenoids (69.0-786.3mg), anthocyanin (11.7-493.7mg) and ascorbic acid (245.0-314.2mg). Microwave boiling significantly (p<0.05) decreased/increased phytochemicals but none of the compounds followed same trend in all vegetables. Boiling process reduced anti-nutrients from fresh samples (FS) as observed for nitrate (4.5-73.6% by BSW and 22.5-98.8% by BNW); phytate (6.2-69.7% by BSW and 10.6-57.3% by BNW) and oxalate (14.7-88.9% by BSW and 14.5-87.3% by BNW) but saponin increased in 18 vegetables by BNW while 8 vegetables by BSW. The study revealed differential pattern of change in phytochemical matrix and anti-nutrients in vegetables by microwave boiling which will help in devising efficient cooking practices and contribute in health and nutritional security.

  2. Enhanced tolerance to NaCl and LiCl stresses by over-expressing Caragana korshinskii sodium/proton exchanger 1 (CkNHX1) and the hydrophilic C terminus is required for the activity of CkNHX1 in Atsos3-1 mutant and yeast.

    PubMed

    Yang, Da-Hai; Song, Li-Ying; Hu, Jun; Yin, Wei-Bo; Li, Zhi-Guo; Chen, Yu-Hong; Su, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2012-01-13

    Sodium/proton exchangers (NHX antiporters) play important roles in plant responses to salt stress. Previous research showed that hydrophilic C-terminal region of Arabidopsis AtNHX1 negatively regulates the Na(+)/H(+) transporting activity. In this study, CkNHX1 were isolated from Caragana korshinskii, a pea shrub with high tolerance to salt, drought, and cold stresses. Transcripts of CkNHX1 were detected predominantly in roots, and were significantly induced by NaCl stress in stems. Transgenic yeast and Arabidopsisthalianasos3-1 (Atsos3-1) mutant over-expressing CkNHX1 and its hydrophilic C terminus-truncated derivative, CkNHX1-ΔC, were generated and subjected to NaCl and LiCl stresses. Expression of CkNHX1 significantly enhanced the resistance to NaCl and LiCl stresses in yeast and Atsos3-1 mutant. Whereas, compared with expression of CkNHX1, the expression of CkNHX1-ΔC had much less effect on NaCl tolerance in Atsos3-1 and LiCl tolerance in yeast and Atsos3-1. All together, these results suggest that the predominant expression of CkNHX1 in roots might contribute to keep C. korshinskii adapting to the high salt condition in this plant's living environment; CkNHX1 could recover the phenotype of Atsos3-1 mutant; and the hydrophilic C-terminal region of CkNHX1 should be required for Na(+)/H(+) and Li(+)/H(+) exchanging activity of CkNHX1.

  3. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  4. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  5. Impact of humic acid fouling on membrane performance and transport of pharmaceutically active compounds in forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Nghiem, Long D; Price, William E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-09-01

    The impact of humic acid fouling on the membrane transport of two pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) - namely carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole - in forward osmosis (FO) was investigated. Deposition of humic acid onto the membrane surface was promoted by the complexation with calcium ions in the feed solution and the increase in ionic strength at the membrane surface due to the reverse transport of NaCl draw solute. The increase in the humic acid deposition on the membrane surface led to a substantial decrease in the membrane salt (NaCl) permeability coefficient but did not result in a significant decrease in the membrane pure water permeability coefficient. As the deposition of humic acid increased, the permeation of carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole decreased, which correlated well with the decrease in the membrane salt (NaCl) permeability coefficient. It is hypothesized that the hydrated humic acid fouling layer hindered solute diffusion through the membrane pore and enhanced solute rejection by steric hindrance, but not the permeation of water molecules. The membrane water and salt (NaCl) permeability coefficients were fully restored by physical cleaning of the membrane, suggesting that humic acid did not penetrate into the membrane pores.

  6. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  7. Stochastic steps in secondary active sugar transport.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Joshua L; Ghezzi, Chiara; Bisignano, Paola; Loo, Donald D F; Choe, Seungho; Abramson, Jeff; Rosenberg, John M; Wright, Ernest M; Grabe, Michael

    2016-07-05

    Secondary active transporters, such as those that adopt the leucine-transporter fold, are found in all domains of life, and they have the unique capability of harnessing the energy stored in ion gradients to accumulate small molecules essential for life as well as expel toxic and harmful compounds. How these proteins couple ion binding and transport to the concomitant flow of substrates is a fundamental structural and biophysical question that is beginning to be answered at the atomistic level with the advent of high-resolution structures of transporters in different structural states. Nonetheless, the dynamic character of the transporters, such as ion/substrate binding order and how binding triggers conformational change, is not revealed from static structures, yet it is critical to understanding their function. Here, we report a series of molecular simulations carried out on the sugar transporter vSGLT that lend insight into how substrate and ions are released from the inward-facing state of the transporter. Our simulations reveal that the order of release is stochastic. Functional experiments were designed to test this prediction on the human homolog, hSGLT1, and we also found that cytoplasmic release is not ordered, but we confirmed that substrate and ion binding from the extracellular space is ordered. Our findings unify conflicting published results concerning cytoplasmic release of ions and substrate and hint at the possibility that other transporters in the superfamily may lack coordination between ions and substrate in the inward-facing state.

  8. Stochastic steps in secondary active sugar transport

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, Joshua L.; Ghezzi, Chiara; Bisignano, Paola; Loo, Donald D. F.; Choe, Seungho; Abramson, Jeff; Rosenberg, John M.; Wright, Ernest M.; Grabe, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Secondary active transporters, such as those that adopt the leucine-transporter fold, are found in all domains of life, and they have the unique capability of harnessing the energy stored in ion gradients to accumulate small molecules essential for life as well as expel toxic and harmful compounds. How these proteins couple ion binding and transport to the concomitant flow of substrates is a fundamental structural and biophysical question that is beginning to be answered at the atomistic level with the advent of high-resolution structures of transporters in different structural states. Nonetheless, the dynamic character of the transporters, such as ion/substrate binding order and how binding triggers conformational change, is not revealed from static structures, yet it is critical to understanding their function. Here, we report a series of molecular simulations carried out on the sugar transporter vSGLT that lend insight into how substrate and ions are released from the inward-facing state of the transporter. Our simulations reveal that the order of release is stochastic. Functional experiments were designed to test this prediction on the human homolog, hSGLT1, and we also found that cytoplasmic release is not ordered, but we confirmed that substrate and ion binding from the extracellular space is ordered. Our findings unify conflicting published results concerning cytoplasmic release of ions and substrate and hint at the possibility that other transporters in the superfamily may lack coordination between ions and substrate in the inward-facing state. PMID:27325773

  9. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  10. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Rueda, David; de Nazelle, Audrey; Andersen, Zorana J.; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Bruha, Jan; Bruhova-Foltynova, Hana; Desqueyroux, Hélène; Praznoczy, Corinne; Ragettli, Martina S.; Tainio, Marko; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Policies that stimulate active transportation (walking and bicycling) have been related to heath benefits. This study aims to assess the potential health risks and benefits of promoting active transportation for commuting populations (age groups 16–64) in six European cities. We conducted a health impact assessment using two scenarios: increased cycling and increased walking. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality related to changes in physical activity level, exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution with a diameter <2.5 μm, as well as traffic fatalities in the cities of Barcelona, Basel, Copenhagen, Paris, Prague, and Warsaw. All scenarios produced health benefits in the six cities. An increase in bicycle trips to 35% of all trips (as in Copenhagen) produced the highest benefits among the different scenarios analysed in Warsaw 113 (76–163) annual deaths avoided, Prague 61 (29–104), Barcelona 37 (24–56), Paris 37 (18–64) and Basel 5 (3–9). An increase in walking trips to 50% of all trips (as in Paris) resulted in 19 (3–42) deaths avoided annually in Warsaw, 11(3–21) in Prague, 6 (4–9) in Basel, 3 (2–6) in Copenhagen and 3 (2–4) in Barcelona. The scenarios would also reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year). Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists and urban planners will help to introduce the health perspective in transport policies and promote active transportation. PMID:26930213

  11. Regulators of Slc4 bicarbonate transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Thornell, Ian M.; Bevensee, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    The Slc4 family of transporters is comprised of anion exchangers (AE1-4), Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporters (NCBTs) including electrogenic Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCe1 and NBCe2), electroneutral Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCn1 and NBCn2), and the electroneutral Na-driven Cl-bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE), as well as a borate transporter (BTR1). These transporters regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and contribute to steady-state pHi, but are also involved in other physiological processes including CO2 carriage by red blood cells and solute secretion/reabsorption across epithelia. Acid-base transporters function as either acid extruders or acid loaders, with the Slc4 proteins moving HCO−3 either into or out of cells. According to results from both molecular and functional studies, multiple Slc4 proteins and/or associated splice variants with similar expected effects on pHi are often found in the same tissue or cell. Such apparent redundancy is likely to be physiologically important. In addition to regulating pHi, a HCO−3 transporter contributes to a cell's ability to fine tune the intracellular regulation of the cotransported/exchanged ion(s) (e.g., Na+ or Cl−). In addition, functionally similar transporters or splice variants with different regulatory profiles will optimize pH physiology and solute transport under various conditions or within subcellular domains. Such optimization will depend on activated signaling pathways and transporter expression profiles. In this review, we will summarize and discuss both well-known and more recently identified regulators of the Slc4 proteins. Some of these regulators include traditional second messengers, lipids, binding proteins, autoregulatory domains, and less conventional regulators. The material presented will provide insight into the diversity and physiological significance of multiple members within the Slc4 gene family. PMID:26124722

  12. Sugar-activated ion transport in canine lingual epithelium. Implications for sugar taste transduction

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    There is good evidence indicating that ion-transport pathways in the apical regions of lingual epithelial cells, including taste bud cells, may play a role in salt taste reception. In this article, we present evidence that, in the case of the dog, there also exists a sugar- activated ion-transport pathway that is linked to sugar taste transduction. Evidence was drawn from two parallel lines of experiments: (a) ion-transport studies on the isolated canine lingual epithelium, and (b) recordings from the canine chorda tympani. The results in vitro showed that both mono- and disaccharides in the mucosal bath stimulate a dose-dependent increase in the short-circuit current over the concentration range coincident with mammalian sugar taste responses. Transepithelial current evoked by glucose, fructose, or sucrose in either 30 mM NaCl or in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (K-H) was partially blocked by amiloride. Among current carriers activated by saccharides, the current response was greater with Na than with K. Ion flux measurements in K-H during stimulation with 3-O-methylglucose showed that the sugar-evoked current was due to an increase in the Na influx. Ouabain or amiloride reduced the sugar-evoked Na influx without effect on sugar transport as measured with tritiated 3-O-methylglucose. Amiloride inhibited the canine chorda tympani response to 0.5 M NaCl by 70-80% and the response to 0.5 M KCl by approximately 40%. This agreed with the percent inhibition by amiloride of the short-circuit current supported in vitro by NaCl and KCl. Amiloride also partially inhibited the chorda tympani responses to sucrose and to fructose. The results indicate that in the dog: (a) the ion transporter subserving Na taste also subserves part of the response to K, and (b) a sugar-activated, Na- preferring ion-transport system is one mechanism mediating sugar taste transduction. Results in the literature indicate a similar sweet taste mechanism for humans. PMID:3171536

  13. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  14. Astrocytic GABA transporter activity modulates excitatory neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Boddum, Kim; Jensen, Thomas P.; Magloire, Vincent; Kristiansen, Uffe; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are ideally placed to detect and respond to network activity. They express ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, and can release gliotransmitters. Astrocytes also express transporters that regulate the extracellular concentration of neurotransmitters. Here we report a previously unrecognized role for the astrocytic GABA transporter, GAT-3. GAT-3 activity results in a rise in astrocytic Na+ concentrations and a consequent increase in astrocytic Ca2+ through Na+/Ca2+ exchange. This leads to the release of ATP/adenosine by astrocytes, which then diffusely inhibits neuronal glutamate release via activation of presynaptic adenosine receptors. Through this mechanism, increases in astrocytic GAT-3 activity due to GABA released from interneurons contribute to 'diffuse' heterosynaptic depression. This provides a mechanism for homeostatic regulation of excitatory transmission in the hippocampus. PMID:27886179

  15. Electron scattering in graphene with adsorbed NaCl nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Drabińska, Aneta Kaźmierczak, Piotr; Bożek, Rafał; Karpierz, Ewelina; Wysmołek, Andrzej; Kamińska, Maria; Wołoś, Agnieszka; Krajewska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-07

    In this work, the results of contactless magnetoconductance and Raman spectroscopy measurements performed for a graphene sample after its immersion in NaCl solution were presented. The properties of the immersed sample were compared with those of a non-immersed reference sample. Atomic force microscopy and electron spin resonance experiments confirmed the deposition of NaCl nanoparticles on the graphene surface. A weak localization signal observed using contactless magnetoconductance showed the reduction of the coherence length after NaCl treatment of graphene. Temperature dependence of the coherence length indicated a change from ballistic to diffusive regime in electron transport after NaCl treatment. The main inelastic scattering process was of the electron-electron type but the major reason for the reduction of the coherence length at low temperatures was additional, temperature independent, inelastic scattering. We associate it with spin flip scattering, caused by NaCl nanoparticles present on the graphene surface. Raman spectroscopy showed an increase in the D and D′ bands intensities for graphene after its immersion in NaCl solution. An analysis of the D, D′, and G bands intensities proved that this additional scattering is related to the decoration of vacancies and grain boundaries with NaCl nanoparticles, as well as generation of new on-site defects as a result of the decoration of the graphene surface with NaCl nanoparticles. The observed energy shifts of 2D and G bands indicated that NaCl deposition on the graphene surface did not change carrier concentration, but reduced compressive biaxial strain in the graphene layer.

  16. Bursts of Active Transport in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Kuo, James; Granick, Steve

    2013-11-01

    We show, using a large new data set, that the temporally resolved speed of active cargo transport in living cells follows a scaling law over several decades of time and length. The statistical regularities display a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup, followed by rapid release. The scaling power law agrees quantitatively with those reported in inanimate systems (jammed colloids and granular media, and magnetic Barkhausen noise), suggesting a common origin in pushing through a crowded environment in a weak force regime. The implied regulation of the speed of active cellular transport due to environmental obstruction results in bursts of speed and acceleration. These findings extend the classical notion of molecular crowding.

  17. Bursts of active transport in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Kuo, James; Granick, Steve

    2013-11-15

    We show, using a large new data set, that the temporally resolved speed of active cargo transport in living cells follows a scaling law over several decades of time and length. The statistical regularities display a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup, followed by rapid release. The scaling power law agrees quantitatively with those reported in inanimate systems (jammed colloids and granular media, and magnetic Barkhausen noise), suggesting a common origin in pushing through a crowded environment in a weak force regime. The implied regulation of the speed of active cellular transport due to environmental obstruction results in bursts of speed and acceleration. These findings extend the classical notion of molecular crowding.

  18. The effect of NaCl substitution with KCl on proteinase activities of cell-free extract and cell-free supernatant at different pH levels and salt concentrations: Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Ayyash, M M; Sherkat, F; Shah, N P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of substitution of NaCl with KCl at different pH levels and salt concentrations on proteinase activity of cell-free extract and cell-free supernatant of the probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei. de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe broth aliquots were mixed with 2 pure salts (NaCl and KCl) and 2 salt concentrations at 2 concentration levels (5 and 10%), inoculated with Lactobacillus acidophilus or Lactobacillus casei, and incubated aerobically at 37°C for 22 h. The cultures were then centrifuged at 4,000×g for 30 min, and the collected cell pellets were used to prepare cell-wall proteinases and the supernatants used as a source of supernatant (extracellular) proteinases. The proteolytic activity and protein content of both portions were determined. After incubation of both portions with 3 milk caseins (α-, β-, κ-casein), the supernatants were individually subjected to analysis of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity and proteolytic activity using the o-phthalaldehyde method. Significant differences were observed in ACE-inhibitory and proteolytic activities between salt substitution treatments of cell-free extract and cell-free supernatant from both probiotic strains at the same salt concentration and pH level.

  19. Active learning in transportation engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, Jennifer Anne

    The objectives of this research were (1) to develop experimental active-based-learning curricula for undergraduate courses in transportation engineering and (2) to assess the effectiveness of an active-learning-based traffic engineering curriculum through an educational experiment. The researcher developed a new highway design course as a pilot study to test selected active-learning techniques before employing them in the traffic engineering curriculum. Active-learning techniques, including multiple-choice questions, short problems completed by individual students or small groups, and group discussions, were used as active interludes within lectures. The researcher also collected and analyzed student performance and attitude data from control and experimental classes to evaluate the relative effectiveness of the traditional lecture (control) approach and the active-learning (experimental) approach. The results indicate that the active-learning approach adopted for the experimental class did have a positive impact on student performance as measured by exam scores. The students in the experimental class also indicated slightly more positive attitudes at the end of the course than the control class, although the difference was not significant. The author recommends that active interludes similar to those in the experimental curricula be used in other courses in civil engineering.

  20. Single-molecule detection with active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, David Allan

    A glass capillary is used near the focal region of a custom-built confocal microscope to investigate the use of active transport for single-molecule detection in solution, with both one and two-photon laser excitation. The capillary tip has a diameter of several microns and is carefully aligned nearby to the sub-micron laser beam waist, collinear to the optical axis, so that a negative pressure-difference causes molecules to be drawn into the capillary, along the laser beam axis. The flow of solution, which is characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), can increase the single-molecule detection rate for slowly diffusing proteins by over a factor of 100, while the mean rate of photons during each burst is similar to that for random diffusional transport. Also, the flow is along the longest axis of the ellipsoidally-shaped confocal volume, which results in more collected photons per molecule than that for transverse flow at the same speed. When transport is dominated by flow, FCS can no longer distinguish molecules with differing translational diffusion, and hence a fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method based on differences in fluorescence brightness is investigated as a means for assaying different solution components, for applications in pharmaceutical drug discovery. Multi-channel fluctuation spectroscopy techniques can also be used for assays with the flow system and hence this dissertation also reports the characterization of a prototype 4-channel single-photon detector with a two-wavelength polarization-resolved optical set-up.

  1. Transport in active systems crowded by obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2017-02-01

    The reactive and diffusive dynamics of a single chemically powered Janus motor in a crowded medium of moving but passive obstacles is investigated using molecular simulation. It is found that the reaction rate of the catalytic motor reaction decreases in a crowded medium as the volume fraction of obstacles increases as a result of a reduction in the Smoluchowski diffusion-controlled reaction rate coefficient that contributes to the overall reaction rate. A continuum model is constructed and analyzed to interpret the dependence of the steady-state reaction rate observed in simulations on the volume fraction of obstacles in the system. The steady-state concentration fields of reactant and product are shown to be sensitive to the local structure of obstacles around the Janus motor. It is demonstrated that the active motor exhibits enhanced diffusive motion at long times with a diffusion constant that decreases as the volume fraction of crowding species increases. In addition, the dynamical properties of a passive tracer particle in a system containing many active Janus motors is studied to investigate how an active environment influences the transport of non-active species. The diffusivity of a passive tracer particle in an active medium is found to be enhanced in systems with forward-moving Janus motors due to the cooperative dynamics of these motors.

  2. The relative roles of passive surface forces and active ion transport in the modulation of airway surface liquid volume and composition.

    PubMed

    Tarran, R; Grubb, B R; Gatzy, J T; Davis, C W; Boucher, R C

    2001-08-01

    Two hypotheses have been proposed recently that offer different views on the role of airway surface liquid (ASL) in lung defense. The "compositional" hypothesis predicts that ASL [NaCl] is kept low (<50 mM) by passive forces to permit antimicrobial factors to act as a chemical defense. The "volume" hypothesis predicts that ASL volume (height) is regulated isotonically by active ion transport to maintain efficient mechanical mucus clearance as the primary form of lung defense. To compare these hypotheses, we searched for roles for: (1) passive forces (surface tension, ciliary tip capillarity, Donnan, and nonionic osmolytes) in the regulation of ASL composition; and (2) active ion transport in ASL volume regulation. In primary human tracheobronchial cultures, we found no evidence that a low [NaCl] ASL could be produced by passive forces, or that nonionic osmolytes contributed substantially to ASL osmolality. Instead, we found that active ion transport regulated ASL volume (height), and that feedback existed between the ASL and airway epithelia to govern the rate of ion transport and volume absorption. The mucus layer acted as a "reservoir" to buffer periciliary liquid layer height (7 microm) at a level optimal for mucus transport by donating or accepting liquid to or from the periciliary liquid layer, respectively. These data favor the active ion transport/volume model hypothesis to describe ASL physiology.

  3. A general method for determining secondary active transporter substrate stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Gabriel A; Mulligan, Christopher; Mindell, Joseph A

    2017-01-25

    The number of ions required to drive substrate transport through a secondary active transporter determines the protein's ability to create a substrate gradient, a feature essential to its physiological function, and places fundamental constraints on the transporter's mechanism. Stoichiometry is known for a wide array of mammalian transporters, but, due to a lack of readily available tools, not for most of the prokaryotic transporters for which high-resolution structures are available. Here, we describe a general method for using radiolabeled substrate flux assays to determine coupling stoichiometries of electrogenic secondary active transporters reconstituted in proteoliposomes by measuring transporter equilibrium potentials. We demonstrate the utility of this method by determining the coupling stoichiometry of VcINDY, a bacterial Na(+)-coupled succinate transporter, and further validate it by confirming the coupling stoichiometry of vSGLT, a bacterial sugar transporter. This robust thermodynamic method should be especially useful in probing the mechanisms of transporters with available structures.

  4. Berberine acutely activates the glucose transport activity of GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Cok, Alexandra; Plaisier, Christina; Salie, Matthew J; Oram, Daniel S; Chenge, Jude; Louters, Larry L

    2011-07-01

    Berberine, which has a long history of use in Chinese medicine, has recently been shown to have efficacy in the treatment of diabetes. While the hypoglycemic effect of berberine has been clearly documented in animal and cell line models, such as 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myotube cells, the mechanism of action appears complex with data implicating activation of the insulin signaling pathway as well as activation of the exercise or AMP kinase-mediated pathway. There have been no reports of the acute affects of berberine on the transport activity of the insulin-insensitive glucose transporter, GLUT1. Therefore, we examined the acute effects of berberine on glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells, a cell line that express only GLUT1. Berberine- activated glucose uptake reaching maximum stimulation of five-fold at >40 μM. Significant activation (P < 0.05) was measured within 5 min reaching a maximum by 30 min. The berberine effect was not additive to the maximal stimulation by other known stimulants, azide, methylene blue or glucose deprivation, suggesting shared steps between berberine and these stimulants. Berberine significantly reduced the K(m) of glucose uptake from 6.7 ± 1.9 mM to 0.55 ± 0.08 mM, but had no effect on the V(max) of uptake. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP kinase, did not affect berberine-stimulated glucose uptake, but inhibitors of downstream kinases partially blocked berberine stimulation. SB203580 (inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase) did not affect submaximal berberine activation, but did lower maximal berberine stimulation by 26%, while PD98059 (inhibitor of ERK kinase) completely blocked submaximal berberine activation and decreased the maximal stimulation by 55%. It appears from this study that a portion of the hypoglycemic effects of berberine can be attributed to its acute activation of the transport activity of GLUT1.

  5. Isopiestic Determination of the Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of NaCl + SrCl2 + H2O at 298.15 K, and Representation with an Extended Ion-Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, S L; Rard, J A; Miller, D G

    2004-11-09

    Isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements were made at 298.15 K for aqueous NaCl + SrCl{sub 2} solutions, using NaCl(aq) as the reference standard. The measurements for these ternary solutions were made at NaCl ionic strength fractions of y{sub 1} = 0.17066, 0.47366, and 0.82682 for the water activity range 0.9835 {ge} a{sub w} {ge} 0.8710. Our results, and those from two previous isopiestic studies, were combined and used with previously determined parameters for NaCl(aq) and those for SrCl{sub 2}(aq) determined here to evaluate the mixing parameters{sup S}{Theta}{sub Na,Sr} = (0.0562 {+-} 0.0007) kg {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and {Psi}{sub Na,Sr,Cl} = -(0.00705 {+-} 0.00017) kg{sup 2} {center_dot} mol{sup -2} for an extended form of Pitzer's ion-interaction model. These model parameters are valid for ionic strengths of I {le} 7.0 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}, where higher-order electrostatic effects have been included in the mixture model. If the fitting range is extended to the saturated solution molalities, then {sup S}{Theta}{sub Na,Sr} = (0.07885 {+-} 0.00195) kg {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and {Psi}{sub Na,Sr,Cl} = -(0.01230 {+-} 0.00033) kg{sup 2} {center_dot} mol{sup -2}. The extended ion-interaction model parameters obtained from available isopiestic data for SrCl{sub 2}(aq) at 298.15 K yield recommended values of the water activities and osmotic and activity coefficients.

  6. Integration of a 'proton antenna' facilitates transport activity of the monocarboxylate transporter MCT4.

    PubMed

    Noor, Sina Ibne; Pouyssegur, Jacques; Deitmer, Joachim W; Becker, Holger M

    2017-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate the proton-coupled transport of high-energy metabolites like lactate and pyruvate and are expressed in nearly every mammalian tissue. We have shown previously that transport activity of MCT4 is enhanced by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), which has been suggested to function as a 'proton antenna' for the transporter. In the present study, we tested whether creation of an endogenous proton antenna by introduction of a cluster of histidine residues into the C-terminal tail of MCT4 (MCT4-6xHis) could facilitate MCT4 transport activity when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results show that integration of six histidines into the C-terminal tail does indeed increase transport activity of MCT4 to the same extent as did coexpression of MCT4-WT with CAII. Transport activity of MCT4-6xHis could be further enhanced by coexpression with extracellular CAIV, but not with intracellular CAII. Injection of an antibody against the histidine cluster into MCT4-expressing oocytes decreased transport activity of MCT4-6xHis, while leaving activity of MCT4-WT unaltered. Taken together, these findings suggest that transport activity of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 can be facilitated by integration of an endogenous proton antenna into the transporter's C-terminal tail.

  7. The maltose ABC transporter: action of membrane lipids on the transporter stability, coupling and ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huan; Dalal, Kush; Wang, Victor; Rouiller, Isabelle; Duong, Franck

    2013-08-01

    The coupling between ATP hydrolysis and substrate transport remains a key question in the understanding of ABC-mediated transport. We show using the MalFGK2 complex reconstituted into nanodiscs, that membrane lipids participate directly to the coupling reaction by stabilizing the transporter in a low energy conformation. When surrounded by short acyl chain phospholipids, the transporter is unstable and hydrolyzes large amounts of ATP without inducing maltose. The presence of long acyl chain phospholipids stabilizes the conformational dynamics of the transporter, reduces its ATPase activity and restores dependence on maltose. Membrane lipids therefore play an essential allosteric function, they restrict the transporter ATPase activity to increase coupling to the substrate. In support to the notion, we show that increasing the conformational dynamics of MalFGK2 with mutations in MalF increases the transporter ATPase activity but decreases the maltose transport efficiency.

  8. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  9. Transportation as a "Related Service": Issues that Involve Transition Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Missouri LINC.

    The paper discusses transportation as a related service for students with disabilities expecially as related to school-to-work transition activities. First, the legislative and legal basis for providing transportation services is discussed in the form of answers to frequently asked questions: why provide transportation? what is the basis for…

  10. Chill activation of compatible solute transporters in Corynebacterium glutamicum at the level of transport activity.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Nuran; Krämer, Reinhard; Morbach, Susanne

    2005-07-01

    The gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum harbors four osmoregulated secondary uptake systems for compatible solutes, BetP, EctP, LcoP, and ProP. When reconstituted in proteoliposomes, BetP was shown to sense hyperosmotic conditions via the increase in luminal K(+) and to respond by instant activation. To study further putative ways of stimulus perception and signal transduction, we have investigated the responses of EctP, LcoP, and BetP, all belonging to the betaine-carnitine-choline transporter family, to chill stress at the level of activity. When fully activated by hyperosmotic stress, they showed the expected increase of activity at increasing temperature. In the absence of osmotic stress, EctP was not activated by chill and LcoP to only a very low extent, whereas BetP was significantly stimulated at low temperature. BetP was maximally activated at 10 degrees C, reaching the same transport rate as that observed under hyperosmotic conditions at this temperature. A role of cytoplasmic K(+) in chill-dependent activation of BetP was ruled out, since (i) the cytoplasmic K(+) concentration did not change significantly at lower temperatures and (ii) a mutant BetP lacking the C-terminal 25 amino acids, which was previously shown to have lost the ability to be activated by luminal K(+), was fully competent in chill sensing. When heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, BetP did not respond to chill stress. This may indicate that the membrane in which BetP is inserted plays an important role in chill activation and thus in signal transduction by BetP, different from the previously established K(+)-mediated process.

  11. Air pollution exposure: An activity pattern approach for active transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew D.; Yiannakoulias, Nikolaos; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the calculation of personal air pollution exposure during trips made by active transportation using activity patterns without personal monitors. We calculate exposure as the inhaled dose of particulate matter 2.5 μg or smaller. Two modes of active transportation are compared, and they include cycling and walking. Ambient conditions are calculated by combining mobile and stationary monitoring data in an artificial neural network space-time model. The model uses a land use regression framework and has a prediction accuracy of R2 = 0.78. Exposure is calculated at 10 m or shorter intervals during the trips using inhalation rates associated with both modes. The trips are children's routes between home and school. The average dose during morning cycling trips was 2.17 μg, during morning walking trips was 3.19 μg, during afternoon cycling trips was 2.19 μg and during afternoon walking trips was 3.23 μg. The cycling trip dose was significantly lower than the walking trip dose. The air pollution exposure during walking or cycling trips could not be strongly predicted by either the school or household ambient conditions, either individually or in combination. Multiple linear regression models regressing both the household and school ambient conditions against the dose were only able to account for, at most, six percent of the variance in the exposure. This paper demonstrates that incorporating activity patterns when calculating exposure can improve the estimate of exposure compared to its calculation from ambient conditions.

  12. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model.

    PubMed

    Vaquer, Sergi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Rabadán, Arnau; González, Albert; Fenollosa, Felip; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay (®) (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary) was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG) transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and

  13. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model

    PubMed Central

    Vaquer, Sergi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Rabadán, Arnau; González, Albert; Fenollosa, Felip; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay ® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary) was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG) transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and

  14. Transporting Radioactive Waste: An Engineering Activity. Grades 5-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAZWRAP, The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program.

    This brochure contains an engineering activity for upper elementary, middle school, and high school students that examines the transportation of radioactive waste. The activity is designed to inform students about the existence of radioactive waste and its transportation to disposal sites. Students experiment with methods to contain the waste and…

  15. Heat transport in active harmonic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Mei C.; Ellis, Fred M.; Kottos, Tsampikos; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Geisel, Theo; Prosen, Tomaz

    2011-08-15

    We show that a harmonic lattice model with amplifying and attenuating elements, when coupled to two thermal baths, exhibits unique heat transport properties. Some of these novel features include anomalous nonequilibrium steady-state heat currents, negative differential thermal conductance, as well as nonreciprocal heat transport. We find that when these elements are arranged in a PT-symmetric manner, the domain of existence of the nonequilibrium steady state is maximized. We propose an electronic experimental setup based on resistive-inductive-capacitive (RLC) transmission lines, where our predictions can be tested.

  16. Transport and biological activities of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, Brittnee L; Agellon, Luis B

    2013-07-01

    Bile acids have emerged as important biological molecules that support the solubilization of various lipids and lipid-soluble compounds in the gut, and the regulation of gene expression and cellular function. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and eventually released into the small intestine. The majority of bile acids are recovered in the distal end of the small intestine and then returned to the liver for reuse. The components of the mechanism responsible for the recycling of bile acids within the enterohepatic circulation have been identified whereas the mechanism for intracellular transport is less understood. Recently, the ileal lipid binding protein (ILBP; human gene symbol FABP6) was shown to be needed for the efficient transport of bile acids from the apical side to the basolateral side of enterocytes in the distal intestine. This review presents an overview of the transport of bile acids between the liver and the gut as well as within hepatocytes and enterocytes. A variety of pathologies is associated with the malfunction of the bile acid transport system.

  17. Characterization of NaCl tolerance in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough through experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aifen; Baidoo, Edward; He, Zhili; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Baumohl, Jason K; Benke, Peter; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Xie, Ming; Song, Rong; Arkin, Adam P; Hazen, Terry C; Keasling, Jay D; Wall, Judy D; Stahl, David A; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-09-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough strains with significantly increased tolerance to NaCl were obtained via experimental evolution. A NaCl-evolved strain, ES9-11, isolated from a population cultured for 1200 generations in medium amended with 100 mM NaCl, showed better tolerance to NaCl than a control strain, EC3-10, cultured for 1200 generations in parallel but without NaCl amendment in medium. To understand the NaCl adaptation mechanism in ES9-11, we analyzed the transcriptional, metabolite and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles of strain ES9-11 with 0, 100- or 250 mM-added NaCl in medium compared with the ancestral strain and EC3-10 as controls. In all the culture conditions, increased expressions of genes involved in amino-acid synthesis and transport, energy production, cation efflux and decreased expression of flagellar assembly genes were detected in ES9-11. Consistently, increased abundances of organic solutes and decreased cell motility were observed in ES9-11. Glutamate appears to be the most important osmoprotectant in D. vulgaris under NaCl stress, whereas, other organic solutes such as glutamine, glycine and glycine betaine might contribute to NaCl tolerance under low NaCl concentration only. Unsaturation indices of PLFA significantly increased in ES9-11. Branched unsaturated PLFAs i17:1 ω9c, a17:1 ω9c and branched saturated i15:0 might have important roles in maintaining proper membrane fluidity under NaCl stress. Taken together, these data suggest that the accumulation of osmolytes, increased membrane fluidity, decreased cell motility and possibly an increased exclusion of Na(+) contribute to increased NaCl tolerance in NaCl-evolved D. vulgaris.

  18. Characterization of NaCl tolerance in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough through experimental evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Aifen; Baidoo, Edward; He, Zhili; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Baumohl, Jason K; Benke, Peter; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Xie, Ming; Song, Rong; Arkin, Adam P; Hazen, Terry C; Keasling, Jay D; Wall, Judy D; Stahl, David A; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-01-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough strains with significantly increased tolerance to NaCl were obtained via experimental evolution. A NaCl-evolved strain, ES9-11, isolated from a population cultured for 1200 generations in medium amended with 100 mM NaCl, showed better tolerance to NaCl than a control strain, EC3-10, cultured for 1200 generations in parallel but without NaCl amendment in medium. To understand the NaCl adaptation mechanism in ES9-11, we analyzed the transcriptional, metabolite and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles of strain ES9-11 with 0, 100- or 250 mM-added NaCl in medium compared with the ancestral strain and EC3-10 as controls. In all the culture conditions, increased expressions of genes involved in amino-acid synthesis and transport, energy production, cation efflux and decreased expression of flagellar assembly genes were detected in ES9-11. Consistently, increased abundances of organic solutes and decreased cell motility were observed in ES9-11. Glutamate appears to be the most important osmoprotectant in D. vulgaris under NaCl stress, whereas, other organic solutes such as glutamine, glycine and glycine betaine might contribute to NaCl tolerance under low NaCl concentration only. Unsaturation indices of PLFA significantly increased in ES9-11. Branched unsaturated PLFAs i17:1 ω9c, a17:1 ω9c and branched saturated i15:0 might have important roles in maintaining proper membrane fluidity under NaCl stress. Taken together, these data suggest that the accumulation of osmolytes, increased membrane fluidity, decreased cell motility and possibly an increased exclusion of Na+ contribute to increased NaCl tolerance in NaCl-evolved D. vulgaris. PMID:23575373

  19. Study of active cooling for supersonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential benefits of using the fuel heat sink of hydrogen fueled supersonic transports for cooling large portions of the aircraft wing and fuselage are examined. The heat transfer would be accomplished by using an intermediate fluid such as an ethylene glycol-water solution. Some of the advantages of the system are: (1) reduced costs by using aluminum in place of titanium, (2) reduced cabin heat loads, and (3) more favorable environmental conditions for the aircraft systems. A liquid hydrogen fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic transport aircraft design was used for the reference uncooled vehicle. The cooled aircraft designs were analyzed to determine their heat sink capability, the extent and location of feasible cooled surfaces, and the coolant passage size and spacing.

  20. Modeling of active transmembrane transport in a mixture theory framework.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Morrison, Barclay; Hung, Clark T

    2010-05-01

    This study formulates governing equations for active transport across semi-permeable membranes within the framework of the theory of mixtures. In mixture theory, which models the interactions of any number of fluid and solid constituents, a supply term appears in the conservation of linear momentum to describe momentum exchanges among the constituents. In past applications, this momentum supply was used to model frictional interactions only, thereby describing passive transport processes. In this study, it is shown that active transport processes, which impart momentum to solutes or solvent, may also be incorporated in this term. By projecting the equation of conservation of linear momentum along the normal to the membrane, a jump condition is formulated for the mechano-electrochemical potential of fluid constituents which is generally applicable to nonequilibrium processes involving active transport. The resulting relations are simple and easy to use, and address an important need in the membrane transport literature.

  1. [Model of active peristaltic transport in biosystems].

    PubMed

    Klochkov, B N; Romanov, A S

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear distributed mathematical model of soft vessel with the nonmonotonous static characteristic is proposed and considered. The model describes space-time dynamics of vessel clearance change. Wave phenomena in vessels of different nature and the possibility of peristaltic fluid pumping are discussed and analyzed. The model is rather common in character and represents a description of the whole class of transport phenomena. Lymphatic vessels are particularly considered.

  2. Calculation of NaCl, KCl and LiCl Salts Activity Coefficients in Polyethylene Glycol (PEG4000)-Water System Using Modified PHSC Equation of State, Extended Debye-Hückel Model and Pitzer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjani, Azam

    2016-07-01

    For biomolecules and cell particles purification and separation in biological engineering, besides the chromatography as mostly applied process, aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) are of the most favorable separation processes that are worth to be investigated in thermodynamic theoretically. In recent years, thermodynamic calculation of ATPS properties has attracted much attention due to their great applications in chemical industries such as separation processes. These phase calculations of ATPS have inherent complexity due to the presence of ions and polymers in aqueous solution. In this work, for target ternary systems of polyethylene glycol (PEG4000)-salt-water, thermodynamic investigation for constituent systems with three salts (NaCl, KCl and LiCl) has been carried out as PEG is the most favorable polymer in ATPS. The modified perturbed hard sphere chain (PHSC) equation of state (EOS), extended Debye-Hückel and Pitzer models were employed for calculation of activity coefficients for the considered systems. Four additional statistical parameters were considered to ensure the consistency of correlations and introduced as objective functions in the particle swarm optimization algorithm. The results showed desirable agreement to the available experimental data, and the order of recommendation of studied models is PHSC EOS > extended Debye-Hückel > Pitzer. The concluding remark is that the all the employed models are reliable in such calculations and can be used for thermodynamic correlation/predictions; however, by using an ion-based parameter calculation method, the PHSC EOS reveals both reliability and universality of applications.

  3. In vitro synthesis of a Major Facilitator Transporter for specific active transport across Droplet Interface Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Heather E.; Harris, Nicola J.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-01-01

    Nature encapsulates reactions within membrane-bound compartments, affording sequential and spatial control over biochemical reactions. Droplet Interface Bilayers are evolving into a valuable platform to mimic this key biological feature in artificial systems. A major issue is manipulating flow across synthetic bilayers. Droplet Interface Bilayers must be functionalised, with seminal work using membrane-inserting toxins, ion channels and pumps illustrating the potential. Specific transport of biomolecules, and notably transport against a concentration gradient, across these bilayers has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we successfully incorporate the archetypal Major Facilitator Superfamily transporter, lactose permease, into Droplet Interface Bilayers and demonstrate both passive and active, uphill transport. This paves the way for controllable transport of sugars, metabolites and other essential biomolecular substrates of this ubiquitous transporter superfamily in DIB networks. Furthermore, cell-free synthesis of lactose permease during DIB formation also results in active transport across the interface bilayer. This adds a specific disaccharide transporter to the small list of integral membrane proteins that can be synthesised via in vitro transcription/translation for applications of DIB-based artificial cell systems. The introduction of a means to promote specific transport of molecules across Droplet Interface Bilayers against a concentration gradient gives a new facet to droplet networks. PMID:27996025

  4. An Abiotic Glass-Bead Collector Exhibiting Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Youhei; Kanda, Masato; Yamamoto, Daigo; Shioi, Akihisa

    2015-09-01

    Animals relocate objects as needed by active motion. Active transport is ubiquitous in living organisms but has been difficult to realize in abiotic systems. Here we show that a self-propelled droplet can gather scattered beads toward one place on a floor and sweep it clean. This is a biomimetic active transport with loadings and unloadings, because the transport was performed by a carrier and the motion of the carrier was maintained by the energy of the chemical reaction. The oil droplet produced fluctuation of the local number density of the beads on the floor, followed by its autocatalytic growth. This mechanism may inspire the technologies based on active transport wherein chemical and physical substances migrate as in living organisms.

  5. Regulation of airway surface liquid volume and mucus transport by active ion transport.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Mucus clearance is an important component of the lung's innate defense against disease, and the ability of the airways to clear mucus is strongly dependent on the volume of liquid on airway surfaces. Whether airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is maintained by passive surface forces or by active ion transport is controversial yet crucial to the understanding of how this system operates in both health and disease. In support of active ion transport being the major determinant of ASL volume, we have demonstrated that normal airway epithelia sense and autoregulate ASL height (volume) by adjusting the rates of Na+ absorption and Cl- secretion to maintain mucus transport.

  6. A general method for determining secondary active transporter substrate stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Gabriel A; Mulligan, Christopher; Mindell, Joseph A

    2017-01-01

    The number of ions required to drive substrate transport through a secondary active transporter determines the protein’s ability to create a substrate gradient, a feature essential to its physiological function, and places fundamental constraints on the transporter’s mechanism. Stoichiometry is known for a wide array of mammalian transporters, but, due to a lack of readily available tools, not for most of the prokaryotic transporters for which high-resolution structures are available. Here, we describe a general method for using radiolabeled substrate flux assays to determine coupling stoichiometries of electrogenic secondary active transporters reconstituted in proteoliposomes by measuring transporter equilibrium potentials. We demonstrate the utility of this method by determining the coupling stoichiometry of VcINDY, a bacterial Na+-coupled succinate transporter, and further validate it by confirming the coupling stoichiometry of vSGLT, a bacterial sugar transporter. This robust thermodynamic method should be especially useful in probing the mechanisms of transporters with available structures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21016.001 PMID:28121290

  7. Active transportation safety features around schools in Canada.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Bryn; Rosu, Andrei; Janssen, Ian; Pickett, William

    2013-10-31

    The purpose of this study was to describe the presence and quality of active transportation safety features in Canadian school environments that relate to pedestrian and bicycle safety. Variations in these features and associated traffic concerns as perceived by school administrators were examined by geographic status and school type. The study was based on schools that participated in 2009/2010 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey. ArcGIS software version 10 and Google Earth were used to assess the presence and quality of ten different active transportation safety features. Findings suggest that there are crosswalks and good sidewalk coverage in the environments surrounding most Canadian schools, but a dearth of bicycle lanes and other traffic calming measures (e.g., speed bumps, traffic chokers). Significant urban/rural inequities exist with a greater prevalence of sidewalk coverage, crosswalks, traffic medians, and speed bumps in urban areas. With the exception of bicycle lanes, the active transportation safety features that were present were generally rated as high quality. Traffic was more of a concern to administrators in urban areas. This study provides novel information about active transportation safety features in Canadian school environments. This information could help guide public health efforts aimed at increasing active transportation levels while simultaneously decreasing active transportation injuries.

  8. Active Transportation Safety Features around Schools in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, Bryn; Rosu, Andrei; Janssen, Ian; Pickett, William

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the presence and quality of active transportation safety features in Canadian school environments that relate to pedestrian and bicycle safety. Variations in these features and associated traffic concerns as perceived by school administrators were examined by geographic status and school type. The study was based on schools that participated in 2009/2010 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey. ArcGIS software version 10 and Google Earth were used to assess the presence and quality of ten different active transportation safety features. Findings suggest that there are crosswalks and good sidewalk coverage in the environments surrounding most Canadian schools, but a dearth of bicycle lanes and other traffic calming measures (e.g., speed bumps, traffic chokers). Significant urban/rural inequities exist with a greater prevalence of sidewalk coverage, crosswalks, traffic medians, and speed bumps in urban areas. With the exception of bicycle lanes, the active transportation safety features that were present were generally rated as high quality. Traffic was more of a concern to administrators in urban areas. This study provides novel information about active transportation safety features in Canadian school environments. This information could help guide public health efforts aimed at increasing active transportation levels while simultaneously decreasing active transportation injuries. PMID:24185844

  9. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2014-11-21

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction.

  10. Active urea transport in lower vertebrates and mammals.

    PubMed

    Bankir, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Some unicellular organisms can take up urea from the surrounding fluids by an uphill pumping mechanism. Several active (energy-dependent) urea transporters (AUTs) have been cloned in these organisms. Functional studies show that active urea transport also occurs in elasmobranchs, amphibians, and mammals. In the two former groups, active urea transport may serve to conserve urea in body fluids in order to balance external high ambient osmolarity or prevent desiccation. In mammals, active urea transport may be associated with the need to either store and/or reuse nitrogen in the case of low nitrogen supply, or to excrete nitrogen efficiently in the case of excess nitrogen intake. There are probably two different families of AUTs, one with a high capacity able to establish only a relatively modest transepithelial concentration difference (renal tubule of some frogs, pars recta of the mammalian kidney, early inner medullary collecting duct in some mammals eating protein-poor diets) and others with a low capacity but able to maintain a high transepithelial concentration difference that has been created by another mechanism or in another organ (elasmobranch gills, ventral skin of some toads, and maybe mammalian urinary bladder). Functional characterization of these transporters shows that some are coupled to sodium (symports or antiports) while others are sodium-independent. In humans, only one genetic anomaly, with a mild phenotype (familial azotemia), is suspected to concern one of these transporters. In spite of abundant functional evidence for such transporters in higher organisms, none have been molecularly identified yet.

  11. Caulis Sinomenii extracts activate DA/NE transporter and inhibit 5HT transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Bi, Cheng; Qin, Guo-Wei; Guo, Li-He

    2009-08-01

    Caulis Sinomenii (QFT) has analgesic, sedative, and anxiolytic-like actions, and is proven effective for improving drug dependence that is known to be associated with abnormal monoaminergic transmission. We assessed whether QFT would be biologically active in functionally regulating monoamine transporters using CHO cells expressing dopamine transporter (DAT), norepinephrine transporter (NET), or serotonin transporter (SERT) (i.e. D8, N1, or S6 cells, respectively). Here, we showed that its primary extracts, such as QA, QC, QE, QD, and QB (QFT ethanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate, alkaloid-free chloroform, and alkaloid-containing chloroform extract, respectively), and secondary extracts, such as QE-2, - 3, - 5, - 7, QD-1, - 2, - 3, - 4, - 5, and QB-1, - 2, - 3, - 4, - 5 (fractioned from QE, QD, and QB, respectively), in differing degrees, either increased DA/ NE uptake by corresponding D8/N1 cells or decreased 5HT uptake by S6 cells; wherein, QE-2, QD-3, and QE-7 were potent DA/NE uptake activators while both QE-7 and QB-5 were potent 5HT uptake inhibitors. Furthermore, the enhancement of DA/NE uptake was dependent of DAT/NET activity, and the inhibition of 5HT uptake was typical of competition. Thus, QFT extracts, especially QE-2 and QE-7 (both with stronger potencies), are novel monoamine transporter modulators functioning as DAT/ NET activators and/or SERT inhibitors, and would likely improve neuropsychological disorders through regulating monoamine transporters.

  12. Constant enthalpy change value during pyrophosphate hydrolysis within the physiological limits of NaCl.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Satoshi; Kidokoro, Shun-ichi; Masaki, Kazuo; Nakasone, Kaoru; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2013-10-11

    A decrease in water activity was thought to result in smaller enthalpy change values during PPi hydrolysis, indicating the importance of solvation for the reaction. However, the physiological significance of this phenomenon is unknown. Here, we combined biochemistry and calorimetry to solve this problem using NaCl, a physiologically occurring water activity-reducing reagent. The pyrophosphatase activities of extremely halophilic Haloarcula japonica, which can grow at ∼4 M NaCl, and non-halophilic Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were maximal at 2.0 and 0.1 M NaCl, respectively. Thus, halophilic and non-halophilic pyrophosphatases exhibit distinct maximal activities at different NaCl concentration ranges. Upon calorimetry, the same exothermic enthalpy change of -35 kJ/mol was obtained for the halophile and non-halophiles at 1.5-4.0 and 0.1-2.0 M NaCl, respectively. These results show that solvation changes caused by up to 4.0 M NaCl (water activity of ∼0.84) do not affect the enthalpy change in PPi hydrolysis. It has been postulated that PPi is an ATP analog, having a so-called high energy phosphate bond, and that the hydrolysis of both compounds is enthalpically driven. Therefore, our results indicate that the hydrolysis of high energy phosphate compounds, which are responsible for biological energy conversion, is enthalpically driven within the physiological limits of NaCl.

  13. Classroom Activities in Transportation: Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This curriculum supplement was designed to correlate directly with "A Guide to Curriculum Planning in Technology Education," published by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. It is also a companion book to three other classroom activity compilations, one in each of the other three major systems of technology--manufacturing,…

  14. The connexion between active cation transport and metabolism in erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, R.; Ager, Margaret E.

    1965-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the dependence on the concentrations of internal Na+ and external K+ of lactate and phosphate production in human erythrocytes. 2. Lactate production was stimulated by Na+ and K+ but only when they were internal and external respectively. The stimulation was counteracted by ouabain. The production of phosphate was affected in the same way. 3. There is a quantitative correlation between these effects and those previously found for cation movements and the membrane adenosine triphosphatase. 4. It is concluded that the rate of energy production in glycolysis is partly controlled by the magnitude of active transport; the extent of this regulation is shown to vary from 25 to 75% of a basal rate that is independent of active transport. 5. The activity of the membrane adenosine triphosphatase was also compared with rates of Na+ and K+ transport. The latter were varied by altering the concentrations of internal Na+ and external K+, and by inhibiting with ouabain. 6. A threefold variation of active transport rate was accompanied by a parallel change in the membrane adenosine-triphosphatase activity. The results show a constant stoicheiometry for the number of ions moved/mol. of ATP hydrolysed, independent of the electrochemical gradient against which the ions were moved. 7. Calculations show that the amount of ATP hydrolysed would provide enough energy for the osmotic work. The results are discussed in relation to possible mechanisms for active transport. PMID:16749106

  15. Promoting physical activity and reducing climate change: opportunities to replace short car trips with active transportation.

    PubMed

    Maibach, Edward; Steg, Linda; Anable, Jillian

    2009-10-01

    Automobile use is a significant contributor to climate change, local air pollution, pedestrian injuries and deaths, declines in physical activity and obesity. A significant proportion of car use is for short trips that can relatively easily be taken with active transportation options--walking or cycling--or with public transportation. In this commentary, we review a number of immediate, practical opportunities to implement policies and programs that reduce short car trips and increase active transportation.

  16. Regulation of Na-Cl absorption in rabbit proximal colon in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, J.H.; De Siognie, R.

    1987-01-01

    Ion transport in rabbit proximal colon (PC) in vitro is dominated by a Na-Cl cotransport system stimulated by epinephrine. To further characterize the regulation of Na-Cl transport, the authors tested the effects of specific adrenergic agonists on ion fluxes under short-circuit conditions. Additionally, they tested the effects of the transport inhibitors bumetanide, furosemide, and 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS). Basal Na and Cl absorption were essentially nil. The ..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist clonidine significantly increased net Na and Cl absorption. The ..cap alpha../sub 1/-agonist phenylephrine and the ..beta..-agonist isoproterenol did not alter ion transport. The ..cap alpha../sub 2/-blocker yohimbine (YOH) had a complex, concentration-dependent effect. Propranolol (10/sup -5/ M) and pracozin (10/sup -6/ M) did not significantly alter either basal or stimulated ion transport. Neither bumetanide (10/sup -6/ or 10/sup -4/ M) nor furosemide (10/sup -4/ M) blocked epinephrine-stimulated Na absorption. SITS (10/sup -4/ M) and removal of mucosal K did not have a significant effect on ion transport. Conclusions: 1) Na-Cl cotransport in rabbit PC is primarily under ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic control, 2) YOH at high concentrations acts as an agonist in PC, 3) ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonists stimulate Na-Cl absorption in both rabbit ileum and PC. In PC, however, the process is electrically quiet and therefore does not appear to be associated with electrogenic HCO/sub 3/ secretion as found in ileum, 4) the lack of effect of bumetanide, furosemide, and 0 K on Na transport suggests that a single Na-Cl (or Na-K-2Cl) carrier is not involved in Na-Cl cotransport in proximal colon.

  17. P2X Receptors Inhibit NaCl Absorption in mTAL Independently of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Samuel L.; Isidor, Søren; Praetorius, Helle A.; Leipziger, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Activation of basolateral P2X receptors markedly reduces NaCl absorption in mouse medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL). Here we tested the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the ATP-mediated (P2X) transport inhibition. We used isolated, perfused mTALs from mice to electrically measure NaCl absorption. By microelectrodes we determined the transepithelial voltage (Vte) and transepithelial resistance (Rte). Via these two parameters, we calculated the equivalent short circuit current, I'sc as a measure of the transepithelial Na+ absorption. Basolateral ATP (100 μM) acutely induced reversible inhibition of Na+ absorption (24 ± 4%, n = 10). Addition of L-arginine (100 μM) had no apparent effect on the ATP-induced transport inhibition. Acute reduction of extracellular [Ca2+] to either 100 nM or 0 nM by addition of EGTA had no effect on the ATP-induced transport inhibition. In the presence of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME (100 μM) and/or ODQ to inhibit the guanylyl cyclase, the ATP effect remained unaffected. Increasing the concentration and incubation time for L-NAME (1 mM) still did not reveal any effect on the ATP-mediated transport inhibition. Acute addition of the NO donors SNAP (100 μM) and Spermine NONOate (10 μM) did not alter tubular transport. High concentrations of L-NAME (1 mM) in itself, however, reduced the transepithelial transport significantly. Thus, we find no evidence for nitric oxide (NO) as second messenger for P2X receptor-dependent transport inhibition in mTAL. Moreover, Ca2+ signaling appears not involved in the ATP-mediated effect. It remains undefined how P2X receptors trigger the marked reduction of transport in the TAL. PMID:28174542

  18. Active Transportation to School: Findings from a National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Janet E.; Shisler, Jessica L.; Yore, Michelle M.; Caspersen, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    In the past, active transportation to school offered an important source of daily physical activity for youth; more recently, however, factors related to distance, safety, or physical or social environments may have contributed to the proportion of children who travel to school by motorized vehicle. The authors examine the characteristics of…

  19. Substrate regulation of ascorbate transport activity in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.X.; Jaworski, E.M.; Kulaga, A.; Dixon, S.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Astrocytes possess a concentrative L-ascorbate (vitamin C) uptake mechanism involving a Na(+)-dependent L-ascorbate transporter located in the plasma membrane. The present experiments examined the effects of deprivation and supplementation of extracellular L-ascorbate on the activity of this transport system. Initial rates of L-ascorbate uptake were measured by incubating primary cultures of rat astrocytes with L-(14C)ascorbate for 1 min at 37 degrees C. We observed that the apparent maximal rate of uptake (Vmax) increased rapidly (less than 1 h) when cultured cells were deprived of L-ascorbate. In contrast, there was no change in the apparent affinity of the transport system for L-(14C)ascorbate. The increase in Vmax was reversed by addition of L-ascorbate, but not D-isoascorbate, to the medium. The effects of external ascorbate on ascorbate transport activity were specific in that preincubation of cultures with L-ascorbate did not affect uptake of 2-deoxy-D-(3H(G))glucose. We conclude that the astroglial ascorbate transport system is modulated by changes in substrate availability. Regulation of transport activity may play a role in intracellular ascorbate homeostasis by compensating for regional differences and temporal fluctuations in external ascorbate levels.

  20. A thermochemical explanation for the stability of NaCl3 and NaCl7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes de Farias, Robson

    2017-03-01

    Thermodynamically stable cubic and orthorhombic NaCl3 as well as NaCl7 have been synthesized (Zhang et al., 2013). In the present work, a thermochemical explanation for the stability of such unusual sodium chlorides is provided, based on lattice energy values. Using the Glasser-Jenkins generalized equation (Glasser and Jenkins, 2000) lattice energies (kJ mol-1) of -162.5, -168.9 and -113.1 are calculated for Pm3n NaCl3, Pnma NaCl3 and NaCl7, respectively. It is postulated that any NaxCly compound could be synthesized, if the ionic character of the Nasbnd Cl bond in the prepared compound remains around 80%, and the sodium charge below unit.

  1. Advocacy for active transport: advocate and city council perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Effective advocacy is an important part of efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Research about effective health advocacy is scarce, however, the health sector can learn from the experiences and knowledge of community advocates and those who are on the receiving end of this advocacy. The aim of this study is to explore advocacy for active transport from the perspectives of community advocates and representatives from City councils. Methods Cycling and walking advocates were identified from the local contact list of Cycling Advocates Network and Living Streets Aotearoa. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with cycle and walking advocates from throughout New Zealand. Advocates also nominated a suitable council officer at their local City council to be interviewed. Interviews were recorded and transcribed and categories of responses for each of the questions created. Results Several processes were used by advocates to engage with council staff, including formal council submissions, meetings, stakeholder forums and partnership in running community events promoting active transport. Several other agencies were identified as being influential for active transport, some as potential coalition partners and others as potential adversaries. Barriers to improving conditions for active transport included a lack of funding, a lack of will-power among either council staff or councillors, limited council staff capacity (time or training) and a culture of providing infrastructure for motor vehicles instead of people. Several suggestions were made about how the health sector could contribute to advocacy efforts, including encouraging political commitment, engaging the media, communicating the potential health benefits of active transport to the general public and being role models in terms of personal travel mode choice and having workplaces that support participation in active transport. Conclusions There is potential for the

  2. Neuroinflammation activates efflux transport by NFκB

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chuanhui; Argyropoulos, George; Zhang, Yan; Kastin, Abba J.; Hsuchou, Hung; Pan, Weihong

    2009-01-01

    Background/aims Although it is known that drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may be hampered by efflux transport activity of the multidrug resistance (mdr) gene product P-glycoprotein, it is not clear how inflammation regulates efflux transporters. In rat brain endothelial (RBE4) cells of BBB origin, the proinflammatory cytokine TNF mainly induces transcriptional upregulation of mdr1b, and to a lesser extent mdr1a, resulting in greater efflux of the substrates (Yu C et al., Cell Physiol Biochem, 2007). This study further determined the mechanisms by which TNF activates mdr1b promoter activity. Methods/Results Luciferase reporter assays and DNA binding studies show that (a) maximal basal promoter activity was conferred by a 476 bp sequence upstream to the mdr1b transcriptional initiation site; (2) TNF induced upregulation of promoter activity by NFkB nuclear translocation; and (3) the NFκB binding site of the mdr1b promoter was solely responsible for basal and TNF-activated gene transcription, whereas the p53 binding site was not involved. Binding of the p65 subunit of NFκB to nuclear DNA from RBE4 cells was shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Conclusion Thus, NFκB mediated TNF-induced upregulation of mdr1b promoter activity, illustrating how inflammation activates BBB efflux transport. PMID:19088456

  3. Dopamine transporter occupancy by RTI-55, inhibition of dopamine transport and stimulation of locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Gifford, A.N.; Volkow, N.D.

    1997-05-01

    Cocaine analogs such as RTI-55 (or {beta}CIT) with a higher affinity for the DAT are potentially useful as therapeutic drugs in cocaine abuse as well as for radiopharmaceutical use. Previously we showed that in mice RTI-55 (2 mg/Kg, i/p) reduced H-3 cocaine striatum-to-cerebellum ratios (St/Cb, {lg_bullet}) from 1.6 to 1.2 at 3 h after administration, with recovery by 12 h. In the present study we demonstrate a very similar time-course for transport {triangle} measured in striatal homo within 2 min of sacrifice. The maximum inhibition of uptake at about 1 h corresponded to about 80% of the control uptake rate, similar to the percent reduction in St/Cb. The time-course of the effect of this dose of RTI-55 on locomotor activity ({sq_bullet}) was complex, with a drop in the activity measure at 7 h, after a further injection of RTI-55, but activity remained higher than in saline controls. In spite of this complexity, which may be associated with stereotypies and/or exhaustion, the duration of increased activity is consistent with the duration of transporter blockade. These experiments support the notion that PET/SPECT measures of transporter occupancy accurately reflect transporter inhibition.

  4. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  6. Transport of active ellipsoidal particles in ratchet potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan Wu, Jian-Chun

    2014-03-07

    Rectified transport of active ellipsoidal particles is numerically investigated in a two-dimensional asymmetric potential. The out-of-equilibrium condition for the active particle is an intrinsic property, which can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the perfect sphere particle can facilitate the rectification, while the needlelike particle destroys the directed transport. There exist optimized values of the parameters (the self-propelled velocity, the torque acting on the body) at which the average velocity takes its maximal value. For the ellipsoidal particle with not large asymmetric parameter, the average velocity decreases with increasing the rotational diffusion rate, while for the needlelike particle (very large asymmetric parameter), the average velocity is a peaked function of the rotational diffusion rate. By introducing a finite load, particles with different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities) will move to the opposite directions, which is able to separate particles of different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities)

  7. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  8. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  9. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  10. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  11. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  12. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R; Rogers, Troy D; Stutts, M Jackson; Randell, Scott H; Grubb, Barbara R; Boucher, Richard C

    2012-10-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface.

  13. Unraveling fatty acid transport and activation mechanisms in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Rémi; Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Thévenieau, France; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    Fatty acid (FA) transport and activation have been extensively studied in the model yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae but have rarely been examined in oleaginous yeasts, such as Yarrowia lipolytica. Because the latter begins to be used in biodiesel production, understanding its FA transport and activation mechanisms is essential. We found that Y. lipolytica has FA transport and activation proteins similar to those of S. cerevisiae (Faa1p, Pxa1p, Pxa2p, Ant1p) but mechanism of FA peroxisomal transport and activation differs greatly with that of S. cerevisiae. While the ScPxa1p/ScPxa2p heterodimer is essential for growth on long-chain FAs, ΔYlpxa1 ΔYlpxa2 is not impaired for growth on FAs. Meanwhile, ScAnt1p and YlAnt1p are both essential for yeast growth on medium-chain FAs, suggesting they function similarly. Interestingly, we found that the ΔYlpxa1 ΔYlpxa2 ΔYlant1 mutant was unable to grow on short-, medium-, or long-chain FAs, suggesting that YlPxa1p, YlPxa2p, and YlAnt1p belong to two different FA degradation pathways. We also found that YlFaa1p is involved in FA storage in lipid bodies and that FA remobilization largely depended on YlFat1p, YlPxa1p and YlPxa2p. This study is the first to comprehensively examine FA intracellular transport and activation in oleaginous yeast.

  14. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R.; Rogers, Troy D.; Stutts, M. Jackson; Randell, Scott H.; Grubb, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na+ transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface. PMID:22814399

  15. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo applications. Further

  16. Morphine Induces Ubiquitin-Proteasome Activity and Glutamate Transporter Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liling; Wang, Shuxing; Sung, Backil; Lim, Grewo; Mao, Jianren

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters play a crucial role in physiological glutamate homeostasis, neurotoxicity, and glutamatergic regulation of opioid tolerance. However, how the glutamate transporter turnover is regulated remains poorly understood. Here we show that chronic morphine exposure induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1 in C6 glioma cells with a concurrent decrease in glutamate uptake and increase in proteasome activity, which were blocked by the selective proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or lactacystin but not the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquin. At the cellular level, chronic morphine induced the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome Ten)-mediated up-regulation of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Nedd4 via cAMP/protein kinase A signaling, leading to EAAC1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Either Nedd4 or PTEN knockdown with small interfering RNA prevented the morphine-induced EAAC1 degradation and decreased glutamate uptake. These data indicate that cAMP/protein kinase A signaling serves as an intracellular regulator upstream to the activation of the PTEN/Nedd4-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome system activity that is critical for glutamate transporter turnover. Under an in vivo condition, chronic morphine exposure also induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1, which was prevented by MG-132, and transcriptional up-regulation of PTEN and Nedd4 within the spinal cord dorsal horn. Thus, inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated glutamate transporter degradation may be an important mechanism for preventing glutamate overexcitation and may offer a new strategy for treating certain neurological disorders and improving opioid therapy in chronic pain management. PMID:18539596

  17. Relationship between extracellular osmolarity, NaCl concentration and cell volume in rat glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Rouzaire-Dubois, Béatrice; Ouanounou, Gilles; Dubois, Jean Marc

    2011-06-01

    The cell volume, which controls numerous cellular functions, is theoretically linearly related with the inverse osmolarity. However, deviations from this law have often been observed. In order to clarify the origin of these deviations we electronically measured the mean cell volume of rat glioma cells under three different experimental conditions, namely: at different osmolarities and constant NaCl concentration; at different NaCl concentrations and constant osmolarity and at different osmolarities caused by changes in NaCl concentration. In each condition, the osmolarity was maintained constant or changed with NaCl or mannitol. We showed that the cell volume was dependent on both the extracellular osmolarity and the NaCl concentration. The relationship between cell volume, osmolarity and NaCl concentration could be described by a new equation that is the product of the Boyle-van't Hoff law and the Michaelis-Menten equation at a power of 4. Together, these results suggest that in hyponatriemia, the cell volume deviates from the Boyle-van't Hoff law because either the activity of aquaporin 1, expressed in glioma cells, is decreased or the reduced NaCl influx decreases the osmotically obliged influx of water.

  18. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  19. [Effect of nitrates on active transport of iodine].

    PubMed

    Szökeová, E; Tajtáková, M; Mirossay, L; Mojzis, J; Langer, P; Marcinová, E; Petrovicová, J; Zemberová, E; Bodnár, J

    2001-11-01

    Active iodine transport into the thyrocyte is catalyzed by the transmembrane transport protein Na+/J- symport (NIS) Nitrates can expel iodine from the bond with this transport protein which was found not only in the thyrocyte membrane but also in the cell membrane of the gastric mucosa. The weight of the thyroid gland in mg was significantly greater even when calculated in relation to body weight in the NIT group of rats who were given for 6 days nitrate by gastric tube (100 mg/kg/day) as compared with controls (CON) 17.56 +/- 8.4, 0.07 +/- 0.03/12.10 +/- 9.57, 0.05 +/- 0.03, P < or = 0.01. A lower thyroid activity in per cent calculated per 1 mg of its weight (1.39 +/- 1.0/2.22 +/- 0.9, P < or = 0.01), a higher activity in blood before removal of the thyroid gland (8.54 +/- 4.09/5.45 +/- 2.78) and a lower one after removal of the thyroid gland (1.09 +/- 0.05/0.21 +/- 0.10) before oral administration of I131 in group NIT, suggests a negative effect of nitrates on active iodine transport not only at the level of the thyrocyte but also possible interaction with iodine at the level of the digestive tract. A significantly higher serum level of TT3 in group NIT (0.66 +/- 0.27/0.44 +/- 0.21, P < or = 0.01 regardless of the TSH serum level (2.31 +/- 1.83/2.64 +/- 1.52) and T4 (22.72 +/- 8.2/25 +/- 11.0) suggests a qualitative change in thyroid hormone production in favour of T3 caused even by short-term nitrate administration.

  20. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  1. 77 FR 71430 - New Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Public Transportation Baseline...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration New Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Public Transportation Baseline Assessment for Security Enhancement (BASE) Program AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS. ACTION: 30-day notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces that the...

  2. Synaptic activation modifies microtubules underlying transport of postsynaptic cargo.

    PubMed

    Maas, Christoph; Belgardt, Dorthe; Lee, Han Kyu; Heisler, Frank F; Lappe-Siefke, Corinna; Magiera, Maria M; van Dijk, Juliette; Hausrat, Torben J; Janke, Carsten; Kneussel, Matthias

    2009-05-26

    Synaptic plasticity, the ability of synapses to change in strength, requires alterations in synaptic molecule compositions over time, and synapses undergo selective modifications on stimulation. Molecular motors operate in sorting/transport of neuronal proteins; however, the targeting mechanisms that guide and direct cargo delivery remain elusive. We addressed the impact of synaptic transmission on the regulation of intracellular microtubule (MT)-based transport. We show that increased neuronal activity, as induced through GlyR activity blockade, facilitates tubulin polyglutamylation, a posttranslational modification thought to represent a molecular traffic sign for transport. Also, GlyR activity blockade alters the binding of the MT-associated protein MAP2 to MTs. By using the kinesin (KIF5) and the postsynaptic protein gephyrin as models, we show that such changes of MT tracks are accompanied by reduced motor protein mobility and cargo delivery into neurites. Notably, the observed neurite targeting deficits are prevented on functional depletion or gene expression knockdown of neuronal polyglutamylase. Our data suggest a previously undescribed concept of synaptic transmission regulating MT-dependent cargo delivery.

  3. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced gas transport and subsequent soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Generally, gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of radioxenons and radioiodines in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open peer-reviewed literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the multiple isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radionuclides, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different mass diffusivities due to mass differences between the radionuclides. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures or highly conductive faults which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a so-called ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which is recognized by the oil industry as leading in Discrete Fracture-Matrix (DFM) simulations. It has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations, fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, and Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic differential equations by a complementary finite

  4. Differences in associations between active transportation and built environmental exposures when expressed using different components of individual activity spaces.

    PubMed

    van Heeswijck, Torbjorn; Paquet, Catherine; Kestens, Yan; Thierry, Benoit; Morency, Catherine; Daniel, Mark

    2015-05-01

    This study assessed relationships between built environmental exposures measured within components of individual activity spaces (i.e., travel origins, destinations and paths in-between), and use of active transportation in a metropolitan setting. Individuals (n=37,165) were categorised as using active or sedentary transportation based on travel survey data. Generalised Estimating Equations analysis was used to test relationships with active transportation. Strength and significance of relationships between exposures and active transportation varied for different components of the activity space. Associations were strongest when including travel paths in expression of the built environment. Land use mix and greenness were negatively related to active transportation.

  5. Analysis of the sodium chloride-dependent respiratory kinetics of wheat mitochondria reveals differential effects on phosphorylating and non-phosphorylating electron transport pathways.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, R P; Che-Othman, M H; Millar, A H; Taylor, N L

    2016-04-01

    A number of previous studies have documented the gross response of mitochondrial respiration to salinity treatment, but it is unclear how NaCl directly affects the kinetics of plant phosphorylating and non-phosphorylating electron transport pathways. This study investigates the direct effects of NaCl upon different respiratory pathways in wheat, by measuring rates of isolated mitochondrial oxygen consumption across different substrate oxidation pathways in saline media. We also profile the abundance of respiratory proteins by using targeted selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry of mitochondria isolated from control and salt-treated wheat plants. We show that all pathways of electron transport were inhibited by NaCl concentrations above 400 mM; however electron transfer chains showed divergent responses to NaCl concentrations between 0 and 200 mM. Stimulation of oxygen consumption was measured in response to NaCl in scenarios where exogenous NADH was provided as substrate and electron flow was coupled to the generation of a proton gradient across the inner membrane. Protein abundance measurements show that several enzymes with activities less affected by NaCl are induced by salinity, whereas enzymes with activities inhibited by NaCl are depleted. These data deepen our understanding of how plant respiration responds to NaCl, offering new mechanistic explanations for the divergent salinity responses of whole-plant respiratory rate in the literature.

  6. Active and passive transport of drugs in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Włoch, Stanisław; Pałasz, Artur; Kamiński, Marcin

    2009-10-01

    The human placenta, characterized by the processes of passive transport and facilitated diffusion, contains numerous active transport proteins, usually located in the microvilli of the syncytiotrophoblast or in the endothelium of the capillaries of the villi. These proteins use either the energy from ATP hydrolysis or other mechanisms resulting, among others, from the formation of the maternofetal ion gradient, which facilitates the transfer of various endogenous substances or xenobiotics across the body membranes. The proteins either trigger the efflux of these substances from the fetal tissues via the placenta into the maternal bloodstream, or conversely they accumulate them in the fetal tissues. Both the placenta and the fetus are equipped with independent systems of enzymes of 1st and 2nd phase of substrate metabolism, such as CYP450, glucuronyltransferase or sulphatase. An active therapy with a wide range of drugs, often at high toxicity levels, either shortly before or during pregnancy, has naturally posed a question concerning the degree of impermeability of the placental barrier and how effectively it can be crossed, including any possible negative embryotoxic or teratogenic consequences. Such hazards seem to be quite real, as many drugs are substrates for ABC transporters. Also the placenta itself, including its structure, is subject to vast transformations during pregnancy which may be observed as the thinning of the barrier separating the maternal blood from the fetal one, from 20-30 microm in the first trimester of gestation down to 2-4 microm in the third trimester of gestation.

  7. Serotonin transporter activity in platelets and canine aggression.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Belén; García-Belenguer, Sylvia; Palacio, Jorge; Chacón, Gema; Villegas, Ainara; Alcalde, Ana I

    2010-10-01

    Several studies have suggested an inhibitory action of the serotonergic system in the regulation of canine aggression, but the role of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) has not been investigated. Platelet 5-HT uptake has been proposed as a peripheral marker of brain 5-HTT. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between platelet 5-HTT activity and canine aggression by measuring the rate of 5-HT uptake mediated by 5-HTT in platelets and serum concentrations of 5-HT in both aggressive (n=14) and non-aggressive dogs (n=17). Aggressive dogs showed significantly higher 5-HT uptake by 5-HTT in platelets and lower serum concentrations of 5-HT, compared with the control group. These results suggested an association between an alteration in the serotonergic system and canine aggression, possibly mediated by an increased 5-HT transport.

  8. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  9. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Leesha K; Alabi, Ola D; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Gunnink, Stephen M; Schuiteman, Sam J; Strohbehn, Lauren E; Hamilton, Kathryn E; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin's inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin.

  10. Chloride transport in functionally active phagosomes isolated from Human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Martha L.; Painter, Richard G.; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Guoshun

    2012-01-01

    Chloride anion is critical for hypochlorous acid (HOCl) production and microbial killing in neutrophil phagosomes. However, the molecular mechanism by which this anion is transported to the organelle is poorly understood. In this report, membrane-enclosed and functionally active phagosomes were isolated from human neutrophils by using opsonized paramagnetic latex microspheres and a rapid magnetic separation method. The phagosomes recovered were highly enriched for specific protein markers associated with this organelle such as lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoferrin, and NADPH oxidase. When FITC–dextran was included in the phagocytosis medium, the majority of the isolated phagosomes retained the fluorescent label after isolation, indicative of intact membrane structure. Flow cytometric measurement of acridine orange, a fluorescent pH indicator, in the purified phagosomes demonstrated that the organelle in its isolated state was capable of transporting protons to the phagosomal lumen via the vacuolar-type ATPase proton pump (V-ATPase). When NADPH was supplied, the isolated phagosomes constitutively oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123, indicating their ability to produce hydrogen peroxide. The preparations also showed a robust production of HOCl within the phagosomal lumen when assayed with the HOCl-specific fluorescent probe R19-S by flow cytometry. MPO-mediated iodination of the proteins covalently conjugated to the phagocytosed beads was quantitatively measured. Phagosomal uptake of iodide and protein iodination were significantly blocked by chloride channel inhibitors, including CFTRinh-172 and NPPB. Further experiments determined that the V-ATPase-driving proton flux into the isolated phagosomes required chloride cotransport, and the cAMP-activated CFTR chloride channel was a major contributor to the chloride transport. Taken together, the data suggest that the phagosomal preparation described herein retains ion transport

  11. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Leesha K.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Gunnink, Stephen M.; Schuiteman, Sam J.; Strohbehn, Lauren E.; Hamilton, Kathryn E.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin’s inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin. PMID:27039889

  12. Evaluation of the physical activity biography: sport and transport.

    PubMed

    Rogen, Sandra; Hofmann, Peter; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-05-01

    Beside the genetic disposition, physical activity (PA) is one of the major health factors and can play a large role in the prevention and therapy of many diseases (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, obesity-related diseases etc.). In contrast to the genetic disposition, PA can be deliberately influenced by lifestyle. Therefore, it is of high importance to assess PA patterns. In order to assess PA reliably and validly, a new questionnaire (Physical Activity Biography, PAB) was created. The PAB assesses recreational PA (sport and transport) and enables to distinguish between endurance intensity levels and considers strength and high speed activity patterns throughout life. This study aims to evaluate the PAB by means of item analysis, retest-reliability and validity (criteria were physical fitness assessed by the questionnaire FFB-mot and by exercise tests). 141 participants answered the PAB. For deriving retest-reliability, 81 participants completed the PAB after a retest-interval of one month again. 55 participated in exercise tests and answered the FFB-mot to determine construct validity. Retest-reliability (ICC) above 0.7 was found for most items. For the items assessing recent PA, the criteria of convergent and discriminant validity were given. Despite the complexity of the question under study, the results fulfilled the expectations concerning reliability and validity. The PAB enables to assess the amount of sport and locomotion a person has accomplished during different life time frames and, because of the protective effects of PA on various diseases, may become an important tool for risk assessment. Key pointsThe risk of chronic diseases depends largely on physical activity biography.A new questionnaire (PAB) assessing recent and lifetime physical activity was created.The PAB assesses physical activity during sports and transport.The results of the evaluation of the PAB fulfilled the expectations.The PAB enables to determine a person's amount of recreational

  13. Evaluation of the Physical Activity Biography: Sport and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Rogen, Sandra; Hofmann, Peter; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    Beside the genetic disposition, physical activity (PA) is one of the major health factors and can play a large role in the prevention and therapy of many diseases (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, obesity-related diseases etc.). In contrast to the genetic disposition, PA can be deliberately influenced by lifestyle. Therefore, it is of high importance to assess PA patterns. In order to assess PA reliably and validly, a new questionnaire (Physical Activity Biography, PAB) was created. The PAB assesses recreational PA (sport and transport) and enables to distinguish between endurance intensity levels and considers strength and high speed activity patterns throughout life. This study aims to evaluate the PAB by means of item analysis, retest-reliability and validity (criteria were physical fitness assessed by the questionnaire FFB-mot and by exercise tests). 141 participants answered the PAB. For deriving retest-reliability, 81 participants completed the PAB after a retest-interval of one month again. 55 participated in exercise tests and answered the FFB-mot to determine construct validity. Retest-reliability (ICC) above 0.7 was found for most items. For the items assessing recent PA, the criteria of convergent and discriminant validity were given. Despite the complexity of the question under study, the results fulfilled the expectations concerning reliability and validity. The PAB enables to assess the amount of sport and locomotion a person has accomplished during different life time frames and, because of the protective effects of PA on various diseases, may become an important tool for risk assessment. Key points The risk of chronic diseases depends largely on physical activity biography. A new questionnaire (PAB) assessing recent and lifetime physical activity was created. The PAB assesses physical activity during sports and transport. The results of the evaluation of the PAB fulfilled the expectations. The PAB enables to determine a person’s amount of

  14. TRPM5-dependent amiloride- and benzamil-insensitive NaCl chorda tympani taste nerve response.

    PubMed

    Ren, ZuoJun; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Murthy, Karnam S; Grider, John R; DeSimone, John A; Lyall, Vijay

    2013-07-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) subfamily M member 5 (TRPM5) cation channel is involved in sensing sweet, bitter, umami, and fat taste stimuli, complex-tasting divalent salts, and temperature-induced changes in sweet taste. To investigate if the amiloride- and benzamil (Bz)-insensitive NaCl chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve response is also regulated in part by TRPM5, CT responses to 100 mM NaCl + 5 μM Bz (NaCl + Bz) were monitored in Sprague-Dawley rats, wild-type (WT) mice, and TRP vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1) and TRPM5 knockout (KO) mice in the presence of resiniferatoxin (RTX), a TRPV1 agonist. In rats, NaCl + Bz + RTX CT responses were also monitored in the presence of triphenylphosphine oxide, a specific TRPM5 blocker, and capsazepine and N-(3-methoxyphenyl)-4-chlorocinnamid (SB-366791), specific TRPV1 blockers. In rats and WT mice, RTX produced biphasic effects on the NaCl + Bz CT response, enhancing the response at 0.5-1 μM and inhibiting it at >1 μM. The NaCl + Bz + SB-366791 CT response in rats and WT mice and the NaCl + Bz CT response in TRPV1 KO mice were inhibited to baseline level and were RTX-insensitive. In rats, blocking TRPV1 by capsazepine or TRPM5 by triphenylphosphine oxide inhibited the tonic NaCl + Bz CT response and shifted the relationship between RTX concentration and the magnitude of the tonic CT response to higher RTX concentrations. TRPM5 KO mice elicited no constitutive NaCl + Bz tonic CT response. The relationship between RTX concentration and the magnitude of the tonic NaCl + Bz CT response was significantly attenuated and shifted to higher RTX concentrations. The results suggest that pharmacological or genetic alteration of TRPM5 activity modulates the Bz-insensitive NaCl CT response and its modulation by TRPV1 agonists.

  15. Active sodium transport and the electrophysiology of rabbit colon.

    PubMed

    Schultz, S G; Frizzell, R A; Nellans, H N

    1977-05-12

    The electrophysiologic properties of rabbit colonic epithelial cells were investigated employing microelectrode techniques. Under open-circuit conditions, the transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) averaged 20 mV, serosa positive, and the intracellular electrical potential (psimc) averaged -32 mV, cell interior negative with respect to the mucosal solution; under short-circuit conditions, psimc averaged -46 mV. The addition of amiloride to the mucosal solution abolishes the transepithelial PD and active Na transport, and psimc is hyperpolarized to an average value of -53 mV. These results indicate that Na entry into the mucosal cell is a conductive process which, normally, depolarized psimc. The data obtained were interpreted using a double-membrane equivalent electrical circuit model of the "active Na transport pathway" involving two voltage-independent electromotive forces (emf's) and two voltage-independent resistances arrayed in series. Our observations are consistent with the notions that: (a) The emf's and resistances across the mucosal and baso-lateral membranes are determined predominantly by the emf (64 mV) and resistance of the Na entry process and the emf (53 mV) and resistance of the process responsible for active Na extrusion across the baso-lateral membranes: that is, the electrophysiological properties of the cell appear to be determined solely by the properties and processes responsible for transcellular active Na transport. The emf of the Na entry process is consistent with the notion that the Na activity in the intracellular transport pool is approximately one-tenth that in the mucosal solution or about 14 mM. (b) In the presence of amiloride, the transcellular conductance is essentially abolished and the total tissue conductance is the result of ionic diffusion through paracellular pathways. (c) The negative intracellular potential (with respect to the mucosal solution) is due primarily to the presence of a low resistance

  16. Saharan Dust, Transport Processes, and Possible Impacts on Hurricane Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present observational evidence of significant relationships between Saharan dust outbreak, and African Easterly wave activities and hurricane activities. We found two dominant paths of transport of Saharan dust: a northern path, centered at 25degN associated with eastward propagating 6-19 days waves over northern Africa, and a southern path centered at 15degN, associated with the AEW, and the Atlantic ITCZ. Seasons with stronger dust outbreak from the southern path are associated with a drier atmosphere over the Maximum Development Region (MDR) and reduction in tropical cyclone and hurricane activities in the MDR. Seasons with stronger outbreak from the northern path are associated with a cooler N. Atlantic, and suppressed hurricane in the western Atlantic basin.

  17. Active urea transport by the skin of Bufo viridis: Amiloride- and phloretin-sensitive transport sites

    SciTech Connect

    Rapoport, J.; Abuful, A.; Chaimovitz, C.; Noeh, Z.; Hays, R.M. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY )

    1988-09-01

    Urea is actively transported inwardly (J{sub i}) across the skin of the green toad Bufo viridis. J{sub i} is markedly enhanced in toads adapted to hypertonic saline. The authors studied urea transport across the skin of Bufo viridis under a variety of experimental conditions, including treatment with amiloride and phloretin, agents that inhibit urea permeability in the bladder of Bufo marinus. Amiloride (10{sup {minus}4} M) significantly inhibited J{sub i} in both adapted and unadapted animals and was unaffected by removal of sodium from the external medium. Phloretin (10{sup {minus}4} M) significantly inhibited J{sub i} in adapted animals by 23-46%; there was also a reduction in J{sub i} in unadapted toads at 10{sup {minus}4} and 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M phloretin. A dose-response study revealed that the concentration of phloretin causing half-maximal inhibition (K{sub {1/2}}) was 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M for adapted animals. J{sub i} was unaffected by the substitution of sucrose for Ringer solution or by ouabain. They conclude (1) the process of adaptation appears to involve an increase in the number of amiloride- and phloretin-inhibitable urea transport sites in the skin, with a possible increase in the affinity of the sites for phloretin; (2) the adapted skin resembles the Bufo marinus urinary bladder with respect to amiloride and phloretin-inhibitable sites; (3) they confirm earlier observations that J{sub i} is independent of sodium transport.

  18. Dopamine Transporter Activity Is Modulated by α-Synuclein.

    PubMed

    Butler, Brittany; Saha, Kaustuv; Rana, Tanu; Becker, Jonas P; Sambo, Danielle; Davari, Paran; Goodwin, J Shawn; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2015-12-04

    The duration and strength of the dopaminergic signal are regulated by the dopamine transporter (DAT). Drug addiction and neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases have all been associated with altered DAT activity. The membrane localization and the activity of DAT are regulated by a number of intracellular proteins. α-Synuclein, a protein partner of DAT, is implicated in neurodegenerative disease and drug addiction. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of the interaction between DAT and α-synuclein, the cellular location of this interaction, and the functional consequences of this interaction on the basal, amphetamine-induced DAT-mediated dopamine efflux, and membrane microdomain distribution of the transporter. Here, we found that the majority of DAT·α-synuclein protein complexes are found at the plasma membrane of dopaminergic neurons or mammalian cells and that the amphetamine-mediated increase in DAT activity enhances the association of these proteins at the plasma membrane. Further examination of the interaction of DAT and α-synuclein revealed a transient interaction between these two proteins at the plasma membrane. Additionally, we found DAT-induced membrane depolarization enhances plasma membrane localization of α-synuclein, which in turn increases dopamine efflux and enhances DAT localization in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains.

  19. CFD Model of Water Droplet Transport for ISS Hygiene Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Chang H.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the study is to assess the impacts of free water propagation in the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC). Free water can be generated inside the WHC in small quantities due to crew hygiene activity. To mitigate potential impact of free water in Node 3 cabin the WHC doorway is enclosed by a waterproof bump-out, Kabin, with openings at the top and bottom. At the overhead side of the rack, there is a screen that prevents large drops of water from exiting. However, as the avionics fan in the WHC causes airflow toward the deck side of the rack, small quantities of free water may exit at the bottom of the Kabin. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of Node 3 cabin airflow made possible to identify the paths of water transport. The Node 3 airflow was computed for several ventilation scenarios. To simulate the droplet transport the Lagrangian discrete phase approach was used. Various initial droplet distributions were considered in the study. The droplet diameter was varied in the range of 2-20 mm. The results of the computations showed that most of the drops fall to the rack surface not far from the WHC curtain. The probability of the droplet transport to the adjacent rack surface with electronic equipment was predicted.

  20. Mechanism of NaCl and water reabsorption in the proximal convoluted tubule of rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, K H; Rector, F C

    1976-01-01

    The role of chloride concentration gradients in proximal NaCl and water reabsorption was examined in superficial proximal tubules of the rat by using perfusion and collection techniques. Reabsorptive rates (Jv), chloride concentrations, and transtubular potential difference were measured during perfusion with solutions (A) simulating an ultrafiltrate of plasma; (B) similar to (A) except that 20 meq/liter bicarbonate was replaced with acetate; (C) resembling late proximal fluid (glucose, amino acid, acetate-free, low bicarbonate, and high chloride); and (D) in which glucose and amino acids were replaced with raffinose and bicarbonate was partially replaced by poorly reabsorbable anions (cyclamate,sulfate, and methyl sulfate). In tubules perfused with solutions A and B, Jv were 2.17 and 2.7 nl mm-1 min-1 and chloride concentrations were 131.5 +/- 3.1 and 135 +/- 395 meq/liter, respectively, indicating that reabsorption is qualitatively similar to free-flow conditions and that acetate adequately replaces bicarbonate. With solution C, Jv was 2.10 nl mm-1 min-1 and potential difference was +1.5 +/- 0.2 mV, indicating that the combined presence of glucose, alanine, acetate, and bicarbonate per se is not an absolute requirement. Fluid reabsorption was virtually abolished when tubules were perfused with D solutions; Jv was not significantly different from zero despite sodium and chloride concentrations similar to plasma; chloride concentration was 110.8 +/- 0.2 meq/liter and potential difference was -0.98 mV indicating that chloride was close to electrochemical equilibrium. These results suggest the importance of the chloride gradient to proximal tubule reabsorption in regions where actively reabsorbable solutes (glucose, alanine, acetate, and bicarbonate) are lacking and provide further evidence for a passive model of NaCl and water transport. PMID:993334

  1. Double Knockout of the Na+-Driven Cl-/HCO3- Exchanger and Na+/Cl- Cotransporter Induces Hypokalemia and Volume Depletion.

    PubMed

    Sinning, Anne; Radionov, Nikita; Trepiccione, Francesco; López-Cayuqueo, Karen I; Jayat, Maximilien; Baron, Stéphanie; Cornière, Nicolas; Alexander, R Todd; Hadchouel, Juliette; Eladari, Dominique; Hübner, Christian A; Chambrey, Régine

    2017-01-01

    We recently described a novel thiazide-sensitive electroneutral NaCl transport mechanism resulting from the parallel operation of the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger pendrin and the Na(+)-driven Cl(-)/2HCO3(-) exchanger (NDCBE) in β-intercalated cells of the collecting duct. Although a role for pendrin in maintaining Na(+) balance, intravascular volume, and BP is well supported, there is no in vivo evidence for the role of NDCBE in maintaining Na(+) balance. Here, we show that deletion of NDCBE in mice caused only subtle perturbations of Na(+) homeostasis and provide evidence that the Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) compensated for the inactivation of NDCBE. To unmask the role of NDCBE, we generated Ndcbe/Ncc double-knockout (dKO) mice. On a normal salt diet, dKO and single-knockout mice exhibited similar activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, whereas only dKO mice displayed a lower blood K(+) concentration. Furthermore, dKO mice displayed upregulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel BKCa. During NaCl depletion, only dKO mice developed marked intravascular volume contraction, despite dramatically increased renin activity. Notably, the increase in aldosterone levels expected on NaCl depletion was attenuated in dKO mice, and single-knockout and dKO mice had similar blood K(+) concentrations under this condition. In conclusion, NDCBE is necessary for maintaining sodium balance and intravascular volume during salt depletion or NCC inactivation in mice. Furthermore, NDCBE has an important role in the prevention of hypokalemia. Because NCC and NDCBE are both thiazide targets, the combined inhibition of NCC and the NDCBE/pendrin system may explain thiazide-induced hypokalemia in some patients.

  2. Active transport of vesicles in neurons is modulated by mechanical tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Wylie W.; Saif, Taher A.

    2014-03-01

    Effective intracellular transport of proteins and organelles is critical in cells, and is especially important for ensuring proper neuron functionality. In neurons, most proteins are synthesized in the cell body and must be transported through thin structures over long distances where normal diffusion is insufficient. Neurons transport subcellular cargo along axons and neurites through a stochastic interplay of active and passive transport. Mechanical tension is critical in maintaining proper function in neurons, but its role in transport is not well understood. To this end, we investigate the active and passive transport of vesicles in Aplysia neurons while changing neurite tension via applied strain, and quantify the resulting dynamics. We found that tension in neurons modulates active transport of vesicles by increasing the probability of active motion, effective diffusivity, and induces a retrograde bias. We show that mechanical tension modulates active transport processes in neurons and that external forces can couple to internal (subcellular) forces and change the overall transport dynamics.

  3. Adult Active Transport in the Netherlands: An Analysis of Its Contribution to Physical Activity Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Elliot; Böcker, Lars; Helbich, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Modern, urban lifestyles have engineered physical activity out of everyday life and this presents a major threat to human health. The Netherlands is a world leader in active travel, particularly cycling, but little research has sought to quantify the cumulative amount of physical activity through everyday walking and cycling. Methods Using data collected as part of the Dutch National Travel Survey (2010 – 2012), this paper determines the degree to which Dutch walking and cycling contributes to meeting minimum level of physical activity of 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity throughout the week. The sample includes 74,465 individuals who recorded at least some travel on the day surveyed. As physical activity benefits are cumulative, all walking and cycling trips are analysed, including those to and from public transport. These trips are then converted into an established measure of physical activity intensity, known as metabolic equivalents of tasks. Multivariate Tobit regression models were performed on a range of socio-demographic, transport resources, urban form and meteorological characteristics. Results The results reveal that Dutch men and women participate in 24 and 28 minutes of daily physical activity through walking and cycling, which is 41% and 55% more than the minimum recommended level. It should be noted however that some 57% of the entire sample failed to record any walking or cycling, and an investigation of this particular group serves as an important topic of future research. Active transport was positively related with age, income, bicycle ownership, urban density and air temperature. Car ownership had a strong negative relationship with physically active travel. Conclusion The results of this analysis demonstrate the significance of active transport to counter the emerging issue of sedentary lifestyle disease. The Dutch experience provides other countries with a highly relevant case study in the creation of

  4. Active migration and passive transport of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Ross G; Amino, Rogerio; Sinnis, Photini; Frischknecht, Freddy

    2015-08-01

    Malaria parasites undergo a complex life cycle between their hosts and vectors. During this cycle the parasites invade different types of cells, migrate across barriers, and transfer from one host to another. Recent literature hints at a misunderstanding of the difference between active, parasite-driven migration and passive, circulation-driven movement of the parasite or parasite-infected cells in the various bodily fluids of mosquito and mammalian hosts. Because both active migration and passive transport could be targeted in different ways to interfere with the parasite, a distinction between the two ways the parasite uses to get from one location to another is essential. We discuss the two types of motion needed for parasite dissemination and elaborate on how they could be targeted by future vaccines or drugs.

  5. Directed transport of active particles over asymmetric energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, N; Maggi, C; Di Leonardo, R

    2014-08-21

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the transport of active colloids to target regions, delimited by asymmetric energy barriers. We show that it is possible to introduce a generalized effective temperature that is related to the local variance of particle velocities. The stationary probability distributions can be derived from a simple diffusion equation in the presence of an inhomogeneous effective temperature resulting from the action of external force fields. In particular, transition rates over asymmetric energy barriers can be unbalanced by having different effective temperatures over the two slopes of the barrier. By varying the type of active noise, we find that equal values of diffusivity and persistence time may produce strongly varied effective temperatures and thus stationary distributions.

  6. Coupled ATPase-adenylate kinase activity in ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Hundeep; Lakatos-Karoly, Andrea; Vogel, Ramona; Nöll, Anne; Tampé, Robert; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a superfamily of integral membrane proteins, catalyse the translocation of substrates across the cellular membrane by ATP hydrolysis. Here we demonstrate by nucleotide turnover and binding studies based on 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy that the ABC exporter and lipid A flippase MsbA can couple ATP hydrolysis to an adenylate kinase activity, where ADP is converted into AMP and ATP. Single-point mutations reveal that both ATPase and adenylate kinase mechanisms are associated with the same conserved motifs of the nucleotide-binding domain. Based on these results, we propose a model for the coupled ATPase-adenylate kinase mechanism, involving the canonical and an additional nucleotide-binding site. We extend these findings to other prokaryotic ABC exporters, namely LmrA and TmrAB, suggesting that the coupled activities are a general feature of ABC exporters. PMID:28004795

  7. Active Transport of Nanomaterials Using Motor Proteins -Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Henry

    2005-09-01

    During the six months of funding we have focused first on the completion of the research begun at the University of Washington in the previous funding cycle. Specifically, we developed a method to polymerize oriented networks of microtubules on lithographically patterned surfaces (M.S. thesis Robert Doot). The properties of active transport have been studied detail, yielding insights into the dispersion mechanisms (Nitta et al.). The assembly of multifunctional structures with a microtubule core has been investigated (Ramachandran et al.). Isaac Luria (B.S. in physics, U. of Florida 2005) worked on the directed assembly of nanoscale, non-equilibrium structures as a summer intern. He is now a graduate student in my group at the University of Florida. T. Nitta and H. Hess: Dispersion in Active Transport by Kinesin-Powered Molecular Shuttles, Nano Letters, 5, 1337-1342 (2005) S. Ramachandran, K.-H. Ernst, G. D. Bachand, V. Vogel, H. Hess*: Selective Loading of Kinesin-Powered Molecular Shuttles with Protein Cargo and its Application to Biosensing, submitted to Small (2005)

  8. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Pereira, Rafael Henrique Moraes; Duran, Ana Clara; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. METHODS By using data from the Health section of 2008’s Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil’s National Household Sample Survey), we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. RESULTS A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. CONCLUSIONS Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making PMID:27355465

  9. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of all radioxenons in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radioxenons, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different diffusivities due to mass differences between the radioxenons. A previous study showed surface arrival time of a chemically inert gaseous tracer is affected by its diffusivity. They observed detectable amount for SF6 50 days after detonation and 375 days for He-3. They predict 50 and 80 days for Xe-133 and Ar-37 respectively. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations , fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic

  10. Amphetamine activates calcium channels through dopamine transporter-mediated depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Solis, Ernesto; Ruchala, Iwona; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and its more potent enantiomer S(+)AMPH are psychostimulants used therapeutically to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and have significant abuse liability. AMPH is a dopamine transporter (DAT) substrate that inhibits dopamine (DA) uptake and is implicated in DA release. Furthermore, AMPH activates ionic currents through DAT that modify cell excitability presumably by modulating voltage-gated channel activity. Indeed, several studies suggest that monoamine transporter-induced depolarization opens voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV), which would constitute an additional AMPH mechanism of action. In this study we co-express human DAT (hDAT) with Ca(2+) channels that have decreasing sensitivity to membrane depolarization (CaV1.3, CaV1.2 or CaV2.2). Although S(+)AMPH is more potent than DA in transport-competition assays and inward-current generation, at saturating concentrations both substrates indirectly activate voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.3 and CaV1.2) but not the N-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.2). Furthermore, the potency to achieve hDAT-CaV electrical coupling is dominated by the substrate affinity on hDAT, with negligible influence of L-type channel voltage sensitivity. In contrast, the maximal coupling-strength (defined as Ca(2+) signal change per unit hDAT current) is influenced by CaV voltage sensitivity, which is greater in CaV1.3- than in CaV1.2-expressing cells. Moreover, relative to DA, S(+)AMPH showed greater coupling-strength at concentrations that induced relatively small hDAT-mediated currents. Therefore S(+)AMPH is not only more potent than DA at inducing hDAT-mediated L-type Ca(2+) channel currents but is a better depolarizing agent since it produces tighter electrical coupling between hDAT-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation.

  11. Nicotine decreases the activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hea-Jo; Lim, Young-Jin; Zuo, Zhiyi; Hur, Wonseok; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2014-02-10

    Nicotine, the main ingredient of tobacco, elicits seizures in animal models and cigarette smoking is regarded as a behavioral risk factor associated with epilepsy or seizures. In the hippocampus, the origin of nicotine-induced seizures, most glutamate uptake could be performed primarily by excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3). An association between temporal lobe epilepsy and EAAT3 downregulation has been reported. Therefore, we hypothesized that nicotine may elicit seizures through the attenuation of EAAT3 activity. We investigated chronic nicotine exposure (72 h) cause reduction of the activity of EAAT3 in a Xenopus oocyte expression system using a two-electrode voltage clamp. The roles of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) were also determined. Nicotine (0.001-1 μM) resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in EAAT3 activity with maximal inhibition at nicotine concentrations of 0.03 μM or higher and at an exposure time of 72 h. Vmax on the glutamate response was significantly reduced in the nicotine group (0.03 μM for 72 h), but the Km value of EAAT3 for glutamate was not altered. When nicotine-exposed oocytes (0.03 μM for 72 h) were pretreated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator), the nicotine-induced reduction in EAAT3 activity was abolished. PKC inhibitors (staurosporine, chelerythrine, and calphostin C) significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity, but there were no significant differences among the PKC inhibitors, nicotine, and PKC inhibitors+nicotine groups. Similar response patterns were observed among PI3K inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002), nicotine, and PI3K inhibitors+nicotine. In conclusion, this study suggests that nicotine decreases EAAT3 activity, and that this inhibition seems to be dependent on PKC and PI3K. Our results may provide an additional mechanism for nicotine-induced seizure.

  12. Alternative splice variant of the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter: a novel player in renal salt handling.

    PubMed

    Tutakhel, Omar A Z; Jeleń, Sabina; Valdez-Flores, Marco; Dimke, Henrik; Piersma, Sander R; Jimenez, Connie R; Deinum, Jaap; Lenders, Jacques W; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M

    2016-02-01

    The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) is an important pharmacological target in the treatment of hypertension. The human SLC12A3 gene, encoding NCC, gives rise to three isoforms. Only the third isoform has been extensively investigated. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to establish the abundance and localization of the almost identical isoforms 1 and 2 (NCC1/2) in the human kidney and to determine their functional properties and regulation in physiological conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis of NCC1/2 in the human kidney revealed that NCC1/2 localizes to the apical plasma membrane of the distal convoluted tubule. Importantly, NCC1/2 mRNA constitutes ∼ 44% of all NCC isoforms in the human kidney. Functional analysis performed in the Xenopus laevis oocyte revealed that thiazide-sensitive (22)Na(+) transport of NCC1 was significantly increased compared with NCC3. Mimicking a constitutively active phosphorylation site at residue 811 (S811D) in NCC1 further augmented Na(+) transport, while a nonphosphorylatable variant (S811A) of NCC1 prevented this enhanced response. Analysis of human urinary exosomes demonstrated that water loading in human subjects significantly reduces the abundance of NCC1/2 in urinary exosomes. The present study highlights that previously underrepresented NCC1/2 is a fully functional thiazide-sensitive NaCl-transporting protein. Being significantly expressed in the kidney, it may constitute a unique route of renal NaCl reabsorption and could, therefore, play an important role in blood pressure regulation.

  13. Active transport and obesity prevention - A transportation sector obesity impact scoping review and assessment for Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Brown, V; Moodie, M; Mantilla Herrera, A M; Veerman, J L; Carter, R

    2017-03-01

    Given the alarming prevalence of obesity worldwide and the need for interventions to halt the growing epidemic, more evidence on the role and impact of transport interventions for obesity prevention is required. This study conducts a scoping review of the current evidence of association between modes of transport (motor vehicle, walking, cycling and public transport) and obesity-related outcomes. Eleven reviews and thirty-three primary studies exploring associations between transport behaviours and obesity were identified. Cohort simulation Markov modelling was used to estimate the effects of body mass index (BMI) change on health outcomes and health care costs of diseases causally related to obesity in the Melbourne, Australia population. Results suggest that evidence for an obesity effect of transport behaviours is inconclusive (29% of published studies reported expected associations, 33% mixed associations), and any potential BMI effect is likely to be relatively small. Hypothetical scenario analyses suggest that active transport interventions may contribute small but significant obesity-related health benefits across populations (approximately 65 health adjusted life years gained per year). Therefore active transport interventions that are low cost and targeted to those most amenable to modal switch are the most likely to be effective and cost-effective from an obesity prevention perspective. The uncertain but potentially significant opportunity for health benefits warrants the collection of more and better quality evidence to fully understand the potential relationships between transport behaviours and obesity. Such evidence would contribute to the obesity prevention dialogue and inform policy across the transportation, health and environmental sectors.

  14. Thermally activated charge transport in microbial protein nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Veazey, Joshua P.; Walsh, Kathleen A.; Feliciano, Gustavo T.; Steidl, Rebecca J.; Tessmer, Stuart H.; Reguera, Gemma

    2016-03-01

    The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the expression of conductive protein filaments or pili to respire extracellular electron acceptors such as iron oxides and uranium and to wire electroactive biofilms, but the contribution of the protein fiber to charge transport has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate efficient long-range charge transport along individual pili purified free of metal and redox organic cofactors at rates high enough to satisfy the respiratory rates of the cell. Carrier characteristics were within the orders reported for organic semiconductors (mobility) and inorganic nanowires (concentration), and resistivity was within the lower ranges reported for moderately doped silicon nanowires. However, the pilus conductance and the carrier mobility decreased when one of the tyrosines of the predicted axial multistep hopping path was replaced with an alanine. Furthermore, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy demonstrated the thermal dependence of the differential conductance at the low voltages that operate in biological systems. The results thus provide evidence for thermally activated multistep hopping as the mechanism that allows Geobacter pili to function as protein nanowires between the cell and extracellular electron acceptors.

  15. Thermally activated charge transport in microbial protein nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Veazey, Joshua P; Walsh, Kathleen A; Feliciano, Gustavo T; Steidl, Rebecca J; Tessmer, Stuart H; Reguera, Gemma

    2016-03-24

    The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the expression of conductive protein filaments or pili to respire extracellular electron acceptors such as iron oxides and uranium and to wire electroactive biofilms, but the contribution of the protein fiber to charge transport has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate efficient long-range charge transport along individual pili purified free of metal and redox organic cofactors at rates high enough to satisfy the respiratory rates of the cell. Carrier characteristics were within the orders reported for organic semiconductors (mobility) and inorganic nanowires (concentration), and resistivity was within the lower ranges reported for moderately doped silicon nanowires. However, the pilus conductance and the carrier mobility decreased when one of the tyrosines of the predicted axial multistep hopping path was replaced with an alanine. Furthermore, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy demonstrated the thermal dependence of the differential conductance at the low voltages that operate in biological systems. The results thus provide evidence for thermally activated multistep hopping as the mechanism that allows Geobacter pili to function as protein nanowires between the cell and extracellular electron acceptors.

  16. Thermally activated charge transport in microbial protein nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Veazey, Joshua P.; Walsh, Kathleen A.; Feliciano, Gustavo T.; Steidl, Rebecca J.; Tessmer, Stuart H.; Reguera, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the expression of conductive protein filaments or pili to respire extracellular electron acceptors such as iron oxides and uranium and to wire electroactive biofilms, but the contribution of the protein fiber to charge transport has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate efficient long-range charge transport along individual pili purified free of metal and redox organic cofactors at rates high enough to satisfy the respiratory rates of the cell. Carrier characteristics were within the orders reported for organic semiconductors (mobility) and inorganic nanowires (concentration), and resistivity was within the lower ranges reported for moderately doped silicon nanowires. However, the pilus conductance and the carrier mobility decreased when one of the tyrosines of the predicted axial multistep hopping path was replaced with an alanine. Furthermore, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy demonstrated the thermal dependence of the differential conductance at the low voltages that operate in biological systems. The results thus provide evidence for thermally activated multistep hopping as the mechanism that allows Geobacter pili to function as protein nanowires between the cell and extracellular electron acceptors. PMID:27009596

  17. Theory of activated transport in bilayer quantum Hall systems.

    PubMed

    Roostaei, B; Mullen, K J; Fertig, H A; Simon, S H

    2008-07-25

    We analyze the transport properties of bilayer quantum Hall systems at total filling factor nu=1 in drag geometries as a function of interlayer bias, in the limit where the disorder is sufficiently strong to unbind meron-antimeron pairs, the charged topological defects of the system. We compute the typical energy barrier for these objects to cross incompressible regions within the disordered system using a Hartree-Fock approach, and show how this leads to multiple activation energies when the system is biased. We then demonstrate using a bosonic Chern-Simons theory that in drag geometries current in a single layer directly leads to forces on only two of the four types of merons, inducing dissipation only in the drive layer. Dissipation in the drag layer results from interactions among the merons, resulting in very different temperature dependences for the drag and drive layers, in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  18. Radium geochemistry in Na-Cl type groundwater in Niigata Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Junpei; Satake, Hiroshi; Fukuyama, Taijiro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Sakaguchi, Aya; Yamamoto, Masayoshi

    2010-03-01

    Radium isotopes in 23 Na-Cl type groundwater sampled mainly from deep wells in Niigata Prefecture, which is the site of the largest oil- and gas-fields in Japan, were measured along with U isotopes, chemical components and hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios to elucidate the distribution and behavior of Ra in a brackish environment underground. Also analyzed were U and Th isotopes in 38 rock samples collected from outcrops at 17 locations. Ra-226 concentrations (8.86-1637 mBq kg(-1)) of groundwater samples roughly correlated with total dissolved solid (TDS) concentrations and other alkaline earth contents. Their (228)Ra/(226)Ra activity ratios (0.32-5.2) were similar to or higher than the (232)Th/(238)U activity ratios (0.6-1.7) in the rocks. The most likely transport mechanism of Ra isotopes into groundwater was due to their alpha-recoil from the solid phase, probably from the water-rock interface where Th isotopes had accumulated, and adsorption/desorption reaction based on the increase in (226)Ra contents with TDS.

  19. Complement activation of electrogenic ion transport in isolated rat colon.

    PubMed

    McCole, D F; Otti, B; Newsholme, P; Baird, A W

    1997-11-15

    The complement cascade is an important component in many immune and inflammatory reactions and may contribute to both the diarrhoea and inflammation associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Isolated rat colonic mucosae were voltage clamped in Ussing chambers. Basolateral addition of zymosan-activated whole human serum (ZAS) induced a rapid onset, transient inward short circuit current (SCC). This response was concentration dependent and was significantly attenuated by pre-heating ZAS at 60 degrees C for 30 min. Depletion of complement from normal human serum with cobra venom factor (CVF) significantly lowered SCC responses. Chloride was the primary charge carrying ion as responses to ZAS were abolished in the presence of the loop diuretic bumetanide. The complement component C3a stimulated ion transport but not to the same extent as whole serum. Exogenous C5 was without effect. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor piroxicam significantly attenuated the response to ZAS. These findings support the possibility that complement activation may contribute to the pathophysiology of secretory diarrhoea since activation of electrogenic chloride secretion converts intestinal epithelia to a state of net fluid secretion.

  20. Serotonin transporter genotype modulates amygdala activity during mood regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Hengyi; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Breland, Jessica; Sankoorikal, Geena Mary V.; Brodkin, Edward S.; Farah, Martha J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated the short allele of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) in depression vulnerability, particularly in the context of stress. Several neuroimaging studies have shown that 5-HTTLPR genotype predicts amygdala reactivity to negatively valenced stimuli, suggesting a mechanism whereby the short allele confers depression risk. The current study investigated whether 5-HTTLPR genotype similarly affects neural activity during an induced sad mood and during recovery from sad mood. Participants were 15 homozygous short (S) and 15 homozygous long (L) individuals. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured with perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging during four scanning blocks: baseline, sad mood, mood recovery and following return to baseline. Comparing mood recovery to baseline, both whole brain analyses and template-based region-of-interest analyses revealed greater amygdala activity for the S vs the L-group. There were no significant amygdala differences found during the induced sad mood. These results demonstrate the effect of the S allele on amygdala activity during intentional mood regulation and suggest that amygdala hyperactivity during recovery from a sad mood may be one mechanism by which the S allele confers depression risk. PMID:19858108

  1. Physical Activity Energy Expenditure in Dutch Adolescents: Contribution of Active Transport to School, Physical Education, and Leisure Time Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slingerland, Menno; Borghouts, Lars B.; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Detailed knowledge about physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) can guide the development of school interventions aimed at reducing overweight in adolescents. However, relevant components of PAEE have never been objectively quantified in this population. This study investigated the contribution of active transport to and from…

  2. Compromising KCC2 transporter activity enhances the development of continuous seizure activity

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Matthew R.; Deeb, Tarek Z.; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Dunlop, John; Davies, Paul A.; Moss, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired neuronal inhibition has long been associated with the increased probability of seizure occurrence and heightened seizure severity. Fast synaptic inhibition in the brain is primarily mediated by the type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs), ligand-gated ion channels that can mediate Cl− influx resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and the restriction of neuronal firing. In most adult brain neurons, the K+/Cl− co-transporter-2 (KCC2) establishes hyperpolarizing GABAergic inhibition by maintaining low [Cl−]i. In this study, we sought to understand how decreased KCC2 transport function affects seizure event severity. We impaired KCC2 transport in the 0-Mg2+ ACSF and 4-aminopyridine in vitro models of epileptiform activity in acute mouse brain slices. Experiments with the selective KCC2 inhibitor VU0463271 demonstrated that reduced KCC2 transport increased the duration of SLEs, resulting in non-terminating discharges of clonic-like activity. We also investigated slices obtained from the KCC2-Ser940Ala (S940A) point-mutant mouse, which has a mutation at a known functional phosphorylation site causing behavioral and cellular deficits under hyperexcitable conditions. We recorded from the entorhinal cortex of S940A mouse brain slices in both 0-Mg2+ ACSF and 4-aminopyridine, and demonstrated that loss of the S940 residue increased the susceptibility of continuous clonic-like discharges, an in vitro form of status epilepticus. Our experiments revealed KCC2 transport activity is a critical factor in seizure event duration and mechanisms of termination. Our results highlight the need for therapeutic strategies that potentiate KCC2 transport function in order to decrease seizure event severity and prevent the development of status epilepticus. PMID:27108931

  3. Some aspects of salinity responses in peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) to NaCl treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Yang, Hetong; Wu, Xiaoqing; Guo, Kai; Li, Jishun

    2015-05-01

    Salinity is a major stress that adversely affects plant growth and crop production. Understanding the cellular responses and molecular mechanisms by which plants perceive and adopt salinity stress is of fundamental importance. In this work, some of the cellular signaling events including cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the behaviors of organelles were analyzed in a salt-tolerant species (Keyuan-1) of peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) under NaCl treatment. Our results showed that 200 mM NaCl treatment elicited a distinct progress of cell death with chromatin condensation and caspase-3-like activation and a dramatic burst of ROS which was required for the execution of cell death. The major ROS accumulation occurred in the mitochondria and chloroplasts, which were the sources of ROS production under NaCl stress. Moreover, mitochondrial activity and photosynthetic capacity also exhibited the obvious decrease in the ROS-dependent manner under 200 mM NaCl stress. Furthermore, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) as well as the contents of ascorbate and glutathione changed in the concentration-dependent manner under NaCl stress. Altogether, our data showed the execution of programmed cell death (PCD), the ROS dynamics, and the behaviors of organelles especially mitochondria and chloroplasts in the cellular responses of peppermint to NaCl stress which can be used for the tolerance screening, and contributed to the understanding of the cellular responses and molecular mechanisms of peppermint to salinity stress, providing the theoretic basis for the further development and utilization of peppermint in saline areas.

  4. Temperature-dependent formation of NaCl dihydrate in levitated NaCl and sea salt aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Peckhaus, Andreas; Kiselev, Alexei; Wagner, Robert; Duft, Denis; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-12-28

    Recent laboratory studies indicate that the hydrated form of crystalline NaCl is potentially important for atmospheric processes involving depositional ice nucleation on NaCl dihydrate particles under cirrus cloud conditions. However, recent experimental studies reported a strong discrepancy between the temperature intervals where the efflorescence of NaCl dihydrate has been observed. Here we report the measurements of the volume specific nucleation rate of crystalline NaCl in the aqueous solution droplets of pure NaCl suspended in an electrodynamic balance at constant temperature and humidity in the range from 250 K to 241 K. Based on these measurements, we derive the interfacial energy of crystalline NaCl dihydrate in a supersaturated NaCl solution and determined its temperature dependence. Taking into account both temperature and concentration dependence of nucleation rate coefficients, we explain the difference in the observed fractions of NaCl dihydrate reported in the previous studies. Applying the heterogeneous classical nucleation theory model, we have been able to reproduce the 5 K shift of the NaCl dihydrate efflorescence curve observed for the sea salt aerosol particles, assuming the presence of super-micron solid inclusions (hypothetically gypsum or hemihydrate of CaSO4). These results support the notion that the phase transitions in microscopic droplets of supersaturated solution should be interpreted by accounting for the stochastic nature of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and cannot be understood on the ground of bulk phase diagrams alone.

  5. Morphological, Physiological, and Structural Responses of Two Species of Artemisia to NaCl Stress

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhi-Yong; Su, Yi-Ji; Teng, Nian-Jun; Chen, Su-Mei; Sun, Hai-Nan; Li, Chu-Ling; Chen, Fa-Di

    2013-01-01

    Effects of salt stress on Artemisia scoparia and A. vulgaris “Variegate” were examined. A. scoparia leaves became withered under NaCl treatment, whereas A. vulgaris “Variegate” leaves were not remarkably affected. Chlorophyll content decreased in both species, with a higher reduction in A. scoparia. Contents of proline, MDA, soluble carbohydrate, and Na+ increased in both species under salt stress, but A. vulgaris “Variegate” had higher level of proline and soluble carbohydrate and lower level of MDA and Na+. The ratios of K+/Na+, Ca2+/Na+, and Mg2+/Na+ in A. vulgaris “Variegate” under NaCl stress were higher. Moreover, A. vulgaris “Variegate” had higher transport selectivity of K+/Na+ from root to stem, stem to middle mature leaves, and upper newly developed leaves than A. scoparia under NaCl stress. A. vulgaris “Variegate” chloroplast maintained its morphological integrity under NaCl stress, whereas A. scoparia chloroplast lost integrity. The results indicated that A. scoparia is more sensitive to salt stress than A. vulgaris “Variegate.” Salt tolerance is mainly related to the ability of regulating osmotic pressure through the accumulation of soluble carbohydrates and proline, and the gradient distribution of K+ between roots and leaves was also contributed to osmotic pressure adjustment and improvement of plant salt tolerance. PMID:24235883

  6. NaCl stress impact on the key enzymes in glycolysis from Lactobacillus bulgaricus during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Sun, Jinwei; Qi, Xiaoxi; Liu, Libo

    2015-01-01

    The viability of Lactobacillus bulgaricus in freeze-drying is of significant commercial interest to dairy industries. In the study, L.bulgaricus demonstrated a significantly improved (p < 0.05) survival rate during freeze-drying when subjected to a pre-stressed period under the conditions of 2% (w/v) NaCl for 2 h in the late growth phase. The main energy source for the life activity of lactic acid bacteria is related to the glycolytic pathway. To investigate the phenomenon of this stress-related viability improvement in L. bulgaricus, the activities and corresponding genes of key enzymes in glycolysis during 2% NaCl stress were studied. NaCl stress significantly enhanced (p < 0.05) glucose utilization. The activities of glycolytic enzymes (phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase) decreased during freeze-drying, and NaCl stress were found to improve activities of these enzymes before and after freeze-drying. However, a transcriptional analysis of the corresponding genes suggested that the effect of NaCl stress on the expression of the pfk2 gene was not obvious. The increased survival of freeze-dried cells of L. bulgaricus under NaCl stress might be due to changes in only the activity or translation level of these enzymes in different environmental conditions but have no relation to their mRNA transcription level.

  7. NaCl stress impact on the key enzymes in glycolysis from Lactobacillus bulgaricus during freeze-drying

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun; Sun, Jinwei; Qi, Xiaoxi; Liu, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The viability of Lactobacillus bulgaricus in freeze-drying is of significant commercial interest to dairy industries. In the study, L.bulgaricus demonstrated a significantly improved (p < 0.05) survival rate during freeze-drying when subjected to a pre-stressed period under the conditions of 2% (w/v) NaCl for 2 h in the late growth phase. The main energy source for the life activity of lactic acid bacteria is related to the glycolytic pathway. To investigate the phenomenon of this stress-related viability improvement in L. bulgaricus, the activities and corresponding genes of key enzymes in glycolysis during 2% NaCl stress were studied. NaCl stress significantly enhanced (p < 0.05) glucose utilization. The activities of glycolytic enzymes (phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase) decreased during freeze-drying, and NaCl stress were found to improve activities of these enzymes before and after freeze-drying. However, a transcriptional analysis of the corresponding genes suggested that the effect of NaCl stress on the expression of the pfk2 gene was not obvious. The increased survival of freeze-dried cells of L. bulgaricus under NaCl stress might be due to changes in only the activity or translation level of these enzymes in different environmental conditions but have no relation to their mRNA transcription level. PMID:26691481

  8. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  9. The Association between Access to Public Transportation and Self-Reported Active Commuting

    PubMed Central

    Djurhuus, Sune; Hansen, Henning S.; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Active commuting provides routine-based regular physical activity which can reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Using public transportation involves some walking or cycling to a transit stop, transfers and a walk to the end location and users of public transportation have been found to accumulate more moderate physical activity than non-users. Understanding how public transportation characteristics are associated with active transportation is thus important from a public health perspective. This study examines the associations between objective measures of access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting. Self-reported time spent either walking or cycling commuting each day and the distance to workplace were obtained for adults aged 16 to 65 in the Danish National Health Survey 2010 (n = 28,928). Access to public transportation measures were computed by combining GIS-based road network distances from home address to public transit stops an integrating their service level. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the association between access to public transportation measures and active commuting. Distance to bus stop, density of bus stops, and number of transport modes were all positively associated with being an active commuter and with meeting recommendations of physical activity. No significant association was found between bus services at the nearest stop and active commuting. The results highlight the importance of including detailed measurements of access to public transit in order to identify the characteristics that facilitate the use of public transportation and active commuting. PMID:25489998

  10. The association between access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting.

    PubMed

    Djurhuus, Sune; Hansen, Henning S; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-12-05

    Active commuting provides routine-based regular physical activity which can reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Using public transportation involves some walking or cycling to a transit stop, transfers and a walk to the end location and users of public transportation have been found to accumulate more moderate physical activity than non-users. Understanding how public transportation characteristics are associated with active transportation is thus important from a public health perspective. This study examines the associations between objective measures of access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting. Self-reported time spent either walking or cycling commuting each day and the distance to workplace were obtained for adults aged 16 to 65 in the Danish National Health Survey 2010 (n = 28,928). Access to public transportation measures were computed by combining GIS-based road network distances from home address to public transit stops an integrating their service level. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the association between access to public transportation measures and active commuting. Distance to bus stop, density of bus stops, and number of transport modes were all positively associated with being an active commuter and with meeting recommendations of physical activity. No significant association was found between bus services at the nearest stop and active commuting. The results highlight the importance of including detailed measurements of access to public transit in order to identify the characteristics that facilitate the use of public transportation and active commuting.

  11. School Travel Planning: Mobilizing School and Community Resources to Encourage Active School Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buliung, Ron; Faulkner, Guy; Beesley, Theresa; Kennedy, Jacky

    2011-01-01

    Background: Active school transport (AST), school travel using an active mode like walking, may be important to children's overall physical activity. A "school travel plan" (STP) documents a school's transport characteristics and provides an action plan to address school and neighborhood barriers to AST. Methods: We conducted a pilot STP…

  12. Effect of NaCl concentration on productivity and mineral composition of Salicornia europaea as a potential crop for utilization NaCl in LSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, S. A.; Kovaleva, N. P.; Gribovskaya, I. V.; Dolgushev, V. A.; Tikhomirova, N. A.

    The accumulation of solid and liquid wastes in manmade ecosystems presents a problem that has not been efficiently solved yet. Urine, containing NaCl, are part of these products. This is an obstacle to the creation of biological systems with a largely closed material cycling, because the amount of solid and liquid wastes in them must be reduced to a minimum. A possible solution to the problem is to select plant species capable of utilizing sufficiently high concentrations of NaCl, edible for humans, and featuring high productivity. Until recently, the life support systems have included the higher plants that were either sensitive to salinization (wheat, many of the legumes, carrot, potato, maize) or relatively salt-resistant (barley, sugar beet, spinach). Salicomia europaea, whose above-ground part is fully edible for humans, is one of the most promising candidates to be included in life support systems. It is reported in the literature that this plant is capable of accumulating up to 50% NaCl (dry basis). Besides, excessive accumulation of sodium ions should bring forth a decrease in the uptake of potassium ions and other biogenic elements. The aim of this work is to study the feasibility of using S. europaea plants in growth chambers to involve NaCl into material cycling. Plants were grown in vegetation chambers at the irradiance of 100 or 150 W/m 2 PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) and the air temperature 24 °C, by two methods. The first method was to grow the plants on substrate - peat. The peat was supplemented with either 3% NaCl (Variant 1) or 6% NaCl (Variant 2) of the oven-dry mass of the peat. The second method was to grow the plants in water culture, using the solution with a full complement of nutrients, which contained 0.0005% of NaCl, 1% or 2%. The study showed that the addition of NaCl to the substrate or to the solution resulted in the formation of more succulent plants, which considerably increased their biomass. The amount of NaCl uptake

  13. Effects of NaCl stress on antioxidative enzymes of glycine Soja sieb.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan

    2009-03-15

    The activity of anti-oxidant enzymes (Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Peroxidase (POD), Catalase (CAT) and parameters of oxidative stress malondialdehyde (MDA) of shoots were investigated in S. sieb naturally salt-resistant halophyte. The seedlings of S. sieb were treated with varying (0, 80, 160 and 240 mM) NaCl stress. The results showed that NaCl played an important role in growth of S. sieb. It made obviously promotion of certain NaCl concentration to growth of S. sieb, the seeflings of S. sieb grew best under 80 mM salt stress. MDA concentration of S. sieb obviously decreased under 80 mM salt stress then increased with salt concentration increased. The activities of SOD, POD and CAT increased with the increase of the concentration of NaCl in S. sieb. The salt tolerance of this halophyte under salt stress condition are probably due to its ability to exhibit high SOD, POD and CAT enzyme activities and Soluble Sugar (SS) concentration.

  14. Are the correlates of active school transport context-specific?

    PubMed Central

    Larouche, R; Sarmiento, O L; Broyles, S T; Denstel, K D; Church, T S; Barreira, T V; Chaput, J-P; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Tudor-Locke, C; Zhao, P; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Previous research consistently indicates that children who engage in active school transport (AST) are more active than their peers who use motorized modes (car or bus). However, studies of the correlates of AST have been conducted predominantly in high-income countries and have yielded mixed findings. Using data from a heterogeneous sample of 12 country sites across the world, we investigated the correlates of AST in 9–11-year olds. METHODS: The analytical sample comprised 6555 children (53.8% girls), who reported their main travel mode to school and the duration of their school trip. Potential individual and neighborhood correlates of AST were assessed with a parent questionnaire adapted from previously validated instruments. Multilevel generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) were used to examine the associations between individual and neighborhood variables and the odds of engaging in AST while controlling for the child's school. Site moderated the relationship of seven of these variables with AST; therefore we present analyses stratified by site. RESULTS: The prevalence of AST varied from 5.2 to 79.4% across sites and the school-level intra-class correlation ranged from 0.00 to 0.56. For each site, the final GLMM included a different set of correlates of AST. Longer trip duration (that is, ⩾16 min versus ⩽15 min) was associated with lower odds of AST in eight sites. Other individual and neighborhood factors were associated with AST in three sites or less. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate wide variability in the prevalence and correlates of AST in a large sample of children from twelve geographically, economically and culturally diverse country sites. This suggests that AST interventions should not adopt a ‘one size fits all' approach. Future research should also explore the association between psychosocial factors and AST in different countries. PMID:27152191

  15. Effects of surfactants and thermodynamic activity of model active ingredient on transport over plant leaf cuticle.

    PubMed

    Fagerström, Anton; Kocherbitov, Vitaly; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Westbye, Peter; Bergström, Karin; Engblom, Johan

    2013-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of molecular transport across the cuticle of Clivia leaves. In vitro diffusion methodology was used to investigate the transport of a systemic fungicide, tebuconazole, over a model silicone membrane, enzymatically isolated cuticle membranes, and dermatomed leaves. It was shown that dermatomed leaves may replace enzymatically isolated cuticles. Furthermore, the effects of two surfactants, C(10)EO(7) and C(8)G(1.6), on the fungicide transport were investigated. Tebuconazole cuticle permeation was described using Fick's first law of diffusion, expressed by the thermodynamic activity of the solute in the membrane. A new method for calculation of diffusion coefficients in the membrane is proposed. To access the thermodynamic activity of the fungicide in the membranes, sorption isotherms of tebuconazole in the membrane materials studied were recorded. The thermodynamic activity of the fungicide in aqueous solutions was calculated from solubility data. For that purpose, the effect of surfactants on tebuconazole solubility was studied. The results show that addition of surfactants allows for higher concentrations of tebuconazole available for penetration. Nonetheless, at a fixed fungicide thermodynamic activity, all formulations produced the same flux over the silicone membrane independently on the fungicide concentration. This shows that the driving force across non-responding membranes is the gradient of thermodynamic activity, rather than the gradient of the fungicide concentration. In case of leaves, surfactants induced the same quantitative increase in both flux and diffusion coefficient of solute in the cuticle, while the cuticle-water partition coefficient was unaffected.

  16. [Physiological response and salt-tolerance of Gleditsia microphylla under NaCl stress].

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Hou, Yue-min; Li, Xin-yang; Chang, Yue-xia; Huang, Da-zhuang; Lu, Bing-she

    2015-11-01

    In order to exploit the salt-tolerance ability and mechanism of Gleditsia microphylla, the plant growth, cell membrane permeability, the activities of cell protective enzymes, and the distri- butions of Na+ and K+ in different tissues were investigated under various NaCl stress (0.053%, 0.15%, 0.3%, 0.45% and 0.6%) with potted two-year seedlings. The results were as follows: With the increase of NaCl concentration, the seedling growth decreased while the salt injured index in- creased, and the salt-tolerance thresholds of seedling was 0.42% NaCl. With the NaCl concentration increasing, the membrane permeability, superoxide anion radical generating rate and MDA content increased grandly, while the activities of SOD, POD and CAT demonstrated an increase-decrease curve which reached the peak at 0.3% or 0.45%. Under the high salt stress condition, the supero- xide anion could be consumed timely by increasing the activities of SOD, POD and CAT enzymes, which was useful to avoid cell injure. Under salt stress condition, the Na+ content in different tissues increased gradually, following the order of root > leaf > stem, and the K+ content and K+/Na+ in different tissues decreased, following the order of leaf > root > stem. The K+-Na+ selective transpor- tation coefficients (S(K+) · Na+) of stem and leaf tissues under the soil NaCl stress condition were both increased, following the order of leaf > stem. In conclusion, the findings suggested that the salt- adaptation mechanisms of G. microphylla were root salt-rejection by Na+ accumulation and restriction in root tissue and leaf salt-tolerance by a remarkably increased ability of K+ selective absorption and accumulation in leaf tissue.

  17. Active zone proteins are transported via distinct mechanisms regulated by Par-1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Kara R.; Sherman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of synapses underlies a plethora of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disease. Presynaptic specialization called the active zone plays a critical role in the communication with postsynaptic neuron. While the role of many proteins at the active zones in synaptic communication is relatively well studied, very little is known about how these proteins are transported to the synapses. For example, are there distinct mechanisms for the transport of active zone components or are they all transported in the same transport vesicle? Is active zone protein transport regulated? In this report we show that overexpression of Par-1/MARK kinase, a protein whose misregulation has been implicated in Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and neurodegenerative disorders, lead to a specific block in the transport of an active zone protein component- Bruchpilot at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions. Consistent with a block in axonal transport, we find a decrease in number of active zones and reduced neurotransmission in flies overexpressing Par-1 kinase. Interestingly, we find that Par-1 acts independently of Tau-one of the most well studied substrates of Par-1, revealing a presynaptic function for Par-1 that is independent of Tau. Thus, our study strongly suggests that there are distinct mechanisms that transport components of active zones and that they are tightly regulated. PMID:28222093

  18. Betaine Transport Imparts Osmotolerance on a Strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Hutkins, Robert W.; Ellefson, William L.; Kashket, Eva R.

    1987-01-01

    Unlike most Lactobacillus acidophilus strains, a specific strain, L. acidophilus IFO 3532, was found to grow in rich medium containing 1 M sodium acetate, KCl, or NaCl. This strain could also grow with up to 1.8 M NaCl or 3 M nonelectrolytes (fructose, xylose, or sorbitol) added. Thus, this strain was tolerant to osmotic pressures up to 2.8 osM. A search for an intracellular solute which conferred osmoprotection led to the identification of glycine betaine (betaine). Betaine was accumulated to high concentrations in cells growing in MRS medium supplemented with 1 M KCl or NaCl. Uptake of [14C]betaine by L. acidophilus 3532 cells suspended in buffer was stimulated by increasing the medium osmotic pressure with 1 M KCl or NaCl. The accumulated betaine was not metabolized further; transport was relatively specific for betaine and was dependent on an energy source. Other lactobacilli, more osmosensitive than strain 3532, including L. acidophilus strain E4356, L. bulgaricus 8144, and L. delbrueckii 9649, showed lower betaine transport rates in response to an osmotic challenge than L. acidophilus 3532. Experiments with chloramphenicol-treated L. acidophilus 3532 cells indicated that the transport system was not induced but appeared to be activated by an increase in osmotic pressure. PMID:16347448

  19. [Effects of NaCl stress on photosynthesis characteristics and fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction dynamics of Pistacia chinensis leaves].

    PubMed

    Li, Xu-Xin; Liu, Bing-Xiang; Guo, Zhi-Tao; Chang, Yue-Xia; He, Lei; Chen, Fang; Lu, Bing-She

    2013-09-01

    By using fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction dynamics analysis technique (JIP-test), this paper studied the photosynthesis characteristics and fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction dynamics of 1-year old Pistacia chinensis seedlings under the stress of NaCl at the concentrations 0% (CK), 0.15%, 0.3%, 0.45%, and 0.6%. With the increasing concentration of NaCl, the contents of Chl a, Chl b, and Chl (a+b) in the seedlings leaves decreased, the Chl a/b ratio decreased after an initial increase, and the carotenoid content increased. The net photosynthetic rate (P(n)) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) decreased gradually with increasing NaCl concentration. The decrease of P(n) was mainly attributed to the stomatal limitation when the NaCl concentration was lower than 0.3%, and to the non-stomatal limitation when the NaCl concentration was higher than 0.3%. The trapped energy flux per RC (TR0/CS0), electron transport flux per RC (ET0/CS0), density of RCs (RC/CS0), and yield or flux ratio (psi(0) or phi(E0)) decreased, but the absorption flux per CS (ABS/CS0) and the K phase (W(k)) and J phase (V) in the O-J-I-P chlorophyll fluorescence induction curves increased distinctly, indicating that NaCl stress damaged the leaf oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), donor sides, and PS II reaction centers. When the NaCl concentration reached 0.3%, the maximum photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) and performance index (PI(ABS)) decreased 17.7% and 36.6%, respectively, as compared with the control.

  20. Specific regulation of SOD isoforms by NaCl and osmotic stress in leaves of the C3 halophyte Suaeda salsa L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoshan; Lüttge, Ulrich; Ratajczak, Rafael

    2004-03-01

    The halophyte Suaeda salsa L., exposed to different NaCl concentrations (100 and 400 mmol/L) and polyethylene glycol (isoosomotic to 100 mmol/L NaCl) containing nutrient solutions under normal or K+-deficient conditions for 7 days, was used to study effects of NaCl salinity and osmotic stress on chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, malonedialdehyde (MDA) content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoform activities. Photosynthetic capacity was not decreased by NaCl treatment, indicating that S. salsa possesses an effective antioxidative response system for avoiding oxidative damage. Seven SOD activity bands were detected in S. salsa leaf extracts, including an Mn-SOD and several isoforms of Fe-SOD and CuZn-SOD. It turned out that NaCl salinity and osmotic stress lead to a differential regulation of distinct SOD isoenzymes. This differential regulation is suggested to play a major role in stress tolerance of S. salsa.

  1. Achieving recommended daily physical activity levels through commuting by public transportation: unpacking individual and contextual influences.

    PubMed

    Wasfi, Rania A; Ross, Nancy A; El-Geneidy, Ahmed M

    2013-09-01

    This paper estimates the amount of daily walking associated with using public transportation in a large metropolitan area and examines individual and contextual characteristics associated with walking distances. Total walking distance to and from transit was calculated from a travel diary survey for 6913 individuals. Multilevel regression modelling was used to examine the underlying factors associated with walking to public transportation. The physical activity benefits of public transportation varied along gender and socio-economic lines. Recommended minutes of daily physical activity can be achieved for public transportation users, especially train users living in affluent suburbs.

  2. Correlation between Electron Transport and Shear Alfven Activity in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Gorelenkov, N.; Fredrickson, E.; Kaye, S.; Mazzucato, E.

    2009-03-20

    We report the observation of a correlation between shear Alfven eigenmode activity and electron transport in plasma regimes where the electron temperature gradient is flat, and thus the drive for temperature gradient microinstabilities is absent. Plasmas having rapid central electron transport show intense, broadband global Alfven eigenmode (GAE) activity in the 0.5-1.1 MHz range, while plasmas with low transport are essentially GAE-free. The first theoretical assessment of a GAE-electron transport connection indicates that overlapping modes can resonantly couple to the bulk thermal electrons and induce their stochastic diffusion.

  3. Borreliacidal activity of Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA) binding small molecules by manganese transport inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Liu, Song; Kim, Kwang-Min; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, utilizes manganese (Mn) for its various metabolic needs. We hypothesized that blocking Mn transporter could be a possible approach to inhibit metabolic activity of this pathogen and eliminate the infection. We used a combination of in silico protein structure prediction together with molecular docking to target the Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA), a single known Mn transporter in Borrelia and screened libraries of FDA approved compounds that could potentially bind to the predicted BmtA structure with high affinity. Tricyclic antihistamines such as loratadine, desloratadine, and 3-hydroxydesloratadine as well as yohimbine and tadalafil demonstrated a tight binding to the in silico folded BmtA transporter. We, then, tested borreliacidal activity and dose response of the shortlisted compounds from this screen using a series of in vitro assays. Amongst the probed compounds, desloratadine exhibited potent borreliacidal activity in vitro at and above 78 μg/mL (250 μM). Borrelia treated with lethal doses of desloratadine exhibited a significant loss of intracellular Mn specifically and a severe structural damage to the bacterial cell wall. Our results support the possibility of developing a novel, targeted therapy to treat Lyme disease by targeting specific metabolic needs of Borrelia.

  4. Borreliacidal activity of Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA) binding small molecules by manganese transport inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Liu, Song; Kim, Kwang-Min; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, utilizes manganese (Mn) for its various metabolic needs. We hypothesized that blocking Mn transporter could be a possible approach to inhibit metabolic activity of this pathogen and eliminate the infection. We used a combination of in silico protein structure prediction together with molecular docking to target the Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA), a single known Mn transporter in Borrelia and screened libraries of FDA approved compounds that could potentially bind to the predicted BmtA structure with high affinity. Tricyclic antihistamines such as loratadine, desloratadine, and 3-hydroxydesloratadine as well as yohimbine and tadalafil demonstrated a tight binding to the in silico folded BmtA transporter. We, then, tested borreliacidal activity and dose response of the shortlisted compounds from this screen using a series of in vitro assays. Amongst the probed compounds, desloratadine exhibited potent borreliacidal activity in vitro at and above 78 μg/mL (250 μM). Borrelia treated with lethal doses of desloratadine exhibited a significant loss of intracellular Mn specifically and a severe structural damage to the bacterial cell wall. Our results support the possibility of developing a novel, targeted therapy to treat Lyme disease by targeting specific metabolic needs of Borrelia. PMID:25709405

  5. Physical activity associated with public transport use--a review and modelling of potential benefits.

    PubMed

    Rissel, Chris; Curac, Nada; Greenaway, Mark; Bauman, Adrian

    2012-07-01

    Active travel, particularly walking and cycling, has been recommended because of the health benefits associated with increased physical activity. Use of public transport generally involves some walking to bus stops or train stations. This paper is a systematic review of how much time is spent in physical activity among adults using public transport. It also explores the potential effect on the population level of physical activity if inactive adults in NSW, Australia, increased their walking through increased use of public transport. Of 1,733 articles, 27 met the search criteria, and nine reported on absolute measures of physical activity associated with public transport. A further 18 papers reported on factors associated with physical activity as part of public transport use. A range of 8-33 additional minutes of walking was identified from this systematic search as being attributable to public transport use. Using "bootstrapping" statistical modelling, if 20% of all inactive adults increased their walking by only 16 minutes a day for five days a week, we predict there would be a substantial 6.97% increase in the proportion of the adult population considered "sufficiently active". More minutes walked per day, or a greater uptake of public transport by inactive adults would likely lead to significantly greater increases in the adult population considered sufficiently active.

  6. Physical Activity Associated with Public Transport Use—A Review and Modelling of Potential Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Rissel, Chris; Curac, Nada; Greenaway, Mark; Bauman, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Active travel, particularly walking and cycling, has been recommended because of the health benefits associated with increased physical activity. Use of public transport generally involves some walking to bus stops or train stations. This paper is a systematic review of how much time is spent in physical activity among adults using public transport. It also explores the potential effect on the population level of physical activity if inactive adults in NSW, Australia, increased their walking through increased use of public transport. Of 1,733 articles, 27 met the search criteria, and nine reported on absolute measures of physical activity associated with public transport. A further 18 papers reported on factors associated with physical activity as part of public transport use. A range of 8–33 additional minutes of walking was identified from this systematic search as being attributable to public transport use. Using “bootstrapping” statistical modelling, if 20% of all inactive adults increased their walking by only 16 minutes a day for five days a week, we predict there would be a substantial 6.97% increase in the proportion of the adult population considered “sufficiently active”. More minutes walked per day, or a greater uptake of public transport by inactive adults would likely lead to significantly greater increases in the adult population considered sufficiently active. PMID:22851954

  7. Drug Transporter Expression and Activity in Human Hepatoma HuH-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jouan, Elodie; Le Vée, Marc; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatoma cells may represent a valuable alternative to the use of human hepatocytes for studying hepatic drug transporters, which is now a regulatory issue during drug development. In the present work, we have characterized hepatic drug transporter expression, activity and regulation in human hepatoma HuH-7 cells, in order to determine the potential relevance of these cells for drug transport assays. HuH-7 cells displayed notable multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) activity, presumed to reflect expression of various hepatic MRPs, including MRP2. By contrast, they failed to display functional activities of the uptake transporters sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) and organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1), and of the canalicular transporters P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Concomitantly, mRNA expressions of various sinusoidal and canalicular hepatic drug transporters were not detected (NTCP, OATP1B1, organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2), OCT1 and bile salt export pump) or were found to be lower (OATP1B3, OATP2B1, multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1, BCRP and MRP3) in hepatoma HuH-7 cells than those found in human hepatocytes, whereas other transporters such as OAT7, MRP4 and MRP5 were up-regulated. HuH-7 cells additionally exhibited farnesoid X receptor (FXR)- and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-related up-regulation of some transporters. Such data indicate that HuH-7 cells, although expressing rather poorly some main hepatic drug transporters, may be useful for investigating interactions of drugs with MRPs, notably MRP2, and for studying FXR- or Nrf2-mediated gene regulation. PMID:28036031

  8. Opposite-polarity motors activate one another to trigger cargo transport in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Shabeen; Larson, Adam G.; Barlan, Kari; Rice, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular transport is typically bidirectional, consisting of a series of back and forth movements. Kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein require each other for bidirectional transport of intracellular cargo along microtubules; i.e., inhibition or depletion of kinesin-1 abolishes dynein-driven cargo transport and vice versa. Using Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we demonstrate that replacement of endogenous kinesin-1 or dynein with an unrelated, peroxisome-targeted motor of the same directionality activates peroxisome transport in the opposite direction. However, motility-deficient versions of motors, which retain the ability to bind microtubules and hydrolyze adenosine triphosphate, do not activate peroxisome motility. Thus, any pair of opposite-polarity motors, provided they move along microtubules, can activate one another. These results demonstrate that mechanical interactions between opposite-polarity motors are necessary and sufficient for bidirectional organelle transport in live cells. PMID:20038680

  9. The role of NaCl in flame chemistry, in the deposition process, and in its reactions with protective oxides as related to hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium chloride is believed to be the primary source of turbine engine contamination that contributes to hot corrosion. The behavior of NaCl-containing aerosols ingested with turbine intake air is very complex; some of the NaCl may vaporize during combustion while some may remain as particulates. The NaCl can lead to Na2SO4 formation by several possible routes or it can contribute to corrosion directly. Hydrogen or oxygen atom reaction with NaCl(c) was shown to result in the release of Na(g). Gaseous NaCl in flames can be partially converted to gaseous Na2SO4 by homogeneous reactions. The remaining gaseous NaCl and other Na-containing molecules can act as sodium carriers for condensate deposition of Na2SO4 on cool surfaces. A frozen boundary layer theory was developed to predict the rates of deposition. The condensed phase NaCl can be converted directly to condensed Na2SO4 by reaction with sulfur oxides and O2. Reaction of gaseous NaCl with Cr2O3 results in the vapor phase transport of chromium by the formation of complex Cr-containing gaseous molecules. Similar gaseous complexes are formed with molybdenum. The presence of gaseous NaCl was shown to affect the oxidation kinetics of Ni-Cr alloys. It also causes changes in the surface morphology of Al2O3 scales formed on Al-containing alloys.

  10. A systematic review of interventions for promoting active transportation to school

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Active transportation to school is an important contributor to the total physical activity of children and adolescents. However, active school travel has declined over time, and interventions are needed to reverse this trend. The purpose of this paper is to review intervention studies related to active school transportation to guide future intervention research. Methods A systematic review was conducted to identify intervention studies of active transportation to school published in the scientific literature through January 2010. Five electronic databases and a manual search were conducted. Detailed information was extracted, including a quantitative assessment comparing the effect sizes, and a qualitative assessment using an established evaluation tool. Results We identified 14 interventions that focused on active transportation to school. These interventions mainly focused on primary school children in the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom. Almost all the interventions used quasi-experimental designs (10/14), and most of the interventions reported a small effect size on active transportation (6/14). Conclusion More research with higher quality study designs and measures should be conducted to further evaluate interventions and to determine the most successful strategies for increasing active transportation to school. PMID:21320322

  11. Regulation of hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by organochlorine pesticides.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Simon; Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Fardel, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Organochlorine (OC) pesticides constitute a major class of persistent and toxic organic pollutants, known to modulate drug-detoxifying enzymes. In the present study, OCs were demonstrated to also alter the activity and expression of human hepatic drug transporters. Activity of the sinusoidal influx transporter OCT1 (organic cation transporter 1) was thus inhibited by endosulfan, chlordane, heptachlor, lindane, and dieldrine, but not by dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane isomers, whereas those of the canalicular efflux pumps MRP2 (multidrug resistance-associated protein 2) and BCRP (breast cancer resistance protein) were blocked by endosulfan, chlordane, heptachlor, and chlordecone; this latter OC additionally inhibited the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1)/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity. OCs, except endosulfan, were next found to induce MDR1/P-gp and MRP2 mRNA expressions in hepatoma HepaRG cells; some of them also upregulated BCRP. By contrast, expression of sinusoidal transporters was not impaired (organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 and OATP2B1) or was downregulated (sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) and OCT1). Such regulations of drug transporter activity and expression, depending on the respective nature of OCs and transporters, may contribute to the toxicity of OC pesticides.

  12. Multimotor transport in a system of active and inactive kinesin-1 motors.

    PubMed

    Scharrel, Lara; Ma, Rui; Schneider, René; Jülicher, Frank; Diez, Stefan

    2014-07-15

    Long-range directional transport in cells is facilitated by microtubule-based motor proteins. One example is transport in a nerve cell, where small groups of motor proteins, such as kinesins and cytoplasmic dynein, work together to ensure the supply and clearance of cellular material along the axon. Defects in axonal transport have been linked to Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. However, it is not known in detail how multimotor-based cargo transport is impaired if a fraction of the motors are defective. To mimic impaired multimotor transport in vitro, we performed gliding motility assays with varying fractions of active kinesin-1 motors and inactive kinesin-1 motor mutants. We found that impaired transport manifests in multiple motility regimes: 1), a fast-motility regime characterized by gliding at velocities close to the single-molecule velocity of the active motors; 2), a slow-motility regime characterized by gliding at close-to zero velocity or full stopping; and 3), a regime in which fast and slow motilities coexist. Notably, the transition from the fast to the slow regime occurred sharply at a threshold fraction of active motors. Based on single-motor parameters, we developed a stochastic model and a mean-field theoretical description that explain our experimental findings. Our results demonstrate that impaired multimotor transport mostly occurs in an either/or fashion: depending on the ratio of active to inactive motors, transport is either performed at close to full speed or is out of action.

  13. Calcium-induced proline accumulation contributes to amelioration of NaCl injury and expression of glutamine synthetase in greater duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tai-Sheng; Hung, Meng-Ju; Cheng, Yen-I; Cheng, Lee-Ju

    2013-11-15

    The calcium-mediated proline accumulation is a critical response under NaCl stress and the function of the induced proline as a glutamine synthetase (GS) protectant in greater duckweed was investigated. The plants were treated with solutions containing 100mM NaCl, 200 mM NaCl, 200 mM NaCl plus 10mM CaCl2, or 10mM CaCl2 alone for 4 days. At the end of the experiment, the fronds of inoculum treated with 200 mM NaCl showed the chlorotic effect, higher glutamate dehydrogenase (NADH-GDH) activity and lower GS activity. At the lower salinity, the activities of GS and NADH-GDH were not altered markedly. A significant accumulation of proline was not found under either low or high salinity. The activity of Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) was enhanced only at 200 mM NaCl but remained unchanged at 100mM NaCl. The activity of Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) did not change under salinity-stressed. Addition of CaCl2 to the salt stressed plants not only lowered NaCl injury but also showed an elevated level of proline contents in response to the salinity treatment. In addition, both GS activity and corresponding polypeptides were expressed close to the level of control. Exogenous proline protects GS2 and the 32 kDa protein in photosystem II reaction center (D1) from H2O2-induced redox degradation in the chloroplast lysates of duckweed. The results suggest that calcium-induced proline accumulation may play an important role as a GS protectant under NaCl exposure in S. polyrhiza.

  14. Individual Public Transportation Accessibility is Positively Associated with Self-Reported Active Commuting

    PubMed Central

    Djurhuus, Sune; Hansen, Henning Sten; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background: Active commuters have lower risk of chronic disease. Understanding which of the, to some extent, modifiable characteristics of public transportation that facilitate its use is thus important in a public health perspective. The aim of the study was to examine the association between individual public transportation accessibility and self-reported active commuting, and whether the associations varied with commute distance, age, and gender. Methods: Twenty-eight thousand nine hundred twenty-eight commuters in The Capital Region of Denmark reported self-reported time spent either walking or cycling to work or study each day and the distance to work or study. Data were obtained from the Danish National Health Survey collected in February to April 2010. Individual accessibility by public transportation was calculated using a multi-modal network in a GIS. Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the association between accessibility, expressed as access area, and being an active commuter. Results: Public transport accessibility area based on all stops within walking and cycling distance was positively associated with being an active commuter. Distance to work, age, and gender modified the associations. Residing within 10 km commute distance and in areas of high accessibility was associated with being an active commuter and meeting the recommendations of physical activity. For the respondents above 29 years, individual public transportation accessibility was positively associated with being an active commuter. Women having high accessibility had significantly higher odds of being an active commuter compared to having a low accessibility. For men, the associations were insignificant. Conclusion: This study extends the knowledge about the driving forces of using public transportation for commuting by examining the individual public transportation accessibility. Findings suggest that transportation accessibility supports active commuting and planning

  15. Inhibition of Human Drug Transporter Activities by the Pyrethroid Pesticides Allethrin and Tetramethrin

    PubMed Central

    Chedik, Lisa; Bruyere, Arnaud; Le Vee, Marc; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Potin, Sophie; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Pyrethroids are widely-used chemical insecticides, to which humans are commonly exposed, and known to alter functional expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. Limited data have additionally suggested that drug transporters, that constitute key-actors of the drug detoxification system, may also be targeted by pyrethroids. The present study was therefore designed to analyze the potential regulatory effects of these pesticides towards activities of main ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) drug transporters, using transporter-overexpressing cells. The pyrethroids allethrin and tetramethrin were found to inhibit various ABC and SLC drug transporters, including multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), organic anion transporter polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter (MATE) 1, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and OCT2, with IC50 values however ranging from 2.6 μM (OCT1 inhibition by allethrin) to 77.6 μM (OAT3 inhibition by tetramethrin) and thus much higher than pyrethroid concentrations (in the nM range) reached in environmentally pyrethroid-exposed humans. By contrast, allethrin and tetramethrin cis-stimulated OATP2B1 activity and failed to alter activities of OATP1B3, OAT1 and MATE2-K, whereas P-glycoprotein activity was additionally moderately inhibited. Twelve other pyrethoids used at 100 μM did not block activities of the various investigated transporters, or only moderately inhibited some of them (inhibition by less than 50%). In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that molecular parameters, including molecular weight and lipophilicity, are associated with transporter inhibition by allethrin/tetramethrin and successfully predicted transporter inhibition by the pyrethroids imiprothrin and prallethrin. Taken together, these data fully demonstrated that two pyrethoids, i.e., allethrin and tetramethrin, can

  16. Molecular features of the prazosin molecule required for activation of Transport-P.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joaquim Fernando Mendes; Walters, Marcus; Al-Damluji, Saad; Ganellin, C Robin

    2008-08-01

    Closely related structural analogues of prazosin have been synthesised and tested for inhibition and activation of Transport-P in order to identify the structural features of the prazosin molecule that appear to be necessary for activation of Transport-P. So far, all the compounds tested are less active than prazosin. It is shown that the structure of prazosin appears to be very specific for the activation. Only quinazolines have been found to activate, and the presence of the 6,7-dimethoxy and 4-amino groups appears to be critically important.

  17. Dopamine Transporter Genotype Conveys Familial Risk of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder through Striatal Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durston, Sarah; Fossella, John A.; Mulder, Martijn J.; Casey B. J.; Ziermans, Tim B.; Vessaz, M. Nathalie; Van Engeland, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the effect of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) genotype in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The results confirm that DAT1 translates the genetic risk of ADHD through striatal activation.

  18. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  19. 76 FR 73020 - Agency Information Collection (Request for Transportation Expense Reimbursement): Activity Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... unable to pursue training or employment without travel assistance. An agency may not conduct or sponsor... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Request for Transportation Expense Reimbursement): Activity...

  20. Differential tolerance of 3 self-rooted Citrus limon cultivars to NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Tsabarducas, V; Chatzistathis, T; Therios, I; Koukourikou-Petridou, M; Tananaki, C

    2015-12-01

    One-year-old self-rooted cuttings of three Citrus limon cultivars (Nouvel Athos, Lisbon, Maglini) were grown in 1 L black plastic bags, containing a mixture of sand: perlite (1:1), in order to investigate: i) if genotypic differences to salt stress existed, ii) if KNO3 can alleviate salinity stress, iii) the role of carbohydrates (such as the sugars fructose, glucose and sucrose) and proline as possible osmoregulators in C. limon osmoprotection, and iv) if genotypic differences to salt stress tolerance exist among the 3 studied cultivars. The experiment included 3 treatments: i) control (C), i.e. 25% modified Hoagland (No2) solution (MHS)-NaCl, ii) T1, 25% MHS+80 mM NaCl, iii) T2, 25% MHS+80 mM NaCl+5 mM KNO3. Plant growth was negatively affected by high NaCl (T1); the highest Cl and Na quantities have been absorbed by Lisbon, while the lowest ones by Maglini. Salt stress reduced macronutrient and Zn concentrations, as well as the total carbohydrate concentration, and increased peroxidase (POD) activity and chlorophyll fluorescence in the leaves of the 3 C. limon cultivars studied; five mM KNO3 application alleviated the harmful effect of salt stress on leaf total carbohydrate concentration and leaf N and K concentrations. Sucrose was dramatically reduced in all the three genotypes studied, while leaf fructose concentration was significantly increased in Nouvel Nouvel Nouvel Athos and Maglini under salt stress. Leaf proline concentration of Maglini was significantly decreased by the high NaCl concentration, while Nouvel Athos and Lisbon had high proline concentration in their leaves. In conclusion, from the significantly decreased levels of proline for Maglini, together with the greatest reduction of the ratio Fv/Fm and the least enhancement of POD activity-compared to the other two cultivars-it can be concluded that Maglini was more susceptible to salinity, and should not be preferred for cultivation under NaCl stress. Finally, rich KNO3 application

  1. The Role of Flexible Loops in Folding, Trafficking and Activity of Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters.

    PubMed

    Aseervatham, Jaya; Tran, Lucky; Machaca, Khaled; Boudker, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are integral membrane proteins, which reside in plasma membranes of all eukaryotic cells and mediate thermodynamically downhill transport of nucleosides. This process is essential for nucleoside recycling, and also plays a key role in terminating adenosine-mediated cellular signaling. Furthermore, ENTs mediate the uptake of many drugs, including anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. The structure and mechanism, by which ENTs catalyze trans-membrane transport of their substrates, remain unknown. To identify the core of the transporter needed for stability, activity, and for its correct trafficking to the plasma membrane, we have expressed human ENT deletion mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes and determined their localization, transport properties and susceptibility to inhibition. We found that the carboxyl terminal trans-membrane segments are essential for correct protein folding and trafficking. In contrast, the soluble extracellular and intracellular loops appear to be dispensable, and must be involved in the fine-tuning of transport regulation.

  2. Statistics of active transport in Xenopus melanophores cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Barlan, K.; Aranson, I. S.; Gelfand, V. I.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-11-01

    The transport of cell cargo, such as organelles and protein complexes in the cytoplasm, is determined by cooperative action of molecular motors stepping along polar cytoskeletal elements. Analysis of transport of individual organelles generated useful information about the properties of the motor proteins and underlying cytoskeletal elements. In this work, for the first time (to our knowledge), we study collective movement of multiple organelles using Xenopus melanophores, pigment cells that translocate several thousand of pigment granules (melanosomes), spherical organelles of a diameter of {approx} 1 {micro}m. These cells disperse melanosomes in the cytoplasm in response to high cytoplasmic cAMP, while at low cAMP melanosomes cluster at the cell center. Obtained results suggest spatial and temporal organization, characterized by strong correlations between movement of neighboring organelles, with correlation length of {approx} 4 {micro}m and pair lifetime {approx} 5 s. Furthermore, velocity statistics revealed strongly non-Gaussian velocity distribution with high velocity tails demonstrating exponential behavior suggestive of strong velocity correlations. Depolymerization of vimentin intermediate filaments using a dominant-negative vimentin mutant or actin with cytochalasin B reduced correlation of behavior of individual particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that steric repulsion is dominant, but both intermediate filaments and actin microfilaments are involved in dynamic cross-linking organelles in the cytoplasm.

  3. Auxin Activity of Substituted Benzoic Acids and Their Effect on Polar Auxin Transport 1

    PubMed Central

    Keitt, George W.; Baker, Robert A.

    1966-01-01

    Six dichloro-, 3 trichloro-, 2 triiodo-, and 3 heterosubstituted benzoic acids (amiben, dinoben, dicamba), and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid have been tested for effects on growth and on polar auxin transport. Growth activity with and without kinetin was measured by effects on fresh and dry weights of 30-day cultures of fresh tobacco pith. Transport inhibition was measured by following uptake and output of IAA-2-14C through 10 mm bean epicotyl sections. The distribution of callus growth on vascularized tobacco stem segments was also observed. Avena first internode extension assays established the relative activities: dicamba > amiben > dinoben suggested by pith growth results. Growth effects of active compounds were similar with and without kinetin, except that amiben was less active with kinetin, while 2,3,6-trichlorobenzoic acid was more active with kinetin than alone. The weak auxin activity of NPA was confirmed. Transport experiments showed that NPA was the most inhibitory compound tested, followed by TIBA. Other compounds tested were at least 300 times less inhibitory to IAA transport. The best growth promoters were the least inhibitory to transport, and the most effective transport inhibitors were at best poor auxins. It is suggested that the weak auxin and auxin synergistic activity of TIBA (and perhaps 2,3-dichlorobenzoic acid) in extension growth tests arises from its inhibition of transport of endogenous or added auxin out of the sections, rather than from its intrinsic auxin activity. Chemically induced apolar callus growth on vascularized tobacco stem explants can arise from inhibition of native auxin transport, apolar growth stimulation by auxinic action of the test compound, or both. PMID:16656441

  4. Parental Involvement in Active Transport to School Initiatives: A Multi-Site Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy; Baldwin, Julie; Carnoske, Cheryl; Nickelson, Jan; Troped, Philip; Steinman, Lesley; Pluto, Delores; Litt, Jill; Evenson, Kelly; Terpstra, Jennifer; Brownson, Ross; Schmid, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background: Increasing physical activity in youth is a recommended approach to curbing the childhood obesity epidemic. One way to help increase children's daily activity is to promote active transportation to and from school (ATS). Purpose: The purpose of this case study was to explore parental perception of, and participation in, ATS initiatives.…

  5. High Pressure Strength Study on NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Z.; Shieh, S. R.; High Pressure Mineral Physics Group

    2010-12-01

    Yield strength is regarded as one important property related to rheological characteristics of minerals in the Earth’s interior. The strength study of NaCl, a popular pressure medium in static high pressure experiments, has been carried out under non-hydrostatic conditions in a diamond anvil cell up to 43 GPa at room temperature using radial energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique. Phase transformation from B1 (rock salt structure) to B2 (CsCl structure) starts at 29.4 GPa, and is complete at 32.1 GPa. Bulk modulus obtained by third order Birch-Manurgham equation of state is 25.5 GPa with pressure derivative 4.6 for B1 phase, and 30.78 GPa with pressure derivative 4.32 GPa for B2 phase, which are in a good agreement with previous studies. The differential stress of NaCl B1 phase shows very gentle increase with pressure, which indicates that NaCl is a very good pressure-transmitting medium at pressure below 30 GPa. However, the differential stress increases more abruptly for B2 phase and this may imply that NaCl can no longer be regarded as a “soft” pressure medium at very high pressures. For B1 phase, (111) is the strongest plane and (200) is the weakest plane, while (200) becomes the strongest plane in B2 phase. Pure NaCl is weaker than mixture MgO and NaCl, which indicates that soft material become stronger when mixed with hard material. The yield strength of B2 obtained through energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique increase linearly, while the value derived by pressure gradient method shows jagged trend.

  6. Barrier Crossing and Transport Activated by Kangaroo Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostur, M.; Luczka, J.

    1999-01-01

    We study barrier crossing of Brownian particles in a bistable symmetric potential and transport of Brownian particles in spatially periodic structures, driven by both kangaroo fluctuations and thermal equilibrium noise of zero mean values. We consider exponentially and algebraically correlated kangaroo fluctuations. Starting with the full Newton--Langevin equation for the Brownian particle and by introducing scaling as well as dimensionless variables, we show that the equation is very well approximated by overdamped dynamics in which inertial effects can be neglected. We analyze properties of selected macroscopic characteristics of the system such as the mean first passage time (MFPT) of particles from one minimum of the bistable potential to the other and mean stationary velocity of particles moving in a spatially periodic potential. In dependence upon statistics of kangaroo fluctuations and temperature of the system, macroscopic characteristics exhibit distinctive non-monotonic behavior. Accordingly, there exist optimal statistics of fluctuations optimizing macroscopic characteristics.

  7. Corrosion Behavior of Titanium Grade 7 in Fluoride-Containing NaCl Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, T; Whalen, M T; Wong, L

    2004-10-25

    The effects of fluoride on the corrosion behavior of Titanium Grade 7 (0.12-0.25% Pd) have been investigated. Up to 0.1 mol/L fluoride was added to the NaCl brines at 95 C, and three pH values of 4, 8, and 11 were selected for studying pH dependence of fluoride effects. It was observed that fluoride significantly altered the anodic polarization behavior, at all three pH values of 4, 8, and 11. Under acidic condition fluoride caused active corrosion. The corrosion of Titanium grade 7 was increased by three orders of magnitude when a 0.1 mol/L fluoride was added to the NaCl brines at pH 4, and the Pd ennoblement effect was not observed in acidic fluoride-containing environments. The effects of fluoride were reduced significantly when pH was increased to 8 and above.

  8. Activated Transport in the Separate Layers that Form the νT=1 Exciton Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, R. D.; Lok, J. G.; Kraus, S.; Dietsche, W.; von Klitzing, K.; Schuh, D.; Bichler, M.; Tranitz, H.-P.; Wegscheider, W.

    2004-12-01

    We observe the total filling factor νT=1 quantum Hall state in a bilayer two-dimensional electron system with virtually no tunneling. We find thermally activated transport in the balanced system with a monotonic increase of the activation energy with decreasing d/ℓB below 1.65. In the imbalanced system we find activated transport in each of the layers separately, yet the activation energies show a striking asymmetry around the balance point, implying a different excitation spectrum for the separate layers forming the condensed state.

  9. [Function of transport H+-ATPases in plant cell plasma and vacuolar membranes of maize under salt stress conditions and effect of adaptogenic preparations].

    PubMed

    Rybchenko, Zh I; Palladina, T O

    2011-01-01

    Participations of electrogenic H+-pumps of plasma and vacuolar membranes represented by E1-E2 and V-type H+-ATPases in plant cell adaptation to salt stress conditions has been studied by determination of their transport activities. Experiments were carried out on corn seedlings exposed during 1 or 10 days at 0.1 M NaCl. Preparations Methyure and Ivine were used by seed soaking at 10(-7) M. Plasma and vacuolar membrane fractions were isolated from corn seedling roots. In variants without NaCl a hydrolytical activity of plasma membrane H+-ATPase was increased with seedling age and its transport one was changed insignificantly, wherease the response of the weaker vacuolar H+-ATPase was opposite. NaCl exposition decreased hydrolytical activities of both H+-ATPases and increased their transport ones. These results demonstrated amplification of H+-pumps function especially represented by vacuolar H+-ATPase. Both preparations, Methyure mainly, caused a further increase of transport activity which was more expressed in NaCl variants. Obtained results showed the important role of these H+-pumps in plant adaptation under salt stress conditions realized by energetical maintenance of the secondary active Na+/H+ -antiporters which remove Na+ from cytoplasm.

  10. Role of thyroxine on postnatal development of ileal active bile salt transport

    SciTech Connect

    Heubi, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    The role of thyroid hormone on the postnatal development of ileal active taurocholate transport uptake was measured by an in vitro incubation technique in Sprague-Dawley rats. In 16-day-old rats treated with pharmacological doses of L-thyroxine ileal active transport appeared precociously whose K/sub m/ was 1.60 +/- 0.48 mM and V/sub app/ was 8.09 +/- 1.14 nmol min mg dry wt , while age-matched shams had only passive diffusion of taurocholate. To determine whether enhanced endogenous secretion of thyroxine was capable of stimulating development of ileal active taurocholate transport, thyrotrophic stimulating hormone (TSH) was given on days 10-13, with uptake measured on day 16. Following TSH treatment, only passive transport for taurocholate was observed in the ileum; uptake rates were consistently higher than those for untreated controls at each study concentration. Thyroidectomy performed at age 14 days with uptake measured at age 21 days did not ablate development of ileal active transport but resulted in a significant reduction in the V/sub app/ and a significant increase in K/sub m/ compared with age-matched controls. Thyroid hormone does not appear to be obligatory for the postnatal development of ileal active taurocholate transport.

  11. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-12-14

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A{sup 2−}, a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A{sup 2-} by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site.

  12. Perceived neighborhood environmental attributes associated with leisure-time and transport physical activity in Mexican adults.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, Alejandra; Salvo, Deborah; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Hernández, Bernardo; Rivera, Juan A; Pratt, Michael

    2016-12-07

    Environmental factors have been associated with specific physical activity domains, including leisure-time and transport physical activity, in some high income countries. Few studies have examined the environmental correlates for domain-specific physical activity in low-and middle-income countries, and results are inconsistent. We aimed to estimate the associations between perceived environment and self-reported leisure-time walking, moderate-to-vigorous leisure-time physical activity and transport physical activity among adults living in Cuernavaca, Mexico. A population-based study of adults 20 to 64years old was conducted in Cuernavaca, Mexico in 2011 (n=677). Leisure and transport physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire - Long Form. Perceptions of neighborhood environment were obtained by questionnaire. Hurdle regression models estimated the association between environmental perceptions and participation and time spent in each physical activity domain. High perceived aesthetics were positively correlated with participation and time spent in leisure-time walking and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. SES differences existed for aesthetics in relation to participation in leisure-time walking. Participation in transport physical activity was positively associated with easy access to large parks, while closer distance to large parks was a negative correlate for participation and time-spent in this physical activity domain. Results suggest that perceived environmental characteristics related with physical activity are domain specific. High perceived aesthetics were an important correlate for leisure-time activities among Mexican adults, suggesting that policy strategies aimed at improving this environmental perception may be warranted. Patterns of associations between environmental correlates and transport physical activity differed from those reported in commonly studied high income countries.

  13. Amino-acid transporters in T-cell activation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ren, W; Liu, G; Yin, J; Tan, B; Wu, G; Bazer, F W; Peng, Y; Yin, Y

    2017-03-02

    T-cell-mediated immune responses aim to protect mammals against cancers and infections, and are also involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. Cellular uptake and the utilization of nutrients is closely related to the T-cell fate decision and function. Research in this area has yielded surprising findings in the importance of amino-acid transporters for T-cell development, homeostasis, activation, differentiation and memory. In this review, we present current information on amino-acid transporters, such as LAT1 (l-leucine transporter), ASCT2 (l-glutamine transporter) and GAT-1 (γ-aminobutyric acid transporter-1), which are critically important for mediating peripheral naive T-cell homeostasis, activation and differentiation, especially for Th1 and Th17 cells, and even memory T cells. Mechanically, the influence of amino-acid transporters on T-cell fate decision may largely depend on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. These discoveries remarkably demonstrate the role of amino-acid transporters in T-cell fate determination, and strongly indicate that manipulation of the amino-acid transporter-mTORC1 axis could ameliorate many inflammatory or autoimmune diseases associated with T-cell-based immune responses.

  14. Active transportation to school in Canadian youth: should injury be a concern?

    PubMed

    Gropp, Kathleen; Janssen, Ian; Pickett, William

    2013-02-01

    Active transportation to school provides a means for youth to incorporate physical activity into their daily routines, and this has obvious benefits for child health. Studies of active transportation have rarely focused on the negative health effects in terms of injury. This cross-sectional study is based on the 2009/10 Canadian Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey. A sample of children aged 11-15 years (n=20 076) was studied. Multi-level logistic regression was used to examine associations between walking or bicycling to school and related injury. Regular active transportation to school at larger distances (approximately >1.6 km; 1.0 miles) was associated with higher relative odds of active transportation injury (OR: 1.52; 95% CI 1.08 to 2.15), with a suggestion of a dose-response relationship between longer travel distances and injury (p=0.02). Physical activity interventions for youth should encourage participation in active transportation to school, while also recognising the potential for unintentional injury.

  15. Memoryless self-reinforcing directionality in endosomal active transport within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejia; Wang, Bo; Granick, Steve

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to Brownian transport, the active motility of microbes, cells, animals and even humans often follows another random process known as truncated Lévy walk. These stochastic motions are characterized by clustered small steps and intermittent longer jumps that often extend towards the size of the entire system. As there are repeated suggestions, although disagreement, that Lévy walks have functional advantages over Brownian motion in random searching and transport kinetics, their intentional engineering into active materials could be useful. Here, we show experimentally in the classic active matter system of intracellular trafficking that Brownian-like steps self-organize into truncated Lévy walks through an apparent time-independent positive feedback such that directional persistence increases with the distance travelled persistently. A molecular model that allows the maximum output of the active propelling forces to fluctuate slowly fits the experiments quantitatively. Our findings offer design principles for programming efficient transport in active materials.

  16. Substituting KCl for NaCl in fresh Queso Fresco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing the sodium level in cheese is challenging when a signature salty flavor is expected, such as in high-moisture Queso Fresco (QF). Fresh starter-free QF was fine milled and dry salted at different levels of NaCl and KCl to obtain total salt levels of 1.5 to 2.0%. The treatments contained 1....

  17. Intraparticle mass transport mechanism in activated carbon adsorption of phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, E.G.; Miura, Y.; Yokomura, H.; Tajima, S.; Yamashita, S.; Chang, H.T.; Noll, K.E.

    1996-10-01

    Two parallel diffusion mechanisms, pore and surface, can control the rate of contaminant adsorption. The two mechanisms are different functions of temperature and adsorbate concentration. To develop a mechanistic design model for adsorption processes, the two mechanisms must be evaluated separately. In this paper, the authors show that the mechanisms can be separated accurately using a stepwise linearization technique. The technique can easily be incorporated in adsorption diffusion modeling. Two phenolic compounds were used in this study: p-chlorophenol (PCP) and p-nitrophenol (PNP). The application of the linearization technique is illustrated using two types of reactors: a completely mixed batch reactor and a differential reactor. The study results show that pore and surface diffusivity can be determined accurately using the linearization technique. Furthermore, the tortuosity for the absorbent can be estimated from the pore diffusivity. For PCP that is strongly adsorbed by the adsorbent, surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism controlling the intraparticle transport. For weakly adsorbed PNP, neither surface nor pore diffusion is dominant.

  18. Photosynthetic limitations of a halophyte sea aster (Aster tripolium L) under water stress and NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Akihiro; Kanechi, Michio; Uno, Yuichi; Inagaki, Noboru

    2003-02-01

    To understand the mechanisms of salt tolerance in a halophyte, sea aster ( Aster tripolium L.), we studied the changes of water relation and the factors of photosynthetic limitation under water stress and 300 mM NaCl stress. The contents of Na(+) and Cl(-) were highest in NaCl-stressed leaves. Leaf osmotic potentials ( Psi(s)) were decreased by both stress treatments, whereas leaf turgor pressure ( Psi(t)) was maintained under NaCl stress. Decrease in Psi(s) without any loss of Psi(t) accounted for osmotic adjustment using Na(+) and Cl(-) accumulated under NaCl stress. Stress treatments affected photosynthesis, and stomatal limitation was higher under water stress than under NaCl stress. Additionally, maximum CO(2) fixation rate and O(2) evolution rate decreased only under water stress, indicating irreversible damage to photosynthetic systems, mainly by dehydration. Water stress severely affected the water relation and photosynthetic capacity. On the other hand, turgid leaves under NaCl stress have dehydration tolerance due to maintenance of Psi(t) and photosynthetic activity. These results show that sea aster might not suffer from tissue dehydration in highly salinized environments. We conclude that the adaptation of sea aster to salinity may be accomplished by osmotic adjustment using accumulated Na(+) and Cl(-), and that this plant has typical halophyte characteristics, but not drought tolerance.

  19. Regulation of Human Hepatic Drug Transporter Activity and Expression by Diesel Exhaust Particle Extract

    PubMed Central

    Le Vee, Marc; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Lecureur, Valérie; Fardel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe) may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC) uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP), whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute to their

  20. The association between green neighborhood environments and active transportation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Urban nature is an important aspect of health-promoting environments. In particular, street trees and green space can provide a low cost approach to improving public health by promoting physical activity, improving mental health, and facilitating social cohesion. Acti...

  1. Influence of partial replacement of NaCl with KCl on lipid fraction of dry fermented sausages inoculated with a mixture of Lactobacillus plantarum and Staphylococcus carnosus.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, L; Ibañez, C; Cid, C; Astiasarán, I; Bello, J

    1996-07-01

    The effect of partial replacement of NaCl (3% NaCl) with KCl (1.5% NaCl and 1% KCl) on the lipid fraction of dry fermented sausages inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum and Staphylococcus carnosus as starter culture was analysed. The reduction in salt concentration did not affect the Micrococcaceae count. A positive effect on the intensity of lipolytic activity was observed as a consequence of the decrease in salt level. There was no decrease in the oxidative processes. The higher amounts of volatile fatty acids found suggest that the tested modification enhances some of their mechanisms of synthesis.

  2. Red blood cell cation transports in uraemic anaemia: evidence for an increased K/Cl co-transport activity. Effects of dialysis and erythropoietin treatment.

    PubMed

    De Franceschi, L; Olivieri, O; Girelli, D; Lupo, A; Bernich, P; Corrocher, R

    1995-10-01

    This study examines the role of uraemia and the effect of different dialysis treatments on red cell cation transport. We evaluated the main cation transport systems in erythrocytes of non-dialysed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) subjects, of patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), as well as the changes induced by human recombinant erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) administration. In uraemic undialysed and dialysed patients, we observed an increase in K/Cl co-transport activity and in shrinkage-induced amiloride-sensitive (HMA-sensitive) Na efflux (Na/H exchange) and a decrease in Na/K pump and Na/K/Cl co-transport activity, while Na/Li exchange was increased only in dialysed patients. In uraemic erythrocytes, we showed for the first time an increased K/Cl co-transport activity, which was cell age independent. Generally, the different method of dialysis (CAPD or HD) did not modify the cation transport abnormalities observed. During the treatment with r-HuEPO, all the systems, with the exception of the Na/K pump and Na/K/Cl co-transport, increased their activities following the increase of circulating young red cells. The changes produced under r-HuEPO administration were transient and cation transports returned to the baseline values within 100 days of treatment, indicating a primary and prominent pathogenetic role of uraemia in modulating the red cell membrane cation transport activities.

  3. Nutritional impact of elevated calcium transport activity in carrots

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jay; Hawthorne, Keli M.; Hotze, Tim; Abrams, Steven A.; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2008-01-01

    Nutrition recommendations worldwide emphasize ingestion of plant-based diets rather than diets that rely primarily on animal products. However, this plant-based diet could limit the intake of essential nutrients such as calcium. Osteoporosis is one of the world's most prevalent nutritional disorders, and inadequate dietary calcium is a known contributor to the pathophysiology of this condition. Previously, we have modified carrots to express increased levels of a plant calcium transporter (sCAX1), and these plants contain ≈2-fold-higher calcium content in the edible portions of the carrots. However, it was unproven whether this change would increase the total amount of bioavailable calcium. In randomized trials, we labeled these modified carrots with isotopic calcium and fed them to mice and humans to assess calcium bioavailability. In mice feeding regimes (n = 120), we measured 45Ca incorporation into bones and determined that mice required twice the serving size of control carrots to obtain the calcium found in sCAX1 carrots. We used a dual-stable isotope method with 42Ca-labeled carrots and i.v. 46Ca to determine the absorption of calcium from these carrots in humans. In a cross-over study of 15 male and 15 female adults, we found that when people were fed sCAX1 and control carrots, total calcium absorption per 100 g of carrots was 41% ± 2% higher in sCAX1 carrots. Both the mice and human feeding studies demonstrate increased calcium absorption from sCAX1-expressing carrots compared with controls. These results demonstrate an alternative means of fortifying vegetables with bioavailable calcium. PMID:18202180

  4. Thyroid-induced alterations in myocardial sodium-potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase, monovalent cation active transport, and cardiac glycoside binding.

    PubMed Central

    Curfman, G D; Crowley, T J; Smith, T W

    1977-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone on guinea pig myocardial NaK-ATPase activity, transmembrane monovalent cation active transport, and cardiac glycoside binding were were examined. NaK-ATPase activities of left atrial and left ventricular homogenates of control and triiodothyronine (T3)-treated animals were determined, and compared to activities of skeletal muscle and liver. T3 administration was associated with a significant increase of 18% in left atrial and left ventricular NaK-ATPase specific activities. This increment was less than that noted in skeletal muscle (+42%) and liver (+30%). To determine if enhanced NaK-ATPase activity was accompanied by increased monovalent cation active transport, in vitro 86Rb+ uptake by left atrial strips and hemidiaphragms was measured. Transition from the euthyroid to the hyperthyroid state resulted in a 68% increase in active 86Rb+ uptake by left atrium, and a 62% increase in active uptake by diaphragm. Passive 86Rb+ uptake was not affected in either tissue. Ouabain binding by atrial and ventricular homogenates of T3-treated animals was increased by 19 and 17%, respectively, compared to controls, in close agreement with thyroid-induced increments in NaK-ATPase activiey. Taken together, these results are consistent with enhanced myocardial NaK-ATPase activity and monovalent cation activt transport due to an increase in the number of functional enzyme complexes. PMID:138689

  5. Effect of NaCl on the Lifetime of Micro- and Nanobubbles

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Tsutomu; Liu, Shu; Enari, Masatoshi; Oshita, Seiichi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Gohara, Kazutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nanobubbles (MNBs) are potentially useful for industrial applications such as the purification of wastewater and the promotion of physiological activities of living organisms. To develop such applications, we should understand their properties and behavior, such as their lifetime and their number density in solution. In the present study, we observed oxygen MNBs distributed in an electrolyte (NaCl) solution using a transmission electron microscope to analyze samples made with the freeze-fracture replica method. We found that MNBs in a 100 mM NaCl solution remain for at least 1 week, but at higher concentrations decay more quickly. To better understand their lifetimes, we compared measurements of the solution's dissolved oxygen concentration and the ζ-potential of the MNBs. Our detailed observations of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images allows us to conclude that low concentrations of NaCl stabilize MNBs due to the ion shielding effect. However, higher concentrations accelerate their disappearance by reducing the repulsive force between MNBs.

  6. Ascorbic acid and salicylic acid mitigate nacl stress in Caralluma tuberculata Calli.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Riaz Ur; Zia, Muhammad; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Lu, Gang; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz

    2014-06-01

    Plants exposed to salt stress undergo biochemical and morphological changes even at cellular level. Such changes also include activation of antioxidant enzymes to scavenge reactive oxygen species, while morphological changes are determined as deformation of membranes and organelles. Present investigation substantiates this phenomenon for Caralluma tuberculata calli when exposed to NaCl stress at different concentrations. Elevated levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and glutathione reductase (GR) in NaCl-stressed calli dwindled upon application of non-enzymatic antioxidants; ascorbic acid (AA) and salicylic acid (SA). Many fold increased enzymes concentrations trimmed down even below as present in the control calli. Electron microscopic images accentuated several cellular changes upon NaCl stress such as plasmolysed plasma membrane, disruption of nuclear membrane, increased numbers of nucleoli, alteration in shape and lamellar membrane system in plastid, and increased number of plastoglobuli. The cells retrieved their normal structure upon exposure to non-enzymatic antioxidants. The results of the present experiments conclude that NaCl aggravate oxidative molecules that eventually alleviate antioxidant enzymatic system. Furthermore, the salt stress knocked down by applying ascorbic acid and salicylic acid manifested by normal enzyme level and restoration of cellular structure.

  7. Effect of NaCl on aerobic denitrification by strain Achromobacter sp. GAD-3.

    PubMed

    Gui, Mengyao; Chen, Qian; Ni, Jinren

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the effect of NaCl on aerobic denitrification by a novel aerobic denitrifier strain Achromobacter sp. GAD-3. Results indicated that the aerobic denitrification process was inhibited by NaCl concentrations ≥20 g L(-1), leading to lower nitrate removal rates (1.67∼4.0 mg L(-1) h(-1)), higher nitrite accumulation (50.2∼87.4 mg L(-1)), and increasing N2O emission ratios (13∼72 mg L(-1)/mg L(-1)). Poor performance of aerobic denitrification at high salinity was attributed to the suppression of active microbial biomass and electron donating capacity of strain GAD-3. Further studies on the corresponding inhibition of the denitrifying gene expression by higher salinities revealed the significant sensitivity order of nosZ (for N2O reductase) > cnorB (for NO reductase) ≈ nirS (for cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase) > napA (for periplasmic nitrate reductase), accompanied with a time-lapse expression between nosZ and cnorB based on reverse transcription and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis. The insights into the effect of NaCl on aerobic denitrification are of great significance to upgrade wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) containing varying levels of salinity.

  8. Metronidazole activation and isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum electron transport genes.

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, J D; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli F19 recA, nitrate reductase-deficient mutant was constructed by transposon mutagenesis and shown to be resistant to metronidazole. This mutant was a most suitable host for the isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum genes on recombinant plasmids, which activated metronidazole and rendered the E. coli F19 strain sensitive to metronidazole. Twenty-five E. coli F19 clones containing different recombinant plasmids were isolated and classified into five groups on the basis of their sensitivity to metronidazole. The clones were tested for nitrate reductase, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and hydrogenase activities. DNA hybridization and restriction endonuclease mapping revealed that four of the C. acetobutylicum insert DNA fragments on recombinant plasmids were linked in an 11.1-kb chromosomal fragment. DNA sequencing and amino acid homology studies indicated that this DNA fragment contained a flavodoxin gene which encoded a protein of 160 amino acids that activated metronidazole and made the E. coli F19 mutant very sensitive to metronidazole. The flavodoxin and hydrogenase genes which are involved in electron transfer systems were linked on the 11.1-kb DNA fragment from C. acetobutylicum. Images PMID:1991710

  9. The co-benefits for health of investing in active transportation.

    PubMed

    Giles-Corti, Billie; Foster, Sarah; Shilton, Trevor; Falconer, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Amid growing concerns about the impact of rising obesity and physical inactivity levels, climate change, population growth, increasing traffic congestion and declining oil supplies, multiple sectors are now promoting active transportation as an alternative to driving. This paper considers the health benefits and co-benefits of investing in active transportation, enabling comparison of policy options to optimise societal objectives aimed at creating healthy, socially and environmentally sustainable communities. Policies promoting the use of both energy-efficient motor vehicles and increased active transportation would almost double the impact on greenhouse gas emissions and would reduce disease burden by increasing physical activity. More co-benefit and economic analyses research is required to inform 'joined-up' policy solutions.

  10. Policies Related to Active Transport to and from School: A Multisite Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy A.; Brownson, Ross C.; Doescher, Mark P.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Fesperman, Carrie E.; Litt, Jill S.; Pluto, Delores; Steinman, Lesley E.; Terpstra, Jennifer L.; Troped, Philip J.; Schmid, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    Active transportation to and from school (ATS) is a viable strategy to help increase physical activity among youth. ATS can be challenging because initiatives require transdisciplinary collaboration, are influenced by the built environment and are affected by numerous policies. The purpose of this study is to identify policies and factors that…

  11. The Effect of an Active Transport to School Intervention at a Suburban Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bungum, Timothy J.; Clark, Sheila; Aguilar, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many children do not meet physical activity (PA) guidelines. One strategy that may enhance PA is to increase active transport to school (ATS) rates. Purpose: To assess the effects of an ATS intervention. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was used to compare ATS and vehicle traffic rates at a school that participated in a statewide…

  12. Prolactin increases hepatic Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity and messenger RNA post partum.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, T C; Liu, Y; Hyde, J F; Hagenbuch, B; Meier, P J; Vore, M

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity is decreased in pregnancy, but rebounds post partum relative to non-pregnant controls, and that activity can be increased by treatment with ovine prolactin [Ganguly, Hyde and Vore (1993) J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 267, 82-87]. To determine the basis for these effects, Na+/taurocholate co-transport was determined in purified basolateral liver plasma-membrane (bLPM) vesicles and compared with steady-state mRNA levels encoding the Na+/taurocholate-co-transporting polypeptide (Ntcp) in non-pregnant controls, pregnant rats (19-20 days pregnant), rats post partum (48 h post partum) and rats post partum treated with bromocriptine to inhibit prolactin secretion. Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity (nmol/5 s per mg of protein) in bLPM was decreased from 10.4 +/- 1.8 in non-pregnant controls to 7.9 +/- 0.6 in bLPM in pregnant rats, but rebounded to 17.5 +/- 1.3 post partum; treatment of rats post partum with bromocriptine to inhibit prolactin secretion decreased activity to 14.1 +/- 0.9. Northern and slot-blot analyses revealed similar changes in mRNA for Ntcp, so that a positive correlation was observed between Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity and Ntcp mRNA. Furthermore, treatment of ovariectomized rats with ovine prolactin increased Ntcp mRNA 10-fold compared with solvent-treated controls, consistent with the 2-fold increase in Vmax, for Na+/taurocholate co-transport in isolated hepatocytes. These data are the first to demonstrate endogenous physiological regulation by prolactin of Ntcp mRNA in parallel with Na+/taurocholate co-transport activity. Images Figure 2 PMID:7945260

  13. Built Environment and Active Transport to School (BEATS) Study: protocol for a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mandic, Sandra; Williams, John; Moore, Antoni; Hopkins, Debbie; Flaherty, Charlotte; Wilson, Gordon; García Bengoechea, Enrique; Spence, John C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Active transport to school (ATS) is a convenient way to increase physical activity and undertake an environmentally sustainable travel practice. The Built Environment and Active Transport to School (BEATS) Study examines ATS in adolescents in Dunedin, New Zealand, using ecological models for active transport that account for individual, social, environmental and policy factors. The study objectives are to: (1) understand the reasons behind adolescents and their parents' choice of transport mode to school; (2) examine the interaction between the transport choices, built environment, physical activity and weight status in adolescents; and (3) identify policies that promote or hinder ATS in adolescents. Methods and analysis The study will use a mixed-method approach incorporating both quantitative (surveys, anthropometry, accelerometers, Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis, mapping) and qualitative methods (focus groups, interviews) to gather data from students, parents, teachers and school principals. The core data will include accelerometer-measured physical activity, anthropometry, GIS measures of the built environment and the use of maps indicating route to school (students)/work (parents) and perceived safe/unsafe areas along the route. To provide comprehensive data for understanding how to change the infrastructure to support ATS, the study will also examine complementary variables such as individual, family and social factors, including student and parental perceptions of walking and cycling to school, parental perceptions of different modes of transport to school, perceptions of the neighbourhood environment, route to school (students)/work (parents), perceptions of driving, use of information communication technology, reasons for choosing a particular school and student and parental physical activity habits, screen time and weight status. The study has achieved a 100% school recruitment rate (12 secondary schools). Ethics and

  14. A spatial model of cellular molecular trafficking including active transport along microtubules.

    PubMed

    Cangiani, A; Natalini, R

    2010-12-21

    We consider models of Ran-driven nuclear transport of molecules such as proteins in living cells. The mathematical model presented is the first to take into account for the active transport of molecules along the cytoplasmic microtubules. All parameters entering the models are thoroughly discussed. The model is tested by numerical simulations based on discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods. The numerical experiments are compared to the behavior observed experimentally.

  15. Electric Pulse Discharge Activated Carbon Supercapacitors for Transportation Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Subhadarshi; Agrawal, Jyoti

    2012-03-01

    ScienceTomorrow is developing a high-speed, low-cost process for synthesizing high-porosity electrodes for electrochemical double-layer capacitors. Four types of coal (lignite, subbituminous, bituminous, and anthracite) were used as precursor materials for spark discharge activation with multiscale porous structure. The final porosity and pore distribution depended, among other factors, on precursor type. The high gas content in low-grade carbon resulted in mechanical disintegration, whereas high capacitance was attained in higher-grade coal. The properties, including capacitance, mechanical robustness, and internal conductivity, were excellent when the cost is taken into consideration.

  16. Tau reduction prevents Aβ-induced axonal transport deficits by blocking activation of GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jordan C.; Fomenko, Vira; Miyamoto, Takashi; Suberbielle, Elsa; Knox, Joseph A.; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H.; Yu, Gui-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Axonal transport deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are attributed to amyloid β (Aβ) peptides and pathological forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Genetic ablation of tau prevents neuronal overexcitation and axonal transport deficits caused by recombinant Aβ oligomers. Relevance of these findings to naturally secreted Aβ and mechanisms underlying tau’s enabling effect are unknown. Here we demonstrate deficits in anterograde axonal transport of mitochondria in primary neurons from transgenic mice expressing familial AD-linked forms of human amyloid precursor protein. We show that these deficits depend on Aβ1–42 production and are prevented by tau reduction. The copathogenic effect of tau did not depend on its microtubule binding, interactions with Fyn, or potential role in neuronal development. Inhibition of neuronal activity, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, or glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity or expression also abolished Aβ-induced transport deficits. Tau ablation prevented Aβ-induced GSK3β activation. Thus, tau allows Aβ oligomers to inhibit axonal transport through activation of GSK3β, possibly by facilitating aberrant neuronal activity. PMID:25963821

  17. NKCC2A and NFAT5 regulate renal TNF production induced by hypertonic NaCl intake.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shoujin; Bellner, Lars; Ferreri, Nicholas R

    2013-03-01

    Pathways that contribute to TNF production by the kidney are not well defined. Mice given 1% NaCl in the drinking water for 3 days exhibited a 2.5-fold increase in urinary, but not plasma, TNF levels compared with mice given tap water. Since furosemide attenuated the increase in TNF levels, we hypothesized that hypertonic NaCl intake increases renal TNF production by a pathway involving the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC2). A 2.5-fold increase in NKCC2A mRNA accumulation was observed in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) tubules from mice given 1% NaCl; a concomitant 2-fold increase in nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) mRNA and protein expression was observed in the outer medulla. Urinary TNF levels were reduced in mice given 1% NaCl after an intrarenal injection of a lentivirus construct designed to specifically knockdown NKCC2A (EGFP-N2A-ex4); plasma levels of TNF did not change after injection of EGFP-N2A-ex4. Intrarenal injection of EGFP-N2A-ex4 also inhibited the increase of NFAT5 mRNA abundance in the outer medulla of mice given 1% NaCl. TNF production by primary cultures of mTAL cells increased approximately sixfold in response to an increase in osmolality to 400 mosmol/kgH2O produced with NaCl and was inhibited in cells transiently transfected with a dnNFAT5 construct. Transduction of cells with EGFP-N2A-ex4 also prevented increases in TNF mRNA and protein production in response to high NaCl concentration and reduced transcriptional activity of a NFAT5 promoter construct. Since NKCC2A expression is restricted to the TAL, NKCC2A-dependent activation of NFAT5 is part of a pathway by which the TAL produces TNF in response to hypertonic NaCl intake.

  18. Mini-review: regulation of the renal NaCl cotransporter by hormones.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    The renal thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter, NCC, is the major pathway for salt reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule. The activity of this cotransporter is critical for regulation of several physiological variables such as blood pressure, serum potassium, acid base metabolism, and urinary calcium excretion. Therefore, it is not surprising that numerous hormone-signaling pathways regulate NCC activity to maintain homeostasis. In this review, we will provide an overview of the most recent evidence on NCC modulation by aldosterone, angiotensin II, vasopressin, glucocorticoids, insulin, norepinephrine, estradiol, progesterone, prolactin, and parathyroid hormone.

  19. Transport in Halobacterium Halobium: Light-Induced Cation-Gradients, Amino Acid Transport Kinetics, and Properties of Transport Carriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    Cell envelope vesicles prepared from H. halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin and upon illumination protons are ejected. Coupled to the proton motive force is the efflux of Na(+). Measurements of Na-22 flux, exterior pH change, and membrane potential, Delta(psi) (with the dye 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine) indicate that the means of Na(+) transport is sodium/proton exchange. The kinetics of the pH changes and other evidence suggests that the antiport is electrogenic (H(+)/Na(++ greater than 1). The resulting large chemical gradient for Na(+) (outside much greater than inside), as well as the membrane potential, will drive the transport of 18 amino acids. The I9th, glutamate, is unique in that its accumulation is indifferent to Delta(psi): this amino acid is transported only when a chemical gradient for Na(+) is present. Thus, when more and more NaCl is included in the vesicles glutamate transport proceeds with longer and longer lags. After illumination the gradient of H+() collapses within 1 min, while the large Na(+) gradient and glutamate transporting activity persists for 10- 15 min, indicating that proton motive force is not necessary for transport. A chemical gradient of Na(+), arranged by suspending vesicles loaded with KCl in NaCl, drives glutamate transport in the dark without other sources of energy, with V(sub max) and K(sub m) comparable to light-induced transport. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the transport of glutamate is facilitated by symport with Na(+), in an electrically neutral fashion, so that only the chemical component of the Na(+) gradient is a driving force.

  20. Glucose elevates NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 protein levels and nitrate transport activity independently of its HEXOKINASE1-mediated stimulation of NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 expression.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Femke; Thodey, Kate; Lejay, Laurence V; Bevan, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Mineral nutrient uptake and assimilation is closely coordinated with the production of photosynthate to supply nutrients for growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), nitrate uptake from the soil is mediated by genes encoding high- and low-affinity transporters that are transcriptionally regulated by both nitrate and photosynthate availability. In this study, we have studied the interactions of nitrate and glucose (Glc) on gene expression, nitrate transport, and growth using glucose-insensitive2-1 (gin2-1), which is defective in sugar responses. We confirm and extend previous work by showing that HEXOKINASE1-mediated oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) metabolism is required for Glc-mediated NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 (NRT2.1) expression. Treatment with pyruvate and shikimate, two products derived from intermediates of the OPPP that are destined for amino acid production, restores wild-type levels of NRT2.1 expression, suggesting that metabolites derived from OPPP metabolism can, together with Glc, directly stimulate high levels of NRT2.1 expression. Nitrate-mediated NRT2.1 expression is not influenced by gin2-1, showing that Glc does not influence NRT2.1 expression through nitrate-mediated mechanisms. We also show that Glc stimulates NRT2.1 protein levels and transport activity independently of its HEXOKINASE1-mediated stimulation of NRT2.1 expression, demonstrating another possible posttranscriptional mechanism influencing nitrate uptake. In gin2-1 plants, nitrate-responsive biomass growth was strongly reduced, showing that the supply of OPPP metabolites is essential for assimilating nitrate for growth.

  1. Effects of cinnamaldehyde on the glucose transport activity of GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Plaisier, Christina; Cok, Alexandra; Scott, Jordan; Opejin, Adeleye; Bushhouse, Kelsey T; Salie, Mathew J; Louters, Larry L

    2011-02-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cinnamon extracts contain components that enhance insulin action. However, little is know about the effects of cinnamon on non-insulin stimulated glucose uptake. Therefore, the effects of cinnamaldehyde on the glucose transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells were examined under both basal conditions and conditions where glucose uptake is activated by glucose deprivation. The data reveal that cinnamaldehyde has a dual action on the glucose transport activity of GLUT1. Under basal conditions it stimulates glucose uptake and reaches a 3.5 fold maximum stimulation at 2.0mM. However, cinnamaldehyde also inhibits the activation of glucose uptake by glucose deprivation in a dose dependent manner. Experiments with cinnamaldehyde analogs reveal that these activities are dependent on the α,β-unsaturated aldehyde structural motif in cinnamaldehyde. The inhibitory, but not the stimulatory activity of cinnamaldehyde was maintained after a wash-recovery period. Pretreatment of cinnamaldehyde with thiol-containing compounds, such as β-mercaptoethanol or cysteine, blocked the inhibitory activity of cinnamaldehyde. These results suggest that cinnamaldehyde inhibits the activation of GLUT1 by forming a covalent link to target cysteine residue/s. This dual activity of cinnamaldehyde on the transport activity of GLUT1 suggests that cinnamaldehyde is not a major contributor to the anti-diabetic properties of cinnamon.

  2. Effects of cinnamaldehyde on the glucose transport activity of GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Plaisier, Christina; Cok, Alexandra; Scott, Jordan; Opejin, Adeleye; Bushhouse, Kelsey T.; Sallie, Mathew; Louters, Larry L.

    2010-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cinnamon extracts contain components that enhance insulin action. However, little is know about the effects of cinnamon on non-insulin stimulated glucose uptake. Therefore, the effects of cinnamaldehyde on the glucose transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells were examined under both basal conditions and conditions where glucose uptake is activated by glucose deprivation. The data reveal that cinnamaldehyde has a dual action on the glucose transport activity of GLUT1. Under basal conditions it stimulates glucose uptake and reaches a 3.5 fold maximum stimulation at 2.0 mM. However, cinnamaldehyde also inhibits the activation of glucose uptake by glucose deprivation in a dose dependent manner. Experiments with cinnamaldehyde analogs reveal that these activities are dependent on the α,β-unsaturated aldehyde structural motif in cinnamaldehyde. The inhibitory, but not the stimulatory activity of cinnamaldehyde was maintained after a wash-recovery period. Pretreatment of cinnamaldehyde with thiol-containing compounds, such as β-mercaptoethanol or cysteine, blocked the inhibitory activity of cinnamaldehyde. These results suggest that cinnamaldehyde inhibits the activation of GLUT1 by forming a covalent link to target cysteine residue/s. This dual activity of cinnamaldehyde on the transport activity of GLUT1 suggests that cinnamaldehye is not a major contributor to the anti-diabetic properties of cinnamon. PMID:20955755

  3. Na/Cl molar ratio changes during a salting cycle and its application to the estimation of sodium retention in salted watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongbing; Huffine, Maria; Husch, Jonathan; Sinpatanasakul, Leeann

    2012-08-01

    Using soil column experiments and data from natural watersheds, this paper analyzes the changes in Na/Cl molar ratios during a salting cycle of aqueous-soil systems. The soil column experiments involved introducing NaCl salt at various initial concentrations into multiple soil columns. At the start of a salting cycle in the column experiments, sodium was adsorbed more than chloride due to cation exchange processes. As a result, the initial Na/Cl molar ratio in column effluent was lower than 1, but increased thereafter. One-dimensional PHREEQC geochemical transport simulations also were conducted to further quantify these trends under more diverse scenarios. The experimentally determined Na/Cl molar ratio pattern was compared to observations in the annual salting cycle of four natural watersheds where NaCl is the dominant applied road deicing salt. Typically, Na/Cl molar ratios were low from mid-winter to early spring and increased after the bulk of the salt was flushed out of the watersheds during the summer, fall and early winter. The established relationship between the Na/Cl molar ratios and the amount of sodium retention derived from the column experiments and computer simulations present an alternative approach to the traditional budget analysis method for estimating sodium retention when the experimental and natural watershed patterns of Na/Cl molar ratio change are similar. Findings from this study enhance the understanding of sodium retention and help improve the scientific basis for future environmental policies intended to suppress the increase of sodium concentrations in salted watersheds.

  4. Na/Cl molar ratio changes during a salting cycle and its application to the estimation of sodium retention in salted watersheds.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongbing; Huffine, Maria; Husch, Jonathan; Sinpatanasakul, Leeann

    2012-08-01

    Using soil column experiments and data from natural watersheds, this paper analyzes the changes in Na/Cl molar ratios during a salting cycle of aqueous-soil systems. The soil column experiments involved introducing NaCl salt at various initial concentrations into multiple soil columns. At the start of a salting cycle in the column experiments, sodium was adsorbed more than chloride due to cation exchange processes. As a result, the initial Na/Cl molar ratio in column effluent was lower than 1, but increased thereafter. One-dimensional PHREEQC geochemical transport simulations also were conducted to further quantify these trends under more diverse scenarios. The experimentally determined Na/Cl molar ratio pattern was compared to observations in the annual salting cycle of four natural watersheds where NaCl is the dominant applied road deicing salt. Typically, Na/Cl molar ratios were low from mid-winter to early spring and increased after the bulk of the salt was flushed out of the watersheds during the summer, fall and early winter. The established relationship between the Na/Cl molar ratios and the amount of sodium retention derived from the column experiments and computer simulations present an alternative approach to the traditional budget analysis method for estimating sodium retention when the experimental and natural watershed patterns of Na/Cl molar ratio change are similar. Findings from this study enhance the understanding of sodium retention and help improve the scientific basis for future environmental policies intended to suppress the increase of sodium concentrations in salted watersheds.

  5. Novel fluorescence-based approaches for the study of biogenic amine transporter localization, activity, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Mason, J N; Farmer, H; Tomlinson, I D; Schwartz, J W; Savchenko, V; DeFelice, L J; Rosenthal, S J; Blakely, R D

    2005-04-15

    Pre-synaptic norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) transporters (NET and DAT) terminate catecholamine synaptic transmission through reuptake of released neurotransmitter. Recent studies reveal that NET and DAT are tightly regulated by receptor and second messenger-linked signaling pathways. Common approaches for studying these transporters involve use of radiolabeled substrates or antagonists, methods possessing limited spatial resolution and that bear limited opportunities for repeated monitoring of living preparations. To circumvent these issues, we have explored two novel assay platforms that permit temporally resolved quantitation of transport activity and transporter protein localization. To monitor the binding and transport function of NET and DAT in real-time, we have investigated the uptake of the fluorescent organic compound 4-(4-diethylaminostyryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+). We have extended our previous single cell level application of this substrate to monitor transport activity via high-throughput assay platforms. Compared to radiotracer uptake methods, acquisition of ASP+ fluorescence is non-isotopic and allows for continuous, repeated transport measurements on both transfected and native preparations. Secondly, we have extended our application of small-molecule-conjugated fluorescent CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, or quantum dots (Qdots), to utilize antibody and peptide ligands that can identify surface expressed transporters, receptors and other membrane proteins in living cell systems. Unlike typical organic fluorophores, Qdots are highly resistant to bleaching and can be conjugated to multiple ligands. They can also be illuminated by conventional light sources, yet produce narrow, gaussian emission spectra compatible with multiple target visualization (multiplexing). Together, these approaches offer novel opportunities to investigate changes in transporter function and distribution in real-time with superior spatial and temporal resolution.

  6. Guanine-based amphiphiles: synthesis, ion transport properties and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Domenica; Irace, Carlo; Santamaria, Rita; Milano, Domenico; Tecilla, Paolo; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Novel amphiphilic guanine derivatives, here named Gua1 and Gua2, have been prepared through few, simple and efficient synthetic steps. In ion transport experiments through phospholipid bilayers, carried out to evaluate their ability to mediate H(+) transport, Gua2 showed high activity. When this compound was investigated for ion-selective transport activities, no major differences were observed in the behaviour with cations while, in the case of anions, selective activity was observed in the series I(-)>Br(-)>Cl(-)>F(-). The bioactivity of these guanine analogues has been evaluated on a panel of human tumour and non-tumour cell lines in preliminary in vitro cytotoxicity assays, showing a relevant antiproliferative profile for Gua2.

  7. Regulation of ion channels and transporters by AMP-activated kinase (AMPK)

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Florian; Föller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The energy-sensing AMP-activated kinase AMPK ensures survival of energy-depleted cells by stimulating ATP production and limiting ATP utilization. Both energy production and energy consumption are profoundly influenced by transport processes across the cell membane including channels, carriers and pumps. Accordingly, AMPK is a powerful regulator of transport across the cell membrane. AMPK regulates diverse K+ channels, Na+ channels, Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels, Cl- channels, gap junctional channels, glucose carriers, Na+/H+-exchanger, monocarboxylate-, phosphate-, creatine-, amino acid-, peptide- and osmolyte-transporters, Na+/Ca2+-exchanger, H+-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase. AMPK activates ubiquitin ligase Nedd4–2, which labels several plasma membrane proteins for degradation. AMPK further regulates transport proteins by inhibition of Rab GTPase activating protein (GAP) TBC1D1. It stimulates phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate 5-kinase PIKfyve and inhibits phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) via glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Moreover, it stabilizes F-actin as well as downregulates transcription factor NF-κB. All those cellular effects serve to regulate transport proteins. PMID:24366036

  8. Glutamine synthetase activity and the expression of three glul paralogues in zebrafish during transport.

    PubMed

    Dhanasiri, Anusha K S; Fernandes, Jorge M O; Kiron, Viswanath

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS; glutamate-ammonia ligase, EC 6.3.1.2) plays an important role in the nitrogen metabolism of fish. In this study the GS activity and the corresponding genes were examined to understand how they are regulated in zebrafish in response to hyperammonemic stress during a 72 h simulated transport. Whole body ammonia levels, the activity of the enzyme GS and the mRNA expression of the splice variants of three paralogues of glul, glutamine synthetase gene (glula, glulb and glulc) were examined in brain, liver and kidney of zebrafish. Whole body ammonia reached significantly higher levels by 48 h, while brain showed higher levels as early as 24 h, compared to the values at the start of the transport. The GS activities in brain, liver and kidney were significantly higher at the end of 72 h transport than those at the start. However, only the expression of mRNA of glulb-002 and glulb-003 were significantly upregulated during the simulated transport. In silico analysis of the putative promoter regions of glul paralogues revealed glucocorticoid receptor binding sites. However, glucocorticoid response elements of glulb were not different. The up-regulation of GS enzyme activity and hitherto unreported mRNA expression of glul paralogues during zebrafish transport indicate a physiological response of fish to ammonia.

  9. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids*

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  10. Effects of NaCl on responses of ectomycorrhizal black spruce (Picea mariana), white spruce (Picea glauca) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana) to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Polanco, Mónica; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Jones, Melanie D; MacKinnon, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    Black spruce (Picea mariana), white spruce (Picea glauca) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana) were inoculated with Suillus tomentosus and subjected to potassium fluoride (1 mM KF and 5 mM KF) in the presence and absence of 60 mM NaCl. The NaCl and KF treatments reduced total dry weights in jack pine and black spruce seedlings, but they did not affect total dry weights in white spruce seedlings. The addition of 60 mM NaCl to KF treatment solutions alleviated fluoride-induced needle injury in ectomycorrhizal (ECM) black spruce and white spruce, but had little effect in jack pine seedlings. Both KF and 60 mM NaCl treatments reduced E values compared with non-treated control seedlings. However, with the exception of small reductions of K(r) by NaCl treatments in black spruce, the applied KF and NaCl treatments had little effect on K(r) in ECM plants. Chloride tissue concentrations in NaCl-treated plants were not affected by the presence of KF in treatment solutions. However, shoot F concentrations in ECM black spruce and white spruce treated with 5 mM KF + 60 mM NaCl were significantly reduced compared with the 5 mM KF treatment. The results point to a possible competitive inhibition of F transport by Cl. We also suggest that the possibility that aquaporins may be involved in the transmembrane transport of F should be further investigated.

  11. Active transport improves the precision of linear long distance molecular signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Molecular signalling in living cells occurs at low copy numbers and is thereby inherently limited by the noise imposed by thermal diffusion. The precision at which biochemical receptors can count signalling molecules is intimately related to the noise correlation time. In addition to passive thermal diffusion, messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signalling molecules can transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported across biological cells. Active transport is most beneficial when trafficking occurs over large distances, for instance up to the order of 1 metre in neurons. Here we explain how intermittent active transport allows for faster equilibration upon a change in concentration triggered by biochemical stimuli. Moreover, we show how intermittent active excursions induce qualitative changes in the noise in effectively one-dimensional systems such as dendrites. Thereby they allow for significantly improved signalling precision in the sense of a smaller relative deviation in the concentration read-out by the receptor. On the basis of linear response theory we derive the exact mean field precision limit for counting actively transported molecules. We explain how intermittent active excursions disrupt the recurrence in the molecular motion, thereby facilitating improved signalling accuracy. Our results provide a deeper understanding of how recurrence affects molecular signalling precision in biological cells and novel medical-diagnostic devices.

  12. Halopriming of seeds imparts tolerance to NaCl and PEG induced stress in Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek varieties.

    PubMed

    Jisha, K C; Puthur, Jos T

    2014-07-01

    The investigation was carried out to study the effect of halopriming on NaCl and polyethylene glycol-6000 (PEG-6000) induced stress tolerance potential of three Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek varieties, with varied abiotic stress tolerance potential. Halopriming is a seed priming technique in which the seeds were soaked in various salt solutions (in this study NaCl was used). The results of the study indicated that the application of stresses (both NaCl and PEG) induced retardation of growth attributes (measured in terms of shoot length, fresh weight, dry weight) and decrease in physiological attributes like total chlorophyll content, metabolites, photosynthetic and mitochondrial activity of the seedlings in all three V. radiata (L.) varieties. However, halopriming of the seeds could reduce the extent of decrease in these biological attributes. NaCl and PEG stress also caused increase in MDA content (a product of membrane lipid peroxidation) in all the varieties studied and this increase was significantly minimized under halopriming. From the present investigation it was evident that among the green gram varieties studied, Pusa Vishal, a NaCl tolerant variety showed enhanced tolerance to NaCl and PEG induced stress, when the seeds were subjected to halopriming followed by Pusa Ratna (stress sensitive variety). Pusa 9531 (drought tolerant variety) also showed positive halopriming effects but it was less significant when compared to other two varieties. It could be concluded that halopriming improved the drought and salinity stress tolerance potential of all varieties and it was significantly higher in the Pusa Vishal as compared to Pusa 9531 and Pusa Ratna.

  13. A possible role for C4 photosynthetic enzymes in tolerance of Zea mays to NaCl.

    PubMed

    Alla, Mamdouh M Nemat; Hassan, Nemat M

    2012-10-01

    Treatment of 14-day-old maize cultivars (Hybrid351 and Giza2) with 250 mM NaCl significantly reduced shoot fresh and dry weights and protein content during the subsequent 12 days. The magnitude of reduction was more pronounced in Giza than Hybrid. Both cultivars contained converging levels of protein for the enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) under normal conditions; however, NaCl led to increase these levels in Hybrid and decrease them in Giza. Moreover, NaCl significantly inhibited the activities of PEPC, MDH and PPDK in both cultivars during the first 2 days, thereafter the inhibition nullified only in Hybrid; nonetheless, Rubisco was the least affected enzyme in both cultivars. In addition, NaCl slightly increased V (max) of PEPC, MDH and PPDK in Hybrid with no change in K (m); nevertheless V (max) dropped in Giza with an increase in K (m) of only PEPC and MDH. Also K (cat), K (cat)/K (m) and V (max)/K (m) of all enzymes were lower in treated Giza than in treated Hybrid. The increased V (max) of all enzymes in only Hybrid by NaCl confirms that they were synthesised more in Hybrid than in Giza. However, the decreased V (max) in Giza concomitant with the increased K (m) points to an interference of salinity with synthesis of enzymes and their structural integrity. This would lead to a noncompetitive inhibition for the enzymes. These findings declare that maize tolerance to NaCl was larger in Hybrid compared to Giza due to a role for C4 enzymes.

  14. Identification of OpuC as a Chill-Activated and Osmotically Activated Carnitine Transporter in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Angelidis, Apostolos S.; Smith, Linda Tombras; Hoffman, Les M.; Smith, Gary M.

    2002-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is notable for its ability to grow under osmotic stress and at low temperatures. It is known to accumulate the compatible solutes glycine betaine and carnitine from the medium in response to osmotic or chill stress, and this accumulation confers tolerance to these stresses. Two permeases that transport glycine betaine have been identified, both of which are activated by hyperosmotic stress and one of which is activated by low temperature. An osmotically activated transporter for carnitine, OpuC, has also been identified. We have isolated a Tn917-LTV3 insertional mutant that could not be rescued from hyperosmotic stress by exogenous carnitine. The mutant, LTS4a, grew indistinguishably from a control strain (DP-L1044) in the absence of stress or in the absence of carnitine, but DP-L1044 grew substantially faster under osmotic or chill stress in the presence of carnitine. LTS4a was found to be strongly impaired in KCl-activated as well as chill-activated carnitine transport. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of perchloric acid extracts showed that accumulation of carnitine by LTS4a was negligible under all conditions tested. Direct sequencing of LTS4a genomic DNA with a primer based on Tn917-LTV3 yielded a 487-bp sequence, which allowed us to determine that the opuC operon had been interrupted by the transposon. It can be concluded that opuC encodes a carnitine transporter that can be activated by either hyperosmotic stress or chill and that the transport system plays a significant role in the tolerance of L. monocytogenes to both forms of environmental stress. PMID:12039715

  15. Identification of opuC as a chill-activated and osmotically activated carnitine transporter in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, Apostolos S; Smith, Linda Tombras; Hoffman, Les M; Smith, Gary M

    2002-06-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is notable for its ability to grow under osmotic stress and at low temperatures. It is known to accumulate the compatible solutes glycine betaine and carnitine from the medium in response to osmotic or chill stress, and this accumulation confers tolerance to these stresses. Two permeases that transport glycine betaine have been identified, both of which are activated by hyperosmotic stress and one of which is activated by low temperature. An osmotically activated transporter for carnitine, OpuC, has also been identified. We have isolated a Tn917-LTV3 insertional mutant that could not be rescued from hyperosmotic stress by exogenous carnitine. The mutant, LTS4a, grew indistinguishably from a control strain (DP-L1044) in the absence of stress or in the absence of carnitine, but DP-L1044 grew substantially faster under osmotic or chill stress in the presence of carnitine. LTS4a was found to be strongly impaired in KCl-activated as well as chill-activated carnitine transport. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of perchloric acid extracts showed that accumulation of carnitine by LTS4a was negligible under all conditions tested. Direct sequencing of LTS4a genomic DNA with a primer based on Tn917-LTV3 yielded a 487-bp sequence, which allowed us to determine that the opuC operon had been interrupted by the transposon. It can be concluded that opuC encodes a carnitine transporter that can be activated by either hyperosmotic stress or chill and that the transport system plays a significant role in the tolerance of L. monocytogenes to both forms of environmental stress.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates the active transport of serotonin into human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bosin, T.R. )

    1991-03-11

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the active transport of serotonin (5-HT) by human platelets was investigated. Platelets were exposed to either a single dose of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by the glucose/glucose oxidase or xanthine/xanthine oxidase enzyme systems. H{sub 2}{sub 2} produced a rapid, dose-dependent and time-dependent increase in 5-HT transport which was maximal after a 2 min incubation and decreased with continued incubation. Catalase completely prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stimulation and fluoxetine totally blocked 5-HT uptake into stimulated platelets. The glucose/glucose oxidase and the xanthine/xanthine oxidase generating systems produced a similar response to that of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, superoxide dismutase failed to alter the stimulation, while catalase effectively prevented the response. The kinetics of 5-HT transport indicated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment did not alter the K{sub m} of 5-HT transport but significantly increased the maximal rate of 5-HT transport. These data demonstrated that exposure of human platelets to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in a stimulation of the active transport of 5-HT and suggested that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may function to regulate this process.

  17. Chemometrics approach for the prediction of structure-activity relationship for membrane transporter bilitranslocase.

    PubMed

    Martinčič, R; Venko, K; Župerl, Š; Novič, M

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are essential for cellular uptake of numerous salts, nutrients and drugs. Bilitranslocase is a transporter, specific for water-soluble organic anions, and is the only known carrier of nucleotides and nucleotide-like compounds. Experimental data of bilitranslocase ligand specificity for 120 compounds were used to construct classification models using counter-propagation artificial neural networks (CP-ANNs) and support vector machines (SVMs). A subset of active compounds with experimentally determined transport rates was used to build predictive QSAR models for estimation of transport rates of unknown compounds. Several modelling methods and techniques were applied, i.e. CP-ANN, genetic algorithm, self-organizing mapping and multiple linear regression method. The best predictions were achieved using CP-ANN coupled with a genetic algorithm, with the external validation parameter QV(2) of 0.96. The applicability domains of the models were defined to determine the chemical space in which reliable predictions can be obtained. The models were applied for the estimation of bilitranslocase transport activity for two sets of pharmaceutically interesting compounds, antioxidants and antiprions. We found that the relative planarity and a high potential for hydrogen bond formation are the common structural features of anticipated substrates of bilitranslocase. These features may serve as guidelines in the design of new pharmaceuticals transported by bilitranslocase.

  18. Impact of travel mode shift and trip distance on active and non-active transportation in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Parra, Diana C.; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Changes in urban mobility play a major role in transforming metropolitan areas into healthier places. This study quantified the impact of changes in travel mode shift and trip distance on active and non-active transportation of working age adult population of São Paulo. Methods and findings Through different scenarios, we estimated the daily time spent in transportation per inhabitant (divided in active and non-active transportation time) and the proportion of inhabitants accumulating 30 min or more of daily active transportation. The replacement of individual for collective motorized modes in long distance trips (> 1000 m) in combination with the substitution of long for short trips positively impacted all outcomes. Compared to the current situation, there was an increase in the active transportation time (from 19.4 to 26.7 min/inhabitant), which also increased the proportion of adults active for transportation (from 27.6% to 35.4%). Additionally, the non-active transportation time decreased (from 67.0 to 26.2 min/inhabitant), which helped to reduce the total time spent in transportation (from 86.4 to 52.9 min/inhabitant). Conclusion Transport and urban planning policies to reduce individual motorized trips and the number of long trips might produce important health benefits, both by increasing population levels of active transportation and reducing the non-active and the total time of daily trips. PMID:26844071

  19. Activation energy-activation volume master plots for ion transport behavior in polymer electrolytes and supercooled molten salts.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Malcolm D; Imrie, Corrie T; Stoeva, Zlatka; Pas, Steven J; Funke, Klaus; Chandler, Howard W

    2005-09-08

    We demonstrate the use of activation energy versus activation volume "master plots" to explore ion transport in typical fragile glass forming systems exhibiting non-Arrhenius behavior. These systems include solvent-free salt complexes in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and low molecular weight poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) and molten 2Ca(NO3)2.3KNO3 (CKN). Plots showing variations in apparent activation energy EA versus apparent activation volume VA are straight lines with slopes given by M = DeltaEA/DeltaVA. A simple ion transport mechanism is described where the rate determining step involves a dilatation (expressed as VA) around microscopic cavities and a corresponding work of expansion (EA). The slopes of the master plots M are equated to internal elastic moduli, which vary from 1.1 GPa for liquid PPO to 5.0 GPa for molten CKN on account of differing intermolecular forces in these materials.

  20. Estrone Sulfate Transport and Steroid Sulfatase Activity in Colorectal Cancer: Implications for Hormone Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, Lorna C.; Gondal, Ali; Tang, Vivien; Hussain, Maryam T.; Arvaniti, Anastasia; Hewitt, Anne-Marie; Foster, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) affects the incidence and potential progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). As HRT primarily consists of estrone sulfate (E1S), understanding whether this conjugated estrogen is transported and metabolized in CRC will define its potential effect in this malignancy. Here, we show that a panel of CRC cell lines (Colo205, Caco2, HCT116, HT-29) have steroid sulfatase (STS) activity, and thus can hydrolyze E1S. STS activity is significantly higher in CRC cell lysate, suggesting the importance of E1S transport in intracellular STS substrate availability. As E1S transport is regulated by the expression pattern of certain solute carrier organic anion transporter polypeptides, we show that in CRC OATP4A1 is the most abundantly expressed transporter. All four CRC cell lines rapidly transported E1S into cells, with this effect significantly inhibited by the competitive OATP inhibitor BSP. Transient knockdown of OATP4A1 significantly disrupted E1S uptake. Examination of estrogen receptor status showed ERα was present in Colo205 and Caco2 cells. None of the cells expressed ERβ. Intriguingly, HCT116 and HT29 cells strongly expressed the G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), and that stimulation of this receptor with estradiol (E2) and G1, a GPER agonist, significantly (p < 0.01) increased STS activity. Furthermore, tamoxifen and fulvestrant, known GPER agonist, also increased CRC STS activity, with this effect inhibited by the GPER antagonist G15. These results suggest that CRC can take up and hydrolyze E1S, and that subsequent GPER stimulation increases STS activity in a potentially novel positive feedback loop. As elevated STS expression is associated with poor prognosis in CRC, these results suggest HRT, tamoxifen and fulvestrant may negatively impact CRC patient outcomes. PMID:28326039

  1. One-dimensional potential of mean force underestimates activation barrier for transport across flexible lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I.

    2013-10-01

    Transport of a fullerene-like nanoparticle across a lipid bilayer is investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force (PMF) acting on the nanoparticle in a flexible bilayer suspended in water and a bilayer restrained to a flat surface are computed by constrained MD simulations. The rate of the nanoparticle transport into the bilayer interior is predicted using one-dimensional Langevin models based on these PMFs. The predictions are compared with the transport rates obtained from a series of direct (unconstrained) MD simulations of the solute transport into the flexible bilayer. It is observed that the PMF acting on the solute in the flexible membrane underestimates the transport rate by more than an order of magnitude while the PMF acting on the solute in the restrained membrane yields an accurate estimate of the activation energy for transport into the flexible membrane. This paradox is explained by a coexistence of metastable membrane configurations for a range of the solute positions inside and near the flexible membrane. This leads to a significant reduction of the contribution of the transition state to the mean force acting on the solute. Restraining the membrane shape ensures that there is only one stable membrane configuration corresponding to each solute position and thus the transition state is adequately represented in the PMF. This mechanism is quite general and thus this phenomenon is expected to occur in a wide range of interfacial systems. A simple model for the free energy landscape of the coupled solute-membrane system is proposed and validated. This model explicitly accounts for effects of the membrane deformations on the solute transport and yields an accurate prediction of the activation energy for the solute transport.

  2. One-dimensional potential of mean force underestimates activation barrier for transport across flexible lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I

    2013-10-07

    Transport of a fullerene-like nanoparticle across a lipid bilayer is investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force (PMF) acting on the nanoparticle in a flexible bilayer suspended in water and a bilayer restrained to a flat surface are computed by constrained MD simulations. The rate of the nanoparticle transport into the bilayer interior is predicted using one-dimensional Langevin models based on these PMFs. The predictions are compared with the transport rates obtained from a series of direct (unconstrained) MD simulations of the solute transport into the flexible bilayer. It is observed that the PMF acting on the solute in the flexible membrane underestimates the transport rate by more than an order of magnitude while the PMF acting on the solute in the restrained membrane yields an accurate estimate of the activation energy for transport into the flexible membrane. This paradox is explained by a coexistence of metastable membrane configurations for a range of the solute positions inside and near the flexible membrane. This leads to a significant reduction of the contribution of the transition state to the mean force acting on the solute. Restraining the membrane shape ensures that there is only one stable membrane configuration corresponding to each solute position and thus the transition state is adequately represented in the PMF. This mechanism is quite general and thus this phenomenon is expected to occur in a wide range of interfacial systems. A simple model for the free energy landscape of the coupled solute-membrane system is proposed and validated. This model explicitly accounts for effects of the membrane deformations on the solute transport and yields an accurate prediction of the activation energy for the solute transport.

  3. The promiscuous phosphomonoestearase activity of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA, a thermophilic Cu+ transport ATPase.

    PubMed

    Bredeston, Luis M; González Flecha, F Luis

    2016-07-01

    Membrane transport P-type ATPases display two characteristic enzymatic activities: a principal ATPase activity provides the driving force for ion transport across biological membranes, whereas a promiscuous secondary activity catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters. This last activity is usually denoted as the phosphatase activity of P-ATPases. In the present study, we characterize the phosphatase activity of the Cu(+)-transport ATPase from Archaeglobus fulgidus (Af-CopA) and compare it with the principal ATPase activity. Our results show that the phosphatase turnover number was 20 times higher than that corresponding to the ATPase activity, but it is compensated by a high value of Km, producing a less efficient catalysis for pNPP. This secondary activity is enhanced by Mg(2+) (essential activator) and phospholipids (non-essential activator), and inhibited by salts and Cu(+). Transition state analysis of the catalyzed and noncatalyzed hydrolysis of pNPP indicates that Af-CopA enhances the reaction rates by a factor of 10(5) (ΔΔG(‡)=38 kJ/mol) mainly by reducing the enthalpy of activation (ΔΔH(‡)=30 kJ/mol), whereas the entropy of activation is less negative on the enzyme than in solution. For the ATPase activity, the decrease in the enthalpic component of the barrier is higher (ΔΔH(‡)=39 kJ/mol) and the entropic component is small on both the enzyme and in solution. These results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in the transference of the phosphoryl group of p-nitrophenyl phosphate and ATP.

  4. Active intracellular transport in metastatic cells studied by spatial light interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Silvia; Kandel, Mikhail; Sridharan, Shamira; Majeed, Hassaan; Monroy, Freddy; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns of intracellular transport are very difficult to quantify and, consequently, continue to be insufficiently understood. While it is well documented that mass trafficking inside living cells consists of both random and deterministic motions, quantitative data over broad spatiotemporal scales are lacking. We studied the intracellular transport in live cells using spatial light interference microscopy, a high spatiotemporal resolution quantitative phase imaging tool. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (directed, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). Furthermore, we studied the behavior of the two-dimensional mass density over 30 h in HeLa cells and focused on the active component. We determined the standard deviation of the velocity distribution at the point of cell division for each cell and compared the standard deviation velocity inside the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found that the velocity distribution in the cytoplasm is consistently broader than in the nucleus, suggesting mechanisms for faster transport in the cytosol versus the nucleus. Future studies will focus on improving phase measurements by applying a fluorescent tag to understand how particular proteins are transported inside the cell.

  5. Cell swelling, co-transport activation and potassium conductance in isolated perfused rabbit kidney proximal tubules.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J S; Potts, D J

    1990-01-01

    1. Isolated, perfused rabbit proximal tubules were used to study the effects of activation of the apical membrane sodium co-transporters, and of the effects of osmotically induced cell swelling, upon cell volume, basolateral membrane potential and apparent partial conductance of potassium. 2. Activation of electrogenic apical sodium co-transport caused a depolarization of the basolateral membrane and a reduction of the basolateral apparent potassium transference number. This was followed by a spontaneous partial recovery of potential and increase in apparent potassium transference number. 3. Stimulation of apical sodium co-transport led to a sustained increase in cell volume. 4. A sustained increase in cell volume (of similar magnitude to that seen after activation of apical membrane sodium co-transporters) was also caused by reduction of bath and perfusate osmolality by removal of 89 mmol l-1 mannitol from both lumen and bath solutions. 5. This reduction in bath and perfusate osmolality also led to a basolateral membrane hyperpolarization and an increase in basolateral apparent potassium transference number. 6. These observations support the possibility that some of the partial recovery of basolateral membrane potential (Vb1) during apical sodium co-transport stimulation is due to a cell volume sensitive change in basolateral potassium conductance. PMID:2213582

  6. A fully resolved active musculo-mechanical model for esophageal transport

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Wenjun; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal transport is a physiological process that mechanically transports an ingested food bolus from the pharynx to the stomach via the esophagus, a multilayered muscular tube. This process involves interactions between the bolus, the esophagus, and the neurally coordinated activation of the esophageal muscles. In this work, we use an immersed boundary (IB) approach to simulate peristaltic transport in the esophagus. The bolus is treated as a viscous fluid that is actively transported by the muscular esophagus, and the esophagus is modeled as an actively contracting, fiber-reinforced tube. Before considering the full model of the esophagus, however, we first consider a standard benchmark problem of flow past a cylinder. Next a simplified version of our model is verified by comparison to an analytic solution to the tube dilation problem. Finally, three different complex models of the multi-layered esophagus, which differ in their activation patterns and the layouts of the mucosal layers, are extensively tested. To our knowledge, these simulations are the first of their kind to incorporate the bolus, the multi-layered esophagus tube, and muscle activation into an integrated model. Consistent with experimental observations, our simulations capture the pressure peak generated by the muscle activation pulse that travels along the bolus tail. These fully resolved simulations provide new insights into roles of the mucosal layers during bolus transport. In addition, the information on pressure and the kinematics of the esophageal wall resulting from the coordination of muscle activation is provided, which may help relate clinical data from manometry and ultrasound images to the underlying esophageal motor function. PMID:26190859

  7. A fully resolved active musculo-mechanical model for esophageal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Wenjun; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-10-01

    Esophageal transport is a physiological process that mechanically transports an ingested food bolus from the pharynx to the stomach via the esophagus, a multi-layered muscular tube. This process involves interactions between the bolus, the esophagus, and the neurally coordinated activation of the esophageal muscles. In this work, we use an immersed boundary (IB) approach to simulate peristaltic transport in the esophagus. The bolus is treated as a viscous fluid that is actively transported by the muscular esophagus, and the esophagus is modeled as an actively contracting, fiber-reinforced tube. Before considering the full model of the esophagus, however, we first consider a standard benchmark problem of flow past a cylinder. Next a simplified version of our model is verified by comparison to an analytic solution to the tube dilation problem. Finally, three different complex models of the multi-layered esophagus, which differ in their activation patterns and the layouts of the mucosal layers, are extensively tested. To our knowledge, these simulations are the first of their kind to incorporate the bolus, the multi-layered esophagus tube, and muscle activation into an integrated model. Consistent with experimental observations, our simulations capture the pressure peak generated by the muscle activation pulse that travels along the bolus tail. These fully resolved simulations provide new insights into roles of the mucosal layers during bolus transport. In addition, the information on pressure and the kinematics of the esophageal wall resulting from the coordination of muscle activation is provided, which may help relate clinical data from manometry and ultrasound images to the underlying esophageal motor function.

  8. A fully resolved active musculo-mechanical model for esophageal transport.

    PubMed

    Kou, Wenjun; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2015-10-01

    Esophageal transport is a physiological process that mechanically transports an ingested food bolus from the pharynx to the stomach via the esophagus, a multilayered muscular tube. This process involves interactions between the bolus, the esophagus, and the neurally coordinated activation of the esophageal muscles. In this work, we use an immersed boundary (IB) approach to simulate peristaltic transport in the esophagus. The bolus is treated as a viscous fluid that is actively transported by the muscular esophagus, and the esophagus is modeled as an actively contracting, fiber-reinforced tube. Before considering the full model of the esophagus, however, we first consider a standard benchmark problem of flow past a cylinder. Next a simplified version of our model is verified by comparison to an analytic solution to the tube dilation problem. Finally, three different complex models of the multi-layered esophagus, which differ in their activation patterns and the layouts of the mucosal layers, are extensively tested. To our knowledge, these simulations are the first of their kind to incorporate the bolus, the multi-layered esophagus tube, and muscle activation into an integrated model. Consistent with experimental observations, our simulations capture the pressure peak generated by the muscle activation pulse that travels along the bolus tail. These fully resolved simulations provide new insights into roles of the mucosal layers during bolus transport. In addition, the information on pressure and the kinematics of the esophageal wall resulting from the coordination of muscle activation is provided, which may help relate clinical data from manometry and ultrasound images to the underlying esophageal motor function.

  9. Evaporation of NaCl solution from porous media with mixed wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstad, Mina; Shokri, Nima

    2016-05-01

    Evaporation of saline water from porous media is ubiquitous in many processes including soil salinization, crop production, and CO2 sequestration in deep saline acquirer. It is controlled by the transport properties of porous media, atmospheric conditions, and properties of the evaporating saline solution. In the present study, the effects of mixed wettability conditions on the general dynamics of water evaporation from porous media saturated with NaCl solution were investigated. To do so, we conducted a comprehensive series of evaporation experiments using sand mixtures containing different fractions of hydrophobic grains saturated with NaCl solutions. Our results showed that increasing fraction of hydrophobic grains in the mixed wettability sand pack had minor impact on the evaporative mass losses due to the presence of salt whose precipitation patterns were significantly influenced by the mixed wettability condition. Through macroscale and microscale investigations, we found formation of patchy efflorescence in the case of mixed wettability sand pack as opposed to crusty efflorescence in the case of completely hydrophilic porous media. Furthermore, the presence of salty water and hydrophobic grains in the sand pack significantly influenced the general dynamics and morphology of the receding drying front. Our results extend the understanding of the saline water evaporation from porous media with direct applications to various hydrological and engineering processes.

  10. The effects of arginine glutamate, a promising excipient for protein formulation, on cell viability: Comparisons with NaCl

    PubMed Central

    Kheddo, Priscilla; Golovanov, Alexander P.; Mellody, Kieran T.; Uddin, Shahid; van der Walle, Christopher F.; Dearman, Rebecca J.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of an equimolar mixture of l-arginine and l-glutamate (Arg·Glu) on cell viability and cellular stress using in vitro cell culture systems are examined with reference to NaCl, in the context of monoclonal antibody formulation. Cells relevant to subcutaneous administration were selected: the human monocyte cell line THP-1, grown as a single cell suspension, and adherent human primary fibroblasts. For THP-1 cells, the mechanism of cell death caused by relatively high salt concentrations was investigated and effects on cell activation/stress assessed as a function of changes in membrane marker and cytokine (interleukin-8) expression. These studies demonstrated that Arg·Glu does not have any further detrimental effects on THP-1 viability in comparison to NaCl at equivalent osmolalities, and that both salts at higher concentrations cause cell death by apoptosis; there was no significant effect on measures of THP-1 cellular stress/activation. For adherent fibroblasts, both salts caused significant toxicity at ~ 400 mOsm/kg, although Arg·Glu caused a more precipitous subsequent decline in viability than did NaCl. These data indicate that Arg·Glu is of equivalent toxicity to NaCl and that the mechanism of toxicity is such that cell death is unlikely to trigger inflammation upon subcutaneous injection in vivo. PMID:26873863

  11. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells. Progress report, May 1986--January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-12-31

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ([Ca{sup 2+}]) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic [Ca{sup 2+}] is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic [Ca{sup 2+}] and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic [Ca{sup 2+}]. The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  12. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the conserved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. Our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  13. Ionic transporter activity in astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes during brain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Annunziato, Lucio; Boscia, Francesca; Pignataro, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Glial cells constitute a large percentage of cells in the nervous system. During recent years, a large number of studies have critically attributed to glia a new role which no longer reflects the long-held view that glia constitute solely a silent and passive supportive scaffolding for brain cells. Indeed, it has been hypothesized that glia, partnering neurons, have a much more actively participating role in brain function. Alteration of intraglial ionic homeostasis in response to ischemic injury has a crucial role in inducing and maintaining glial responses in the ischemic brain. Therefore, glial transporters as potential candidates in stroke intervention are becoming promising targets to enhance an effective and additional therapy for brain ischemia. In this review, we will describe in detail the role played by ionic transporters in influencing astrocyte, microglia, and oligodendrocyte activity and the implications that these transporters have in the progression of ischemic lesion. PMID:23549380

  14. Variations in active transport behavior among different neighborhoods and across adult lifestages

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Lars Breum; Madsen, Thomas; Schipperijn, Jasper; Ersbøll, Annette K; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Objective Built environment characteristics are closely related to transport behavior, but observed variations could be due to residents own choice of neighborhood called residential self-selection. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in neighborhood walkability and residential self-selection across life stages in relation to active transport behavior. Methods The IPEN walkability index, which consists of four built environment characteristics, was used to define 16 high and low walkable neighborhoods in Aarhus, Denmark (250.000 inhabitants). Transport behavior was assessed using the IPAQ questionnaire. Life stages were categorized in three groups according to age and parental status. A factor analysis was conducted to investigate patterns of self-selection. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were carried out to evaluate the association between walkability and transport behavior i.e. walking, cycling and motorized transport adjusted for residential self-selection and life stages. Results A total of 642 adults aged 20–65 years completed the questionnaire. The highest rated self-selection preference across all groups was a safe and secure neighborhood followed by getting around easily on foot and by bicycle. Three self-selection factors were detected, and varied across the life stages. In the multivariable models high neighborhood walkability was associated with less motorized transport (OR 0.33 95%CI 0.18–0.58), more walking (OR 1.65 95%CI 1.03–2.65) and cycling (OR 1.50 95% CI 1.01–2.23). Self-selection and life stage were also associated with transport behavior, and attenuated the association with walkability. Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that some variation in transport behavior can be explained by life stages and self-selection, but the association between living in a more walkable neighborhood and active transport is still significant after adjusting for these factors. Life stage significantly moderated the

  15. Analysis of Thalassiosira pseudonana Silicon Transporters Indicates Distinct Regulatory Levels and Transport Activity through the Cell Cycle▿

    PubMed Central

    Thamatrakoln, Kimberlee; Hildebrand, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of the expression and activity of silicon transporters (SITs) was done on synchronously growing cultures of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana to provide insight into the role these proteins play in cellular silicon metabolism during the cell cycle. The first SIT-specific polyclonal peptide antibody was generated and used in the immunoblot analysis of whole-cell protein lysates to monitor SIT protein levels during synchronized progression through the cell cycle. Peaks in SIT protein levels correlated with active periods of silica incorporation into cell wall substructures. Quantitative real-time PCR on each of the three distinct SIT genes (TpSIT1, TpSIT2, and TpSIT3) showed that mRNA levels for the most highly expressed SIT genes peaked during the S phase of the cell cycle, a period prior to maximal silicon uptake and during which cell wall silicification does not occur. Variations in protein and mRNA levels did not correlate, suggesting that a significant regulatory step of SITs is at the translational or posttranslational level. Surge uptake rates also did not correlate with SIT protein levels, suggesting that SIT activity is internally controlled by the rate of silica incorporation. This is the first study to characterize SIT mRNA and protein expression and cellular uptake kinetics during the course of the cell cycle and cell wall synthesis, and it provides novel insight into SIT regulation. PMID:17172435

  16. [Effects of salicylic acid on sucrose metabolism of tomato seedlings under NaCl stress].

    PubMed

    Su, Yue; Li, Tian-Lai; Li, Nan; Yang, Feng-Jun; Lu, Shao-Wei

    2009-06-01

    A water culture experiment was conducted with the seedlings of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cultivar Liaoyuanduoli to study the effects of salicylic acid (SA) on their sucrose metabolism under NaCl stress. The seedlings were treated with different concentrations (100, 300, and 500 mg x L(-1)) of SA, and the contents of sucrose, glucose, and fructose as well as the related enzyme activities of sucrose metabolism, including acid invertase (AI), neutral invertase (NI), sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), and sucrose synthase (SS), in seedling leaves were determined. Under NaCl stress, SA could maintain or enhance the leaf fructose and glucose contents and the leaf AI, NI, SPS and SS activities, with the highest increment of fructose and glucose contents being 30.0% and 31.1% and that of AI, NI, SPS and SS activities being 24.7%, 27.9%, 22.0% and 24.5%, respectively, in comparing with no SA application, while had less effect on the leaf sucrose content, which suggested that SA could play a protective role in the NaCl-tolerance of tomato seedlings via enhancing the leaf invertase activity to increase leaf fructose and glucose contents. The best alleviating effect was observed at 500 mg x L(-1) of SA.

  17. The AKT2 potassium channel mediates NaCl induced depolarization in the root of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Recatalà, Vicenta

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil salinization is a major cause of plant stress, partly due to the physicochemical similarities between Na+ and K+. Na+ ions compete with K+ ions for their transport into root cells. However, the point of Na+ entry remains unidentified. Here, I have applied the Electrical Penetration Graph as a method for whole plant electrophysiology in order to test if (a) root exposure to NaCl induces depolarization waves that propagate from root to shoot via the phloem, and if (b) the electrophysiological effects of root exposure to NaCl require expression of the potassium channels AKT1 and/or AKT2. The data suggest that AKT2 subunit containing K+ channels mediate NaCl-induced depolarization of root cells, and that this depolarization does not propagate to leaves via the phloem. PMID:27043750

  18. Carbohydrate kinase (RhaK)-dependent ABC transport of rhamnose in Rhizobium leguminosarum demonstrates genetic separation of kinase and transport activities.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Damien; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2013-08-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum the ABC transporter responsible for rhamnose transport is dependent on RhaK, a sugar kinase that is necessary for the catabolism of rhamnose. This has led to a working hypothesis that RhaK has two biochemical functions: phosphorylation of its substrate and affecting the activity of the rhamnose ABC transporter. To address this hypothesis, a linker-scanning random mutagenesis of rhaK was carried out. Thirty-nine linker-scanning mutations were generated and mapped. Alleles were then systematically tested for their ability to physiologically complement kinase and transport activity in a strain carrying an rhaK mutation. The rhaK alleles generated could be divided into three classes: mutations that did not affect either kinase or transport activity, mutations that eliminated both transport and kinase activity, and mutations that affected transport activity but not kinase activity. Two genes of the last class (rhaK72 and rhaK73) were found to have similar biochemical phenotypes but manifested different physiological phenotypes. Whereas rhaK72 conferred a slow-growth phenotype when used to complement rhaK mutants, the rhaK73 allele did not complement the inability to use rhamnose as a sole carbon source. To provide insight to how these insertional variants might be affecting rhamnose transport and catabolism, structural models of RhaK were generated based on the crystal structure of related sugar kinases. Structural modeling suggests that both rhaK72 and rhaK73 affect surface-exposed residues in two distinct regions that are found on one face of the protein, suggesting that this protein's face may play a role in protein-protein interaction that affects rhamnose transport.

  19. 78 FR 73824 - Subzones 247A and 247B, Authorization of Production Activity, GE Transportation, (Locomotives...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Subzones 247A and 247B, Authorization of Production Activity, GE Transportation, (Locomotives, Off-Highway Vehicles and Motors/Engines), Lawrence Park and Grove City, Pennsylvania On July...

  20. Siderophore Cephalosporin Cefiderocol Utilizes Ferric Iron Transporter Systems for Antibacterial Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Toru; Yoshizawa, Hidenori; Sato, Takafumi; Nakamura, Rio; Tsuji, Masakatsu; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Cefiderocol (S-649266) is a novel parenteral siderophore cephalosporin conjugated with a catechol moiety at the third-position side chain. The in vitro activity of cefiderocol against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was enhanced under iron-depleted conditions, whereas that of ceftazidime was not affected. The monitoring of [thiazole-14C]cefiderocol revealed the increased intracellular accumulation of cefiderocol in P. aeruginosa cells incubated under iron-depleted conditions compared with those incubated under iron-sufficient conditions. Cefiderocol was shown to have potent chelating activity with ferric iron, and extracellular iron was efficiently transported into P. aeruginosa cells in the presence of cefiderocol as well as siderophores, while enhanced transport of extracellular ferric iron was not observed when one of the hydroxyl groups of the catechol moiety of cefiderocol was replaced with a methoxy group. We conclude that cefiderocol forms a chelating complex with iron, which is actively transported into P. aeruginosa cells via iron transporters, resulting in potent antibacterial activity of cefiderocol against P. aeruginosa. PMID:27736756

  1. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-05-16

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

  2. 78 FR 76152 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to CBP Inspection and Permit AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... information collection: 1651-0003. SUMMARY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department...

  3. 75 FR 60772 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to CBP Inspection and Permit AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... information collection: 1651-0003. SUMMARY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department...

  4. Making Tracks 1.0: Action Researching an Active Transportation Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Daniel; Foran, Andrew; Robinson, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the first cycle of an action research project. The objective of this action research was to examine the implementation of a school-based active transportation education program (Making Tracks). A two-cycle action research design was employed in which elementary school students' (ages 7-9), middle school…

  5. Mitigation of NaCl Stress by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi through the Modulation of Osmolytes, Antioxidants and Secondary Metabolites in Mustard (Brassica juncea L.) Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sarwat, Maryam; Hashem, Abeer; Ahanger, Mohammad A.; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Alqarawi, A. A.; Alyemeni, Mohammed N.; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Present work was carried out to investigate the possible role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in mitigating salinity-induced alterations in Brassica juncea L. Exposure to NaCl stress altered the morphological, physio-biochemical attributes, antioxidant activity, secondary metabolites and phytohormones in the mustard seedlings. The growth and biomass yield, leaf water content, and total chlorophyll content were decreased with NaCl stress. However, AMF-inoculated plants exhibited enhanced shoot and root length, elevated relative water content, enhanced chlorophyll content, and ultimately biomass yield. Lipid peroxidation and proline content were increased by 54.53 and 63.47%, respectively with 200 mM NaCl concentration. Further increase in proline content and decrease in lipid peroxidation was observed in NaCl-treated plants inoculated with AMF. The antioxidants, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and reduced glutathione were increased by 48.35, 54.86, 43.85, and 44.44%, respectively, with 200 mM NaCl concentration. Further increase in these antioxidants has been observed in AMF-colonized plants indicating the alleviating role of AMF to salinity stress through antioxidant modulation. The total phenol, flavonoids, and phytohormones increase with NaCl treatment. However, NaCl-treated plants colonized with AMF showed further increase in the above parameters except ABA, which was reduced with NaCl+AMF treatment over the plants treated with NaCl alone. Our results demonstrated that NaCl caused negative effect on B. juncea seedlings; however, colonization with AMF enhances the NaCl tolerance by reforming the physio-biochemical attributes, activities of antioxidant enzymes, and production of secondary metabolites and phytohormones. PMID:27458462

  6. Active transport of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles in a reconstituted cell-free system.

    PubMed

    French, B T; Schumm, D E; Webb, T E

    1987-08-01

    The ability of a reconstituted cell-free system to transport mRNA as a ribonucleoprotein particle has been examined. Poly(A) messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs), UV cross-linked after release from isolated liver nuclei in a cell-free system, exhibited a buoyant density of 1.33 g/cm3 in cesium sulfate and 1.47 g/cm3 in cesium chloride, values identical to those of poly(A) mRNP isolated directly from liver polysomes. Furthermore, the in vivo and in vitro transported mRNP showed a similar degree of resistance to RNase digestion and had sedimentation coefficients approximately 2.5 times that of the isolated mRNA. Release of both total mRNA and alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA was proportional to the concentration of a specific cytoplasmic protein. Removal of the transport proteins from the cytosol with streptomycin sulfate provided a basal system incapable of supporting the active transport of alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA. Hybridization of released RNA with a recombinant probe specific for intron 6 of alpha 2 mu-globulin showed that intron sequences were retained within the nucleus under optimal alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA transport conditions and that the transported alpha 2 mu-globulin mRNA was of mature size.

  7. Activation of sucrose transport in defoliated Lolium perenne L.: an example of apoplastic phloem loading plasticity.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Alexandre; Desclos, Marie; Amiard, Véronique; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Adams, William W; Turgeon, Robert; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Noiraud-Romy, Nathalie

    2009-07-01

    The pathway of carbon phloem loading was examined in leaf tissues of the forage grass Lolium perenne. The effect of defoliation (leaf blade removal) on sucrose transport capacity was assessed in leaf sheaths as the major carbon source for regrowth. The pathway of carbon transport was assessed via a combination of electron microscopy, plasmolysis experiments and plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) purified by aqueous two-phase partitioning from the microsomal fraction. Results support an apoplastic phloem loading mechanism. Imposition of an artificial proton-motive force to PMVs from leaf sheaths energized an active, transient and saturable uptake of sucrose (Suc). The affinity of Suc carriers for Suc was 580 microM in leaf sheaths of undefoliated plants. Defoliation induced a decrease of K(m) followed by an increase of V(max). A transporter was isolated from stubble (including leaf sheaths) cDNA libraries and functionally expressed in yeast. The level of L.perenne SUcrose Transporter 1 (LpSUT1) expression increased in leaf sheaths in response to defoliation. Taken together, the results indicate that Suc transport capacity increased in leaf sheaths of L. perenne in response to leaf blade removal. This increase might imply de novo synthesis of Suc transporters, including LpSUT1, and may represent one of the mechanisms contributing to rapid refoliation.

  8. Active transport of amino acids by a guanidiniocarbonyl-pyrrole receptor.

    PubMed

    Urban, Christian; Schmuck, Carsten

    2010-08-16

    Herein we report the synthesis and characterization of a transporter 9 for N-acetylated amino acids. Transporter 9 is a conjugate of a guanidiniocarbonyl pyrrole cation, one of the most efficient carboxylate binding motifs reported so far, and a hydrophobic tris(dodecylbenzyl) group, which ensures solubility in organic solvents. In its protonated form, 9 binds N-acetylated amino acid carboxylates in wet organic solvents with association constants in the range of 10(4) M(-1) as estimated by extraction experiments. Aromatic amino acids are preferred due to additional cation-pi-interactions of the amino acid side chain with the guanidiniocarbonyl pyrrole moiety. U-tube experiments established efficient transport across a bulk liquid chloroform phase with fluxes approaching 10(-6) mol m(-2) s(-1). In experiments with single substrates, the release rate of the amino acid from the receptor-substrate complex at the interface with the receiving phase is rate determining. In contrast to this, in competition experiments with several substrates, the thermodynamic affinity to 9 becomes decisive. As 9 can only transport anions in its protonated form and has a pK(a) value of approximately 7, pH-driven active transport of amino acids is also possible. Transport occurs as a symport of the amino acid carboxylate and a proton.

  9. Effect of anaerobiosis, dinitrophenol and fluoride on the active intestinal transport of galactose in snail.

    PubMed

    Barber, A; Jordana, R; Ponz, F

    1975-06-01

    The active transport of galactose across the intestinal wall (everted sacs) of the snail Cryptomphalus hortensis Müller has been studied in vitro, under several metabolic conditions. Anaerobiosis does not change the serosal/mucosal galactose gradients which are developed in oxygen atmosphere. Dinitrophenol (10(-4) M) greatly increased the O2 uptake by the tissue and clearly inhibits the sugar transport. At 5 times 10(-4) M concentration, DNP totally prevents the uphill transport while the O2 uptake is normal. The inhibition produced by DNP does not increase by anaerobiosis. Fluoride inhibits the galactose transport and also the O2 uptake. It is deduced that in snail intestine the energy for the active transport of galactose can be supplied by aerobic as much as by anaerobic metabolism. The inhibition by dinitrophenol seems to be independent of its uncoupling action on the oxidative phosphorylation. The inhibitory effect of NaF may be due both to glycolisis inhibition and to alteration of the digestive epithelium.

  10. The Shoelace Antenna: Measurements of Driven Transport and Prospects for Active Edge Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore; Labombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Terry, J. L.; Baek, S. G.; Ennever, P.; Edlund, E.; Han, W.; Burke, W. M.; Wolfe, S. M.; Irby, J. H.; Hughes, J. W.; Fitzgerald, E. W.; Granetz, R. S.; Greenwald, M. J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Marmar, E. S.; Pierson, S. Z.; Porkolab, M.; Vieira, R. F.; Wukitch, S. J.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2016-10-01

    The Shoelace antenna was built to drive edge fluctuations in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, matching the wavenumber (k = 1.5/cm) and frequency (50< f<200 kHz) of the Quasi-Coherent Mode (QCM). This fluctuation is responsible for regulating transport across the plasma boundary in the steady-state, ELM-free Enhanced D α(EDA) H-mode; the goal of the Shoelace antenna is to regulate edge transport actively via the same mechanism. Initial experiments demonstrated that the antenna drove a resonant response in the edge plasma in steady-state EDA and transient, non-ELMy H-modes, but transport measurements were unavailable. In 2016, the Shoelace antenna was relocated to enable direct measurements of driven transport by a reciprocating Mirror Langmuir Probe, while also making available gas puff imaging and reflectometer data to provide radial localization of the driven fluctuation. This talk will describe these measurements, and compare them to those of the intrinsic QCM in the context of assessing the feasibility of achieving active control of edge transport using direct coupling to edge modes. This work is supported by USDoE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  11. Modeling cytoskeletal traffic: an interplay between passive diffusion and active transport.

    PubMed

    Neri, Izaak; Kern, Norbert; Parmeggiani, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    We introduce the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with Langmuir kinetics on a network as a microscopic model for active motor protein transport on the cytoskeleton, immersed in the diffusive cytoplasm. We discuss how the interplay between active transport along a network and infinite diffusion in a bulk reservoir leads to a heterogeneous matter distribution on various scales: we find three regimes for steady state transport, corresponding to the scale of the network, of individual segments, or local to sites. At low exchange rates strong density heterogeneities develop between different segments in the network. In this regime one has to consider the topological complexity of the whole network to describe transport. In contrast, at moderate exchange rates the transport through the network decouples, and the physics is determined by single segments and the local topology. At last, for very high exchange rates the homogeneous Langmuir process dominates the stationary state. We introduce effective rate diagrams for the network to identify these different regimes. Based on this method we develop an intuitive but generic picture of how the stationary state of excluded volume processes on complex networks can be understood in terms of the single-segment phase diagram.

  12. Mouse SGLT3a generates proton-activated currents but does not transport sugar.

    PubMed

    Barcelona, Stephanie; Menegaz, Danusa; Díez-Sampedro, Ana

    2012-04-15

    Sodium-glucose cotransporters (SGLTs) are secondary active transporters belonging to the SLC5 gene family. SGLT1, a well-characterized member of this family, electrogenically transports glucose and galactose. Human SGLT3 (hSGLT3), despite sharing a high amino acid identity with human SGLT1 (hSGLT1), does not transport sugar, although functions as a sugar sensor. In contrast to humans, two different genes in mice and rats code for two different SGLT3 proteins, SGLT3a and SGLT3b. We previously cloned and characterized mouse SGLT3b (mSGLT3b) and showed that, while it does transport sugar like SGLT1, it likely functions as a physiological sugar sensor like hSGLT3. In this study, we cloned mouse SGLT3a (mSGLT3a) and characterized it by expressing it in Xenopus laevis oocytes and performing electrophysiology and sugar transport assays. mSGLT3a did not transport sugar, and sugars did not induce currents at pH 7.4, though acidic pH induced inward currents that increased in the presence of sugar. Moreover, mutation of residue 457 from glutamate to glutamine resulted in a Na(+)-dependent transport of sugar that was inhibited by phlorizin. To corroborate our results in oocytes, we expressed and characterized mSGLT3a in mammalian cells and confirmed our findings. In addition, we cloned, expressed, and characterized rat SGLT3a in oocytes and found characteristics similar to mSGLT3a. In summary, acidic pH induces currents in mSGLT3a, and sugar-induced currents are increased at acidic pH, but wild-type SGLT3a does not transport sugar.

  13. Uncoupling proteins 2 and 3 are highly active H+ transporters and highly nucleotide sensitive when activated by coenzyme Q (ubiquinone)

    PubMed Central

    Echtay, Karim S.; Winkler, Edith; Frischmuth, Karina; Klingenberg, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Based on the discovery of coenzyme Q (CoQ) as an obligatory cofactor for H+ transport by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) [Echtay, K. S., Winkler, E. & Klingenberg, M. (2000) Nature (London) 408, 609–613] we show here that UCP2 and UCP3 are also highly active H+ transporters and require CoQ and fatty acid for H+ transport, which is inhibited by low concentrations of nucleotides. CoQ is proposed to facilitate injection of H+ from fatty acid into UCP. Human UCP2 and 3 expressed in Escherichia coli inclusion bodies are solubilized, and by exchange of sarcosyl against digitonin, nucleotide binding as measured with 2′-O-[5-(dimethylamino)naphthalene-1-sulfonyl]-GTP can be restored. After reconstitution into vesicles, Cl− but no H+ are transported. The addition of CoQ initiates H+ transport in conjunction with fatty acids. This increase is fully sensitive to nucleotides. The rates are as high as with reconstituted UCP1 from mitochondria. Maximum activity is at a molar ratio of 1:300 of CoQ:phospholipid. In UCP2 as in UCP1, ATP is a stronger inhibitor than ADP, but in UCP3 ADP inhibits more strongly than ATP. Thus UCP2 and UCP3 are regulated differently by nucleotides, in line with their different physiological contexts. These results confirm the regulation of UCP2 and UCP3 by the same factors CoQ, fatty acids, and nucleotides as UCP1. They supersede reports that UCP2 and UCP3 may not be H+ transporters. PMID:11171965

  14. Relationship between NaCl- and H2O2-Induced Cytosolic Ca2+ Increases in Response to Stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Rui; Xue, Yan; Chen, Amelia; An, Lizhe; Pei, Zhen-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Salinity is among the environmental factors that affect plant growth and development and constrain agricultural productivity. Salinity stress triggers increases in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) via Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Salinity stress, as well as other stresses, induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is well established that ROS also triggers increases in [Ca2+]i. However, the relationship and interaction between salinity stress-induced [Ca2+]i increases and ROS-induced [Ca2+]i increases remain poorly understood. Using an aequorin-based Ca2+ imaging assay we have analyzed [Ca2+]i changes in response to NaCl and H2O2 treatments in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that NaCl and H2O2 together induced larger increases in [Ca2+]i in Arabidopsis seedlings than either NaCl or H2O2 alone, suggesting an additive effect on [Ca2+]i increases. Following a pre-treatment with either NaCl or H2O2, the subsequent elevation of [Ca2+]i in response to a second treatment with either NaCl or H2O2 was significantly reduced. Furthermore, the NaCl pre-treatment suppressed the elevation of [Ca2+]i seen with a second NaCl treatment more than that seen with a second treatment of H2O2. A similar response was seen when the initial treatment was with H2O2; subsequent addition of H2O2 led to less of an increase in [Ca2+]i than did addition of NaCl. These results imply that NaCl-gated Ca2+ channels and H2O2-gated Ca2+ channels may differ, and also suggest that NaCl- and H2O2-evoked [Ca2+]i may reduce the potency of both NaCl and H2O2 in triggering [Ca2+]i increases, highlighting a feedback mechanism. Alternatively, NaCl and H2O2 may activate the same Ca2+ permeable channel, which is expressed in different types of cells and/or activated via different signaling pathways. PMID:24124535

  15. Transport Activity of the Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporter NBCe1 Is Enhanced by Different Isoforms of Carbonic Anhydrase

    PubMed Central

    Schueler, Christina; Becker, Holger M.; McKenna, Robert; Deitmer, Joachim W.

    2011-01-01

    Transport metabolons have been discussed between carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and several membrane transporters. We have now studied different CA isoforms, expressed in Xenopus oocytes alone and together with the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter 1 (NBCe1), to determine their catalytic activity and their ability to enhance NBCe1 transport activity. pH measurements in intact oocytes indicated similar activity of CAI, CAII and CAIII, while in vitro CAIII had no measurable activity and CAI only 30% of the activity of CAII. All three CA isoforms increased transport activity of NBCe1, as measured by the transport current and the rate of intracellular sodium rise in oocytes. Two CAII mutants, altered in their intramolecular proton pathway, CAII-H64A and CAII-Y7F, showed significant catalytic activity and also enhanced NBCe1 transport activity. The effect of CAI, CAII, and CAII mutants on NBCe1 activity could be reversed by blocking CA activity with ethoxyzolamide (EZA, 10 µM), while the effect of the less EZA-sensitive CAIII was not reversed. Our results indicate that different CA isoforms and mutants, even if they show little enzymatic activity in vitro, may display significant catalytic activity in intact cells, and that the ability of CA to enhance NBCe1 transport appears to depend primarily on its catalytic activity. PMID:22076132

  16. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells: Progress report, January 1986--June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this proposal are to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. Several different energy-dependent Ca transport systems have been identified and characterized from oat root tissue (a monocot tissue) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot tissue). They are described in more detail below. I also have included in this progress report our continuing studies to understand the mode of action of the Helminthosporium maydis T toxin. This study was initially supported by a preceding DOE grant. The time needed to complete the study overlapped partly with the present grant period.

  17. Electron Thermal Transport Barrier and Magnetohydrodynamic Activity Observed in Tokamak Plasmas with Negative Central Shear

    SciTech Connect

    de Baar, M.R.; Hogeweij, G.M.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Oomens, A.A.; Schueller, F.C.

    1997-06-01

    In the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, plasmas with steady-state negative central shear (NCS) are made with off-axis electron cyclotron heating. Shifting the power deposition by 2mm results in a sharp transition of confinement. The good confinement branch features a transport barrier at the off-axis minimum of the safety factor (q) , where q{le}3, and two magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, where one is localized at the off-axis minimum of q and one covers the entire NCS region. The low confinement branch has q{gt}3 everywhere, no transport barrier, and no MHD activity. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Effect of insulin-like factors on glucose transport activity in unweighted rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Ritter, Leslie S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of 3 or 6 days of unweighting on glucose transport activity, as assessed by 2-deoxyglucose uptake, in soleus strips stimulated by maximally effective concentrations of insulin, IGF-I, vanadate, or phospholipase C (PLC) is examined. Progressively increased responses to maximally effective doses of insulin or insulin-like growth factor were observed after 3 and 6 days of unweighting compared with weight matched control strips. Enhanced maximal responses to vanadate (6 days only) and PLC (3 and 6 days) were also observed. The data provide support for the existance of postreceptor binding mechanisms for the increased action of insulin on the glucose transport system in unweighted rat skeletal muscle.

  19. Divergent mechanisms for the insulin resistant and hyperresponsive glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted and refed rats. Alterations in both glucose transporter number and intrinsic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, B B; Simpson, I A; Cushman, S W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fasting and refeeding on the glucose transport response to insulin in isolated rat adipose cells have been examined using 3-O-methylglucose transport in intact cells and cytochalasin B binding and Western blotting in subcellular membrane fractions. After a 72-h fast, basal glucose transport activity decreases slightly and insulin-stimulated activity decreases greater than 85%. Following 48 h of fasting, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity is diminished from 3.9 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 fmol/cell per min (mean +/- SEM). Similarly, the concentrations of glucose transporters are reduced with fasting in both the plasma membranes from insulin-stimulated cells from 38 +/- 5 to 18 +/- 3 pmol/mg of membrane protein and the low density microsomes from basal cells from 68 +/- 8 to 34 +/- 9 pmol/mg of membrane protein. Ad lib. refeeding for 6 d after a 48-h fast results in up to twofold greater maximally insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity compared with the control level (7.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.5 +/- 0.2 fmol/cell per min), before returning to baseline at 10 d. However, the corresponding concentration of glucose transporters in the plasma membranes is restored only to the control level (45 +/- 5 vs. 50 +/- 5 pmol/mg of membrane protein). Although the concentration of glucose transporters in the low density microsomes of basal cells remains decreased, the total number is restored to the control level due to an increase in low density microsomal protein. Thus, the insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted rats can be explained by a decreased translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane due to a depleted intracellular pool. In contrast, the insulin hyperresponsive glucose transport observed with refeeding appears to result from (a) a restored translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane from a repleted intracellular pool and (b) enhanced plasma membrane glucose transporter intrinsic activity

  20. Thyroid-stimulating hormone increases active transport of perchlorate into thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Neil; Valentín-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C; McCuistion, Caroline Gibbs; Fenton, Mike S; Gin, Eric; Salem, Andrew; Hershman, Jerome M

    2008-04-01

    Perchlorate blocks thyroidal iodide transport in a dose-dependent manner. The human sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) has a 30-fold higher affinity for perchlorate than for iodide. However, active transport of perchlorate into thyroid cells has not previously been demonstrated by direct measurement techniques. To demonstrate intracellular perchlorate accumulation, we incubated NIS-expressing FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells in various concentrations of perchlorate, and we used a sensitive ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method to measure perchlorate accumulation in the cells. Perchlorate caused a dose-related inhibition of 125-iodide uptake at 1-10 microM. The perchlorate content from cell lysate was analyzed, showing a higher amount of perchlorate in cells that were incubated in medium with higher perchlorate concentration. Thyroid-stimulating hormone increased perchlorate uptake in a dose-related manner, thus supporting the hypothesis that perchlorate is actively transported into thyroid cells. Incubation with nonradiolabeled iodide led to a dose-related reduction of intracellular accumulation of perchlorate. To determine potential toxicity of perchlorate, the cells were incubated in 1 nM to 100 microM perchlorate and cell proliferation was measured. Even the highest concentration of perchlorate (100 microM) did not inhibit cell proliferation after 72 h of incubation. In conclusion, perchlorate is actively transported into thyroid cells and does not inhibit cell proliferation.

  1. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  2. Theaflavins, dimeric catechins, inhibit peptide transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers via down-regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated peptide transporter PEPT1.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Junko; Park, Ha-Young; Kunitake, Yuri; Yoshiura, Keiko; Matsui, Toshiro

    2013-06-15

    In the small intestine, peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) plays a role in the transport of di- and tripeptides. In this study, we investigated whether theaflavins (TFs) affect the absorption of small peptides in human intestinal Caco-2 cells, since TFs do not penetrate through the cells and might be involved in intestinal transport systems. In transport experiments, the transport of glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar, a model molecule for PEPT1 transport) and other dipeptides (Val-Tyr and Ile-Phe) were significantly reduced (P<0.05) in TFs-pretreated cells. In TF 3'-O-gallate-pretreated cells, Western blot analysis revealed attenuated expression of PEPT1 transporter and Gly-Sar transport was completely ameliorated by 10 μM Compound C, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that TFs inhibit peptide transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers, probably through suppression of AMPK-mediated PEPT1 expression, which should be considered a new bioactivity of TFs in black tea.

  3. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  4. [Measurement of the transport activities of bile salt export pump using chemiluminescence detection method].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kana; Murai, Tsuyoshi; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Hui, Shu-Ping; Kurosawa, Takao

    2010-05-01

    Monovalent bile acids, such as taurine- and glycine-conjugated bile acids, are excreted into bile by bile salt export pumps (BSEP, ABCB11). Human BSEP (hBSEP) is physiologically important because it was identified as the gene responsible for the genetic disease: progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC-2). The evaluation of the inhibitory effect of hBSEP transport activity provides significant information for predicting toxic potential in the early phase of drug development. The role and function of hBSEP have been investigated by the examination of the ATP-dependent transport of radioactive isotopically (RI)-labeled bile acid such as a tritium labeled taurocholic acid, in membrane vesicles obtained from hBSEP-expressing cells. The chemiluminescence detection method using 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3alpha-HSD) had been developed for a simple analysis of bile acids in human biological fluids. This method is extremely sensitive and it may be applicable for the measurements of bile acid transport activities by hBSEP vesicles without using RI-labeled bile acid. The present paper deals with an application of the chemiluminescence detection method using 3alpha-HSD with enzyme cycling method to the measurement of ATP-dependent transport activities of taurocholic acid (T-CA) in membrane vesicles obtained from hBSEP-expressing Sf9 cells. Calibration curves for T-CA was linear over the range from 10 to 400 pmol/ml. The values of the kinetic parameters for hBSEP vesicles obtained by the chemiluminescence detection method were comparable with the values of that obtained by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. This assay method was highly useful for the measurements of bile acid transport activities.

  5. Phase transitions in antiferromagnets with a NaCl structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassan-Ogly, F. A.; Filippov, B. N.

    2006-05-01

    A revised derivation scheme of possible magnetic structures in an FCC lattice with the nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions taken into account is proposed. A model of simultaneous magnetic and structural phase transitions of the first order is developed for antiferromagnets with a NaCl structure and with a strong cubic magnetic anisotropy on the base of synthesis of magnetic modified 6-state Potts model and theoretical models of structural phase transitions in cubic crystals. It is shown that the high-temperature diffuse magnetic scattering of neutrons transforms into magnetic Bragg reflections below Néel point.

  6. Expression and phosphorylation of the Na+-Cl- cotransporter NCC in vivo is regulated by dietary salt, potassium, and SGK1.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Volker; Schroth, Jana; Lang, Florian; Kuhl, Dietmar; Uchida, Shinichi

    2009-09-01

    The Na-Cl cotransporter NCC is expressed in the distal convoluted tubule, activated by phosphorylation, and has been implicated in renal NaCl and K(+) homeostasis. The serum and glucocorticoid inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) contributes to renal NaCl retention and K(+) excretion, at least in part, by stimulating the epithelial Na(+) channel and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in the downstream segments of aldosterone-sensitive Na(+)/K(+) exchange. In this study we confirmed in wild-type mice (WT) that dietary NaCl restriction increases renal NCC expression and its phosphorylation at Thr(53), Thr(58), and Ser(71), respectively. This response, however, was attenuated in mice lacking SGK1 (Sgk1(-/-)), which may contribute to impaired NaCl retention in those mice. Total renal NCC expression and phosphorylation at Thr(53), Thr(58), and Ser(71) in WT were greater under low- compared with high-K(+) diet. This finding is consistent with a regulation of NCC to modulate Na(+) delivery to downstream segments of Na(+)/K(+) exchange, thereby modulating K(+) excretion. Dietary K(+)-dependent variation in renal expression of total NCC and phosphorylated NCC were not attenuated in Sgk1(-/-) mice. In fact, high-K(+) diet-induced NCC suppression was enhanced in Sgk1(-/-) mice. The hyperkalemia induced in Sgk1(-/-) mice by a high-K(+) diet may have augmented NCC suppression, thereby increasing Na(+) delivery and facilitating K(+) excretion in downstream segments of impaired Na(+)/K(+) exchange. In summary, changes in NaCl and K(+) intake altered NCC expression and phosphorylation, an observation consistent with a role of NCC in NaCl and K(+) homeostasis. The two maneuvers dissociated plasma aldosterone levels from NCC expression and phosphorylation, implicating additional regulators. Regulation of NCC expression and phosphorylation by dietary NaCl restriction appears to involve SGK1.

  7. Light-activated amino acid transport in Halobacterium halobium envelope vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. E.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from Halobacterium halobium cell envelopes accumulate amino acids in response to light-induced electrical and chemical gradients. Nineteen of 20 commonly occurring amino acids have been shown to be actively accumulated by these vesicles in response to illumination or in response to an artificially created Na+ gradient. On the basis of shared common carriers the transport systems can be divided into eight classes, each responsible for the transport of one or several amino acids: arginine, lysine, histidine; asparagine, glutamine; alanine, glycine, threonine, serine; leucine, valine, isoleucine, methionine; phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan; aspartate; glutamate; proline. Available evidence suggests that these carriers are symmetrical in that amino acids can be transported equally well in both directions across the vesicle membranes. A tentative working model to account for these observations is presented.

  8. Estimating Active Transportation Behaviors to Support Health Impact Assessment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Theodore J; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been promoted as a means to encourage transportation and city planners to incorporate health considerations into their decision-making. Ideally, HIAs would include quantitative estimates of the population health effects of alternative planning scenarios, such as scenarios with and without infrastructure to support walking and cycling. However, the lack of baseline estimates of time spent walking or biking for transportation (together known as "active transportation"), which are critically related to health, often prevents planners from developing such quantitative estimates. To address this gap, we use data from the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey to develop a statistical model that estimates baseline time spent walking and biking as a function of the type of transportation used to commute to work along with demographic and built environment variables. We validate the model using survey data from the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC, USA, metropolitan area. We illustrate how the validated model could be used to support transportation-related HIAs by estimating the potential health benefits of built environment modifications that support walking and cycling. Our statistical model estimates that on average, individuals who commute on foot spend an additional 19.8 (95% CI 16.9-23.2) minutes per day walking compared to automobile commuters. Public transit riders walk an additional 5.0 (95% CI 3.5-6.4) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. Bicycle commuters cycle for an additional 28.0 (95% CI 17.5-38.1) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. The statistical model was able to predict observed transportation physical activity in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region to within 0.5 MET-hours per day (equivalent to about 9 min of daily walking time) for 83% of observations. Across the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region, an estimated 38 (95% CI 15-59) premature deaths potentially could be avoided if the entire

  9. Community Vision and Interagency Alignment: A Community Planning Process to Promote Active Transportation.

    PubMed

    DeGregory, Sarah Timmins; Chaudhury, Nupur; Kennedy, Patrick; Noyes, Philip; Maybank, Aletha

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the Brooklyn Active Transportation Community Planning Initiative launched in 2 New York City neighborhoods. Over a 2-year planning period, residents participated in surveys, school and community forums, neighborhood street assessments, and activation events-activities that highlighted the need for safer streets locally. Consensus among residents and key multisectoral stakeholders, including city agencies and community-based organizations, was garnered in support of a planned expansion of bicycling infrastructure. The process of building on community assets and applying a collective impact approach yielded changes in the built environment, attracted new partners and resources, and helped to restore a sense of power among residents.

  10. Proteomic and Physiological Analyses Reveal Putrescine Responses in Roots of Cucumber Stressed by NaCl

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yinghui; Zhong, Min; Shu, Sheng; Du, Nanshan; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shirong

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major environmental constraint that threatens agricultural productivity. Different strategies have been developed to improve crop salt tolerance, among which the effects of polyamines have been well-reported. To gain a better understanding of the cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) responses to NaCl and unravel the underlying mechanism of exogenous putrescine (Put) alleviating salt-induced damage, comparative proteomic analysis was conducted on cucumber roots treated with NaCl, and/or Put for 7 days. The results showed that exogenous Put restored the root growth inhibited by NaCl. Sixty-two differentially expressed proteins implicated in various biological processes were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The four largest categories included proteins involved in defense response (24.2%), protein metabolism (24.2%), carbohydrate metabolism (19.4%), and amino acid metabolism (14.5%). Exogenous Put up-regulated most identified proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, implying an enhancement in energy generation. Proteins involved in defense response and protein metabolism were differently regulated by Put, which indicated the roles of Put in stress resistance and proteome rearrangement. Put also increased the abundance of proteins involved in amino acid metabolism. Meanwhile, physiological analysis showed that Put could further up-regulated the levels of free amino acids in salt stressed-roots. In addition, Put also improved endogenous polyamines contents by regulating the transcription levels of key enzymes in polyamine metabolism. Taken together, these results suggest that Put may alleviate NaCl-induced growth inhibition through degradation of misfolded/damaged proteins, activation of stress defense, and the promotion of carbohydrate metabolism to generate more energy. PMID:27471514

  11. Action of Steroidal Diamines on Active Transport and Permeability Properties of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Simon; Levine, Elaine

    1968-01-01

    The steroidal diamine irehdiamine A (IDA) is a potent inhibitor of bacteriophage growth and macromolecular synthesis in Escherichia coli. By using radioactive 42K and 14C-thiomethylgalactoside (TMG), rapid effects of IDA and related steroids, both on the influx of potassium and TMG via their respective transport systems and on the efflux (leakage) of radioactivity from the treated cells, have been measured. IDA affects both the influx and efflux of 42K at concentrations of steroid as low as 2 × 10−5m. Because of the increased leakage, it is not possible to tell whether there is a direct effect reducing the rate of active transport of potassium. The primary diamine, IDA, and its bis-secondary, bis-tertiary, and bis-quaternary diamine analogues are decreasingly effective in altering cell permeability properties in the order 1° > 2° > 3° > 4°. The effects of IDA on potassium transport are mirrored by similar effects on the transport of TMG. Therefore, the action of IDA is on the cell membrane and not directly on one or another transport system. The effects of IDA on cell permeability can reasonably explain the inhibitory actions of the drugs on bacteriophage growth and cellular metabolism. PMID:4877122

  12. Modeling preferential water flow and solute transport in unsaturated soil using the active region model

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, F.; Wang, K.; Zhang, R.; Liu, H.H.

    2009-03-15

    Preferential flow and solute transport are common processes in the unsaturated soil, in which distributions of soil water content and solute concentrations are often characterized as fractal patterns. An active region model (ARM) was recently proposed to describe the preferential flow and transport patterns. In this study, ARM governing equations were derived to model the preferential soil water flow and solute transport processes. To evaluate the ARM equations, dye infiltration experiments were conducted, in which distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration were measured. Predicted results using the ARM and the mobile-immobile region model (MIM) were compared with the measured distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration. Although both the ARM and the MIM are two-region models, they are fundamental different in terms of treatments of the flow region. The models were evaluated based on the modeling efficiency (ME). The MIM provided relatively poor prediction results of the preferential flow and transport with negative ME values or positive ME values less than 0.4. On the contrary, predicted distributions of soil water content and Cl- concentration using the ARM agreed reasonably well with the experimental data with ME values higher than 0.8. The results indicated that the ARM successfully captured the macroscopic behavior of preferential flow and solute transport in the unsaturated soil.

  13. The Role of Potassium in Active Transport of Sodium by the Toad Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Alvin; Leaf, Alexander

    1963-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the isolated urinary bladder of the toad, Bufo marinus, in order to explain the dependence of active sodium transport on the presence of potassium, in the serosal medium. Attempts to obtain evidence for coupled sodium-potassium transport by the serosal pump were unsuccessful; no relation between sodium transport and uptake of K42 from the serosal medium was demonstrable. Rather, the predominant effect of serosal potassium appeared to be operative at the mucosal permeability barrier, influencing the permeability of this surface to sodium. The mucosal effects of serosal potassium were correlated with effects on cellular cation content. When sodium Ringer's solution was used as serosal medium, removal of potassium resulted in significant decrease in tissue potassium content, commensurate increase in tissue sodium content, and marked depression of mucosal permeability and sodium transport. When choline replaced sodium in the serosal medium, removal of potassium resulted in only slight alterations of tissue electrolyte content, and effects on mucosal permeability and sodium transport were minimal. PMID:19873552

  14. Modulation of LAT1 (SLC7A5) transporter activity and stability by membrane cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, David; Chiduza, George N.; Wright, Gareth S. A.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Hasnain, S. Samar

    2017-01-01

    LAT1 (SLC7A5) is a transporter for both the uptake of large neutral amino acids and a number of pharmaceutical drugs. It is expressed in numerous cell types including T-cells, cancer cells and brain endothelial cells. However, mechanistic knowledge of how it functions and its interactions with lipids are unknown or limited due to inability of obtaining stable purified protein in sufficient quantities. Our data show that depleting cellular cholesterol reduced the Vmax but not the Km of the LAT1 mediated uptake of a model substrate into cells (L-DOPA). A soluble cholesterol analogue was required for the stable purification of the LAT1 with its chaperon CD98 (4F2hc,SLC3A2) and that this stabilised complex retained the ability to interact with a substrate. We propose cholesterol interacts with the conserved regions in the LAT1 transporter that have been shown to bind to cholesterol/CHS in Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter. In conclusion, LAT1 is modulated by cholesterol impacting on its stability and transporter activity. This novel finding has implications for other SLC7 family members and additional eukaryotic transporters that contain the LeuT fold. PMID:28272458

  15. Effects of road de-icing salt (NaCl) on larval wood frogs (Rana sylvatica).

    PubMed

    Sanzo, Domenico; Hecnar, Stephen J

    2006-03-01

    Vast networks of roads cover the earth and have numerous environmental effects including pollution. A major component of road runoff in northern countries is salt (mostly NaCl) used as a winter de-icing agent, but few studies of effects of road salts on aquatic organisms exist. Amphibians require aquatic habitats and chemical pollution is implicated as a major factor in global population declines. We exposed wood frog tadpoles to NaCl. Tests revealed 96-h LC50 values of 2,636 and 5,109 mg/l and tadpoles experienced reduced activity, weight, and displayed physical abnormalities. A 90 d chronic experiment revealed significantly lower survivorship, decreased time to metamorphosis, reduced weight and activity, and increased physical abnormalities with increasing salt concentration (0.00, 0.39, 77.50, 1,030.00 mg/l). Road salts had toxic effects on larvae at environmentally realistic concentrations with potentially far-ranging ecological impacts. More studies on the effects of road salts are warranted.

  16. The contribution of SNAT1 to system A amino acid transporter activity in human placental trophoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Desforges, M.; Greenwood, S.L.; Glazier, J.D.; Westwood, M.; Sibley, C.P.

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} mRNA levels for SNAT1 are higher than other system A subtype mRNAs in primary human cytotrophoblast. {yields} SNAT1 knockdown in cytotrophoblast cells significantly reduces system A activity. {yields} SNAT1 is a key contributor to system A-mediated amino acid transport in human placenta. -- Abstract: System A-mediated amino acid transport across the placenta is important for the supply of neutral amino acids needed for fetal growth. All three system A subtypes (SNAT1, 2, and 4) are expressed in human placental trophoblast suggesting there is an important biological role for each. Placental system A activity increases as pregnancy progresses, coinciding with increased fetal nutrient demands. We have previously shown SNAT4-mediated system A activity is higher in first trimester than at term, suggesting that SNAT1 and/or SNAT2 are responsible for the increased system A activity later in gestation. However, the relative contribution of each subtype to transporter activity in trophoblast at term has yet to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to identify the predominant subtype of system A in cytotrophoblast cells isolated from term placenta, maintained in culture for 66 h, by: (1) measuring mRNA expression of the three subtypes and determining the Michaelis-Menten constants for uptake of the system A-specific substrate, {sup 14}C-MeAIB, (2) investigating the contribution of SNAT1 to total system A activity using siRNA. Results: mRNA expression was highest for the SNAT1 subtype of system A. Kinetic analysis of {sup 14}C-MeAIB uptake revealed two distinct transport systems; system 1: K{sub m} = 0.38 {+-} 0.12 mM, V{sub max} = 27.8 {+-} 9.0 pmol/mg protein/20 min, which resembles that reported for SNAT1 and SNAT2 in other cell types, and system 2: K{sub m} = 45.4 {+-} 25.0 mM, V{sub max} = 1190 {+-} 291 pmol/mg protein/20 min, which potentially represents SNAT4. Successful knockdown of SNAT1 mRNA using target-specific si

  17. Photosystem I cyclic electron transport: Measurement of ferredoxin-plastoquinone reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Cleland, R E; Bendall, D S

    1992-12-01

    Absorbance changes of ferredoxin measured at 463 nm in isolated thylakoids were shown to arise from the activity of the enzyme ferredoxin-plastoquinone reductase (FQR) in cyclic electron transport. Under anaerobic conditions in the presence of DCMU and an appropriate concentration of reduced ferredoxin, a light-induced absorbance decrease due to further reduction of Fd was assigned to the oxidation of the other components in the cyclic pathway, primarily plastoquinone. When the light was turned off, Fd was reoxidised and this gave a direct quantitative measurement of the rate of cyclic electron transport due to the activity of FQR. This activity was sensitive to the classical inhibitor of cyclic electron transport, antimycin, and also to J820 and DBMIB. Antimycin had no effect on Fd reduction although this was inhibited by stigmatellin. This provides further evidence that there is a quinone reduction site outside the cytochrome bf complex. The effect of inhibitors of ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase and experiments involving the modification of ferredoxin suggest that there may be some role for the reductase as a component of FQR. Contrary to expectations, NADPH2 inhibited FQR activity; ATP and ADP had no effect.

  18. A fully resolved fluid-structure-muscle-activation model for esophageal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Wenjun; Bhalla, Amneet P. S.; Griffith, Boyce E.; Johnson, Mark; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2013-11-01

    Esophageal transport is a mechanical and physiological process that transfers the ingested food bolus from the pharynx to the stomach through a multi-layered esophageal tube. The process involves interactions between the bolus, esophageal wall composed of mucosal, circular muscle (CM) and longitudinal muscle (LM) layers, and neurally coordinated muscle activation including CM contraction and LM shortening. In this work, we present a 3D fully-resolved model of esophageal transport based on the immersed boundary method. The model describes the bolus as a Newtonian fluid, the esophageal wall as a multi-layered elastic tube represented by springs and beams, and the muscle activation as a traveling wave of sequential actuation/relaxation of muscle fibers, represented by springs with dynamic rest lengths. Results on intraluminal pressure profile and bolus shape will be shown, which are qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. Effects of activating CM contraction only, LM shortening only or both, for the bolus transport, are studied. A comparison among them can help to identify the role of each type of muscle activation. The support of grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 from NIH is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Contrasts in active transport behaviour across four countries: How do they translate into public health benefits?

    PubMed Central

    Götschi, Thomas; Tainio, Marko; Maizlish, Neil; Schwanen, Tim; Goodman, Anna; Woodcock, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective Countries and regions vary substantially in transport related physical activity that people gain from walking and cycling and in how this varies by age and gender. This study aims to quantify the population health impacts of differences between four settings. Method The Integrated Transport and Health Model (ITHIM) was used to estimate health impacts from changes to physical activity that would arise if adults in urban areas in England and Wales adopted travel patterns of Switzerland, the Netherlands, and California. The model was parameterised with data from travel surveys from each setting and estimated using Monte Carlo simulation. Two types of scenarios were created, one in which the total travel time budget was assumed to be fixed and one where total travel times varied. Results Substantial population health benefits would accrue if people in England and Wales gained as much transport related physical activity as people in Switzerland or the Netherlands, whilst smaller but still considerable harms would occur if active travel fell to the level seen in California. The benefits from achieving the travel patterns of the high cycling Netherlands or high walking Switzerland were similar. Conclusion Differences between high income countries in how people travel have important implications for population health. PMID:25724106

  20. Quantification of ionic transport within thermally-activated batteries using electron probe micro-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humplik, Thomas; Stirrup, Emily K.; Grillet, Anne M.; Grant, Richard P.; Allen, Ashley N.; Wesolowski, Daniel E.; Roberts, Christine C.

    2016-07-01

    The transient transport of electrolytes in thermally-activated batteries is studied using electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA), demonstrating the robust capability of EPMA as a useful tool for studying and quantifying mass transport within porous materials, particularly in difficult environments where classical flow measurements are challenging. By tracking the mobility of bromine and potassium ions from the electrolyte stored within the separator into the lithium silicon anode and iron disulfide cathode, we are able to quantify the transport mechanisms and physical properties of the electrodes including permeability and tortuosity. Due to the micron to submicron scale porous structure of the initially dry anode, a fast capillary pressure driven flow is observed into the anode from which we are able to set a lower bound on the permeability of 10-1 mDarcy. The transport into the cathode is diffusion-limited because the cathode originally contained some electrolyte before activation. Using a transient one-dimensional diffusion model, we estimate the tortuosity of the cathode electrode to be 2.8 ± 0.8.

  1. Fatty acid transport and activation and the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Angel; Fraisl, Peter; Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Dirusso, Concetta C; Singer, Diane; Sealls, Whitney; Black, Paul N

    2008-09-15

    These studies defined the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid transport, activation and trafficking using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and established the kinetic constants of fatty acid transport in an effort to define whether vectorial acylation represents a common mechanism in different cell types (3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes, Caco-2 and HepG2 cells and three endothelial cell lines (b-END3, HAEC, and HMEC)). As expected, fatty acid transport protein (FATP)1 and long-chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl)1 were the predominant isoforms expressed in adipocytes consistent with their roles in the transport and activation of exogenous fatty acids destined for storage in the form of triglycerides. In cells involved in fatty acid processing including Caco-2 (intestinal-like) and HepG2 (liver-like), FATP2 was the predominant isoform. The patterns of Acsl expression were distinct between these two cell types with Acsl3 and Acsl5 being predominant in Caco-2 cells and Acsl4 in HepG2 cells. In the endothelial lines, FATP1 and FATP4 were the most highly expressed isoforms; the expression patterns for the different Acsl isoforms were highly variable between the different endothelial cell lines. The transport of the fluorescent long-chain fatty acid C(1)-BODIPY-C(12) in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes followed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the apparent efficiency (k(cat)/K(T)) of this process increases over 2-fold (2.1 x 10(6)-4.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)) upon adipocyte differentiation. The V(max) values for fatty acid transport in Caco-2 and HepG2 cells were essentially the same, yet the efficiency was 55% higher in Caco-2 cells (2.3 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1) versus 1.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)). The kinetic parameters for fatty acid transport in three endothelial cell types demonstrated they were the least efficient cell types for this process giving V(max) values that were nearly 4-fold lower than those defined form 3T3-L1 adipocytes, Caco-2 cells and HepG2 cells. The

  2. Estimating Active Transportation Behaviors to Support Health Impact Assessment in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Theodore J.; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been promoted as a means to encourage transportation and city planners to incorporate health considerations into their decision-making. Ideally, HIAs would include quantitative estimates of the population health effects of alternative planning scenarios, such as scenarios with and without infrastructure to support walking and cycling. However, the lack of baseline estimates of time spent walking or biking for transportation (together known as “active transportation”), which are critically related to health, often prevents planners from developing such quantitative estimates. To address this gap, we use data from the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey to develop a statistical model that estimates baseline time spent walking and biking as a function of the type of transportation used to commute to work along with demographic and built environment variables. We validate the model using survey data from the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill, NC, USA, metropolitan area. We illustrate how the validated model could be used to support transportation-related HIAs by estimating the potential health benefits of built environment modifications that support walking and cycling. Our statistical model estimates that on average, individuals who commute on foot spend an additional 19.8 (95% CI 16.9–23.2) minutes per day walking compared to automobile commuters. Public transit riders walk an additional 5.0 (95% CI 3.5–6.4) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. Bicycle commuters cycle for an additional 28.0 (95% CI 17.5–38.1) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. The statistical model was able to predict observed transportation physical activity in the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill region to within 0.5 MET-hours per day (equivalent to about 9 min of daily walking time) for 83% of observations. Across the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill region, an estimated 38 (95% CI 15–59) premature deaths potentially could

  3. Experimental thermal transport evolution of silane activated nano-clay reinforced styrene butadiene elastomeric nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, S. S.; Iqbal, N.; Jamil, T.; Bashir, A.; Shahid, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, silane activated nanoclay was reinforced in styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) to enhance the thermal resistance/stability and mechanical properties of SBR. silane activated nanoclay with variant concentrations was impregnated in the rubber matrix to fabricate polymer nanocomposites under control processing conditions. Experimental thermal transport, thermal oxidation, phase transition study, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite specimens were carried out. Thermal insulation, thermal stability, and heat flow response were remarkably enhanced with the addition of nanokaolinite in the polymer matrix. Phase transition temperatures, their corresponding enthalpies, tensile strength, elastic modulus, elongation at break and hardness of the rubber composites were positively influenced with the filler incorporation into the host matrix. The Even dispersion of nanoreinforcements, morphological and compositional analyses of the thermal transport tested specimens were performed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively.

  4. Recent Cooperative Research Activities of HDD and Flexible Media Transport Technologies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Kyosuke

    This paper presents the recent status of industry-university cooperative research activities in Japan on the mechatronics of information storage and input/output equipment. There are three research committees for promoting information exchange on technical problems and research topics of head-disk interface in hard disk drives (HDD), flexible media transport and image printing processes which are supported by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineering (JSME), the Japanese Society of Tribologists (JAST) and the Japan Society of Precision Engineering (JSPE). For hard disk drive technology, the Storage Research Consortium (SRC) is supporting more than 40 research groups in various different universities to perform basic research for future HDD technology. The past and present statuses of these activities are introduced, particularly focusing on HDD and flexible media transport mechanisms.

  5. Dynamic defect correlations dominate activated electronic transport in SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snijders, Paul C.; Şen, Cengiz; McConnell, Michael P.; Ma, Ying-Zhong; May, Andrew F.; Herklotz, Andreas; Wong, Anthony T.; Ward, T. Zac

    2016-07-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a critically important material for the study of emergent electronic phases in complex oxides, as well as for the development of applications based on their heterostructures. Despite the large body of knowledge on STO, there are still many uncertainties regarding the role of defects in the properties of STO, including their influence on ferroelectricity in bulk STO and ferromagnetism in STO-based heterostructures. We present a detailed analysis of the decay of persistent photoconductivity in STO single crystals with defect concentrations that are relatively low but significantly affect their electronic properties. The results show that photo-activated electron transport cannot be described by a superposition of the properties due to independent point defects as current models suggest but is, instead, governed by defect complexes that interact through dynamic correlations. These results emphasize the importance of defect correlations for activated electronic transport properties of semiconducting and insulating perovskite oxides.

  6. Dynamic defect correlations dominate activated electronic transport in SrTiO3

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Paul C.; Şen, Cengiz; McConnell, Michael P.; Ma, Ying-Zhong; May, Andrew F.; Herklotz, Andreas; Wong, Anthony T.; Ward, T. Zac

    2016-01-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a critically important material for the study of emergent electronic phases in complex oxides, as well as for the development of applications based on their heterostructures. Despite the large body of knowledge on STO, there are still many uncertainties regarding the role of defects in the properties of STO, including their influence on ferroelectricity in bulk STO and ferromagnetism in STO-based heterostructures. We present a detailed analysis of the decay of persistent photoconductivity in STO single crystals with defect concentrations that are relatively low but significantly affect their electronic properties. The results show that photo-activated electron transport cannot be described by a superposition of the properties due to independent point defects as current models suggest but is, instead, governed by defect complexes that interact through dynamic correlations. These results emphasize the importance of defect correlations for activated electronic transport properties of semiconducting and insulating perovskite oxides. PMID:27443503

  7. DOE FUEL CELL R&D ACTIVITIES: TRANSPORTATION, STATIONARY, AND PORTABLE POWER APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Terry L; Garland, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Fuel Cell R&D Activities: Transportation, Stationary, and Portable Power Applications Terry Payne, PhD, PE, Technology development Manager; and Nancy Garland, PhD, Acting Fuel Cell Team Leader, Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies, U.S. Department of Energy* In 2007, the Department of Energy s Hydrogen Program initiated new research and development projects aimed at reducing component cost and increasing stack durability and performance of transportation and stationary fuel cells. Updated progress in the Program including highlights from the new projects includes operation of a membrane electrode assembly over 7300 with voltage cycling. Market transformation activities in the Program such as forklifts for distribution centers and fuel cells for backup power will be discussed.

  8. Loss of ATP-dependent transport activity in pseudoxanthoma elasticum-associated mutants of human ABCC6 (MRP6).

    PubMed

    Iliás, Attila; Urbán, Zsolt; Seidl, Thomas L; Le Saux, Olivier; Sinkó, Emese; Boyd, Charles D; Sarkadi, Balázs; Váradi, András

    2002-05-10

    Mutations in the ABCC6 (MRP6) gene cause pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a rare heritable disorder resulting in the calcification of elastic fibers. In the present study a cDNA encoding a full-length normal variant of ABCC6 was amplified from a human kidney cDNA library, and the protein was expressed in Sf9 insect cells. In isolated membranes ATP binding as well as ATP-dependent active transport by ABCC6 was demonstrated. We found that glutathione conjugates, including leukotriene C(4) and N-ethylmaleimide S-glutathione (NEM-GS), were actively transported by human ABCC6. Organic anions (probenecid, benzbromarone, indomethacin), known to interfere with glutathione conjugate transport of human ABCC1 and ABCC2, inhibited the ABCC6-mediated NEM-GS transport in a specific manner, indicating that ABCC6 has a unique substrate specificity. We have also expressed three missense mutant forms of ABCC6, which have recently been shown to cause PXE. MgATP binding was normal in these proteins; ATP-dependent NEM-GS or leukotriene C(4) transport, however, was abolished. Our data indicate that human ABCC6 is a primary active transporter for organic anions. In the three ABCC6 mutant forms examined, the loss of transport activity suggests that these mutations result in a PXE phenotype through a direct influence on the transport activity of this ABC transporter.

  9. Interactions of ( sup 3 H)amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. II. Active transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1991-05-01

    The accumulation of 5 nM d-({sup 3}H)amphetamine (d-({sup 3}H)AMPH) into rat brain synaptosomes was examined using physiological buffer conditions. The accumulation of d-({sup 3}H)AMPH into striatal synaptosomes was saturable, of high affinity, ouabain-sensitive and temperature-dependent, suggesting an active transport phenomenon. Eadee-Hofstee analysis of striatal d-({sup 3}H)AMPH transport (AMT) saturation isotherms indicated an apparent Km of 97 nM and a Vmax of 3.0 fmol/mg tissue/min. Lesion of the striatal dopaminergic innervation led to equivalent decreases of ({sup 3}H) dopamine (DA) transport and AMT, indicating that AMT occurs in DA terminals. Furthermore, AMT was not evident in cerebral cortex, a brain region with a paucity of DA terminals. In competition studies, AMT was stereospecific; d-AMPH (IC50 = 60 nM) was an 8-fold more potent inhibitor of the transport than its I-isomer (IC50 = 466 nM). DA(IC50 = 257 nM), DA uptake blockers and substrates were found to be potent inhibitors of AMT: GBR12909 IC50 = 5 nM; methamphetamine IC50 = 48 nM; methylphenidate IC50 = 53 nM; and cocaine IC50 = 172 nM. In contrast, serotonin was relatively weak in inhibiting AMT (IC50 = 7.9 microM). There was a highly significant (P less than .001; slope = 1.2) linear correlation between the AMT-inhibiting potencies of AMPH analogs and their potencies in stimulating locomotor activity in rodents. AMT may be important in the low dose effects of AMPH such as increased locomotor activity in rodents and stimulant activity in man. Differences between AMT and d-({sup 3}H)AMPH sequestration described earlier, as well as their possible relevance to behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of AMPH administration are also discussed.

  10. Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches (PASTA): a study protocol for a multicentre project

    PubMed Central

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Panis, Luc Int; Anaya, Esther; Avila-Palencia, Ione; Boschetti, Florinda; Brand, Christian; Cole-Hunter, Tom; Dons, Evi; Eriksson, Ulf; Gaupp-Berghausen, Mailin; Kahlmeier, Sonja; Laeremans, Michelle; Mueller, Natalie; Orjuela, Juan Pablo; Racioppi, Francesca; Raser, Elisabeth; Rojas-Rueda, David; Schweizer, Christian; Standaert, Arnout; Uhlmann, Tina; Wegener, Sandra; Götschi, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Only one-third of the European population meets the minimum recommended levels of physical activity (PA). Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for non-communicable diseases. Walking and cycling for transport (active mobility, AM) are well suited to provide regular PA. The European research project Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches (PASTA) pursues the following aims: (1) to investigate correlates and interrelations of AM, PA, air pollution and crash risk; (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of selected interventions to promote AM; (3) to improve health impact assessment (HIA) of AM; (4) to foster the exchange between the disciplines of public health and transport planning, and between research and practice. Methods and analysis PASTA pursues a mixed-method and multilevel approach that is consistently applied in seven case study cities. Determinants of AM and the evaluation of measures to increase AM are investigated through a large scale longitudinal survey, with overall 14 000 respondents participating in Antwerp, Barcelona, London, Örebro, Rome, Vienna and Zurich. Contextual factors are systematically gathered in each city. PASTA generates empirical findings to improve HIA for AM, for example, with estimates of crash risks, factors on AM-PA substitution and carbon emissions savings from mode shifts. Findings from PASTA will inform WHO's online Health Economic Assessment Tool on the health benefits from cycling and/or walking. The study's wide scope, the combination of qualitative and quantitative methods and health and transport methods, the innovative survey design, the general and city-specific analyses, and the transdisciplinary composition of the consortium and the wider network of partners promise highly relevant insights for research and practice. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained by the local ethics committees in the countries where the work is being conducted, and sent to the European

  11. Activation of glutamate transport evokes rapid glutamine release from perisynaptic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Uwechue, Nneka M; Marx, Mari-Carmen; Chevy, Quentin; Billups, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of astrocytes by neuronal activity and the subsequent release of neuromodulators is thought to be an important regulator of synaptic communication. In this study we show that astrocytes juxtaposed to the glutamatergic calyx of Held synapse in the rat medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) are stimulated by the activation of glutamate transporters and consequently release glutamine on a very rapid timescale. MNTB principal neurones express electrogenic system A glutamine transporters, and were exploited as glutamine sensors in this study. By simultaneous whole-cell voltage clamping astrocytes and neighbouring MNTB neurones in brainstem slices, we show that application of the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) substrate d-aspartate stimulates astrocytes to rapidly release glutamine, which is detected by nearby MNTB neurones. This release is significantly reduced by the toxins l-methionine sulfoximine and fluoroacetate, which reduce glutamine concentrations specifically in glial cells. Similarly, glutamine release was also inhibited by localised inactivation of EAATs in individual astrocytes, using internal dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or dissipating the driving force by modifying the patch-pipette solution. These results demonstrate that astrocytes adjacent to glutamatergic synapses can release glutamine in a temporally precise, controlled manner in response to glial glutamate transporter activation. Since glutamine can be used by neurones as a precursor for glutamate and GABA synthesis, this represents a potential feedback mechanism by which astrocytes can respond to synaptic activation and react in a way that sustains or enhances further communication. This would therefore represent an additional manifestation of the tripartite relationship between synapses and astrocytes. PMID:22411007

  12. Association of serotonin transporter promoter regulatory region polymorphism and cerebral activity to visual presentation of food.

    PubMed

    Kaurijoki, Salla; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Niskanen, Eini; Carlson, Synnöve; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Pesonen, Ullamari; Kaprio, Jaakko M; Rissanen, Aila; Tiihonen, Jari; Karhunen, Leila

    2008-07-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have revealed links between genetic polymorphisms and cognitive and behavioural processes. Serotonin is a classical neurotransmitter of central nervous system, and it is connected to the control of appetite and satiety. In this study, the relationship between the functional variation in the serotonin transporter gene and the activity in the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a brain area activated by visual food stimuli was explored. Thirty subjects underwent serial fMRI studies and provided DNA for genetic analyses. Subjects homozygous for the long allele exhibited greater left PCC activity in the comparison food > non-food compared with individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the short allele. The association between genotype and activation was linear, the subjects with two copies of the long allele variant having the strongest activation. These results demonstrate the possible genetically driven variation in the response of the left PCC to visual presentation of food in humans.

  13. Phase I metabolites of mephedrone display biological activity as substrates at monoamine transporters

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, F P; Wimmer, L; Dillon‐Carter, O; Partilla, J S; Burchardt, N V; Mihovilovic, M D; Baumann, M H

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose 4‐Methyl‐N‐methylcathinone (mephedrone) is a synthetic stimulant that acts as a substrate‐type releaser at transporters for dopamine (DAT), noradrenaline (NET) and 5‐HT (SERT). Upon systemic administration, mephedrone is metabolized to several phase I compounds: the N‐demethylated metabolite, 4‐methylcathinone (nor‐mephedrone); the ring‐hydroxylated metabolite, 4‐hydroxytolylmephedrone (4‐OH‐mephedrone); and the reduced keto‐metabolite, dihydromephedrone. Experimental Approach We used in vitro assays to compare the effects of mephedrone and synthetically prepared metabolites on transporter‐mediated uptake and release in HEK293 cells expressing human monoamine transporters and in rat brain synaptosomes. In vivo microdialysis was employed to examine the effects of i.v. metabolite injection (1 and 3 mg·kg−1) on extracellular dopamine and 5‐HT levels in rat nucleus accumbens. Key Results In cells expressing transporters, mephedrone and its metabolites inhibited uptake, although dihydromephedrone was weak overall. In cells and synaptosomes, nor‐mephedrone and 4‐OH‐mephedrone served as transportable substrates, inducing release via monoamine transporters. When administered to rats, mephedrone and nor‐mephedrone produced elevations in extracellular dopamine and 5‐HT, whereas 4‐OH‐mephedrone did not. Mephedrone and nor‐mephedrone, but not 4‐OH‐mephedrone, induced locomotor activity. Conclusions and Implications Our results demonstrate that phase I metabolites of mephedrone are transporter substrates (i.e. releasers) at DAT, NET and SERT, but dihydromephedrone is weak in this regard. When administered in vivo, nor‐mephedrone increases extracellular dopamine and 5‐HT in the brain whereas 4‐OH‐mephedrone does not, suggesting the latter metabolite does not penetrate the blood–brain barrier. Future studies should examine the pharmacokinetics of nor‐mephedrone to determine its possible

  14. MAPK-mediated enhanced expression of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase confers the improved adaption to NaCl stress in a halotolerate peppermint (Mentha piperita L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Zhen, Zhen; Guo, Kai; Harvey, Paul; Li, Jishun; Yang, Hetong

    2016-03-01

    Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-H(+)-ATPase) has been proved to be of importance in maintenance of ion homeostasis inside plant cells under NaCl stress. In this study, the expression levels and salt-tolerate function of V-H(+)-ATPase genes were investigated in the roots and leaves of a halotolerate peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) Keyuan-1 treated with different concentrations of NaCl. Results showed that the expressions of V-H(+)-ATPase in the transcriptional, protein and activity levels were significantly enhanced in the halotolerate peppermint Keyuan-1 compared to the wild-type (WT) peppermint under 50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl treatment. Moreover, inhibition experiments exhibited that V-H(+)-ATPase activity played vital roles in the salt tolerance of peppermint Keyuan-1 to 150 mM NaCl stress through increasing the vacuolar H(+) pumping activity and Na(+) compartmentalization capacity. Furthermore, results of Western blots showed that the activity of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was significantly increased under different concentrations of NaCl in the halotolerate peppermint Keyuan-1, which was much higher than that of WT peppermint. Further experiments with inhibitors suggested that this MAPK protein was responsible for the enhanced expression of V-H(+)-ATPase in the halotolerate peppermint Keyuan-1. In response to NaCl stress, increase of cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) occurred upstream of MAPK activation in the halotolerate peppermint Keyuan-1. In all, these findings demonstrated that increased V-H(+)-ATPase activity was positively correlated with the enhanced salt tolerance in the halotolerate peppermint Keyuan-1, providing the theoretic basis for the further development and utilization of peppermint in saline areas.

  15. Source-sink regulation of cotyledonary reserve mobilization during cashew (Anacardium occidentale) seedling establishment under NaCl salinity.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Eduardo Luiz; Almeida, Tânia Dias; Chagas, Roberta Magalhães; Ponte, Luiz Ferreira Aguiar; Viégas, Ricardo Almeida; Silveira, Joaquim Albenísio Gomes

    2009-01-01

    Seedling establishment is a critical process to crop productivity, especially under saline conditions. This work was carried out to investigate the hypothesis that reserve mobilization is coordinated with salt-induced inhibition of seedling growth due to changes in source-sink relations. To test this hypothesis, cashew nuts (Anacardium occidentale) were sown in vermiculite irrigated daily with distilled water (control) or 50mM NaCl and they were evaluated at discrete developmental stages from the seed germination until the whole seedling establishment. The salt treatment coordinately delayed the seedling growth and the cotyledonary reserve mobilization. However, these effects were more pronounced at late seedling establishment than in earlier stages. The storage protein mobilization was affected by salt stress before the lipid and starch breakdown. The globulin fraction represented the most important storage proteins of cashew cotyledons, and its mobilization was markedly delayed by NaCl along the seedling establishment. Free amino acids were mostly retained in the cotyledons of salt-treated seedlings when the mobilization of storage proteins, lipids and starch was strongly delayed. Proline was not considerably accumulated in the cotyledons of cashew seedlings as a response to NaCl salinity. According to these results it is noteworthy that the salt-induced inhibition of seedling growth is narrowly coordinated with the delay of reserve mobilization and the accumulation of hydrolysis products in cotyledons. Also, it was evidenced that free amino acids, especially those related to nitrogen transport, are potential signals involved in the regulation of storage protein hydrolysis during cashew seedling establishment under NaCl salinity.

  16. EarthScope Transportable Array Siting Outreach Activities in Alaska and Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardine, L.; Dorr, P. M.; Tape, C.; McQuillan, P.; Taber, J.; West, M. E.; Busby, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScopeTransportable Array is working to locate over 260 stations in Alaska and western Canada. In this region, new tactics and partnerships are needed to increase outreach exposure. IRIS and EarthScope are partnering with the Alaska Earthquake Center, part of University of Alaska Geophysical Institute, to spread awareness of Alaska earthquakes and the benefits of the Transportable Array for Alaskans. Nearly all parts of Alaska are tectonically active. The tectonic and seismic variability of Alaska requires focused attention at the regional level, and the remoteness and inaccessibility of most Alaska villages and towns often makes frequent visits difficult. For this reason, Alaska outreach most often occurs at community events. When a community is accessible, every opportunity to engage the residents is made. Booths at state fairs and large cultural gatherings, such as the annual convention of the Alaska Federation of Natives, are excellent venues to distribute earthquake information and to demonstrate a wide variety of educational products and web-based applications related to seismology and the Transportable Array that residents can use in their own communities. Region-specific publications have been developed to tie in a sense of place for residents of Alaska. The Alaska content for IRIS's Active Earth Monitor will emphasize the widespread tectonic and seismic features and offer not just Alaska residents, but anyone interested in Alaska, a glimpse into what is going on beneath their feet. The concerted efforts of the outreach team will have lasting effects on Alaskan understanding of the seismic hazard and tectonics of the region. Efforts to publicize the presence of the Transportable Array in Alaska, western Canada, and the Lower 48 also continue. There have been recent articles published in university, local and regional newspapers; stories appearing in national and international print and broadcast media; and documentaries produced by some of the world

  17. Peptides actively transported across the tympanic membrane: Functional and structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Kurabi, Arwa; Beasley, Kerry A.; Chang, Lisa; McCann, James; Pak, Kwang; Ryan, Allen F.

    2017-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is the most common infectious disease of children under six, causing more antibiotic prescriptions and surgical procedures than any other pediatric condition. By screening a bacteriophage (phage) library genetically engineered to express random peptides on their surfaces, we discovered unique peptides that actively transport phage particles across the intact tympanic membrane (TM) and into the middle ear (ME). Herein our goals were to characterize the physiochemical peptide features that may underlie trans-TM phage transport; assess morphological and functional effects of phage peptides on the ME and inner ear (IE); and determine whether peptide-bearing phage transmigrate from the ME into the IE. Incubation of five peptide-bearing phage on the TM for over 4hrs resulted in demonstrably superior transport of one peptide, in level and in exponential increase over time. This suggests a preferred peptide motif for TM active transport. Functional and structural comparisons revealed unique features of this peptide: These include a central lysine residue, isoelectric point of 0.0 at physiological pH and a hydrophobic C-terminus. When the optimal peptide was applied to the TM independent of phage, similar transport was observed, indicating that integration into phage is not required. When 109 particles of the four different trans-TM phage were applied directly into the ME, no morphological effects were detected in the ME or IE when compared to saline or wild-type (WT) phage controls. Comparable, reversible hearing loss was observed for saline controls, WT phage and trans-TM peptide phage, suggesting a mild conductive hearing loss due to ME fluid. Perilymph titers after ME incubation established that few copies of trans-TM peptide phage crossed into the IE. The results suggest that, within the parameters tested, trans-TM peptides are safe and could be used as potential agents for noninvasive delivery of drugs, particles and gene therapy vectors to the ME

  18. [Physiological responses of different cucumber cultivars seedlings to iso-osmotic Mg (NO3) 2 and NaCl stress].

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi-wei; Li, Li-bin; Kong, Su-ping; Qiu, An; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yun-nan; Sun, Xiao-lei

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of iso-osmotic solution of Mg (NO3) 2 and NaCl on seedling growth, leaf lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, and osmotic adjustment substance accumulation were investigated using three cucumber cultivars with different ecotypes. Then salt tolerance was evaluated by membership function method. The results revealed that under the stress of 60 and 80 mmol x L(-1) Mg(NO3) 2 solution and its isotonic 90 and 120 mmol x L(-1) NaCl solution, the seedling traits such as height, stem diameter, leaf area, fresh and dry mass of aerial part and underground parts, and antioxidant enzymes activity were obviously decreased with the increasing concentration of Mg( NO3)2 and its isotonic NaCl in the three cucumber cultivars. Moreover, the inhibitory effects became more obvious with the increasing concentration of either Mg(NO3)2 or NaCl solution. MDA content and membrane lipid peroxidation were enhanced in cucumber seedlings. Among the three cultivars, SJ31-1 changed less than the other two cultivars regarding the reduced amplitudes of biomass, and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT), and the increased amplitude of MDA. In addition, Mg (NO3)2 solution inhibited seedling growth more strongly than isotonic NaCl solution did, such difference was relatively significant with increasing the concentration of solution. The contents of proline, soluble amino acids, and soluble sugars varied depending on the cucumber genotype and salt type. The increased amplitude of proline content was the largest in SJ31-1, and that of soluble sugars was the largest in Lubai 19 when growing under salt treatment. The change of these parameters in Xintaimici was in between. Soluble sugars and soluble proteins were predominant osmolytes unde NaCl stress, whereas proline and soluble proteins were main osmolytes under Mg (NO3) 2 stress. Comprehensive evaluation showed that salt tolerance of the three cucumber cultivars was in order

  19. The renal thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter as mediator of the aldosterone-escape phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Masilamani, Shyama; Nielsen, Jakob; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Brooks, Heddwen L.; Nielsen, Søren; Knepper, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    The kidneys “escape” from the Na-retaining effects of aldosterone when circulating levels of aldosterone are inappropriately elevated in the setting of normal or expanded extracellular fluid volume, e.g., in primary aldosteronism. Using a targeted proteomics approach, we screened renal protein extracts with rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed to each of the major Na transporters expressed along the nephron to determine whether escape from aldosterone-mediated Na retention is associated with decreased abundance of one or more of renal Na transporters. The analysis revealed that the renal abundance of the thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) was profoundly and selectively decreased. None of the other apical solute-coupled Na transporters displayed decreases in abundance, nor were the total abundances of the three ENaC subunits significantly altered. Immunocytochemistry showed a strong decrease in NCC labeling in distal convoluted tubules of aldosterone-escape rats with no change in the cellular distribution of NCC. Ribonuclease protection assays (RPAs) revealed that the decrease in NCC protein abundance was not associated with altered NCC mRNA abundance. Thus, the thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter of the distal convoluted tubule appears to be the chief molecular target for regulatory processes responsible for mineralocorticoid escape, decreasing in abundance via a posttranscriptional mechanism. J. Clin. Invest. 108:215–222 (2001). DOI:10.1172/JCI200110366. PMID:11457874

  20. The European Eel NCCβ Gene Encodes a Thiazide-resistant Na-Cl Cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Erika; Plata, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Gama, Alejandro; Argaiz, Eduardo R; Vázquez, Norma; Leyva-Ríos, Karla; Islas, León; Cutler, Christopher; Pacheco-Alvarez, Diana; Mercado, Adriana; Cariño-Cortés, Raquel; Castañeda-Bueno, María; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-10-21

    The thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) is the major pathway for salt reabsorption in the mammalian distal convoluted tubule. NCC plays a key role in the regulation of blood pressure. Its inhibition with thiazides constitutes the primary baseline therapy for arterial hypertension. However, the thiazide-binding site in NCC is unknown. Mammals have only one gene encoding for NCC. The eel, however, contains a duplicate gene. NCCα is an ortholog of mammalian NCC and is expressed in the kidney. NCCβ is present in the apical membrane of the rectum. Here we cloned and functionally characterized NCCβ from the European eel. The cRNA encodes a 1043-amino acid membrane protein that, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, functions as an Na-Cl cotransporter with two major characteristics, making it different from other known NCCs. First, eel NCCβ is resistant to thiazides. Single-point mutagenesis supports that the absence of thiazide inhibition is, at least in part, due to the substitution of a conserved serine for a cysteine at position 379. Second, NCCβ is not activated by low-chloride hypotonic stress, although the unique Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) binding site in the amino-terminal domain is conserved. Thus, NCCβ exhibits significant functional differences from NCCs that could be helpful in defining several aspects of the structure-function relationship of this important cotransporter.

  1. Trimodal Control of Ion-Transport Activity on Cyclo-oligo-(1→6)-β-D-glucosamine-Based Artificial Ion-Transport Systems.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arundhati; Saha, Tanmoy; Gening, Marina L; Titov, Denis V; Gerbst, Alexey G; Tsvetkov, Yury E; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Talukdar, Pinaki

    2015-11-23

    Cyclo-oligo-(1→6)-β-D-glucosamines functionalized with hydrophobic tails are reported as a new class of transmembrane ion-transport system. These macrocycles with hydrophilic cavities were introduced as an alternative to cyclodextrins, which are supramolecular systems with hydrophobic cavities. The transport activities of these glycoconjugates were manipulated by altering the oligomericity of the macrocycles, as well as the length and number of attached tails. Hydrophobic tails of 3 different sizes were synthesized and coupled with each glucosamine scaffold through the amide linkage to obtain 18 derivatives. The ion-transport activity increased from di- to tetrameric glucosamine macrocycles, but decreased further when flexible pentameric glucosamine was introduced. The ion-transport activity also increased with increasing length of attached linkers. For a fixed length of linkers, the transport activity decreased when the number of such tails was reduced. All glycoconjugates displayed a uniform anion-selectivity sequence: Cl(-) >Br(-) >I(-) . From theoretical studies, hydrogen bonding between the macrocycle backbone and the anion bridged through water molecules was observed.

  2. Evaluation of Activity Concentration Values and Doses due to the Transport of Low Level Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Rawl, Richard R; Scofield, Patricia A; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an international Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to evaluate the safety of transport of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This report presents the United States contribution to that IAEA research program. The focus of this report is on the analysis of the potential doses resulting from the transport of low level radioactive material. Specific areas of research included: (1) an examination of the technical approach used in the derivation of exempt activity concentration values and a comparison of the doses associated with the transport of materials included or not included in the provisions of Paragraph 107(e) of the IAEA Safety Standards, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Requirements No. TS-R-1; (2) determination of the doses resulting from different treatment of progeny for exempt values versus the A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values; and (3) evaluation of the dose justifications for the provisions applicable to exempt materials and low specific activity materials (LSA-I). It was found that the 'previous or intended use' (PIU) provision in Paragraph 107(e) is not risk informed since doses to the most highly exposed persons (e.g., truck drivers) are comparable regardless of intended use of the transported material. The PIU clause can also have important economic implications for co-mined ores and products that are not intended for the fuel cycle but that have uranium extracted as part of their industrial processing. In examination of the footnotes in Table 2 of TS-R-1, which identifies the progeny included in the exempt or A1/A2 values, there is no explanation of how the progeny were selected. It is recommended that the progeny for both the exemption and A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values should be similar regardless of application, and that the same physical information should be used in deriving the limits. Based on the evaluation of doses due to the transport of low-level NORM

  3. Cell-specific ATP7A transport sustains copper-dependent tyrosinase activity in melanosomes.

    PubMed

    Setty, Subba Rao Gangi; Tenza, Danièle; Sviderskaya, Elena V; Bennett, Dorothy C; Raposo, Graça; Marks, Michael S

    2008-08-28

    Copper is a cofactor for many cellular enzymes and transporters. It can be loaded onto secreted and endomembrane cuproproteins by translocation from the cytosol into membrane-bound organelles by ATP7A or ATP7B transporters, the genes for which are mutated in the copper imbalance syndromes Menkes disease and Wilson disease, respectively. Endomembrane cuproproteins are thought to incorporate copper stably on transit through the trans-Golgi network, in which ATP7A accumulates by dynamic cycling through early endocytic compartments. Here we show that the pigment-cell-specific cuproenzyme tyrosinase acquires copper only transiently and inefficiently within the trans-Golgi network of mouse melanocytes. To catalyse melanin synthesis, tyrosinase is subsequently reloaded with copper within specialized organelles called melanosomes. Copper is supplied to melanosomes by ATP7A, a cohort of which localizes to melanosomes in a biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1)-dependent manner. These results indicate that cell-type-specific localization of a metal transporter is required to sustain metallation of an endomembrane cuproenzyme, providing a mechanism for exquisite spatial control of metalloenzyme activity. Moreover, because BLOC-1 subunits are mutated in subtypes of the genetic disease Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, these results also show that defects in copper transporter localization contribute to hypopigmentation, and hence perhaps other systemic defects, in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.

  4. Cell-specific ATP7A transport sustains copper-dependent tyrosinase activity in melanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gangi Setty, Subba Rao; Tenza, Danièle; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Raposo, Graça; Marks, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Copper is a cofactor for many cellular enzymes and transporters1. To load onto secreted and endomembrane cuproproteins, copper is translocated from the cytosol into membrane-bound organelles by ATP7A or ATP7B transporters, the genes for which are mutated in the copper imbalance syndromes, Menkes and Wilson disease, respectively2. Endomembrane cuproproteins are thought to stably incorporate copper upon transit through the trans Golgi network (TGN), within which ATP7A3 accumulates by dynamic cycling through early endocytic compartments4. Here we show that the pigment cell-specific cuproenzyme tyrosinase acquires copper only transiently and inefficiently within the TGN of melanocytes. To catalyze melanin synthesis, tyrosinase is subsequently reloaded with copper within specialized organelles called melanosomes. Copper is supplied to melanosomes by ATP7A, a cohort of which localizes to melanosomes in a Biogenesis of Lysosome-related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1)-dependent manner. These results indicate that cell type-specific localization of a metal transporter is required to sustain metallation of an endomembrane cuproenzyme, providing a mechanism for exquisite spatial control of metalloenzyme activity. Moreover, as BLOC-1 subunits are mutated in subtypes of the genetic disease, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS), these results also show that defects in copper transporter localization contribute to hypopigmentation, and hence perhaps other systemic defects, in HPS. PMID:18650808

  5. Activation and Proton Transport Mechanism in Influenza A M2 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories 2 μs in length have been generated for the pH-activated, tetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus in all protonation states of the pH sensor located at the His37 tetrad. All simulated structures are in very good agreement with high-resolution structures. Changes in the channel caused by progressive protonation of His37 provide insight into the mechanism of proton transport. The channel is closed at both His37 and Trp41 sites in the singly and doubly protonated states, but it opens at Trp41 upon further protonation. Anions access the charged His37 and by doing so stabilize the protonated states of the channel. The narrow opening at the His37 site, further blocked by anions, is inconsistent with the water-wire mechanism of proton transport. Instead, conformational interconversions of His37 correlated with hydrogen bonding to water molecules indicate that these residues shuttle protons in high-protonation states. Hydrogen bonds between charged and uncharged histidines are rare. The valve at Val27 remains on average quite narrow in all protonation states but fluctuates sufficiently to support water and proton transport. A proton transport mechanism in which the channel, depending on pH, opens at either the histidine or valine gate is only partially supported by the simulations. PMID:24209848

  6. Methylphenidate and its ethanol transesterification metabolite ethylphenidate: brain disposition, monoamine transporters and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Williard, Robin L; Middaugh, Lawrence D; Zhu, Hao-Jie B; Patrick, Kennerly S

    2007-02-01

    Ethylphenidate is formed by metabolic transesterification of methylphenidate and ethanol. Study objectives were to (a) establish that ethylphenidate is formed in C57BL/6 (B6) mice; (b) compare the stimulatory effects of ethylphenidate and methylphenidate enantiomers; (c) determine methylphenidate and ethylphenidate plasma and brain distribution and (d) establish in-vitro effects of methylphenidate and ethylphenidate on monoamine transporter systems. Experimental results were that: (a) coadministration of ethanol with the separate methylphenidate isomers enantioselectively produced l-ethylphenidate; (b) d and dl-forms of methylphenidate and ethylphenidate produced dose-responsive increases in motor activity with stimulation being less for ethylphenidate; (c) plasma and whole-brain concentrations were greater for ethylphenidate than methylphenidate and (d) d and DL-methylphenidate and ethylphenidate exhibited comparably potent low inhibition of the dopamine transporter, whereas ethylphenidate was a less potent norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. These experiments establish the feasibility of the B6 mouse model for examining the interactive effects of ethanol and methylphenidate. As reported for humans, concurrent exposure of B6 mice to methylphenidate and ethanol more readily formed l-ethylphenidate than d-ethylphenidate, and the l-isomers of both methylphenidate and ethylphenidate were biologically inactive. The observed reduced stimulatory effect of d-ethylphenidate relative to d-methylphenidate appears not to be the result of brain dispositional factors, but rather may be related to its reduced inhibition of the norepinephrine transporter, perhaps altering the interaction of dopaminergic and noradrenergic neural systems.

  7. The Na+/I symporter (NIS) mediates electroneutral active transport of the environmental pollutant perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Dohán, Orsolya; Portulano, Carla; Basquin, Cécile; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Amzel, L Mario; Carrasco, Nancy

    2007-12-18

    The Na(+)/I(-) symporter (NIS) is a key plasma membrane protein that mediates active I(-) uptake in the thyroid, lactating breast, and other tissues with an electrogenic stoichiometry of 2 Na(+) per I(-). In the thyroid, NIS-mediated I(-) uptake is the first step in the biosynthesis of the iodine-containing thyroid hormones, which are essential early in life for proper CNS development. In the lactating breast, NIS mediates the translocation of I(-) to the milk, thus supplying this essential anion to the nursing newborn. Perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) is a well known competitive inhibitor of NIS. Exposure to food and water contaminated with ClO(4)(-) is common in the U.S. population, and the public health impact of such exposure is currently being debated. To date, it is still uncertain whether ClO(4)(-) is a NIS blocker or a transported substrate of NIS. Here we show in vitro and in vivo that NIS actively transports ClO(4)(-), including ClO(4)(-) translocation to the milk. A simple mathematical fluxes model accurately predicts the effect of ClO(4)(-) transport on the rate and extent of I(-) accumulation. Strikingly, the Na(+)/ ClO(4)(-) transport stoichiometry is electroneutral, uncovering that NIS translocates different substrates with different stoichiometries. That NIS actively concentrates ClO(4)(-) in maternal milk suggests that exposure of newborns to high levels of ClO(4)(-) may pose a greater health risk than previously acknowledged because ClO(4)(-) would thus directly inhibit the newborns' thyroidal I(-) uptake.

  8. EarthScope Transportable Array Siting Outreach Activities in Alaska and Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorr, P. M.; Gardine, L.; Tape, C.; McQuillan, P.; Cubley, J. F.; Samolczyk, M. A.; Taber, J.; West, M. E.; Busby, R.

    2015-12-01

    The EarthScope Transportable Array is deploying about 260 stations in Alaska and western Canada. IRIS and EarthScope are partnering with the Alaska Earthquake Center, part of the University of Alaska's Geophysical Institute, and Yukon College to spread awareness of earthquakes in Alaska and western Canada and the benefits of the Transportable Array for people living in these regions. We provide an update of ongoing education and outreach activities in Alaska and Canada as well as continued efforts to publicize the Transportable Array in the Lower 48. Nearly all parts of Alaska and portions of western Canada are tectonically active. The tectonic and seismic variability of Alaska, in particular, requires focused attention at the regional level, and the remoteness and inaccessibility of most Alaskan and western Canadian villages and towns often makes frequent visits difficult. When a community is accessible, every opportunity to engage the residents is made. Booths at state fairs and large cultural gatherings, such as the annual convention of the Alaska Federation of Natives, are excellent venues to distribute earthquake information and to demonstrate a wide variety of educational products and web-based applications related to seismology and the Transportable Array that residents can use in their own communities. Meetings and interviews with Alaska Native Elders and tribal councils discussing past earthquakes has led to a better understanding of how Alaskans view and understand earthquakes. Region-specific publications have been developed to tie in a sense of place for residents of Alaska and the Yukon. The Alaska content for IRIS's Active Earth Monitor emphasizes the widespread tectonic and seismic features and offers not just Alaska residents, but anyone interested in Alaska, a glimpse into what is going on beneath their feet. The concerted efforts of the outreach team will have lasting effects on Alaskan and Canadian understanding of the seismic hazard and

  9. Comparative Transport Activity of Intact Cells, Membrane Vesicles, and Mesosomes of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Robert A.; Thurman, Paul; Rogers, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    Sodium ion was shown to stimulate strongly the transport of l-glutamic acid into cells of Bacillus licheniformis 6346 His−. Lithium ion had a slight capacity to replace Na+ in this capacity, but K+ was without effect. Three of five amino acids tested. l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-alanine, were concentrated against a gradient in the cells. Intracellular pools of these amino acids were extractable with 5% trichloroacetic acid. Pools of l-histidine and l-lysine could not be detected. No evidence of active transport of lysine into cells could be detected, and histidine was taken up in the absence of chloramphenicol but not in its presence. The uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicle preparations was strongly stimulated by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and to a lesser extent by succinate. The presence of phenazine methosulfate increased uptake in the presence of succinate. Either l- or d-lactate and adenosine triphosphate were without effect. None of these compounds stimulated the uptake of glutamic acid by mesosomes, although some mesosome preparations contained separable membrane which was very active. NADH strongly stimulated the uptake of aspartic acid and alanine by membrane vesicles but had only a slight effect on the uptake of histidine and lysine. No evidence of active transport of any of the amino acids into mesosomes could be detected either in the presence or absence of NADH. NADH stimulation of the uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles was destroyed by exposure to light of 360 nm; this inactivation was reversible by vitamin K2(5) or K2(10). Sodium ion stimulated transport of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles. PMID:4347247

  10. Interaction of ABC transport proteins with toxic metals at the level of gene and transport activity in the PLHC-1 fish cell line.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Camilla; Zaja, Roko; Loncar, Jovica; Smital, Tvrtko; Focardi, Silvano; Corsi, Ilaria

    2012-06-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of four toxic metals with ABC transport proteins in piscine cell line PLHC-1. Cells were exposed for 24 h to 0.01-1 μM of CdCl(2), HgCl(2), As(2)O(3), or K(2)Cr(2)O(7) and the expression of a series of ABC genes (abcb1, abcc1-4) was determined using qRT-PCR. Using the fluorescent model substrates calcein-AM and monochlorbimane we measured interaction of metals with the transport activity of ABC transporters. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity was measured in PLHC-1/dox (P-gp overexpressing cells) while activity and interactions of metals with MRPs was measured in PLHC-1/wt cells. After 24 h exposure, abcc2-4 genes were dose-dependently up-regulated by all metals, while abcb1 and abcc1 were less affected. Up-regulation of abcc2 was more pronounced, with up to 8-fold increase in expression. Abcc3 and abcc4 were moderately inducible by HgCl(2) with 3.3-fold and 2.2-fold, respectively. All metals caused a significant inhibition of both P-gp (2.9- to 4-fold vs. controls) and MRP (1.3- to 1.8-fold) transport activities. Modulation of ABC genes and transport activities was further investigated in PLHC-1/wt cells exposed to 1 μM HgCl(2) for 72 h and in Hg resistant cells selected by long term cultivation of PLHC-1/wt cells in increasing concentrations of HgCl(2). Exposure to HgCl(2) for 72 h induced MRP genes expression and efflux activity. The long term cultivation of PLHC-1/wt cells in HgCl(2), did not cause prolonged up-regulation of the tested abc genes but resulted in higher MRP transport activities as determined by the increased sensitivity of these cells to MK571 (MRP specific inhibitor). Results of the present study indicated specific interaction of metals with selected ABC transport proteins. Modulation of ABC transporters takes place at both transcriptional and functional level. An active involvement of efflux pumps in Hg clearance in fish is suggested.

  11. Propulsion/ASME Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Activities in the Advanced Space Transportation Program Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Turner, James

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Office Of Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (OASTT) has establish three major coals. "The Three Pillars for Success". The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville,Ala. focuses on future space transportation technologies under the "Access to Space" pillar. The Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) Project, part of ASTP, focuses on the reusable technologies beyond those being pursued by X-33. The main activity over the past two and a half years has been on advancing the rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) technologies. In June of last year, activities for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) airframe and propulsion technologies were initiated. These activities focus primarily on those technologies that support the year 2000 decision to determine the path this country will take for Space Shuttle and RLV. In February of this year, additional technology efforts in the reusable technologies were awarded. The RBCC effort that was completed early this year was the initial step leading to flight demonstrations of the technology for space launch vehicle propulsion. Aerojet, Boeing-Rocketdyne and Pratt & Whitney were selected for a two-year period to design, build and ground test their RBCC engine concepts. In addition, ASTROX, Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and University of Alabama in Huntsville also conducted supporting activities. The activity included ground testing of components (e.g., injectors, thrusters, ejectors and inlets) and integrated flowpaths. An area that has caused a large amount of difficulty in the testing efforts is the means of initiating the rocket combustion process. All three of the prime contractors above were using silane (SiH4) for ignition of the thrusters. This follows from the successful use of silane in the NASP program for scramjet ignition. However, difficulties were immediately encountered when silane (an 80/20 mixture of hydrogen/silane) was used for rocket

  12. Optical imaging of neuronal activity in tissue labeled by retrograde transport of Calcium Green Dextran.

    PubMed

    McPherson, D R; McClellan, A D; O'Donovan, M J

    1997-05-01

    In many neurophysiological studies it is desirable to simultaneously record the activity of a large number of neurons. This is particularly true in the study of vertebrate motor systems that generate rhythmic behaviors, such as the pattern generator for locomotion in vertebrate spinal cord. Optical imaging of neurons labeled with appropriate fluorescent dyes, in which fluorescence is activity-dependent, provides a means to record the activity of many neurons at the same time, while also providing fine spatial resolution of the position and morphology of active neurons. Voltage-sensitive dyes have been explored for this purpose and have the advantage of rapid response to transmembrane voltage changes. However, voltage-sensitive dyes bleach readily, which results in phototoxic damage and limits the time that labeled neurons can be imaged. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio is typically small, so that averaging of responses is usually required. As an alternative to voltage-sensitive dyes, calcium-sensitive dyes can exhibit large changes in fluorescence. Most neurons contain voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, and numerous reports indicate that neuronal activity is accompanied by increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration. In this protocol we describe a method to use retrograde transport of the dextran conjugate of a calcium-sensitive dye (Calcium Green Dextran) to label selectively populations of brain and spinal interneurons in a primitive vertebrate (lamprey), for subsequent video-rate imaging of changes in intracellular fluorescence during neuronal activity. Although described with specific reference to lampreys, the technique has also been applied to embryonic chick spinal cord and larval zebrafish preparations and should be easily adaptable to other systems. The most significant novel feature of the protocol is the use of retrograde axonal transport to selectively fill neurons that have known axonal trajectories. Using lampreys, we have obtained activity

  13. NMR studies on Na+ transport in Synechococcus PCC 6311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitschmann, W. H.; Packer, L.

    1992-01-01

    The freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 6311 is able to adapt to grow after sudden exposure to salt (NaCl) stress. We have investigated the mechanism of Na+ transport in these cells during adaptation to high salinity. Na+ influx under dark aerobic conditions occurred independently of delta pH or delta psi across the cytoplasmic membrane, ATPase activity, and respiratory electron transport. These findings are consistent with the existence of Na+/monovalent anion cotransport or simultaneous Na+/H+ +anion/OH- exchange. Na+ influx was dependent on Cl-, Br-, NO3-, or NO2-. No Na+ uptake occurred after addition of NaI, NaHCO3, or Na2SO4. Na+ extrusion was absolutely dependent on delta pH and on an ATPase activity and/or on respiratory electron transport. This indicates that Na+ extrusion via Na+/H+ exchange is driven by primary H+ pumps in the cytoplasmic membrane. Cells grown for 4 days in 0.5 m NaCl medium, "salt-grown cells," differ from control cells by a lower maximum velocity of Na+ influx and by lower steady-state ratios of [Na+]in/[Na+]out. These results indicate that cells grown in high-salt medium increase their capacity to extrude Na+. During salt adaptation Na+ extrusion driven by respiratory electron transport increased from about 15 to 50%.

  14. Impaired NaCl taste thresholds in Zn deprived rats

    SciTech Connect

    Brosvic, G.M.; Slotnick, B.M.; Nelson, N.; Henkin, R.I.

    1986-03-05

    Zn deficiency is a relatively common cause of loss of taste acuity in humans. In some patients replacement with exogenous Zn results in rapid reversal of the loss whereas in others prolonged treatment is needed to restore normal taste function. To study this 300 gm outbred Sprague Dawley rats were given Zn deficient diet (< 1 ppm Zn) supplemented with Zn in drinking water (0.1 gm Zn/100 gm body weight). Rats were trained in an automated operant conditions procedure and NaCl taste thresholds determined. During an initial training period and over two replications mean thresholds were 0.006% and mean plasma Zn was 90 +/- 2 ..mu..g/dl (M +/- SEM) determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Rats were then divided into two groups; in one (3 rats) Zn supplement was removed, in the other (4 rats), pair-fed with the former group, Zn supplement was continued. In 10 days NaCl thresholds in Zn deprived rats increased significantly (0.07%, p < 0.01) and in 17 days increased 13 fold (0.08%) but thresholds for pair fed, supplemented rats remained constant (0.006%). There was no overlap in response between any rat in the two groups. Plasma Zn at 17 days in Zn-deprived rats was significantly below pair-fed rats (52 +/- 13 vs 89 +/- 6 ..mu..g/dl, respectively, P < 0.01). At this time Zn-deprived rats were supplemented with Zn for 27 days without any reduction in taste thresholds. These preliminary results are consistent with previous observations in Zn deficient patients.

  15. Glucose Transport into Everted Sacks of Intestine of Mice: A Model for the Study of Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deyrup-Olsen, Ingrith; Linder, Alison R.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a laboratory procedure which uses the small intestines of mice as models for the transport of glucose and other solutes. Demonstrations are suitable for either introductory or advanced physiology courses. (RE)

  16. The stability of sodalite in the system NaAlSiO sub 4 -NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Z.D. ); Helffrich, G.R. ); Bohlen, S.R. ); Essene, E.J. )

    1989-08-01

    The reaction sodalite = {beta}-nepheline + NaCl (s) was reversed in solid-medium apparatus and the reaction sodalite = carnegieite + NaCl (l) was reversed at 1 bar (1,649-1,652 K). The experimental reversals between 923 K and 973 K can be fit with a dP/dT of {minus}11 bar/K, suggesting that the excess entropy for sodalite is present only above 923 K. A phase diagram for the NaAlSiO{sub 4}-NaCl system that is consistent with the measured thermochemical data and the experiments between 973 and 1,650 K can be generated if the 61.7 J/mol{center dot}K entropy contribution is included in the S{sup 0}{sub 298} of sodalite. This entropy contribution must be removed below 973 K for the experiments to fit with calculations. Previously unreported thermodynamic data estimated in this study are {Delta}G{sup 0}{sub 298} for sodalite ({minus}12,697 kJ/mol) and carnegieite (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) ({minus}1,958 kJ/mol), S{sup 0}{sub 298} of carnegieite (129.6 J/mol{center dot}K) and compressibility of NaCl{sub liquid} (V{sup P}{sub 298} (cm{sup 3}) = 31.6{center dot}(1 - 24.7{center dot}10{sup {minus}3}{center dot}P + 800{center dot}10{sup {minus}6}{center dot}P{sup 2}))(T in K; P in kbar). Sodalite is a high-temperature, low-pressure phase, stable well above the solidus in sodic silica-undersaturated magmas enriched in NaCl, and its presence constrains NaCl activities in magmas. Estimates of minimum NaCl (l) activities in the Mont St-Hilaire sodalite syenites are 0.05 at 1,073 K and 0.13 at 1,273 K. Density calculations are consistent with the field observations that sodalite phenocrysts will float in a nepheline syenite liquid. This explains the enrichment of sodalite in the upper levels of the sodalite syenites at Mont St.Hilaire and elsewhere.

  17. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    DOE PAGES

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; ...

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, whichmore » coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.« less

  18. Mechanistic determinants of the directionality and energetics of active export by a heterodimeric ABC transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, Nina; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet S.; Hulpke, Sabine; Abele, Rupert; Gaudet, Rachelle; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-07

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) participates in immune surveillance by moving proteasomal products into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen for major histocompatibility complex class I loading and cell surface presentation to cytotoxic T cells. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis for antigen translocation. Notably, TAP works as a molecular diode, translocating peptide substrates against the gradient in a strict unidirectional way. We reveal the importance of the D-loop at the dimer interface of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in coupling substrate translocation with ATP hydrolysis and defining transport vectoriality. Substitution of the converved aspartate, which coordinates the ATP-binding site, decreases NBD dimerization affinity and turns the unidirectional primary active pump into a passive bidirectional nucleotide-gated facilitator. Thus, ATP hydrolysis is not required for translocation per se, but is essential for both active and unidirectional transport. As a result, our data provide detailed mechanistic insight into how heterodimeric ABC exporters operate.

  19. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Program review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport Project, established as one element of the NASA/Boeing Energy Efficient Transport Technology Program. The performance assessment showed that incorporating ACT into an airplane designed to fly approximately 200 passengers approximately 2,000 nmi could yield block fuel savings from 6 to 10 percent at the design range. The principal risks associated with incorporating these active control functions into a commercial airplane are those involved with the ACT system implementation. The Test and Evaluation phase of the IAAC Project focused on the design, fabrication, and test of a system that implemented pitch axis fly-by-wire, pitch axis augmentation, and wing load alleviation. The system was built to be flight worthy, and was planned to be experimentally flown on the 757. The system was installed in the Boeing Digital Avionics Flight Controls Laboratory (DAFCL), where open loop hardware and software tests, and a brief examination of a direct drive valve (DDV) actuation concept were accomplished. The IAAC Project has shown that ACT can be beneficially incorporated into a commercial transport airplane. Based on the results achieved during the testing phase, there appears to be no fundamental reason(s) that would preclude the commercial application of ACT, assuming an appropriate development effort is included.

  20. MAPK-mediated regulation of growth and essential oil composition in a salt-tolerant peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) under NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Wang, Wenwen; Li, Guilong; Guo, Kai; Harvey, Paul; Chen, Quan; Zhao, Zhongjuan; Wei, Yanli; Li, Jishun; Yang, Hetong

    2016-11-01

    Peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) is an important and commonly used flavoring agent worldwide, and salinity is a major stress that limits plant growth and reduces crop productivity. This work demonstrated the metabolic responses of essential oil production including the yield and component composition, gene expression, enzyme activity, and protein activation in a salt-tolerant peppermint Keyuan-1 with respect to NaCl stress. Our results showed that Keyuan-1 maintained normal growth and kept higher yield and content of essential oils under NaCl stress than wild-type (WT) peppermint.Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and qPCR results showed that compared to WT seedlings, a 150-mM NaCl stress exerted no obvious changes in essential oil composition, transcriptional level of enzymes related to essential oil metabolism, and activity of pulegone reductase (Pr) in Keyuan-1 peppermint which preserved the higher amount of menthol and menthone as well as the lower content of menthofuran upon the 150-mM NaCl stress. Furthermore, it was noticed that a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) protein exhibited a time-dependent activation in the Keyuan-1 peppermint and primarily involved in the modulation of the essential oil metabolism in the transcript and enzyme levels during the 12-day treatment of 150 mM NaCl. In all, our data elucidated the effect of NaCl on metabolic responses of essential oil production, and demonstrated the MAPK-dependent regulation mechanism of essential oil biosynthesis in the salt-tolerant peppermint, providing scientific basis for the economic and ecological utilization of peppermint in saline land.

  1. Identification of Residues in the Lipopolysaccharide ABC Transporter That Coordinate ATPase Activity with Extractor Function

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; Owens, Tristan W.; Orabella, Matthew J.; Davis, Rebecca M.; May, Janine M.; Trauger, Sunia A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), creating a permeability barrier against toxic molecules, including many antimicrobials. To assemble LPS on their surface, Gram-negative bacteria must extract newly synthesized LPS from the inner membrane, transport it across the aqueous periplasm, and translocate it across the outer membrane. The LptA to -G proteins assemble into a transenvelope complex that transports LPS from the inner membrane to the cell surface. The Lpt system powers LPS transport from the inner membrane by using a poorly characterized ATP-binding cassette system composed of the ATPase LptB and the transmembrane domains LptFG. Here, we characterize a cluster of residues in the groove region of LptB that is important for controlling LPS transport. We also provide the first functional characterization of LptFG and identify their coupling helices that interact with the LptB groove. Substitutions at conserved residues in these coupling helices compromise both the assembly and function of the LptB2FG complex. Defects in LPS transport conferred by alterations in the LptFG coupling helices can be rescued by changing a residue in LptB that is adjacent to functionally important residues in the groove region. This suppression is achieved by increasing the ATPase activity of the LptB2FG complex. Taken together, these data identify a specific binding site in LptB for the coupling helices of LptFG that is responsible for coupling of ATP hydrolysis by LptB with LptFG function to achieve LPS extraction. PMID:27795402

  2. Transport and deposition of activation products in a helium cooled fusion power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, W.E.

    1980-09-01

    The transport and deposition of neutron activation products in a helium cooled tokamak fusion power plant are investigated. Stainless steel is used as coolant channel material for a helium/steam system. The important gamma emitting nuclides /sup 56/Mn, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 57/Co, /sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 51/Cr, and /sup 99/Mo are considered. The dominant release mechanism identified is direct daughter recoil emission from (n,x) type reactions. Corrosion and evaporation are discussed. The radionuclide inventory released by these mechanisms is predicted to exceed 1 x 10/sup 4/ Ci for a reference reactor design after only several days of operation, and approach 3.5 x 10/sup 4/ Ci in equilibrium. A mass transport model is then used to predict the deposition pattern of this inventory in the reactor cooling system.

  3. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-06-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ~95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes.

  4. An optical assay of the transport activity of ClC-7.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Ilaria; Zifarelli, Giovanni; Pusch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis, characterized by excessive osteoclast mediated bone resorption, affects millions of people worldwide representing a major public health problem. ClC-7 is a chloride-proton exchanger localized in lysosomes and in the resorption lacuna in osteoclasts where it is essential for bone resorption. Thus, drugs targeted at ClC-7 have been proposed for ameliorating osteoporosis. However, functional assays suited for high throughput screening (HTS) of ClC-7 function are lacking. Here we describe two complementary variants of purely optical assays of the transport activity of ClC-7, redirected to the plasma membrane employing a genetically encoded fluorescent Cl⁻/pH indicator fused to the ClC-7 protein. These simple and robust functional assays of ClC-7 transport are well-suited to be applied in HTS of small-molecule inhibitors and may help to develop drugs suited for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  5. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ∼95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes. PMID:27251117

  6. Conductance and activation energy for electron transport in series and parallel intramolecular circuits.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Wu, Ning; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-11-30

    We investigate electron transport through series and parallel intramolecular circuits in the framework of the multi-level Redfield theory. Based on the assumption of weak monomer-bath couplings, the simulations depict the length and temperature dependence in six types of intramolecular circuits. In the tunneling regime, we find that the intramolecular circuit rule is only valid in the weak monomer coupling limit. In the thermally activated hopping regime, for circuits based on two different molecular units Ma and Mb with distinct activation energies Eact,a > Eact,b, the activation energies of Ma and Mb in series are nearly the same as Eact,a while those in parallel are nearly the same as Eact,b. This study gives a comprehensive description of electron transport through intramolecular circuits from tunneling to thermally activated hopping. We hope that this work can motivate additional studies to design intramolecular circuits based on different types of building blocks, and to explore the corresponding circuit laws and the length and temperature dependence of conductance.

  7. Synaptic GABA release prevents GABA transporter type-1 reversal during excessive network activity

    PubMed Central

    Savtchenko, Leonid; Megalogeni, Maria; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Walker, Matthew C.; Pavlov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    GABA transporters control extracellular GABA, which regulates the key aspects of neuronal and network behaviour. A prevailing view is that modest neuronal depolarization results in GABA transporter type-1 (GAT-1) reversal causing non-vesicular GABA release into the extracellular space during intense network activity. This has important implications for GABA uptake-targeting therapies. Here we combined a realistic kinetic model of GAT-1 with experimental measurements of tonic GABAA receptor currents in ex vivo hippocampal slices to examine GAT-1 operation under varying network conditions. Our simulations predict that synaptic GABA release during network activity robustly prevents GAT-1 reversal. We test this in the 0 Mg2+ model of epileptiform discharges using slices from healthy and chronically epileptic rats and find that epileptiform activity is associated with increased synaptic GABA release and is not accompanied by GAT-1 reversal. We conclude that sustained efflux of GABA through GAT-1 is unlikely to occur during physiological or pathological network activity. PMID:25798861

  8. Influence of different host associations on glutamine synthetase activity and ammonium transporter in Santalumalbum L.

    PubMed

    Deepa, P; Yusuf, A

    2016-07-01

    The present study was aimed at understanding the role of different hosts in ammonium transporter1;2 expressions and glutamine synthetase(GS) activity and their effects on the growth parameters in the sandal. Sandal plant associated with leguminous host expressed better growth parameters. GS activity of leguminous hosts alone and in host associated sandals was analyzed using GS transferase assay. Highest GS activity was expressed in Mimosa pudica-sandal association compared to other leguminous and non-leguminous host associations. The association of N2 fixing host with sandal enhanced C and N levels in order to maintain the C/N value. The role of ammonium transporters in N nutrition of sandal-host association was elucidated by cloning AMT1;2 from the leaves, haustoria and roots of host associated sandal and quantifying the relative expression by the [Formula: see text] method. SaAMT1;2 was strongly up-regulated in leaves, roots and haustoria of leguminous host associated sandal compared to non-leguminous host associations. The relative increase in SaAMT1;2 expressions and up-regulated GS activity positively affected the growth parameters in sandal when associated with leguminous hosts.

  9. [Important application of intestinal transporters and metabolism enzymes on gastrointestinal disposal of active ingredients of Chinese materia medica].

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaolin; Du, Qiu; Di, Liuqing

    2010-02-01

    Oral drug bioavailability depends on gastrointestinal absorption, intestinal transporters and metabolism enzymes are the important factors in drug gastrointestinal absorption and they can also be induced or inhibited by the active ingredients of Chinese materia medica. This article presents important application of intestinal transporters and metabolism enzymes on gastrointestinal disposal of the active ingredients of Chinese materia medica, and points out the importance of research on transport and metabolism of the active ingredients of Chinese materia medica in Chinese extract and Chinese medicinal formulae.

  10. Desalination feasibility study of an industrial NaCl stream by bipolar membrane electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ghyselbrecht, Karel; Silva, Ana; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Boussu, Katleen; Meesschaert, Boudewijn; Pinoy, Luc

    2014-07-01

    The industrial implementation of alternative technologies in the processing of saline effluent streams is a topic of growing importance. In this technical feasibility study, the desalination of an industrial saline stream containing about 75 g L(-1) NaCl contaminated with some organic matter using bipolar membrane electrodialysis (EDBM) was investigated on lab-scale. Bipolar membranes of two different manufacturers (PCA - PolymerChemie Altmeier GmbH and FuMA-Tech GmbH) were tested and compared in terms of electrical resistance, current efficiency and purity of the produced acid and base stream. In both cases, almost complete desalination (>99%) was achieved and simultaneously HCl and NaOH were produced with a concentration between 1.5 and 2 M with a relatively good purity. The Fumasep bipolar membranes scored slightly better for electrical resistance and current efficiency. On the other hand, slightly higher current densities were achieved with PCA bipolar membranes. Simultaneously, some information was obtained on the transport behavior of the organic matter present in the saline stream. It was observed that a transport competition occurred between the organic matter and the accompanying chlorides. From this lab-scale study it was concluded that EDBM is a promising and attractive technology in the area of saline effluent reclamation and reuse.

  11. Diversity and activity of sugar transporters in nematode-induced root syncytia

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Julia; Hess, Paul H.; Szakasits, Dagmar; Blöchl, Andreas; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Daxböck-Horvath, Sabine; Bohlmann, Holger; van Bel, Aart J. E.; Grundler, Florian M. W.

    2009-01-01

    The plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii stimulates plant root cells to form syncytial feeding structures which synthesize all nutrients required for successful nematode development. Cellular re-arrangements and modified metabolism of the syncytia are accompanied by massive intra- and intercellular solute allocations. In this study the expression of all genes annotated as sugar transporters in the Arabidopsis Membrane Protein Library was investigated by Affymetrix gene chip analysis in young and fully developed syncytia compared with non-infected Arabidopsis thaliana roots. The expression of three highly up-regulated (STP12, MEX1, and GTP2) and three highly down-regulated genes (SFP1, STP7, and STP4) was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The most up-regulated gene (STP12) was chosen for further in-depth studies using in situ RT-PCR and a nematode development assay with a T-DNA insertion line revealing a significant reduction of male nematode development. The specific role of STP12 expression in syncytia of male juveniles compared with those of female juveniles was further shown by qRT-PCR. In order to provide evidence for sugar transporter activity across the plasma membrane of syncytia, fluorescence-labelled glucose was used and membrane potential recordings following the application of several sugars were performed. Analyses of soluble sugar pools revealed a highly specific composition in syncytia. The presented work demonstrates that sugar transporters are specifically expressed and active in syncytia, indicating a profound role in inter- and intracelluar transport processes. PMID:19487386

  12. Protease-activated receptor-2 stimulates intestinal epithelial chloride transport through activation of PLC and selective PKC isoforms.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Jacques Q; Moreau, France; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2009-06-01

    Serine proteases play important physiological roles through their activity at G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PARs). We examined the roles that specific phospholipase (PL) C and protein kinase (PK) C (PKC) isoforms play in the regulation of PAR(2)-stimulated chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cells. Confluent SCBN epithelial monolayers were grown on Snapwell supports and mounted in modified Ussing chambers. Short-circuit current (I(sc)) responses to basolateral application of the selective PAR(2) activating peptide, SLIGRL-NH(2), were monitored as a measure of net electrogenic ion transport caused by PAR(2) activation. SLIGRL-NH(2) induced a transient I(sc) response that was significantly reduced by inhibitors of PLC (U73122), phosphoinositol-PLC (ET-18), phosphatidylcholine-PLC (D609), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; LY294002). Immunoblot analysis revealed the phosphorylation of both PLCbeta and PLCgamma following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of PKC (GF 109203X), PKCalpha/betaI (Gö6976), and PKCdelta (rottlerin), but not PKCzeta (selective pseudosubstrate inhibitor), also attenuated this response. Cellular fractionation and immunoblot analysis, as well as confocal immunocytochemistry, revealed increases of PKCbetaI, PKCdelta, and PKCepsilon, but not PKCalpha or PKCzeta, in membrane fractions following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with U73122, ET-18, or D609 inhibited PKC activation. Inhibition of PI3K activity only prevented PKCdelta translocation. Immunoblots revealed that PAR(2) activation induced phosphorylation of both cRaf and ERK1/2 via PKCdelta. Inhibition of PKCbetaI and PI3K had only a partial effect on this response. We conclude that basolateral PAR(2)-induced chloride secretion involves activation of PKCbetaI and PKCdelta via a PLC-dependent mechanism resulting in the stimulation of cRaf and ERK1/2 signaling.

  13. Carbamazepine enhances the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwanwoo; Huang, Yueming; Washington, Jacqueline M; Briggs, Nicole W; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate transporters (also called excitatory amino acid transporters, EAAT) participate in maintaining extracellular homeostasis of glutamate, a major excitatory neurotransmitter, and regulating glutamate neurotransmission. EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT, may also regulate gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. Dysfunction of EAAT3 has been shown to induce seizure in rats. We hypothesize that carbamazepine, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, enhances EAAT3 activity. We tested this hypothesis using oocytes artificially expressing EAAT3 and C6 rat glioma cells expressing endogenous EAAT3. In oocytes, carbamazepine dose-dependently enhanced EAAT3 activity. The EC50 of this carbamazepine effect was 12.2muM. The concentrations of carbamazepine to significantly enhance EAAT3 activity were within the therapeutic serum levels (17-51muM) of carbamazepine for the antiepileptic effect. Carbamazepine decreased the Km but did not change the maximal response of EAAT3 to glutamate. Carbamazepine-increased EAAT3 activity was inhibited by wortmannin or LY-294002, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, but was not affected by staurosporine, chelerythrine or calphostin C, protein kinase C inhibitors. In C6 cells, carbamazepine also enhanced the endogenous EAAT3 activity. However, carbamazepine did not affect the activity of EAAT4 expressed in Cos7 cells. These results suggest that carbamazepine at clinically relevant concentrations specifically enhances the affinity of EAAT3 for glutamate to increase EAAT3 activity via a PI3K-dependent pathway. EAAT3 may be a therapeutic target for carbamazepine in the central nervous system.

  14. Caffeine-induced inhibition of the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Kim, Sang-Tae; Zuo, Zhiyi; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2013-02-27

    Caffeine has been known to trigger seizures, however, the precise mechanism about the proconvulsive effect of caffeine remains unclear. Glutamate transporters play an important role to maintain the homeostasis of glutamate concentration in the brain tissue. Especially, dysfunction of excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3) can lead to seizures. We investigated the effects of caffeine on the activity of EAAT3 and the involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Rat EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting EAAT3 mRNA. l-Glutamate (30μM)-induced inward currents were recorded via the two-electrode voltage clamp method. Caffeine decreased EAAT3 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Caffeine (30μM for 3min) significantly reduced V(max), but did not alter K(m) value of EAAT3 for glutamate. When preincubated oocytes with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator) were exposed to caffeine, PMA-induced increase in EAAT3 activity was abolished. Two PKC inhibitors (chelerythrine and staurosporine) significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity. Whereas, there were no significant differences among the PKC inhibitors, caffeine, and PKC inhibitors+caffeine groups. In similarly fashion, wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor) significantly decreased EAAT3 activity, however no statistical differences were observed among the wortmannin, caffeine, and wortmannin+caffeine groups. Our results demonstrate that caffeine attenuates EAAT3 activity and this reducing effect of caffeine seems to be mediated by PKC and PI3K.

  15. Transport dynamics of molecular motors that switch between an active and inactive state.

    PubMed

    Pinkoviezky, I; Gov, N S

    2013-08-01

    Molecular motors are involved in key transport processes in the cell. Many of these motors can switch from an active to a nonactive state, either spontaneously or depending on their interaction with other molecules. When active, the motors move processively along the filaments, while when inactive they are stationary. We treat here the simple case of spontaneously switching motors, between the active and inactive states, along an open linear track. We use our recent analogy with vehicular traffic, where we go beyond the mean-field description. We map the phase diagram of this system, and find that it clearly breaks the symmetry between the different phases, as compared to the standard total asymmetric exclusion process. We make several predictions that may be testable using molecular motors in vitro and in living cells.

  16. Isoxazole analogues bind the System xc− Transporter: Structure-activity Relationship and Pharmacophore Model

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sarjubhai A.; Rajale, Trideep; O’Brien, Erin; Burkhart, David J.; Nelson, Jared K.; Twamley, Brendan; Blumenfeld, Alex; Szabon-Watola, Monika I.; Gerdes, John M.; Bridges, Richard J.; Natale, Nicholas R.

    2009-01-01

    Analogues of amino methylisoxazole propionic acid (AMPA), were prepared from a common intermediate 12, including lipophilic analogues using lateral metalation and electrophilic quenching, and were evaluated at System xc−. Both the 5-naphthylethyl-(16) and 5-naphthylmethoxymethyl-(17) analogues adopt an E-conformation in the solid state, yet while the former has robust binding at System xc−, the latter is virtually devoid of activity. The most potent analogues were amino acid naphthyl-ACPA 7g, and hydrazone carboxylic acid, 11e Y=Y′=3,5-(CF3)2, which both inhibited glutamate up-take by the System xc− transporter with comparable potency to the endogenous substrate cystine, whereas in contrast the closed isoxazolo[3,4-d] pyridazinones 13 have significantly lower activity. A preliminary pharmacophore model has been constructed to provide insight into the analogue structure-activity relationships. PMID:19932968

  17. Thermally activated transport of a dislocation loop within an elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Kazuhito; Kuramoto, Eiichi

    2007-08-01

    We report thermally activated transport of a dislocation loop in terms of a line tension model, where the dislocation line is assumed to be a flexible string. According to conventional rate theory, the features of thermal activation are determined by the saddle-point geometry in high dimensional configuration space. If the circumference of a dislocation loop L is longer than a critical length Lc, the selected saddle-point configuration is the well known double-kink type solution. On the other hand, the manner of the thermal activation of a dislocation loop shorter than Lc is rather point-defect-like. In the present work, we pay attention to the temperature dependence of transition rate which is represented such as ν0∗exp(-E/kT). The pre-exponential factor depends on temperature like ν0∗˜T for sufficiently long dislocation loops on the basis of the analysis.

  18. Elementary steps for charge transport in DNA: thermal activation vs. tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Yuri A.; Burin, Alexander L.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    Using stacks of Watson-Crick base pairs as an important example of multichromophoric molecular assemblies, we studied charge migration in DNA with special emphasis on the mechanism of hole hopping between neighboring guanines (G) connected by the adenine-thymine (AT) bridge. The tight-binding model proposed for this elementary step shows that for short AT bridges, hole transfer between two G bases proceeds via quantum mechanical tunneling. By contrast, hopping over long bridges requires thermal activation. The condition for crossover between tunneling and thermal activation near room temperature is specified and applies to the analysis of experimental data. We show that thermal activation dominates, if the bridge between two G bases contains more than three AT pairs. Our theoretical findings predict that the replacement of AT base pairs by GC pairs increases the efficiency of hole transport only in the case of short base pair sequences. For long sequences, however, the opposite effect is expected.

  19. A Multidrug ABC Transporter with a Taste for Salt

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, Daniel A. P.; Venter, Henrietta; Barrera, Nelson P.; Seeger, Markus A.; Woebking, Barbara; Matak-Vinkovic, Dijana; Balakrishnan, Lekshmy; Yao, Yao; U, Edmond C. Y.; Shilling, Richard A.; Robinson, Carol V.; Thorn, Peter; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2009-01-01

    Background LmrA is a multidrug ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter from Lactococcus lactis with no known physiological substrate, which can transport a wide range of chemotherapeutic agents and toxins from the cell. The protein can functionally replace the human homologue ABCB1 (also termed multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein MDR1) in lung fibroblast cells. Even though LmrA mediates ATP-dependent transport, it can use the proton-motive force to transport substrates, such as ethidium bromide, across the membrane by a reversible, H+-dependent, secondary-active transport reaction. The mechanism and physiological context of this reaction are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined ion transport by LmrA in electrophysiological experiments and in transport studies using radioactive ions and fluorescent ion-selective probes. Here we show that LmrA itself can transport NaCl by a similar secondary-active mechanism as observed for ethidium bromide, by mediating apparent H+-Na+-Cl− symport. Remarkably, LmrA activity significantly enhances survival of high-salt adapted lactococcal cells during ionic downshift. Conclusions/Significance The observations on H+-Na+-Cl− co-transport substantiate earlier suggestions of H+-coupled transport by LmrA, and indicate a novel link between the activity of LmrA and salt stress. Our findings demonstrate the relevance of investigations into the bioenergetics of substrate translocation by ABC transporters for our understanding of fundamental mechanisms in this superfamily. This study represents the first use of electrophysiological techniques to analyze substrate transport by a purified multidrug transporter. PMID:19593434

  20. Progesterone increases the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Son, Ilsoon; Shin, Hyun-Jung; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Kim, Hae-Kyoung; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-09-05

    Progesterone is an important sex hormone for pregnancy and also has neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects. It is well-known that full-term parturients become more susceptible to volatile anesthetics. Glutamate transporters are important for preventing neurotoxicity and anesthetic action in the central nervous system. We investigated the effects of progesterone on the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3), the major neuronal EAAT. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by injecting its mRNA. Oocytes were incubated with diluted progesterone for 72 h. Two-electrode voltage clamping was used to measure membrane currents before, during, and after applying 30 μML-glutamate. Progesterone (1-100 nM) significantly increased EAAT3 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Our kinetic study showed that the Vmax was increased in the progesterone group compared with that in the control group (2.7 ± 0.2 vs. 3.6 ± 0.2μC for control group vs. progesterone group; n=18-23; P<0.05), however, Km was unaltered (46.7 ± 10.2μM vs. 55.9 ± 10.5μM for control group vs. progesterone group; n=18-23; P>0.05). Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, did not change progesterone-enhanced EAAT3 activity. Inhibitors of PKC or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) abolished the progesterone-induced increases in EAAT3 activity. Our results suggest that progesterone enhances EAAT3 activity and that PKC and PI3K are involved in mediating these effects. These effects of progesterone may contribute to its anticonvulsant and anesthesia-related properties.

  1. Dioxin mediates downregulation of the reduced folate carrier transport activity via the arylhydrocarbon receptor signalling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Halwachs, Sandra; Lakoma, Cathleen; Gebhardt, Rolf; Schaefer, Ingo; Seibel, Peter; Honscha, Walther

    2010-07-15

    Dioxins such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) are common environmental contaminants known to regulate several genes via activation of the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) associated with the development of numerous adverse biological effects. However, comparatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which dioxins display their toxic effects in vertebrates. The 5' untranslated region of the hepatocellular Reduced folate carrier (Rfc1; Slc19a1) exhibits AhR binding sites termed dioxin responsive elements (DRE) that have as yet only been found in the promoter region of prototypical TCDD target genes. Rfc1 mediated transport of reduced folates and antifolate drugs such as methotrexate (MTX) plays an essential role in physiological folate homeostasis and MTX cancer chemotherapy. In order to determine whether this carrier represents a target gene of dioxins we have investigated the influence of TCDD on functional Rfc1 activity in rat liver. Pre-treatment of rats with TCDD significantly diminished hepatocellular Rfc1 uptake activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In further mechanistic studies we demonstrated that this reduction was due to TCDD-dependent activation of the AhR signalling pathway. We additionally showed that binding of the activated receptor to DRE motifs in the Rfc1 promoter resulted in downregulation of Rfc1 gene expression and reduced carrier protein levels. As downregulation of pivotal Rfc1 activity results in functional folate deficiency associated with an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases or carcinogenesis, our results indicate that deregulation of this essential transport pathway represents a novel regulatory mechanism how dioxins display their toxic effects through the Ah receptor.

  2. Ceramide 1-Phosphate Increases P-Glycoprotein Transport Activity at the Blood-Brain Barrier via Prostaglandin E2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mesev, Emily V; Miller, David S; Cannon, Ronald E

    2017-04-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven efflux pump, regulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Sphingolipids, endogenous to brain tissue, influence inflammatory responses and cell survival in vitro. Our laboratory has previously shown that sphingolipid signaling by sphingosine 1-phosphate decreases basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. Here, we investigated the potential for another sphingolipid, ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), to modulate efflux pumps at the BBB. Using confocal microscopy and measuring luminal accumulation of fluorescent substrates, we assessed the transport activity of several efflux pumps in isolated rat brain capillaries. C1P treatment induced P-glycoprotein transport activity in brain capillaries rapidly and reversibly. In contrast, C1P did not affect transport activity of two other major efflux transporters, multidrug resistance protein 2 and breast cancer resistance protein. C1P induced P-glycoprotein transport activity without changing transporter protein expression. Inhibition of the key signaling components in the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 signaling cascade (phospholipase A2, COX-2, multidrug resistance protein 4, and G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E2 receptors 1 and 2), abolished P-glycoprotein induction by C1P. We show that COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 are required for C1P-mediated increases in P-glycoprotein activity independent of transporter protein expression. This work describes how C1P activates a signaling cascade to dynamically regulate P-glycoprotein transport at the BBB and offers potential clinical targets to modulate neuroprotection and drug delivery to the CNS.

  3. Ceramide 1-Phosphate Increases P-Glycoprotein Transport Activity at the Blood-Brain Barrier via Prostaglandin E2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mesev, Emily V.; Miller, David S.

    2017-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven efflux pump, regulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Sphingolipids, endogenous to brain tissue, influence inflammatory responses and cell survival in vitro. Our laboratory has previously shown that sphingolipid signaling by sphingosine 1-phosphate decreases basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. Here, we investigated the potential for another sphingolipid, ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), to modulate efflux pumps at the BBB. Using confocal microscopy and measuring luminal accumulation of fluorescent substrates, we assessed the transport activity of several efflux pumps in isolated rat brain capillaries. C1P treatment induced P-glycoprotein transport activity in brain capillaries rapidly and reversibly. In contrast, C1P did not affect transport activity of two other major efflux transporters, multidrug resistance protein 2 and breast cancer resistance protein. C1P induced P-glycoprotein transport activity without changing transporter protein expression. Inhibition of the key signaling components in the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 signaling cascade (phospholipase A2, COX-2, multidrug resistance protein 4, and G-protein–coupled prostaglandin E2 receptors 1 and 2), abolished P-glycoprotein induction by C1P. We show that COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 are required for C1P-mediated increases in P-glycoprotein activity independent of transporter protein expression. This work describes how C1P activates a signaling cascade to dynamically regulate P-glycoprotein transport at the BBB and offers potential clinical targets to modulate neuroprotection and drug delivery to the CNS. PMID:28119480

  4. Active school transport and weekday physical activity in 9–11-year-old children from 12 countries

    PubMed Central

    Denstel, K D; Broyles, S T; Larouche, R; Sarmiento, O L; Barreira, T V; Chaput, J-P; Church, T S; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Tudor-Locke, C; Zhao, P; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Active school transport (AST) may increase the time that children spend in physical activity (PA). This study examined relationships between AST and weekday moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light physical activity (LPA), sedentary time (SED) and total activity during naturally organized time periods (daily, before school, during school and after school) in a sample of children from 12 countries. METHODS: The sample included 6224 children aged 9–11 years. PA and sedentary time were objectively measured using Actigraph accelerometers. AST was self-reported by participants. Multilevel generalized linear and logistic regression statistical models were used to determine associations between PA, SED and AST across and within study sites. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, highest parental educational attainment, BMI z-score and accelerometer wear time, children who engaged in AST accumulated significantly more weekday MVPA during all studied time periods and significantly less time in LPA before school compared with children who used motorized transport to school. AST was unrelated to time spent in sedentary behaviors. Across all study sites, AST was associated with 6.0 min (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.7–7.3; P<0.0001) more of weekday MVPA; however, there was some evidence that this differed across study sites (P for interaction=0.06). Significant positive associations were identified within 7 of 12 study sites, with differences ranging from 4.6 min (95% CI: 0.3–8.9; P=0.04, in Canada) to 10.2 min (95% CI: 5.9–14.4; P<0.0001, in Brazil) more of daily MVPA among children who engaged in AST compared with motorized transport. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrated that AST was associated with children spending more time engaged in MVPA throughout the day and less time in LPA before school. AST represents a good behavioral target to increase levels of PA in children. PMID:27152177

  5. Getting There! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Transportation Safety for Grades 9 through 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the transportation safety topic for grades 9-12. It contains forty-three learning activities…

  6. Getting There! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Transportation Safety for Grades 6 through 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the transportation safety topic for grades 6-9. The manual contains forty-seven learning activities…

  7. Magnetic Flux Transport and the Long-term Evolution of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-01

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  8. Subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons express active vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    PubMed

    Tata, Ada Maria; De Stefano, M Egle; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Vilaró, M Teresa; Levey, Allan I; Biagioni, Stefano

    2004-01-15

    The vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) is a transmembrane protein required, in cholinergic neurons, for selective storage of acetylcholine into synaptic vesicles. Although dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons utilize neuropeptides and amino acids for neurotransmission, we have previously demonstrated the presence of a cholinergic system. To investigate whether, in sensory neurons, the vesicular accumulation of acetylcholine relies on the same mechanisms active in classical cholinergic neurons, we investigated VAChT presence, subcellular distribution, and activity. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of VAChT mRNA and protein product in DRG neurons and in the striatum and cortex, used as positive controls. Moreover, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry showed VAChT staining located mainly in the medium/large-sized subpopulation of the sensory neurons. A few small neurons were also faintly labeled by immunocytochemistry. In the electron microscope, immunolabeling was associated with vesicle-like elements distributed in the neuronal cytoplasm and in both myelinated and unmyelinated intraganglionic nerve fibers. Finally, [(3)H]acetylcholine active transport, evaluated either in the presence or in the absence of ATP, also demonstrated that, as previously reported, the uptake of acetylcholine by VAChT is ATP dependent. This study suggests that DRG neurons not only are able to synthesize and degrade ACh and to convey cholinergic stimuli but also are capable of accumulating and, possibly, releasing acetylcholine by the same mechanism used by the better known cholinergic neurons.

  9. Glucose-induced activation of rubidium transport and water flux in sunflower root systems.

    PubMed

    Quintero, J M; Molina, R; Fournier, J M; Benlloch, M; Ramos, J

    2001-01-01

    Excised 20-d-old sunflower roots (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Sun-Gro 393) were used to study the effect of different sugars on rubidium and water fluxes. The roots sensed and absorbed glucose from the external medium inducing the activation of rubidium accumulated in the root (Rb(+) root), the flux of exuded rubidium (J(Rb)) and, to a lesser degree, the exudation rate (J(v)). These effects were also triggered by fructose, but not by 6-deoxyglucose (6-dG), a glucose analogue which is not a substrate for hexokinase (HXK). The effect of 2-deoxyglucose (2-dG), an analogue that is phosphorylated but not further metabolized, was complex, suggesting an inhibitory effect on solute transport to the xylem. The amounts of glucose required to activate rubidium and water fluxes were similar to those previously reported to regulate different processes in other plants (0.5--10 mM). When sorbitol was used instead of glucose, neither rubidium uptake (Rb(+) root plus J(Rb)) nor J(v) was activated. It is proposed that glucose present in the root plays an important signalling role in the regulation of Rb(+) (K(+)) and water transport in plant roots.

  10. MAGNETIC FLUX TRANSPORT AND THE LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-20

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  11. Evaluation of multiple-frequency, active and passive acoustics as surrogates for bedload transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Pachman, Gregory; Lorang, Mark; Tonolla, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The use of multiple-frequency, active acoustics through deployment of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) shows potential for estimating bedload in selected grain size categories. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the University of Montana (UM), evaluated the use of multiple-frequency, active and passive acoustics as surrogates for bedload transport during a pilot study on the Kootenai River, Idaho, May 17-18, 2012. Four ADCPs with frequencies ranging from 600 to 2000 kHz were used to measure apparent moving bed velocities at 20 stations across the river in conjunction with physical bedload samples. Additionally, UM scientists measured the sound frequencies of moving particles with two hydrophones, considered passive acoustics, along longitudinal transects in the study reach. Some patterns emerged in the preliminary analysis which show promise for future studies. Statistically significant relations were successfully developed between apparent moving bed velocities measured by ADCPs with frequencies 1000 and 1200 kHz and bedload in 0.5 to 2.0 mm grain size categories. The 600 kHz ADCP seemed somewhat sensitive to the movement of gravel bedload in the size range 8.0 to 31.5 mm, but the relation was not statistically significant. The passive hydrophone surveys corroborated the sample results and could be used to map spatial variability in bedload transport and to select a measurement cross-section with moving bedload for active acoustic surveys and physical samples.

  12. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Alters Intracellular Sequestration of Zinc through Interaction with the Transporter ZIP4

    SciTech Connect

    Emmetsberger, Jaime; Mirrione, Martine M.; Zhou, Chun; Fernandez-Monreal, Monica; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Ji, Kyungmin; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2010-09-17

    Glutamatergic neurons contain free zinc packaged into neurotransmitter-loaded synaptic vesicles. Upon neuronal activation, the vesicular contents are released into the synaptic space, whereby the zinc modulates activity of postsynaptic neurons though interactions with receptors, transporters and exchangers. However, high extracellular concentrations of zinc trigger seizures and are neurotoxic if substantial amounts of zinc reenter the cells via ion channels and accumulate in the cytoplasm. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a secreted serine protease, is also proepileptic and excitotoxic. However, tPA counters zinc toxicity by promoting zinc import back into the neurons in a sequestered form that is nontoxic. Here, we identify the zinc influx transporter, ZIP4, as the pathway through which tPA mediates the zinc uptake. We show that ZIP4 is upregulated after excitotoxin stimulation of the mouse, male and female, hippocampus. ZIP4 physically interacts with tPA, correlating with an increased intracellular zinc influx and lysosomal sequestration. Changes in prosurvival signals support the idea that this sequestration results in neuroprotection. These experiments identify a mechanism via which neurons use tPA to efficiently neutralize the toxic effects of excessive concentrations of free zinc.

  13. Diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through China reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Lingbo; Xiang, Xin; Rao, Yongchu; Ye, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Chang An

    2016-03-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels have been considered as the most promising candidate structure materials for a fusion reactor. In the recent decades, two new types of RAFM steels, called China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel and China Low-activation Ferritic (CLF-1) steel, have been developed. The gas evolution permeation technique has been used to investigate diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through CLAM and CLF-1 over the temperature range 623 ∼ 873 K at deuterium pressure of 105 Pa. The resultant transport parameters are: Φ (mol. m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 5.40 × 10-8 exp (-46.8 (kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2 s-1) = 3.81 × 10-7 exp(-24.0(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S (mol. m-3 Pa-1/2) = 1.42 × 10-1 exp(-22.8(kJ. mol-1)/RT) for CLAM; while Φ(mol m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.76 × 10-8 exp(-43.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2. s-1) = 1.02 × 10-7 exp(-16.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S(mol. m-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.73 × 10-1 exp(-27.0(kJ. mol-1) /RT) for CLF-1. The results show that CLAM is more permeable than CLF-1, thus it is easier for hydrogen isotopes to transport and be removed.

  14. Effects of acute and chronic uremia on active cation transport in rat myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Druml, W.; Kelly, R.A.; England, B.K.; O'Hara, D.S.; Mitch, W.E. )

    1990-12-01

    As abnormalities of active cation transport could contribute to the genesis of uremic cardiomyopathy, we investigated myocardial sodium pump function in rats with acute renal failure (ARF) and with a model of experimental chronic renal failure (CRF) that has metabolic similarities to advanced chronic uremia in humans. CRF rats were hypertensive and had left ventricular hypertrophy (33% higher heart:body weight ratio; P less than 0.01) at four weeks compared to pair-fed sham-operated rats. Importantly, both ouabain- and furosemide-sensitive 86Rb uptake rates were unchanged in left ventricular myocardial slices from CRF, and the intracellular sodium concentration was not different from that of control rats even though skeletal muscle sodium was increased, as we found previously. Insulin-stimulated, ouabain-sensitive 86Rb influx was also preserved. There also were no abnormalities in myocardium cation transport in rats with ARF. However, (3H)ouabain binding was decreased 45% in CRF rats (P less than 0.01); it was unchanged in acute uremia. Decreased ouabain binding in chronic uremia was due entirely to fewer low affinity (3H)ouabain binding sites (the binding affinity for ouabain was unaffected). We conclude that in chronic, (but not acute) renal failure, sodium pump number is reduced in myocardium but intracellular sodium is unchanged and active cation flux rates are maintained. These results emphasize that in rats with chronic uremia, intracellular sodium homeostasis is preserved in myocardium, despite the presence of marked abnormalities of active cation transport in skeletal muscle that are characteristic of chronic uremia.

  15. Effect of Pluronic P85 on ATPase Activity of Drug Efflux Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Li, Shu; Li, Yili; Alakhov, Valery Yu.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Pluronic block copolymers are potent sensitizers of multi-drug resistant (MDR) cancer cells. The sensitization effect by Pluronics is a result of two processes acting in concert: i) intracellular ATP depletion, and ii) inhibition of ATPase activity of drug efflux proteins. This work characterizes effects of Pluronic P85 on ATPase activities of Pgp, MRP1, and MRP2 drug efflux transport proteins and interaction of these proteins with their substrates, vinblastine, and leucotriene C4. Methods Using membranes overexpressing Pgp, MRP1, and MRP2, the current study evaluates effects of Pluronic P85 (P85) on the kinetic parameters (Vmax, Km, Vmax/Km) of ATP hydrolysis by these ATPases. Results The decreases in the maximal reaction rates (Vmax) and increases in apparent Michaelis constants (Km) for these transporters in the presence of various concentrations of P85 were observed. The mechanism of these effects may involve i) conformational changes of the transporter due to membrane fluidization and/or ii) nonspecific steric hindrance of the drug-binding sites by P85 chains embedded into cellular membranes. The extent of these alterations was increased in the row MRP1 < MRP2 << Pgp. Conclusions These data suggest that there are unifying pathways for the inhibition of Pgp and MRPs by the block copolymer. However, the effect of P85 on Pgp ATPase activity is considerably greater compared with the effects on MRP1 and MRP2 ATPases. This may be a reason for greater inhibitory effects of Pluronic in Pgp- compared with MRP-overexpressing cells. PMID:15648254

  16. Quantitative Prediction of Human Renal Clearance and Drug-Drug Interactions of Organic Anion Transporter Substrates Using In Vitro Transport Data: A Relative Activity Factor Approach.

    PubMed

    Mathialagan, Sumathy; Piotrowski, Mary A; Tess, David A; Feng, Bo; Litchfield, John; Varma, Manthena V

    2017-04-01

    Organic anion transporters (OATs) are important in the renal secretion, and thus, the clearance, of many drugs; and their functional change can result in pharmacokinetic variability. In this study, we applied transport rates measured in vitro using OAT-transfected human embryonic kidney cells to predict human renal secretory and total renal clearance of 31 diverse drugs. Selective substrates to OAT1 (tenofovir), OAT2 (acyclovir and ganciclovir), and OAT3 (benzylpenicillin, oseltamivir acid) were used to obtain relative activity factors (RAFs) for these individual transporters by relating in vitro transport clearance (after physiologic scaling) to in vivo secretory clearance. Using the estimated RAFs (0.64, 7.3, and 4.1, respectively, for OAT1, OAT2, and OAT3, respectively) and the in vitro active clearances, renal secretory clearance and total renal clearance were predicted with average fold errors (AFEs) of 1.89 and 1.40, respectively. The results show that OAT3-mediated transport play a predominant role in renal secretion for 22 of the 31 drugs evaluated. This mechanistic static approach was further applied to quantitatively predict renal drug-drug interactions (AFE ∼1.6) of the substrate drugs with probenecid, a clinical probe OAT inhibitor. In conclusion, the proposed in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approach is the first comprehensive attempt toward mechanistic modeling of renal secretory clearance based on routinely employed in vitro cell models.

  17. Calcium- and potassium-permeable plasma membrane transporters are activated by copper in Arabidopsis root tips: linking copper transport with cytosolic hydroxyl radical production.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Andrés-Colás, Nuria; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Gunsé, Benet; Peñarrubia, Lola; Shabala, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    Transition metals such as copper can interact with ascorbate or hydrogen peroxide to form highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH(•) ), with numerous implications to membrane transport activity and cell metabolism. So far, such interaction was described for extracellular (apoplastic) space but not cytosol. Here, a range of advanced electrophysiological and imaging techniques were applied to Arabidopsis thaliana plants differing in their copper-transport activity: Col-0, high-affinity copper transporter COPT1-overexpressing (C1(OE) ) seedlings, and T-DNA COPT1 insertion mutant (copt1). Low Cu concentrations (10 µm) stimulated a dose-dependent Gd(3+) and verapamil sensitive net Ca(2+) influx in the root apex but not in mature zone. C1(OE) also showed a fivefold higher Cu-induced K(+) efflux at the root tip level compared with Col-0, and a reduction in basal peroxide accumulation at the root tip after copper exposure. Copper caused membrane disruptions of the root apex in C1(OE) seedlings but not in copt1 plants; this damage was prevented by pretreatment with Gd(3+) . Our results suggest that copper transport into cytosol in root apex results in hydroxyl radical generation at the cytosolic side, with a consequent regulation of plasma membrane OH(•) -sensitive Ca(2+) and K(+) transport systems.

  18. A novel surfactant-, NaCl-, and protease-tolerant β-mannanase from Bacillus sp. HJ14.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Song, Zhifeng; Wu, Qian; Zhou, Junpei; Li, Junjun; Mu, Yuelin; Tang, Xianghua; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Deng, Shucan; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-05-01

    A glycoside hydrolase family 5 β-mannanase-encoding gene was cloned from Bacillus sp. HJ14 isolated from saline soil in Heijing town. Coding sequence of mature protein (without the predicted signal peptide from M1 to A30) was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Purified recombinant mannanase (rMan5HJ14) exhibited optimal activity at pH 6.5 and 65 °C. The enzyme showed good salt tolerance, retaining more than 56 % β-mannanase activity at 3.0-30.0 % (w/v) NaCl and more than 94 % of the initial activity after incubation with 3.0-30.0 % (w/v) NaCl at 37 °C for 60 min. Almost no mannanase activity was lost after incubation of rMan5HJ14 with trypsin, proteinase K, and Alcalase at 37 °C for 60 min. Surfactants and chelating agents, namely SDS, CTAB, Tween 80, Triton X-100, EDTA, and sodium tripolyphosphate, showed little or no effect (retaining >82.4 % activity) on enzymatic activity. Liquid detergents, namely Tupperware, Walch, Bluemoon, Tide, and OMO, also showed little or no effect (retaining >72.4 % activity) on enzymatic activity at 0.5-2.0 % (v/v). The enzyme further presents a high proportion (11.97 %) of acidic amino acid residues (D and E), which may affect the SDS and NaCl tolerance of the enzyme. Together, the mannanase may be an alternative for potential use in liquid detergent industry.

  19. Performance of an active/passive hybrid solar system utilizing vapor transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Vapor-phase heat-transport systems are being tested in two of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The systems consist of an active fin-and-tube collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector with a pump or with a self-pumping scheme. A computer model was developed to predict the behavior of the system, after which the computer was used to predict the annual performance of these systems in five cities. The report compares the measured and the predicted results as well as the system's sensitivity to several parameters.

  20. Discovery of a Biological Mechanism of Active Transport through the Tympanic Membrane to the Middle Ear

    PubMed Central

    Kurabi, Arwa; Pak, Kwang K.; Bernhardt, Marlen; Baird, Andrew; Ryan, Allen F.

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a common pediatric disease for which systemic antibiotics are often prescribed. While local treatment would avoid the systemic treatment side-effects, the tympanic membrane (TM) represents an impenetrable barrier unless surgically breached. We hypothesized that the TM might harbor innate biological mechanisms that could mediate trans-TM transport. We used two M13-bacteriophage display biopanning strategies to search for mediators of trans-TM transport. First, aliquots of linear phage library displaying 1010th 12mer peptides were applied on the TM of rats with active bacterial OM. The middle ear (ME) contents were then harvested, amplified and the preparation re-applied for additional rounds. Second, the same naïve library was sequentially screened for phage exhibiting TM binding, internalization and then transit. Results revealed a novel set of peptides that transit across the TM to the ME in a time and temperature dependent manner. The peptides with highest transport capacities shared sequence similarities. Historically, the TM was viewed as an impermeable barrier. However, our studies reveal that it is possible to translocate peptide-linked small particles across the TM. This is the first comprehensive biopanning for the isolation of TM transiting peptidic ligands. The identified mechanism offers a new drug delivery platform into the ME. PMID:26946957

  1. [Effect of padan on active sodium transport in the epithelium of isolated frog skin].

    PubMed

    Kontek, M; Pogorzelska, H; Knapowski, J

    1984-01-01

    The effects of " Padan " (hydrochloride of 1.3-di/ carbomylothio /-2-N-dimethylamino/propane/ upon transport capabilities of plasmatic membrane have been checked. The experiment was performed on isolated skin of Rana temporaria frogs. Assessment of transporting activity of membrane in relation to sodium ion involved a method developed by Ussing with so called "short-circuit" technique. The effects of the pesticide on the external and internal surface of the frog's skin have been examined, final concentrations of the compound being 3.4 X 10(-6) M to 3.4 X 10(-3) M. The results indicate that " Padan ", whether administered to the external or internal surface of the membrane, decreases the value of membrane potential and short-circuit current, which is indicative of membrane transport inhibition. The effect varies with pesticide concentration in the medium, though it is statistically significant only in concentration 3.4 X 10(-3) M. On the other hand, membrane resistance usually gets increased as the compound concentration in the medium increases. The results indicate that cellular membrane should be considered while explaining the mechanism of toxic effects of " Padan " upon organism.

  2. Health Impacts of Increased Physical Activity from Changes in Transportation Infrastructure: Quantitative Estimates for Three Communities.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Theodore J; MacDonald Gibson, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Recently, two quantitative tools have emerged for predicting the health impacts of projects that change population physical activity: the Health Economic Assessment Tool (HEAT) and Dynamic Modeling for Health Impact Assessment (DYNAMO-HIA). HEAT has been used to support health impact assessments of transportation infrastructure projects, but DYNAMO-HIA has not been previously employed for this purpose nor have the two tools been compared. To demonstrate the use of DYNAMO-HIA for supporting health impact assessments of transportation infrastructure projects, we employed the model in three communities (urban, suburban, and rural) in North Carolina. We also compared DYNAMO-HIA and HEAT predictions in the urban community. Using DYNAMO-HIA, we estimated benefit-cost ratios of 20.2 (95% C.I.: 8.7-30.6), 0.6 (0.3-0.9), and 4.7 (2.1-7.1) for the urban, suburban, and rural projects, respectively. For a 40-year time period, the HEAT predictions of deaths avoided by the urban infrastructure project were three times as high as DYNAMO-HIA's predictions due to HEAT's inability to account for changing population health characteristics over time. Quantitative health impact assessment coupled with economic valuation is a powerful tool for integrating health considerations into transportation decision-making. However, to avoid overestimating benefits, such quantitative HIAs should use dynamic, rather than static, approaches.

  3. Health Impacts of Increased Physical Activity from Changes in Transportation Infrastructure: Quantitative Estimates for Three Communities

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Theodore J.; MacDonald Gibson, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Recently, two quantitative tools have emerged for predicting the health impacts of projects that change population physical activity: the Health Economic Assessment Tool (HEAT) and Dynamic Modeling for Health Impact Assessment (DYNAMO-HIA). HEAT has been used to support health impact assessments of transportation infrastructure projects, but DYNAMO-HIA has not been previously employed for this purpose nor have the two tools been compared. To demonstrate the use of DYNAMO-HIA for supporting health impact assessments of transportation infrastructure projects, we employed the model in three communities (urban, suburban, and rural) in North Carolina. We also compared DYNAMO-HIA and HEAT predictions in the urban community. Using DYNAMO-HIA, we estimated benefit-cost ratios of 20.2 (95% C.I.: 8.7–30.6), 0.6 (0.3–0.9), and 4.7 (2.1–7.1) for the urban, suburban, and rural projects, respectively. For a 40-year time period, the HEAT predictions of deaths avoided by the urban infrastructure project were three times as high as DYNAMO-HIA's predictions due to HEAT's inability to account for changing population health characteristics over time. Quantitative health impact assessment coupled with economic valuation is a powerful tool for integrating health considerations into transportation decision-making. However, to avoid overestimating benefits, such quantitative HIAs should use dynamic, rather than static, approaches. PMID:26504832

  4. Activity of erdosteine on mucociliary transport in patients affected by chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, D; Del Donno, M; Casalini, A; D'Ippolito, R; Fregnan, G B

    1991-01-01

    The influence of erdosteine (a mucomodulator endowed with mucolytic and antioxidant properties) on human mucociliary transport (MCT) was investigated in a double-blind placebo controlled study. Sixteen former smokers affected by chronic bronchitis, preselected for their mucociliary responsiveness to an inhaled beta 2-agonist, were divided into two groups (matched by number, sex, age and FEV1%) and orally treated with placebo or erdosteine (300 mg t.i.d.) for 8 days. Their MCT was assessed by the bronchofiberscopy technique just before starting the treatment and at the end of the treatment. The pretreatment mucus transport velocity in these patients was significantly decreased with respect to healthy subjects. The erdosteine treatment induced a significant improvement of MCT while placebo was inactive (mean % variation +/- SE against their baseline values being +60.4 +/- 18.4 and -3.0 +/- 5.9, respectively). This peculiar activity of erdosteine on mucus transport may be of clinical usefulness in chronic bronchitic patients and it can be added to beta 2-agonist to restore the decreased MCT.

  5. Mechanism of active transport: free energy dissipation and free energy transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Tanford, C

    1982-01-01

    The thermodynamic pathway for "chemiosmotic" free energy transduction in active transport is discussed with an ATP-driven Ca2+ pump as an illustrative example. Two innovations are made in the analysis. (i) Free energy dissipated as heat is rigorously excluded from overall free energy bookkeeping by focusing on the dynamic equilibrium state of the chemiosmotic process. (ii) Separate chemical potential terms for free energy donor and transported ions are used to keep track of the thermodynamic state of each substrate through the reaction cycle. These procedures clarify the mechanism of free energy transduction, even without step-by-step analysis. The results show that free energy exchange must occur in its entirety among protein-bound species. Imposition of conditions for an adequate rate of physiological function further indicates (i) that the standard free energy of hydrolysis of protein-bound ATP (to yield protein-bound products) needs to differ substantially from the standard free energy of hydrolysis in solution and (ii) that binding sites for the transported ions must have different affinities when facing opposite sides of the membrane. The results also demonstrate that step-by-step "basic" free energy changes (often used in the form of free energy level diagrams) are inherently unsuited for analysis of the mechanism of free energy transduction. PMID:6216483

  6. eUnaG: a new ligand-inducible fluorescent reporter to detect drug transporter activity in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Johannes T.-H.; Nam, Kwangho; Yeh, Joshua T.-H.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of metabolites and toxic organic solutes are orchestrated by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and the organic solute carrier family (SLC) proteins. A large number of ABC and SLC transpoters exist; however, only a small number have been well characterized. To facilitate the analysis of these transporters, which is important for drug safety and physiological studies, we developed a sensitive genetically encoded bilirubin (BR)-inducible fluorescence sensor (eUnaG) to detect transporter-coupled influx/efflux of organic compounds. This sensor can be used in live cells to measure transporter activity, as excretion of BR depends on ABC and SLC transporters. Applying eUnaG in functional RNAi screens, we characterize l(2)03659 as a Drosophila multidrug resistant-associated ABC transporter. PMID:28176814

  7. The active transport of fluorescein by the retinal vessels and the retina

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Vaz, J. G.; Maurice, D. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The movement of fluorescein across the retinal surface of the rabbit's eye was estimated by measuring the concentration gradient of the dye in the vitreous body. These measurements were made in vivo by means of a slit-lamp fluorophotometer, or were taken from frozen sections of enucleated eyes. 2. In the normal eye, fluorescein does not pass from the blood to the vitreous body across any part of the retina. When injected into the vitreous body it passes rapidly out across the entire retinal surface, even against a very large concentration gradient. 3. A variety of metabolic and competitive inhibitors, effective in blocking organic anion transport in the kidney and liver, tend to abolish this unidirectional movement of fluorescein across the retina. 4. The region occupied by the retinal vessels is more sensitive to inhibition than other areas of the retina. Occlusion of the vessels by diathermy prevents the exchange of fluorescein in this region. 5. It appears, then, that there is an active transport of organic anions out of the vitreous body, both by the retinal capillaries and by the retina itself. The latter system is probably located in the pigment epithelium and seems to be carried forward to the rear surface of the iris. 6. Since the walls of the retinal vessels of the rabbit are freely in contact with the vitreous body, the active transport must take place across the capillary endothelial cells themselves. These vessels have structural and permeability characteristics found only in the central nervous system and it is to be presumed that the anion transport system is shared by the capillaries of the brain. 7. The function of the transport in the retina may be to protect the nervous tissue from toxic materials by preventing their entry from the blood or by removing products of metabolism conjugated as organic anions. Alternatively, the mechanism may be concerned in maintaining the normal adhesion of the retina to the choroid, since retinal detachment was

  8. 76 FR 7560 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... Conformity Determinations for Federally Funded and Approved Transportation Plans, Programs and Projects.../epahome/dockets.htm . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Astrid Larsen, State Measures and Conformity Group...: Transportation Conformity Determinations for Federally Funded and Approved Transportation Plans, Programs...

  9. Visualization of glutamine transporter activities in living cells using genetically encoded glutamine sensors.

    PubMed

    Gruenwald, Katrin; Holland, John Todd; Stromberg, Verlyn; Ahmad, Altaf; Watcharakichkorn, Daisy; Okumoto, Sakiko

    2012-01-01

    Glutamine plays a central role in the metabolism of critical biological molecules such as amino acids, proteins, neurotransmitters, and glutathione. Since glutamine metabolism is regulated through multiple enzymes and transporters, the cellular glutamine concentration is expected to be temporally dynamic. Moreover, differentiation in glutamine metabolism between cell types in the same tissue (e.g. neuronal and glial cells) is often crucial for the proper function of the tissue as a whole, yet assessing cell-type specific activities of transporters and enzymes in such heterogenic tissue by physical fractionation is extremely challenging. Therefore, a method of reporting glutamine dynamics at the cellular level is highly desirable. Genetically encoded sensors can be targeted to a specific cell type, hence addressing this knowledge gap. Here we report the development of Föster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) glutamine sensors based on improved cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins, monomeric Teal Fluorescent Protein (mTFP)1 and venus. These sensors were found to be specific to glutamine, and stable to pH-changes within a physiological range. Using cos7 cells expressing the human glutamine transporter ASCT2 as a model, we demonstrate that the properties of the glutamine transporter can easily be analyzed with these sensors. The range of glutamine concentration change in a given cell can also be estimated using sensors with different affinities. Moreover, the mTFP1-venus FRET pair can be duplexed with another FRET pair, mAmetrine and tdTomato, opening up the possibility for real-time imaging of another molecule. These novel glutamine sensors will be useful tools to analyze specificities of glutamine metabolism at the single-cell level.

  10. Structural basis for the metal-selective activation of the manganese transport regulator of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Kliegman, Joseph I; Griner, Sarah L; Helmann, John D; Brennan, Richard G; Glasfeld, Arthur

    2006-03-21

    The manganese transport regulator (MntR) of Bacillus subtilis is activated by Mn(2+) to repress transcription of genes encoding transporters involved in the uptake of manganese. MntR is also strongly activated by cadmium, both in vivo and in vitro, but it is poorly activated by other metal cations, including calcium and zinc. The previously published MntR.Mn(2+) structure revealed a binuclear complex of manganese ions with a metal-metal separation of 3.3 A (herein designated the AB conformer). Analysis of four additional crystal forms of MntR.Mn(2+) reveals that the AB conformer is only observed in monoclinic crystals at 100 K, suggesting that this conformation may be stabilized by crystal packing forces. In contrast, monoclinic crystals analyzed at room temperature (at either pH 6.5 or pH 8.5), and a second hexagonal crystal form (analyzed at 100 K), all reveal the shift of one manganese ion by 2.5 A, thereby leading to a newly identified conformation (the AC conformer) with an internuclear distance of 4.4 A. Significantly, the cadmium and calcium complexes of MntR also contain binuclear complexes with a 4.4 A internuclear separation. In contrast, the zinc complex of MntR contains only one metal ion per subunit, in the A site. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms the stoichiometry of Mn(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+) binding to MntR. We propose that the specificity of MntR activation is tied to productive binding of metal ions at two sites; the A site appears to act as a selectivity filter, determining whether the B or C site will be occupied and thereby fully activate MntR.

  11. Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in the Activity of Electron Transport Chain Complexes of Brain Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the activity of individual mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II/III, IV) and citrate synthase induced by pharmacologically different cannabinoids. In vitro effects of selected cannabinoids on mitochondrial enzymes were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Both cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, anandamide, and R-(+)-WIN55,212-2, and antagonist/inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptors, AM251, and cannabidiol were examined in pig brain mitochondria. Different effects of these cannabinoids on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase were found. Citrate synthase activity was decreased only by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and AM251. Significant increase in the complex I activity was induced by anandamide. At micromolar concentration, all the tested cannabinoids inhibited the activity of electron transport chain complexes II/III and IV. Stimulatory effect of anandamide on activity of complex I may participate on distinct physiological effects of endocannabinoids compared to phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids. Common inhibitory effect of cannabinoids on activity of complex II/III and IV confirmed a non-receptor-mediated mechanism of cannabinoid action on individual components of system of oxidative phosphorylation.

  12. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI.

  13. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Shin, Misun; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP). Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH. PMID:26057890

  14. The uncoupled ATPase activity of the ABC transporter BtuC2D2 leads to a hysteretic conformational change, conformational memory, and improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; I. Gilson, Amy; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters comprise a large and ubiquitous family of proteins. From bacteria to man they translocate solutes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Unlike other enzymes that use ATP as an energy source, ABC transporters are notorious for having high levels of basal ATPase activity: they hydrolyze ATP also in the absence of their substrate. It is unknown what are the effects of such prolonged and constant activity on the stability and function of ABC transporters or any other enzyme. Here we report that prolonged ATP hydrolysis is beneficial to the ABC transporter BtuC2D2. Using ATPase assays, surface plasmon resonance interaction experiments, and transport assays we observe that the constantly active transporter remains stable and functional for much longer than the idle one. Remarkably, during extended activity the transporter undergoes a slow conformational change (hysteresis) and gradually attains a hyperactive state in which it is more active than it was to begin with. This phenomenon is different from stabilization of enzymes by ligand binding: the hyperactive state is only reached through ATP hydrolysis, and not ATP binding. BtuC2D2 displays a strong conformational memory for this excited state, and takes hours to return to its basal state after catalysis terminates. PMID:26905293

  15. Transcellular transport of isosmotic volumes by the rabbit gall-bladder in vitro.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, O; Leyssac, P P

    1969-03-01

    1. Fluid transport rate and oxygen consumption (Q(O2)) were studied in rabbit gall-bladder preparations in vitro exposed on both sides to identical Ringer solutions with NaCl concentrations (and osmolarities) varying from 70 to 140 m-equiv Na(+)/l.).2. The time sequence of acute effects on transport rate resulting from sudden changes in the NaCl concentration of the bathing solutions indicated that, (a) as a primary effect, fluid volume transfer rate remained unaffected whereas Na transport rate changed abruptly in direct proportion to the Na concentration of the bathing media; (b) a secondary, delayed and partly reversible depression of fluid transfer rate following elevation of the NaCl concentration was observed only when the rate of transport was relatively high initially.3. A fixed, and highly significant, linear relationship between changes in transport-linked oxygen consumption (DeltaQ(O2)) and measured net fluid volume transport (DeltaT(vol)) was found independent of the NaCl concentration of the bathing media, dQ(O2)/dT(vol) being 0.22 +/- 11% and 0.25 +/- 8% in bladders incubated in solutions containing 140 and 70 m-equiv Na(+)/l. respectively.4. Oxygen consumption per equiv of Na(+) (calculated) transported varied in inverse proportion to the Na concentration of the bathing media, dQ(O2)/dT(Na) being 0.0016 +/- 11% and 0.0036 +/- 8% in ;140 R' and ;70 R' solutions, respectively.5. Removal of K from the bathing solutions was followed by a gradual and partly reversible depression of fluid transport rate to a minimum level (about 100 x 10(-4) mul H(2)O. min(-1).mg(-1)) independent of the initial transport rate.6. It is concluded that the range of absorption rates of isosmotic fluid from the gall-bladder lumen represents a range of energy requiring capacities for transfer of fluid volume units; the data suggest that the intracellular (cytoplasmic) ion composition, depending on the presence of external K, as well as hormonal action may influence the capacity

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROORGANISMS WITH IMPROVED TRANSPORT AND BIOSURFACTANT ACTIVITY FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McInerney; N. Youssef; T. Fincher; S.K. Maudgalya; M.J. Folmsbee; R. Knapp; D. Nagle

    2004-05-31

    Diverse microorganisms were screened for biosurfactant production and anaerobic growth at elevated salt concentrations to obtain candidates most suitable for microbial oil recovery. Seventy percent of the 205 strains tested, mostly strains of Bacillus mojavensis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus sonorensis, produced biosurfactants aerobically and 41% of the strains had biosurfactant activity greater than Bacillus mojavensis JF-2, the current candidate for oil recovery. Biosurfactant activity varied with the percentage of the 3-hydroxy-tetradecanoate isomers in the fatty acid portion of the biosurfactant. Changing the medium composition by incorporation of different precursors of 3-hydroxy tetradecanoate increased the activity of biosurfactant. The surface tension and critical micelle concentration of 15 different, biosurfactant-producing Bacillus strains was determined individually and in combination with other biosurfactants. Some biosurfactant mixtures were found to have synergistic effect on surface tension (e.g. surface tension was lowered from 41 to 31 mN/m in some cases) while others had a synergistic effect on CMD-1 values. We compared the transport abilities of spores from three Bacillus strains using a model porous system to study spore recovery and transport. Sand-packed columns were used to select for spores or cells with the best transport abilities through brine-saturated sand. Spores of Bacillus mojavensis strains JF-2 and ROB-2 and a natural recombinant, strain C-9, transported through sand at very high efficiencies. The earliest cells/spores that emerged from the column were re-grown, allowed to sporulate, and applied to a second column. This procedure greatly enhanced the transport of strain C-9. Spores with enhanced transport abilities can be easily obtained and that the preparation of inocula for use in MEOR is feasible. Tertiary oil recovery experiments showed that 10 to 40 mg/l of JF-2 biosurfactant in the presence of 0

  17. Genetic variability of NaCl tolerance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Saeed, A; Saleem, M F; Zakria, M; Anjum, S A; Shakeel, A; Saeed, N

    2011-07-12

    Cultivation of crops in soils with high salt (NaCl) content can affect plant development. We examined the morphological and physiological mechanisms of salt tolerance in tomato. The responses of 72 accessions of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to salinity were compared by measuring shoot and root lengths, and fresh shoot and root weights relative to those of controls (plants grown in normal salt levels). All traits were reduced at the seedling stage when salinity levels were increased. The accession x salinity interaction was significant for all traits. Root length had higher heritability than other traits and was used as a selection criterion to identify salt-tolerant and -non-tolerant accessions. On the basis of root length, accessions LA2661, CLN2498A, CLN1621L, BL1176, 6233, and 17870 were considered to be more tolerant than accessions 17902, LO2875 and LO4360. The degree of salt tolerance was checked by analyzing K+ and Na+ concentrations and K+/Na+ ratio in tissues of plants treated with 10 and 15 dS/m salinity levels. Tolerance of these accessions to salinity was most associated with low accumulation of Na+ and higher K+/Na+ ratios.

  18. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; da Silveira, Pedro; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  19. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; Silveira, Pedro da; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  20. Gabapentin inhibits the activity of the rat excitatory glutamate transporter 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gil, Yang Sook; Kim, Jong Hak; Kim, Chi Hyo; Han, Jong In; Zuo, Zhiyi; Baik, Hee Jung

    2015-09-05

    Gabapentin, a derivative of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is used to treat epilepsy and neuropathic pain. The pharmacological mechanisms for gabapentin effects are not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of gabapentin on the activity of excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) that can regulate extracellular glutamate concentrations. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Membrane currents were recorded after application of l-glutamate in the presence or absence of different concentrations of gabapentin (1-300μM) by using a two-electrode voltage clamp. To determine the effect of gabapentin on Vmax and Km of EAAT3 for l-glutamate, l-glutamate at 3-300μM was used. To study the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) on gabapentin-induced changes in EAAT3 activity, oocytes were incubated with the PKC activator (Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA), the PKC inhibitors (chelerythrine or staurosporine), and the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Gabapentin decreased EAAT3 activity in a concentration-dependent manner and EAAT3 activity was significantly inhibited by 10-300μM gabapentin. Gabapentin significantly decreased Vmax without affecting Km. PMA increased EAAT3 activity; however, gabapentin attenuated the PMA-induced increase in EAAT3 activity. Pre-incubation of oocytes with chelerythrine, staurosporine, or wortmannin decreased basal EAAT3 activity, which was further reduced by gabapentin. We conclude that gabapentin decreases EAAT3 activity at clinically relevant and higher concentrations, in which PKC and PI3K may not be involved. The results suggest that EAAT3 might not be a target for the anticonvulsant action of gabapentin.

  1. Organ-specific responses of vacuolar H-ATPase in the shoots and roots of C halophyte Suaeda salsa to NaCl.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Feng; Song, Jie; Wang, Bao-Shan

    2010-03-01

    Suaeda salsa L. is a halophytic species that is well adapted to high salinity. In order to understand its salt tolerance mechanism, we examined the growth and vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) response to NaCl within the shoots and roots. The growth of shoots, but not roots, was dramatically stimulated by NaCl. Cl(-) and Na(+) were mainly accumulated in shoots. V-ATPase activity was significantly increased by NaCl in roots and especially in shoots. Interestingly, antisera ATP95 and ATP88b detected three V(1) subunits (66, 55 and 36 KDa) of V-ATPase only in shoots, while an 18 kDa V(0) subunit of V-ATPase was detected by both antisera in shoots and roots. It suggested that the tissue-specific characteristics of V-ATPase were related to the different patterns of growth and ion accumulation in shoots and roots of S. salsa.

  2. Monosodium glutamate, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate, lysine and taurine improve the sensory quality of fermented cooked sausages with 50% and 75% replacement of NaCl with KCl.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Bibiana Alves; Campagnol, Paulo Cezar Bastianello; Morgano, Marcelo Antônio; Pollonio, Marise Aparecida Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Fermented cooked sausages were produced by replacing 50% and 75% of NaCl with KCl and adding monosodium glutamate, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate, lysine and taurine. The manufacturing process was monitored by pH and water activity measurements. The sodium and potassium contents of the resulting products were measured. The color values (L*, a* and b*), texture profiles and sensory profiles were also examined. Replacing 50% and 75% NaCl with KCl depreciated the sensory quality of the products. The reformulated sausages containing monosodium glutamate combined with lysine, taurine, disodium inosinate and disodium guanylate masked the undesirable sensory attributes associated with the replacement of 50% and 75% NaCl with KCl, allowing the production of fermented cooked sausages with good sensory acceptance and approximately 68% sodium reduction.

  3. Effect of NaCl, Gum Arabic and Microbial Transglutaminase on the Gel and Emulsion Characteristics of Porcine Myofibrillar Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davaatseren, Munkhtugs

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of gum arabic (GA) combined with microbial transglutaminase (TG) on the functional properties of porcine myofibrillar protein (MP). As an indicator of functional property, heat-set gel and emulsion characteristics of MP treated with GA and/or TG were explored under varying NaCl concentrations (0.1-0.6 M). The GA improved thermal gelling ability of MP during thermal processing and after cooling, and concomitantly added TG assisted the formation of viscoelastic MP gel formation. Meanwhile, the addition of GA decreased cooking yield of MP gel at 0.6 M NaCl concentration, and the yield was further decreased by TG addition, mainly attributed by enhancement of protein-protein interactions. Emulsion characteristics indicated that GA had emulsifying ability and the addition of GA increased the emulsification activity index (EAI) of MP-stabilized emulsion. However, GA showed a negative effect on emulsion stability, particularly great drop in the emulsion stability index (ESI) was found in GA treatment at 0.6 M NaCl. Consequently, the results indicated that GA had a potential advantage to form a viscoelastic MP gel. For the practical aspect, the application of GA in meat processing had to be limited to the purposes of texture enhancer such as restructured products, but not low-salt products and emulsion-type meat products. PMID:26761678

  4. Guanidinylated Neomycin Mediates Heparan Sulfate–dependent Transport of Active Enzymes to Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sarrazin, Stéphane; Wilson, Beth; Sly, William S; Tor, Yitzhak; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2010-01-01

    Guanidinylated neomycin (GNeo) can transport bioactive, high molecular weight cargo into the interior of cells in a process that depends on cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In this report, we show that GNeo-modified quantum dots bind to cell surface heparan sulfate, undergo endocytosis and eventually reach the lysosomal compartment. An N-hydroxysuccinimide activated ester of GNeo (GNeo-NHS) was prepared and conjugated to two lysosomal enzymes, β--glucuronidase (GUS) and α--iduronidase. Conjugation did not interfere with enzyme activity and enabled binding of the enzymes to heparin-Sepharose and heparan sulfate on primary human fibroblasts. Cells lacking the corresponding lysosomal enzyme took up sufficient amounts of the conjugated enzymes to restore normal turnover of glycosaminoglycans. The high capacity of proteoglycan-mediated uptake suggests that this method of delivery might be used for enzyme replacement or introduction of foreign enzymes into cells. PMID:20442709

  5. Regulation of synaptic activity by snapin-mediated endolysosomal transport and sorting

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Recycling synaptic vesicles (SVs) transit through early endosomal sorting stations, which raises a fundamental question: are SVs sorted toward endolysosomal pathways? Here, we used snapin mutants as tools to assess how endolysosomal sorting and trafficking impact presynaptic activity in wild-type and snapin−/− neurons. Snapin acts as a dynein adaptor that mediates the retrograde transport of late endosomes (LEs) and interacts with dysbindin, a subunit of the endosomal sorting complex BLOC-1. Expressing dynein-binding defective snapin mutants induced SV accumulation at presynaptic terminals, mimicking the snapin−/− phenotype. Conversely, over-expressing snapin reduced SV pool size by enhancing SV trafficking to the endolysosomal pathway. Using a SV-targeted Ca2+ sensor, we demonstrate that snapin–dysbindin interaction regulates SV positional priming through BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting. Our study reveals a bipartite regulation of presynaptic activity by endolysosomal trafficking and sorting: LE transport regulates SV pool size, and BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting fine-tunes the Ca2+ sensitivity of SV release. Therefore, our study provides new mechanistic insights into the maintenance and regulation of SV pool size and synchronized SV fusion through snapin-mediated LE trafficking and endosomal sorting. PMID:26108535

  6. Regulation of synaptic activity by snapin-mediated endolysosomal transport and sorting.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-08-04

    Recycling synaptic vesicles (SVs) transit through early endosomal sorting stations, which raises a fundamental question: are SVs sorted toward endolysosomal pathways? Here, we used snapin mutants as tools to assess how endolysosomal sorting and trafficking impact presynaptic activity in wild-type and snapin(-/-) neurons. Snapin acts as a dynein adaptor that mediates the retrograde transport of late endosomes (LEs) and interacts with dysbindin, a subunit of the endosomal sorting complex BLOC-1. Expressing dynein-binding defective snapin mutants induced SV accumulation at presynaptic terminals, mimicking the snapin(-/-) phenotype. Conversely, over-expressing snapin reduced SV pool size by enhancing SV trafficking to the endolysosomal pathway. Using a SV-targeted Ca(2+) sensor, we demonstrate that snapin-dysbindin interaction regulates SV positional priming through BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting. Our study reveals a bipartite regulation of presynaptic activity by endolysosomal trafficking and sorting: LE transport regulates SV pool size, and BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting fine-tunes the Ca(2+) sensitivity of SV release. Therefore, our study provides new mechanistic insights into the maintenance and regulation of SV pool size and synchronized SV fusion through snapin-mediated LE trafficking and endosomal sorting.

  7. Policies related to active transport to and from school: a multisite case study.

    PubMed

    Eyler, Amy A; Brownson, Ross C; Doescher, Mark P; Evenson, Kelly R; Fesperman, Carrie E; Litt, Jill S; Pluto, Delores; Steinman, Lesley E; Terpstra, Jennifer L; Troped, Philip J; Schmid, Thomas L

    2008-12-01

    Active transportation to and from school (ATS) is a viable strategy to help increase physical activity among youth. ATS can be challenging because initiatives require transdisciplinary collaboration, are influenced by the built environment and are affected by numerous policies. The purpose of this study is to identify policies and factors that influence ATS initiatives. Nine elementary schools in seven states participated in this case study. Sixty-nine stakeholders were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed, coded and analyzed using a master thematic codebook. This study identified two distinct aspects of policies: 'influential factors' which are factors that might impact policies related to ATS and 'policy actions' which are policies reported by people involved in ATS initiatives that directly affected their success. Influential factors included sidewalks, crosswalks/crossing guards, funding, personal safety concerns, advocacy group involvement and others. Policy actions included policies on school speed zone, drop-off, no-transport zones, school siting, school start/dismissal time and school choice. Despite the diversity of the schools studied, similarities included influence of built environment, safety concerns, funding and transdisciplinary collaboration. Stakeholders need to work together to stimulate action and ensure successful initiatives. Influential factors appear to be important to this process.

  8. Dynamic defect correlations dominate activated electronic transport in SrTiO3

    DOE PAGES

    Snijders, Paul C.; Sen, Cengiz; McConnell, Michael P.; ...

    2016-07-22

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a critically important material for the study of emergent electronic phases in complex oxides, as well as for the development of applications based on their heterostructures. Despite the large body of knowledge on STO, there are still many uncertainties regarding the role of defects in the properties of STO, including their influence on ferroelectricity in bulk STO and ferromagnetism in STO-based heterostructures. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the decay of persistent photoconductivity in STO single crystals with defect concentrations that are relatively low but significantly affect their electronic properties. The resultsmore » show that photo-activated electron transport cannot be described by a superposition of the properties due to independent point defects as current models suggest but is, instead, governed by defect complexes that interact through dynamic correlations. In conclusion, these results emphasize the importance of defect correlations for activated electronic transport properties of semiconducting and insulating perovskite oxides.« less

  9. Dynamic defect correlations dominate activated electronic transport in SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Snijders, Paul C.; Sen, Cengiz; McConnell, Michael P.; Ma, Ying-Zhong; May, Andrew F.; Herklotz, Andreas; Wong, Anthony T.; Ward, Thomas Zac

    2016-07-22

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a critically important material for the study of emergent electronic phases in complex oxides, as well as for the development of applications based on their heterostructures. Despite the large body of knowledge on STO, there are still many uncertainties regarding the role of defects in the properties of STO, including their influence on ferroelectricity in bulk STO and ferromagnetism in STO-based heterostructures. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the decay of persistent photoconductivity in STO single crystals with defect concentrations that are relatively low but significantly affect their electronic properties. The results show that photo-activated electron transport cannot be described by a superposition of the properties due to independent point defects as current models suggest but is, instead, governed by defect complexes that interact through dynamic correlations. In conclusion, these results emphasize the importance of defect correlations for activated electronic transport properties of semiconducting and insulating perovskite oxides.

  10. Human proximal tubule epithelial cells cultured on hollow fibers: living membranes that actively transport organic cations.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J; De Napoli, I E; Fedecostante, M; Schophuizen, C M S; Chevtchik, N V; Wilmer, M J; van Asbeck, A H; Croes, H J; Pertijs, J C; Wetzels, J F M; Hilbrands, L B; van den Heuvel, L P; Hoenderop, J G; Stamatialis, D; Masereeuw, R

    2015-11-16

    The bioartificial kidney (BAK) aims at improving dialysis by developing 'living membranes' for cells-aided removal of uremic metabolites. Here, unique human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) monolayers were cultured on biofunctionalized MicroPES (polyethersulfone) hollow fiber membranes (HFM) and functionally tested using microfluidics. Tight monolayer formation was demonstrated by abundant zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression along the tight junctions of matured ciPTEC on HFM. A clear barrier function of the monolayer was confirmed by limited diffusion of FITC-inulin. The activity of the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) in ciPTEC was evaluated in real-time using a perfusion system by confocal microscopy using 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) as a fluorescent substrate. Initial ASP(+) uptake was inhibited by a cationic uremic metabolites mixture and by the histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine. In conclusion, a 'living membrane' of renal epithelial cells on MicroPES HFM with demonstrated active organic cation transport was successfully established as a first step in BAK engineering.

  11. Human proximal tubule epithelial cells cultured on hollow fibers: living membranes that actively transport organic cations

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, J.; De Napoli, I. E; Fedecostante, M.; Schophuizen, C. M. S.; Chevtchik, N. V.; Wilmer, M. J.; van Asbeck, A. H.; Croes, H. J.; Pertijs, J. C.; Wetzels, J. F. M.; Hilbrands, L. B.; van den Heuvel, L. P.; Hoenderop, J. G.; Stamatialis, D.; Masereeuw, R.

    2015-01-01

    The bioartificial kidney (BAK) aims at improving dialysis by developing ‘living membranes’ for cells-aided removal of uremic metabolites. Here, unique human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cell (ciPTEC) monolayers were cultured on biofunctionalized MicroPES (polyethersulfone) hollow fiber membranes (HFM) and functionally tested using microfluidics. Tight monolayer formation was demonstrated by abundant zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression along the tight junctions of matured ciPTEC on HFM. A clear barrier function of the monolayer was confirmed by limited diffusion of FITC-inulin. The activity of the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) in ciPTEC was evaluated in real-time using a perfusion system by confocal microscopy using 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+) as a fluorescent substrate. Initial ASP+ uptake was inhibited by a cationic uremic metabolites mixture and by the histamine H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine. In conclusion, a ‘living membrane’ of renal epithelial cells on MicroPES HFM with demonstrated active organic cation transport was successfully established as a first step in BAK engineering. PMID:26567716

  12. Effect of cyclic aromatics on sodium active transport in frog skin

    SciTech Connect

    Blankemeyer, J.T.; Bowerman, M.C. )

    1993-01-01

    A modified glass Ussing-chamber was used to mount the skin. The electrical potential difference (PD) was measured by two 3% agar-frog Ringer's bridges. Current (i.e. short-circuit current, or ISC) was passed by Ag-AgCl electrodes placed so that current density was uniform across the skin. Ringer's solution, bathing each side of the frog skin, was stirred and aerated by gas-lift pumps. The effect of toxicants on the ISC was determined by using the 15 min prior to toxicant administration as a control period, then calculating the change in ISC during the toxicant period as a percent of the control ISC. Phenol and benzene are components of crude oil and crude oil waste. These hydrocarbons and phenanthrene were tested for their effect on frog skin. The results show that the effect of organics on sodium active transport of an epithelium is to alter the active transport of sodium ions. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Field dependent thermoelectric properties of organic semiconductors—A tool to determine the nature of charge transport in materials exhibiting thermally activated transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendels, Dan; Tessler, Nir

    2015-03-01

    By implementing Monte Carlo simulations and employing the concept of effective temperature, we explore the effects of an applied field bias on the charge carrier statistics and Peltier coefficient in hopping systems subject to the parameter range applicable to disordered organic semiconductors. Distinct differences are found between the observed field dependences as obtained from systems in which energetic disorder is spatially correlated and those in which it is not. Considerable differences are also found between the charge carrier statistics and the Peltier coefficient's field dependence in systems in which charge is transported by bare charge carriers and systems in which it is propagated by polarons. Peltier coefficient field dependence investigations are, hence, proposed as a new tool for studying charge transport and thermoelectricity in disordered organic semiconductors and systems which exhibit thermally activated transport in general.

  14. Children exposure assessment to ultrafine particles and black carbon: The role of transport and cooking activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Stabile, L.; Morawska, L.; Russi, A.

    2013-11-01

    An accurate evaluation of the airborne particle dose-response relationship requires detailed measurements of the actual particle concentration levels that people are exposed to, in every microenvironment in which they reside. The aim of this work was to perform an exposure assessment of children in relation to two different aerosol species: ultrafine particles (UFPs) and black carbon (BC). To this purpose, personal exposure measurements, in terms of UFP and BC concentrations, were performed on 103 children aged 8-11 years (10.1 ± 1.1 years) using hand-held particle counters and aethalometers. Simultaneously, a time-activity diary and a portable GPS were used to determine the children's daily time-activity pattern and estimate their inhaled dose of UFPs and BC. The median concentration to which the study population was exposed was found to be comparable to the high levels typically detected in urban traffic microenvironments, in terms of both particle number (2.2 × 104 part. cm-3) and BC (3.8 μg m-3) concentrations. Daily inhaled doses were also found to be relatively high and were equal to 3.35 × 1011 part. day-1 and 3.92 × 101 μg day-1 for UFPs and BC, respectively. Cooking and using transportation were recognized as the main activities contributing to overall daily exposure, when normalized according to their corresponding time contribution for UFPs and BC, respectively. Therefore, UFPs and BC could represent tracers of children exposure to particulate pollution from indoor cooking activities and transportation microenvironments, respectively.

  15. Coordinative modulation of human zinc transporter 2 gene expression through active and suppressive regulators.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Ju; Liu, Ya-Chuan; Lin, Meng-Chieh; Chen, Yi-Ting; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Zinc transporter 2 (ZnT2) is one of the cellular factors responsible for Zn homeostasis. Upon Zn overload, ZnT2 reduces cellular Zn by transporting it into excretory vesicles. We investigated the molecular mechanism that regulates human ZnT2 (hZnT2) gene expression. Zn induces hZnT2 expression in dose- and time-dependent manners. Overexpression of metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) increases hZnT2 transcription, whereas depletion of MTF-1 reduces hZnT2 expression. There are five putative metal response elements (MREs) within 1kb upstream of the hZnT2 gene. A serial deletion of the hZnT2 promoter region (from 5' to 3') shows that the two MREs proximal to the gene are essential for Zn-induced promoter activity. Further mutation analysis concludes that the penultimate MRE (MREb) supports the metal-induced promoter activity. The hZnT2 promoter has also a zinc finger E-box binding homeobox (ZEB) binding element. Mutation or deletion of this ZEB binding element elevates the basal and Zn-induced hZnT2 promoter activities. Knockdown of ZEB1 mRNA enhances the hZnT2 transcript level in HEK-293 cells. In MCF-7 (ZEB-deficient) cells, expression of ZEB proteins attenuates the Zn-induced hZnT2 expression. However, expressions of MTF-1 target genes such as human ZnT1 and metallothionein IIA were not affected. Our study shows the expression of the hZnT2 gene is coordinately regulated via active and suppressive modulators.

  16. Increased cervical electrical activity during oestrus in progestagen treated ewes: Possible role in sperm transport.

    PubMed

    Cavaco-Gonçalves, S; Marques, C C; Horta, A E M; Figueroa, J P

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was to characterize the pattern of cervical myoelectrical activity (EMG) in the sheep, during the periovulatory period, after synchronization of oestrus with progestagen and eCG. EMG was measured with a computerised modular system in five ewes previously fitted with a pair of monopolar Teflon needle electrodes in the muscle layers of the cervix. Each ewe was submitted to oestrus synchronization treatment with intravaginal progestagen sponge during 12 days, and the administration of 500 IU of eCG at the withdrawal of sponge. EMG was recorded in each animal during 19 h, starting 44 h after withdrawal of sponge. The number and duration of events were determined every hour during the experiment. Two distinct event durations were identified: one lasting less than 200 s and another lasting between 300 and 500 s. The two types of events analysed (less than 200 s and lasting between 300 and 500 s) had a similar pattern during the period of observation although they were not in synchrony. For events lasting less than 200 s, activity increased between 48 and 50 h after sponge withdrawal, with the peak of activity being observed between 51 and 53 h. For events of 300-500 s duration, the peak of activity was observed between 48 and 50h after sponge withdrawal and activity was maintained until 51-53 h. The increase in cervical motility observed in progestagen-eCG treated ewes is in keeping with the increase in cervical activity observed by others in natural cycling animals, and suggests that exogenous hormones used in synchronization protocols had no deleterious action on cervical motility during periovulatory period. The enhanced activity of cervical muscle layer found around the time of mating and/or AI suggests it may play an important role as a regulatory mechanism of sperm transport. Taking advantage of the cervical responsiveness to various drugs, experimental modulation of cervical activity could be used to facilitate cervical sperm

  17. Small-molecule activator of glutamate transporter EAAT2 translation provides neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qiongman; Chang, Ling-Chu; Takahashi, Kou; Liu, Qibing; Schulte, Delanie A; Lai, Liching; Ibabao, Brian; Lin, Yuchen; Stouffer, Nathan; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitra; Xing, Xuechao; Seyb, Kathleen I; Cuny, Gregory D; Glicksman, Marcie A; Lin, Chien-Liang Glenn

    2014-03-01

    Glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 plays a major role in glutamate clearance in synaptic clefts. Several lines of evidence indicate that strategies designed to increase EAAT2 expression have potential for preventing excitotoxicity, which contributes to neuronal injury and death in neurodegenerative diseases. We previously discovered several classes of compounds that can increase EAAT2 expression through translational activation. Here, we present efficacy studies of the compound LDN/OSU-0212320, which is a pyridazine derivative from one of our lead series. In a murine model, LDN/OSU-0212320 had good potency, adequate pharmacokinetic properties, no observed toxicity at the doses examined, and low side effect/toxicity potential. Additionally, LDN/OSU-0212320 protected cultured neurons from glutamate-mediated excitotoxic injury and death via EAAT2 activation. Importantly, LDN/OSU-0212320 markedly delayed motor function decline and extended lifespan in an animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We also found that LDN/OSU-0212320 substantially reduced mortality, neuronal death, and spontaneous recurrent seizures in a pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epilepsy model. Moreover, our study demonstrated that LDN/OSU-0212320 treatment results in activation of PKC and subsequent Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) activation, which regulates activation of EAAT2 translation. Our data indicate that the use of small molecules to enhance EAAT2 translation may be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Inhibition of Fast Axonal Transport by Pathogenic SOD1 Involves Activation of p38 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morfini, Gerardo A.; Bosco, Daryl A.; Brown, Hannah; Gatto, Rodolfo; Kaminska, Agnieszka; Song, Yuyu; Molla, Linda; Baker, Lisa; Marangoni, M. Natalia; Berth, Sarah; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Bagnato, Carolina; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Watterson, D. Martin; Huang, Chun-Fang; Banker, Gary; Brown, Robert H.; Brady, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT) deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS. PMID:23776455

  19. Activity-based concept for transport and partitioning of ionizing organics.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Stefan; Franco, Antonio; Mackay, Don

    2010-08-15

    Ionizing chemicals, including pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products, are care products, are widely used chemicals of commerce and have been detected in the environment in large numbers. These "ionics" are subject to a variety of processes, such as dissociation, ion trap, and electrical interactions with organic matter and biota. Conventional chemodynamic concepts and models designed to treat neutral compounds do not necessarily address these processes. A new system of equations, based on activity and analogous to the fugacity approach, is suggested to describe the fate of organic ionics. The total concentration of all molecule species in a bulk compartment is determined from the product of activity 'a' and a bulk activity capacity 'B'. The concentration ratio between compartments in equilibrium depends on the activity ratio and the capacity ratio. Changes in partitioning due to pH, ionic strength, and the ion trap effect are quantified. The calculation is illustrated for two pharmaceuticals, namely the monovalent acid ibuprofen and the monovalent base trimethoprim, in a multimedia lake system. Trimethoprim is neutral at high pH but ionized at low pH, while ibuprofen exhibits the opposite. The concentration ratios of air and biota to water are shown to depend on pH. The activity approach may be used to describe transport and partitioning of multivalent ionizable organic compounds and to build multimedia fate models.

  20. Ascorbic acid transport into cultured pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, E.I.; May, V.; Eipper, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    An amidating enzyme designated peptidyl-glycine ..cap alpha..-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) has been studied in a variety of tissues and is dependent on molecular oxygen and stimulated by copper and ascorbic acid. To continue investigating the relationship among cellular ascorbic acid concentrations, amidating ability, and PAM activity, the authors studied ascorbic acid transport in three cell preparations that contain PAM and produce amidated peptides: primary cultures of rat anterior and intermediate pituitary and mouse AtT-20 tumor cells. When incubated in 50 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid all three cell preparations concentrated ascorbic acid 20- to 40-fold, producing intracellular ascorbate concentrations of 1 to 2 mM, based on experimentally determined cell volumes. All three cell preparations displayed saturable ascorbic acid uptake with half-maximal initial rates occurring between 9 and 18 ..mu..M ascorbate. Replacing NaCl in the uptake buffer with choline chloride significantly diminished ascorbate uptake in all three preparations. Ascorbic acid efflux from these cells was slow, displaying half-lives of 7 hours. Unlike systems that transport dehydroascorbic acid, the transport system for ascorbic acid in these cells was not inhibited by glucose. Thus, ascorbate is transported into pituitary cells by a sodium-dependent, active transport system.

  1. Studies on electrochemical characterization and performance prediction of cellulose acetate and Zeocarb-225 composite membranes in aqueous NaCl solutions.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, A K; Ahmad, Suhail

    2006-06-01

    We have mixed cellulose acetate and Zeocarb-225 in different ratios, leading to the preparations of Membrane-1 and Membrane-2. Membrane potential, water content, and conductance measurements have been carried out to estimate and analyze the data in terms of equilibria and important electrochemical parameters. The Donnan equilibrium has been incorporated to estimate the activity coefficient of counterions, y(p)M, and solute, y(+/-)M in the membrane phase along with the parameter, so called varphi expressing non-ideality. Dependence of the extent of hydrophilicity of both membranes on mean electrolyte concentrations has been examined. Selectivity in membranes is discussed in terms of dissociation equilibria, K(d)s and K(d)f. It has been found that membrane surface charge density sigma(s) increases with increasing of external NaCl concentration. Dependence of water transport number and cationic transport number on electrolyte concentration shows a similar trend of variation. At higher mean concentration of electrolyte, water transport number in Membrane-2 has a negative value. Membrane-2 has a higher value of water transport number than Membrane-1. The entropy production due to solute and water transport has been quantified for both the membranes in the light of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The various type of interactions such as solute-membrane, solute-water, and water-membrane are analyzed in terms of friction coefficients (f(ij)) of Spiegler's frictional pore model. In our case, an f(wm) < f(sm) < f(sw)-like trend is observed in both membranes. These frictional coefficients show close dependence on external electrolyte concentrations. Pore potential values of Membrane-1 and Membrane-2 have been worked out using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In both systems pore potential values increase with increasing mean electrolyte concentrations. The transport through Membrane-1 and Membrane-2 tends to follow diffusion-control criteria, i.e., (D(+/-) . C. d/D(+/-)M C

  2. Further structure-activity relationship studies of piperidine-based monoamine transporter inhibitors: effects of piperidine ring stereochemistry on potency. Identification of norepinephrine transporter selective ligands and broad-spectrum transporter inhibitors.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Kurome, Toru; Giberson, Kelly M; Johnson, Kenneth M; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2005-12-15

    4-(4-Chlorophenyl)piperidine analogues each bearing a thioacetamide side chain appendage similar to that found in the wake-promoting drug modafinil have been synthesized. The transporter inhibitory activity of both the cis and trans isomers of these 3,4-disubstituted piperidines in both their (+)- and (-)-enantiomeric forms was determined. These studies reveal that the (-)-cis analogues exhibit dopamine transporter/norepinephrine transporter (DAT/NET) selectivity as was previously reported for the (+)-trans analogues. On the other hand, the (-)-trans and the (+)-cis isomers show serotonin transporter (SERT) or SERT/NET selectivity. Among them, (+)-cis-5b shows a low nanomolar Ki for the NET with 39-fold and 321-fold lower potency at the DAT and SERT, respectively, thus making it a useful pharmacological research tool for exploring NET-associated behavioral signatures. On the other hand, several of the compounds described herein, such as (+)-trans-5c, show comparable activity at all three transporters. Because broad-spectrum transporter inhibitors have been hypothesized to exhibit a more rapid onset of action and/or a greater efficacy as antidepressant agents than those selective for SERT or SERT + NET, some of the present compounds will be valuable to study in animal models of depression.

  3. Ouabain on active transepithelial sodium transport in frog skin: studies with microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Studies were done with isolated frog skin to determine the effects of 10(-4) M ouabain on the electrophysiological parameters of outer and inner barriers of the Na-transporting cells. Microelectrodes were used to impale the skins from the outer surface to determine the intracellular voltages (Vsco) under conditions of short-circuiting and under conditions where a voltage clamp was used to vary the transepithelial voltage, VT. From this, the electrical resistances of outer (Rfo) and inner (RI) barriers were estimated. In addition, the driving force for active transepithelial Na transport (ENa = E'1) was estimated from the values of VT when the Vo = 0 mV (Helman and Fisher. 1977. J. Gen. Physiol. 69: 571-604). Studies were done with skins bathed with the usual 2.4 meq/liter [K]i in the inner solution as well as with reduced [K]i of 0.5 and 0 meq/liter. Characteristically, the responses to ouabain could be described by an initial rapid phase (5-10 min) during which time the Ri was increased markedly and the E'1 was decreased from control values. Thereafter, during the slow phases of the response, the resistances of both outer and inner barriers increased continuously and markedly with time leading ultimately to essentially complete inhibition of the short-circuit current. Similar studies were done with skins exposed to 10(-4) M amiloride in the outer solution. Although estimates of Ri could not be obtained under these conditions, the effects on the Vsco and E'1 were similar to those observed for the Na-transporting skins. However, the magnitudes of the effects were less and relatively slower than observed for the Na- transporting skins. The results of these studies were analyzed within the context of a proposed electrical model that takes into account the observation that the magnitude of the voltage at the inner barrier appears to exceed the equilibrium potential for K especially when transepithelial Na transport is inhibited at the apical barrier of the cells. PMID

  4. A needs assessment for DOE`s packaging and transportation activities - a look into the twenty-first century

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, R.; Turi, G.; Brancato, R.; Blalock, L.; Merrill, O.

    1995-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has performed a department-wide scoping of its packaging and transportation needs and has arrived at a projection of these needs for well into the twenty-first century. The assessment, known as the Transportation Needs Assessment (TNA) was initiated during August 1994 and completed in December 1994. The TNA will allow DOE to better prepare for changes in its transportation requirements in the future. The TNA focused on projected, quantified shipping needs based on forecasts of inventories of materials which will ultimately require transport by the DOE for storage, treatment and/or disposal. In addition, experts provided input on the growing needs throughout DOE resulting from changes in regulations, in DOE`s mission, and in the sociopolitical structure of the United States. Through the assessment, DOE`s transportation needs have been identified for a time period extending from the present through the first three decades of the twenty-first century. The needs assessment was accomplished in three phases: (1) defining current packaging, shipping, resource utilization, and methods of managing packaging and transportation activities; (2) establishing the inventory of materials which DOE will need to transport on into the next century and scenarios which project when, from where, and to where these materials will need to be transported; and (3) developing requirements and projected changes for DOE to accomplish the necessary transport safely and economically.

  5. Travel On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Transportation for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Jane; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual for grades 4-6 covers all four topics. Materials in four chapters comprising fourteen mini-units cover…

  6. Travel On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Transportation for Grades K-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Jane; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual for grades K-3 covers all four topics. Materials in the thirteen mini-units present different aspects of…

  7. Transportation Consumer Education for Adults: Mini-Units and Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers all four topics at the adult level. Materials in four chapters comprising seventeen mini-units…

  8. Proteome Analyses of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm at Elevated Levels of NaCl.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nazrul; Ross, Julia M; Marten, Mark R

    2015-10-01

    Our studies demonstrate that sodium chloride (NaCl) induces changes in biofilm, mediated by increased production of polysaccharides intercellular adhesion (PIA). We identified 12 proteins that showed higher abundance in increased level of NaCl. This includes one important protein (IsaA) known to be associated with biofilm stability. In addition, we also found higher abundance of a cold shock protein, CspA, at higher NaCl. We have also identified several other proteins that are differentially expressed to the elevated levels of NaCl and mapped them in the regulatory pathways of PIA. The majority of proteins are involved with various aspects bacterial metabolic function. Our results demonstrated that NaCl influences gene regulatory networks controlling exopolysaccharide expression.

  9. Effect of NaCl concentration in electrodeposited Co-P alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, John H.; Raja, M.; Thanikaikarasan, S.; Kim, Yong Deak; Srikumar, S. R.; Mahalingam, T.

    2009-04-01

    Cobalt-Phosphorous (Co-P) alloy thin films were prepared by electrodeposition technique from an aqueous electrolytic bath at various sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations. The effect of sodium chloride concentration on electrochemical, structural, morphological, compositional and magnetic properties of the films was investigated by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques, respectively. The mechanism of formation of Co-P alloy thin films was studied using cyclic voltammetry. The compositional analysis shows that the content of phosphorous (P) increases and the content of cobalt (Co) decreases by adding NaCl. X-ray diffraction studies revealed amorphous nature for films obtained at high concentration of NaCl and hexagonal closed packed (hcp) structure for films obtained at low NaCl concentration. Magnetic properties illustrate that high value of coercivity, saturation magnetization, remanence, and saturating field were obtained at high concentration of NaCl.

  10. Relative Contributions of Active Mediated Transport and Passive Diffusion of Fluoroquinolones with Various Lipophilicities in a Calu-3 Lung Epithelial Cell Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Brillault, Julien; De Castro, Whocely Victor; Couet, William

    2010-01-01

    The transport characteristics of six fluoroquinolones (FQs) with various lipophilicities were compared in a Calu-3 cell model. For each FQ, an active polarized transport was observed in the direction of the apical side. However, the apparent permeability of FQs resulted from active transport and passive diffusion that were highly variable between compounds and mainly governed by lipophilicity. Therefore, active transport was predominant for compounds with relatively low lipophilicity but minor for FQs with higher lipophilicity. PMID:19822706

  11. Comparative Localization and Functional Activity of the Main Hepatobiliary Transporters in HepaRG Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bachour-El Azzi, Pamela; Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Li, Ruoya; Guével, Rémy Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Stieger, Bruno; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2015-01-01

    The role of hepatobiliary transporters in drug-induced liver injury remains poorly understood. Various in vivo and in vitro biological approaches are currently used for studying hepatic transporters; however, appropriate localization and functional activity of these transporters are essential for normal biliary flow and drug transport. Human hepatocytes (HHs) are considered as the most suitable in vitro cell model but erratic availability and inter-donor functional variations limit their use. In this work, we aimed to compare localization of influx and efflux transporters and their functional activity in differentiated human HepaRG hepatocytes with fresh HHs in conventional (CCHH) and sandwich (SCHH) cultures. All tested influx and efflux transporters were correctly localized to canalicular [bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), and MDR3] or basolateral [Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) and MRP3] membrane domains and were functional in all models. Contrary to other transporters, NTCP and BSEP were less abundant and active in HepaRG cells, cellular uptake of taurocholate was 2.2- and 1.4-fold and bile excretion index 2.8- and 2.6-fold lower, than in SCHHs and CCHHs, respectively. However, when taurocholate canalicular efflux was evaluated in standard and divalent cation-free conditions in buffers or cell lysates, the difference between the three models did not exceed 9.3%. Interestingly, cell imaging showed higher bile canaliculi contraction/relaxation activity in HepaRG hepatocytes and larger bile canaliculi networks in SCHHs. Altogether, our results bring new insights in mechanisms involved in bile acids accumulation and excretion in HHs and suggest that HepaRG cells represent a suitable model for studying hepatobiliary transporters and drug-induced cholestasis. PMID:25690737

  12. Fast responses of metabolites in Vicia faba L. to moderate NaCl stress.