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Sample records for active native trypsin

  1. The Activity of Trypsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Salvatore F.; Holzman, Tom

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that illustrates the following points concerning the experimental determination of trypsin activity: (1) there is a difference in basing enzyme concentration on weight, absorbance, or active sites; and (2) the method of expressing enzyme concentration determines the value of specific, molecular, and catalytic center…

  2. Trypsin activation pathway of rotavirus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Arias, C F; Romero, P; Alvarez, V; López, S

    1996-01-01

    The infectivity of rotaviruses is increased by and most probably is dependent on trypsin treatment of the virus. This proteolytic treatment specifically cleaves VP4, the protein that forms the spikes on the surface of the virions, to polypeptides VP5 and VP8. This cleavage has been reported to occur in rotavirus SA114fM at two conserved, closely spaced arginine residues located at VP4 amino acids 241 and 247. In this work, we have characterized the VP4 cleavage products of rotavirus SA114S generated by in vitro treatment of the virus with increasing concentrations of trypsin and with proteases AspN and alpha-chymotrypsin. The VP8 and VP5 polypeptides were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with antibodies raised to synthetic peptides that mimic the terminal regions of VP4 generated by the trypsin cleavage. It was shown that in addition to arginine residues 241 and 247, VP4 is cleaved at arginine residue 231. These three sites were found to have different susceptibilities to trypsin, Arg-241 > Arg-231 > Arg-247, with the enhancement of infectivity correlating with cleavage at Arg-247 rather than at Arg-231 or Arg-241. Proteases AspN and alpha-chymotrypsin cleaved VP4 at Asp-242 and Tyr-246, respectively, with no significant enhancement of infectivity, although this enhancement could be achieved by further treatment of the virus with trypsin. The VP4 end products of trypsin treatment were a homogeneous VP8 polypeptide comprising VP4 amino acids 1 to 231 and a heterogeneous VP5, which is formed by two polypeptide species (present at a ratio of approximately 1:5) as a result of cleavage at either Arg-241 or Arg-247. A pathway for the trypsin activation of rotavirus infectivity is proposed. PMID:8709201

  3. Indirect activation of the epithelial Na+ channel by trypsin.

    PubMed

    Bengrine, Abderrahmane; Li, Jinqing; Hamm, L Lee; Awayda, Mouhamed S

    2007-09-14

    We tested the hypothesis that the serine protease trypsin can indirectly activate the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC). Experiments were carried out in Xenopus oocytes and examined the effects on the channel formed by all three human ENaC subunits and that formed by Xenopus epsilon and human beta and gamma subunits (epsilonbetagammaENaC). Low levels of trypsin (1-10 ng/ml) were without effects on the oocyte endogenous conductances and were specifically used to test the effects on ENaC. Addition of 1 ng/ml trypsin for 60 min stimulated the amiloride-sensitive human ENaC conductance (g(Na)) by approximately 6-fold. This effect on the g(Na) was [Na(+)]-independent, thereby ruling out an interaction with channel feedback inhibition by Na(+). The indirect nature of this activation was confirmed in cell-attached patch clamp experiments with trypsin added to the outside of the pipette. Trypsin was comparatively ineffective at activating epsilonbetagammaENaC, a channel that exhibited a high spontaneous open probability. These observations, in combination with surface binding experiments, indicated that trypsin indirectly activated membrane-resident channels. Activation by trypsin was also dependent on catalytic activity of this protease but was not accompanied by channel subunit proteolysis. Channel activation was dependent on downstream activation of G-proteins and was blocked by G-protein inhibition by injection of guanyl-5'-yl thiophosphate and by pre-stimulation of phospholipase C. These data indicate a receptor-mediated activation of ENaC by trypsin. This trypsin-activated receptor is distinct from that of protease-activated receptor-2, because the response to trypsin was unaffected by protease-activated receptor-2 overexpression or knockdown. PMID:17627947

  4. Trypsin-induced ATPase Activity in Potato Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, D W; Laties, G G

    1976-04-01

    Potato mitochondria (Solanum tuberosum var. Russet Burbank), which readily phosphorylate ADP in oxidative phosphorylation, show low levels of ATPase activity which is stimulated neither by Mg(2+), 2,4-dinitrophenol, incubation with respiratory substrates, nor disruption by sonication or treatment with Triton X-100, individually or in concert. Treatment of disrupted potato mitochondria with trypsin stimulates Mg(2+)-dependent, oligomycin-sensitive ATPase activity 10- to 15-fold, suggesting the presence of an ATPase inhibitor protein. Trypsin-induced ATPase activity was unaffected by uncoupler. Oligomycin-sensitive ATPase activity decreases as exposure to trypsin is increased. Incubation at alkaline pH or heating at 60 C for 2 minutes also activates ATPase of sonicated potato mitochondria. Disruption of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea), red sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), and carrot (Daucus carota) mitochondria increases ATPase activity, which is further enhanced by treatment with trypsin. The significance of the tight association of the inhibitor protein and ATPase in potato mitochondria is not clear.

  5. Partial purification of plasma thromboplastin antecedent (factor XI) and its activation by trypsin.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Ratnoff, O D; Marshall, J S; Pensky, J

    1973-04-01

    A persistent puzzle in our understanding of hemostasis has been the absence of hemorrhagic symptoms in the majority of patients with Hageman trait, the hereditary deficiency of Hageman factor (factor XII). One proposed hypothesis is that alternative mechanisms exist in blood through which plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA, factor XI) can become active in the absence of Hageman factor. In order to test this hypothesis, the effect of several proteolytic enzymes, among them thrombin, plasma kallikrein, and trypsin, was tested upon unactivated PTA. PTA was prepared from normal human plasma by Ca(3)(PO(4))(2) adsorption, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and successive chromatography on QAE-Sephadex (twice). Sephadex-G150, and SP-Sephadex. The partially purified PTA was almost all in its native form, with a specific activity of 45-70 U/mg protein; the yield was about 10%. It contained no measurable amounts of other known clotting factors, plasmin, plasminogen, nor IgG. Incubation of PTA with trypsin generated potent clot-promoting activity that corrected the abnormally long clotting time of plasma deficient in Hageman factor or PTA but not in Christmas factor. This clot-promoting agent behaved like activated PTA on gel filtration (apparent molecular weight: 185,000) and was specifically inhibited by an antiserum directed against activated PTA. These data suggested that PTA can be converted into its active form by trypsin. PTA was not activated by thrombin, chymotrypsin, papain, ficin, plasmin, plasma kallikrein, tissue thromboplastin, or C. Trypsin converted PTA to its active form enzymatically. Whether trypsin serves to activate PTA in vivo is not yet clear.

  6. Inhibitory activity against plasmin, trypsin, and elastase in rennet whey and in cheese fortified with whey protein.

    PubMed

    Benfeldt, C; Sørensen, J; Petersen, T E

    1998-03-01

    The inhibitory activity against trypsin, elastase, and plasmin was determined in samples of Danbo 45+ that were manufactured from milk pasteurized at 72, 80, and 90 degrees C for 15, 30 and 60 s; the corresponding rennet wheys; and Havarti 45+ manufactured from milk concentrated 1.8-fold, 2.7-fold, and 4.6-fold by ultrafiltration. A sensitive colorimetric assay demonstrated that the incorporation of thermally denatured whey proteins into the cheese curd by pasteurization resulted in a decreased proteinase inhibitory activity against trypsin and elastase in Danbo 45+ and against trypsin, elastase, and plasmin in the corresponding rennet wheys. However, incorporation of native whey proteins into Havarti 45+ by ultrafiltration of the cheese milk resulted in an increased inhibitory activity against trypsin and elastase in the cheeses. Cheese manufactured from milk concentrated 1.8-fold, 2.7-fold, or 4.6-fold displayed trypsin inhibitory activity that was 1.8, 2.9, and 5.1 times, respectively, that of the reference cheese. Similarly, the elastase inhibitory activity in the cheeses increased 2.2, 3.2 and 7.8 times. The increased inhibitory activity in cheese fortified with native whey protein likely contributes to the decreased proteolysis and altered ripening characteristics of the resulting cheeses, and further, the method can be adapted to detection of other inhibitors if sufficiently sensitive substrates are available.

  7. Trypsin causes platelet activation independently of known protease-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingying; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2014-01-01

    To identify a physiological agonist of PAR3, we used PAR4 null murine platelets, which were known to express only PAR3. In this study, we tested several proteases and found that trypsin, but not heat-inactivated trypsin, activated PAR4 null murine platelets. Even at high concentrations, trypsin caused shape change without increasing intracellular calcium levels in PAR4 null murine platelets. Consistent with this result, the Gq inhibitor YM-254890 had no effect on trypsin-induced shape change. However, trypsin-induced platelet shape change was abolished by either p160ROCK inhibitor, Y27632 or H1152. Furthermore, trypsin caused phosphorylation of myosin light chain (Thr18), but not Akt or Erk. Surprisingly, trypsin caused a similar shape change in PAR4-desensitized PAR3 null murine platelets as in PAR4 null murine platelets, indicating that trypsin did not activate PAR3 to cause shape change. More interestingly, the Src family kinase (SFK) inhibitor PP2 abolished trypsin-induced, but not AYPGKF-induced, shape change. Hence, trypsin activated a novel signaling pathway through RhoA/p160ROCK and was regulated by SFKs. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a novel protease signaling pathway in platelets that is independent of PARs. This protease-induced novel signaling pathway regulates platelet shape change through SFKs and p160ROCK. PMID:24030758

  8. A thermostable trypsin inhibitor with antiproliferative activity from small pinto beans.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Zhang, Yanbo; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-08-01

    Small pinto bean is a cultivar of Phaseolus vulgaris. It produces a 16-kDa trypsin inhibitor that could be purified using anion exchange and size chromatography. Q-Sepharose, Mono Q and Superdex 75 columns were employed for the isolation process. Small pinto bean trypsin inhibitor demonstrated moderate pH stability (pH 2-10) and marked heat stability, with its trypsin inhibitory activity largely retained after exposure to 100 °C for half an hour. The activity was abolished in the presence of dithiothreitol, in a dose-dependent manner, implying that disulfide bonds in small pinto bean trypsin inhibitor are crucial for the activity. The trypsin inhibitor showed a blocked N-terminus. The trypsin inhibitor only slightly inhibited the viability of breast cancer MCF7 and hepatoma HepG2 cells at 125 μM. PMID:23859150

  9. Digestive enzyme activity and mRNA level of trypsin in embryonic redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarnatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen; Zhao, Yunlong; Zhou, Zhongliang; An, Chuanguang; Ma, Qiang

    2008-02-01

    The digestive enzyme activity and mRNA level of trypsin during the embryonic development of Cherax quadricarinatus were analyzed using biochemical and Fluorogenic Quantitative PCR (FQ—PCR) methods. The results show that the activities of trypsin and chymotrypsin had two different change patterns. Trypsin specific activity increased rapidly in the early stages of development and still remained high in preparation for the hatch stage. However, chymotrypsin activity peaked in stage 4 of embryonic development and decreased significantly in the last stage. The mRNA level of trypsin was elevated in all stages and two peak values were observed in stages 2 and 5 respectively. The results indicate that trypsin is very important for the utilization of the yolk during embryonic development and for the assimilation of dietary protein for larvae. The gene of trypsin is probably regulated at transcriptional level. The mRNA levels of trypsin can reflect not only trypsin activity, but also the regulatory mechanism for expression of trypsin gene to a certain degree.

  10. Effects of bisphenol S on the structures and activities of trypsin and pepsin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei

    2014-11-19

    The effects of bisphenol S on the structures and activities of trypsin and pepsin were investigated by various methods like UV-visible absorbance, fluorescence, circular dichroism, and molecular docking. The secondary and tertiary structures of trypsin and pepsin were altered by bisphenol S binding, which resulted in the loosening of the skeletons of trypsin and pepsin. In addition, bisphenol S induced microenvironmental changes around tyrosine and tryptophan residues of trypsin and pepsin. The activity experimental results showed that the activity of pepsin decreases obviously with the increasing concentration of BPS, while the activity of trypsin does not change remarkably. The binding and thermodynamic parameters obtained by molecular docking and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the bindings of bisphenol S to trypsin and pepsin were spontaneous processes and hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions played a vital role in stabilizing the bisphenol S-trypsin and bisphenol S-pepsin complexes. The binding constants (K(A)) of bisphenol S with trypsin were 7.42 × 10(4) (298 K) and 5.91 × 10(4) L/mol (310 K), and those of pepsin were 5.78 × 10(4) (298 K) and 4.44 × 10(4) L/mol (310 K). Moreover, there was one main kind of binding site for bisphenol S on trypsin or pepsin.

  11. [Effect of the Hydrogel Carrier Structure on the Activity of Immobilized Trypsin].

    PubMed

    Valuev, L I; Valuev, I L; Vanchugova, L V; Valueva, T A

    2015-01-01

    The dependence of the activity of trypsin immobilized in polyacrylamide hydrogel on the hydrogel swelling ratio, the size distribution of its pores, and the means of enzyme binding has been studied. It has been shown that the most favorable conditions for immobilized trypsin are provided upon its binding to hydrogel via trypsin macromonomer copolymerization with acrylamide and a linking agent in the presence of a modifier that limits polymer chain growth. PMID:26596090

  12. Enzymatic synthesis of hyaluronan hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kakizaki, Ikuko; Takahashi, Ryoki; Yanagisawa, Miho; Yoshida, Futaba; Takagaki, Keiichi

    2015-09-01

    Human urinary trypsin inhibitor is a proteoglycan that has a single low-sulfated chondroitin 4-sulfate chain at the seryl residue in position 10 of the core protein as a glycosaminoglycan moiety, and is used as an anti-inflammatory medicine based on the protease inhibitory activity of the core protein. However, the functions of the glycosaminoglycan moiety have not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, the glycosaminoglycan chains of a native urinary trypsin inhibitor were remodeled to hyaluronan chains, with no changes to the core protein, using transglycosylation as a reverse reaction of the hydrolysis of bovine testicular hyaluronidase, and the properties of the hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitor were then analyzed. The trypsin inhibitory activitiy of the hyaluronan hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitor was similar to that of the native type; however, its inhibitory effect on the hydrolysis of hyaluronidase were not as strong as that of the native type. This result demonstrated that the native urinary trypsin inhibitor possessed hyaluronidase inhibitory activity on its chondroitin sulfate chain. The hyaluronan hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitors obtained affinity to a hyaluronan-binding protein not exhibited by the native type. The interactions between the hyaluronan hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitors and phosphatidylcholine (abundant in the outer layer of plasma membrane) were stronger than that of the native type. Hyaluronan hybrid urinary trypsin inhibitors may be useful for investigating the functions of the glycosaminoglycan chains of urinary trypsin inhibitors and hyaluronan, and our hybrid synthesizing method may be used widely in research for future medical applications.

  13. The novel trypsin Y from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) - isolation, purification and characterisation.

    PubMed

    Pálsdóttir, Helga Margrét; Gudmundsdóttir, Ágústa

    2008-11-15

    This report describes the isolation and partial characterization of the novel group III trypsin Y from the pyloric caeca of Atlantic cod. Other Atlantic cod trypsins have been used as food processing aids with good results. Trypsin Y was purified by p-aminobenzamidine affinity chromatography and characterized by SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis, as well as by activity measurements towards synthetic substrates. Identification of trypsin Y was done with polyclonal antibodies raised towards the recombinant form of the enzyme and by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Trypsin Y is the only group III trypsin isolated from its native source and characterized by biochemical methods. In accordance with the r-trypsin Y, the native enzyme shows dual substrate specificity, i.e. towards trypsin and chymotrypsin specific substrates. This, along with the high cold-adapted character of trypsin Y, may be valuable for its use as a processing aid for sensitive products such as seafood. PMID:26047443

  14. Effect of Moringa oleifera flower extract on larval trypsin and acetylcholinesterase activities in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Dias de Assis, Caio Rodrigo; de Souza Bezerra, Ranilson; Xavier, Haroudo Satiro; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2012-03-01

    Aedes aegypti control is crucial to reducing dengue fever. Aedes aegypti larvae have developed resistance to organophosporous insecticides and the use of natural larvicides may help manage larval resistance by increasing elements in insecticide rotation programs. Here, we report on larvicidal activity of Moringa oleifera flower extract against A. aegypti L(1), L(2), L(3), and L(4) as well as the effect of flower extract on gut trypsin and whole-larval acetylcholinesterase from L(4.) In addition, the heated flower extract was investigated for larvicidal activity against L(4) and effect on larval gut trypsin. Moringa oleifera flower extract contains a proteinaceous trypsin inhibitor (M. oleifera flower trypsin inhibitor, MoFTI), triterpene (β-amyrin), sterol (β-sitosterol) as well as flavonoids (kaempferol and quercetin). Larvicidal activity was detected against L(2), L(3), and L(4) (LC(50) of 1.72%, 1.67%, and 0.92%, respectively). Flower extract inhibited L(4) gut trypsin (MoFTI K(i) = 0.6 nM) and did not affect acetylcholinesterase activity. In vivo assay showed that gut trypsin activity from L(4) treated with M. oleifera flower extract decreased over time (0-1,440 min) and was strongly inhibited (98.6%) after 310 min incubation; acetylcholinesterase activity was not affected. Thermal treatment resulted in a loss of trypsin inhibitor and larvicidal activities, supporting the hypothesis that flower extract contains a proteinaceous trypsin inhibitor that may be responsible for the deleterious effects on larval mortality. PMID:22392801

  15. Investigation of trypsin-CdSe quantum dot interactions via spectroscopic methods and effects on enzymatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gurvir; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the interactions between trypsin and water soluble cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots investigated by spectrophotometric methods. CdSe quantum dots have strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin by a static quenching mechanism. The quenching has been studied at three different temperatures where the results revealed that electrostatic interactions exist between CdSe quantum dots and trypsin and are responsible to stabilize the complex. The Scatchard plot from quenching revealed 1 binding site for quantum dots by trypsin, the same has been confirmed by making isothermal titrations of quantum dots against trypsin. The distance between donor and acceptor for trypsin-CdSe quantum dot complexes is calculated to be 2.8 nm by energy transfer mechanisms. The intrinsic fluorescence of CdSe quantum dots has also been enhanced by the trypsin, and is linear for concentration of trypsin ranging 1-80 μl. All the observations evidence the formation of trypsin-CdSe quantum dot conjugates, where trypsin retains the enzymatic activity which in turn is temperature and pH dependent.

  16. A trypsin inhibitor from Sapindus saponaria L. seeds: purification, characterization, and activity towards pest insect digestive enzyme.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Diz Filho, Eduardo B S; Freire, Mariadas Graças M; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sumikawa, Joana T; Toyama, Marcos H; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes the purification, characterization and determination of the partial primary structure of the first trypsin inhibitor isolated from the family Sapindaceae. A highly stable, potent trypsin inhibitor (SSTI) was purified to homogeneity. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the protein consists of a two-polypeptide chain with molecular masses of approximately 15 and 3 kDa. The purified inhibitor inhibited bovine trypsin at a 1:1 M ratio. Kinetic analysis revealed that the protein is a competitive inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 10⁻⁹ M for trypsin. The partial NH₂- terminal sequence of 36 amino acids in SSTI indicates homology with other members of the trypsin-inhibitor family from different sources. This inhibitor is highly stable in the presence of denaturing agents. SSTI showed significant inhibitory activity against trypsin-like proteases present in the larval midgut on Anagasta kuehniella, Corcyra cephalonica, Diatreae saccharalis and Anticarsia gemmatalis.

  17. Engineering Protein Allostery: 1.05 Å Resolution Structure and Enzymatic Properties of a Na[superscript +]-activated Trypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Michael J.; Carrell, Christopher J.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2008-05-28

    Some trypsin-like proteases are endowed with Na{sup +}-dependent allosteric enhancement of catalytic activity, but this important mechanism has been difficult to engineer in other members of the family. Replacement of 19 amino acids in Streptomyces griseus trypsin targeting the active site and the Na{sup +}-binding site were found necessary to generate efficient Na{sup +} activation. Remarkably, this property was linked to the acquisition of a new substrate selectivity profile similar to that of factor Xa, a Na{sup -} activated protease involved in blood coagulation. The X-ray crystal structure of the mutant trypsin solved to 1.05 {angstrom} resolution defines the engineered Na{sup +} site and active site loops in unprecedented detail. The results demonstrate that trypsin can be engineered into an efficient allosteric protease, and that Na+ activation is interwoven with substrate selectivity in the trypsin scaffold.

  18. Improved Production of Active Streptomyces griseus Trypsin with a Novel Auto-Catalyzed Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Ling, Zhenmin; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Kang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    N-terminal sequences play crucial roles in regulating expression, translation, activation and enzymatic properties of proteins. To reduce cell toxicity of intracellular trypsin and increase secretory expression, we developed a novel auto-catalyzed strategy to produce recombinant trypsin by engineering the N-terminus of mature Streptomyces griseus trypsin (SGT). The engineered N-terminal peptide of SGT was composed of the thioredoxin, glycine-serine linker, His6-tag and the partial bovine trypsinogen pro-peptide (DDDDK). Furthermore, we constructed a variant TLEI with insertion of the artificial peptide at N-terminus and site-directed mutagenesis of the autolysis residue R145. In fed-batch fermentation, the production of extracellular trypsin activity was significantly improved to 47.4 ± 1.2 U·ml−1 (amidase activity, 8532 ± 142.2 U·ml−1 BAEE activity) with a productivity of 0.49 U·ml−1·h−1, which was 329% greater than that of parent strain Pichia pastoris GS115-SGT. This work has significant potential to be scaled-up for microbial production of SGT. In addition, the N-terminal peptide engineering strategy can be extended to improve heterologous expression of other toxic enzymes. PMID:26983398

  19. A Trypsin Inhibitor from Clitoria fairchildiana Cotyledons is Active Against Digestive Enzymes of Aedes aegypti Larvae.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lucilene O; Fernandes, Kátia V S; Pádua, Dayanni de Souza; Carvalho, André de O; Lemos, Francisco J A; Gomes, Valdirene M; Oliveira, Antônia E A; Ferreira, André T da Silva; Perales, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, the principal mosquito vector of yellow fever, dengue fever and chikungunya fever virus-transmitted diseases, is an insect closely associated with humans and their housing habitats. As there is no commercially available vaccine, prevention is the most suggested form of avoiding disease spreading and a number of studies are being developed in order to give support to vector control operations. The present study reports on the identification of a trypsin inhibitor isolated from cotyledons of the Clitoria fairchildiana amazonic tree seeds, which was able to reduce by 87.93 % the activity of digestive enzymes of fourth instar A. aegypti larva. A partial amino acid sequence showed strong similarity with sequences from several trypsin inhibitors already reported in the literature. The 13,000 Da isolated inhibitor was seen to be active solely against trypsin-like enzymes, neither acting on papain, α-amylase nor on other serine proteases, such as elastase, chymotrypsin or subtilisin. At least six from seven active digestive proteases from A. aegypti larvae, visualized by zymography, were severely affected soon after exposed to the inhibitor. The strong and specific action of the isolated inhibitor against trypsin digestive enzymes of this insect vector led us to believe that this protein may be a good candidate for a prospective alternative biocontrol method. PMID:26156641

  20. Effect of ace inhibitors and TMOF on growth, development, and trypsin activity of larval Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lemeire, Els; Borovsky, Dov; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase capable of cleaving dipeptide or dipeptideamide moieties at the C-terminal end of peptides. ACE is present in the hemolymph and reproductive tissues of insects. The presence of ACE in the hemolymph and its broad substrate specificity suggests an important role in processing of bioactive peptides. This study reports the effects of ACE inhibitors on larval growth in the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis. Feeding ACE inhibitors ad lib decreased the growth rate, inhibited ACE activity in the larval hemolymph, and down-regulated trypsin activity in the larval gut. These results indicate that S. littoralis ACE may influence trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut by interacting with a trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). Injecting third instar larvae with a combination of Aea-TMOF and the ACE inhibitor captopril, down-regulated trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut indicating that an Aea-TMOF gut receptor analogue could be present. Injecting captopril and enalapril into newly molted fifth instar larvae stopped larval feeding and decreased weight gain. Together, these results indicate that ACE inhibitors are efficacious in stunting larval growth and ACE plays an important role in larval growth and development. PMID:18949805

  1. Proteolytic Activation of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Coronavirus Spike Fusion Protein by Trypsin in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J.; Wubbolts, Richard W.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Rottier, Peter J. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infection by investigating the spike protein of a PEDV isolate (wtPEDV) using a reverse genetics system based on the trypsin-independent cell culture-adapted strain DR13 (caPEDV). We demonstrate that trypsin acts on the wtPEDV spike protein after receptor binding. We mapped the genetic determinant for trypsin-dependent cell entry to the N-terminal region of the fusion subunit of this class I fusion protein, revealing a conserved arginine just upstream of the putative fusion peptide as the potential cleavage site. Whereas coronaviruses are typically processed by endogenous proteases of the producer or target cell, PEDV S protein activation strictly required supplementation of a protease, enabling us to study mechanistic details of proteolytic processing. IMPORTANCE Recurring PEDV epidemics constitute a serious animal health threat and an economic burden, particularly in Asia but, as of recently, also on the North-American subcontinent. Understanding the biology of PEDV is critical for combatting the infection. Here, we provide new insight into the protease-dependent cell entry of PEDV. PMID:24807723

  2. Proteolytic activation of the porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus spike fusion protein by trypsin in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J; Wubbolts, Richard W; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2014-07-01

    Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infection by investigating the spike protein of a PEDV isolate (wtPEDV) using a reverse genetics system based on the trypsin-independent cell culture-adapted strain DR13 (caPEDV). We demonstrate that trypsin acts on the wtPEDV spike protein after receptor binding. We mapped the genetic determinant for trypsin-dependent cell entry to the N-terminal region of the fusion subunit of this class I fusion protein, revealing a conserved arginine just upstream of the putative fusion peptide as the potential cleavage site. Whereas coronaviruses are typically processed by endogenous proteases of the producer or target cell, PEDV S protein activation strictly required supplementation of a protease, enabling us to study mechanistic details of proteolytic processing. Importance: Recurring PEDV epidemics constitute a serious animal health threat and an economic burden, particularly in Asia but, as of recently, also on the North-American subcontinent. Understanding the biology of PEDV is critical for combatting the infection. Here, we provide new insight into the protease-dependent cell entry of PEDV. PMID:24807723

  3. Purification and characteristics of trypsin from masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou) cultured in fresh-water.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Gaku; Yamaguchi, Takahito; Kishimura, Hideki; Yamaha, Etsurou; Saeki, Hiroki

    2010-09-01

    Trypsin from the pyloric ceca of masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou) cultured in fresh water was purified by a series of chromatographies including Sephacryl S-200, Sephadex G-50 and diethylaminoethyl cellulose to obtain a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and native PAGE. The molecular mass of the purified trypsin was estimated to be approximately 24,000 Da by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and N ( alpha )-p-tosyl-L: -lysine chloromethyl ketone. Masu salmon trypsin was stabilized by calcium ion. The optimum pH of the masu salmon trypsin was around pH 8.5, and the trypsin was unstable below pH 5.0. The optimum temperature of the masu salmon trypsin was around 60 degrees C, and the trypsin was stable below 50 degrees C, like temperate-zone and tropical-zone fish trypsins. The N-terminal 20 amino acid sequence of the masu salmon trypsin was IVGGYECKAYSQPHQVSLNS, and its charged amino acid content was lower than those of trypsins from frigid-zone fish and similar to those of trypsins from temperate-zone and tropical-zone fish. In the phylogenetic tree, the masu salmon trypsin was classified into the group of the temperate-zone fish trypsin.

  4. The effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin on the bactericidal activity and specific antibody activity of bovine colostrum.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, J H; Arzabe, R; Piñeiro, A; Olivito, A M

    1977-01-01

    Digestion of bovine colostral whey with trypsin or chymotrypsin caused a progressive loss of the complement-mediated bactericidal activity of naturally-occurring colostral antibodies of E. coli 0111. Bactericidal activity was associated primarily with IgG1 immunoglobulin and to a lesser extent with IgM. Chymotrypsin preferentially attacked IgM, destroying its antibacterial activity and producing an apparent decrease in its mol wt. Trypsin preferentially attacked IgG1, but loss of antibacterial activity was in this case not accompanied by a decrease in molecular weight. Using colostral whey with antiperoxidase activity it was shown that the kinetics of loss of specific antibody activity were similar to those of loss of bactericidal activity. It is therefore suggested that trypsin may cause a loss of specific antibody activity of colostral IgG1 without cleaving the immunoglobulin molecule. PMID:321342

  5. Proteolytic and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity in Germinating Jojoba Seeds (Simmondsia chinensis).

    PubMed

    Samac, D; Storey, R

    1981-12-01

    Changes in proteolytic activity (aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, endopeptidase) were followed during germination (imbibition through seedling development) in extracts from cotyledons of jojoba seeds (Simmondsia chinensis). After imbibition, the cotyledons contained high levels of sulfhydryl aminopeptidase activity (APA) but low levels of serine carboxypeptidase activity (CPA). CPA increased with germination through the apparent loss of a CPA inhibitor substance in the seed. Curves showing changes in endopeptidase activity (EPA) assayed at pH 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 during germination were distinctly different. EPA at pH 4, 5, 6, and 7 showed characteristics of sulfhydryl enzymes while activity at pH 8 was probably due to a serine type enzyme. EPA at pH 6 was inhibited early in germination by one or more substances in the seed. Activities at pH 5 and later at pH 6 were the highest of all EPA throughout germination and increases in these activities were associated with a rapid loss of protein from the cotyledons of the developing seedling.Jojoba cotyledonary extracts were found to inhibit the enzymic activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and pepsin but not the protease from Aspergillus saotoi. The heat-labile trypsin inhibitor substance(s) was found in commercially processed jojoba seed meal and the albumin fraction of seed proteins. Trypsin inhibitor activity decreased with germination.

  6. Continuous method to determine the trypsin inhibitor activity in soybean flour.

    PubMed

    Coscueta, Ezequiel R; Pintado, Manuela E; Picó, Guillermo A; Knobel, Gastón; Boschetti, Carlos E; Malpiedi, Luciana Pellegrini; Nerli, Bibiana B

    2017-01-01

    The determination of trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity is of importance to evaluate the nutritional value of soybean flours. An analytical method, which involves a continuous spectrophotometric rate determination for trypsin activity against the substrate N-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide, is proposed as an alternative to the standard discontinuous assay. Stopping the reaction with acetic acid and a centrifugation/filtration step to decrease turbidity are not required, thus reducing costs and sample preparation time. The TI activity of different flour samples, determined by both assays, demonstrated to be statistically comparable, irrespective of the TI concentration level. The coefficients of variation of the novel method did not exceed 8% at any concentration level. The curves of progress reaction showed a non-linear behavior in samples without TI. A reduction of incubation time from 10min to 2min increased the method sensitivity and extended its linear range. A more economical, faster and simpler assay was developed. PMID:27507460

  7. Continuous method to determine the trypsin inhibitor activity in soybean flour.

    PubMed

    Coscueta, Ezequiel R; Pintado, Manuela E; Picó, Guillermo A; Knobel, Gastón; Boschetti, Carlos E; Malpiedi, Luciana Pellegrini; Nerli, Bibiana B

    2017-01-01

    The determination of trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity is of importance to evaluate the nutritional value of soybean flours. An analytical method, which involves a continuous spectrophotometric rate determination for trypsin activity against the substrate N-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide, is proposed as an alternative to the standard discontinuous assay. Stopping the reaction with acetic acid and a centrifugation/filtration step to decrease turbidity are not required, thus reducing costs and sample preparation time. The TI activity of different flour samples, determined by both assays, demonstrated to be statistically comparable, irrespective of the TI concentration level. The coefficients of variation of the novel method did not exceed 8% at any concentration level. The curves of progress reaction showed a non-linear behavior in samples without TI. A reduction of incubation time from 10min to 2min increased the method sensitivity and extended its linear range. A more economical, faster and simpler assay was developed.

  8. Effect of High Pressure on the Porcine Placenral Hydrolyzing Activity of Pepsin, Trypsin and Chymotrypsin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of protease treatments (trypsin, chymotrypsin, and pepsin) under various pressure levels (0.1-300 MPa) for the characteristics of porcine placenta hydrolysates. According to gel electrophoretic patterns, the trypsin showed the best placental hydrolyzing activity followed by chymotrypsin, regardless of the pressure levels. In particular, the peptide bands of tryptic-digested hydrolysate were not shown regardless of applied pressure levels. The peptide bands of hydrolysate treated chymotrypsin showed gradual decreases in molecular weights (Mw) with increasing pressure levels. However, the pepsin did not show any evidences of placental hydrolysis even though the pressure levels were increased to 300 MPa. The gel permeation chromatography (GPC) profiles showed that the trypsin and pepsin had better placental hydrolyzing activities under high pressure (particularly at 200 MPa), with lower Mw distributions of the hydrolysates. Pepsin also tend to lower the Mw of peptides, while the major bands of hydrolysates being treated at 300 MPa were observed at more than 7,000 Da. There were some differences in amino acid compositions of the hydrolysates, nevertheless, the peptides were mainly composed of glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala), hydroxyproline (Hyp) and proline (Pro). Consequently, the results indicate that high pressure could enhance the placental hydrolyzing activities of the selected proteases and the optimum pressure levels at which the maximum protease activity is around 200 MPa. PMID:26760740

  9. The Trypsin Inhibitor Panulirin Regulates the Prophenoloxidase-activating System in the Spiny Lobster Panulirus argus

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Corzo, Gerardo; Besada, Vladimir; Vega-Hurtado, Yamile; González-González, Yamile; Perera, Erick; Porto-Verdecia, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    The melanization reaction promoted by the prophenoloxidase-activating system is an essential defense response in invertebrates subjected to regulatory mechanisms that are still not fully understood. We report here the finding and characterization of a novel trypsin inhibitor, named panulirin, isolated from the hemocytes of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus with regulatory functions on the melanization cascade. Panulirin is a cationic peptide (pI 9.5) composed of 48 amino acid residues (5.3 kDa), with six cysteine residues forming disulfide bridges. Its primary sequence was determined by combining Edman degradation/N-terminal sequencing and electrospray ionization-MS/MS spectrometry. The low amino acid sequence similarity with known proteins indicates that it represents a new family of peptidase inhibitors. Panulirin is a competitive and reversible tight-binding inhibitor of trypsin (Ki = 8.6 nm) with a notable specificity because it does not inhibit serine peptidases such as subtilisin, elastase, chymotrypsin, thrombin, and plasmin. The removal of panulirin from the lobster hemocyte lysate leads to an increase in phenoloxidase response to LPS. Likewise, the addition of increasing concentrations of panulirin to a lobster hemocyte lysate, previously depleted of trypsin-inhibitory activity, decreased the phenoloxidase response to LPS in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results indicate that panulirin is implicated in the regulation of the melanization cascade in P. argus by inhibiting peptidase(s) in the pathway toward the activation of the prophenoloxidase enzyme. PMID:24047891

  10. The trypsin inhibitor panulirin regulates the prophenoloxidase-activating system in the spiny lobster Panulirus argus.

    PubMed

    Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Corzo, Gerardo; Besada, Vladimir; Vega-Hurtado, Yamile; González-González, Yamile; Perera, Erick; Porto-Verdecia, Marlene

    2013-11-01

    The melanization reaction promoted by the prophenoloxidase-activating system is an essential defense response in invertebrates subjected to regulatory mechanisms that are still not fully understood. We report here the finding and characterization of a novel trypsin inhibitor, named panulirin, isolated from the hemocytes of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus with regulatory functions on the melanization cascade. Panulirin is a cationic peptide (pI 9.5) composed of 48 amino acid residues (5.3 kDa), with six cysteine residues forming disulfide bridges. Its primary sequence was determined by combining Edman degradation/N-terminal sequencing and electrospray ionization-MS/MS spectrometry. The low amino acid sequence similarity with known proteins indicates that it represents a new family of peptidase inhibitors. Panulirin is a competitive and reversible tight-binding inhibitor of trypsin (Ki = 8.6 nm) with a notable specificity because it does not inhibit serine peptidases such as subtilisin, elastase, chymotrypsin, thrombin, and plasmin. The removal of panulirin from the lobster hemocyte lysate leads to an increase in phenoloxidase response to LPS. Likewise, the addition of increasing concentrations of panulirin to a lobster hemocyte lysate, previously depleted of trypsin-inhibitory activity, decreased the phenoloxidase response to LPS in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results indicate that panulirin is implicated in the regulation of the melanization cascade in P. argus by inhibiting peptidase(s) in the pathway toward the activation of the prophenoloxidase enzyme.

  11. Effects of trypsin, thrombin and proteinase-activated receptors on guinea pig common bile duct motility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Che

    2012-11-10

    Trypsin and thrombin activate proteinase-activated receptors (PARs), which modulate gastrointestinal motility. The common bile duct is exposed to many proteinases that can activate PARs, especially during infection and stone obstruction. We investigated PAR effects on common bile duct motility in vitro. Contraction and relaxation of isolated guinea pig common bile duct strips caused by PAR(1), PAR(2) and PAR(4) agonists were measured using isometric transducers. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the expression of PAR(1) and PAR(2). Thrombin and two PAR(1) peptide agonists, TFLLR-NH(2) and SFLLRN-NH(2), evoked moderate relaxation of the carbachol-contracted common bile duct in a concentration-dependent manner. Trypsin and three PAR(2) peptide agonists, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH(2), SLIGKV-NH(2) and SLIGRL-NH(2), generated moderate to marked relaxation as well. The existence of PAR(1) and PAR(2) mRNA in the common bile duct was identified by RT-PCR. Moreover, two PAR(4)-selective agonists, AYPGKF-NH(2) and GYPGQV-NH(2), produced relaxation of the common bile duct. In contrast, all PAR(1), PAR(2) and PAR(4) inactive control peptides did not elicit relaxation. This indicates that PAR(1), PAR(2) and PAR(4) mediate common bile duct relaxation. The thrombin, TFLLR-NH(2), trypsin, and AYPGKF-NH(2)-induced responses were not affected by tetrodotoxin, implying that the PAR effects are not neurally mediated. Our findings provide the first evidence that PAR(1) and PAR(2) mediate whereas agonists of PAR(4) elicit relaxation of the guinea pig common bile duct. Trypsin and thrombin relax the common bile duct. PARs may play an important role in the control of common bile duct motility. PMID:22960409

  12. Trypsins from yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacores) spleen: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Klomklao, Sappasith; Benjakul, Soottawat; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Kishimura, Hideki; Simpson, Benjamin K; Saeki, Hiroki

    2006-05-01

    Two anionic trypsins (A and B) were purified to homogeneity from yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacores) spleen by a series of column chromatographies including Sephacryl S-200, Sephadex G-50 and DEAE-cellulose. Purity was increased to 70.6- and 91.5-fold with approximately 2.8% and 15.6% yield for trypsin A and B, respectively. The apparent molecular weight of both trypsins was estimated to be 24 kDa by size exclusion chromatography and SDS-PAGE. Both trypsin A and B appeared as a single band on native-PAGE. Trypsin A and B exhibited the maximal activity at 55 and 65 degrees C, respectively, and had the same optimal pH at 8.5 using TAME as a substrate. Both trypsins were stable to heat treatment up to 50 degrees C and in the pH range of 6.0 to 11.0. Both trypsin A and B were stabilized by calcium ion. The activities were inhibited effectively by soybean trypsin inhibitor, TLCK and partially inhibited by EDTA, but were not inhibited by E-64, N-ethylmaleimide, iodoacetic acid, TPCK and pepstatin A. Activity of both trypsins continuously decreased with increasing NaCl concentration (0-30%). Apparent Km and Kcat of trypsin A and B for TAME were 0.2-0.33 mM and 66.7-80 S(-1), respectively. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of trypsin A, IVGGYECQAHSQPHQVSLNA, and trypsin B, IVGGYECQAHSQPPQVSLNA, indicated the high homology between both enzymes. PMID:16500127

  13. A theoretical study of the active sites of papain and S195C rat trypsin: implications for the low reactivity of mutant serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    The serine and cysteine proteinases represent two important classes of enzymes that use a catalytic triad to hydrolyze peptides and esters. The active site of the serine proteinases consists of three key residues, Asp...His...Ser. The hydroxyl group of serine functions as a nucleophile and the imidazole ring of histidine functions as a general acid/general base during catalysis. Similarly, the active site of the cysteine proteinases also involves three key residues: Asn, His, and Cys. The active site of the cysteine proteinases is generally believed to exist as a zwitterion (Asn...His+...Cys-) with the thiolate anion of the cysteine functioning as a nucleophile during the initial stages of catalysis. Curiously, the mutant serine proteinases, thiol subtilisin and thiol trypsin, which have the hybrid Asp...His...Cys triad, are almost catalytically inert. In this study, ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations have been performed on the active sites of papain and the mutant serine proteinase S195C rat trypsin. These calculations predict that the active site of papain exists predominately as a zwitterion (Cys-...His+...Asn). However, similar calculations on S195C rat trypsin demonstrate that the thiol mutant is unable to form a reactive thiolate anion prior to catalysis. Furthermore, structural comparisons between native papain and S195C rat trypsin have demonstrated that the spatial juxtapositions of the triad residues have been inverted in the serine and cysteine proteinases and, on this basis, I argue that it is impossible to convert a serine proteinase to a cysteine proteinase by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:8819168

  14. Screening and purification of a novel trypsin inhibitor from Prosopis juliflora seeds with activity toward pest digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, S; Franco, O L; Tagliari, P D; Bloch, C; Mohan, M; Thayumanavan, B

    2005-08-01

    Several pests are capable of decreasing crop production causing severe economical and social losses. Aiming to find novel molecules that could impede the digestion process of different pests, a screening of alpha-amylase and trypsin-like proteinase inhibitors was carried out in Prosopis juliflora, showing the presence of both in dry seeds. Furthermore, a novel trypsin inhibitor, with molecular mass of 13,292 Da, was purified showing remarkable in vitro activity against T. castaneum and C. maculatus.

  15. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for organophosphates binding to trypsin and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Ruark, Christopher D; Hack, C Eric; Robinson, Peter J; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) nerve agents such as sarin, soman, tabun, and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino) ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) do not react solely with acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Evidence suggests that cholinergic-independent pathways over a wide range are also targeted, including serine proteases. These proteases comprise nearly one-third of all known proteases and play major roles in synaptic plasticity, learning, memory, neuroprotection, wound healing, cell signaling, inflammation, blood coagulation, and protein processing. Inhibition of these proteases by OP was found to exert a wide range of noncholinergic effects depending on the type of OP, the dose, and the duration of exposure. Consequently, in order to understand these differences, in silico biologically based dose-response and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methodologies need to be integrated. Here, QSAR were used to predict OP bimolecular rate constants for trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. A heuristic regression of over 500 topological/constitutional, geometric, thermodynamic, electrostatic, and quantum mechanical descriptors, using the software Ampac 8.0 and Codessa 2.51 (SemiChem, Inc., Shawnee, KS), was developed to obtain statistically verified equations for the models. General models, using all data subsets, resulted in R(2) values of .94 and .92 and leave-one-out Q(2) values of 0.9 and 0.87 for trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. To validate the general model, training sets were split into independent subsets for test set evaluation. A y-randomization procedure, used to estimate chance correlation, was performed 10,000 times, resulting in mean R(2) values of .24 and .3 for trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. The results show that these models are highly predictive and capable of delineating the complex mechanism of action between OP and serine proteases, and ultimately, by applying this approach to other OP enzyme reactions such as AChE, facilitate the development of biologically based

  16. Vegetative Storage Protein in Litchi chinensis, a Subtropical Evergreen Fruit Tree, Possesses Trypsin Inhibitor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wei-Min; Peng, Shi-Qing; Wang, Xu-Chu; Shi, Min-Jing; Chen, Yue-Yi; Hu, Zheng-Hai

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Vegetative storage proteins (VSPs) are commonly bioactive in herbaceous plants but few VSPs with bioactivity have been identified in trees. In addition, information on the characterization of VSPs in evergreen trees is limited. The objective of this study was to characterize the VSPs with bioactivity in evergreen trees. Methods The VSP in lychee (Litchi chinensis), an evergreen fruit tree, was characterized by a combination of cytological, biochemical and molecular biological techniques. Key Results The VSP in lychee was a 22-kDa protein. It accumulated in the large central vacuoles of protein-storing cells (PSCs) in two distinguishable forms, granular and floccular. The PSCs were of a novel type. The 22-kDa protein is distributed in mature leaves, bark tissues of branches, trunk and large roots, paralleling the distribution of PSCs. Its homologues were present in mature seed. During young shoot development and fruiting, the 22-kDa protein decreased apparently, suggesting a nitrogen-storage function. The 22-kDa protein had several isoforms encoded by a small multigene family. One gene member, LcVSP1, was cloned. The LcVSP1 had no intron and contained a 675 bp open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 225 amino acids. LcVSP1 was homologous to Kunitz trypsin inhibitors. The 22-kDa protein inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin, but had no inhibitory effect on subtilisin. Conclusions Lychee is rich in a 22-kDa VSP with trypsin inhibitor activity. The VSP plays an important role in nitrogen storage while its possible defensive function remains to be elucidated. PMID:17913726

  17. The Appearance of New Active Forms of Trypsin Inhibitor in Germinating Mung Bean (Vigna radiata) Seeds.

    PubMed

    Lorensen, E; Prevosto, R; Wilson, K A

    1981-07-01

    Ungerminated seeds of mung bean contain a single major species (F) of trypsin inhibitor with five minor species (A-E) separable on diethylaminoethyl-cellulose. During germination the level of trypsin inhibitory activity decreases from 1.8 units/grams dry weight in ungerminated cotyledons to 1.2 units/grams in cotyledons from seeds germinated 5 days. This decrease is accompanied by major changes in the distribution of inhibitory activity among the inhibitor species. By 48 hours of germination, inhibitor F has largely disappeared with an accompanying rapid increase in inhibitor C. Similarly, though less rapidly, inhibitor E decreases while inhibitor A increases. A similar sequence of changes is found in vitro when purified inhibitor F is incubated with extracts from seeds germinated 96 hours. The combined in vivo and in vitro data suggest a conversion sequence of: F --> E --> C --> A. The in vitro conversion is inhibited by phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride but not by iodoacetamide, indicating that at least the initial phases of inhibitor conversion are not catalyzed by the mung bean vicilin peptidohydrolase.

  18. Kinetic roles and conformational properties of the non-native two-disulphide intermediates in the refolding of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Darby, N J; van Mierlo, C P; Scott, G H; Neuhaus, D; Creighton, T E

    1992-04-20

    The most productive folding pathway of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) proceeds through the disulphide intermediates (30-51), (30-51, 5-14), and (30-51, 5-38); these are important kinetic intermediates in folding, even though the latter pair contain non-native disulphide bonds. Analogues of these intermediates have been prepared by protein engineering methods and their conformational properties examined by circular dichroism and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance. The (30-51), (30-51, 5-14) and (30-51, 5-38) analogues exhibit comparable degrees of stable structure, which cannot include those portions of the polypeptide chain involving Cys5, Cys14 and Cys38. These properties are consistent with the roles of (30-51, 5-14) and (30-51, 5-38) in the folding pathway of BPTI, which demand that they exhibit a considerable degree of conformational flexibility in part of the molecule. PMID:1373775

  19. Trypsin-Sensitive, Rapid Inactivation of a Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaro, Christopher R.; Lingle, Christopher J.

    1992-09-01

    Most calcium-activated potassium channels couple changes in intracellular calcium to membrane excitability by conducting a current with a probability that depends directly on submembrane calcium concentration. In rat adrenal chromaffin cells, however, a large conductance, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) undergoes rapid inactivation, suggesting that this channel has a physiological role different than that of other BK channels. The inactivation of the BK channel, like that of the voltage-gated Shaker B potassium channel, is removed by trypsin digestion and channels are blocked by the Shaker B amino-terminal inactivating domain. Thus, this BK channel shares functional and possibly structural homologies with other inactivating voltage-gated potassium channels.

  20. Trypsin pre-treatment corrects SRID over-estimation of immunologically active, pre-fusion HA caused by mixed immunoprecipitin rings.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yingxia; Palladino, Giuseppe; Xie, Yuhong; Ferrari, Annette; Ma, Xiuwen; Han, Liqun; Dormitzer, Philip R; Settembre, Ethan C

    2016-06-17

    Influenza vaccines are the primary intervention to prevent the substantial health burden of seasonal and pandemic influenza. Subunit and split influenza vaccines are formulated, released for clinical use, and tested for stability based on their content of immunologically active (capable of eliciting functional antibodies) hemagglutinin (HA). Single-radial immunodiffusion (SRID), the standard in vitro potency assay in the field, is believed to specifically detect immunologically active HA. We confirmed that, with conformationally homogeneous HA preparations, SRID specifically detected native, pre-fusion HA, which elicited influenza neutralizing and hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies in mice, and it did not detect low-pH stressed, post-fusion HA, which was selectively removed from the SRID gel during a blotting step and was significantly less immunologically active. This selective detection was due to the SRID format, not a conformational specificity of the sheep antiserum used in the SRID, as the same antiserum detected non-stressed and low-pH stressed HA similarly when used in an ELISA format. However, when low-pH stressed HA was mixed with non-stressed HA, SRID detected both forms in mixed immunoprecipitin rings, leading to over-quantification of pre-fusion HA. We previously reported that trypsin digestion of antigen samples selectively degrade stressed HA, so that an otherwise conformationally insensitive biophysical quantification technique, reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), can specifically quantify trypsin-resistant, immunologically active, pre-fusion HA. Here, we report that trypsin digestion can also improve the specificity of SRID so that it can quantify immunologically active, pre-fusion HA when it is mixed with less immunologically active, post-fusion HA. PMID:27154389

  1. Cleaning out the Litterbox of Proteomic Scientists’ Favorite Pet: Optimized Data Analysis Avoiding Trypsin Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chemically modified trypsin is a standard reagent in proteomics experiments but is usually not considered in database searches. Modification of trypsin is supposed to protect the protease against autolysis and the resulting loss of activity. Here, we show that modified trypsin is still subject to self-digestion, and, as a result, modified trypsin-derived peptides are present in standard digests. We depict that these peptides commonly lead to false-positive assignments even if native trypsin is considered in the database. Moreover, we present an easily implementable method to include modified trypsin in the database search with a minimal increase in search time and search space while efficiently avoiding these false-positive hits. PMID:26938934

  2. Cleaning out the Litterbox of Proteomic Scientists' Favorite Pet: Optimized Data Analysis Avoiding Trypsin Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Schittmayer, Matthias; Fritz, Katarina; Liesinger, Laura; Griss, Johannes; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    Chemically modified trypsin is a standard reagent in proteomics experiments but is usually not considered in database searches. Modification of trypsin is supposed to protect the protease against autolysis and the resulting loss of activity. Here, we show that modified trypsin is still subject to self-digestion, and, as a result, modified trypsin-derived peptides are present in standard digests. We depict that these peptides commonly lead to false-positive assignments even if native trypsin is considered in the database. Moreover, we present an easily implementable method to include modified trypsin in the database search with a minimal increase in search time and search space while efficiently avoiding these false-positive hits. PMID:26938934

  3. Effects of Croton rhamnifolioides essential oil on Aedes aegypti oviposition, larval toxicity and trypsin activity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Geanne K N; Dutra, Kamilla A; Lira, Camila S; Lima, Bheatriz N; Napoleão, Thiago H; Paiva, Patrícia M G; Maranhão, Claudia A; Brandão, Sofia S F; Navarro, Daniela M A F

    2014-01-01

    Although numerous reports are available concerning the larvicidal potential of essential oils, very few investigations have focused on their mechanisms of action. In the present study, we have investigated the chemical composition of the leaf oil of Croton rhamnifolioides during storage and its effects on oviposition and survival of larvae of the dengue fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. In addition, we have established a possible mechanism of action for the larvicidal activity of the essential oil. GC-MS analyses revealed marked differences in the composition of oil that had been freshly isolated and that of a sample that had been stored in a sealed amber-glass vial under refrigeration for three years. However, both fresh and stored oil exhibited substantial larvicidal activities with LC50 values of 122.35 and 89.03 ppm, respectively, and oviposition deterrent effects against gravid females at concentrations of 50 and 100 µg·mL-1. These results demonstrate that the larvicidal effect of the essential oil was unchanged during three years of storage even though its chemical composition altered. Hence, the essential oil could be used in the preparation of commercial products. In addition, we observed that the trypsin-like activity of mosquito larvae was inhibited in vitro by the essential oil of C. rhamnifolioides, suggesting that the larvicidal effect may be associated with inhibition of this enzyme.

  4. Effects of Croton rhamnifolioides essential oil on Aedes aegypti oviposition, larval toxicity and trypsin activity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Geanne K N; Dutra, Kamilla A; Lira, Camila S; Lima, Bheatriz N; Napoleão, Thiago H; Paiva, Patrícia M G; Maranhão, Claudia A; Brandão, Sofia S F; Navarro, Daniela M A F

    2014-01-01

    Although numerous reports are available concerning the larvicidal potential of essential oils, very few investigations have focused on their mechanisms of action. In the present study, we have investigated the chemical composition of the leaf oil of Croton rhamnifolioides during storage and its effects on oviposition and survival of larvae of the dengue fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. In addition, we have established a possible mechanism of action for the larvicidal activity of the essential oil. GC-MS analyses revealed marked differences in the composition of oil that had been freshly isolated and that of a sample that had been stored in a sealed amber-glass vial under refrigeration for three years. However, both fresh and stored oil exhibited substantial larvicidal activities with LC50 values of 122.35 and 89.03 ppm, respectively, and oviposition deterrent effects against gravid females at concentrations of 50 and 100 µg·mL-1. These results demonstrate that the larvicidal effect of the essential oil was unchanged during three years of storage even though its chemical composition altered. Hence, the essential oil could be used in the preparation of commercial products. In addition, we observed that the trypsin-like activity of mosquito larvae was inhibited in vitro by the essential oil of C. rhamnifolioides, suggesting that the larvicidal effect may be associated with inhibition of this enzyme. PMID:25317582

  5. Antimicrobial Activity of ILTI, a Kunitz-Type Trypsin Inhibitor from Inga laurina (SW.) Willd.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Taveira, Gabriel B; Gomes, Valdirene M; de Barros, Karina M C A; Maria-Neto, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Over the last few years, a growing number of proteinase inhibitors have been isolated from plants and particularly from seeds and have shown antimicrobial activity. A 20,000 Da serine peptidase inhibitor, named ILTI, was isolated from Inga laurina seeds and showed potent inhibitory enzymatic activity against trypsin. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ILTI on the growth of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms. We observed that ILTI strongly inhibited in particular the growth of Candida tropicalis and Candida buinensis, inducing cellular agglomeration. However, it was ineffective against human pathogenic bacteria. We also investigated the potential of ILTI to permeabilize the plasma membrane of yeast cells. C. tropicalis and C. buinensis were incubated for 24 h with the ILTI at different concentrations, which showed that this inhibitor induced changes in the membranes of yeast cells, leading to their permeabilization. Interestingly, ILTI induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C. tropicalis and C. buinensis cells. Finally, ILTI was coupled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and subsequent treatment of C. tropicalis and C. buinensis with DAPI revealed the presence of the labeled protein in the intracellular spaces. In conclusion, our results indicated the ability of peptidase inhibitors to induce microbial inhibition; therefore, they might offer templates for the design of new antifungal agents. PMID:26769111

  6. Isothermal titration calorimetry determination of individual rate constants of trypsin catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, César; Condado-Morales, Itzel; Olguin, Luis F; Costas, Miguel

    2015-06-15

    Determination of individual rate constants for enzyme-catalyzed reactions is central to the understanding of their mechanism of action and is commonly obtained by stopped-flow kinetic experiments. However, most natural substrates either do not fluoresce/absorb or lack a significant change in their spectra while reacting and, therefore, are frequently chemically modified to render adequate molecules for their spectroscopic detection. Here, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to obtain Michaelis-Menten plots for the trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of several substrates at different temperatures (278-318K): four spectrophotometrically blind lysine and arginine N-free esters, one N-substituted arginine ester, and one amide. A global fitting of these data provided the individual rate constants and activation energies for the acylation and deacylation reactions, and the ratio of the formation and dissociation rates of the enzyme-substrate complex, leading also to the corresponding free energies of activation. The results indicate that for lysine and arginine N-free esters deacylation is the rate-limiting step, but for the N-substituted ester and the amide acylation is the slowest step. It is shown that ITC is able to produce quality kinetic data and is particularly well suited for those enzymatic reactions that cannot be measured by absorption or fluorescence spectroscopy.

  7. Cold Adaptation, Ca2+ Dependency and Autolytic Stability Are Related Features in a Highly Active Cold-Adapted Trypsin Resistant to Autoproteolysis Engineered for Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Nappa, Alvaro; Reyes, Fernando; Andrews, Barbara A.; Asenjo, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Pig trypsin is routinely used as a biotechnological tool, due to its high specificity and ability to be stored as an inactive stable zymogen. However, it is not an optimum enzyme for conditions found in wound debriding for medical uses and trypsinization processes for protein analysis and animal cell culturing, where low Ca2+ dependency, high activity in mild conditions and easy inactivation are crucial. We isolated and thermodynamically characterized a highly active cold-adapted trypsin for medical and laboratory use that is four times more active than pig trypsin at 10° C and at least 50% more active than pig trypsin up to 50° C. Contrary to pig trypsin, this enzyme has a broad optimum pH between 7 and 10 and is very insensitive to Ca2+ concentration. The enzyme is only distantly related to previously described cryophilic trypsins. We built and studied molecular structure models of this trypsin and performed molecular dynamic calculations. Key residues and structures associated with calcium dependency and cryophilicity were identified. Experiments indicated that the protein is unstable and susceptible to autoproteolysis. Correlating experimental results and structural predictions, we designed mutations to improve the resistance to autoproteolysis and conserve activity for longer periods after activation. One single mutation provided around 25 times more proteolytic stability. Due to its cryophilic nature, this trypsin is easily inactivated by mild denaturation conditions, which is ideal for controlled proteolysis processes without requiring inhibitors or dilution. We clearly show that cold adaptation, Ca2+ dependency and autolytic stability in trypsins are related phenomena that are linked to shared structural features and evolve in a concerted fashion. Hence, both structurally and evolutionarily they cannot be interpreted and studied separately as previously done. PMID:23951314

  8. Nutritive value and effect of blanching on the trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor activities of selected leafy vegetables.

    PubMed

    Mosha, T C; Gaga, H E

    1999-01-01

    Proximate composition, energy, mineral and vitamin contents and the effect of blanching methods and times on the trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor activities were studied using cabbage, collard, turnip, peanut, and sweet potato leaves. Results of this study indicated that, crude protein, crude fat, carbohydrate and ash contents were in the range of 15.5-25.6%, 1.4-6.5%, 60.4-73.1% and 6.8-7.5%, respectively. Total dietary fiber was lowest in cabbage (28.2 g/100 g) and highest in the collard leaves (43.1%) while energy content per 100 g of vegetables was highest in sweet potato leaves (402 kcal) and lowest in cabbage (379 kcal). The mineral content per 100 g of vegetables were in the range of 33.4-249.8 mg, 241.2-471.2 mg, 12.1-75.1 mg, 14.9-98.9 mg, 0.5-3.5 mg and 0.9-3.1 mg for Ca, K, Na, Mg, Fe and Zn, respectively. For ascorbic acid, riboflavin, thiamin and total carotenoids, concentrations in 100 g of vegetables were in the range of 45.1-112.7 mg, 0.2-0.3 mg, 0.3-0.8 mg and 2.0-7.3 mg, respectively. The trypsin inhibitory activity per gram of the vegetables was highest in collard (60.1 TIU/g) and lowest in peanut leaves (41.0 TIU/g). Chymotrypsin inhibitor activity was highest in the peanut (69.6 CIU/g) but lowest in the collard leaves (48.0 CIU/g). Both trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor activities were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced by most of the treatments in either the conventional or microwave blanching methods. In the conventional blanching method, trypsin inhibitor activity was reduced by 0.5, 6.8, 11.9, 9.0 and 19.3 percent in cabbage, collard, turnip, sweet potato and peanut leaves, respectively, when the vegetables were blanched for 2.5 minutes but after blanching for 10 minutes, the trypsin inhibitor activity was reduced by 29.7, 34.9, 54.3, 52.3 and 65.6 percent in cabbage, collard, turnip, sweet potato and peanut greens, respectively. For the microwave oven blanching, trypsin inhibitor activity was reduced by 3.8, 3.3, 32.7, 5.0 and 9.5 percent

  9. Expression and purification of a cold-adapted group III trypsin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pálsdóttir, Helga Margrét; Gudmundsdóttir, Agústa

    2007-02-01

    The recently classified group III trypsins include members like Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) trypsin Y as well as seven analogues from other cold-adapted fish species. The eight group III trypsins have been characterized from their cDNAs and deduced amino acid sequences but none of the enzymes have been isolated from their native sources. This study describes the successful expression and purification of a recombinant HP-thioredoxin-trypsin Y fusion protein in the His-Patch ThioFusion Escherichia coli expression system and its purification by chromatographic methods. The recombinant form of trypsin Y was previously expressed in Pichia pastoris making it the first biochemically characterized group III trypsin. It has dual substrate specificity towards trypsin and chymotrypsin substrates and demonstrates an increasing activity at temperatures between 2 and 21 degrees C with a complete inactivation at 30 degrees C. The aim of the study was to facilitate further studies of recombinant trypsin Y by finding an expression system yielding higher amounts of the enzyme than possible in our hands in the P. pastoris system. Also, commercial production of trypsin Y will require an efficient and inexpensive expression system like the His-Patch ThioFusion E. coli expression system described here as the enzyme is produced in very low amounts in the Atlantic cod.

  10. Dual core quantum dots for highly quantitative ratiometric detection of trypsin activity in cystic fibrosis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelló Serrano, Iván; Stoica, Georgiana; Matas Adams, Alba; Palomares, Emilio

    2014-10-01

    We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for recessive genetic diseases like human cystic fibrosis. In a screening program in which the goal is to detect disease and also the carrier status, early diagnosis could be of great help.We present herein two colour encoded silica nanospheres (2nanoSi) for the fluorescence quantitative ratiometric determination of trypsin in humans. Current detection methods for cystic fibrosis diagnosis are slow, costly and suffer from false positives. The 2nanoSi proved to be a highly sensitive, fast (minutes), and single-step approach nanosensor for the screening and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, allowing the quantification of trypsin concentrations in a wide range relevant for clinical applications (25-350 μg L-1). Furthermore, as trypsin is directly related to the development of cystic fibrosis (CF), different human genotypes, i.e. CF homozygotic, CF heterozygotic, and unaffected, respectively, can be determined using our 2nanoSi nanospheres. We anticipate the 2nanoSi system to be a starting point for non-invasive, easy-to-use and cost effective ratiometric fluorescent biomarkers for

  11. The belonging of gpMuc, a glycoprotein from Mucuna pruriens seeds, to the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor family explains its direct anti-snake venom activity.

    PubMed

    Scirè, Andrea; Tanfani, Fabio; Bertoli, Enrico; Furlani, Emiliano; Nadozie, Hope-Onyekwere N; Cerutti, Helena; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Bini, Luca; Guerranti, Roberto

    2011-07-15

    In Nigeria, Mucuna pruriens seeds are locally prescribed as an oral prophylactic for snake bite and it is claimed that when two seeds are swallowed they protect the individual for a year against snake bites. In order to understand the Mucuna pruriens antisnake properties, the proteins from the acqueous extract of seeds were purified by three chromatographic steps: ConA affinity chromatography, tandem anionic-cationic exchange and gel filtration, obtaining a fraction conventionally called gpMucB. This purified fraction was analysed by SDS-PAGE obtaining 3 bands with apparent masses ranging from 20 to 24 kDa, and by MALDI-TOF which showed two main peaks of 21 and 23 kDa and another small peak of 19 kDa. On the other hand, gel filtration analysis of the native protein indicated a molecular mass of about 70 kDa suggesting that in its native form, gpMucB is most likely an oligomeric multiform protein. Infrared spectroscopy of gpMucB indicated that the protein is particularly thermostable both at neutral and acidic pHs and that it is an all beta protein. All data suggest that gpMucB belongs to the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor family explaining the direct anti-snake venom activity of Mucuna pruriens seeds.

  12. Proteolytic profiling and comparative analyses of active trypsin-like serine peptidases in preimaginal stages of Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatu s, a widespread insect in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, is a vector of multiple arboviruses and parasites, and is considered an important risk to human and veterinary health. Proteolytic enzymes play crucial roles in the insect physiology including the modulation of embryonic development and food digestion. Therefore, these enzymes represent important targets for the development of new control strategies. This study presents zymographic characterization and comparative analysis of the proteolytic activity found in eggs, larval instars and pupae of Culex quinquefasciatus. Methods The proteolytic profiles of eggs, larvae and pupa of Cx. quinquefasciatus were characterized by SDS-PAGE co-polymerized with 0.1% gelatin, according to the pH, temperature and peptidase inhibitor sensitivity. In addition, the proteolytic activities were characterized in solution using 100 μM of the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Results Comparison of the proteolytic profiles by substrate-SDS-PAGE from all preimaginal stages of the insect revealed qualitative and quantitative differences in the peptidase expression among eggs, larvae and pupae. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that the proteolytic activity from preimaginal stages is mostly due to trypsin-like serine peptidases that display optimal activity at alkaline pH. In-solution, proteolytic assays of the four larval instars using the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC in the presence or absence of a trypsin-like serine peptidase inhibitor confirmed the results obtained by substrate-SDS-PAGE analysis. The trypsin-like serine peptidases of the four larval instars were functional over a wide range of temperatures, showing activities at 25°C and 65°C, with an optimal activity between 37°C and 50°C. Conclusion The combined use of zymography and in-solution assays, as performed in this study, allowed for a more detailed analysis of the repertoire of proteolytic

  13. Conversion of trypsin to a copper enzyme: tyrosinase/catechol oxidase by chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Okutucu, Burcu; Zeytunluoglu, Ali; Zihnioglu, Figen

    2010-01-01

    New active sites can be introduced into naturally occurring enzymes by the chemical modification of specific amino acid residues in concert with genetic techniques. Chemical strategies have had a significant impact in the field of enzyme design such as modifying the selectivity and catalytic activity which is very different from those of the corresponding native enzymes. Thus, chemical modification has been exploited for the incorporation of active site binding analogs onto protein templates and for atom replacement in order to generate new functionality such as the conversion of a hydrolase into a peroxidase. The introduction of a coordination complex into a substrate binding pocket of trypsin could probably also be extended to various enzymes of significant therapeutic and biotechnological importance. The aim of this study is the conversion of trypsin into a copper enzyme: tyrosinase by chemical modification. Tyrosinase is a biocatalyst (EC.1.14.18.1) containing two atoms of copper per active site with monooxygenase activity. The active site of trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4), a serine protease was chemically modified by copper (Cu(+2)) introduced p-aminobenzamidine (pABA- Cu(+2): guanidine containing schiff base metal chelate) which exhibits affinity for the carboxylate group in the active site as trypsin-like inhibitor. Trypsin and the resultant semisynthetic enzyme preparation was analysed by means of its trypsin and catechol oxidase/tyrosinase activity. After chemical modification, trypsin-pABA-Cu(+2) preparation lost 63% of its trypsin activity and gained tyrosinase/catechol oxidase activity. The kinetic properties (K(cat), K(m), K(cat)/K(m)), optimum pH and temperature of the trypsin-pABA-Cu(+2) complex was also investigated. PMID:20024799

  14. Physical activity and Native Americans: a review.

    PubMed

    Coble, James D; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2006-07-01

    The physical activity behaviors of Native-American populations in the United States and Canada have received little attention in the health literature. The purpose of this review was to unite the literature regarding the physical activity behaviors of Native Americans. A majority of the literature was obtained using online databases. Reference lists were also reviewed to gain further access to the literature. Key-word searches included various combinations of Aboriginal, Native Indian, American Indian, Native American, First Nation, Métis, or Alaska Native with physical activity, exercise, and health behavior. Articles included were those published in English-language, peer-reviewed journals from 1990 until November 2005 that focused on participants aged 18 years and older. This review is organized according to ecologic models of health behavior, which take into account several correlates to explain human behavior, including demographic, personal health, environmental, and psychosocial. Correlates were included if they appeared at least three times in the literature. As a result of these inclusion criteria, the number of reviewed articles includes 28 quantitative, 4 qualitative, and 3 intervention studies. Results indicate that age, gender, and social support are important factors associated with physical activity. The remaining correlates show inconsistent or indeterminate results due in part to the paucity of research. It is suggested that an increase in the number of studies, especially those using longitudinal designs, is needed. Further, the application of psychosocial models to understand physical activity motivations as well as culturally appropriate and validated measurement tools are largely absent in the Native-American physical activity literature. PMID:16777541

  15. Two Kunitz-type inhibitors with activity against trypsin and papain from Pithecellobium dumosum seeds: purification, characterization, and activity towards pest insect digestive enzyme.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A S; Migliolo, L; Aquino, R O; Ribeiro, J K C; Macedo, L L P; Bemquerer, M P; Santos, E A; Kiyota, S; de Sales, M P

    2009-01-01

    Two trypsin inhibitors (called PdKI-3.1 and PdKI-3.2) were purified from the seeds of the Pithecellobium dumosum tree. Inhibitors were obtained by TCA precipitation, affinity chromatography on Trypsin-Sepharose and reversed-phase-HPLC. SDS-PAGE analysis with or without reducing agent showed that they are a single polypeptide chain, and MALDI-TOF analysis determined molecular masses of 19696.96 and 19696.36 Da, respectively. The N-terminal sequence of both inhibitors showed strong identity to the Kunitz family trypsin inhibitors. They were stable over a wide pH (2-9) and temperature (37 to 100 degrees C) range. These inhibitors reduced over 84% of trypsin activity with inhibition constant (Ki) of 4.20 x 10(-8) and 2.88 x 10(-8) M, and also moderately inhibited papain activity, a cysteine proteinase. PdKI-3.1 and PdKI-3.2 mainly inhibited digestive enzymes from Plodia interpunctella, Zabrotes subfasciatus and Ceratitis capitata guts. Results show that both inhibitors are members of the Kunitz-inhibitor family and that they affect the digestive enzyme larvae of diverse orders, indicating a potential insect antifeedant.

  16. Thiaminase activity in native freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Sweet, Stephanie; Galbraith, Heather S.; Honeyfield, Dale C.

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in the Great Lakes has been attributed to elevated levels of thiaminase I enzyme activity in invasive prey species; however, few studies have investigated thiaminase activity in native prey species. Some of the highest levels of thiaminase activity have been measured in invasive dreissenid mussels with little understanding of background levels contributed by native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae). In this study, thiaminase activity was measured in two freshwater mussel species, Elliptio complanata and Strophitus undulatus, from the Delaware and Susquehanna River drainage basins located in north eastern United States. Thiaminase activity was also measured in gravid and non-gravid S. undulatus. Average thiaminase activity differed significantly between species (7.2 and 42.4 μmol/g/min, for E. complanata and S. undulatus respectively) with no differences observed between drainage basins. Gravid S. undulatus had significantly lower thiaminase activity (28.0 μmol/g/min) than non-gravid mussels (42.4 μmol/g/min). Our results suggest that a suite of factors may regulate thiaminase activity in freshwater mussels and that native freshwater mussel thiaminase activity is within the range observed for invasive dreissenids. These results add to our understanding of the complexities in identifying the ecological conditions that set the stage for thiamine deficiency.

  17. Roots of Contemporary Native American Activism. Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Troy R.

    1996-01-01

    Traces the foundations and development of Native American activism, 1950s-90s. Discusses relocation of reservation American Indians to urban areas in the 1950s without promised aid or vocational training, changing aspirations of Indian veterans and college students, lessons of the civil rights movement, occupations of Alcatraz Island and Wounded…

  18. Transcriptional profiling analysis of Spodoptera litura larvae challenged with Vip3Aa toxin and possible involvement of trypsin in the toxin activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Chen, Chen; Wu, Songqing; Shao, Ensi; Li, Mengnan; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Vip proteins, a new group of insecticidal toxins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, are effective against specific pests including Spodoptera litura. Here, we report construction of a transcriptome database of S. litura by de novo assembly along with detection of the transcriptional response of S. litura larvae to Vip3Aa toxin. In total, 56,498 unigenes with an N50 value of 1,853 bp were obtained. Results of transcriptome abundance showed that Vip3Aa toxin provoked a wide transcriptional response of the S. litura midgut. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for immunity-related, metabolic-related and Bt-related genes. Twenty-nine immunity-related genes, 102 metabolic-related genes and 62 Bt-related genes with differential expression were found. On the basis of transcriptional profiling analysis, we focus on the functional validation of trypsin which potentially participated in the activation of Vip3Aa protoxin. Zymogram analysis indicated that the presence of many proteases, including trypsin, in S. litura larvae midgut. Results of enzymolysis in vitro of Vip3Aa by trypsin, and bioassay and histopathology of the trypsin-digested Vip3Aa toxin showed that trypsin was possibly involved in the Vip3Aa activation. This study provides a transcriptome foundation for the identification and functional validation of the differentially expressed genes in an agricultural important pest, S. litura. PMID:27025647

  19. Comparative Studies on the Interaction of Spermidine with Bovine Trypsin by Multispectroscopic and Docking Methods.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Lida; Shareghi, Behzad; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Farhadian, Sadegh

    2016-09-15

    The effect of spermidine on the kinetics, conformation, and dynamics of native trypsin was studied by steady-state thermal stability, intrinsic fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, and kinetic techniques, as well as molecular docking, at the temperatures of 298 and 308 K. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants (Ksv) for the trypsin-spermidine complex were obtained at two temperatures, revealing that spermidine quenched the intensity of trypsin through the static mode of the quenching mechanism. The corresponding thermodynamic parameters, Gibbs free-energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes, showed that the binding process was spontaneous. These values and the molecular docking technique revealed that the hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces played a major role in stabilizing the complex. CD, absorption, and fluorescence results also indicated that spermidine binding had a partial effect on trypsin structure. Spermidine could also influence the activity of trypsin. Upon spermidine binding, the Vmax value of the enzyme was increased and the kcat/Km values were enhanced slightly. The Tm of the trypsin-spermidine complex was enhanced probably due to the higher H-bond formation and lower surface hydrophobicity after spermidine modification, as confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence spectra. UV absorption and CD studies also indicated that the binding of spermidine to trypsin had induced microenvironmental changes around the enzyme, leading to changes in its secondary structure. PMID:27541356

  20. Introduction of {alpha}-hydroxymethyamino acid residues in substrate specificity P1 position of trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 from sunflower seeds retains its activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zablotna, Ewa; Kret, Agnieszka; Jaskiewicz, Anna; Olma, Aleksandra; Leplawy, Miroslaw T.; Rolka, Krzysztof . E-mail: krzys@chem.univ.gda.pl

    2006-02-17

    In many complexes formed by serine proteinases and their inhibitors, the hydroxyl group provided by water molecule or by the inhibitor Ser residue is located close to the inhibitor P{sub 1}-P{sub 1}{sup '} reactive site. In order to investigate the role of this group, we synthesized analogues of trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 isolated from the seeds of sunflower modified in P{sub 1} by {alpha}-hydroxymethylserine (HmSer) and both enantiomers of {alpha}-hydroxymethylvaline (HmVal). All the synthesized analogues inhibited bovine {beta}-trypsin and human leukocyte elastase. SFTI-1 analogues with HmVal and HmSer appear to be potent inhibitors of bovine {beta}-trypsin, whereas [Val{sup 5}]SFTI-1 is practically inactive. Also trypsin inhibitory activity of [Ser{sup 5}]SFTI-1 is significantly lower. Since the electrostatic interaction between protonated {epsilon}-NH{sub 2} group of the inhibitor P{sub 1} position and {beta}-carboxylate of trypsin Asp{sup 189} is the main driving force for interaction of both molecules, the results obtained are very interesting. We believe that these SFTI-1 analogues belong to a novel class of serine proteinase inhibitors.

  1. Purification and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Junchen; Liu, Yuan; An, Tianchen; Liu, Yujun; Wang, Manchuriga; Song, Yanting; Zheng, Feifei; Wu, Dan; Zhang, Yingxia; Deng, Shiming

    2015-05-01

    A proteinaceous inhibitor against trypsin was isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. by successive ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange, and gel-filtration chromatography. The trypsin inhibitor, named as AHLTI (A. heterophyllus Lam. trypsin inhibitor), consisted of a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of 28.5 kDa, which was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel-filtration chromatography. The N-terminal sequence of AHLTI was DEPPSELDAS, which showed no similarity to other known trypsin inhibitor sequence. AHLTI completely inhibited bovine trypsin at a molar ratio of 1:2 (AHLTI:trypsin) analyzed by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, inhibition activity assay, and gel-filtration chromatography. Moreover, kinetic enzymatic studies were carried out to understand the inhibition mechanism of AHLTI against trypsin. Results showed that AHLTI was a competitive inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) of 3.7 × 10(-8) M. However, AHLTI showed weak inhibitory activity toward chymotrypsin and elastase. AHLTI was stable over a broad range of pH 4-8 and temperature 20-80°C. The reduction agent, dithiothreitol, had no obvious effect on AHLTI. The trypsin inhibition assays of AHLTI toward digestive enzymes from insect pest guts in vitro demonstrated that AHLTI was effective against enzymes from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). These results suggested that AHLTI might be a novel trypsin inhibitor from A. heterophyllus Lam. belonging to Kunitz family, and play an important role in protecting from insect pest.

  2. Purification and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Junchen; Liu, Yuan; An, Tianchen; Liu, Yujun; Wang, Manchuriga; Song, Yanting; Zheng, Feifei; Wu, Dan; Zhang, Yingxia; Deng, Shiming

    2015-05-01

    A proteinaceous inhibitor against trypsin was isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. by successive ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange, and gel-filtration chromatography. The trypsin inhibitor, named as AHLTI (A. heterophyllus Lam. trypsin inhibitor), consisted of a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of 28.5 kDa, which was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel-filtration chromatography. The N-terminal sequence of AHLTI was DEPPSELDAS, which showed no similarity to other known trypsin inhibitor sequence. AHLTI completely inhibited bovine trypsin at a molar ratio of 1:2 (AHLTI:trypsin) analyzed by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, inhibition activity assay, and gel-filtration chromatography. Moreover, kinetic enzymatic studies were carried out to understand the inhibition mechanism of AHLTI against trypsin. Results showed that AHLTI was a competitive inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) of 3.7 × 10(-8) M. However, AHLTI showed weak inhibitory activity toward chymotrypsin and elastase. AHLTI was stable over a broad range of pH 4-8 and temperature 20-80°C. The reduction agent, dithiothreitol, had no obvious effect on AHLTI. The trypsin inhibition assays of AHLTI toward digestive enzymes from insect pest guts in vitro demonstrated that AHLTI was effective against enzymes from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). These results suggested that AHLTI might be a novel trypsin inhibitor from A. heterophyllus Lam. belonging to Kunitz family, and play an important role in protecting from insect pest. PMID:25851516

  3. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K.; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus. PMID:27656149

  4. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K.; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus.

  5. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus. PMID:27656149

  6. A preliminary neutron crystallography on the trypsin-bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Yamada, T.; Kurihara, K.; Tamada, T.; Kuroki, R.; Tanaka, I.; Takahashi, H.; Niimura, N.

    2010-11-01

    Trypsin is one of serine proteases. BPTI (Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor) is a protein inhibitor, which binds trypsin tightly and inhibits cleavage of peptide bonds. X-ray structure determination of trypsin-BPTI complex could make clear the overview of the active site. However, information of hydrogen atoms related to catalytic mechanism has not been satisfied. In this study, the trypsin-BPTI complex structure has been determined by neutron diffraction data at 2.0 Å resolution. Deuterium atoms of catalytic triad, hydration structures in the binding pocket of trypsin and hydrogen bonds were observed. We would like to discuss details of hydrogen bonds in the interface between trypsin and BPTI and the adjacent water molecules including hydrogen atoms involved in the enzymatic reaction.

  7. Secretion of miraculin through the function of a signal peptide conserved in the Kunitz-type soybean trypsin inhibitor family.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ayako; Satoh, Makiko; Matsuyama, Tomomi; Ito, Akane; Nakata, Rieko; Aoyama, Takashi; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2013-06-19

    Miraculin, a glycoprotein that modifies sour tastes into sweet ones, belongs to the Kunitz-type soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) family. To clarify the functional relation of miraculin with Kunitz-type STIs, we investigated its subcellular localization and trypsin inhibitory activity. In transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, miraculin, fused to yellow fluorescent protein, localized to and outside the plasma membrane depending on the putative secretion signal peptide. When transgenic seedlings were cultured in liquid medium, miraculin was present in the supernatant only after cellulase treatment. No trypsin inhibitory activity was detected in native or recombinant miraculin. In conclusion, miraculin is secreted outside the plasma membrane through the function of a signal peptide, conserved in Kunitz-type STIs, whereas its trypsin inhibitory activity may be lost during its evolution. PMID:23660404

  8. TsAg5, a Taenia solium cysticercus protein with a marginal trypsin-like activity in the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Analiz; Sifuentes, Cecilia; Gilman, Robert H.; Gutiérrez, Andrés H.; Piña, Ruby; Chile, Nancy; Carrasco, Sebastián; Larson, Sandra; Mayta, Holger; Verástegui, Manuela; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel; García, Héctor H.; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium larva. Although the mechanism of infection is not completely understood, it is likely driven by proteolytic activity that degrades the intestinal wall to facilitate oncosphere penetration and further infection. We analyzed the publicly available Taenia solium EST/DNA library and identified two contigs comprising a full-length cDNA fragment very similar to E. granulosus Ag5 protein. The Taenia solium cDNA sequence included a proteolytic trypsin-like-domain in the C-terminal region, and a thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain in the N-terminal region. Both the trypsin-like and adherence domains were expressed independently as recombinant proteins in bacterial systems. TsAg5 showed marginal trypsin-like activity and high sequence similarity to Ag5. The purified antigens were tested in a Western immunoblot assay to diagnose human neurocysticercosis. The sensitivity of the trypsin-like-domain was 96.36% in patients infected with extraparenchymal cysts, 75.44% in patients infected with multiple cysts, and 39.62% in patients with a single cyst. Specificity was 76.70%. The thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain was not specific for neurocysticercosis. PMID:21893105

  9. TsAg5, a Taenia solium cysticercus protein with a marginal trypsin-like activity in the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Analiz; Sifuentes, Cecilia; Gilman, Robert H; Gutiérrez, Andrés H; Piña, Ruby; Chile, Nancy; Carrasco, Sebastián; Larson, Sandra; Mayta, Holger; Verástegui, Manuela; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel; García, Héctor H; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko

    2011-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium larva. Although the mechanism of infection is not completely understood, it is likely driven by proteolytic activity that degrades the intestinal wall to facilitate oncosphere penetration and further infection. We analyzed the publicly available T. solium EST/DNA library and identified two contigs comprising a full-length cDNA fragment very similar to Echinococcus granulosus Ag5 protein. The T. solium cDNA sequence included a proteolytic trypsin-like-domain in the C-terminal region, and a thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain in the N-terminal region. Both the trypsin-like and adherence domains were expressed independently as recombinant proteins in bacterial systems. TsAg5 showed marginal trypsin-like activity and high sequence similarity to Ag5. The purified antigens were tested in a Western immunoblot assay to diagnose human neurocysticercosis. The sensitivity of the trypsin-like-domain was 96.36% in patients infected with extraparenchymal cysts, 75.44% in patients infected with multiple cysts, and 39.62% in patients with a single cyst. Specificity was 76.70%. The thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain was not specific for neurocysticercosis.

  10. Elimination of trypsin inhibitor activity and beany flavor in soy milk by consecutive blanching and ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) processing.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaohong; Chang, Sam K C; Liu, Zhisheng; Xu, Baojun

    2008-09-10

    Soy foods contain significant health-promoting components but also may contain beany flavor and trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA), which can cause pancreatic disease if present at a high level. Thermal processing can inactivate TIA and lipoxygenase. Ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) processing is relatively new for manufacturing soy milk. Simultaneous elimination of TIA and soy odor by UHT processing for enhancing soy milk quality has not been reported. The objective was to determine TIA in soy milk processed by traditional, steam injection, blanching, and UHT methods and to compare the products with commercial soy milk products. Soybean was soaked and blanched at 70-85 degrees C for 30 s-7.5 min. The blanched beans were made into base soy milk. The hexanal content of the base soy milk was determined by gas chromatography to determine the best conditions for further thermal processing by indirect and direct UHT methods at 135-150 degrees C for 10-50 s using the Microthermics processor. Soy milk was also made from soaked soybeans by traditional batch cooking and steaming methods. Eighteen commercial products were selected from the supermarket. Residual TIA in soy milk processed by the traditional and steam injection to 100 degrees C for 20 min was approximately 13%. Blanching could inactivate 25-50% of TIAs of the raw soy milk. The blanch conditions of 80 degrees C and 2 min were selected for UHT processing because these conditions produced blanched soy milk without hexanal, indicating a complete heat inactivation of lipoxygenases. The TIA decreased with increased temperature and time of UHT heating. The maximal trypsin inhibitor inactivation was achieved by UHT direct and indirect methods with residual activities of approximately 10%. Some commercial soy milk products contained high TIAs. The results are important to the food industry and consumers. Kinetic analysis showed that heat inactivation (denaturation) of TIA, under the continuous processing conditions of the

  11. 21 CFR 184.1914 - Trypsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1914 Trypsin. (a) Trypsin (CAS Reg. No. 9002-07-7) is an enzyme preparation... characterizing enzyme activity is that of a peptide hydrolase (EC 3.4.21.4). (b) The ingredient meets the...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1914 - Trypsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1914 Trypsin. (a) Trypsin (CAS Reg. No. 9002-07-7) is an enzyme preparation... characterizing enzyme activity is that of a peptide hydrolase (EC 3.4.21.4). (b) The ingredient meets the...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1914 - Trypsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1914 Trypsin. (a) Trypsin (CAS Reg. No. 9002-07-7) is an enzyme preparation... characterizing enzyme activity is that of a peptide hydrolase (EC 3.4.21.4). (b) The ingredient meets the...

  14. Bi-functional peptides with both trypsin-inhibitory and antimicrobial activities are frequent defensive molecules in Ranidae amphibian skins.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiuwen; Liu, Huan; Yang, Xuening; Che, Qiaolin; Liu, Rui; Yang, Hailong; Liu, Xiuhong; You, Dewen; Wang, Aili; Li, Jianxu; Lai, Ren

    2012-07-01

    Amphibian skins act as the first line against noxious aggression by microorganisms, parasites, and predators. Anti-microorganism activity is an important task of amphibian skins. A large amount of gene-encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has been identified from amphibian skins. Only a few of small protease inhibitors have been found in amphibian skins. From skin secretions of 5 species (Odorrana livida, Hylarana nigrovittata, Limnonectes kuhlii, Odorrana grahami, and Amolops loloensis) of Ranidae frogs, 16 small serine protease inhibitor peptides have been purified and characterized. They have lengths of 17-20 amino acid residues (aa). All of them are encoded by precursors with length of 65-70 aa. These small peptides show strong trypsin-inhibitory abilities. Some of them can exert antimicrobial activities. They share the conserved GCWTKSXXPKPC fragment in their primary structures, suggesting they belong to the same families of peptide. Signal peptides of precursors encoding these serine protease inhibitors share obvious sequence similarity with those of precursors encoding AMPs from Ranidae frogs. The current results suggest that these small serine protease inhibitors are the common defensive compounds in frog skin of Ranidae as amphibian skin AMPs. PMID:21927839

  15. Bi-functional peptides with both trypsin-inhibitory and antimicrobial activities are frequent defensive molecules in Ranidae amphibian skins.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiuwen; Liu, Huan; Yang, Xuening; Che, Qiaolin; Liu, Rui; Yang, Hailong; Liu, Xiuhong; You, Dewen; Wang, Aili; Li, Jianxu; Lai, Ren

    2012-07-01

    Amphibian skins act as the first line against noxious aggression by microorganisms, parasites, and predators. Anti-microorganism activity is an important task of amphibian skins. A large amount of gene-encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has been identified from amphibian skins. Only a few of small protease inhibitors have been found in amphibian skins. From skin secretions of 5 species (Odorrana livida, Hylarana nigrovittata, Limnonectes kuhlii, Odorrana grahami, and Amolops loloensis) of Ranidae frogs, 16 small serine protease inhibitor peptides have been purified and characterized. They have lengths of 17-20 amino acid residues (aa). All of them are encoded by precursors with length of 65-70 aa. These small peptides show strong trypsin-inhibitory abilities. Some of them can exert antimicrobial activities. They share the conserved GCWTKSXXPKPC fragment in their primary structures, suggesting they belong to the same families of peptide. Signal peptides of precursors encoding these serine protease inhibitors share obvious sequence similarity with those of precursors encoding AMPs from Ranidae frogs. The current results suggest that these small serine protease inhibitors are the common defensive compounds in frog skin of Ranidae as amphibian skin AMPs.

  16. Improvement of the stability and activity of immobilized trypsin on modified Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles for hydrolysis of bovine serum albumin and its application in the bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Atacan, Keziban; Çakıroğlu, Bekir; Özacar, Mahmut

    2016-12-01

    Trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) was successfully immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles that had been pre-treated with gallic acid (GA). Measurements of protein load by using Bradford assay and the trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of Nα-Benzoyl-dl-arginine 4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (BApNA) were made for the immobilized enzyme. By using magnetic nanoparticles, which provides easy separation and decent support material for enzyme immobilization with high surface area to volume ratio, and by employing biocompatible material gallic acid, immobilized enzyme system was synthesized along with improving trypsin activity and stability. Immobilized trypsin (TR) was more stable than the free one and demonstrated higher enzymatic activity at elevated temperatures (45-55°C) and in the alkaline pH region (6-10.5). Fe3O4 NPs-GA-TR retained 92% of its initial activity after 120days of storage at 4°C in sodium phosphate buffer (0.1M, pH 7.5), whereas the free trypsin maintained about 64% of its initial activity during the same storage period. In addition, activity of the immobilized trypsin was preserved 54.5% of its initial activity after eight times successive reuse. The Michaelis-Menten kinetic constant (Km) and maximum reaction velocity (Vmax) for free trypsin were 5.1mM and 23mM/min, respectively, whereas Km and Vmax values of immobilized trypsin were 7.88mM and 18.3mM/min, respectively. The performance of the immobilized trypsin was demonstrated by carrying out the hydrolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA) within 1h, and the assay was performed by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique. The hydrolysis of bovine milk as a real food was investigated by immobilized trypsin using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). PMID:27374556

  17. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a pre-launch Native American ceremony, Radmilla Cody, the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, sings the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  18. B2 kinin receptor activation is the predominant mechanism by which trypsin mediates endothelium-dependent relaxation in bovine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Grant R; Selemidis, Stavros; Cocks, Thomas M

    2008-07-01

    The roles of kinin and protease-activated receptors (PAR) in endothelium-dependent relaxations to the serine protease, trypsin, were examined in rings of bovine left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Trypsin (0.01-30 U/ml) caused biphasic, endothelium-dependent relaxations-a high potency (0.01-0.3 U/ml), low efficacy relaxation [maximum relaxation (R (max)), 9.0 +/- 5.1%] followed by a lower potency (1-30 U/ml) but high efficacy (R (max), 90.4 +/- 5.5%) relaxation, which was abolished by aprotinin. Captopril (10 microM) caused an approximately 10-fold leftward shift of the second phase response such that the first phase was masked. The second phase relaxation to trypsin was inhibited in a concentration-dependent, non-surmountable manner by the B2 antagonist, HOE-140. At 3 nM HOE-140, the second phase response to trypsin was abolished unmasking the first phase. Kallikrein (0.0003-0.3 U/ml) caused monophasic, endothelium-dependent relaxations (R (max), 33.7 +/- 14.6%), which were potentiated by captopril (R (max), 94.2 +/- 1.0%) and abolished by HOE-140. In the presence of captopril, the second phase relaxation to trypsin was only minimally inhibited by either N(G)-nitro-L: -arginine (100 microM) or 67 mM [K(+)](o) alone but markedly reduced when these two treatments were combined (R (max), 26.1 +/- 11.6% versus 98.6 +/- 2.9% in controls). The PAR1-activating peptide, SFLLRN (0.1-30 microM), but not the PAR2-activating peptide, SLIGRL, caused concentration-dependent relaxations (pEC(50), 5.9 +/- 0.0%; R (max), 43.3 +/- 8.3%). In conclusion, trypsin causes endothelium-dependent relaxations in the bovine LAD predominantly via release of endogenous BK, which in turn activates endothelial B2 receptors. Only a minor role for PAR1-like receptors was evident in this tissue. PMID:18458878

  19. A study on trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. protease inhibitory activity in Cassia tora (L.) syn Senna tora (L.) Roxb. seed extract

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Proteases play an important role in virulence of many human, plant and insect pathogens. The proteinaceous protease inhibitors of plant origin have been reported widely from many plant species. The inhibitors may potentially be used for multiple therapeutic applications in viral, bacterial, fungal diseases and physiological disorders. In traditional Indian medicine system, Cassia tora (Senna tora) is reportedly effective in treatment of skin and gastrointestinal disorders. The present study explores the protease inhibitory activity of the above plant seeds against trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases. Methods The crushed seeds of Cassia tora were washed thoroughly with acetone and hexane for depigmentation and defatting. The proteins were fractionated by ammonium sulphate (0-30, 30-60, 60-90%) followed by dialysis and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The inhibitory potential of crude seed extract and most active dialyzed fraction against trypsin and proteases was established by spot test using unprocessed x-ray film and casein digestion methods, respectively. Electrophoretic analysis of most active fraction (30-60%) and SEC elutes were carried employing Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Gelatin SDS-PAGE. Inhibition of fungal spore germination was studied in the presence of dialyzed active inhibitor fraction. Standard deviation (SD) and ANOVA were employed as statistical tools. Results The crude seeds' extract displayed strong antitryptic, bacterial and fungal protease inhibitory activity on x-ray film. The seed protein fraction 30-60% was found most active for trypsin inhibition in caseinolytic assay (P < 0.001). The inhibition of caseinolytic activity of the proteases increased with increasing ratio of seed extract. The residual activity of trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases remained only 4, 7 and 3.1%, respectively when proteases were incubated with 3 mg ml-1 seed protein

  20. Graphene Oxide Selectively Enhances Thermostability of Trypsin.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kai; Tan, Pengli; Luo, Yinchan; Feng, Liangzhu; Xu, Ligeng; Liu, Zhuang; Li, Youyong; Peng, Rui

    2015-06-10

    In the past few years, graphene and its derivative, graphene oxide (GO), have been extensively studied for their applications in biotechnology. In our previous work, we reported certain PEGylated GOs (GO-PEGs) can selectively promote trypsin activity and enhance its thermostability. To further explore this, here we synthesized a series of GO-PEGs with varying PEGylation degrees. Enzymatic activity assay shows that both GO and GO-PEGs can protect trypsin, but not chymotrypsin, from thermal denaturation at high temperature. Surprisingly, the lower the PEGylation degree, the better the protection, and GO as well as the GO-PEG with the lowest PEGylation degree show the highest protection efficiency (∼70% retained activity at 70 °C). Fluorescence spectroscopy analysis shows that GO/GO-PEGs have strong interactions with trypsin. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation results reveal that trypsin is adsorbed onto the surface of GO through its cationic residues and hydrophilic residues. Different from chymotrypsin adsorbed on GO, the active site of trypsin is covered by GO. MD simulation at high temperature shows that, through such interaction with GO, trypsin's active site is therefore stabilized and protected by GO. Our work not only illustrates the promising potential of GO/GO-PEGs as efficient, selective modulators for trypsin, but also provides the interaction mechanism of GO with specific proteins at the nano-bio interface. PMID:25985836

  1. Haze activity of different barley trypsin inhibitors of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe).

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingzhen; Huang, Lu; Huang, Yuqing; Wu, Dezhi; Hu, Hongliang; Li, Chengdao; Zhang, Guoping

    2014-12-15

    Our previous study found that the critical protein in SE (silica eluted) proteins is BTI-CMe, and assumed that SE-ve malt for brewing may improve the haze stability in beer. In this study, we investigated the difference in gene sequence and corresponding amino acid sequence of BTI-CMe between SE+ve and SE-ve types. The results showed that there were 7 amino acid differences between Yerong (SE-ve) and Franklin (SE+ve). Two types BTI-CMe were expressed in vitro and purified successfully. By adding the purified BTI-CMe into commercial beer, we found that both original turbidity and alcohol chill haze degree of beer were increased. BTI-CMe of SE-ve haplotype showed a lower level of haze formation in beer than SE+ve haplotype. Response surface methodology (RSM) was conducted to determine the relationship between BTI-CMe and tannic acid, and their effects on haze formation. It was found that (1) higher content of BTI-CMe and/or tannic acid in beer would give rise to higher turbidity; (2) there was a significant interaction between BTI-CMe and tannic acid; (3) haze activity disparity of BTI-CMe between two types was significantly and positively correlated with the tannic acid concentration.

  2. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a pre-launch Native American ceremony, Radmilla Cody (right) , the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, sings the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language. With her is her grandmother. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  3. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An elder of her Navaho tribe, Dorothy Cody shares the stage with her granddaughter Radmilla Cody (not shown), the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, who is singing the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language during a pre-launch Native American ceremony. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  4. [Effect of trypsin on the rat keratinocyte separation and subculture].

    PubMed

    Ouyang, An-Li; Zhou, Yan; Hua, Ping; Tan, Wen-Song

    2002-01-01

    The effect of trypsin on the separation an subculture of the keratinocytes was investigated in this work. It was found that when 0.25% trypsin was employed for 5 minutes to separate keratinocytes, the number of active keratinocytes and the cells capable of forming colony were higher than those of other experimental conditions. The maximum attached ratio of primary keratinocytes was obtained when skin tissues were treated at 0.05% concentration of trypsin. With the increase of the trypsin concentrations, the attached ratio, attachment rate constant, and colony forming efficiency were all increased. Thus, 0.25% concentration of trypsin was recommended for separating and subculturing the keratinocytes.

  5. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chickasaw Dance Troupe performs an Honor Dance during the Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  6. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chickasaw Dance Troupe performs an Honor Dance for John Herrington's parents during the Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  7. Characterization of the Interaction Between Pancreatic Trypsin and an Enteric Copolymer as a Tool for Several Biotechnological Applications.

    PubMed

    Braia, Mauricio Javier; Loureiro, Dana Belén; Tubio, Gisela; Romanini, Diana

    2015-12-01

    Protein-polyelectrolyte complexes are very interesting systems since they can be applied in many long-established and emerging areas of biotechnology. From nanotechnology to industrial processing, these complexes are used for many purposes: to build multilayer particles for biosensors; to entrap and deliver proteins for pharmaceutical applications; to isolate and immobilize proteins. The enteric copolymer poly(methacrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate) 1:2 (MMA) has been designed for drug delivery although its chemical properties allow to use it for other applications. Understanding the interaction between trypsin and this polymer is very important in order to optimize the mechanism of formation of this complex for different biotechnological applications.The formation of the trypsin-MMA complex was studied by spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. Structural analysis of trypsin was carried out by catalytic activity assays, circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments showed that the insoluble complex contains 12 trypsin molecules per MMA molecule at pH 5 and they interact with high affinity to form insoluble complexes. Both electrostatic and hydrophobic forces are involved in the formation of the complex. The structure of trypsin is not affected by the presence of MMA, although it interacts with some domains of trypsin affecting its thermal denaturation as seen in the differential scanning calorimetry experiments. Its catalytic activity is not altered. Dynamic light scattering demonstrated the presence of a soluble trypsin-copolymer complex at pH 5 and 8. Turbidimetric assays show that the insoluble complex can be dissolved by low ionic strength and/or pH in order to obtain free native trypsin. PMID:26612727

  8. Effect of trypsin inhibitor activity in soya bean on growth performance, protein digestibility and incidence of sub-clinical necrotic enteritis in broiler chicken flocks.

    PubMed

    Palliyeguru, M W C D; Rose, S P; Mackenzie, A M

    2011-06-01

    1. The effect of three different levels of dietary trypsin inhibitor activity (achieved by varying the amount of non-toasted full fat soya bean in replacement for toasted full fat soya bean) on the incidence of spontaneously-occurring sub-clinical necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens was compared. A fourth dietary treatment compared the effect of a diet that used potato protein concentrate as the major protein source. The determined trypsin inhibitor activity increased with the increasing content of non-toasted soya bean: 1·90, 6·21, 8·46 and 3·72 mg/g for the three soya bean diets (0, 100 and 200 g of non-toasted soya bean/kg) and the potato protein diet respectively. 2. Although increasing amounts of the non-toasted full-fat soya bean increased the feed intakes of the birds, there was a marked reduction in protein digestibility, weight gain and feed conversion efficiency. 3. There was a linear increase in sub-clinical NE lesions in the duodenum, jejunum, mid small intestine and ileum with increasing non-toasted soya bean. Caecal Clostridium perfringens counts increased with the increasing dietary content of non-toasted soya bean. Serum α-toxin antibodies were higher in the birds fed the 200 g non-toasted soya bean/kg diet compared with the other diets. 4. The results demonstrated that variation in the amount of non-toasted dietary soya bean not only affects growth performance of broilers but also affects the incidence of sub-clinical necrotic enteritis in the flock. Ensuring the lowest possible trypsin-inhibitor activity in soya bean samples is a valuable tool to improve the health and welfare of birds and in reducing the financial losses from this disease.

  9. Isolation and characteristics of trypsin inhibitor from the hepatopancreas of a squid (Todarodes pacificus).

    PubMed

    Kishimura, H; Saeki, H; Hayashi, K

    2001-08-01

    Trypsin inhibitor was purified from the hepatopancreas of squid (Todarodes pacificus). The final inhibitor preparation was nearly homogeneous by SDS-PAGE with an estimated molecular weight of approximately 6300. The squid trypsin inhibitor was acid- and heat-stable, and active against trypsins from the pyloric ceca of starfish (Asterias amurensis) and saury (Cololabis saira) and porcine pancreatic trypsin. Amino acid composition of the squid trypsin inhibitor was compared with other invertebrate trypsin inhibitors. The squid trypsin inhibitor inhibited the autolysis of walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) myofibrillar proteins. PMID:11470450

  10. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Seminole Native American Veterans serve as color guard during a pre-launch Native American ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. David Nunez, U.S. Navy, carries the State of Florida Flag; David Stephen Bowers, U.S. Army, carries the Flag of the United States of America; Charles Billie Hiers, U.S. Marine Corps., carries the Seminole Tribe of Florida Flag. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  11. Synergistic Enhancement of the Antifungal Activity of Wheat and Barley Thionins by Radish and Oilseed Rape 2S Albumins and by Barley Trypsin Inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Terras, FRG.; Schoofs, HME.; Thevissen, K.; Osborn, R. W.; Vanderleyden, J.; Cammue, BPA.; Broekaert, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    Although thionins and 2S albumins are generally considered as storage proteins, both classes of seed proteins are known to inhibit the growth of pathogenic fungi. We have now found that the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) or barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) thionin concentration required for 50% inhibition of fungal growth is lowered 2- to 73-fold when combined with 2S albumins (at sub- or noninhibitory concentrations) from radish (Raphanus sativus L.) or oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). Furthermore, the thionin antifungal activity is synergistically enhanced (2- to 33-fold) by either the small subunit or the large subunit of the radish 2S albumins. Three other 2S albumin-like proteins, the barley trypsin inhibitor and two barley Bowman-Birk-type trypsin inhibitor isoforms, also act synergistically with the thionins (2- to 55-fold). The synergistic activity of thionins combined with 2S albumins is restricted to filamentous fungi and to some Gram-positive bacteria, whereas Gram-negative bacteria, yeast, cultured human cells, and erythrocytes do not show an increased sensitivity to thionin/albumin combinations (relative to the sensitivity to the thionins alone). Scanning electron microscopy and measurement of K+ leakage from fungal hyphae revealed that 2S albumins have the same mode of action as thionins, namely the permeabilization of the hyphal plasmalemma. Moreover, 2S albumins and thionins act synergistically in their ability to permeabilize fungal membranes. PMID:12232024

  12. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Chickasaw Indian princesses 'sign' the Lord's Prayer during a Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The princesses are Crystal Underwood, Julie Underwood and Tamela Alexander. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  13. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Indian princesses seen here contributed to a pre-launch Native American ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex by leading a prayer. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  14. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Indian princesses pose with folk singer Buffy Saint- Marie (center) during a Native American ceremony held in the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. Several days of activities were held at KSC and in Orlando commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  15. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Singer Buffy Sainte-Marie sings during a pre-launch Native American ceremony in the Rocket Garden of the KSC Visitor Complex. She herself is a Cree. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  16. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Tribal Elder Lee Frazier leads the dedication to the astronauts of STS-113 during the Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  17. Role of trypsin-like cleavage at arginine 192 in the enzymatic and cytotonic activities of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, C C; Messer, R J; Cieplak, W

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin have suggested that proteolytic cleavage plays an important role in the expression of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and toxicity. Specifically, several studies have implicated a trypsin-like cleavage at arginine 192, which lies within an exposed region subtended by a disulfide bond in the intact A subunit, in toxicity. To investigate the role of this modification in the enzymatic and cytotonic properties of heat-labile enterotoxin, the response of purified, recombinant A subunit to tryptic activation and the effect of substituting arginine 192 with glycine on the activities of the holotoxin were examined. The recombinant A subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin exhibited significant levels of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity that were only nominally increased (approximately twofold) by prior limited trypsinolysis. The enzymatic activity also did not appear to be affected by auto-ADP-ribosylation that occurs during the high-level synthesis of the recombinant A subunit in E. coli. A mutant form of the holotoxin containing the arginine 192-to-glycine substitution exhibited levels of cytotonic activity for CHO cells that were similar to that of the untreated, wild-type holotoxin but exhibited a marked delay in the ability to increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in Caco-2 cells. The results indicate that trypsin-like cleavage of the A subunit of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin at arginine 192 is not requisite to the expression of enzymatic activity by the A subunit and further reveal that this modification, although it enhances the biological and enzymatic activities of the toxin, is not absolutely required for the enterotoxin to elicit cytotonic effects. Images PMID:7927684

  18. Protective effect of Carbopol on enzymatic degradation of a peptide-like substrate. I: Effect of various concentrations and grades of Carbopol and other reaction variables on trypsin activity.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, A P; Wigent, R J; Moore, J C; Schwartz, J B

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the effect of various concentrations and grades of Carbopol on trypsin-induced degradation of a prototype substrate, N(alpha)-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester hydrochloride (BAEE). Effect of other reaction variables, such as viscosity and ionic strength of the medium on the trypsin activity, was also analyzed simultaneously. Four concentrations and three commercially available grades of Carbopol were used. The effect of Carbopol was expressed in terms of change in the velocity of degradation reaction. A modified trypsin assay was developed and used for analysis. Up to a concentration of 0.35% w/v, Carbopol 934P showed a concentration-dependent increase in its ability to reduce the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of BAEE. Similar inhibitory effect was observed with all three grades of Carbopol. The activity of trypsin was unaffected by other reaction variables, suggesting that interaction between the protein and the polymer could be the mechanism responsible for reduced trypsin activity. This study suggests that Carbopol can be a useful excipient for oral delivery of bioactive proteins and peptides, due to its ability to reduce the enzyme-induced degradation of these agents.

  19. Virulence testing and extracellular subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) activity during propagule production of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus isolates from whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Moguel, Judith; González-Barajas, Margarita; Mier, Teresa; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío; Aranda, Eduardo; Toriello, Conchita

    2007-03-01

    To properly characterize several isolates of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus, a fungal entomopathogen of whiteflies (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and other insect pests for biocontrol purposes, virulence towards Trialeurodes vaporariorum, and subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) protease activity during propagule production were investigated in monospore cultures (MCs). The virulence of three MCs towards second instar whiteflies was measured and expressed as lethal median concentration (LC50). Number and widthlength ratio of propagules (blastospores, hyphal bodies, short hyphae, submerged conidia) and extracellular proteolytic activity was determined simultaneously in liquid medium. Total protease activity was assayed with azocasein, Pr1 and Pr2 activity was determined with the substrates N-Succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide and N-Benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-pnitroanilide, respectively. Natural variability in virulence, propagule production and cuticle-degrading proteases among isolates was observed. Bioassays showed a LC50 of 1.1 x 1,000, 2.5 x 10,000 and 7.6 x 10,000 conidia/ml for MCs EH-506/3, EH-503/3 and EH-520/3, respectively, EH-506/3 being the most virulent isolate. Isolate EH-503/3 produced the highest yield of propagules (7.7 x 10000000 propagules/ml), followed by EH-520/3 with 6.4 x 10000000 and EH-506/3 with 1.0 x 10000000 propagules/ml. Subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) activity was present in the three MCs. Subtilisin-like (Pr1) activity was highest (745.7 UPr1/ml at 120 h) in the most virulent isolate, EH-506/3, pointing at Pr1 as a phenotypic marker of virulence for P. fumosoroseus. EH-506/3 appears to be a good candidate for whitefly biocontrol due to its high virulence, Pr1 concentration and rapid transition to blastospores in submerged liquid medium.

  20. A rational design for improving the trypsin resistance of aflatoxin-detoxifizyme (ADTZ) based on molecular structure evaluation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuxin; Wu, Xiyang; Xie, Chunfang; Hu, Yadong; Liu, Daling; Ma, Yi; Yao, Dongsheng

    2016-05-01

    The resistance of feed enzymes against proteases is crucial in livestock farming. In this study, the trypsin resistance of aflatoxin-detoxifizyme (ADTZ) is improved. ADTZ possesses 72 lys/arg residue sites, 45 of which are scattered on the outermost layers of the molecule (RSA≧25%). These 45 lys/arg sites could be target sites for trypsin hydrolysis. By considering shape-matching (including physical and secondary bond interactions) and the "induced fit-effect", we hypothesized that some of these lys/arg sites are vulnerable to trypsin. A protein-protein docking simulation method was used to avoid the massive computational requirements and to address the intricacy of selecting candidate sites, as candidate site selection is affected by space displacement. Optimal mutants (K244Q/K213C/K270T and R356E/K357T/R623C) were predicted by computational design with protein folding energy analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. A trypsin digestion assay was performed, and the mutants displayed much higher stability against trypsin hydrolysis compared to the native enzyme. Moreover, temperature- and pH-activity profiles revealed that the designed mutations did not affect the catalytic activity of the enzyme. PMID:26992797

  1. A rational design for improving the trypsin resistance of aflatoxin-detoxifizyme (ADTZ) based on molecular structure evaluation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuxin; Wu, Xiyang; Xie, Chunfang; Hu, Yadong; Liu, Daling; Ma, Yi; Yao, Dongsheng

    2016-05-01

    The resistance of feed enzymes against proteases is crucial in livestock farming. In this study, the trypsin resistance of aflatoxin-detoxifizyme (ADTZ) is improved. ADTZ possesses 72 lys/arg residue sites, 45 of which are scattered on the outermost layers of the molecule (RSA≧25%). These 45 lys/arg sites could be target sites for trypsin hydrolysis. By considering shape-matching (including physical and secondary bond interactions) and the "induced fit-effect", we hypothesized that some of these lys/arg sites are vulnerable to trypsin. A protein-protein docking simulation method was used to avoid the massive computational requirements and to address the intricacy of selecting candidate sites, as candidate site selection is affected by space displacement. Optimal mutants (K244Q/K213C/K270T and R356E/K357T/R623C) were predicted by computational design with protein folding energy analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. A trypsin digestion assay was performed, and the mutants displayed much higher stability against trypsin hydrolysis compared to the native enzyme. Moreover, temperature- and pH-activity profiles revealed that the designed mutations did not affect the catalytic activity of the enzyme.

  2. A laundry detergent-stable alkaline trypsin from striped seabream (Lithognathus mormyrus) viscera: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    El Hadj Ali, Nedra; Hmidet, Noomen; Bougatef, Ali; Nasri, Rim; Nasri, Moncef

    2009-11-25

    An alkaline trypsin from the intestine of striped seabream (Lithognathus mormyrus) was purified and characterized. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by precipitation with ammonium sulfate, Sephadex G-100 gel filtration and CM-Sephadex cation-exchange chromatography, with a 24.9-fold increase in specific activity and 13% recovery. The molecular weight of the purified alkaline trypsin was estimated to be 27.5 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and size exclusion chromatography. The purified trypsin appeared as a single band on native PAGE. Interestingly, the enzyme was highly active over a wide range of pH from 8.0 to 11.0, with an optimum at pH 10.0 using Nalpha-benzoyl-dl-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA) as a substrate. The relative activities at pH 8.0, 11.0, and 12.0 were 73%, 67% and 50.4%, respectively. The enzyme was extremely stable over a broad pH range (5.0-12.0). The optimum temperature for enzyme activity was 50 degrees C. The purified enzyme was strongly inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). In addition, the enzyme showed excellent stability toward various surfactants and bleache agents and compatibility with some commercial solid and liquid detergents. The trypsin kinetic constants, Km and kcat of the enzyme for BAPNA, were 0.29 mM and 1.36 s(-1), respectively, while the catalytic efficiency kcat/Km was 4.68 s(-1) mM(-1).

  3. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  4. Neural activation in speech production and reading aloud in native and non-native languages.

    PubMed

    Berken, Jonathan A; Gracco, Vincent L; Chen, Jen-Kai; Soles, Jennika; Watkins, Kate E; Baum, Shari; Callahan, Megan; Klein, Denise

    2015-05-15

    We used fMRI to investigate neural activation in reading aloud in bilinguals differing in age of acquisition. Three groups were compared: French-English bilinguals who acquired two languages from birth (simultaneous), French-English bilinguals who learned their L2 after the age of 5 years (sequential), and English-speaking monolinguals. While the bilingual groups contrasted in age of acquisition, they were matched for language proficiency, although sequential bilinguals produced speech with a less native-like accent in their L2 than in their L1. Simultaneous bilinguals activated similar brain regions to an equivalent degree when reading in their two languages. In contrast, sequential bilinguals more strongly activated areas related to speech-motor control and orthographic to phonological mapping, the left inferior frontal gyrus, left premotor cortex, and left fusiform gyrus, when reading aloud in L2 compared to L1. In addition, the activity in these regions showed a significant positive correlation with age of acquisition. The results provide evidence for the engagement of overlapping neural substrates for processing two languages when acquired in native context from birth. However, it appears that the maturation of certain brain regions for both speech production and phonological encoding is limited by a sensitive period for L2 acquisition regardless of language proficiency.

  5. Native New Zealand plants with inhibitory activity towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants have long been investigated as a source of antibiotics and other bioactives for the treatment of human disease. New Zealand contains a diverse and unique flora, however, few of its endemic plants have been used to treat tuberculosis. One plant, Laurelia novae-zelandiae, was reportedly used by indigenous Maori for the treatment of tubercular lesions. Methods Laurelia novae-zelandiae and 44 other native plants were tested for direct anti-bacterial activity. Plants were extracted with different solvents and extracts screened for inhibition of the surrogate species, Mycobacterium smegmatis. Active plant samples were then tested for bacteriostatic activity towards M. tuberculosis and other clinically-important species. Results Extracts of six native plants were active against M. smegmatis. Many of these were also inhibitory towards M. tuberculosis including Laurelia novae-zelandiae (Pukatea). M. excelsa (Pohutukawa) was the only plant extract tested that was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our data provide support for the traditional use of Pukatea in treating tuberculosis. In addition, our analyses indicate that other native plant species possess antibiotic activity. PMID:20537175

  6. Protein hydrolysis by immobilized and stabilized trypsin.

    PubMed

    Marques, Daniela; Pessela, Benavides C; Betancor, Lorena; Monti, Rubens; Carrascosa, Alfonso V; Rocha-Martin, Javier; Guisán, Jose M; Fernandez-Lorente, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of novel immobilized and stabilized derivatives of trypsin is reported here. The new derivatives preserved 80% of the initial catalytic activity toward synthetic substrates [benzoyl-arginine p-nitroanilide (BAPNA)] and were 50,000-fold more thermally stable than the diluted soluble enzyme in the absence of autolysis. Trypsin was immobilized on highly activated glyoxyl-Sepharose following a two-step immobilization strategy: (a) first, a multipoint covalent immobilization at pH 8.5 that only involves low pK(a) amino groups (e.g., those derived from the activation of trypsin from trypsinogen) is performed and (b) next, an additional alkaline incubation at pH 10 is performed to favor an intense, additional multipoint immobilization between the high concentration of proximate aldehyde groups on the support surface and the high pK(a) amino groups at the enzyme surface region that participated in the first immobilization step. Interestingly, the new, highly stable trypsin derivatives were also much more active in the proteolysis of high molecular weight proteins when compared with a nonstabilized derivative prepared on CNBr-activated Sepharose. In fact, all the proteins contained a cheese whey extract had been completely proteolyzed after 6 h at pH 9 and 50°C, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Under these experimental conditions, the immobilized biocatalysts preserve more than 90% of their initial activity after 20 days. Analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the best immobilized trypsin derivative showed a surface region containing two amino terminal groups and five lysine (Lys) residues that may be responsible for this novel and interesting immobilization and stabilization. Moreover, this region is relatively far from the active site of the enzyme, which could explain the good results obtained for the hydrolysis of high-molecular weight proteins.

  7. [Abscisic acid level, activities of proteinases and trypsin inhibitory proteins in the germinating seeds of common beans under conditions of water stress].

    PubMed

    Domash, V I; Protsko, R F; Vasiuk, V A; Shumikhin, S V; Ermolitskaia, L V; Sharpio, T P

    2006-01-01

    Specific features of changes in the contents of free and bound abscisic acid (ABA) and activities of neutral and alkaline proteinases and trypsin inhibitory proteins were determined in the embryonic axis and cotyledons of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) after drying. The changes in ABA content, observed following the loss of 5% seed weight, were regarded as an adaptive reaction to stress, whereas the corresponding changes after the loss of 10% seed weight, as a result of pathological disturbance of ABA metabolism. Both drying modes had a negative effect on the state of the proteinase-inhibitory system, as was apparent from the disruption of the regular inverse correlation between the activities of proteinases and serine proteinase inhibitory proteins. Comparison of the dynamics of these characteristics with the buildup of water stress demonstrated an inverse correlation between the content of free ABA and the activity of the proteinases studied. This suggests a potential inhibitory effect of this hormone on the function of the hydrolases in question in the germinating seed.

  8. Effects of soybean trypsin inhibitor on hypopharyngeal gland protein content, total midgut protease activity and survival of the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Sagili, Ramesh R; Pankiw, Tanya; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2005-09-01

    Insecticidal properties of protease inhibitors have been established in transgenic plants. In the wake of continuous research and rapid development of protease inhibitors it is important to assess possible effects on beneficial insects like the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.). In this study, newly emerged caged bees were fed pollen diets containing three different concentrations (0.1%, 0.5% and 1% w:w) of soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). Hypopharyngeal gland protein content, total midgut proteolytic enzyme activity of these bees, and survival were measured. Bees fed 1% SBTI had significantly reduced hypopharyngeal gland protein content and midgut proteolytic enzyme activity. There were no significant differences between control, 0.1% and 0.5% SBTI treatments. Bees fed a diet containing 1% SBTI had the lowest survival, followed by 0.5% and 0.1%, over a 30-day period. We concluded that nurse bees fed a pollen diet containing at least 1% SBTI would be poor producers of larval food, potentially threatening colony growth and maintenance. PMID:15927200

  9. Metabolism of poly- -hydroxybutyrate: effect of mild alkaline extraction on native poly- -hydroxybutyrate granules.

    PubMed

    Griebel, R J; Merrick, J M

    1971-11-01

    Mild alkaline extraction of native poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules results in the solubilization of a protein fraction. Both the solubilized protein fraction and the extracted granules are essentially devoid of PHB synthetase activity unless recombined. The protein fraction has been separated by chromatography into two components (A-I and A-II). A-I but not A-II can be recombined with extracted granules to give rise to PHB synthetase activity. Extracted granules no longer require pretreatment with activator or trypsin but are directly susceptible to hydrolysis by Rhodospirillum rubrum depolymerase. Addition of A-II or A-I prevents the direct hydrolysis by depolymerase. The inhibition is reversed by activator or trypsin. We conclude that native granules are associated with a protein inhibitor which prevents the hydrolysis of PHB by depolymerase unless the protein is destroyed by trypsin, removed by alkaline extraction, or modified by activator. PMID:5001870

  10. Dissociating Cortical Activity during Processing of Native and Non-Native Audiovisual Speech from Early to Late Infancy.

    PubMed

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Bortfeld, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Initially, infants are capable of discriminating phonetic contrasts across the world's languages. Starting between seven and ten months of age, they gradually lose this ability through a process of perceptual narrowing. Although traditionally investigated with isolated speech sounds, such narrowing occurs in a variety of perceptual domains (e.g., faces, visual speech). Thus far, tracking the developmental trajectory of this tuning process has been focused primarily on auditory speech alone, and generally using isolated sounds. But infants learn from speech produced by people talking to them, meaning they learn from a complex audiovisual signal. Here, we use near-infrared spectroscopy to measure blood concentration changes in the bilateral temporal cortices of infants in three different age groups: 3-to-6 months, 7-to-10 months, and 11-to-14-months. Critically, all three groups of infants were tested with continuous audiovisual speech in both their native and another, unfamiliar language. We found that at each age range, infants showed different patterns of cortical activity in response to the native and non-native stimuli. Infants in the youngest group showed bilateral cortical activity that was greater overall in response to non-native relative to native speech; the oldest group showed left lateralized activity in response to native relative to non-native speech. These results highlight perceptual tuning as a dynamic process that happens across modalities and at different levels of stimulus complexity. PMID:25116572

  11. Dissociating Cortical Activity during Processing of Native and Non-Native Audiovisual Speech from Early to Late Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Bortfeld, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Initially, infants are capable of discriminating phonetic contrasts across the world’s languages. Starting between seven and ten months of age, they gradually lose this ability through a process of perceptual narrowing. Although traditionally investigated with isolated speech sounds, such narrowing occurs in a variety of perceptual domains (e.g., faces, visual speech). Thus far, tracking the developmental trajectory of this tuning process has been focused primarily on auditory speech alone, and generally using isolated sounds. But infants learn from speech produced by people talking to them, meaning they learn from a complex audiovisual signal. Here, we use near-infrared spectroscopy to measure blood concentration changes in the bilateral temporal cortices of infants in three different age groups: 3-to-6 months, 7-to-10 months, and 11-to-14-months. Critically, all three groups of infants were tested with continuous audiovisual speech in both their native and another, unfamiliar language. We found that at each age range, infants showed different patterns of cortical activity in response to the native and non-native stimuli. Infants in the youngest group showed bilateral cortical activity that was greater overall in response to non-native relative to native speech; the oldest group showed left lateralized activity in response to native relative to non-native speech. These results highlight perceptual tuning as a dynamic process that happens across modalities and at different levels of stimulus complexity. PMID:25116572

  12. A functional comparison of ovine and porcine trypsins.

    PubMed

    Dallas Johnson, Keryn; Clark, Alan; Marshall, Sue

    2002-03-01

    Trypsin was isolated from ovine and porcine pancreas using affinity chromatography on immobilized p-aminobenzamidine. Molecular masses of the two proteins were 23900 and 23435 Da, determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. The purified trypsins were compared using the kinetic properties K(m) and k(cat) which were determined at pH 8.0 and between 25 and 55 degrees C. Comparison of the Michaelis constants for ovine and porcine trypsins toward N-alpha-benzoyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BapNA) indicated that ovine trypsin had higher affinity for this substrate than the porcine enzyme. The rates of the reactions catalysed by the two enzymes correlated strongly over the range of temperatures and substrate concentrations tested, as did the k(cat) values. The specific activity of ovine trypsin for BapNA was, on average, approximately 10% higher than that of the porcine enzyme over the range of conditions tested. Porcine trypsin was less susceptible to denaturation at low pH or high temperature than was ovine trypsin. Porcine and ovine trypsin produced seven identically sized fragments from auto-catalytic hydrolysis. Proposed regions of identity between ovine and porcine trypsins were I(54)-K(77), L(98)-R(107), S(134)-K(178) and N(209)-K(116). Hydrolysis of beta-lactoglobulin, egg white lysozyme or casein by ovine or porcine trypsin yielded virtually identical patterns of fragments although the rate at which fragments were produced, in the case of beta-lactoglobulin, differed between the two enzymes. On balance the two enzymes appear to be functionally identical in their action. PMID:11959024

  13. Micropollutant degradation via extracted native enzymes from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Krah, Daniel; Ghattas, Ann-Kathrin; Wick, Arne; Bröder, Kathrin; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-05-15

    A procedure was developed to assess the biodegradation of micropollutants in cell-free lysates produced from activated sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This proof-of-principle provides the basis for further investigations of micropollutant biodegradation via native enzymes in a solution of reduced complexity, facilitating downstream protein analysis. Differently produced lysates, containing a variety of native enzymes, showed significant enzymatic activities of acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase and β-glucuronidase in conventional colorimetric enzyme assays, whereas heat-deactivated controls did not. To determine the enzymatic activity towards micropollutants, 20 compounds were spiked to the cell-free lysates under aerobic conditions and were monitored via LC-ESI-MS/MS. The micropollutants were selected to span a wide range of different biodegradabilities in conventional activated sludge treatment via distinct primary degradation reactions. Of the 20 spiked micropollutants, 18 could be degraded by intact sludge under assay conditions, while six showed reproducible degradation in the lysates compared to the heat-deactivated negative controls: acetaminophen, N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole (acetyl-SMX), atenolol, bezafibrate, erythromycin and 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine (10-OH-CBZ). The primary biotransformation of the first four compounds can be attributed to amide hydrolysis. However, the observed biotransformations in the lysates were differently influenced by experimental parameters such as sludge pre-treatment and the addition of ammonium sulfate or peptidase inhibitors, suggesting that different hydrolase enzymes were involved in the primary degradation, among them possibly peptidases. Furthermore, the transformation of 10-OH-CBZ to 9-CA-ADIN was caused by a biologically-mediated oxidation, which indicates that in addition to hydrolases further enzyme classes (probably oxidoreductases) are present in the native lysates. Although the

  14. Micropollutant degradation via extracted native enzymes from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Krah, Daniel; Ghattas, Ann-Kathrin; Wick, Arne; Bröder, Kathrin; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-05-15

    A procedure was developed to assess the biodegradation of micropollutants in cell-free lysates produced from activated sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This proof-of-principle provides the basis for further investigations of micropollutant biodegradation via native enzymes in a solution of reduced complexity, facilitating downstream protein analysis. Differently produced lysates, containing a variety of native enzymes, showed significant enzymatic activities of acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase and β-glucuronidase in conventional colorimetric enzyme assays, whereas heat-deactivated controls did not. To determine the enzymatic activity towards micropollutants, 20 compounds were spiked to the cell-free lysates under aerobic conditions and were monitored via LC-ESI-MS/MS. The micropollutants were selected to span a wide range of different biodegradabilities in conventional activated sludge treatment via distinct primary degradation reactions. Of the 20 spiked micropollutants, 18 could be degraded by intact sludge under assay conditions, while six showed reproducible degradation in the lysates compared to the heat-deactivated negative controls: acetaminophen, N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole (acetyl-SMX), atenolol, bezafibrate, erythromycin and 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine (10-OH-CBZ). The primary biotransformation of the first four compounds can be attributed to amide hydrolysis. However, the observed biotransformations in the lysates were differently influenced by experimental parameters such as sludge pre-treatment and the addition of ammonium sulfate or peptidase inhibitors, suggesting that different hydrolase enzymes were involved in the primary degradation, among them possibly peptidases. Furthermore, the transformation of 10-OH-CBZ to 9-CA-ADIN was caused by a biologically-mediated oxidation, which indicates that in addition to hydrolases further enzyme classes (probably oxidoreductases) are present in the native lysates. Although the

  15. Bulgur processes increase nutrition value: possible role in in-vitro protein digestability, phytic acid, trypsin inhibitor activity and mineral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Ertaş, Nilgün; Türker, Selman

    2014-07-01

    Changes in the chemical constituents and nutritive quality of chickpea bulgur process, were studied in seeds that were soaked at different time (2, 8 and 12 h), different soaking water pH (pH 4, 6 and 8). Soaking in pH 8 soaking water and 12 h soaking time significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the ash content of chickpea bulgur samples. Compared to the raw material, the protein content and in-vitro protein digestibility increased, but starch, crude fiber, fat and energy values decreased and trypsin inhibitor activity was completely eliminated by bulgur process. As the soaking time increased, the phytic acid content also decreased. The highest total phenolic content was determinated with bulgur samples soaked in pH 4 soaking water. The P, Ca, and K values decreased with increasing soaking time. The HCl-extractability of P, Ca, Mg, Fe and K present in chickpea bulgur samples were significantly higher than the raw chickpea seeds. PMID:24966437

  16. Interference by Gastrografin with a spectrophotometric trypsin assay

    PubMed Central

    Cowen, A. E.; McGeary, Heather M.; Campbell, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    Small quantities of Gastrografin remaining in the intestinal tract some hours after introduction have been shown to cause falsely low trypsin values as determined by a spectrophotometric assay system. This interference is due first to the high absorbance of Gastrografin at 254 nm resulting in a falsely high background optical density. Secondly, Gastrografin inhibits esterase activity towards the synthetic substrate used in this assay. Gastrografin did not interfere with gelatin proteolysis by trypsin and did not affect amylase or lipase determination. Thus the instillation of Gastrografin into the duodenum before pancreatic function tests should be avoided when the trypsin content is to be determined spectrophotometrically. PMID:5036096

  17. Interaction of methotrexate with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Zhou, Qiuhua

    2013-11-01

    Trypsin is one of important digestive enzymes that have intimate correlation with human health and illness. In this work, the interaction of trypsin with methotrexate was investigated by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results revealed that methotrexate could interact with trypsin with about one binding site. Methotrexate molecule could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis implied that electrostatic force, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions were the main interactions for stabilizing the trypsin-methotrexate system, which agreed well with the results from the molecular modeling study.

  18. In vivo bioinsecticidal activity toward Ceratitis capitata (fruit fly) and Callosobruchus maculatus (cowpea weevil) and in vitro bioinsecticidal activity toward different orders of insect pests of a trypsin inhibitor purified from tamarind tree (Tamarindus indica) seeds.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carina L; Bezerra, Ingrid W L; Oliveira, Adeliana S; Moura, Fabiano T; Macedo, Leonardo L P; Gomes, Carlos E M; Barbosa, Aulus E A D; Macedo, Francisco P; Souza, Tánia M S; Franco, Octavio L; Bloch-J, Carlos; Sales, Mauricio P

    2005-06-01

    A proteinaceous inhibitor with high activity against trypsin-like serine proteinases was purified from seeds of the tamarind tree (Tamarindus indica) by gel filtration on Shephacryl S-200 followed by a reverse-phase HPLC Vidac C18 TP. The inhibitor, called the tamarind trypsin inhibitor (TTI), showed a Mr of 21.42 kDa by mass spectrometry analysis. TTI was a noncompetitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 1.7 x 10(-9) M. In vitro bioinsecticidal activity against insect digestive enzymes from different orders showed that TTI had remarkable activity against enzymes from coleopteran, Anthonomus grandis (29.6%), Zabrotes subfasciatus (51.6%), Callosobruchus maculatus (86.7%), Rhyzopertha dominica(88.2%), and lepidopteron, Plodia interpuncptella (26.7%), Alabama argillacea (53.8%), and Spodoptera frugiperda (75.5%). Also, digestive enzymes from Diptera, Ceratitis capitata (fruit fly), were inhibited (52.9%). In vivo bioinsecticidal assays toward C. capitata and C. maculatus larvae were developed. The concentration of TTI (w/w) in the artificial seed necessary to cause 50% mortality (LD50) of larvae was 3.6%, and that to reduce mass larvae by 50.0% (ED50) was 3.2%. Furthermore, the mass C. capitata larvae were affected at 53.2% and produced approximately 34% mortality at a level of 4.0% (w/w) of TTI incorporated in artificial diets.

  19. THE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF CRYSTALLINE TRYPSIN

    PubMed Central

    Scherp, Henry W.

    1933-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of crystalline trypsin in 0.5 saturated magnesium sulfate at 5°C. is 0.020 ±0.001 cm.2 per day, corresponding to a molecular radius of 2.6 x 10–7 cm. The rate of diffusion of the proteolytic activity is the same as that of the protein nitrogen, indicating that these two properties are held together in chemical combination and not in the form of an adsorption complex. PMID:19872740

  20. Characterization and expression of trypsinogen and trypsin in medaka testis.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Sanath; Ogiwara, Katsueki; Takahashi, Takayki

    2014-12-01

    Previously, we reported that the medaka testis abundantly expresses the mRNA for trypsinogen, which is a well-known pancreatic proenzyme that is secreted into and activated in the intestine. Currently, we report our characterization of the medaka trypsin using a recombinant enzyme and show that this protein is a serine protease that shares properties with trypsins from other species. Two polypeptides (28- and 26-kDa) were detected in the testis extracts by Western blot analysis using antibodies that are specific for medaka trypsinogen. The 28-kDa polypeptide was shown to be trypsinogen (inactive precursor), and the 26-kDa polypeptide was shown to be trypsin (active protease). We did not detect enteropeptidase, which is the specific activator of trypsinogen, in the testis extract. Immunohistochemical analyses using the same trypsinogen-specific antibody produced a strong signal in the spermatogonia and spermatozoa of the mature medaka testis. Substantial staining was found with spermatocytes, whereas extremely weak signals were observed with spermatids. In vitro incubation of testis fragments with the trypsinogen antibody strongly inhibited the release of sperm from the testis into the medium. Trypsin activity was detected in sperm extracts using gelatin zymographic analysis. Immunocytochemistry showed that trypsinogen and trypsin were localized to the cell membranes surrounding the sperm head. Collectively, these results suggest that trypsin plays an important role in the testis function of the medaka.

  1. Conformational selection in trypsin-like proteases

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Nicola; Vogt, Austin D.; Gohara, David W.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    For over four decades, two competing mechanisms of ligand recognition – conformational selection and induced-fit - have dominated our interpretation of protein allostery. Defining the mechanism broadens our understanding of the system and impacts our ability to design effective drugs and new therapeutics. Recent kinetics studies demonstrate that trypsin-like proteases exist in equilibrium between two forms: one fully accessible to substrate (E) and the other with the active site occluded (E*). Analysis of the structural database confirms existence of the E* and E forms and vouches for the allosteric nature of the trypsin fold. Allostery in terms of conformational selection establishes an important paradigm in the protease field and enables protein engineers to expand the repertoire of proteases as therapeutics. PMID:22664096

  2. THE INACTIVATION OF TRYPSIN BY X-RAYS

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Harry; Northrop, John H.

    1925-01-01

    1. The inactivating effect of soft x-rays on trypsin in solutions of various degrees of concentration has been studied. 2. It has been found to run parallel with spontaneous heat inactivation. It is almost, if not entirely, confined to the free or active trypsin. 3. Under radiation of constant intensity, the inactivation follows the simple exponential law which indicates a monomolecular reaction. 4. Estimates have been made of the amount of ionization required to inactivate trypsin to half value in these experiments and in those of Hussey and Thompson, who employed the beta rays from Radium B and C. The close agreement corroborates the idea that the effect is a function of ionization only. 5. The nature of the process of inactivation is discussed; inactivation seems to result from electrical neutralization of the trypsin ion. PMID:19872235

  3. Ring flips revisited: (13)C relaxation dispersion measurements of aromatic side chain dynamics and activation barriers in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Ulrich; Modig, Kristofer; Akke, Mikael

    2014-07-22

    Intramolecular motions of proteins are critical for biological function. Transient structural fluctuations underlie a wide range of processes, including enzyme catalysis, ligand binding to buried sites, and generic protein motions, such as 180° rotation of aromatic side chains in the protein interior, but remain poorly understood. Understanding the dynamics and molecular nature of concerted motions requires characterization of their rates and energy barriers. Here we use recently developed (13)C transverse relaxation dispersion methods to improve our current understanding of aromatic ring flips in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). We validate these methods by benchmarking ring-flip rates against the three previously characterized cases in BPTI, namely, Y23, Y35, and F45. Further, we measure conformational exchange for one additional aromatic ring, F22, which can be interpreted in terms of a flip rate of 666 s(-1) at 5 °C. Upon inclusion of our previously reported result that Y21 also flips slowly [Weininger, U., et al. (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 9241-9247], the (13)C relaxation dispersion experiments thus reveal relatively slow ring-flip rates for five of eight aromatic residues in BPTI. These results are in contrast with previous reports, which have estimated that all rings, except Y23, Y35, and F45, flip with a high rate at ambient temperature. The (13)C relaxation dispersion data result in an updated rank order of ring-flip rates in BPTI, which agrees considerably better with that estimated from a recent 1 ms molecular dynamics trajectory than do previously published NMR data. However, significant quantitative differences remain between experiment and simulation, in that the latter yields flip rates that are in many cases too fast by 1-2 orders of magnitude. By measuring flip rates across a temperature range of 5-65 °C, we determined the activation barriers of ring flips for Y23, Y35, and F45. Y23 and F45 have identical activation parameters

  4. Immunological activity difference between native calreticulin monomers and oligomers.

    PubMed

    He, Mi-chun; Wang, Jun; Wu, Jian; Gong, Fang-yuan; Hong, Chao; Xia, Yun; Zhang, Li-juan; Bao, Wan-rong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the greatly increased immunological activities of recombinant murine calreticulin (rCRT) are largely attributed to its self-oligomerization. Although native CRT (nCRT) can also oligomerize under stress conditions in vitro, whether this phenomenon could occur inside cells and the immunological activity difference between nCRT monomers and oligomers remained unclear. In this study, we illustrated the formation of CRT oligomers in tranfectant cells under "heat & low pH" (42°C/pH 6.5) condition. The mixture of nCRT oligomers and monomers (OnCRT) was obtained after 3 hr treatment of murine monomeric nCRT (MnCRT) under similar condition (42°C/pH 5.0) in vitro. The OnCRT thus obtained was better recognized by 2 monoclonal Abs from mice that had been immunized with oligomeric rCRT. Unlike MnCRT, OnCRT was able to elicit CRT-specific IgG production in mice. OnCRT also stimulated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) to secrete significantly higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40 than did MnCRT in vitro. We postulate that oligomerization of soluble CRT may occur under certain pathophysiological conditions (e.g. ultrahyperpyrexia) and the resultant oligomers may exhibit exaggerated immunostimulating activities, thereby affiliating the inflammatory responses in vivo.

  5. Investigation on potential enzyme toxicity of clenbuterol to trypsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Jun; Xu, Qifei; Dai, Jinping; Liu, Rutao

    2013-03-01

    Clenbuterol (CLB) is a kind of β2-adrenergic agonists which was illegally used as feed additives nowadays. The toxic interaction of CLB with trypsin, an important digestive enzyme, was studied in vitro using multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling methods. CLB was proved to bind with trypsin in S1 pocket, forming a complex driven by the dominant force of H-bond. The binding constant was calculated to be 1.79887 × 105 L mol-1 at 289 K and 0.32584 × 105 L mol-1 at 310 K, respectively. The skeleton of trypsin became loosened and unfolded with the amino residues microenvironment changed. The secondary and tertiary structure of trypsin also varied. Molecular modeling studies illustrated specific display of the binding information and explained most of the experiment phenomena. The binding site of CLB induced the fluorescence quenching as well as inhibition of enzyme activity of trypsin. The study confirmed that CLB had potential toxicity on both the structure and function of trypsin and the effects enhanced with the increasing concentration of CLB.

  6. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Chickasaw Dance troupe member Tim Harjo (second from left) leads Joyce and James Herrington in a dance honoring their son, STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington. The dance was part of a Native American ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex commemorating Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission.

  7. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Joyce and James Herrington, parents of John Herrington, accept a gift during a pre-launch Native American ceremony. They are the parents of John Herrington, mission specialist on mission STS-113. Herrington is the first Native American to be going into space.

  8. Maize (Zea mays)-derived bovine trypsin: characterization of the first large-scale, commercial protein product from transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Susan L; Mayor, Jocelyne M; Bailey, Michele R; Barker, Donna K; Love, Robert T; Lane, Jeffrey R; Delaney, Donna E; McComas-Wagner, Janet M; Mallubhotla, Hanuman D; Hood, Elizabeth E; Dangott, Lawrence J; Tichy, Shane E; Howard, John A

    2003-10-01

    Bovine trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) is an enzyme that is widely used for commercial purposes to digest or process other proteins, including some therapeutic proteins. The biopharmaceutical industry is trying to eliminate animal-derived proteins from manufacturing processes due to the possible contamination of these products by human pathogens. Recombinant trypsin has been produced in a number of systems, including cell culture, bacteria and yeast. To date, these expression systems have not produced trypsin on a scale sufficient to fulfill the need of biopharmaceutical manufacturers where kilogram quantities are often required. The present paper describes commercial-level production of trypsin in transgenic maize (Zea mays) and its physical and functional characterization. This protease, the first enzyme to be produced on a large-scale using transgenic plant technology, is functionally equivalent to native bovine pancreatic trypsin. The availability of this reagent should allow for the replacement of animal-derived trypsin in the processing of pharmaceutical proteins.

  9. Porphyrin Induced Laser Deactivation of Trypsinogen-Trypsin Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perido, Joanna; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatitis is caused by the inflammation of the pancreas, where the digestive enzyme trypsin is activated from the precursor enzyme trypsinogen while still in the pancreas. The presence of trypsin in the pancreas causes auto-activation of trypsinogen, resulting in greater inflammation and auto-digestion of the pancreas. In severe cases, this cascade effect can lead to organ failure, diabetes, and pancreatic cancer. Our hypothesis is that if trypsinogen is prevented from auto-activating into trypsin, then this cascade can be stopped. We propose to do this by inducing conformational changes in trypsinogen when bound to a photoactive porphyrin dye. Porphyrins are comprised of four linked heterocyclic groups forming a flat ring, and bind well with proteins such as trypsinogen. In this study we used spectroscopic techniques to probe the binding of meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatephenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) to trypsinogen in vitro, as a preliminary step to then prompt and characterize conformational changes of trypsinogen through irradiation. If conformational changes are detected the trypsinogen will be tested for trypsin inactivation. This investigation may provide promising initial results to the possible use of porphyrins as an inhibitor of the self-activation of trypsinogen into trypsin, and a potential inhibitor of pancreatitis. MARC*U-STAR.

  10. The NESA Activities Handbook for Native and Multicultural Classrooms. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Don, Comp.; Napoleon, Art, Comp.

    This book, the second of three volumes, contains educational, culture-sensitive activities tested and designed for use in native and multicultural classrooms. The activities, developed Native Education Services Associates, stress the importance of culture in students' lives, and teaches them basic personal and community-related skills so they may…

  11. The NESA Activities Handbook for Native and Multicultural Classrooms. Volume Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Don, Comp.; Lundeberg, Wayne, Comp.

    This book, the last of three volumes, contains educational, culture-sensitive activities tested and designed for use in native and multicultural classrooms. The activities, developed by Native Education Services Associates, stress the importance of culture in students' lives, and teaches them basic personal and community-related skills so they may…

  12. Trypsin-induced lysis of lipid vesicles: effect of surface charge and lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Liu, D; Huang, L

    1992-04-01

    We have made a curious observation that the proteolytic enzyme, trypsin, induced a rapid and complete release of the contents of vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and oleic acid (OA). Content release at 37 degrees C, monitored by the release of an entrapped fluorescence marker (calcein), was accompanied by an extensive vesicle aggregation. The lytic activity of trypsin on the vesicles depended on pH and liposome composition. The optimal pH for vesicle lysis was below pH 7.4, which was different from the optimal pH for catalytic activity of trypsin. The lytic activity of trypsin was specific for vesicles composed of DOPE and fatty acids such as OA and palmitoleic acid; vesicles composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, N-methyl-DOPE, and OA, or DOPE combined with other negatively charged lipids such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid were not sensitive to trypsin. Inhibition of enzyme activity by trypsin inhibitors did not abolish the lytic activity, suggesting that the lytic activity of trypsin is not related to the catalytic activity. However, the lytic activity of trypsin on vesicles composed of DOPE and OA was inhibited in the presence of excess vesicles containing negative charges, or by a pretreatment of trypsin with acylating reagent to reduce the positive-charge content of trypsin. These data demonstrate that vesicle aggregation and lysis are the results of electrostatic interactions of positive charges on trypsin and negative charges on the vesicles. Phase separation and transition to nonbilayer phases of the vesicle lipids are likely involved.

  13. Immobilization of trypsin onto 1,4-diisothiocyanatobenzene-activated porous glass for microreactor-based peptide mapping by capillary electrophoresis: effect of calcium ions on the immobilization procedure.

    PubMed

    Dartiguenave, Catherine; Hamad, Hussein; Waldron, Karen C

    2010-03-24

    The immobilization conditions and kinetic behaviour of trypsin, covalently immobilized via the 1,4-diisothiocyanatobenzene (DITC) linker onto aminopropylated controlled pore glass (CPG) particles, have been evaluated to establish a rapid and efficient protocol for fabrication of an immobilized enzyme microreactor (IMER) for protein hydrolysis and subsequent peptide mapping. Addition of calcium ions to either the immobilization reaction solution or hydrolysis assay was studied for a synthetic substrate. Activity was slightly higher when immobilization was carried out in the presence of Ca(2+) whereas more enzyme could be immobilized in its absence. A protocol requiring less than 3 h was devised to obtain maximal enzymatic activity with the lowest ratio of soluble trypsin to DITC-CPG particles. The resulting immobilized enzyme was found to retain an acceptable percentage (ca. 35%) of its activity after immobilization. The particles were dry-packed into a capillary to make a microscale IMER. Repeatability, reusability and digestion efficiency of the microIMER were investigated for the substrate beta-casein using capillary electrophoretic-based peptide mapping. In initial tests, a single device showed reproducible peptide maps for 21 digestions lasting 2 h each, carried out over a period of 2 months. Complete digestion of beta-casein could be achieved in a few minutes (86 s residence time in the microIMER followed by a wash step).

  14. Multiple trypsin inhibitors from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds, the Chinese drug mubiezhi.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ricardo C H; Fong, W P; Ng, T B

    2004-02-01

    Five trypsin inhibitors, with N-terminal sequences demonstrating homology to each other and exhibiting a molecular weight of 5100, 4800, 4400, 4100, and 3900, respectively, were isolated from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds with a protocol involving acid extraction, ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose chromatography, and RP-HPLC on a C18 column. Specific inhibitory activity against trypsin was demonstrated by the trypsin isoinhibitors with Ki values ranging from 5.3 x 10(-8) to 1.8 x 10(-6) M. None of the isoinhibitors could be cleaved by trypsin. PMID:15062996

  15. Multiple trypsin inhibitors from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds, the Chinese drug mubiezhi.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ricardo C H; Fong, W P; Ng, T B

    2004-02-01

    Five trypsin inhibitors, with N-terminal sequences demonstrating homology to each other and exhibiting a molecular weight of 5100, 4800, 4400, 4100, and 3900, respectively, were isolated from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds with a protocol involving acid extraction, ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose chromatography, and RP-HPLC on a C18 column. Specific inhibitory activity against trypsin was demonstrated by the trypsin isoinhibitors with Ki values ranging from 5.3 x 10(-8) to 1.8 x 10(-6) M. None of the isoinhibitors could be cleaved by trypsin.

  16. Highly Stable Trypsin-Aggregate Coatings on Polymer Nanofibers for Repeated Protein Digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byoung Chan; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Lee, Sang-mok; Ahn, Hye-kyung; Nair, Sujith; Kim, Seong H.; Kim, Beom S.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Camp, David G.; Grate, Jay W.; Smith, Richard D.; Koo, Yoon-mo; Gu, Man Bock; Kim, Jungbae

    2009-04-01

    A stable and robust trypsin-based biocatalytic system was developed and demonstrated for proteomic applications. The system utilizes polymer nanofibers coated with trypsin aggregates for immobilized protease digestions. After covalently attaching an initial layer of trypsin to the polymer nanofibers, highly concentrated trypsin molecules are crosslinked to the layered trypsin by way of a glutaraldehyde treatment. This new process produced a 300-fold increase in trypsin activity compared with a conventional method for covalent trypsin immobilization and proved to be robust in that it still maintained a high level of activity after a year of repeated recycling. This highly stable form of immobilized trypsin was also resistant to autolysis, enabling repeated digestions of bovine serum albumin over 40 days and successful peptide identification by LC-MS/MS. Finally, the immobilized trypsin was resistant to proteolysis when exposed to other enzymes (i.e. chymotrypsin), which makes it suitable for use in “real-world” proteomic applications. Overall, the biocatalytic nanofibers with enzyme aggregate coatings proved to be an effective approach for repeated and automated protein digestion in proteomic analyses.

  17. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During an administrator's briefing at the IMAX 2 theatre, Lt. Gov. Jefferson Keel of the Chickasaw Nation (far left) presents a blanket with the seal of the Chickasaw Nation to NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (second from right). Next to O'Keefe is Chickasaw Gov. Bill Anoatubby. Next to Gov. Keel is Mrs. Laura O'Keefe. STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington is a tribally enrolled Chickasaw and the world's first Native American astronaut. Kennedy Space Center hosted more than 350 Native Americans in STS-113 prelaunch events surrounding the historic mission assignment of Herrington.

  18. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mr. and Mrs. Sean O'Keefe (center) pose with officials of the Chickasaw Nation. Second from left is Lt. Gov. Jefferson Keel with his wife, Carol (far left). Second from right is Gov. Bill Anoatubby with his wife, Janice (far right). STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington is a tribally enrolled Chickasaw and the world's first Native American astronaut. Kennedy Space Center hosted more than 350 Native Americans in STS-113 prelaunch events surrounding the historic mission assignment of Herrington.

  19. 78 FR 32243 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Native American Career and Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Native American Career and Technical Education... Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP) Performance Reports. OMB Control Number: 1830-0573. Type... Annual Burden Hours: 1,200. Abstract: The Native American Career and Technical Education Program...

  20. Internet Activities and Developmental Predictors: Gender Differences among Digital Natives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve Marie

    2011-01-01

    Widespread adoption of the Internet during the past two decades has produced the first generation of digital natives. Ninety-five children (M[subscript age] = 10.4 years) completed a questionnaire that measured three clusters of variables: 1) Internet use at home and school, 2) peer, school, and home self-esteem, 3) and cognitive abilities…

  1. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Nation Cultural Resources Director Haskell Alexander (left) presents a gift to Joyce and James Herrington, parents of John Herrington, mission specialist on mission STS-113. Herrington is the first Native American to be going into space.

  2. Supercritical fluid assisted production of micrometric powders of the labile trypsin and chitosan/trypsin composite microparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-Bin; Guan, Yi-Xin; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2015-07-15

    Supercritical fluid assisted atomization introduced by a hydrodynamic cavitation mixer (SAA-HCM) was used to prepare micrometric particles of a labile protein, i.e., trypsin from aqueous solution without use of any organic solvents. The trypsin particles precipitated had various morphologies under different process conditions, with particle diameters ranging from 0.2 to 4 μm. FTIR, SDS-PAGE, CD and fluorescence spectra were performed to analyze the structural stability of the protein, and trypsin retained above 70% of the biological activity. Besides, chitosan was selected as the polymer carrier in an effort to prepare trypsin composite microparticles via SAA-HCM process. The influences of chitosan molecular weight, polymer/protein ratio and solution concentration on the particle morphology and size distribution were investigated in detail. Non-coalescing spherical composite microparticles with a narrow particle distribution (0.2-3 μm) could be obtained. The SAA-HCM prepared particles were amorphous as demonstrated by XRD and had a loading efficiency about 90%. The protein release profiles of the composite microparticles were evaluated using both the immersion condition and a Franz diffusion cell. Finally, the distribution of the protein within the particles was characterized through CLSM analysis of FITC-labeled trypsin-loaded chitosan microparticles. The SAA-HCM process is demonstrated to be a protein-friendly and promising technique for production of protein and polymer/protein composite particles formulations from aqueous solutions for drug delivery systems. PMID:25957701

  3. Comprehensive analysis of protein digestion using six trypsins reveals the origin of trypsin as a significant source of variability in proteomics1

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Scott J.; Rudnick, Paul A.; Liang, Yuxue; Dong, Qian; Stein, Stephen E.; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    2014-01-01

    Trypsin is an endoprotease commonly used for sample preparation in proteomics experiments. Importantly, protein digestion is dependent on multiple factors, including the trypsin origin and digestion conditions. In-depth characterization of trypsin activity could lead to improved reliability of peptide detection and quantitation in both targeted and discovery proteomics studies. To this end, we assembled a data analysis pipeline and suite of visualization tools for quality control and comprehensive characterization of pre-analytical variability in proteomics experiments. Using these tools, we evaluated six available proteomics-grade trypsins and their digestion of a single purified protein, human serum albumin (HSA). HSA was aliquoted and then digested for 2 or 18 hours for each trypsin, and the resulting digests were desalted and analyzed in triplicate by reversed phase liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry. Peptides were identified and quantified using the NIST MSQC pipeline and a comprehensive HSA mass spectral library. We performed a statistical analysis of peptide abundances from different digests, and further visualized the data using the principal component analysis and quantitative protein “sequence maps”. While the performance of individual trypsins across repeat digests was reproducible, significant differences were observed depending on the origin of the trypsin (i.e., bovine vs. porcine). Bovine trypsins produced a higher number of peptides containing missed cleavages, whereas porcine trypsins produced more semi-tryptic peptides. In addition, many cleavage sites showed variable digestion kinetics patterns, evident from the comparison of peptide abundances in 2 hour vs. 18 hour digests. Overall, this work illustrates effects of an often neglected source of variability in proteomics experiments: the origin of the trypsin. PMID:24116745

  4. Streptomyces erythraeus Trypsin Inactivates α1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Vukoti, Krishna M.; Kadiyala, Chandra Sekhar Rao; Miyagi, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) is a serine protease that is secreted extracellularly by Streptomyces erythraeus. We investigated the inhibitory effect of α1-antitrypsin on the catalytic activity of SET. Intriguingly, we found that SET is not inhibited by α1-antitrypsin. Our investigations into the molecular mechanism underlying this observation revealed that SET hydrolyzes the Met-Ser bond in the reaction center loop of α1-antitrypsin. However, SET somehow avoids entrapment by α1-antitrypsin. We also confirmed that α1-antitrypsin loses its inhibitory activity after incubation with SET. Thus, our study demonstrates that SET is not only resistant to α1-antitrypsin but also inactivates α1-antitrypsin. PMID:22115549

  5. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyaniline to stabilize immobilized trypsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, J. C.; D. Mercês, A. A.; Cabrera, M.; Shigeyosi, W. T.; de Souza, S. D.; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Fabris, J. D.; Cardoso, C. A.; Neri, D. F. M.; C. Silva, M. P.; Carvalho, L. B.

    2016-12-01

    It is reported the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles via the chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3+ ions and their preparation by coating them with polyaniline. The electronic micrograph analysis showed that the mean diameter for the nanoparticles is ˜15 nm. FTIR, powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical, crystallographic and 57Fe hyperfine structures for the two samples. The nanoparticles, which exhibited magnetic behavior with relatively high spontaneous magnetization at room temperature, were identified as being mainly formed by maghemite ( γFe2O3). The coated magnetic nanoparticles (sample labeled "mPANI") presented a real ability to bind biological molecules such as trypsin, forming the magnetic enzyme derivative (sample "mPANIG-Trypsin"). The amount of protein and specific activity of the immobilized trypsin were found to be 13±5 μg of protein/mg of mPANI (49.3 % of immobilized protein) and 24.1±0.7 U/mg of immobilized protein, respectively. After 48 days of storage at 4 ∘C, the activity of the immobilized trypsin was found to be 89 % of its initial activity. This simple, fast and low-cost procedure was revealed to be a promising way to prepare mPANI nanoparticles if technological applications addressed to covalently link biomolecules are envisaged. This route yields chemically stable derivatives, which can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture with a magnetic field and recyclable reused.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1914 - Trypsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are....1914 Trypsin. (a) Trypsin (CAS Reg. No. 9002-07-7) is an enzyme preparation obtained from purified extracts of porcine or bovine pancreas. It is a white to tan amorphous powder. Its characterizing...

  7. Probing the binding of procyanidin B3 to trypsin and pepsin: A multi-technique approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangrong; Geng, Mingjiang

    2016-04-01

    Proanthocyanidins are a mixture of monomers, oligomers, and polymers of flavan-3-ols that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. One of the most widely studied proanthocyanidins is procyanidin B3. In this study, the binding of procyanidin B3 to trypsin and pepsin was investigated using spectrofluorimetry, equilibrium microdialysis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Fluorescence experiments indicate procyanidin B3 quenches the fluorescence of trypsin/pepsin through a static process. Thermodynamic analysis reveals that procyanidin B3 binds to trypsin/pepsin is synergistically driven by enthalpy and entropy, and the major driving forces are hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interactions. Procyanidin B3 binds trypsin in a more firmly way than pepsin, and one molecule of procyanidin B3 combines with one molecule of trypsin/pepsin. The binding parameters obtained from equilibrium microdialysis are consistent with the results obtained from fluorescence spectroscopy. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and CD spectroscopy show that procyanidin B3 may induce microenvironmental and conformational changes of trypsin and pepsin. Molecular modeling displays the specific binding site of procyanidin B3 on trypsin and pepsin. The study provides an accurate and full basic data for clarifying the binding mechanisms of procyanidin B3 with trypsin and pepsin and is helpful for understanding its biological activity in vivo. PMID:26740464

  8. Mechanism of cinnamic acid-induced trypsin inhibition: a multi-technique approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Zhou, Qiuhua; Cao, Jian; Wang, Yanqing

    2013-12-01

    In order to investigate the association of the protease trypsin with cinnamic acid, the interaction was characterized by using fluorescence, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, molecular modeling and an enzymatic inhibition assay. The binding process may be outlined as follows: cinnamic acid can interact with trypsin with one binding site to form cinnamic acid-trypsin complex, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity; the spectroscopic data show that the interaction is a spontaneous process with the estimated enthalpy and entropy changes being -8.95 kJ mol(-1) and 50.70 J mol(-1) K(-1), respectively. Noncovalent interactions make the main contribution to stabilize the trypsin-cinnamic acid complex; cinnamic acid can enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket and alter the environment around Trp and Tyr residues.

  9. Evaluation of the toxicity of ionic liquids on trypsin: A mechanism study.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunchang; Dong, Xing; Yan, Lingling; Li, Dandan; Hua, Shaofeng; Hu, Chaobing; Pan, Chengcheng

    2016-04-01

    The toxicity of ionic liquids (ILs) was evaluated by using trypsin as biomarker. Experimental results indicated that the trypsin activity was inhibited by ILs and the degree of inhibition highly depended on the chemical structures of ILs. Primary analysis illustrated that hydrophobicity of ILs was one of the driven forces ruling the ILs-trypsin interaction. Thermodynamic parameters, Gibbs free energy change (ΔG), enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were obtained by analyzing the fluorescence behavior of trypsin in the presence of ILs. Both negative ΔH and ΔS suggested hydrogen bonding was the major driven force underlying the IL-trypsin interaction. To assess the toxicity of ILs, it should be considered the combination of the hydrogen bonding ability and hydrophobicity of ILs. A regression based model was established to correlate the relationship of the inhibitory ability, hydrophobicity and hydrogen bonding ability of ILs.

  10. Evaluation of the toxicity of ionic liquids on trypsin: A mechanism study.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunchang; Dong, Xing; Yan, Lingling; Li, Dandan; Hua, Shaofeng; Hu, Chaobing; Pan, Chengcheng

    2016-04-01

    The toxicity of ionic liquids (ILs) was evaluated by using trypsin as biomarker. Experimental results indicated that the trypsin activity was inhibited by ILs and the degree of inhibition highly depended on the chemical structures of ILs. Primary analysis illustrated that hydrophobicity of ILs was one of the driven forces ruling the ILs-trypsin interaction. Thermodynamic parameters, Gibbs free energy change (ΔG), enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were obtained by analyzing the fluorescence behavior of trypsin in the presence of ILs. Both negative ΔH and ΔS suggested hydrogen bonding was the major driven force underlying the IL-trypsin interaction. To assess the toxicity of ILs, it should be considered the combination of the hydrogen bonding ability and hydrophobicity of ILs. A regression based model was established to correlate the relationship of the inhibitory ability, hydrophobicity and hydrogen bonding ability of ILs. PMID:26807945

  11. Influence of black gram (Vigna mungo) trypsin inhibitory fraction on the hepatic protein catabolism in male albino mice.

    PubMed

    Kamalakannan, V; Sathyamoorthy, A V; Motlag, D B

    1984-01-01

    The effect of black gram and black gram trypsin inhibitor on the protein catabolism of male albino mice has been investigated. Group 1 was given autoclaved black gram (control), Group II raw black gram and Group III the autoclaved black gram incorporated with 1% black gram trypsin inhibitor. Blood as well as urinary urea and creatine were found to be elevated in Groups II and III. Increased levels of arginase, ornithine transcarbamylase and transaminases were noted in Groups II and III. The results suggested an enhanced catabolism of proteins evoked by the native black gram trypsin inhibitor.

  12. Carbonic anhydrase activity in the red blood cells of sea level and high altitude natives.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, J; Caceda, R; Gamboa, A; Monge-C, C

    2000-01-01

    Red blood cell carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has not been studied in high altitude natives. Because CA is an intraerythocytic enzyme and high altitude natives are polycythemic, it is important to know if the activity of CA per red cell volume is different from that of their sea level counterparts. Blood was collected from healthy subjects living in Lima (150m) and from twelve subjects from Cerro de Pasco (4330m), and hematocrit and carbonic anhydrase activity were measured. As expected, the high altitude natives had significantly higher hematocrits than the sea level controls (p = 0.0002). No difference in the CA activity per milliliter of red cells was found between the two populations. There was no correlation between the hematocrit and CA activity.

  13. U.S. Geological Survey activities related to American Indians and Alaska Natives fiscal year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Brunstein, F. Craig

    2006-01-01

    The USGS works in cooperation with American Indian and Alaska Native governments to conduct research on (1) water, energy, and mineral resources, (2) animals and plants that are important for traditional lifeways or have environmental or economic significance, and (3) natural hazards. This report describes most of the activities that the USGS conducted with American Indian and Alaska Native governments, educational institutions, and individuals during Federal fiscal year (FY) 2004. Most of these USGS activities were collaborations with Tribes, Tribal organizations, or professional societies. Other activities were conducted cooperatively with the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) or other Federal entities.

  14. The NESA Activities Handbook for Native and Multicultural Classrooms. [Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Don, Comp.; Green, Howard, Comp.

    This book, the first of three volumes, contains a collection of activities designed for or appropriate to the native Indian or multicultural classroom. Levels range from kindergarten to grade 12. Some of the activities have been borrowed from other sources, but many have been developed or adapted and are available here for the first time. The…

  15. Does Pedometer Goal Setting Improve Physical Activity among Native Elders? Results from a Randomized Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Craig N.; Russo, Joan E.; Charles, Steve; Goldberg, Jack; Forquera, Ralph; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    We examined if step-count goal setting resulted in increases in physical activity and walking compared to only monitoring step counts with pedometers among American Indian/Alaska Native elders. Outcomes included step counts, self-reported physical activity and well-being, and performance on the 6-minute walk test. Although no significant…

  16. U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives: Fiscal Year 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcus, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This report describes the activities that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted with American Indian and Alaska Native governments, educational institutions, and individuals during Federal fiscal year (FY) 2005. Most of these USGS activities were collaborations with Tribes, Tribal organizations, or professional societies. Others were conducted cooperatively with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) or other Federal entities. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). The USGS does not have regulatory or land management responsibilities. As described in this report, there are many USGS activities that are directly relevant to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and to Native lands. A USGS website, dedicated to making USGS more accessible to American Indians, Alaska Natives, their governments, and institutions, is available at www.usgs.gov/indian. This website includes information on how to contact USGS American Indian/Alaska Native Liaisons, training opportunities, and links to other information resources. This report and previous editions are also available through the website. The USGS realizes that Native knowledge and cultural traditions of living in harmony with nature result in unique Native perspectives that enrich USGS studies. USGS seeks to increase the sensitivity and openness of its scientists to the breadth of Native knowledge, expanding the information on which their research is based. USGS scientific studies include data collection, mapping, natural resource modeling, and research projects. These projects typically last 2 or 3 years, although some are parts of longer-term activities. Some projects are funded cooperatively, with USGS funds matched or supplemented by individual Tribal governments, or by the BIA. These projects may also receive funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Indian Health Service (part of the Department of Health and Human Services

  17. Trypsin inactivation by latex fabricated gold nanoparticles: A new strategy towards insect control.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Borase, Hemant P; Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Patil, Satish V

    2016-10-01

    Before applying nanotechnologies in biomedical and environmental areas it is advised to study interactions of nanoparticles and other nanomaterials with biomacromolecule present in living system. Moreover there is scarcity of reports on interactions between nanoparticles and biomaterials. In present report a rapid, ecofriendly method of fabricating stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using latex of Jatropha curcas is reported for the first time. AuNPs found to have characteristic absorption maxima centered at 540nm, multiple irregular shapes with size range from 20 to 50nm and have crystalline nature. Latex fabricated AuNPs were found to inhibit catalytic potential of trypsin (a vital enzyme responsible for digestion, insecticide resistance and in several disease conditions). The interactions between AuNPs and trypsin were analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometry and microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry which suggests formation of trypsin-AuNPs complex responsible for lowering catalytic activity of trypsin. Transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and particle size distribution studies further confirm complex formation between trypsin and AuNPs. Diverse interactions of metal nanoparticles with proteins such as covalent interaction, electrostatic interactions and binding to SH group of amino acid may be the reasons behind inhibition of trypsin activity. In vivo studies on serum of several vectors and agriculturally important pests supported instrumental results on AuNPs induced trypsin inhibition. This work will bring a new research direction to explore eco-friendly nanoparticle in insect control via inhibition of enzyme catalytic potential.

  18. Trypsin inactivation by latex fabricated gold nanoparticles: A new strategy towards insect control.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Borase, Hemant P; Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Patil, Satish V

    2016-10-01

    Before applying nanotechnologies in biomedical and environmental areas it is advised to study interactions of nanoparticles and other nanomaterials with biomacromolecule present in living system. Moreover there is scarcity of reports on interactions between nanoparticles and biomaterials. In present report a rapid, ecofriendly method of fabricating stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using latex of Jatropha curcas is reported for the first time. AuNPs found to have characteristic absorption maxima centered at 540nm, multiple irregular shapes with size range from 20 to 50nm and have crystalline nature. Latex fabricated AuNPs were found to inhibit catalytic potential of trypsin (a vital enzyme responsible for digestion, insecticide resistance and in several disease conditions). The interactions between AuNPs and trypsin were analyzed by UV-vis spectrophotometry and microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry which suggests formation of trypsin-AuNPs complex responsible for lowering catalytic activity of trypsin. Transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and particle size distribution studies further confirm complex formation between trypsin and AuNPs. Diverse interactions of metal nanoparticles with proteins such as covalent interaction, electrostatic interactions and binding to SH group of amino acid may be the reasons behind inhibition of trypsin activity. In vivo studies on serum of several vectors and agriculturally important pests supported instrumental results on AuNPs induced trypsin inhibition. This work will bring a new research direction to explore eco-friendly nanoparticle in insect control via inhibition of enzyme catalytic potential. PMID:27542740

  19. Preparing bioactive surface of polystyrene with hydrophobin for trypsin immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Baolong; Li, Bingzhang; Wang, Huifang; Guo, Ruijie; Liang, HaiXia; Qiao, Mingqiang; Li, Wenfeng

    2016-05-01

    A simple and reliable enzyme immobilization technique which can retain their catalytic activity for a long time is interest in many technologies. Here, the trypsin was immobilized by physisorption on polystyrene (PS) surface coated with a class I hydrophobin recombinant HGFI (rHGFI). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water-contact-angle measurements demonstrated that the hydrophobicity of the PS could be well improved by rHGFI modification, and the self-assembled rHGFI showed an admirable stability on the hydrophobic PS surface against hot SDS rinsing. The enzyme activity assay illustrated that the capacity of rHGFI could enable it to well intermediate trypsin on PS surface and allow its immobilization lasting in an active form. The results obtained in this work show a way that surface modification with rHGFI should be an easy and feasible strategy for applications of enzyme-based catalytic surfaces in biosensing.

  20. A mutant trypsin-like enzyme from Streptomyces fradiae, created by site-directed mutagenesis, improves affinity chromatography for protein trypsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Katoh, T; Kikuchi, N; Nagata, K; Yoshida, N

    1996-08-01

    The Ser-170 residue of a trypsin-like enzyme from Streptomyces fradiae (SFT), which is considered to be the active-site serine, was replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis to improve the affinity chromatography step for a Kazal-type trypsin inhibitor pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI). The resulting mutant SFT, designated as [S170A]SFT, was expressed in Streptomyces lividans and purified to homogeneity. [S170A]SFT was catalytically inactive, but still had the ability to bind tightly to PSTI and to soybean trypsin inhibitor with dissociation constants of 3.1 x 10(-7) M and 1.9 x 10(-8) M respectively. We further demonstrated that recombinant human PSTI secreted into Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture broth could be purified to homogeneity with a one-step [S170A]SFT-affinity column. The purified PSTI contained no molecules intramolecularly cleaved by active trypsin, which are found when trypsin-affinity chromatography is used for the purification. This eliminated the need for further separation of intact PSTI from intramolecularly cleaved PSTI by high-performance liquid chromatography, thus simplifying and improving its purification process.

  1. Antioxidant activity and potential photoprotective from amazon native flora extracts.

    PubMed

    Martins, Francislene J; Caneschi, César A; Vieira, José L F; Barbosa, Wagner; Raposo, Nádia R B

    2016-08-01

    Plant species are sources of active compounds that can fight and/or prevent damage caused by reactive oxygen species, which enables the development of natural products that can help to prevent premature aging caused by exposure to solar radiation. This study assessed the antioxidant and photoprotective activities of six dried extracts of plants from the Brazilian Amazon biome. Plant extracts were prepared in 70% (v/v) ethanol by dynamic maceration for 72h in the dark, and then filtered, concentrated and lyophilized. The extracts were subjected to a phytochemical screening. The antioxidant activity was measured using a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and the photoprotection assay was performed using the diffuse transmittance technique. The data obtained from the antioxidant activity assay was evaluated by Student's t-test for independent samples, with the aid of Statistical Package for Social Sciences v.14.0 for Windows software. The flavonoids represent a special metabolites class present in all analyzed extracts. The antioxidant activity (μgmL(-1)) decreased in the following order: Aniba canelilla (1.80±0.16), Brosimum acutifolium (2.84±0.38), Dalbergia monetaria (5.46±0.17) or Caesalpinia pyramidalis (6.45±1.18), Arrabidaea chica (15.35±0.86), and Aspidosperma nitidum (99.14±2.3). Only D. monetaria showed a considerable sun protection factor allowing for labeling (6.0±0.3). The D. monetaria extract was considered the most promising sample because it had optimal antioxidant and photoprotective activities against solar radiation, considering the limit established by regulatory agencies. These extracts with antioxidant potential can be used in photoprotective formulations, providing synergistic photoprotective effect or elevating the adeed value of the product. Additionally, these formulations are attractive to a population who searchs for products made with natural ingredients. PMID:27208744

  2. Biochemical evidence of specific trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors in the rhynchobdellid leech, Theromyzon tessulatum.

    PubMed

    Chopin, V; Stefano, G; Salzet, M

    2000-01-01

    The presence of two specific trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors from head parts of the rhynchobdellid leech Theromyzon tessulatum is reported. Two proteins, anti-trypsin chymotrypsin A (ATCA; 14636.6 +/- 131 Da) and anti-trypsin-chymotrypsin B (ATCB; 14368 +/- 95 Da) were purified by size exclusion and anion-exchange chromatography followed by reversed-phase HPLC. Based on amino-acid composition, N-terminal sequence determination (MELCELGQSCSRD-NPQPSNM), matrix assisted laser desorption-time of flight measurement (MALDI-TOF), trypsin mapping comparison, inhibition constant determination (Ki), and influence on amidolytic activity of different serine proteases, it is demonstrated that ATCA and ATCB are novel and highly potent serine-protease inhibitors of trypsin and chymotrypsin (ATCA: 350fM towards trypsin and chymotrypsin; ATCB: 400 and 75 fM towards trypsin and chymotrypsin, respectively). It is further surmised that ATCA and ATCB are linked, in that ATCB would lead to the formation of ATCA after loss of few amino acid residues.

  3. Reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor has a compact structure.

    PubMed

    Amir, D; Haas, E

    1988-12-13

    The conformation of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (R-BPTI) under reducing conditions was monitored by measurements of nonradiative excitation energy-transfer efficiencies (E) between a donor probe attached to the N-terminal Arg1 residue and an acceptor attached to one of the lysine residues (15, 26, 41, or 46) [Amir, D., & Haas, E. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 2162-2175]. High-excitation energy-transfer efficiencies that approach those found in the native state were obtained for the reduced labeled BPTI derivatives in 0.5 M guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn.HCl) and 4 mM DTT. Unlike the dependence expected for a random coil chain, E does not decrease as a function of the number of residues between the labeled sites. The efficiency of energy transfer between probes attached to residues 1 and 15 in the reduced state is higher than that found for the same pair of sites in the native state or reduced unfolded (in 6 M Gdn.HCl) state. This segment also shows high dynamic flexibility. These results indicate that the overall structure of reduced BPTI under folding (but still reducing) conditions shows a high population of conformers with interprobe distances similar to those of the native state. Reduced BPTI seems to be in a molten globule state characterized by a flexible, compact structure, which probably reorganizes into the native structure when the folding is allowed to proceed under oxidizing conditions. PMID:2466482

  4. Differences in aggression, activity and boldness between native and introduced populations of an invasive crayfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pintor, L.M.; Sih, A.; Bauer, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    Aggressiveness, along with foraging voracity and boldness, are key behavioral mechanisms underlying the competitive displacement and invasion success of exotic species. However, do aggressiveness, voracity and boldness of the invader depend on the presence of an ecologically similar native competitor in the invaded community? We conducted four behavioral assays to compare aggression, foraging voracity, threat response and boldness to forage under predation risk of multiple populations of exotic signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus across its native and invaded range with and without a native congener, the Shasta crayfish P. fortis. We predicted that signal crayfish from the invaded range and sympatric with a native congener (IRS) should be more aggressive to outcompete a close competitor than populations from the native range (NR) or invaded range and allopatric to a native congener (IRA). Furthermore, we predicted that IRS populations of signal crayfish should be more voracious, but less bold to forage under predation risk since native predators and prey likely possess appropriate behavioral responses to the invader. Contrary to our predictions, results indicated that IRA signal crayfish were more aggressive towards conspecifics and more voracious and active foragers, yet also bolder to forage under predation risk in comparison to NR and IRS populations, which did not differ in behavior. Higher aggression/voracity/ boldness was positively correlated with prey consumption rates, and hence potential impacts on prey. We suggest that the positive correlations between aggression/voracity/boldness are the result of an overall aggression syndrome. Results of stream surveys indicated that IRA streams have significantly lower prey biomass than in IRS streams, which may drive invading signal crayfish to be more aggressive/voracious/bold to acquire resources to establish a population. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  5. Online and Face-to-Face Activities of Non-Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Carmen Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine non-native English speaking students' activity in face-to-face versus online learning environments. The amount of foreign students in the United States increased by 3% in the academic year 2009-2010 (Open Doors, 2010). Adding close to $20 billion to the USA economy, "higher education is among the…

  6. Native Americans Today: Resources and Activities for Educators, Grades 4-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschfelder, Arlene; Beamer, Yvonne

    This activity guide seeks to dispel misrepresentations of Native Americans and build understanding among cultures by offering a hands-on approach to dissecting the whys and hows of institutionalized racism and by painting a realistic and diverse picture of modern American Indians. Each lesson includes a suggested grade level, materials and time…

  7. Using Active Learning to Teach Culturally Relevant Personal Finance to Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saboe, Lorna

    2014-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching approach that requires students to do something intellectually with course content. This involves examining, questioning, and relating knowledge gained from previous experiences to new knowledge and skills. Native American students have been found to have low financial literacy skills. Family and consumer sciences…

  8. Keepers of the Animals: Native American Stories and Wildlife Activities for Children and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caduto, Michael J.; Bruchac, Joseph

    Twenty-four stories in this book provide a program of study in Native North American Indian culture. The stories introduce the concepts of wildlife ecology and environmental and stewardship issues concerning animals, habitat, and natural history. The field-tested activities encourage creative thinking and synthesis of knowledge and experience by…

  9. Diet Overlap and Foraging Activity between Feral Pigs and Native Peccaries in the Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Galetti, Mauro; Camargo, Hiléia; Siqueira, Tadeu; Keuroghlian, Alexine; Donatti, Camila I; Jorge, Maria Luisa S P; Pedrosa, Felipe; Kanda, Claudia Z; Ribeiro, Milton C

    2015-01-01

    Inter-specific competition is considered one of the main selective pressures affecting species distribution and coexistence. Different species vary in the way they forage in order to minimize encounters with their competitors and with their predators. However, it is still poorly known whether and how native species change their foraging behavior in the presence of exotic species, particularly in South America. Here we compare diet overlap of fruits and foraging activity period of two sympatric native ungulates (the white-lipped peccary, Tayassu pecari, and the collared peccary, Pecari tajacu) with the invasive feral pig (Sus scrofa) in the Brazilian Pantanal. We found high diet overlap between white-lipped peccaries and feral pigs, but low overlap between collared peccaries and feral pigs. Furthermore, we found that feral pigs may influence the foraging period of both native peccaries, but in different ways. In the absence of feral pigs, collared peccary activity peaks in the early evening, possibly allowing them to avoid white-lipped peccary activity peaks, which occur in the morning. In the presence of feral pigs, collared peccaries forage mostly in early morning, while white-lipped peccaries forage throughout the day. Our results indicate that collared peccaries may avoid foraging at the same time as white-lipped peccaries. However, they forage during the same periods as feral pigs, with whom they have lower diet overlap. Our study highlights how an exotic species may alter interactions between native species by interfering in their foraging periods.

  10. Diet Overlap and Foraging Activity between Feral Pigs and Native Peccaries in the Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Galetti, Mauro; Camargo, Hiléia; Siqueira, Tadeu; Keuroghlian, Alexine; Donatti, Camila I; Jorge, Maria Luisa S P; Pedrosa, Felipe; Kanda, Claudia Z; Ribeiro, Milton C

    2015-01-01

    Inter-specific competition is considered one of the main selective pressures affecting species distribution and coexistence. Different species vary in the way they forage in order to minimize encounters with their competitors and with their predators. However, it is still poorly known whether and how native species change their foraging behavior in the presence of exotic species, particularly in South America. Here we compare diet overlap of fruits and foraging activity period of two sympatric native ungulates (the white-lipped peccary, Tayassu pecari, and the collared peccary, Pecari tajacu) with the invasive feral pig (Sus scrofa) in the Brazilian Pantanal. We found high diet overlap between white-lipped peccaries and feral pigs, but low overlap between collared peccaries and feral pigs. Furthermore, we found that feral pigs may influence the foraging period of both native peccaries, but in different ways. In the absence of feral pigs, collared peccary activity peaks in the early evening, possibly allowing them to avoid white-lipped peccary activity peaks, which occur in the morning. In the presence of feral pigs, collared peccaries forage mostly in early morning, while white-lipped peccaries forage throughout the day. Our results indicate that collared peccaries may avoid foraging at the same time as white-lipped peccaries. However, they forage during the same periods as feral pigs, with whom they have lower diet overlap. Our study highlights how an exotic species may alter interactions between native species by interfering in their foraging periods. PMID:26536608

  11. Diet Overlap and Foraging Activity between Feral Pigs and Native Peccaries in the Pantanal

    PubMed Central

    Galetti, Mauro; Camargo, Hiléia; Siqueira, Tadeu; Keuroghlian, Alexine; Donatti, Camila I.; Jorge, Maria Luisa S. P.; Pedrosa, Felipe; Kanda, Claudia Z.; Ribeiro, Milton C.

    2015-01-01

    Inter-specific competition is considered one of the main selective pressures affecting species distribution and coexistence. Different species vary in the way they forage in order to minimize encounters with their competitors and with their predators. However, it is still poorly known whether and how native species change their foraging behavior in the presence of exotic species, particularly in South America. Here we compare diet overlap of fruits and foraging activity period of two sympatric native ungulates (the white-lipped peccary, Tayassu pecari, and the collared peccary, Pecari tajacu) with the invasive feral pig (Sus scrofa) in the Brazilian Pantanal. We found high diet overlap between white-lipped peccaries and feral pigs, but low overlap between collared peccaries and feral pigs. Furthermore, we found that feral pigs may influence the foraging period of both native peccaries, but in different ways. In the absence of feral pigs, collared peccary activity peaks in the early evening, possibly allowing them to avoid white-lipped peccary activity peaks, which occur in the morning. In the presence of feral pigs, collared peccaries forage mostly in early morning, while white-lipped peccaries forage throughout the day. Our results indicate that collared peccaries may avoid foraging at the same time as white-lipped peccaries. However, they forage during the same periods as feral pigs, with whom they have lower diet overlap. Our study highlights how an exotic species may alter interactions between native species by interfering in their foraging periods. PMID:26536608

  12. Ink-native electrophoresis: an alternative to blue-native electrophoresis more suitable for in-gel detection of enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keisuke; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu; Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2013-09-15

    Blue-native electrophoresis (BNE) is a useful technique for analyzing protein complexes, but the Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) dye used in BNE often hampers in-gel detection of enzymatic activity. Here we report an improved method, termed ink-native electrophoresis (INE), in which Pelikan 4001 fountain pen ink is used as a charge-shifting agent instead of CBB. INE is more suitable than BNE for in-gel detection of protein kinase activity after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and its performance in protein complex separation is comparable to that of conventional BNE. INE may provide a powerful tool to isolate and analyze various protein complexes. PMID:23747281

  13. Using Trypsin & Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor to Teach Principles of Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, David R.; Herr, Julie; Hollister, Rhiannon

    2006-01-01

    Trypsin and soybean trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz inhibitor) can be used in a relatively simple and inexpensive student exercise to demonstrate the usefulness of enzyme kinetics. The study of enzyme kinetics is essential to biology because enzymes play such a crucial role in the biochemical pathways of all living organisms. The data from enzyme…

  14. Assessing lay health advisor activity in an intervention to prevent lead poisoning in Native American children.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Michelle Crozier; Stern, Rachel; Whitecrow-Ollis, Sally; Malcoe, Lorraine Halinka

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess patterns of lay health advisor (LHA) activity in an intervention to reduce lead exposure in Native American children exposed to mine waste. A total of 39 LHAs were recruited and trained to become LHAs from eight tribes in northeastern Oklahoma. LHAs completed activity tracking forms over a 2-year intervention period to document contacts made with community groups and individuals in their social networks. They engaged in an average of 5.4 activities per month, reaching an average of 39 persons. Close members of their social networks were reached in 40.4% of the contacts; persons outside of their networks were reached in 24% of the contacts. This study suggests that 1 to 3 contacts per week may be a reasonable expectation for LHA activity. Findings also suggest that LHA interventions are a promising approach for engaging Native American communities in addressing an environmental health problem. PMID:14610989

  15. Trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors from Vigna mungo seeds.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Allen H K; Wong, Jack H; Ng, T B

    2009-01-01

    Three trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors were isolated from seeds of the black gram (Vigna mungo) with a procedure that entailed cation exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, anion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, ion exchange chromatography by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on Mono Q and Mono S, and gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex 75. Two of the trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors were adsorbed on the first four types of chromatographic media. All three inhibitors have a molecular mass of 16 kDa as judged by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The trypsin inhibitory activity of the inhibitors was attenuated in the presence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. The remaining inhibitor was unadsorbed on SP-Sepharose but adsorbed on Q-Sepharose, Mono Q and Mono S. The protease inhibitors did not exert any inhibitory effect on hepatoma (Hep G2) and breast cancer (MCF 7) cells or antifungal action toward Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. Two of the inhibitors slightly inhibited the activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, with an IC50 in the millimolar range.

  16. Isolation and characteristics of trypsin from pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterina pectinifera.

    PubMed

    Kishimura, Hideki; Hayashi, Kenji

    2002-06-01

    Trypsin was purified from pyloric ceca of the starfish Asterina Pectinifera by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and cation-exchange chromatography. Final enzyme preparation was nearly homogeneous in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and its molecular weight was estimated as approximately 28000. Optimum pH and temperature of A. pectinifera trypsin for hydrolysis of N(alpha)-p-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride were approximately pH 8.0 and 55 degrees C, respectively. A. pectinifera trypsin was unstable at above 50 degrees C and below pH 5.0, and was not activated by adding Ca(2+). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of A. pectinifera trypsin, IVGGHEF, was found. PMID:12031475

  17. Crystal Structures of a Plant Trypsin Inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum (EcTI) and of Its Complex with Bovine Trypsin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dongwen; Lobo, Yara A.; Batista, Isabel F. C.; Marques-Porto, Rafael; Gustchina, Alla; Oliva, Maria L. V.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A serine protease inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum (EcTI) belongs to the Kunitz family of plant inhibitors, common in plant seeds. It was shown that EcTI inhibits the invasion of gastric cancer cells through alterations in integrin-dependent cell signaling pathway. We determined high-resolution crystal structures of free EcTI (at 1.75 Å) and complexed with bovine trypsin (at 2 Å). High quality of the resulting electron density maps and the redundancy of structural information indicated that the sequence of the crystallized isoform contained 176 residues and differed from the one published previously. The structure of the complex confirmed the standard inhibitory mechanism in which the reactive loop of the inhibitor is docked into trypsin active site with the side chains of Arg64 and Ile65 occupying the S1 and S1′ pockets, respectively. The overall conformation of the reactive loop undergoes only minor adjustments upon binding to trypsin. Larger deviations are seen in the vicinity of Arg64, driven by the needs to satisfy specificity requirements. A comparison of the EcTI-trypsin complex with the complexes of related Kunitz inhibitors has shown that rigid body rotation of the inhibitors by as much as 15° is required for accurate juxtaposition of the reactive loop with the active site while preserving its conformation. Modeling of the putative complexes of EcTI with several serine proteases and a comparison with equivalent models for other Kunitz inhibitors elucidated the structural basis for the fine differences in their specificity, providing tools that might allow modification of their potency towards the individual enzymes. PMID:23626794

  18. Dissection of the binding of hydrogen peroxide to trypsin using spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Yu, Zehua; Hu, Xinxin; Liu, Rutao

    2015-02-01

    Studies on the effects of environmental pollutants to protein in vitro has become a global attention. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is used as an effective food preservative and bleacher in industrial production. The toxicity of H2O2 to trypsin was investigated by multiple spectroscopic techniques and the molecular docking method at the molecular level. The intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin was proved to be quenched in a static process based on the results of fluorescence lifetime experiment. Hydrogen bonds interaction and van der Waals forces were the main force to generate the trypsin-H2O2 complex on account of the negative ΔH0 and ΔS0. The binding of H2O2 changed the conformational structures and internal microenvironment of trypsin illustrated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) results. However, the binding site was far away from the active site of trypsin and the trypsin activity was only slightly affected by H2O2, which was further explained by molecular docking investigations.

  19. Trypsin immobilization on to polymer surface through grafted layer and its reaction with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kulik, E A; Kato, K; Ivanchenko, M I; Ikada, Y

    1993-08-01

    Trypsin was covalently immobilized and physically adsorbed on to the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) fibres using poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) chains grafted on to the ozonized fibres. The covalent immobilization was accomplished through amide formation between amino groups of trypsin and carboxyl groups of grafted PAAc chains, with the use of water-soluble carbodiimide. A set of samples with surface concentrations of grafted polymer ranging from 0.03 to 2.5 micrograms/cm2 was used to study the effects of grafted layer on the enzymatic activity of immobilized trypsin and its inhibition by trypsin inhibitors of different molecular sizes. The amount of immobilized trypsin increased linearly with an increase in graft yield of fibres, but the activity of immobilized enzyme reached saturation at a certain graft yield, probably because of diffusion limitation for the transport of enzyme substrate molecules into the grafted PAAc layer. The reduction of inhibition with an increase in graft yield and in molecular weight of inhibitors was attributed to enhancement of steric hindrance and enzyme inactivation in the dense grafted layer. We also found that the adsorbed trypsin was inhibited more easily than the covalently immobilized at any concentration of the grafted PAAc and for any type of inhibitor used.

  20. Interaction of Cu(2+), Pb (2+), Zn (2+) with trypsin: what is the key factor of their toxicity?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Guiliang; Gao, Canzhu; Liu, Rutao

    2014-11-01

    Heavy metals possess great endangerment to environment even human health because of their indissolubility and bioaccumulation. The toxicity of heavy metal ions (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+)) to trypsin was investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and enzyme activity assay. The experimental results showed that toxic effect of heavy metal ions was due to their own characteristic, rather than the electric charges of the ion. Zn(2+) could not show the obvious toxicity to trypsin, while the structure and function of trypsin was damaged when the enzyme explored to Cu(2+) and Pb(2+). From the spectra results, we found that Cu(2+) would bind with trypsin, which lead to the fluorescence quenched and hydrophobicity increased. Pb(2+) could also change the structure and reduce the activity of trypsin in high concentration. In vitro measurement, the toxicity order of heavy metal ions to trypsin is: Cu(2+) > Pb(2+) > Zn(2+). In addition, isothermal titration calorimetry analysis proved that the interactions between Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+) and trypsin were all spontaneous and exothermic, which indicated the adverse effect of these heavy metal ions to trypsin. PMID:25323557

  1. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Unexplored Brazilian Native Fruits.

    PubMed

    Infante, Juliana; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Lazarini, Josy Goldoni; Franchin, Marcelo; Alencar, Severino Matias de

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian native fruits are unmatched in their variety, but a poorly explored resource for the development of food and pharmaceutical products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phenolic composition as well as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts of leaves, seeds, and pulp of four Brazilian native fruits (Eugenia leitonii, Eugenia involucrata, Eugenia brasiliensis, and Eugenia myrcianthes). GC-MS analyses of the ethanolic extracts showed the presence of epicatechin and gallic acid as the major compounds in these fruits. Antioxidant activity was measured using synthetic DPPH free-radical scavenging, β-carotene bleaching assay, and reactive oxygen species (ROO·, O2·-, and HOCl). The fruit extracts also exhibited antioxidant effect against biologically relevant radicals such as peroxyl, superoxide, and hypochlorous acid. In general, the pulps were the fruit fractions that exhibited the lowest antioxidant activities, whereas the leaves showed the highest ones. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed in an in vivo model using the carrageenan-induced neutrophil migration assay, which evaluates the inflammatory response in the acute phase. The pulp, seeds, and leaves of these fruits reduced the neutrophil influx by 40% to 64%. Based on these results, we suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of these native fruits is related to the modulation of neutrophil migration, through the inhibition of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, as well as to the antioxidant action of their ethanolic extracts in scavenging the free-radicals released by neutrophils. Therefore, these native fruits can be useful to produce food additives and functional foods. PMID:27050817

  2. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Unexplored Brazilian Native Fruits.

    PubMed

    Infante, Juliana; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Lazarini, Josy Goldoni; Franchin, Marcelo; Alencar, Severino Matias de

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian native fruits are unmatched in their variety, but a poorly explored resource for the development of food and pharmaceutical products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phenolic composition as well as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts of leaves, seeds, and pulp of four Brazilian native fruits (Eugenia leitonii, Eugenia involucrata, Eugenia brasiliensis, and Eugenia myrcianthes). GC-MS analyses of the ethanolic extracts showed the presence of epicatechin and gallic acid as the major compounds in these fruits. Antioxidant activity was measured using synthetic DPPH free-radical scavenging, β-carotene bleaching assay, and reactive oxygen species (ROO·, O2·-, and HOCl). The fruit extracts also exhibited antioxidant effect against biologically relevant radicals such as peroxyl, superoxide, and hypochlorous acid. In general, the pulps were the fruit fractions that exhibited the lowest antioxidant activities, whereas the leaves showed the highest ones. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed in an in vivo model using the carrageenan-induced neutrophil migration assay, which evaluates the inflammatory response in the acute phase. The pulp, seeds, and leaves of these fruits reduced the neutrophil influx by 40% to 64%. Based on these results, we suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of these native fruits is related to the modulation of neutrophil migration, through the inhibition of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, as well as to the antioxidant action of their ethanolic extracts in scavenging the free-radicals released by neutrophils. Therefore, these native fruits can be useful to produce food additives and functional foods.

  3. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Unexplored Brazilian Native Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Infante, Juliana; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Lazarini, Josy Goldoni; Franchin, Marcelo; de Alencar, Severino Matias

    2016-01-01

    Brazilian native fruits are unmatched in their variety, but a poorly explored resource for the development of food and pharmaceutical products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phenolic composition as well as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts of leaves, seeds, and pulp of four Brazilian native fruits (Eugenia leitonii, Eugenia involucrata, Eugenia brasiliensis, and Eugenia myrcianthes). GC—MS analyses of the ethanolic extracts showed the presence of epicatechin and gallic acid as the major compounds in these fruits. Antioxidant activity was measured using synthetic DPPH free-radical scavenging, β-carotene bleaching assay, and reactive oxygen species (ROO·, O2·−, and HOCl). The fruit extracts also exhibited antioxidant effect against biologically relevant radicals such as peroxyl, superoxide, and hypochlorous acid. In general, the pulps were the fruit fractions that exhibited the lowest antioxidant activities, whereas the leaves showed the highest ones. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed in an in vivo model using the carrageenan-induced neutrophil migration assay, which evaluates the inflammatory response in the acute phase. The pulp, seeds, and leaves of these fruits reduced the neutrophil influx by 40% to 64%. Based on these results, we suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of these native fruits is related to the modulation of neutrophil migration, through the inhibition of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, as well as to the antioxidant action of their ethanolic extracts in scavenging the free-radicals released by neutrophils. Therefore, these native fruits can be useful to produce food additives and functional foods. PMID:27050817

  4. Trypsin coatings on electrospun and alcohol-dispersed polymer nanofibers for trypsin digestion column

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Seung-Hyun; Chang, Mun Seock; Kim, Byoung Chan; An, Hyo Jin; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.; Lee, Sang-Won; Kim, Jungbae

    2010-09-15

    The construction of a trypsin reactor in a chromatography column for rapid and efficient protein digestion in proteomics is described. Electrospun and alcohol-dispersed polymer nanofibers were used for the fabrication of highly stable trypsin coating, which was prepared by a two-step process of covalent attachment and enzyme crosslinking. In a comparative study with the trypsin coatings on asspun and non-dispersed nanofibers, it has been observed that a simple step of alcohol dispersion improved not only the enzyme loading but also the performance of protein digestion. In-column digestion of enolase was successfully performed in less than twenty minutes. By applying the alcohol dispersion of polymer nanofibers, the bypass of samples was reduced by filling up the column with well-dispersed nanofibers, and subsequently, interactions between the protein and the enzymes were improved yielding more complete and reproducible digestions. Regardless of alcohol-dispersion or not, trypsin coating showed better digestion performance and improved performance stability under recycled uses than covalently-attached trypsin. The combination of highly stable trypsin coating and alcoholdispersion of polymer nanofibers has opened up a new potential to develop a trypsin column for on-line and automated protein digestion.

  5. Crystal structure of an extensively simplified variant of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor in which over one-third of the residues are alanines

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Monirul; Sohya, Shihori; Noguchi, Keiichi; Yohda, Masafumi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    We report the high-resolution crystal structures of an extensively simplified variant of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor containing 20 alanines (BPTI-20st) and a reference single-disulfide-bonded variant (BPTI-[5,55]st) at, respectively, 1.39 and 1.09 Å resolutions. The sequence was simplified based on the results of an alanine scanning experiment, as reported previously. The effects of the multiple alanine substitutions on the overall backbone structure were surprisingly small (Cα atom RMSD of 0.53 Å) being limited to small local structural perturbations. Both BPTI variants retained a wild-type level of trypsin inhibitory activity. The side-chain configurations of residues buried in the hydrophobic cores (<30% accessible surface area) were almost perfectly retained in both BPTI-20st and BPTI-[5,55]st, indicating that neither multiple alanine replacements nor the removal of the disulfide bonds affected their precise placements. However, the side chains of three partially buried residues (Q31, R20, and to some extent Y21) and several unburied residues rearranged into alternative dense-packing structures, suggesting some plasticity in their shape complementarity. These results indicate that a protein sequence simplified over its entire length can retain its densely packed, native side-chain structure, and suggest that both the design and fold recognition of natively folded proteins may be easier than previously thought. PMID:18829434

  6. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple multilayer random crosslinking of the trypsin molecules onto magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while the conventional immobilization of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. A single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome were digested at atmospheric pressure and 37 °C for 12 h or in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, EC-TR/NPs performed equally to or better than free trypsin in terms of both identified peptide/protein number and the digestion reproducibility. In addition, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very rapid (~1 min) and efficient digestions with more reproducible digestion results. PMID:21204257

  7. Novel superparamagnetic sanoparticles for trypsin immobilization and the application for efficient proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Hu, Kunya; Liu, Yuntao; Pan, Yuting; Yang, Yanjun

    2013-12-30

    Immobilization of trypsin onto the superparamagnetic carboxymethyl chitosan (Fe3O4 (PEG+CM-CTS)) nanoparticles was studied. FTIR and fluorescence spectroscopy data demonstrated that the Fe3O4 (PEG+CM-CTS) nanoparticles were capable of preventing the trypsin unfolding. Due to the large specific surface area and excellent dispersibility, the adsorption equilibrium of trypsin onto the nanoparticles was achieved quickly within 30min. The results of kinetic parameters (Michaelis constant, Km) with regards to the free trypsin (FT) and immobilized trypsin (IT) were 23.1 and 24.1mg/mL separately, implying that IT has less affinity to the BAEE used as the substrate. However, the MALDI-TOF MS analysis indicated that, IT could be used for fast and efficient Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) digestion under very facile processes, thanks to the easy manipulation of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNs), as well as the greatly reduced digestion time (from 12h to 15min). IT exhibited a sound stability after re-uses for six times, with 76.3% of the initial activity thereof still retained, thus making it more attractive in the application fields. These results are expected to open up a great potential use of such Fe3O4 (PEG+CM-CTS) nanoparticles as a superior nanosupport for trypsin immobilization. PMID:24211332

  8. Does pedometer goal setting improve physical activity among Native elders? Results from a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sawchuk, Craig N; Russo, Joan E; Charles, Steve; Goldberg, Jack; Forquera, Ralph; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    We examined if step-count goal setting resulted in increases in physical activity and walking compared to only monitoring step counts with pedometers among American Indian/Alaska Native elders. Outcomes included step counts, self-reported physical activity and well-being, and performance on the 6-minute walk test. Although no significant between-group differences were found, within-group analyses indicated that elders significantly improved on the majority of step count, physical activity, health-related quality of life, and 6-minute walk outcomes.

  9. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors' dynamics that may be of utility in drug design. PMID:26975976

  10. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2016-03-15

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors' dynamics that may be of utility in drug design.

  11. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design. PMID:26975976

  12. Organogenesis of exocrine pancreas in sharpsnout sea bream (Diplodus puntazzo) larvae: characterization of trypsin expression.

    PubMed

    Kamaci, H Okan; Suzer, Cüneyt; Coban, Deniz; Saka, Sahin; Firat, Kürşat

    2010-12-01

    The ontogeny and differentiation stages of digestive systems related with trypsin expression in larvae of sharpsnout sea bream, Diplodus puntazzo, were investigated from hatching to 40 DAH (days after hatching), and total lengths and weights of larvae were determined. Histologic and enzymatic techniques were used to explain the functional development of the pancreas including trypsin activity. The pancreas was identified as a compact structure located in the region slightly posterior to the liver. At 3 DAH, first anus and then mouth opened. Incipient pancreas secretion polyhedral cells could be first observed as zymogen granules. During larval metamorphosis, the pancreas became diffuse, spreading throughout the mesentery in proximity to the stomach, the anterior intestine and the pyloric caeca. The specific activity of trypsin (42.54±6.8 mU/mg protein(-1)) was found as early as after hatching at larvae size of 2.87±0.34 mm at 0 DAH. Activity further increased until 10 DAH, especially after exogenous feeding. The highest trypsin activity was detected at 25 DAH as 119.26±11.6 mU/mg protein(-1). It is concluded that exocrine pancreas organogenesis is the main critical step in the development of digestive system that results in zymogen granules accumulation and increased trypsin activity. PMID:20077135

  13. Inactivation of trypsin inhibitors in sweet potato and taro tubers during processing.

    PubMed

    Kiran, K Sasi; Padmaja, G

    2003-01-01

    In order to understand the extent of elimination of trypsin inhibitors during processing of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and taro (Colocasia esculenta) tubers, a detailed study was conducted using tubers processed by oven drying, cooking, and microwave baking. Between 80 and 90% trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity was retained in sweet potato chips up to 2h at 70 degrees C. Among the four cultivars of sweet potatoes, RS-III-2 trypsin inhibitors were more heat labile. Heating at 100 degrees C led to rapid inactivation of TI of sweet potatoes. Varietal differences in thermal stability were more pronounced for the trypsin inhibitors of taro than sweet potatoes. Taro inhibitors were also more rapidly inactivated than sweet potato TI. Between 17 and 31% TI activity was retained in cooked tuber pieces of sweet potatoes, while only 3-10% were retained in taro cultivars. Very effective inactivation of trypsin inhibitors of sweet potatoes and taro could be obtained through microwave baking. Flour prepared from taro was devoid of TI activity, while 5-12% TI activity was retained in the flour prepared from sweet potatoes. The study clearly established that among the four techniques used, microwave baking and flour preparation were the best methods to eliminate TI from sweet potatoes and taro.

  14. Structural Insights into the Role of the Cyclic Backbone in a Squash Trypsin Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Norelle L.; Thorstholm, Louise; Greenwood, Kathryn P.; King, Gordon J.; Rosengren, K. Johan; Heras, Begoña; Martin, Jennifer L.; Craik, David J.

    2013-01-01

    MCoTI-II is a head-to-tail cyclic peptide with potent trypsin inhibitory activity and, on the basis of its exceptional proteolytic stability, is a valuable template for the design of novel drug leads. Insights into inhibitor dynamics and interactions with biological targets are critical for drug design studies, particularly for protease targets. Here, we show that the cyclization and active site loops of MCoTI-II are flexible in solution, but when bound to trypsin, the active site loop converges to a single well defined conformation. This finding of reduced flexibility on binding is in contrast to a recent study on the homologous peptide MCoTI-I, which suggested that regions of the peptide are more flexible upon binding to trypsin. We provide a possible explanation for this discrepancy based on degradation of the complex over time. Our study also unexpectedly shows that the cyclization loop, not present in acyclic homologues, facilitates potent trypsin inhibitory activity by engaging in direct binding interactions with trypsin. PMID:24169696

  15. The Influence of Parental Nativity, Neighborhood Disadvantage and the Built Environment on Physical Activity Behaviors in Latino Youth

    PubMed Central

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Yedidia, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Little evidence exists examining if parental nativity, neighborhood disadvantage and built environment features are associated with physical activity behaviors in Latino youth. We used a representative sample of Latino youth (n = 616) living in New Jersey to examine parental nativity associations with active transport to school, active use of sidewalks, use of local neighborhood parks, and use of neighborhood physical activity facilities. We estimated prevalence ratios (PR) that accounted for the complex survey design. Latino youth with foreign-born parents were generally more active than their US-born peers, and those with parents in the US 10 years or less were more likely to engage in active transport to school (PR = 1.51, 95 % CI 1.04–2.21), after adjusting for census-based neighborhood disadvantage, self-reported neighborhood measures, and geocoded distance to school. Parental nativity status should be considered in policies or interventions designed to increase physical activity among Latino youth. PMID:24162884

  16. Isolation of a trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor and its functional properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoyun; Shao, Biao; Lu, Wei; Hong, Jing; Rao, Pingfan

    2014-01-01

    A novel trypsin inhibitor with thermal and pH stability, designated Merrtine, was isolated from Glycine max L. merr. The procedure involved ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on CM-Sephadex C-50, and affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel. The 20 N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined to be DEYSKPCCDLCMCTRRCPPQ, demonstrating high homology with the sequence of Bowman-Birk type trypsin inhibitors. The molecular mass and isoelectric point of the inhibitor were estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and isoelectric focusing to be 20.0 kD and 5.8, respectively. Trypsin could be completely inhibited by Merrtine when the molar ratio was 8.1. The inhibitory activity of Merrtine was unaffected after exposure to temperatures up to 85 °C, as well as within the pH range 2-12. Besides inhibiting trypsin-chymotrypsin, the inhibitor demonstrated additional antifungal activity against the species of Alternaria alternate, Fusarium oxysporum, Pythium aphanidermatum, Physalospora piricola, Botrytis cinerea, and Fusarium solani. We herein report not only the trypsin inhibitor's extraction and isolation for the first time, but also its physiochemical and antifungal properties. PMID:24499360

  17. Human β-defensin 4 with non-native disulfide bridges exhibit antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Himanshu; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Human defensins play multiple roles in innate immunity including direct antimicrobial killing and immunomodulatory activity. They have three disulfide bridges which contribute to the stability of three anti-parallel β-strands. The exact role of disulfide bridges and canonical β-structure in the antimicrobial action is not yet fully understood. In this study, we have explored the antimicrobial activity of human β-defensin 4 (HBD4) analogs that differ in the number and connectivity of disulfide bridges. The cysteine framework was similar to the disulfide bridges present in μ-conotoxins, an unrelated class of peptide toxins. All the analogs possessed enhanced antimicrobial potency as compared to native HBD4. Among the analogs, the single disulfide bridged peptide showed maximum potency. However, there were no marked differences in the secondary structure of the analogs. Subtle variations were observed in the localization and membrane interaction of the analogs with bacteria and Candida albicans, suggesting a role for disulfide bridges in modulating their antimicrobial action. All analogs accumulated in the cytosol where they can bind to anionic molecules such as nucleic acids which would affect several cellular processes leading to cell death. Our study strongly suggests that native disulfide bridges or the canonical β-strands in defensins have not evolved for maximal activity but they play important roles in determining their antimicrobial potency.

  18. Human β-Defensin 4 with Non-Native Disulfide Bridges Exhibit Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Himanshu; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Human defensins play multiple roles in innate immunity including direct antimicrobial killing and immunomodulatory activity. They have three disulfide bridges which contribute to the stability of three anti-parallel β-strands. The exact role of disulfide bridges and canonical β-structure in the antimicrobial action is not yet fully understood. In this study, we have explored the antimicrobial activity of human β-defensin 4 (HBD4) analogs that differ in the number and connectivity of disulfide bridges. The cysteine framework was similar to the disulfide bridges present in μ-conotoxins, an unrelated class of peptide toxins. All the analogs possessed enhanced antimicrobial potency as compared to native HBD4. Among the analogs, the single disulfide bridged peptide showed maximum potency. However, there were no marked differences in the secondary structure of the analogs. Subtle variations were observed in the localization and membrane interaction of the analogs with bacteria and Candida albicans, suggesting a role for disulfide bridges in modulating their antimicrobial action. All analogs accumulated in the cytosol where they can bind to anionic molecules such as nucleic acids which would affect several cellular processes leading to cell death. Our study strongly suggests that native disulfide bridges or the canonical β-strands in defensins have not evolved for maximal activity but they play important roles in determining their antimicrobial potency. PMID:25785690

  19. Texas Native Plants Yield Compounds with Cytotoxic Activities against Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Corena V; Cai, Shengxin; Peng, Jiangnan; Robles, Andrew J; Hartley, Rachel M; Powell, Douglas R; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Mooberry, Susan L

    2016-03-25

    There remains a critical need for more effective therapies for the treatment of late-stage and metastatic prostate cancers. Three Texas native plants yielded three new and three known compounds with antiproliferative and cytotoxic activities against prostate cancer cells with IC50 values in the range of 1.7-35.0 μM. A new sesquiterpene named espadalide (1), isolated from Gochnatia hypoleuca, had low micromolar potency and was highly effective in clonogenic assays. Two known bioactive germacranolides (2 and 3) were additionally isolated from G. hypoleuca. Dalea frutescens yielded two new isoprenylated chalcones, named sanjuanolide (4) and sanjoseolide (5), and the known sesquiterpenediol verbesindiol (6) was isolated from Verbesina virginica. Mechanistic studies showed that 1-4 caused G2/M accumulation and the formation of abnormal mitotic spindles. Tubulin polymerization assays revealed that 4 increased the initial rate of tubulin polymerization, but did not change total tubulin polymer levels, and 1-3 had no effects on tubulin polymerization. Despite its cytotoxic activity, compound 6 did not initiate changes in cell cycle distribution and has a mechanism of action different from the other compounds. This study demonstrates that new compounds with significant biological activities germane to unmet oncological needs can be isolated from Texas native plants.

  20. Increased lung vascular permeability after pancreatitis and trypsin infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Tahamont, M. V.; Barie, P. S.; Blumenstock, F. A.; Hussain, M. H.; Malik, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    We examined the role of proteases in mediating lung vascular injury after acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Studies were made in sheep in which pulmonary lymph was collected for assessment of the changes in transvascular fluid and protein exchange. The induction of pancreatitis by injection of trypsin and sodium taurocholate into the pancreas resulted in increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance (lymph flow x lymph-to-plasma protein concentration ratio). The pulmonary vascular pressures did not change significantly after pancreatitis, indicating that the increases in pulmonary lymph flow and protein clearance were due to increased pulmonary endothelial permeability. The response to pancreatitis was also characterized by decreases in concentrations of fibrinogen, platelets, and granulocytes. Pulmonary leukostasis was a common morphologic feature in this group. In another group, an intravenous infusion of trypsin, which produced decreases in antiprotease activity comparable to those observed after pancreatitis, also resulted in increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance. These increases in lymph fluxes were comparable to those observed after pancreatitis and were also associated with decreases in concentrations of fibrinogen, platelets, and granulocytes. Pulmonary leukostasis was evident in this group upon histologic examination. In a third group, pretreatment with Trasylol prevented the increases in pulmonary lymph flow and transvascular protein clearance after pancreatitis, suggesting that the pancreatitis-induced pulmonary vascular injury is the result of the release of proteases. The results indicate a common pulmonary vascular response to acute pancreatitis and trypsin infusion. The release of proteases into the circulation after acute pancreatitis may be the initiating event mediating the pulmonary vascular injury. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figures 11 and 12 PMID:6181692

  1. Natural plant enzyme inhibitors. Characterization of an unusual alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor from ragi (Eleusine coracana Geartn.).

    PubMed Central

    Shivaraj, B; Pattabiraman, T N

    1981-01-01

    An inhibitor I-1, capable of acting on both alpha-amylase and trypsin, was purified to homogeneity from ragi (finger-millet) grains. The factor was found to be stable to heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 1 h in the presence of NaCl and also was stable over the wide pH range 1-10. Pepsin and Pronase treatment of inhibitor I-1 resulted in gradual loss of both the inhibitory activities. Formation of trypsin-inhibitor I-1 complex, amylase-inhibitor I-1 complex and trypsin-inhibitor I-1-amylase trimer complex was demonstrated by chromatography on a Bio-Gel P-200 column. This indicated that the inhibitor is 'double-headed' in nature. The inhibitor was retained on a trypsin-Sepharose 4B column at pH 7.0. Elution at acidic pH resulted in almost complete recovery of amylase-inhibitory and trypsin-inhibitory activities. alpha-Amylase was retained on a trypsin-Sepharose column to which inhibitor I-1 was bound, but not on trypsin-Sepharose alone. Modification of amino groups of the inhibitor with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid resulted in complete loss of amylase-inhibitory activity but only 40% loss in antitryptic activity. Modification of arginine residues by cyclohexane-1,2-dione led to 85% loss of antitryptic activity after 5 h, but no effect on amylase-inhibitory activity. The results show that a single bifunctional protein factor is responsible for both amylase-inhibitory and trypsin-inhibitory activities with two different reactive sites. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6796040

  2. A trypsin-like proteinase in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): purification, characterization, and host plant inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mina; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali

    2014-01-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase was purified and characterized in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae. A purification process that used Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies revealed a proteinase with specific activity of 66.7 μmol/min/mg protein, recovery of 27.04 and purification fold of 23.35. Molecular weight of the purified protein was found to be 35.8 kDa. Optimal pH and temperature were obtained 9 and 20°C for the purified trypsin proteinase, respectively. The purified enzyme was significantly inhibited by PMSF, TLCK, and SBTI as specific inhibitors of trypsins in which TLCK showed the highest inhibitory effect. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors were extracted from four varieties of pomegranate including Brait, Torsh-Sabz, May-Khosh, and Shirin by ion exchange chromatography. It was found that fractions 17-20 of Brait; fractions 18 and 21-26 of Torsh-Sabz; fractions 1-7, 11-17, and 19-21 of May-Khosh and fraction 8 for Shirin showed presence of trypsin inhibitor in these host. Comparison of their inhibitory effects on the purified trypsin proteinase of E. ceratoniae demonstrated that fractions from May-khosh variety had the highest effect on the enzyme among other extracted fractions. Characterization of serine proteinases of insects mainly trypsins is one of the promising methods to decrease population and damages via extracting their inhibitors and providing resistant varieties.

  3. Antioxidant Activities and Phytochemicals of Leaf Extracts from 10 Native Rhododendron Species in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Yang; Lin, Lei-Chen; Ho, Shang-Tse; Tung, Yu-Tang; Tseng, Yen-Hsueh

    2014-01-01

    Rhododendron, one of the most famous ornamental plants in the world, is traditionally a medicinal plant. However, the potential bioactivities of native Rhododendron in Taiwan have not been completely studied. In this study, the results revealed that Rhododendron pseudochrysanthum exhibited the best antioxidant activities among 10 native Rhododendron species in Taiwan. Furthermore, based on a bioactivity-guided isolation principle, nine specific phytochemicals were isolated and identified as (2R,3S)-catechin (1), (2R,3R)-epicatechin (1′), (2R,3R)-dihydromyricetin 3-O-β-l-arabinopyranoside (2), (2S,3S)-taxifolin 3-O-β-l-arabinopyranoside (2′), (2R,3R)-taxifolin 3-O-β-l-arabinopyranoside (3), myricetin 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (3′), rutin (4), hyperoside (5), and quercitrin (6). Of these compounds, 2 and 3 were found to be major bioactive compounds, and their concentrations in the n-butanol (BuOH) fraction were determined to be 52.0 and 67.3 mg per gram, respectively. These results demonstrated that methanolic extracts of Rhododendron pseudochrysanthum leaves have excellent antioxidant activities and great potential as a source for natural health products. PMID:24987425

  4. Investigate the Binding of Catechins to Trypsin Using Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fengchao; Yang, Kecheng; Li, Yunqi

    2015-01-01

    To explore the inhibitory mechanism of catechins for digestive enzymes, we investigated the binding mode of catechins to a typical digestive enzyme-trypsin and analyzed the structure-activity relationship of catechins, using an integration of molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculation. We found that catechins with different structures bound to a conservative pocket S1 of trypsin, which is comprised of residues 189–195, 214–220 and 225–228. In the trypsin-catechin complexes, Asp189 by forming strong hydrogen bonding, and Gln192, Trp215 and Gly216 through hydrophobic interactions, all significantly contribute to the binding of catechins. The number and the position of hydroxyl and aromatic groups, the structure of stereoisomers, and the orientation of catechins in the binding pocket S1 of trypsin all affect the binding affinity. The binding affinity is in the order of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) > Epicatechin gallate (ECG) > Epicatechin (EC) > Epigallocatechin (EGC), and 2R-3R EGCG shows the strongest binding affinity out of other stereoisomers. Meanwhile, the synergic conformational changes of residues and catechins were also analyzed. These findings will be helpful in understanding the knowledge of interactions between catechins and trypsin and referable for the design of novel polyphenol based functional food and nutriceutical formulas. PMID:25938485

  5. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple crosslinking of the enzyme to magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while a control sample of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. Digestions were carried out on a single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome, and also compared for digestion at atmospheric pressure and 37 ºC for 12 h, and in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, the EC-TR/NPs performed equally as well or better than free trypsin in terms of the number of peptide/protein identifications and reproducibility across technical replicates. However, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very fast (~1 min) and more reproducible digestions.

  6. Investigate the binding of catechins to trypsin using docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fengchao; Yang, Kecheng; Li, Yunqi

    2015-01-01

    To explore the inhibitory mechanism of catechins for digestive enzymes, we investigated the binding mode of catechins to a typical digestive enzyme-trypsin and analyzed the structure-activity relationship of catechins, using an integration of molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculation. We found that catechins with different structures bound to a conservative pocket S1 of trypsin, which is comprised of residues 189-195, 214-220 and 225-228. In the trypsin-catechin complexes, Asp189 by forming strong hydrogen bonding, and Gln192, Trp215 and Gly216 through hydrophobic interactions, all significantly contribute to the binding of catechins. The number and the position of hydroxyl and aromatic groups, the structure of stereoisomers, and the orientation of catechins in the binding pocket S1 of trypsin all affect the binding affinity. The binding affinity is in the order of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) > Epicatechin gallate (ECG) > Epicatechin (EC) > Epigallocatechin (EGC), and 2R-3R EGCG shows the strongest binding affinity out of other stereoisomers. Meanwhile, the synergic conformational changes of residues and catechins were also analyzed. These findings will be helpful in understanding the knowledge of interactions between catechins and trypsin and referable for the design of novel polyphenol based functional food and nutriceutical formulas. PMID:25938485

  7. Allostery in trypsin-like proteases suggests new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Gohara, David W; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    Trypsin-like proteases (TLPs) are a large family of enzymes responsible for digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, development, fertilization, apoptosis and immunity. A current paradigm posits that the irreversible transition from an inactive zymogen to the active protease form enables productive interaction with substrate and catalysis. Analysis of the entire structural database reveals two distinct conformations of the active site: one fully accessible to substrate (E) and the other occluded by the collapse of a specific segment (E*). The allosteric E*-E equilibrium provides a reversible mechanism for activity and regulation in addition to the irreversible zymogen to protease conversion and points to new therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting or activating the enzyme. In this review, we discuss relevant examples, with emphasis on the rational engineering of anticoagulant thrombin mutants.

  8. Recurrent Selection for Transgene Activity Levels in Maize Results in Proxy Selection for a Native Gene with the Same Promoter.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Anastasia L; Schroder, Megan N; Scott, M Paul

    2016-01-01

    High activity levels of a transgene can be very useful, making a transgene easier to evaluate for safety and efficacy. High activity levels can also increase the economic benefit of the production of high value proteins in transgenic plants. The goal of this research is to determine if recurrent selection for activity of a transgene will result in higher activity, and if selection for activity of a transgene controlled by a native promoter will also increase protein levels of the native gene with the same promoter. To accomplish this goal we used transgenic maize containing a construct encoding green fluorescent protein controlled by the promoter for the maize endosperm-specific 27 kDa gamma zein seed storage protein. We carried out recurrent selection for fluorescence intensity in two breeding populations. After three generations of selection, both selected populations were significantly more fluorescent and had significantly higher levels of 27 kDa gamma zein than the unselected control populations. These higher levels of the 27 kDa gamma zein occurred independently of the presence of the transgene. The results show that recurrent selection can be used to increase activity of a transgene and that selection for a transgene controlled by a native promoter can increase protein levels of the native gene with the same promoter via proxy selection. Moreover, the increase in native gene protein level is maintained in the absence of the transgene, demonstrating that proxy selection can be used to produce non-transgenic plants with desired changes in gene expression.

  9. Recombinant cold-adapted trypsin I from Atlantic cod-expression, purification, and identification.

    PubMed

    Jónsdóttir, Gudrún; Bjarnason, Jón Bragi; Gudmundsdóttir, Agústa

    2004-01-01

    Atlantic cod trypsin I is a cold-adapted proteolytic enzyme exhibiting approximately 20 times higher catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) than its mesophilic bovine counterpart for the simple amide substrate BAPNA. In general, cold-adapted proteolytic enzymes are sensitive to autolytic degradation, thermal inactivation as well as molecular aggregation, even at temperatures as low as 18-25 degrees C which may explain the problems observed with their expression, activation, and purification. Prior to the data presented here, there have been no reports in the literature on the expression of psychrophilic or cold-adapted proteolytic enzymes from fish. Nevertheless, numerous cold-adapted proteolytic microbial enzymes have been successfully expressed in bacteria and yeast. This report describes successful expression, activation, and purification of the recombinant cod trypsin I in the His-Patch ThioFusion Escherichia coli expression system. The E. coli pThioHis expression vector used in the study enabled the formation of a fusion protein between a highly soluble fraction of HP-thioredoxin contained in the vector and the N-terminal end of the precursor form of cod trypsin I. The HP-thioredoxin part of the fusion protein binds to a metal-chelating ProBond column, which facilitated its purification. The cod trypsin I part of the purified fusion protein was released by proteolytic cleavage, resulting in concomitant activation of the recombinant enzyme. The recombinant cod trypsin I was purified to homogeneity on a trypsin-specific benzamidine affinity column. The identity of the recombinant enzyme was demonstrated by electrophoresis and chromatography.

  10. Mechanism of curcumin-induced trypsin inhibition: Computational and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Kang, Yi-Jun; Gu, Yun-Lan; Cao, Jian

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the experimental and theoretical methods were used to analyze the binding interaction of food dye, curcumin with trypsin. The results of fluorescence spectroscopic measurements indicated that curcumin binding resulted in the obviously intrinsic fluorescence quenching with the increase concentration of curcumin. This binding interaction is a spontaneous process with the estimated enthalpy and entropy changes being -15.70 kJ mol-1 and 40.25 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. Hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic forces played an important role in the complex formation between curcumin and trypsin. Moreover, curcumin could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket and makes the activity of trypsin decrease remarkably with the increasing concentration of curcumin.

  11. Mechanism of curcumin-induced trypsin inhibition: Computational and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Kang, Yi-Jun; Gu, Yun-Lan; Cao, Jian

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the experimental and theoretical methods were used to analyze the binding interaction of food dye, curcumin with trypsin. The results of fluorescence spectroscopic measurements indicated that curcumin binding resulted in the obviously intrinsic fluorescence quenching with the increase concentration of curcumin. This binding interaction is a spontaneous process with the estimated enthalpy and entropy changes being -15.70 kJ mol-1 and 40.25 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. Hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic forces played an important role in the complex formation between curcumin and trypsin. Moreover, curcumin could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket and makes the activity of trypsin decrease remarkably with the increasing concentration of curcumin.

  12. Biochemical Characterization of An Arginine-Specific Alkaline Trypsin from Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jin-Song; Li, Wei; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Xie, Min-Feng; Yang, Biao; Zhang, Rong-Xian; Li, Heng; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Xu, Zheng-Hong; Shi, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we isolated a trypsin-producing strain DMN6 from the leather waste and identified it as Bacillus licheniformis through a two-step screening strategy. The trypsin activity was increased up to 140 from 20 U/mL through culture optimization. The enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with a molecular mass of 44 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the specific activity of purified enzyme is 350 U/mg with Nα-Benzoyl-l-arginine ethylester as the substrate. The optimum temperature and pH for the trypsin are 65 °C and pH 9.0, respectively. Also, the enzyme can be significantly activated by Ba2+. This enzyme is relatively stable in alkaline environment and displays excellent activity at low temperatures. It could retain over 95% of enzyme activity after 180 min of incubation at 45 °C. The distinguished activity under low temperature and prominent stability enhance its catalytic potential. In the current work, the open reading frame was obtained with a length of 1371 nucleotides that encoded a protein of 456 amino acids. These data would warrant the B. licheniformis trypsin as a promising candidate for catalytic application in collagen preparation and leather bating through further protein engineering. PMID:26694369

  13. Crystal structure of bovine duodenase, a serine protease, with dual trypsin and chymotrypsin-like specificities.

    PubMed

    Pletnev, V Z; Zamolodchikova, T S; Pangborn, W A; Duax, W L

    2000-10-01

    The three-dimensional structure of duodenase, a serine protease from bovine duodenum mucosa, has been determined at 2.4A resolution. The enzyme, which has both trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like activities, most closely resembles human cathepsin G with which it shares 57% sequence identity and similar specificity. The catalytic Ser195 in duodenase adopts the energetically favored conformation typical of serine proteinases and unlike the strained state typical of lipase/esterases. Of several waters in the active site of duodenase, the one associated with Ser214 is found in all serine proteinases and most lipase/esterases. The conservation of the Ser214 residue in serine proteinase, its presence in the active site, and participation in a hydrogen water network involving the catalytic triad (His57, Asp107, and Ser195) argues for its having an important role in the mechanism of action. It may be referred to as a fourth member of the catalytic triad. Duodenase is one of a growing family of enzymes that possesses trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like activity. Not long ago, these activities were considered to be mutually exclusive. Computer modeling reveals that the S1 subsite of duodenase has structural features compatible with effective accommodation of P1 residues typical of trypsin (Arg/Lys) and chymotrypsin (Tyr/Phe) substrates. The determination of structural features associated with functional variation in the enzyme family may permit design of enzymes with a specific ratio of trypsin and chymotrypsin activities. PMID:10944388

  14. Critical assessment of accelerating trypsination methods.

    PubMed

    Hustoft, Hanne Kolsrud; Reubsaet, Leon; Greibrokk, Tyge; Lundanes, Elsa; Malerod, Helle

    2011-12-15

    In LC-MS based proteomics, several accelerating trypsination methods have been introduced in order to speed up the protein digestion, which is often considered a bottleneck. Traditionally and most commonly, due to sample heterogeneity, overnight digestion at 37 °C is performed in order to digest both easily and more resistant proteins. High efficiency protein identification is important in proteomics, hours with LC-MS/MS analysis is needless if the majority of the proteins are not digested. Based on preliminary experiments utilizing some of the suggested accelerating methods, the question of whether accelerating digestion methods really provide the same protein identification efficiency as the overnight digestion was asked. In the present study we have evaluated four different accelerating trypsination methods (infrared (IR) and microwave assisted, solvent aided and immobilized trypsination). The methods were compared with conventional digestion at 37 °C in the same time range using a four protein mixture. Sequence coverage and peak area of intact proteins were used for the comparison. The accelerating methods were able to digest the proteins, but none of the methods appeared to be more efficient than the conventional digestion method at 37 °C. The conventional method at 37 °C is easy to perform using commercially available instrumentation and appears to be the digestion method to use. The digestion time in targeted proteomics can be optimized for each protein, while in comprehensive proteomics the digestion time should be extended due to sample heterogeneity and influence of other proteins present. Recommendations regarding optimizing and evaluating the tryptic digestion for both targeted and comprehensive proteomics are given, and a digestion method suitable as the first method for newcomers in comprehensive proteomics is suggested.

  15. Cytoprotective and pro-apoptotic activities of native Australian herbs polyphenolic-rich extracts.

    PubMed

    Sakulnarmrat, Karunrat; Fenech, Michael; Thomas, Philip; Konczak, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Three commercially grown native herbs unique to Australia, Tasmannia pepper leaf (Tasmannia lanceolata R. Br., Winteracea; TPL), anise myrtle (Syzygium anisatum Vickery, Craven & Biffen, Myrtaceae; AM) and lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora F. Muell, Myrtaceae; LM) as well as a reference sample bay leaf (Laurus nobilis L., Lauraceae; BL) were examined for potential cytoprotective properties. All native herbs exhibited greater cellular antioxidant activity as measured by the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay than bay leaf and reduced the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) induced death of hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells by 25-50%. All herb extracts reduced the proliferation of colon (HT-29; IC(50)=0.75-1.39mg/ml), stomach (AGS; IC(50)=0.59-1.88mg/ml), bladder (BL13; IC(50)=0.56-1.12mg/ml) and liver (HepG2; IC(50)=0.38-1.36mg/ml) cancer cells. No significant reduction of cell viability of non-transformed colon (CCD-18Co; IC(50)>2.0mg/ml) and mixed stomach and intestine (Hs 738.St/Int; IC(50)>2.0mg/ml) cells was observed. Flow cytometry analysis and the results of the cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome (CBMNCyt) assay conducted with respectively, promyelocytic leukaemia (HL-60) and colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells suggest an increase in apoptosis following treatment with the herb extracts. The occurrence of apoptotic cells coincided with an increase in caspase-3 enzyme activity. The results of the CBMNCyt assay suggested no direct DNA damage in colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells as a result of treatment with all extracts, applied at final concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0mg/ml. PMID:23017386

  16. Antioxidant and antimycotic activities of two native lavandula species from portugal.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Rafael; Madureira, Ana Margarida; Jorge, Rita; Adão, Rita; Duarte, Aida; Duarte, Noélia; Lopes, Maria Manuel; Teixeira, Generosa

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant and antimycotic activities of the essential oils and extracts of two native Portuguese Lavandula species, L. stoechas subsp. luisieri and L. pedunculata, were evaluated by in vitro assays. The total phenolics and flavonoids content were also determined. The antioxidant potential was assessed through DPPH radical scavenging, inhibition of lipid peroxidation (ILP), and DNA protection assays. All samples displayed a high DPPH scavenging activity, some of them showing concentration dependence. The majority of the samples were also able to inhibit lipid peroxidation. A strong correlation was observed between the results of DPPH and ILP assays and the flavonoids content of the samples. In the DNA protection assay, all the extracts were able to preserve DNA integrity. The antimycotic activity was performed against twelve fungi belonging to Basidiomycota and Ascomycota Divisions. L. stoechas subsp. luisieri exhibited the broadest activity spectra. L. pedunculata extracts were active against five fungi. Cryptococcus neoformans was the most sensitive, being inhibited by all the extracts. Our results led to the conclusion that L. stoechas subsp. luisieri and L. pedunculata can be useful as new sources of natural antioxidants and antimycotic agents, providing a possible valorization of the existing biodiversity and resources of Portuguese flora. PMID:25922611

  17. Antioxidant and Antimycotic Activities of Two Native Lavandula Species from Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Rafael; Madureira, Ana Margarida; Jorge, Rita; Adão, Rita; Duarte, Aida; Duarte, Noélia; Lopes, Maria Manuel; Teixeira, Generosa

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant and antimycotic activities of the essential oils and extracts of two native Portuguese Lavandula species, L. stoechas subsp. luisieri and L. pedunculata, were evaluated by in vitro assays. The total phenolics and flavonoids content were also determined. The antioxidant potential was assessed through DPPH radical scavenging, inhibition of lipid peroxidation (ILP), and DNA protection assays. All samples displayed a high DPPH scavenging activity, some of them showing concentration dependence. The majority of the samples were also able to inhibit lipid peroxidation. A strong correlation was observed between the results of DPPH and ILP assays and the flavonoids content of the samples. In the DNA protection assay, all the extracts were able to preserve DNA integrity. The antimycotic activity was performed against twelve fungi belonging to Basidiomycota and Ascomycota Divisions. L. stoechas subsp. luisieri exhibited the broadest activity spectra. L. pedunculata extracts were active against five fungi. Cryptococcus neoformans was the most sensitive, being inhibited by all the extracts. Our results led to the conclusion that L. stoechas subsp. luisieri and L. pedunculata can be useful as new sources of natural antioxidants and antimycotic agents, providing a possible valorization of the existing biodiversity and resources of Portuguese flora. PMID:25922611

  18. Fast and efficient benign oxidation of native wheat starch by acidic bromate under microwave activation.

    PubMed

    Komulainen, Sanna; Diaz, Estibaliz; Pursiainen, Jouni; Lajunen, Marja

    2013-02-15

    A simple oxidation of starch in water by bromate was substantially improved by microwave activation. In the oxidation of native wheat starch its advantages were the highly reduced need of oxidant from 1.05 to 0.1-0.25 equiv, shortened reaction time from 2 to 5.5h to 10 min, and moderate or high yields of oxidation content (degree of oxidation 0.22-0.55) of water-soluble products. Acidic treatment before the oxidation reaction promoted the carbonyl formation yielding higher contents of oxidized products (degree of oxidation 0.43-0.55) than without it (degree of oxidation 0.22-0.28). The pretreatment did not have similar effect on the amount of carboxyl groups. The oxidation route of acidic bromate oxidation of starch is discussed.

  19. Functional Trade-Offs in Promiscuous Enzymes Cannot Be Explained by Intrinsic Mutational Robustness of the Native Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, Miriam; Emond, Stephane; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which an emerging new function trades off with the original function is a key characteristic of the dynamics of enzyme evolution. Various cases of laboratory evolution have unveiled a characteristic trend; a large increase in a new, promiscuous activity is often accompanied by only a mild reduction of the native, original activity. A model that associates weak trade-offs with “evolvability” was put forward, which proposed that enzymes possess mutational robustness in the native activity and plasticity in promiscuous activities. This would enable the acquisition of a new function without compromising the original one, reducing the benefit of early gene duplication and therefore the selection pressure thereon. Yet, to date, no experimental study has examined this hypothesis directly. Here, we investigate the causes of weak trade-offs by systematically characterizing adaptive mutations that occurred in two cases of evolutionary transitions in enzyme function: (1) from phosphotriesterase to arylesterase, and (2) from atrazine chlorohydrolase to melamine deaminase. Mutational analyses in various genetic backgrounds revealed that, in contrast to the prevailing model, the native activity is less robust to mutations than the promiscuous activity. For example, in phosphotriesterase, the deleterious effect of individual mutations on the native phosphotriesterase activity is much larger than their positive effect on the promiscuous arylesterase activity. Our observations suggest a revision of the established model: weak trade-offs are not caused by an intrinsic robustness of the native activity and plasticity of the promiscuous activity. We propose that upon strong adaptive pressure for the new activity without selection against the original one, selected mutations will lead to the largest possible increases in the new function, but whether and to what extent they decrease the old function is irrelevant, creating a bias towards initially weak trade-offs and

  20. Trypsin-enabled construction of anti-fouling and self-cleaning polyethersulfone membrane.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing; Su, Yanlei; Ning, Xue; Chen, Wenjuan; Peng, Jinming; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2011-01-01

    Constructing anti-fouling and self-cleaning membrane surfaces based on covalent attachment of trypsin on poly(methacrylic acid)-graft-polyethersulfone (PMAA-g-PES) membrane was reported. The carboxylic acid groups enriched on asymmetric PMAA-g-PES membrane surface were activated with 1-ethyl-(3-3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and employed as chemical anchors for the conjugation with amino groups of trypsin. Activity assays showed that such chemically immobilized trypsin was much more active and stable than that of the physically adsorbed counterpart. Trypsin covalently attached on membrane surface could substantially resist protein fouling in dynamic flow process. The considerable enhancement of protein solution permeation flux was observed as a consequence of rapid enzymatic degradation of protein deposited onto membrane surface. The permeation flux of the membrane could be recovered upon simple hydraulic flush after protein filtration, suggesting superior self-cleaning property. After multi-cycle BSA filtration over 15-day period, the active self-cleaning membrane maintained more than 95.0% of its initial flux.

  1. Review of techniques to prevent introduction of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) during native mussel (Unionoidea) conservation activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Newton, T.J.; Gatenby, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Because of the declines in diversity and abundance of native freshwater mussels (superfamily Unionoidea), and the potential decimation of populations of native mussels resulting from the rapid spread of the exotic zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha, management options to eliminate or reduce the threat of the zebra mussel are needed. Relocating native mussels to refugia (artificial and natural) has been proposed to mitigate the threat of zebra mussels to native species. Relocation of native mussels to refugia such as fish hatchery facilities or natural habitats within their historic range. Which are unlikely to be infested by zebra mussels, necessitates that protocols be developed to prevent the inadvertent introduction of zebra mussels. Several recent studies have developed Such protocols, and have assessed their effectiveness on the health and survival of native mussels during subsequent relocation to various refugia. The purpose of this project is to synthesize and evaluate the current protocols and to develop a set of procedures that resource managers and researchers should consider before conducting conservation activities in zebra mussel infested waters. We found that the existing protocols have many common points of concern, such as facility modification and suitability, zebra mussel risk assessment and management procedures, and health and disease management procedures. These conservation protocols may have broad applicability to other situations and locations. A summary and evaluation of the information in these main areas, along with recommended guidelines, are presented in this article.

  2. Trypsin inhibitors of buffalo seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, N; Ramesh, V

    1992-03-01

    Two trypsin inhibitors from acid-treated buffalo seminal plasma were purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography. These acid-stable trypsin inhibitors having charge heterogeneity were homogeneous with respect to size as revealed by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. Gel filtration data suggest molecular weight value of 9,900 Da for inhibitor I and 10,900 Da for inhibitor II. Molecular weight estimated by SDS-PAGE was found to be 10,600 Da and 11,200 Da for inhibitors I and II, respectively. The hydrodynamic properties such as Stokes radii (1.58 nm and 1.62 nm); intrinsic viscosity (2.5725 ml/g and 2.5025 ml/g) and diffusion coefficient (13.499 x 10(-11) m2/sec. and 13.166X10(-11) m2/sec) respectively for inhibitor I and II were determined by analytical gel filtration. These inhibitors were fairly thermostable and could not be stained by PAS reagent. Both the inhibitors were found to inhibit buffalo acrosin but not bovine chymotrypsin.

  3. Characterization of a chitinase with antifungal activity from a native Serratia marcescens B4A.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mandana; Aminzadeh, Saeed; Zolgharnein, Hossein; Safahieh, Alireza; Daliri, Morteza; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Ghoroghi, Ahmad; Motallebi, Abbasali

    2011-07-01

    Chitinases have the ability of chitin digestion that constitutes a main compound of the cell wall in many of the phytopathogens such as fungi. In the following investigation, a novel chitinase with antifungal activity was characterized from a native Serratia marcescens B4A. Partially purified enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa. It indicated an optimum activity in pH 5 at 45°C. Enzyme was stable in 55°C for 20 min and at a pH range of 3-9 for 90 min at 25°C. When the temperature was raised to 60°C, it might affect the structure of enzymes lead to reduction of chitinase activity. Moreover, the Km and Vmax values for chitin were 8.3 mg/ml and 2.4 mmol/min, respectively. Additionally, the effect of some cations and chemical compounds were found to stimulate the chitinase activity. In addition, Iodoacetamide and Idoacetic acid did not inhibit enzyme activity, indicating that cysteine residues are not part of the catalytic site of chitinase. Finally, chitinase activity was further monitored by scanning electronic microscopy data in which progressive changes in chitin porosity appeared upon treatment with chitinase. This enzyme exhibited antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, Bipolaris sp, Alternaria raphani, Alternaria brassicicola, revealing a potential application for the industry with potentially exploitable significance. Fungal chitin shows some special features, in particular with respect to chemical structure. Difference in chitinolytic ability must result from the subsite structure in the enzyme binding cleft. This implies that why the enzyme didn't have significant antifungal activity against other Fungi.

  4. Presenilin 1 promotes trypsin-induced neuroprotection via the PAR2/ERK signaling pathway. Effects of presenilin 1 FAD mutations.

    PubMed

    Nikolakopoulou, Angeliki M; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Robakis, Nikolaos K

    2016-06-01

    Mutants of presenilin 1 (PS1) increase neuronal cell death causing autosomal-dominant familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). Recent literature shows that treatment of neuronal cultures with low concentrations of trypsin, a member of the serine family of proteases, protects neurons from toxic insults by binding to the proteinase-activated receptor 2 and stimulating survival kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2). Other studies show that PS1 is necessary for the neuroprotective activity of specific neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Here, we show that treatment of mouse cortical neuronal cultures with trypsin activates ERK1/2 and protects neurons against glutamate excitoxicity. The trypsin-dependent ERK activation and neuroprotection requires both alleles of PS1 because neither PS1 knockout nor PS1 hemizygous neuronal cultures can use exogenous trypsin to activate ERK1/2 or increase neuronal survival. The protective effect of PS1 does not depend on its γ-secretase activity because inhibitors of γ-secretase have no effect on trypsin-mediated neuroprotection. Importantly, cortical neuronal cultures either heterozygous or homozygous for PS1 FAD mutants are unable to use trypsin to activate ERK1/2 and rescue neurons from excitotoxicity, indicating that FAD mutants inhibit trypsin-dependent neuroprotection in an autosomal-dominant manner. Furthermore, our data support the theory that PS FAD mutants increase neurodegeneration by inhibiting the ability of neurons to use cellular factors as protective agents against toxic insults. PMID:27143420

  5. Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation of Raw and Cooked Meat of Korean Native Chickens and Other Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Muhlisin; Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Ji Hye; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe antioxidant enzyme activity, iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chickens and other poultry. The breast and thigh meat of three Korean native chicken breeds including Woorimatdak, Hyunin black and Yeonsan ogye, and three commercial poultry breeds including the broiler, White Leghorn and Pekin duck (Anasplatyrhyncos domesticus) were studied. The analyses of the antioxidant enzymes activity, iron content and lipid oxidation were performed in raw and cooked samples. The activity of catalase (CAT) in the thigh meat was higher than that of the breast meat of three Korean native chickens and the broiler, respectively. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the uncooked thigh meat of three Korean native chickens was higher than that of the breasts. The breast meat of Woorimatdak and Pekin duck had higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than the others, while only the thigh meat of Pekin duck had the highest activity. Cooking inactivated CAT and decreased the activity of GPx and SOD. The thigh meat of Woorimatdak, White Leghorn, Yeonsan ogye and Hyunin black contained more total iron than the breast meat of those breeds. The heme-iron lost during cooking ranged from 3.2% to 14.8%. It is noted that the thigh meat had higher thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values than the breast in all chicken breeds. Though Woorimatdak showed higher antioxidant enzyme activity and lower released-iron percentage among Korean native chickens, no differences were found on lipid oxidation. We confirm that the dark meat of poultry exhibited higher antioxidant enzyme activity and contained more iron than the white meat. PMID:26954148

  6. Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation of Raw and Cooked Meat of Korean Native Chickens and Other Poultry.

    PubMed

    Muhlisin; Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Ji Hye; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to observe antioxidant enzyme activity, iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chickens and other poultry. The breast and thigh meat of three Korean native chicken breeds including Woorimatdak, Hyunin black and Yeonsan ogye, and three commercial poultry breeds including the broiler, White Leghorn and Pekin duck (Anasplatyrhyncos domesticus) were studied. The analyses of the antioxidant enzymes activity, iron content and lipid oxidation were performed in raw and cooked samples. The activity of catalase (CAT) in the thigh meat was higher than that of the breast meat of three Korean native chickens and the broiler, respectively. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the uncooked thigh meat of three Korean native chickens was higher than that of the breasts. The breast meat of Woorimatdak and Pekin duck had higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than the others, while only the thigh meat of Pekin duck had the highest activity. Cooking inactivated CAT and decreased the activity of GPx and SOD. The thigh meat of Woorimatdak, White Leghorn, Yeonsan ogye and Hyunin black contained more total iron than the breast meat of those breeds. The heme-iron lost during cooking ranged from 3.2% to 14.8%. It is noted that the thigh meat had higher thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values than the breast in all chicken breeds. Though Woorimatdak showed higher antioxidant enzyme activity and lower released-iron percentage among Korean native chickens, no differences were found on lipid oxidation. We confirm that the dark meat of poultry exhibited higher antioxidant enzyme activity and contained more iron than the white meat.

  7. Women's Class Strategies as Activism in Native Community Building in Toronto, 1950-1975

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Bobiwash, Heather

    2003-01-01

    Between the end of World War II and the early 1970s, many Native women in Ontario came to Toronto in the hopes of accessing higher education, jobs, and freedom denied them on reserves under the oppression of federal government tutelage. However, much of the literature on Native rural-urban migration in Canada concentrates on an association between…

  8. Trypsin inhibitors from Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum leaves involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ribeiro, S F F; Gonçalves, L S A; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Vasconcelos, I M; Gomes, V M

    2014-11-07

    Several plant organs contain proteinase inhibitors, which are produced during normal plant development or are induced upon pathogen attack to suppress the enzymatic activity of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we examined the presence of proteinase inhibitors, specifically trypsin inhibitors, in the leaf extract of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum inoculated with PepYMV (Pepper yellow mosaic virus). Leaf extract from plants with the accession number UENF 1624, which is resistant to PepYMV, was collected at 7 different times (0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h). Seedlings inoculated with PepYMV and control seedlings were grown in a growth chamber. Protein extract from leaf samples was partially purified by reversed-phase chromatography using a C2/C18 column. Residual trypsin activity was assayed to detect inhibitors followed by Tricine-SDS-PAGE analysis to determine the N-terminal peptide sequence. Based on trypsin inhibitor assays, trypsin inhibitors are likely constitutively synthesized in C. baccatum var. pendulum leaf tissue. These inhibitors are likely a defense mechanism for the C. baccatum var. pendulum- PepYMV pathosystem.

  9. Trypsin inhibitors from Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum leaves involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ribeiro, S F F; Gonçalves, L S A; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Vasconcelos, I M; Gomes, V M

    2014-01-01

    Several plant organs contain proteinase inhibitors, which are produced during normal plant development or are induced upon pathogen attack to suppress the enzymatic activity of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we examined the presence of proteinase inhibitors, specifically trypsin inhibitors, in the leaf extract of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum inoculated with PepYMV (Pepper yellow mosaic virus). Leaf extract from plants with the accession number UENF 1624, which is resistant to PepYMV, was collected at 7 different times (0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h). Seedlings inoculated with PepYMV and control seedlings were grown in a growth chamber. Protein extract from leaf samples was partially purified by reversed-phase chromatography using a C2/C18 column. Residual trypsin activity was assayed to detect inhibitors followed by Tricine-SDS-PAGE analysis to determine the N-terminal peptide sequence. Based on trypsin inhibitor assays, trypsin inhibitors are likely constitutively synthesized in C. baccatum var. pendulum leaf tissue. These inhibitors are likely a defense mechanism for the C. baccatum var. pendulum- PepYMV pathosystem. PMID:25501145

  10. Metabolism of trypsin-inhibitory proteins in the germinating seeds of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Pusztai, A

    1972-06-01

    A number of proteins with trypsin-inhibitory activity was separated by isoelectric focusing and their amounts measured in the extracts of the seeds of kidney bean at various stages of germination up to 16 days.The total trypsin inhibitor content of the dormant seed, 2.2 mg per g bean rose to about 3.6 mg by the seventh day and declined slowly after the tenth day of germination. The individual trypsin inhibitors however, appeared to change independently of each other and some components disappeared almost completely with the progress of germination. The emergence of an inhibitor not found in the dormant seed was also observed. Some of the inhibitor proteins attained a maximum concentration by the 7-8th day of germination. This coincided with a similar maximum in the general protein and proteolytic enzyme content of the germinating bean seeds. The results obtained suggested that the main function during germination of these protein components might not be related to their trypsin-inhibitory activity.

  11. Probing the binding mechanisms of α-tocopherol to trypsin and pepsin using isothermal titration calorimetry, spectroscopic, and molecular modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangrong; Ni, Tianjun

    2016-06-01

    α-Tocopherol is a required nutrient for a variety of biological functions. In this study, the binding of α-tocopherol to trypsin and pepsin was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and molecular modeling methods. Thermodynamic investigations reveal that α-tocopherol binds to trypsin/pepsin is synergistically driven by enthalpy and entropy. The fluorescence experimental results indicate that α-tocopherol can quench the fluorescence of trypsin/pepsin through a static quenching mechanism. The binding ability of α-tocopherol with trypsin/pepsin is in the intermediate range, and one molecule of α-tocopherol combines with one molecule of trypsin/pepsin. As shown by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, α-tocopherol may induce conformational changes of trypsin/pepsin. Molecular modeling displays the specific binding site and gives information about binding forces and α-tocopherol-tryptophan (Trp)/tyrosine (Tyr) distances. In addition, the inhibition rate of α-tocopherol on trypsin and pepsin was studied. The study provides a basic data set for clarifying the binding mechanisms of α-tocopherol with trypsin and pepsin and is helpful for understanding its biological activity in vivo.

  12. Characterization of p-aminobenzamidine-based sorbent and its use for high-performance affinity chromatography of trypsin-like proteases.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Suzuki, Takao; Hasegawa, Masazumi; Kato, Yoshio; Sasaki, Hiroo; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2003-08-15

    An affinity sorbent, hydrophilic polymer-based carrier of different pore size (Toyopearl) with immobilized p-aminobenzamidine (ABA), has been prepared. Its basic properties and some applications for protein purification were studied. ABA, which is a synthetic inhibitor for trypsin-like proteases, was covalently immobilized to Toyopearl by reductive amination. The ligand density and binding capacity for porcine trypsin varied depending on the pore size of Toyopearl. The maximum binding capacity of the immobilized p-aminobenzamidine Toyopearl (ABA-Toyopearl) for trypsin was more than 40 mg/ml gel. ABA-Toyopearl thus obtained was very stable below pH 8 and was successfully used for high-performance affinity chromatography of trypsin-like proteases such as trypsin, thrombin, tissue-type plasminogen activator or urokinase in a single step at 25 degrees C. PMID:13677653

  13. PCB exposure and in vivo CYP1A2 activity among Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Edward F; Hwang, Syni-An; Lambert, George; Gomez, Marta; Tarbell, Alice

    2005-03-01

    Cytochrome P-450 1A2 (CYP1A2) is an enzyme involved in the metabolic activation of some carcinogens and is believed to be induced by xenobiotics. Very few studies, however, have investigated the association between environmental exposures and in vivo CYP1A2 activity in humans. To address this issue, a study was conducted of CYP1A2 activity among Native Americans exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the consumption of fish from the St. Lawrence River. At the Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne (in New York and in Ontario and Quebec, Canada), 103 adults were interviewed, and they donated blood for serum PCB analysis and underwent the caffeine breath test (CBT), a safe and noninvasive procedure that uses caffeine as a probe for CYP1A2 activity in vivo. The results supported the findings of other studies that CBT values are higher among smokers and men and lower among women who use oral contraceptives. Despite a relatively low average total PCB body burden in this population, the sum of serum levels for nine mono- or di-ortho-substituted PCB congeners showed positive associations with CBT values (p = 0.052 wet weight and p = 0.029 lipid adjusted), as did toxic equivalent quantities (TEQs; p = 0.091 for wet weight and 0.048 for lipid adjusted). Regarding individual congeners, serum levels of PCB-153, PCB-170, and PCB-180 were significantly correlated with CBT values. The results support the notion that CYP1A2 activity may be a marker of an early biological effect of exposure to PCBs in humans and that the CBT may be a useful tool to monitor such effects.

  14. PCB Exposure and in Vivo CYP1A2 Activity among Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Edward F.; Hwang, Syni-An; Lambert, George; Gomez, Marta; Tarbell, Alice

    2005-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 1A2 (CYP1A2) is an enzyme involved in the metabolic activation of some carcinogens and is believed to be induced by xenobiotics. Very few studies, however, have investigated the association between environmental exposures and in vivo CYP1A2 activity in humans. To address this issue, a study was conducted of CYP1A2 activity among Native Americans exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the consumption of fish from the St. Lawrence River. At the Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne (in New York and in Ontario and Quebec, Canada), 103 adults were interviewed, and they donated blood for serum PCB analysis and underwent the caffeine breath test (CBT), a safe and noninvasive procedure that uses caffeine as a probe for CYP1A2 activity in vivo. The results supported the findings of other studies that CBT values are higher among smokers and men and lower among women who use oral contraceptives. Despite a relatively low average total PCB body burden in this population, the sum of serum levels for nine mono- or di-ortho-substituted PCB congeners showed positive associations with CBT values (p = 0.052 wet weight and p = 0.029 lipid adjusted), as did toxic equivalent quantities (TEQs; p = 0.091 for wet weight and 0.048 for lipid adjusted). Regarding individual congeners, serum levels of PCB-153, PCB-170, and PCB-180 were significantly correlated with CBT values. The results support the notion that CYP1A2 activity may be a marker of an early biological effect of exposure to PCBs in humans and that the CBT may be a useful tool to monitor such effects. PMID:15743714

  15. A designed glycoprotein analogue of Gc-MAF exhibits native-like phagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Bogani, Federica; McConnell, Elizabeth; Joshi, Lokesh; Chang, Yung; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2006-06-01

    Rational protein design has been successfully used to create mimics of natural proteins that retain native activity. In the present work, de novo protein engineering is explored to develop a mini-protein analogue of Gc-MAF, a glycoprotein involved in the immune system activation that has shown anticancer activity in mice. Gc-MAF is derived in vivo from vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) via enzymatic processing of its glycosaccharide to leave a single GalNAc residue located on an exposed loop. We used molecular modeling tools in conjunction with structural analysis to splice the glycosylated loop onto a stable three-helix bundle (alpha3W, PDB entry 1LQ7). The resulting 69-residue model peptide, MM1, has been successfully synthesized by solid-phase synthesis both in the aglycosylated and the glycosylated (GalNAc-MM1) form. Circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed the expected alpha-helical secondary structure. The thermodynamic stability as evaluated from chemical and thermal denaturation is comparable with that of the scaffold protein, alpha3W, indicating that the insertion of the exogenous loop of Gc-MAF did not significantly perturb the overall structure. GalNAc-MM1 retains the macrophage stimulation activity of natural Gc-MAF; in vitro tests show an identical enhancement of Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis in primary macrophages. GalNAc-MM1 provides a framework for the development of mutants with increased activity that could be used in place of Gc-MAF as an immunomodulatory agent in therapy. PMID:16734450

  16. PCB Exposure and in Vivo CYP1A2 Activity among Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Edward F.; Hwang, Syni-An; Lambert, George; Gomez, Marta; Tarbell, Alice

    2005-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 1A2 (CYP1A2) is an enzyme involved in the metabolic activation of some carcinogens and is believed to be induced by xenobiotics. Very few studies, however, have investigated the association between environmental exposures and in vivo CYP1A2 activity in humans. To address this issue, a study was conducted of CYP1A2 activity among Native Americans exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the consumption of fish from the St. Lawrence River. At the Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne (in New York and in Ontario and Quebec, Canada), 103 adults were interviewed, and they donated blood for serum PCB analysis and underwent the caffeine breath test (CBT), a safe and noninvasive procedure that uses caffeine as a probe for CYP1A2 activity in vivo. The results supported the findings of other studies that CBT values are higher among smokers and men and lower among women who use oral contraceptives. Despite a relatively low average total PCB body burden in this population, the sum of serum levels for nine mono- or di-ortho-substituted PCB congeners showed positive associations with CBT values (p = 0.052 wet weight and p = 0.029 lipid adjusted), as did toxic equivalent quantities (TEQs; p = 0.091 for wet weight and 0.048 for lipid adjusted). Regarding individual congeners, serum levels of PCB-153, PCB-170, and PCB-180 were significantly correlated with CBT values. The results support the notion that CYP1A2 activity may be a marker of an early biological effect of exposure to PCBs in humans and that the CBT may be a useful tool to monitor such effects. PMID:15743714

  17. Short communication: Assessing antihypertensive activity in native and model Queso Fresco cheeses.

    PubMed

    Paul, M; Van Hekken, D L

    2011-05-01

    Hispanic-style cheeses are one of the fastest growing varieties in the United States, making up approximately 2% of the total cheese production in this country. Queso Fresco is one of most popular Hispanic-style cheeses. Protein extracts from several varieties of Mexican Queso Fresco and model Queso Fresco were analyzed for potential antihypertensive activity. Many Quesos Frescos obtained from Mexico are made from raw milk and therefore the native microflora is included in the cheese-making process. Model Queso Fresco samples were made from pasteurized milk and did not utilize starter cultures. Water-soluble protein extracts from 6 Mexican Quesos Frescos and 12 model cheeses were obtained and assayed for their ability to inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme, implying potential as foods that can help to lower blood pressure. All model cheeses displayed antihypertensive activity, but mainly after 8 wk of aging when they were no longer consumable, whereas the Mexican samples did display some angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory action after minimal aging.

  18. Walking Patterns in a Sample of African American, Native American, and Caucasian Women: The Cross-Cultural Activity Participation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitt, Melicia C.; DuBose, Katrina D.; Ainsworth, Barbara E.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine

    2004-01-01

    This analysis describes walking patterns among African American, Native American, and Caucasian women from South Carolina and New Mexico. Walking was assessed using pedometer and physical activity (PA) record data based on 4 consecutive days on either three (Study Phase 1) or two (Study Phase 2) occasions. Participants walked 5,429 [plus or minus]…

  19. Activity patterns and parasitism rates of fire ant decapitating flies (Diptera:Phoridae:Pseudacteon spp.) in their native Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: This work describes the annual and daily activity patterns of two parasitoid fly communities of the fire ant S. invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in their native Argentina. Pseudacteon (Diptera: Phoridae) flies were censused monthly for one year at two sites in northwestern Corr...

  20. 8 CFR 329.5 - Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... service during World War II. 329.5 Section 329.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. (a) A person desiring to... Armed Forces in the Far East, or (ii) Within the Commonwealth Army of the Philippines, the...

  1. Recurrent Selection for Transgene Activity Levels in Maize Results in Proxy Selection for a Native Gene with the Same Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Anastasia L.; Schroder, Megan N.; Scott, M. Paul

    2016-01-01

    High activity levels of a transgene can be very useful, making a transgene easier to evaluate for safety and efficacy. High activity levels can also increase the economic benefit of the production of high value proteins in transgenic plants. The goal of this research is to determine if recurrent selection for activity of a transgene will result in higher activity, and if selection for activity of a transgene controlled by a native promoter will also increase protein levels of the native gene with the same promoter. To accomplish this goal we used transgenic maize containing a construct encoding green fluorescent protein controlled by the promoter for the maize endosperm-specific 27kDa gamma zein seed storage protein. We carried out recurrent selection for fluorescence intensity in two breeding populations. After three generations of selection, both selected populations were significantly more fluorescent and had significantly higher levels of 27kDa gamma zein than the unselected control populations. These higher levels of the 27kDa gamma zein occurred independently of the presence of the transgene. The results show that recurrent selection can be used to increase activity of a transgene and that selection for a transgene controlled by a native promoter can increase protein levels of the native gene with the same promoter via proxy selection. Moreover, the increase in native gene protein level is maintained in the absence of the transgene, demonstrating that proxy selection can be used to produce non-transgenic plants with desired changes in gene expression. PMID:26895451

  2. Trypsin/creatinine clearance ratio and serum immunoreactive trypsin in digestive and pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Del Favero, G; Fabris, C; Bonvicini, P; Piccoli, A; Baccaglini, U; Pedrazzoli, S; Burlina, A; Naccarato, R

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of trypsin/creatinine clearance ratio (Ctr/Ccr) and serum immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) was evaluated in a total of 168 subjects with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis and non-pancreatic digestive diseases. Amylase/creatinine clearance ratio (Cam/Ccr) and serum amylase levels were also evaluated in order to establish their possible relationship with Ctr/Ccr and IRT values. Elevated Ctr/Ccr and IRT values were observed in several patients with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. Abnormal IRT and Ctr/Ccr values were found in 28.2 and 4% of non-pancreatic digestive diseases, respectively. IRT and amylase serum levels showed consensual modifications, while Ctr/Ccr showed a behavior different from that of Cam/Ccr. Liver damage seems to play a role in increasing serum IRT levels of patients without pancreatic involvement, while the increased Ctr/Ccr seems to depend on other factors, for instance renal tubular dysfunction.

  3. Are valve repairs associated with better outcomes than replacements in patients with native active valve endocarditis?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong; Zhang, Benqing

    2014-12-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether valve replacement was associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates than valve repair in patients with native active valve endocarditis. Altogether 662 papers were found using the reported search, of which 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Traditionally, valve replacement has been the standard therapy for valve endocarditis when surgical treatment is indicated. But now valve repair is increasingly used as an alternative, which may avoid disadvantages of anticoagulation, lower the risk of prosthetic infection and improve postoperative survival. To compare outcomes of these two treatments between studies can be difficult because most of related papers contain raw data on prosthetic valve endocarditis or healed endocarditis, which were excluded from our manuscript. Studies only analysing the outcomes of either of these treatments without the comparison of valve repair and replacement were also excluded. Finally, seven papers were identified. The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology 2006 valvular guidelines recommended that mitral valve repair should be performed instead of replacement when at all possible. In three of the seven studies, there were significant differences between valve repair and replacement in long-term survival. One study found that aortic valve repair offered better outcomes in freedom from reoperation at 5 years (P = 0.021) and in survival at 4 years (repair vs replacement 88 vs 65%; P = 0.047). One study reported that there was improved event-free survival at 10 years in the mitral valve repair group (P = 0.015), although there was more previous septic embolization in this group. In one study, early and late mortality

  4. Trypsin and thrombin accelerate aggregation of human endocrine pancreas precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chiju; Geras-Raaka, Elizabeth; Marcus-Samuels, Bernice; Oron, Yoram; Gershengorn, Marvin C

    2006-02-01

    Human islet-derived precursor cells (hIPCs) and human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PANC-1) cells can be induced to form aggregates that subsequently differentiate into hormone-expressing islet-like cell aggregates (ICAs). We show that challenge of hIPCs or PANC-1 cells with thrombin or trypsin resulted in stimulation of signaling via the inositol-tris-phosphate second messenger pathway leading to rapid, transient increases in cytosolic calcium ion concentration in the majority of the cells. Because we found that hIPCs, PANC-1 cells, human fetal pancreas, and human adult islets express two protease-activated receptors (PARs), PAR-1 and PAR-2, we tested whether the effects of thrombin and trypsin were mediated, at least in part, by these receptors. Peptide agonists that are relatively specific for PAR-1 (SFLLRN-amide) or PAR-2 (SLIGRL-amide) stimulated increases in inositol phosphates and cytosolic calcium ion concentration, and increased the phosphorylation of Rho, a small G-protein associated with cytoskeletal changes affecting cellular morphology and migration. Most importantly, we show that these agonists increased the rate of hIPC aggregation leading to the formation of more viable, smaller ICAs. Our data show that thrombin and trypsin accelerate aggregation, an early stage of hIPC differentiation in vitro, and imply that pancreatic trypsin and thrombin may be involved in islet development in vivo. PMID:16021635

  5. IL-2-Activated Killer Cells and Native Cytokines in Treatment of Patients with Advanced Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostanin, Alexander A.; Chernykh, Helena R.; Leplina, Olga Y.; Shevela, Ekaterina Ya.; Niconov, Sergey D.; Kozlov, Vladimir A.

    1997-12-01

    We evaluated the efficiency/tolerability of and the immunological changes induced by the adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) with IL-2-activated killer cells, and preparation of native cytokines from swine spleen (PSS) in treatment of 20 patients with advanced cancer (10 patients with primary lung cancer; 3 with metastatic melanoma; 2 with advanced neuroblastoma; 2 with ovarian cancer; renal cancer; gastric adenocarcinoma; and colorectal cancer). The partial/minor response of duration period 2-10 months was observed in 20% of patients. 2/4 patients, who underwent partial surgical tumor resection and following AIT course, sustained the event-free survival for more than 24 months. The response to the therapy was revealed in 4/10 patients with lung cancer, 2/2 patients with neuroblastoma, of whom each had ovarian and colorectal cancers. The evaluation of a dose of infused LAKcells as well as combined i.v./local (endobronchial or endoperitoneal) LAK administration were necessary to assure positive response in patients. The cytokine and/or side effects were moderate and the combined LAK-PSS infusions were generally well tolerated by the patients. The treatment was followed by activation of the patient immune system that included: (i) rebound in amount of peripheral blood lymphocytes; (ii) gain in amount of CD3(+) T cells and those CD4(+) helper/inducer; (iii) enchantment of lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production (IL-2, IL-1, TNF-alpha). Being injected to patients in combination with LAK cells, cytokines related to PSS action and/or those, either exogenous or secondary, and released by in vitro and in vivo, activated lymphocytes and could cause the therapeutic effects.

  6. Stimulation of reductive dechlorination of hexachlorobenzene in soil by inducing the native microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörfler, Ulrike; Brahushi, Ferdi; Schroll, Reiner

    2010-05-01

    The reductive dechlorination and degradation of 14C-hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was investigated in an agricultural soil. The activity of the native anaerobic microbial community could be induced by saturating the soil with water. Under these conditions high rates of dechlorination were observed. After 20 weeks of incubation only 1% of the applied 14C-HCB could be detected in the fraction of extractable residues. Additionally organic substances, like wheat straw and lucerne straw, however considerably delayed and reduced the dechlorination process in soil. The decline of HCB was not only caused by dechlorination but also by the formation of non-extractable residues, whereby their amounts varied with time depending on the experimental conditions. Several dechlorination products were detected, indicating the following main HCB transformation pathway: HCB - PCB - 1,2,3,5-TeCB - 1,3,5-TCB - 1,3-DCB, with 1,3,5-TCB as main intermediate dechlorination product. The other TeCB-, TCB- and DCB-isomers were also detected in low amount, showing the presence of more than one dechlorination pathway. Since the methane production rates were lowest when the dechlorination rates were highest, it can be assumed that methanogenic bacteria were not involved in the dechlorination process of HCB. The established 14C-mass balance show, that with increasing dechlorination and incubation times, the 14C-recoveries decreased, which is a indication that highly volatile metabolites where formed in an increasing amount..

  7. Phytochemical Composition and Metabolic Performance Enhancing Activity of Dietary Berries Traditionally Used by Native North Americans

    PubMed Central

    Burns Kraft, Tristan F.; Dey, Moul; Rogers, Randy B.; Ribnicky, David M.; Gipp, David M.; Cefalu, William T.; Raskin, Ilya; Lila, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Four wild berry species, Amelanchier alnifolia, Viburnum trilobum, Prunus virginiana, and Shepherdia argentea, all integral to the traditional subsistence diet of Native American tribal communities, were evaluated to elucidate phytochemical composition and bioactive properties related to performance and human health. Biological activity was screened using a range of bioassays that assessed the potential for these little-known dietary berries to affect diabetic microvascular complications, hyperglycemia, pro-inflammatory gene expression, and metabolic syndrome symptoms. Non-polar constituents from berries, including carotenoids, were potent inhibitors of aldose reductase (an enzyme involved in the etiology of diabetic microvascular complications) whereas the polar constituents, mainly phenolic acids, anthocyanins, and proanthocyanidins, were hypoglycemic agents and strong inhibitors of IL-1β and COX-2 gene expression. Berry samples also showed the ability to modulate lipid metabolism and energy expenditure in a manner consistent with improving metabolic syndrome. The results demonstrate that these berries traditionally consumed by tribal cultures contain a rich array of phytochemicals that have the capacity to promote health and protect against chronic diseases, such as diabetes. PMID:18211018

  8. The relationship between active hand and ear advantage in the native and foreign language.

    PubMed

    Mildner, Vesna; Stanković, Davor; Petković, Marina

    2005-03-01

    In an experimental design involving two auditorily presented competing commands (one to each ear), 144 right-handed subjects (72 male and 72 female) were asked to provide motor responses. Half of each group of subjects was responding with their right hand and the other half with the left. The test was applied in the subjects' native language (Croatian) and in English, which they had learned as a foreign language. Ear advantage was determined by calculating laterality indices from the order of responding to the commands. On average, right-ear advantage was found in all conditions. Analysis of results revealed the effect of the active hand in Croatian (with significant decrease in the right-ear advantage when using the left hand). The same trend failed to reach significance in English. In responses to English stimuli, there was a significant effect of gender (with men exhibiting a lower right-ear advantage than women). The same trend was not significant for Croatian stimuli. The consistently lower right-ear advantage found in male subjects is contrary to the traditional assumptions that men are more lateralized than women and warrants further investigation.

  9. Why Ser and not Thr brokers catalysis in the trypsin fold.

    PubMed

    Pelc, Leslie A; Chen, Zhiwei; Gohara, David W; Vogt, Austin D; Pozzi, Nicola; Di Cera, Enrico

    2015-02-24

    Although Thr is equally represented as Ser in the human genome and as a nucleophile is as good as Ser, it is never found in the active site of the large family of trypsin-like proteases that utilize the Asp/His/Ser triad. The molecular basis of the preference of Ser over Thr in the trypsin fold was investigated with X-ray structures of the thrombin mutant S195T free and bound to an irreversible active site inhibitor. In the free form, the methyl group of T195 is oriented toward the incoming substrate in a conformation seemingly incompatible with productive binding. In the bound form, the side chain of T195 is reoriented for efficient substrate acylation without causing steric clash within the active site. Rapid kinetics prove that this change is due to selection of an active conformation from a preexisting ensemble of reactive and unreactive rotamers whose relative distribution determines the level of activity of the protease. Consistent with these observations, the S195T substitution is associated with a weak yet finite activity that allows identification of an unanticipated important role for S195 as the end point of allosteric transduction in the trypsin fold. The S195T mutation abrogates the Na(+)-dependent enhancement of catalytic activity in thrombin, activated protein C, and factor Xa and significantly weakens the physiologically important allosteric effects of thrombomodulin on thrombin and of cofactor Va on factor Xa. The evolutionary selection of Ser over Thr in trypsin-like proteases was therefore driven by the need for high catalytic activity and efficient allosteric regulation. PMID:25664608

  10. Use of denatured radioalbumin for determination of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors in different plant seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Blahovec, J. )

    1991-02-01

    The procedure for determination of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors with urea-denatured albumin labeled by {sup 125}I is described. The content of both types of inhibitory activity has been determined in crude extracts of soybean, bean, lentil, pea, horse bean, maize, and 20 pea cultivars. The method is sufficiently sensitive, reliable, and particularly suitable when estimations must be done in crude plant extract with low inhibitory activity.

  11. The structure and stability of trypsin-resistant segments from rabbit tropomyosin.

    PubMed

    Eckard, E E; Cowgill, R W

    1976-06-15

    Tropomyosin was found to undergo only limited digestion by trypsin at 0 degrees C and the two segments that accumulated amounted to two-thirds of the original protein. They are referred to as segments A and B. These segments were not resistant to trypsin digestion at 20 degrees C and at the latter temperature no large fragments remained as judged by disc gel electrophoresis. Segments A and B were separated from each other on the basis of solubility differences and were found to have molecular weights of 24600 and 21900 respectively. Each of the segments appeared to retain about 70-75% of the helical conformation as judged by circular dichroism at 20 degrees C. However, the segments did not show any of the inhibitory activity of the parent tropomyosin molecule when mixed with troponin in the Mg2+-actomyosin ATPase system. Amino acid analysis showed that the portion of tropomyosin that was digested by trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) had a lower content of the helix stabilizing residues Glu and Leu and a higher content of the helix-destabilizing residues Arg and Lys. These differences indicate that the digested portion should be less stable in the helical conformation than the two trypsin-resistant segments. End group determinations along with the results of the amino acid analysis indicated that segment A was probably derived from the central one-third of tropomyosin and segment B from the C-terminal one-third. By the process of elimination the N-terminal third appears to have been more liable region that was digested by trypsin. The segments A and B were shown to differ in their stability to denaturation by guanidine-HCl and elevated temperature. All of these observations indicate that tropomyosin is not a uniform structure and is composed of regions of different stability.

  12. Concerted regulation of inhibitory activity of alpha 1-antitrypsin by the native strain distributed throughout the molecule.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eun Joo; Lee, Cheolju; Yu, Myeong-Hee

    2002-04-19

    The native forms of common globular proteins are in their most stable state but the native forms of plasma serpins (serine protease inhibitors) show high energy state interactions. The high energy state strain of alpha(1)-antitrypsin, a prototype serpin, is distributed throughout the whole molecule, but the strain that regulates the function directly appears to be localized in the region where the reactive site loop is inserted during complex formation with a target protease. To examine the functional role of the strain at other regions of alpha(1)-antitrypsin, we increased the stability of the molecule greatly via combining various stabilizing single amino acid substitutions that did not affect the activity individually. The results showed that a substantial increase of stability, over 13 kcal mol(-1), affected the inhibitory activity with a correlation of 11% activity loss per kcal mol(-1). Addition of an activity affecting single residue substitution in the loop insertion region to these very stable substitutions caused a further activity decrease. The results suggest that the native strain of alpha(1)-antitrypsin distributed throughout the molecule regulates the inhibitory function in a concerted manner. PMID:11834734

  13. Trypsin digestion for determining orientation of ATPase in Halobacterium saccharovorum membrane vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, H.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared by low pressure disruption of cells exhibited no ATPase activity in the absence of Triton X-100, although 43% of the total menadione reductase activity was detected. Trypsin digestion reduced menadione reductase activity by 45% whereas ATPase activity was not affected. Disruption of the membrane fraction at higher pressure solubilized about 45% of the ATPase activity. The soluble activity was still enhanced by Triton X-100, suggesting that the detergent, besides disrupting membrane vesicles, also activated the ATPase. The discrepancy in localization of menadione reductase and ATPase activities raised questions regarding the reliability of using a single marker enzyme as an indicator of vesicle orientation.

  14. Development of a rapid high-efficiency scalable process for acetylated Sus scrofa cationic trypsin production from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingzhi; Wu, Feilin; Xu, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Trypsin is one of the most important enzymatic tools in proteomics and biopharmaceutical studies. Here, we describe the complete recombinant expression and purification from a trypsinogen expression vector construct. The Sus scrofa cationic trypsin gene with a propeptide sequence was optimized according to Escherichia coli codon-usage bias and chemically synthesized. The gene was inserted into pET-11c plasmid to yield an expression vector. Using high-density E. coli fed-batch fermentation, trypsinogen was expressed in inclusion bodies at 1.47 g/L. The inclusion body was refolded with a high yield of 36%. The purified trypsinogen was then activated to produce trypsin. To address stability problems, the trypsin thus produced was acetylated. The final product was generated upon gel filtration. The final yield of acetylated trypsin was 182 mg/L from a 5-L fermenter. Our acetylated trypsin product demonstrated higher BAEE activity (30,100 BAEE unit/mg) than a commercial product (9500 BAEE unit/mg, Promega). It also demonstrated resistance to autolysis. This is the first report of production of acetylated recombinant trypsin that is stable and suitable for scale-up.

  15. Native Knowledge in the Americas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    1985-01-01

    Native American science is defined as activities of native peoples of the New World in observing physical phenomena and attempting to explain and control them. Problems in studying native science, ethnoscience and native science, archaeostronomy and ethnoastronomy, ethnobotany, agriculture, technology, and future directions are discussed. (JN)

  16. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Silva, José A.; Pompeu, Dávia G.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge. PMID:26207098

  17. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds.

    PubMed

    Silva, José A; Pompeu, Dávia G; Smolka, Marcus B; Gozzo, Fabio C; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N; Granjeiro, Paulo A; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge.

  18. Spatial and activity-dependent catecholamine release in rat adrenal medulla under native neuronal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle; Zarkua, Georgy; Chan, Shyue-An; Sridhar, Arun; Smith, Corey

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla in rat receive excitatory synaptic input through anterior and posterior divisions of the sympathetic splanchnic nerve. Upon synaptic stimulation, the adrenal medulla releases the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine into the suprarenal vein for circulation throughout the body. Under sympathetic tone, catecholamine release is modest. However, upon activation of the sympathoadrenal stress reflex, and increased splanchnic firing, adrenal catecholamine output increases dramatically. Moreover, specific stressors can preferentially increase release of either epinephrine (i.e., hypoglycemia) or norepinephrine (i.e., cold stress). The mechanism for this stressor-dependent segregated release of catecholamine species is not yet fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of either division of the splanchnic selects for epinephrine over norepinephrine release. We introduce an ex vivo rat preparation that maintains native splanchnic innervation of the adrenal gland and we document experimental advantages and limitations of this preparation. We utilize fast scanning cyclic voltammetry to detect release of both epinephrine and norepinephrine from the adrenal medulla, and report that epinephrine and norepinephrine release are regulated spatially and in a frequency-dependent manner. We provide data to show that epinephrine is secreted preferentially from the periphery of the medulla and exhibits a higher threshold and steeper stimulus-secretion function than norepinephrine. Elevated stimulation of the whole nerve specifically enhances epinephrine release from the peripheral medulla. Our data further show that elimination of either division from stimulation greatly attenuated epinephrine release under elevated stimulation, while either division alone can largely support norepinephrine release. PMID:27597763

  19. Levels of toxic arsenic species in native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities.

    PubMed

    García-Salgado, Sara; Quijano, M Ángeles

    2014-03-01

    Ten native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities (Mónica mine, NW Madrid, Spain), with high total arsenic concentration levels (up to 3500 μg g(-1)), have been studied to determine the fraction of arsenic present as toxic forms (inorganic and methylated species), which present a higher mobility and therefore the potential risk associated with their reintegration into the environment is high. Roots and aboveground parts were analyzed separately to assess possible transformations from translocation processes. Extractions were carried out with deionized water by microwave-assisted extraction at a temperature of 90 °C and three extraction steps of 7.5 min each. Total extracted arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, showing extraction percentages from 9 to 39% (calculated as the ratio between total extracted arsenic (Asext) and total arsenic (AsT) concentrations in plants). Speciation studies, performed by high performance liquid chromatography-photo-oxidation-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry, showed the main presence of arsenate (As(v)) (up to 350 μg g(-1)), followed by arsenite (As(iii)), in both plant parts. Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were also found only in some plants. On the other hand, the use of 0.5 mol L(-1) acetic acid as an extractant led to higher extraction percentages (33-87%), but lower column recoveries, probably due to the extraction of arsenic compounds different to the toxic free ions studied, which may come from biotransformation mechanisms carried out by plants to reduce arsenic toxicity. However, As(v) concentrations increased up to 800 μg g(-1) in acid medium, indicating the probable release of As(v) from organoarsenic compounds and therefore a higher potential risk for the environment.

  20. Levels of toxic arsenic species in native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities.

    PubMed

    García-Salgado, Sara; Quijano, M Ángeles

    2014-03-01

    Ten native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities (Mónica mine, NW Madrid, Spain), with high total arsenic concentration levels (up to 3500 μg g(-1)), have been studied to determine the fraction of arsenic present as toxic forms (inorganic and methylated species), which present a higher mobility and therefore the potential risk associated with their reintegration into the environment is high. Roots and aboveground parts were analyzed separately to assess possible transformations from translocation processes. Extractions were carried out with deionized water by microwave-assisted extraction at a temperature of 90 °C and three extraction steps of 7.5 min each. Total extracted arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, showing extraction percentages from 9 to 39% (calculated as the ratio between total extracted arsenic (Asext) and total arsenic (AsT) concentrations in plants). Speciation studies, performed by high performance liquid chromatography-photo-oxidation-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry, showed the main presence of arsenate (As(v)) (up to 350 μg g(-1)), followed by arsenite (As(iii)), in both plant parts. Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were also found only in some plants. On the other hand, the use of 0.5 mol L(-1) acetic acid as an extractant led to higher extraction percentages (33-87%), but lower column recoveries, probably due to the extraction of arsenic compounds different to the toxic free ions studied, which may come from biotransformation mechanisms carried out by plants to reduce arsenic toxicity. However, As(v) concentrations increased up to 800 μg g(-1) in acid medium, indicating the probable release of As(v) from organoarsenic compounds and therefore a higher potential risk for the environment. PMID:24513726

  1. TRADITIONAL FOODS AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS AND ASSOCIATIONS WITH CULTURAL FACTORS IN A DIVERSE ALASKA NATIVE POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Redwood, Diana G; Ferucci, Elizabeth D; Schumacher, Mary C; Johnson, Jennifer S; Lanier, Anne P; Helzer, Laurie J; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Murtaugh, Maureen A; Slattery, Martha L

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of traditional food and physical activity use and associations with cultural factors among 3,830 Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people enrolled in the Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study in 3 regions of Alaska. Study design Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a cohort study. Methods Participants (2,323 women and 1,507 men) completed a computer-assisted self-administered questionnaire that included information on diet, physical activity, life-style and cultural factors. Results Over 92% of participants reported eating at least 1 traditional food in the past year. The top 3 traditional foods reported were fish, moose and agutaq (a mixture of berries and fat). The percentage of people who consumed traditional foods varied by region and age but not by sex (p<0.01). Almost 70% of participants engaged in at least one traditional harvesting physical activity. Picking berries or greens, cutting/smoking fish or meat and fishing were the most common activities. Participation in traditional physical activity was highest in south-west Alaska and was higher among men than women, but did not differ by age (p<0.01). Both traditional food and physical activity were associated with greater tribal self-identification, speaking a Native language at home, using traditional remedies and participating in or attending traditional events (p<0.05). Conclusions The EARTH Study found relationships between traditional food use, physical activities, cultural activities and behaviours. Consumption of a variety of traditional foods and participation in traditional physical activities remain an important part of the contemporary Alaska Native life-style. Efforts to promote and sustain these foods and activities in AN/AI populations may lead to improved health outcomes. PMID:19024803

  2. The presence and inactivation of trypsin inhibitors, tannins, lectins and amylase inhibitors in legume seeds during germination. A review.

    PubMed

    Savelkoul, F H; van der Poel, A F; Tamminga, S

    1992-01-01

    During the germination of legume seeds, enzymes become active in order to degrade starch, storage-protein and proteinaceous antinutritional factors. The degradation of storage-protein is necessary to make peptides and amino acids available in order to stimulate seed growth and early plant growth. Proteinaceous antinutritional factors such as amylase inhibitors, lectins and trypsin inhibitors are present in legume seeds and protect them against predators. However, during germination, they degrade to a lower level by the action of several enzymes. The effect of germination on the content and activity of amylase inhibitors, lectins, tannins and trypsin inhibitors is discussed. PMID:1372122

  3. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor immobilized onto sepharose as a new strategy to purify a thermostable alkaline peptidase from cobia (Rachycentron canadum) processing waste.

    PubMed

    França, Renata Cristina da Penha; Assis, Caio Rodrigo Dias; Santos, Juliana Ferreira; Torquato, Ricardo José Soares; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae; Hirata, Izaura Yoshico; Assis, Diego Magno; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Cavalli, Ronaldo Olivera; Carvalho, Luiz Bezerra de; Bezerra, Ranilson Souza

    2016-10-15

    A thermostable alkaline peptidase was purified from the processing waste of cobia (Rachycentron canadum) using bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) immobilized onto Sepharose. The purified enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 24kDa by both sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometry. Its optimal temperature and pH were 50°C and 8.5, respectively. The enzyme was thermostable until 55°C and its activity was strongly inhibited by the classic trypsin inhibitors N-ρ-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and benzamidine. BPTI column allowed at least 15 assays without loss of efficacy. The purified enzyme was identified as a trypsin and the N-terminal amino acid sequence of this trypsin was IVGGYECTPHSQAHQVSLNSGYHFC, which was highly homologous to trypsin from cold water fish species. Using Nα-benzoyl-dl-arginine ρ-nitroanilide hydrochloride (BApNA) as substrate, the apparent km value of the purified trypsin was 0.38mM, kcat value was 3.14s(-1), and kcat/km was 8.26s(-1)mM(-1). The catalytic proficiency of the purified enzyme was 2.75×10(12)M(-1) showing higher affinity for the substrate at the transition state than other fish trypsin. The activation energy (AE) of the BApNA hydrolysis catalyzed by this enzyme was estimated to be 11.93kcalmol(-1) while the resulting rate enhancement of this reaction was found to be approximately in a range from 10(9) to 10(10)-fold evidencing its efficiency in comparison to other trypsin. This new purification strategy showed to be appropriate to obtain an alkaline peptidase from cobia processing waste with high purification degree. According with N-terminal homology and kinetic parameters, R. canadum trypsin may gathers desirable properties of psychrophilic and thermostable enzymes.

  4. Impact of Native and Invasive Earthworm Activity on Forest Soil Organic Matter Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Top, Sara; Filley, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    Many northern North American forests are experiencing the introduction of exotic European lumbricid species earthworms with documented losses in litter layers, expansion of A-horizons, loss of the organic horizon, changes in fine root density, and shifts in microbial populations as a result. Some of these forests were previously devoid of these ecosystem engineers. We compare the soil isotope and molecular chemistry from two free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) forest experiments (aspen FACE at Rhinelander, Wisconsin and sweet gum FACE at Oak Ridge National Lab, Tennessee) that lie within the zones of earthworm invasion. These sites exhibit differences in amounts of exotic and native species as well as endogeic (predominantly mineral soil dwelling) and epigeic (litter and organic matter horizon dwelling) types. We investigated the impact of earthworm activity by tracking the relative abundance and stable carbon isotope compositions of lignin and substituted fatty acids extracted from isolated earthworms and their fecal pellets and from host soils. Additionally, 15N-labeled additions to the soil provide additional methods for tracking earthworm impacts. Indications of root vs leaf input to earthworm casts and fecal matter were derived from differences in the chemical composition of cutin, suberin, and lignin. The isotopically depleted CO2 used in FACE and the resulting isotopically depleted plant organic matter afford an excellent opportunity to assess biopolymer-specific turnover dynamics. We find that endogeic species are proportionately more responsible for fine root cycling while some epigeic species are responsible for microaggregation of foliar cutin. CSIA of fecal pellet lignin and SFA indicate how these biopolymer pools can be derived from variable sources, roots, background soil, foliar tissue within one earthworm. Additionally, CSIA indicates the distinct roles that different earthworm types have in "aging" surface soil biopolymer pools through encapsulation and

  5. Genetic diversity and antifungal activity of native Pseudomonas isolated from maize plants grown in a central region of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Paula; Cavigliasso, Andrea; Príncipe, Analía; Godino, Agustina; Jofré, Edgardo; Mori, Gladys; Fischer, Sonia

    2012-07-01

    Pseudomonas strains producing antimicrobial secondary metabolites play an important role in the biocontrol of phytopathogenic fungi. In this study, native Pseudomonas spp. isolates were obtained from the rhizosphere, endorhizosphere and bulk soil of maize fields in Córdoba (Argentina) during both the vegetative and reproductive stages of plant growth. However, the diversity based on repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) fingerprinting was not associated with the stage of plant growth. Moreover, the antagonistic activity of the native isolates against phytopathogenic fungi was evaluated in vitro. Several strains inhibited members of the genera Fusarium, Sclerotinia or Sclerotium and this antagonism was related to their ability to produce secondary metabolites. A phylogenetic analysis based on rpoB or 16S rRNA gene sequences confirmed that the isolates DGR22, MGR4 and MGR39 with high biocontrol potential belonged to the genus Pseudomonas. Some native strains of Pseudomonas were also able to synthesise indole acetic acid and to solubilise phosphate, thus possessing potential plant growth-promoting (PGPR) traits, in addition to their antifungal activity. It was possible to establish a relationship between PGPR or biocontrol activity and the phylogeny of the strains. The study allowed the creation of a local collection of indigenous Pseudomonas which could be applied in agriculture to minimise the utilisation of chemical pesticides and fertilisers. PMID:22748594

  6. Combinatorial Enzyme Design Probes Allostery and Cooperativity in the Trypsin Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Michael J.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2010-06-14

    Converting one enzyme into another is challenging due to the uneven distribution of important amino acids for function in both protein sequence and structure. We report a strategy for protein engineering allowing an organized mixing and matching of genetic material that leverages lower throughput with increased quality of screens. Our approach successfully tested the contribution of each surface-exposed loop in the trypsin fold alone and the cooperativity of their combinations towards building the substrate selectivity and Na{sup +}-dependent allosteric activation of the protease domain of human coagulation factor Xa into a bacterial trypsin. As the created proteases lack additional protein domains and protein co-factor activation mechanism requisite for the complexity of blood coagulation, they are stepping-stones towards further understanding and engineering of artificial clotting factors.

  7. Bauhinia variegata var. variegata trypsin inhibitor: From isolation to potential medicinal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho; Bah, Clara Shui Fern; Lin, Peng; Tsao, Sai Wah; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2010-06-11

    Here we report for the first time of a new Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor (termed BvvTI) from seeds of the Camel's foot tree, Bauhinia variegata var. variegata. BvvTI shares the same reactive site residues (Arg, Ser) and exhibits a homology of N-terminal amino acid sequence to other Bauhinia protease inhibitors. The trypsin inhibitory activity (K{sub i}, 0.1 x 10{sup -9} M) of BvvTI ranks the highest among them. Besides anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity, BvvTI could significantly inhibit the proliferation of nasopharyngeal cancer CNE-1 cells in a selective way. This may partially be contributed by its induction of cytokines and apoptotic bodies. These results unveil potential medicinal applications of BvvTI.

  8. The conversion of C'IS to C'1 esterase by plasmin and trypsin.

    PubMed

    Ratnoff, O D; Naff, G B

    1967-02-01

    The formation of C'1 esterase from C'1, the first component of complement, may be brought about by the action of plasmin or trypsin upon C'1s, a subcomponent of C'1. These enzymes also decrease the esterolytic activity of C'1 esterase. The formation of C'1 esterase was demonstrated by measuring the appearance of an agent or agents with esterolytic properties and the capacity to inactivate C'2 and C'4, attributes of C'1 esterase. The activity of the agent which evolved was blocked by serum inhibitor of C'1 esterase. The implications of these observations, that the formation of C'1 esterase during complement fixation is mediated by proteolytic processes, are under study. The possible inhibition of C'1q by soybean trypsin inhibitor is in agreement with this hypothesis.

  9. Kinetics of trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis determined by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Maximova, Ksenia; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was applied to determine enzymatic activity and inhibition. We measured the Michaelis-Menten kinetics for trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of two substrates, casein (an insoluble macromolecule substrate) and Nα-benzoyl-dl-arginine β-naphthylamide (a small substrate), and estimated the thermodynamic parameters in the temperature range from 20 to 37°C. The inhibitory activities of reversible (small molecule benzamidine) and irreversible (small molecule phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and macromolecule α1-antitrypsin) inhibitors of trypsin were also determined. We showed the usefulness of ITC for fast and direct measurement of inhibition constants and half-maximal inhibitory concentrations and for predictions of the mechanism of inhibition. ITC kinetic assays could be an easy and straightforward way to estimate Michaelis-Menten constants and the effectiveness of inhibitors as well as to predict the inhibition mechanism. ITC efficiency was found to be similar to that of classical spectrophotometric enzymatic assays.

  10. Explicit and implicit second language training differentially affect the achievement of native-like brain activation patterns.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Short, Kara; Steinhauer, Karsten; Sanz, Cristina; Ullman, Michael T

    2012-04-01

    It is widely believed that adults cannot learn a foreign language in the same way that children learn a first language. However, recent evidence suggests that adult learners of a foreign language can come to rely on native-like language brain mechanisms. Here, we show that the type of language training crucially impacts this outcome. We used an artificial language paradigm to examine longitudinally whether explicit training (that approximates traditional grammar-focused classroom settings) and implicit training (that approximates immersion settings) differentially affect neural (electrophysiological) and behavioral (performance) measures of syntactic processing. Results showed that performance of explicitly and implicitly trained groups did not differ at either low or high proficiency. In contrast, electrophysiological (ERP) measures revealed striking differences between the groups' neural activity at both proficiency levels in response to syntactic violations. Implicit training yielded an N400 at low proficiency, whereas at high proficiency, it elicited a pattern typical of native speakers: an anterior negativity followed by a P600 accompanied by a late anterior negativity. Explicit training, by contrast, yielded no significant effects at low proficiency and only an anterior positivity followed by a P600 at high proficiency. Although the P600 is reminiscent of native-like processing, this response pattern as a whole is not. Thus, only implicit training led to an electrophysiological signature typical of native speakers. Overall, the results suggest that adult foreign language learners can come to rely on native-like language brain mechanisms, but that the conditions under which the language is learned may be crucial in attaining this goal. PMID:21861686

  11. Explicit and implicit second language training differentially affect the achievement of native-like brain activation patterns.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Short, Kara; Steinhauer, Karsten; Sanz, Cristina; Ullman, Michael T

    2012-04-01

    It is widely believed that adults cannot learn a foreign language in the same way that children learn a first language. However, recent evidence suggests that adult learners of a foreign language can come to rely on native-like language brain mechanisms. Here, we show that the type of language training crucially impacts this outcome. We used an artificial language paradigm to examine longitudinally whether explicit training (that approximates traditional grammar-focused classroom settings) and implicit training (that approximates immersion settings) differentially affect neural (electrophysiological) and behavioral (performance) measures of syntactic processing. Results showed that performance of explicitly and implicitly trained groups did not differ at either low or high proficiency. In contrast, electrophysiological (ERP) measures revealed striking differences between the groups' neural activity at both proficiency levels in response to syntactic violations. Implicit training yielded an N400 at low proficiency, whereas at high proficiency, it elicited a pattern typical of native speakers: an anterior negativity followed by a P600 accompanied by a late anterior negativity. Explicit training, by contrast, yielded no significant effects at low proficiency and only an anterior positivity followed by a P600 at high proficiency. Although the P600 is reminiscent of native-like processing, this response pattern as a whole is not. Thus, only implicit training led to an electrophysiological signature typical of native speakers. Overall, the results suggest that adult foreign language learners can come to rely on native-like language brain mechanisms, but that the conditions under which the language is learned may be crucial in attaining this goal.

  12. The Relationship between Active Hand and Ear Advantage in the Native and Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mildner, V.; Stankovic, D.; Petkovic, M.

    2005-01-01

    In an experimental design involving two auditorily presented competing commands (one to each ear), 144 right-handed subjects (72 male and 72 female) were asked to provide motor responses. Half of each group of subjects was responding with their right hand and the other half with the left. The test was applied in the subjects' native language…

  13. Project NAME: Native American Mathematics Education. Recommended Lesson Activities with Authentic Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    A project sought to improve mathematics instruction at the Winnebago Public School (WPS) on the Winnebago Indian Reservation (Nebraska) and to provide purposeful interactions between preservice teachers from Wayne State College and Native American children. WPS educators, grades K-6, improved their mathematics instructional ability by attending…

  14. Atomic resolution crystal structure of HV-BBI protease inhibitor from amphibian skin in complex with bovine trypsin.

    PubMed

    Grudnik, Przemyslaw; Debowski, Dawid; Legowska, Anna; Malicki, Stanislaw; Golik, Przemyslaw; Karna, Natalia; Rolka, Krzysztof; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Protease inhibitors of the Bowman-Birk (BBI) family are commonly found in plants and animals where they play a protective role against invading pathogens. Here, we report an atomic resolution (1Å) crystal structure of a peptide inhibitor isolated from a skin secretion of a Chinese bamboo odorous frog Huia versabilis (HV-BBI) in complex with trypsin. HV-BBI shares significant similarities in sequence with a previously described inhibitor from a diskless-fingered odorous frog Odorrana graham (ORB). However, the latter is characterized by more than a 16,000 fold higher Ki against trypsin than HV-BBI. Comparative analysis of trypsin cocrystal structures of HV-BBI and ORB and additionally that of Sunflower Trypsin Inhibitor (SFTI-1) together with accessory information on the affinities of inhibitor variants allowed us to pinpoint the inhibitor moiety responsible for the observed large difference in activity and also to define the extent of modifications permissible within the common protease-binding loop scaffold of BBI inhibitors. We suggest that modifications outside of the inhibitory loop permit the evolution of specificity toward different enzymes characterized by trypsin-like specificity. PMID:25546528

  15. Characterization and immobilization of trypsin on tannic acid modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Atacan, Keziban; Özacar, Mahmut

    2015-04-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by co-precipitating Fe2+ and Fe3+ in an ammonia solution. Fe3O4 NPs functionalized with tannic acid were prepared. After functionalization process, trypsin enzyme was immobilized on these Fe3O4 NPs. The influence of pH, temperature, thermal stability, storage time stability and reusability on non-covalent immobilization was studied. The properties of Fe3O4 and its modified forms were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), UV-vis spectrometer (UV) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetization and zeta potential measurements. The immobilized enzyme was slightly more stable than the free enzyme at 45°C. According to the results, the activity of immobilized trypsin was preserved 55% at 45°C after 2 h and 90% after 120 days storage. In addition, the activity of the immobilized trypsin was preserved 40% of its initial activity after eight times of successive reuse. PMID:25686792

  16. Metal-sensitive and thermostable trypsin from the crevalle jack (Caranx hippos) pyloric caeca: purification and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the past decades, the economic development and world population growth has led to increased for food demand. Increasing the fish production is considered one of the alternatives to meet the increased food demand, but the processing of fish leads to by-products such as skin, bones and viscera, a source of environmental contamination. Fish viscera have been reported as an important source of digestive proteases with interesting characteristics for biotechnological processes. Thus, the aim of this study was to purify and to characterize a trypsin from the processing by-products of crevalle jack (Caranx hippos) fish. Results A 27.5 kDa trypsin with N-terminal amino acid sequence IVGGFECTPHVFAYQ was easily purified from the pyloric caeca of the crevalle jack. Its physicochemical and kinetic properties were evaluated using N-α-benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BApNA) as substrate. In addition, the effects of various metal ions and specific protease inhibitors on trypsin activity were determined. Optimum pH and temperature were 8.0 and 50°C, respectively. After incubation at 50°C for 30 min the enzyme lost only 20% of its activity. K m , k cat, and k cat /K m values using BApNA as substrate were 0.689 mM, 6.9 s-1, and 10 s-1 mM-1, respectively. High inhibition of trypsin activity was observed after incubation with Cd2+, Al3+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+ at 1 mM, revealing high sensitivity of the enzyme to metal ions. Conclusions Extraction of a thermostable trypsin from by-products of the fishery industry confirms the potential of these materials as an alternative source of these biomolecules. Furthermore, the results suggest that this trypsin-like enzyme presents interesting biotechnological properties for industrial applications. PMID:24112762

  17. Taste-active compound levels in Korean native chicken meat: The effects of bird age and the cooking process.

    PubMed

    Jayasena, Dinesh D; Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Yong, Hae In; Nam, Ki Chang; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-08-01

    The effects of bird age and the cooking process on the levels of several taste-active compounds, including inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), glutamic acid, cysteine, reducing sugars, as well as oleic, linoleic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA), in the breast and leg meats from a certified meat-type commercial Korean native chicken (KNC) strain (Woorimatdag) were investigated. KNC cocks were raised under similar standard conditions at a commercial chicken farm, and breast and leg meats from birds of various ages (10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 wk; 10 birds/age group) were obtained. After raw and cooked meat samples were prepared, they were analyzed for the aforementioned taste-active compounds. Compared to the leg meat, KNC breast meat had higher levels of IMP, arachidonic acid, and DHA, but lower levels of the other taste-active compounds (P < 0.05). KNC meat lost significant amounts of all the taste-active compounds, excluding oleic and linoleic acids, during the cooking process (P < 0.05). However, bird age only had a minor effect on the levels of these taste-active compounds. The results of this study provide useful information regarding the levels of taste-active compounds in KNC meat from birds of different ages, and their fate during the cooking process. This information could be useful for selection and breeding programs, and for popularizing native chicken meat. PMID:26049798

  18. Taste-active compound levels in Korean native chicken meat: The effects of bird age and the cooking process.

    PubMed

    Jayasena, Dinesh D; Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Yong, Hae In; Nam, Ki Chang; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-08-01

    The effects of bird age and the cooking process on the levels of several taste-active compounds, including inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), glutamic acid, cysteine, reducing sugars, as well as oleic, linoleic, arachidonic, and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA), in the breast and leg meats from a certified meat-type commercial Korean native chicken (KNC) strain (Woorimatdag) were investigated. KNC cocks were raised under similar standard conditions at a commercial chicken farm, and breast and leg meats from birds of various ages (10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 wk; 10 birds/age group) were obtained. After raw and cooked meat samples were prepared, they were analyzed for the aforementioned taste-active compounds. Compared to the leg meat, KNC breast meat had higher levels of IMP, arachidonic acid, and DHA, but lower levels of the other taste-active compounds (P < 0.05). KNC meat lost significant amounts of all the taste-active compounds, excluding oleic and linoleic acids, during the cooking process (P < 0.05). However, bird age only had a minor effect on the levels of these taste-active compounds. The results of this study provide useful information regarding the levels of taste-active compounds in KNC meat from birds of different ages, and their fate during the cooking process. This information could be useful for selection and breeding programs, and for popularizing native chicken meat.

  19. U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives - Fiscal Year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcus, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    In the late 1800s, John Wesley Powell, the second director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), followed his interest in the tribes of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau and studied their cultures, languages, and surroundings. From that early time, the USGS has recognized the importance of Native knowledge and living in harmony with nature as complements to the USGS mission to better understand the Earth. Combining traditional ecological knowledge with empirical studies allows the USGS and Native American governments, organizations, and people to increase their mutual understanding and respect for this land. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). The USGS does not have regulatory or land management responsibilities.

  20. Comparison of the structures of the cyclotheonamide A complexes of human alpha-thrombin and bovine beta-trypsin.

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, V.; Lee, A. Y.; Clardy, J.; Tulinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Thrombin, a trypsin-like serine protease present in blood, plays a central role in the regulation of thrombosis and hemostasis. A cyclic pentapeptide, cyclotheonamide A (CtA), isolated from sponges of the genus Theonella, inhibits thrombin, trypsin, and certain other serine proteases. Enzyme inhibition data for CtA indicate that it is a moderate inhibitor of alpha-thrombin (K(i) = 1.0 nM), but substantially more potent toward trypsin (K(i) = 0.2 nM). The comparative study of the crystal structures of the CtA complexes of alpha-thrombin and beta-trypsin reported here focuses on structure-function relationships in general and the enhanced specificity of trypsin, in particular. The crystal structures of the CtA complexes of thrombin and trypsin were solved and refined at 1.7 and 2.0 A resolution, respectively. The structures show that CtA occupies the active site with the Pro-Arg motif positioned in the S2 and S1 binding sites. The alpha-keto group of CtA is involved in a tetrahedral intermediate hemiketal structure with Ser 195 OG of the catalytic triad and is positioned within bonding distance from, and orthogonal to, the re-face of the carbonyl of the arginine of CtA. As in other productive binding modes of serine proteases, the Ser 214-Gly 216 segment runs in a twisted antiparallel beta-strand manner with respect to the diaminopropionic acid (Dpr)-Arg segment of CtA. The Tyr 60A-Thr 60I insertion loop of thrombin makes a weak aromatic stacking interaction with the v-Tyr of CtA through Trp 60D. The Glu 39 Tyr and Leu 41 Phe substitutions in trypsin produce an enhanced aromatic interaction with D-Phe of CtA, which also leads to different orientations of the side chains of D-Phe and the v-Tyr. The comparison of the CtA complexes of thrombin and trypsin shows that the gross structural features of both in the active site region are the same, whereas the differences observed are mainly due to minor insertions and substitutions. In trypsin, the substitution of Ile 174

  1. Purification, characterization, and complete amino acid sequence of a trypsin inhibitor from amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Valdes-Rodriguez, S; Segura-Nieto, M; Chagolla-Lopez, A; Verver y Vargas-Cortina, A; Martinez-Gallardo, N; Blanco-Labra, A

    1993-01-01

    A protein proteinase inhibitor was purified from a seed extract of amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) by precipitation with (NH4)2SO4, gel-filtration chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. It is a 69-amino acid protein with a high content of valine, arginine, and glutamic acid, but lacking in methionine. The inhibitor has a relative molecular weight of 7400 and an isoelectric point of 7.5. It is a serine proteinase inhibitor that recognizes chymotrypsin, trypsin, and trypsin-like proteinase activities extracted from larvae of the insect Prostephanus truncatus. This inhibitor belongs to the potato-I inhibitor family, showing the closest homology (59.5%) with the Lycopersicum peruvianum trypsin inhibitor, and (51%) with the proteinase inhibitor 5 extracted from the seeds of Cucurbita maxima. The position of the lysine-aspartic acid residues present in the active site of the amaranth inhibitor are found in almost the same relative position as in the inhibitor from C. maxima. PMID:8290633

  2. A chimeric mini-trypsin inhibitor derived from the oil rape proteinase inhibitor type III.

    PubMed

    Trovato, M; Maras, B; Polticelli, F; Costantino, P; Ascenzi, P

    2000-09-01

    The design of chimeric proteins is a major field of interest in structural biology and biotechnology. The successful design of the chimeric protein composed by the minimized reactive site domain of the low-molecular-mass trypsin inhibitor from Brassica napus (var. oleifera) seed (Ser3-Lys35; mini-RTI-III) and murine dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is reported here. The DHFR-mini-RTI-III chimeric protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by metal-chelate affinity chromatography and oxidatively refolded. The affinity of the purified and refolded DHFR-mini-RTI-III for bovine trypsin (K = 5.0 x 10(-10) M) was closely similar to that determined for native RTI-III (K = 2.9 x 10(-10) M), at pH 8.2 and 22.0 degrees C. DHFR-mini-RTI-III may be regarded as a tool in structure-function studies and for developing multifunctional and multidomain proteinase inhibitors.

  3. Legends of Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Presents a theme unit that includes elementary-level, cross-curricular lessons about lifestyle, belief systems, traditions, and history of Native Americans. The unit includes a poster which offers a traditional Cherokee story, literature on Native American legends, and a variety of cross-curricular activities. The unit ends with students writing…

  4. β-galactosidase at the membrane-water interface: a case of an active enzyme with non-native conformation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julieta M; Nolan, Verónica; Perillo, María A

    2013-08-01

    Previously we demonstrated that Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase (β-Gal) binds to zwitterionic lipid membranes improving its catalytic activity. To understand the activation mechanism from the protein perspective, here the thermal dependence of the catalytic activity was evaluated in conjunction with parameters derived from spectroscopy and calorimetry, in the presence and absence of egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine vesicles. In solution, the native state of β-Gal exhibits a loose conformation according to the λmax of fluorescence emission, which is in the upper end of the emission range for most proteins. A non-two state thermal unfolding mechanism was derived from DSC experiments and supported by the sequential unfolding temperatures exhibited by fluorescence (55°C) and CD (60°C) spectroscopies. Quenching of β-Gal's intrinsic fluorescence, provided evidence for a novel and even looser folding for the lipid-bound protein. However, DSC data showed that the thermal unfolding in the presence of lipids occurred with a significant decrease in ΔH compared to what happened in solution, suggesting that only the population of non-bound protein molecules were involved in this process. Concluding, upon binding to a lipid-water interface β-Gal becomes trapped in a partially unfolded state, more active than that of the native protein in solution.

  5. The expression of a mammalian proteinase inhibitor, bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor in tobacco and its effects on Helicoverpa armigera larvae.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Mett, Valentina; Gatehouse, Heather S; Markwick, Ngaire P; Murray, Colleen; Malone, Louise A; Wright, Michelle A; Philip, Bruce A; Watt, Dianne; Gatehouse, Laurence N; Lövei, Gábor L; Shannon, April L; Phung, Margaret M; Watson, Lynn M; Laing, William A

    2002-04-01

    The cDNA for bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor (SI), a homologue of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), including the natural mammalian presequence was expressed in tobacco using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Stable expression required the N-terminal targeting signal presequence although subcellular localization was not proven. SI was found to exist as two forms, one coinciding with authentic BPTI on western blots and the second marginally larger due to retention of the C-terminal peptide. Both were retained on a trypsin-agarose affinity gel and had inhibitory activity. Newly emergent leaves contained predominantly the large form whereas senescent leaves had little except the fully processed form present. Intermediate-aged leaves showed a gradual change indicating that a slow processing of the inhibitor peptide was occurring. The stability of SI was shown by the presence of protein at high levels in completely senescent leaves. Modifications to the cDNA (3' and 5' changes and minor codon changes) resulted in a 20-fold variation in expression. Expression of modified SI in transgenic tobacco leaves at 0.5% total soluble protein reduced both survival and growth of Helicoverpa armigera larvae feeding on leaves from the late first instar. In larvae surviving for 8 days, midgut trypsin activity was reduced in SI-tobacco fed larvae, while chymotrypsin activity was increased. Activities of leucine aminopeptidase and elastase-like chymotrypsin remained unaltered. The use of SI as an insect resistance factor is discussed.

  6. The trypsin inhibitor from Entada acaciifolia seeds affects negatively the development of Mediterranean flour moth, Anagasta kuehniella.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Caio Fernando Ramalho; Marangoni, Sergio; Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean flour moth (Anagasta kuehniella) is a pest insect that attacks stored foods. The difficulty in controlling this kind of pest promotes the development of alternatives for pest control, among them the use of proteins with insecticide effect. In this work, we evaluated the role of a trypsin inhibitor purified from Entada acaciifolia seeds (EATI) on the A. kuehniella development. Different concentrations of inhibitor were added to a diet to determine its effects on insect performance. At 0.4%, the EATI decreases the larval weight and survival rates by 54.6% and 15%, respectively; in addition to the extension of the life cycle of insect. The biochemical analysis showed that the inhibitor is refractory to the digestion by midgut proteases, and led to a reduction of 32% in general proteolytic activity. A detailed analysis of the enzymatic activity revealed a decrease of 50% in trypsin activity as the chymotrypsin activity increased by 12%; possibly to compensate the commitment of the digestive process. The trypsins from the EATI-fed group stayed sensitive to the inhibition by EATI, and based on kinetic assays no new trypsin enzymes were produced as adaptation attempt. The insecticides effects observed for the EATI against this pest encourage a more in depth study of its possible long-term use as a biotechnological tool.

  7. Distinct folding pathways of two homologous disulfide proteins: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Yoa

    2011-01-01

    The folding pathways of disulfide proteins vary substantially (Arolas et al., Trends Biochem Sci 31: 292-301, 2006). The diversity is mainly manifested by (a) the extent of heterogeneity of folding intermediates, (b) the extent of presence of native-like intermediates, and (c) the variation of folding kinetics. Even among structurally similar proteins, the difference can be enormous. This is demonstrated in this concise review with two structurally homologous kunitz-type protease inhibitors, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide, as well as a group of cystine knot proteins. The diversity of their folding mechanisms is illustrated with two different folding techniques: (a) the conventional method of disulfide oxidation (oxidative folding), and (b) the novel method of disulfide scrambling (Chang, J Biol Chem 277: 120-126, 2002). This review also highlights the convergence of folding models concluded form the conventional conformational folding and those obtained by oxidative folding.

  8. Trypsin inhibitor from 3 legume seeds: fractionation and proteolytic inhibition study.

    PubMed

    Wati, Richa Kusuma; Theppakorn, Theerapong; Benjakul, Soottawat; Rawdkuen, Saroat

    2010-04-01

    The trypsin inhibitor from navy beans (Phaseoulus vulgaris), red kidney beans (Phaseoulus vulgaris L.), and adzuki beans (Vigna angularis) provided by the Royal Project Foundation in Thailand was isolated by heat and ammonium sulfate (AS) precipitation. Incubation at 70 degrees C for 10 min produced the highest trypsin inhibitor recovery for all legumes. The AS precipitation with 60% to 80% saturation (precipitate IV) resulted in 41-, 88-, and 34-fold of the purity and (-)26%, 126%, and (-)47% of percentage of activity increase for navy beans, red kidney beans, and adzuki beans, respectively. The trypsin inhibitors had a molecular weight of 132 kDa for navy beans, 118 kDa for red kidney beans, and 13 kDa for adzuki beans under nonreducing conditions. The obtained precipitate IV fraction from each legume effectively prevented the degradation of the tilapia muscle with concentration dependent. The myosin heavy chain increased as the concentration of the inhibitor fraction increased, especially at the highest level of addition. The result indicated that the precipitate IV from these legumes have potential for use as a protease inhibitor in fishery related products.

  9. Trypsin inhibitor from 3 legume seeds: fractionation and proteolytic inhibition study.

    PubMed

    Wati, Richa Kusuma; Theppakorn, Theerapong; Benjakul, Soottawat; Rawdkuen, Saroat

    2010-04-01

    The trypsin inhibitor from navy beans (Phaseoulus vulgaris), red kidney beans (Phaseoulus vulgaris L.), and adzuki beans (Vigna angularis) provided by the Royal Project Foundation in Thailand was isolated by heat and ammonium sulfate (AS) precipitation. Incubation at 70 degrees C for 10 min produced the highest trypsin inhibitor recovery for all legumes. The AS precipitation with 60% to 80% saturation (precipitate IV) resulted in 41-, 88-, and 34-fold of the purity and (-)26%, 126%, and (-)47% of percentage of activity increase for navy beans, red kidney beans, and adzuki beans, respectively. The trypsin inhibitors had a molecular weight of 132 kDa for navy beans, 118 kDa for red kidney beans, and 13 kDa for adzuki beans under nonreducing conditions. The obtained precipitate IV fraction from each legume effectively prevented the degradation of the tilapia muscle with concentration dependent. The myosin heavy chain increased as the concentration of the inhibitor fraction increased, especially at the highest level of addition. The result indicated that the precipitate IV from these legumes have potential for use as a protease inhibitor in fishery related products. PMID:20492270

  10. [Heterologous expression and enzymatic analysis of Streptomyces griseus trypsin in Streptomyces lividans].

    PubMed

    Ma, Tengbo; Ling, Zhenmin; Kang, Zhen; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-04-01

    Trypsin as an important serine protease has been widely used in food, pharmaceutical and tanning industries. In this study, we successfully expressed trypsin (cloning from Streptomyces griseus ATCC10137) in Streptomyces lividans TK24 and comparatively investigated its enzymatic properties. Specifically, applying S. griseus ATCC 10137 genome as template, we obtained the sprT gene and sub-cloned it into the expression plasmid pIJ86, generating the recombinant strain S. lividans TK24/pIJ86-sprT. When cultivated in R2YE and SELF, the activity of rSGT reached 9.21 U/mL and 8.61 U/mL, respectively. Meanwhile, the results of the enzymatic analysis showed that rSGT exhibited a higher acid tolerance and a higher specificity to hydrolyze amide bonds compared with bovine trypsin (BT). In addition, Zn2+ and organic solvents up-regulated esterase and amidase of rSGT. Taken together, the results obtained herein provide meaningful information for further modification of rSGT and its industrial application.

  11. Structural characterization of Spinacia oleracea trypsin inhibitor III (SOTI-III).

    PubMed

    Glotzbach, Bernhard; Schmelz, Stefan; Reinwarth, Michael; Christmann, Andreas; Heinz, Dirk W; Kolmar, Harald

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, several canonical serine protease inhibitor families have been classified and characterized. In contrast to most trypsin inhibitors, those from garden four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) do not share sequence similarity and have been proposed to form the new Mirabilis serine protease inhibitor family. These 30-40-amino-acid inhibitors possess a defined disulfide-bridge topology and belong to the cystine-knot miniproteins (knottins). To date, no atomic structure of this inhibitor family has been solved. Here, the first structure of S. oleracea trypsin inhibitor III (SOTI-III), in complex with bovine pancreatic trypsin, is reported. The inhibitor was synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis on a multi-milligram scale and was assayed to test its inhibitory activity and binding properties. The structure confirmed the proposed cystine-bridge topology. The structural features of SOTI-III suggest that it belongs to a new canonical serine protease inhibitor family with promising properties for use in protein-engineering and medical applications.

  12. A Rapid Screening Analysis of Antioxidant Compounds in Native Australian Food Plants Using Multiplexed Detection with Active Flow Technology Columns.

    PubMed

    Rupesinghe, Emmanuel Janaka Rochana; Jones, Andrew; Shalliker, Ross Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan

    2016-01-20

    Conventional techniques for identifying antioxidant and phenolic compounds in native Australian food plants are laborious and time-consuming. Here, we present a multiplexed detection technique that reduces analysis time without compromising separation performance. This technique is achieved using Active Flow Technology-Parallel Segmented Flow (AFT-PSF) columns. Extracts from cinnamon myrtle (Backhousia myrtifolia) and lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) leaves were analysed via multiplexed detection using an AFT-PSF column with underivatised UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy (MS), and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) derivatisation for antioxidants as detection methods. A number of antioxidant compounds were detected in the extracts of each leaf extract.

  13. Cis-mediated down-regulation of a trypsin gene associated with Bt resistance in cotton bollworm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenxi; Xiao, Yutao; Li, Xianchun; Oppert, Brenda; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic plants producing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are useful for pest control, but their efficacy is reduced when pests evolve resistance. Here we examined the mechanism of resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in the laboratory-selected LF5 strain of the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. This strain had 110-fold resistance to Cry1Ac protoxin and 39-fold resistance to Cry1Ac activated toxin. Evaluation of five trypsin genes revealed 99% reduced transcription of one trypsin gene (HaTryR) was associated with resistance. Silencing of this gene with RNA interference in susceptible larvae increased their survival on diets containing Cry1Ac. Bioassays of progeny from crosses revealed that resistance to Cry1Ac was genetically linked with HaTryR. We identified mutations in the promoter region of HaTryR in the resistant strain. In transfected insect cell lines, transcription was lower when driven by the resistant promoter compared with the susceptible promoter, implicating cis-mediated down-regulation of HaTryR transcription as a mechanism of resistance. The results suggest that H. armigera can adapt to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by decreased expression of trypsin. Because trypsin activation of protoxin is a critical step in toxicity, transgenic plants with activated toxins rather than protoxins might increase the durability of Bt crops.

  14. Cis-mediated down-regulation of a trypsin gene associated with Bt resistance in cotton bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenxi; Xiao, Yutao; Li, Xianchun; Oppert, Brenda; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic plants producing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are useful for pest control, but their efficacy is reduced when pests evolve resistance. Here we examined the mechanism of resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in the laboratory-selected LF5 strain of the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. This strain had 110-fold resistance to Cry1Ac protoxin and 39-fold resistance to Cry1Ac activated toxin. Evaluation of five trypsin genes revealed 99% reduced transcription of one trypsin gene (HaTryR) was associated with resistance. Silencing of this gene with RNA interference in susceptible larvae increased their survival on diets containing Cry1Ac. Bioassays of progeny from crosses revealed that resistance to Cry1Ac was genetically linked with HaTryR. We identified mutations in the promoter region of HaTryR in the resistant strain. In transfected insect cell lines, transcription was lower when driven by the resistant promoter compared with the susceptible promoter, implicating cis-mediated down-regulation of HaTryR transcription as a mechanism of resistance. The results suggest that H. armigera can adapt to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by decreased expression of trypsin. Because trypsin activation of protoxin is a critical step in toxicity, transgenic plants with activated toxins rather than protoxins might increase the durability of Bt crops. PMID:25427690

  15. Isolation and characterization of a protease inhibitor from Acacia karroo with a common combining loop and overlapping binding sites for chymotrypsin and trypsin.

    PubMed

    Patthy, András; Molnár, Tamás; Porrogi, Pálma; Naudé, Ryno; Gráf, László

    2015-01-01

    By using affinity and reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) chromatographies two chymotrypsin-trypsin inhibitors were isolated from seeds of Acacia karroo, a legume of the subfamily Mimosoideae. The primary structure of one of these inhibitors, named AkCI/1, was determined. The inhibitor consists of two polypeptide chains, 139 and 44 residues respectively, which are linked by a single disulfide bridge. The amino acid sequence of AkCI/1 is homologous to and showed more than 60% sequence similarity with other protease inhibitors isolated earlier from the group of Mimosoideae. AkCI/1 inhibits both chymotrypsin (EC 3.4.21.1) and trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) in a 1:1M ratio with Ki values of 2.8 × 10(-12)M and 1.87 × 10(-12)M, respectively. The P1-P1' residues for trypsin were identified as Arg68-Ile69 by selective hydrolysis of the inhibitor at this site, with bovine trypsin and human trypsin IV. The cleavage did not affect the inhibition of trypsin, but fully abolished the chymotrypsin inhibitory activity of AkCI/1. This finding together with our studies on competition of the two enzymes for the same combining loop suggests that the same loop has to contain the binding sites for both proteases. The most likely P1 residue of AkCI/1 for chymotrypsin is Tyr67. PMID:25447841

  16. Isolation and characterization of a protease inhibitor from Acacia karroo with a common combining loop and overlapping binding sites for chymotrypsin and trypsin.

    PubMed

    Patthy, András; Molnár, Tamás; Porrogi, Pálma; Naudé, Ryno; Gráf, László

    2015-01-01

    By using affinity and reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) chromatographies two chymotrypsin-trypsin inhibitors were isolated from seeds of Acacia karroo, a legume of the subfamily Mimosoideae. The primary structure of one of these inhibitors, named AkCI/1, was determined. The inhibitor consists of two polypeptide chains, 139 and 44 residues respectively, which are linked by a single disulfide bridge. The amino acid sequence of AkCI/1 is homologous to and showed more than 60% sequence similarity with other protease inhibitors isolated earlier from the group of Mimosoideae. AkCI/1 inhibits both chymotrypsin (EC 3.4.21.1) and trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) in a 1:1M ratio with Ki values of 2.8 × 10(-12)M and 1.87 × 10(-12)M, respectively. The P1-P1' residues for trypsin were identified as Arg68-Ile69 by selective hydrolysis of the inhibitor at this site, with bovine trypsin and human trypsin IV. The cleavage did not affect the inhibition of trypsin, but fully abolished the chymotrypsin inhibitory activity of AkCI/1. This finding together with our studies on competition of the two enzymes for the same combining loop suggests that the same loop has to contain the binding sites for both proteases. The most likely P1 residue of AkCI/1 for chymotrypsin is Tyr67.

  17. Viral cysteine proteases are homologous to the trypsin-like family of serine proteases: structural and functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J

    1988-01-01

    Proteases that are encoded by animal picornaviruses and plant como- and potyviruses form a related group of cysteine-active-center enzymes that are essential for virus maturation. We show that these proteins are homologous to the family of trypsin-like serine proteases. In our model, the active-site nucleophile of the trypsin catalytic triad, Ser-195, is changed to a Cys residue in these viral proteases. The other two residues of the triad, His-57 and Asp-102, are otherwise absolutely conserved in all the viral protease sequences. Secondary structure analysis of aligned sequences suggests the location of the component strands of the twin beta-barrel trypsin fold in the viral proteases. Unexpectedly, the 2a and 3c subclasses of viral cysteine proteases are, respectively, homologous to the small and large structural subclasses of trypsin-like serine proteases. This classification allows the molecular mapping of residues from viral sequences onto related tertiary structures; we precisely identify amino acids that are strong determinants of specificity for both small and large viral cysteine proteases. Images PMID:3186696

  18. Purification and modes of antifungal action by Vicia faba cv. Egypt trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Hassanien, Abdallah Abd Elazeem; Wong, Jack Ho; Bah, Clara Shui Fern; Soliman, Saeed Saad; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2010-10-13

    A new 15 kDa Bowman-Birk type trypsin inhibitor (termed VFTI-E1) from fava beans (Vicia faba cv. Egypt 1) was isolated using liquid chromatography. Though it exhibited substantial homology in N-terminal amino acid sequence to other protease inhibitors, VFTI-E1 showed antiproteolytic activity against trypsin (K(i) 11.9 × 10(-9) M) but hardly any activity against chymotrypsin. It demonstrated antifungal activity toward the filamentous fungus Valsa mali with an IC(50) of 20 μM. The mechanism of its antifungal action toward V. mali included (1) induction of alteration of hyphal morphology, (2) growth inhibition by chitin deposition at hyphal tips, and (3) permeabilization of fungal membrane. The antifungal activity of VFTI-E1 was dependent on the ambient ionic strength as increasing concentrations of NaCl, CaCl(2), and MgCl(2) diminished the activity. The membranolytic action of VFTI-E1 was confined to fungus, but not exerted on human and rabbit erythrocytes. This study sheds light on the mode of hyphal growth inhibitory activity of protease inhibitors with antifungal activity. The antifungal activity of VFTI-E1 amplifies the scope of its potential applications. PMID:20836498

  19. Early post-larval development of the endoparasitic platyhelminth Mesocestoides corti: trypsin provokes reversible tegumental damage leading to serum-induced cell proliferation and growth.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, I; Galindo, M; Bizarro, C V; Ferreira, H B; Zaha, A; Galanti, N

    2005-11-01

    Mesocestoides corti is a suitable in vitro model for studying the development of human endoparasitic platyhelminthes. Treatment with trypsin, supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS), induces M. corti development from larvae (tetrathyridia) to segmented adult worm; however, the role of this protease and of FBS in post-larval development induction remains unknown. To characterize the participation of trypsin enzymatic activity and of FBS in the induction of tetrathyridia growth and development, both stimuli were added to the larvae either together or sequentially. Additionally, specific inhibition of trypsin activity was also monitored. Finally, the effect of the enzyme on the parasite tegument as well as the proliferative activity and location of proliferating cells after induction of tetrathyridia development were also studied. We conclude that trypsin-induced tetrathyridia development to adult worm is FBS-dependent and that the effect of serum factors is dependent upon a previous trypsin-induced reversible damage to the larva tegument. In dividing and non-dividing tetrathyridia, proliferative activity of cells is mainly located within the apical massif in the anterior region and nerve cords of larvae, respectively. In tetrathyridia stimulated to develop to adult worms, an intense proliferative activity is evident along the nerve cords. Our results suggest that in natural infections the tetrathyridia tegument is temporally made permeable to growth factors by proteolytic enzyme activity in the intestine juice of the definitive host, thus leading to development to adult worms. PMID:15887242

  20. 21 CFR 862.1725 - Trypsin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trypsin test system. 862.1725 Section 862.1725 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... other body fluids and in feces. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the diagnosis...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1725 - Trypsin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trypsin test system. 862.1725 Section 862.1725 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... other body fluids and in feces. Measurements obtained by this device are used in the diagnosis...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1725 - Trypsin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Trypsin test system. 862.1725 Section 862.1725 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1725 - Trypsin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trypsin test system. 862.1725 Section 862.1725 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  4. Alterations in seedling vigour and antioxidant enzyme activities in Catharanthus roseus under seed priming with native diazotrophs.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, B; Jaleel, C A; Gopi, R; Deiveekasundaram, M

    2007-07-01

    An experiment was conducted on Catharanthus roseus to study the effect of seed treatments with native diazotrophs on its seedling growth and antioxidant enzyme activities. The treatments had significant influence on various seedling parameters. There is no significant influence on dry matter production with the diazotrophs, Azospirillum and Azotobacter. However, the vital seedling parameters such as germination percentage and vigour index were improved. Azotobacter treatment influenced maximum of 50% germination, whereas Azospirillum and Azotobacter were on par with C. roseus with respect to their vigour index. There was significant difference in the population of total diazotrophs. Azospirillum and Azotobacter between rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils of C. roseus had the same trend and were observed at various locations of the study. The activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX) and catalase (CAT) were increased to a significant extent due to the treatment with diazotrophs.

  5. Purification, characterization and cDNA cloning of a trypsin from the hepatopancreas of snakehead (Channa argus).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Long-Zhen; Ruan, Mi-Mi; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Liu, Guang-Ming; Sun, Le-Chang; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2012-03-01

    A trypsin was purified from the hepatopancreas of snakehead (Channa argus) by ammonium sulfate fractionation and a series of column chromatographies including DEAE-Sepharose, Sephacryl S-200 HR and Hi-Trap Capto-Q. The molecular mass of the purified trypsin was about 22 kDa, as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature of the purified trypsin were 9.0 and 40°C, respectively. The trypsin was stable in the pH range of 7.5-9.5 and below 45°C. The enzymatic activity was strongly inhibited by serine proteinase inhibitors, such as MBTI, Pefabloc SC, PMSF, LBTI and benzamidine. Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) of the purified protein obtained 2 peptide fragments with 25 amino acid residues and were 100% identical to the trypsinogen from pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes). The activation energy (Ea) of this enzyme was 24.65 kJ·M(-1). Apparent K(m) was 1.02 μM and k(cat) was 148 S(-1) for fluorogenic substrate Boc-Phe-Ser-Arg-MCA. A trypsinogen gene encoding 247 amino acid residues was further cloned on the basis of the sequence obtained from PMF and the conserved site peptide of trypsinogen together with 5'-RACE and 3'-RACE. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a signal peptide of 15 residues and an activation peptide of 9 amino acid residues with a mature protein of 223 residues. The catalytic triad His-64, Asp-107, Ser-201 and 12 Cys residues which may form 6 disulfide bonds were conserved. Compared with the PMF data, only 2 amino acid residues difference were identified, suggesting the cloned trypsinogen is quite possibly the precursor of the purified trypsin. PMID:22155550

  6. Purification, characterization and cDNA cloning of a trypsin from the hepatopancreas of snakehead (Channa argus).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Long-Zhen; Ruan, Mi-Mi; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Liu, Guang-Ming; Sun, Le-Chang; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2012-03-01

    A trypsin was purified from the hepatopancreas of snakehead (Channa argus) by ammonium sulfate fractionation and a series of column chromatographies including DEAE-Sepharose, Sephacryl S-200 HR and Hi-Trap Capto-Q. The molecular mass of the purified trypsin was about 22 kDa, as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature of the purified trypsin were 9.0 and 40°C, respectively. The trypsin was stable in the pH range of 7.5-9.5 and below 45°C. The enzymatic activity was strongly inhibited by serine proteinase inhibitors, such as MBTI, Pefabloc SC, PMSF, LBTI and benzamidine. Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) of the purified protein obtained 2 peptide fragments with 25 amino acid residues and were 100% identical to the trypsinogen from pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes). The activation energy (Ea) of this enzyme was 24.65 kJ·M(-1). Apparent K(m) was 1.02 μM and k(cat) was 148 S(-1) for fluorogenic substrate Boc-Phe-Ser-Arg-MCA. A trypsinogen gene encoding 247 amino acid residues was further cloned on the basis of the sequence obtained from PMF and the conserved site peptide of trypsinogen together with 5'-RACE and 3'-RACE. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a signal peptide of 15 residues and an activation peptide of 9 amino acid residues with a mature protein of 223 residues. The catalytic triad His-64, Asp-107, Ser-201 and 12 Cys residues which may form 6 disulfide bonds were conserved. Compared with the PMF data, only 2 amino acid residues difference were identified, suggesting the cloned trypsinogen is quite possibly the precursor of the purified trypsin.

  7. A bifunctional α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor from pigeonpea seeds: Purification, biochemical characterization and its bio-efficacy against Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Gadge, Prafull P; Wagh, Sandip K; Shaikh, Faiyaz K; Tak, Rajesh D; Padul, Manohar V; Kachole, Manvendra S

    2015-11-01

    This paper evaluates α-amylase inhibitor (α-AI) mediated defense of pigeonpea against Helicoverpa armigera. A bifunctional α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor was purified from the seeds of pigeonpea by native liquid phase isoelectric focusing (N-LP-IEF), affinity chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. Its in-vivo and in-vitro interaction with midgut amylases of H. armigera was studied along with growth inhibitory activity. One and two dimensional (2D) zymographic analyses revealed that the purified inhibitor is dimeric glycoprotein (60.2kDa and 56kDa) exist in a multi-isomeric form with five pI variants (pI 5.5 to 6.3). It was found to be heat labile with complete inactivation up to 80°C and stable over a wide range of pH (4-11). The slow binding and competitive type of α-amylase inhibition was observed with 0.08μM of dissociation constant (Ki) for the enzyme-inhibitor complex (EI). The internal protein sequence of two subunits obtained by mass spectrometry matched with cereal-type α-AI, a conserved domain from AAI_LTSS superfamily and sialyltransferase-like protein respectively. In-vivo studies indicated up-regulation of total midgut α-amylase activity with negative effect on growth rate of H. armigera suggesting its suitability for pest control.

  8. A bifunctional α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor from pigeonpea seeds: Purification, biochemical characterization and its bio-efficacy against Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Gadge, Prafull P; Wagh, Sandip K; Shaikh, Faiyaz K; Tak, Rajesh D; Padul, Manohar V; Kachole, Manvendra S

    2015-11-01

    This paper evaluates α-amylase inhibitor (α-AI) mediated defense of pigeonpea against Helicoverpa armigera. A bifunctional α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor was purified from the seeds of pigeonpea by native liquid phase isoelectric focusing (N-LP-IEF), affinity chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. Its in-vivo and in-vitro interaction with midgut amylases of H. armigera was studied along with growth inhibitory activity. One and two dimensional (2D) zymographic analyses revealed that the purified inhibitor is dimeric glycoprotein (60.2kDa and 56kDa) exist in a multi-isomeric form with five pI variants (pI 5.5 to 6.3). It was found to be heat labile with complete inactivation up to 80°C and stable over a wide range of pH (4-11). The slow binding and competitive type of α-amylase inhibition was observed with 0.08μM of dissociation constant (Ki) for the enzyme-inhibitor complex (EI). The internal protein sequence of two subunits obtained by mass spectrometry matched with cereal-type α-AI, a conserved domain from AAI_LTSS superfamily and sialyltransferase-like protein respectively. In-vivo studies indicated up-regulation of total midgut α-amylase activity with negative effect on growth rate of H. armigera suggesting its suitability for pest control. PMID:26615146

  9. Isolation and purification of trypsin inhibitors from the seeds of Abelmoschus moschatus L.

    PubMed

    Dokka, Muni Kumar; Seva, Lavanya; Davuluri, Siva Prasad

    2015-04-01

    Four trypsin inhibitors, AMTI-I, AMTI-II, AMTI-III, and AMTI-IV, have been isolated and purified to homogeneity from the seeds of Abelmoschus moschatus following ammonium sulphate fractionation, DEAE-cellulose ion exchange chromatography and gel permeation on Sephadex G-100, and their molecular weights were determined to be 22.4, 21.2, 20.8 and 20.2 kDa respectively by SDS-PAGE. While all the four inhibitors were very active against bovine trypsin, two of them (AMTI-III and AMTI-IV) showed moderate activity towards bovine chymotrypsin. AMTI-I and AMTI-II were found to be glycoproteins with neutral sugar content of 2.8 and 4 %, respectively, and all the four inhibitors were devoid of free sulphhydryl groups. The inhibitors were quite stable up to 80 °C for 10 min and were not affected at alkaline as well as acidic conditions tested. Treating them with 8 M urea and 1 % SDS for 24 h at room temperature did not result in any loss of their antitryptic activities. However, they lost considerable antitryptic activity when treated with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Activities of the inhibitors were unaffected even after their reduction with DTT suggesting that disulphide bonds are not needed for their inhibitory activities.

  10. Isolation and purification of trypsin inhibitors from the seeds of Abelmoschus moschatus L.

    PubMed

    Dokka, Muni Kumar; Seva, Lavanya; Davuluri, Siva Prasad

    2015-04-01

    Four trypsin inhibitors, AMTI-I, AMTI-II, AMTI-III, and AMTI-IV, have been isolated and purified to homogeneity from the seeds of Abelmoschus moschatus following ammonium sulphate fractionation, DEAE-cellulose ion exchange chromatography and gel permeation on Sephadex G-100, and their molecular weights were determined to be 22.4, 21.2, 20.8 and 20.2 kDa respectively by SDS-PAGE. While all the four inhibitors were very active against bovine trypsin, two of them (AMTI-III and AMTI-IV) showed moderate activity towards bovine chymotrypsin. AMTI-I and AMTI-II were found to be glycoproteins with neutral sugar content of 2.8 and 4 %, respectively, and all the four inhibitors were devoid of free sulphhydryl groups. The inhibitors were quite stable up to 80 °C for 10 min and were not affected at alkaline as well as acidic conditions tested. Treating them with 8 M urea and 1 % SDS for 24 h at room temperature did not result in any loss of their antitryptic activities. However, they lost considerable antitryptic activity when treated with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Activities of the inhibitors were unaffected even after their reduction with DTT suggesting that disulphide bonds are not needed for their inhibitory activities. PMID:25701144

  11. Correlation between Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Free Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation in Four Lines of Korean Native Chicken Meat.

    PubMed

    Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Seung Gyu; Baek, Ki Ho; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Chang-Yeon; Lee, Cheol-Koo; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the association between antioxidant enzyme activity, free iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chicken (KNC) meat during refrigerated storage. Four lines of KNC (Yeonsan ogye, Hyunin black, Hoengseong yakdak and Hwangbong) were raised under similar conditions. A total of 16 roosters were randomly sampled and slaughtered at the age of 12 mon. The breast and thigh meats were stored aerobically for 10 d at 4℃. Although thigh meat had higher antioxidant enzyme activity, it was more susceptible to lipid oxidation and released more iron during storage than breast meat. Aerobic refrigerated storage for 10 d significantly decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and increased the amount of free iron and malondialdehyde. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were negatively correlated with lipid oxidation, whereas that of catalase was not. The amount of free iron was positively associated with lipid oxidation. We concluded that chicken line did not affect strongly on antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid oxidation in breast meat of KNC. However, the thigh meat of Hwangbong and Hyunin black had higher SOD and GSH-Px activity, respectively, and lower malondialdehyde contents than that of other chickens. SOD, GSH-Px and free iron play significant roles in meat lipid oxidation during refrigerated storage. PMID:27499663

  12. Correlation between Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Free Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation in Four Lines of Korean Native Chicken Meat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Chang-Yeon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the association between antioxidant enzyme activity, free iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chicken (KNC) meat during refrigerated storage. Four lines of KNC (Yeonsan ogye, Hyunin black, Hoengseong yakdak and Hwangbong) were raised under similar conditions. A total of 16 roosters were randomly sampled and slaughtered at the age of 12 mon. The breast and thigh meats were stored aerobically for 10 d at 4℃. Although thigh meat had higher antioxidant enzyme activity, it was more susceptible to lipid oxidation and released more iron during storage than breast meat. Aerobic refrigerated storage for 10 d significantly decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and increased the amount of free iron and malondialdehyde. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were negatively correlated with lipid oxidation, whereas that of catalase was not. The amount of free iron was positively associated with lipid oxidation. We concluded that chicken line did not affect strongly on antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid oxidation in breast meat of KNC. However, the thigh meat of Hwangbong and Hyunin black had higher SOD and GSH-Px activity, respectively, and lower malondialdehyde contents than that of other chickens. SOD, GSH-Px and free iron play significant roles in meat lipid oxidation during refrigerated storage. PMID:27499663

  13. The synthesis, kinetic characterization and application of biotinylated aminoacylchloromethanes for the detection of chymotrypsin and trypsin-like serine proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, G; Bailie, J R; Halliday, I M; Nelson, J; Walker, B

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis of two biotinylated affinity labels for chymotrypsin and trypsin-like serine proteinases is described, along with their kinetic characterization and application to the detection of these proteinases after PAGE and Western blotting. Thus the chloromethane analogues biotinylphenylalanylchloromethane (Bio-Phe-CH2Cl; reagent 1) and biotinylarginylchloromethane (Bio-Arg-CH2Cl, reagent 2), have been shown to be potent active-site-directed inactivators of chymotrypsin and trypsin respectively. The apparent overall second-order rate constants (kobs./[I]) for the inactivation of chymotrypsin and trypsin by reagent 1 (approximately 4.9 x 10(3) M-1.min-1) and reagent 2 (approximately 1.0 x 10(5) M-1.min-1) respectively are comparable with those obtained by other workers with simple urethane-protected analogues and demonstrates that the presence of the bulky biotinyl moiety is compatible with inhibitor effectiveness. Samples of chymotrypsin and trypsin that have been inactivated by reagents 1 and 2 respectively and which have been subjected to SDS/PAGE and Western blotting can be revealed with a streptavidin/alkaline phosphatase label. We can presently detect down to 20 ng of inactivated proteinase by using this system. The utility of the arginine derivative for the detection of the plasma trypsin-like proteinases plasmin and thrombin has also been demonstrated, thus holding out the possibility that this reagent may find general application as an active-site-directed label for this class of proteinase. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1575691

  14. 21 CFR 866.5890 - Inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor immunological test... Systems § 866.5890 Inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor immunological test system. (a) Identification. An inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used...

  15. 21 CFR 524.2620 - Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.2620 Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil. (a) Specifications—(1) Each gram of liquid or aerosol contains 0.12 milligram of crystalline trypsin, 87.0 milligrams of...

  16. Native Thrombocidin-1 and Unfolded Thrombocidin-1 Exert Antimicrobial Activity via Distinct Structural Elements

    PubMed Central

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; de Boer, Leonie; Nguyen, Leonard T.; Boszhard, Laura; Vreede, Jocelyne; Dekker, Henk L.; Speijer, Dave; Drijfhout, Jan W.; te Velde, Anje A.; Crielaard, Wim; Vogel, Hans J.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) can have direct antimicrobial activity, which is apparently related to the presence of a distinct positively charged patch on the surface. However, chemokines can retain antimicrobial activity upon linearization despite the loss of their positive patch, thus questioning the importance of this patch for activity. Thrombocidin-1 (TC-1) is a microbicidal protein isolated from human blood platelets. TC-1 only differs from the chemokine NAP-2/CXCL7 by a two-amino acid C-terminal deletion, but this truncation is crucial for antimicrobial activity. We assessed the structure-activity relationship for antimicrobial activity of TC-1. Reduction of the charge of the TC-1-positive patch by replacing lysine 17 with alanine reduced the activity against bacteria and almost abolished activity against the yeast Candida albicans. Conversely, augmentation of the positive patch by increasing charge density or size resulted in a 2–3-fold increased activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis but did not substantially affect activity against C. albicans. Reduction of TC-1 resulted in loss of the folded conformation, but this disruption of the positive patch did not affect antimicrobial activity. Using overlapping 15-mer synthetic peptides, we demonstrate peptides corresponding to the N-terminal part of TC-1 to have similar antimicrobial activity as intact TC-1. Although we demonstrate that the positive patch is essential for activity of folded TC-1, unfolded TC-1 retained antimicrobial activity despite the absence of a positive patch. This activity is probably exerted by a linear peptide stretch in the N-terminal part of the molecule. We conclude that intact TC-1 and unfolded TC-1 exert antimicrobial activity via distinct structural elements. PMID:22025617

  17. Protein minimization: characterization of the synthetic cyclic dodecapeptide corresponding to the reactive site region of the oil rape trypsin inhibitor type-III.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Maurizio; Casavola, Elena Caroli; Maras, Bruno; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Costantino, Paolo; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2003-03-01

    The design of minimal units required for enzyme inhibition is a major field of interest in structural biology and biotechnology. The successful design of the cyclic dodecapeptide corresponding to the Phe17-Val28 reactive site amino acid sequence of the low-molecular-mass trypsin inhibitor RTI-III from Brassica napus (micro-RTI-III) and of the recombinant murine dihydrofolate reductase-(DHFR-)micro-RTI-III fusion protein (DHFR-micro-RTI-III) is reported here. Micro-RTI-III was synthesized using a stepwise solid-phase approach based on the standard Fmoc chemistry, purified by RP-HPLC, and oxidatively refolded. DHFR-micro-RTI-III was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by metal-chelate affinity chromatography, and oxidatively refolded. The affinity of micro-RTI-III for bovine trypsin (K(d)=1.6x10(-9)M) is similar to that determined for DHFR-micro-RTI-III (K(d)=6.3x10(-10)M) and native RTI-III (K(d)=2.9x10(-10)M), at pH 8.2 and 22.0 degrees C. Remarkably, micro-RTI-III protects the DHFR domain of DHFR-micro-RTI-III from trypsin digestion. Micro-RTI-III is a new minimal trypsin inhibitor and may be regarded as a tool in protein structure-function studies and for developing multifunctional and multidomain proteinase inhibitors.

  18. Circular proteins in plants: solution structure of a novel macrocyclic trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Felizmenio-Quimio, M E; Daly, N L; Craik, D J

    2001-06-22

    Much interest has been generated by recent reports on the discovery of circular (i.e. head-to-tail cyclized) proteins in plants. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of one of the newest such circular proteins, MCoTI-II, a novel trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis, a member of the Cucurbitaceae plant family. The structure consists of a small beta-sheet, several turns, and a cystine knot arrangement of the three disulfide bonds. Interestingly, the molecular topology is similar to that of the plant cyclotides (Craik, D. J., Daly, N. L., Bond, T., and Waine, C. (1999) J. Mol. Biol. 294, 1327-1336), which derive from the Rubiaceae and Violaceae plant families, have antimicrobial activities, and exemplify the cyclic cystine knot structural motif as part of their circular backbone. The sequence, biological activity, and plant family of MCoTI-II are all different from known cyclotides. However, given the structural similarity, cyclic backbone, and plant origin of MCoTI-II, we propose that MCoTI-II can be classified as a new member of the cyclotide class of proteins. The expansion of the cyclotides to include trypsin inhibitory activity and a new plant family highlights the importance and functional variability of circular proteins and the fact that they are more common than has previously been believed. Insights into the possible roles of backbone cyclization have been gained by a comparison of the structure of MCoTI-II with the homologous acyclic trypsin inhibitors CMTI-I and EETI-II from the Cucurbitaceae plant family. PMID:11292835

  19. Circular proteins in plants: solution structure of a novel macrocyclic trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Felizmenio-Quimio, M E; Daly, N L; Craik, D J

    2001-06-22

    Much interest has been generated by recent reports on the discovery of circular (i.e. head-to-tail cyclized) proteins in plants. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of one of the newest such circular proteins, MCoTI-II, a novel trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis, a member of the Cucurbitaceae plant family. The structure consists of a small beta-sheet, several turns, and a cystine knot arrangement of the three disulfide bonds. Interestingly, the molecular topology is similar to that of the plant cyclotides (Craik, D. J., Daly, N. L., Bond, T., and Waine, C. (1999) J. Mol. Biol. 294, 1327-1336), which derive from the Rubiaceae and Violaceae plant families, have antimicrobial activities, and exemplify the cyclic cystine knot structural motif as part of their circular backbone. The sequence, biological activity, and plant family of MCoTI-II are all different from known cyclotides. However, given the structural similarity, cyclic backbone, and plant origin of MCoTI-II, we propose that MCoTI-II can be classified as a new member of the cyclotide class of proteins. The expansion of the cyclotides to include trypsin inhibitory activity and a new plant family highlights the importance and functional variability of circular proteins and the fact that they are more common than has previously been believed. Insights into the possible roles of backbone cyclization have been gained by a comparison of the structure of MCoTI-II with the homologous acyclic trypsin inhibitors CMTI-I and EETI-II from the Cucurbitaceae plant family.

  20. Inhibitory activity of thymol on native and mature Gardnerella vaginalis biofilms: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Braga, Pier Carlo; Dal Sasso, Monica; Culici, Maria; Spallino, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most frequent diagnosis made in women with lower genital tract symptoms. It has recently been observed that 90 % of subjects with BV show the growth of bacteria in the form of biofilms as against only 10% without BV, and that Gardnerella vaginalis was the predominant species. The propensity of G. vaginalis to form biofilm is clinically relevant because this form of growth allows it to tolerate higher concentrations of certain antibiotics, thus increasing the possibilty of recurrent BV even after apparently curative therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether thymol (CAS 89-83-8), a molecule present in thyme essential oil, that is credited with having a series of pharmacological properties including antimicrobial and antifungal effects, can interfere with newly formed and mature G. vaginalis biofilms. The ability of G. vaginalis ATCC 49145 and two G. vaginalis strains isolated from human BV to form biofilm in flat-bottomed 96-well microtitre plates was verified, and the effects of thymol concentrations ranging from 1 to 1/16 MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) on preformed and mature biofilms was investigated by means of spectrophotometric analysis, Nomarski interference contrast microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy with live-dead cell visualisation (SYTO 9 and propidium iodide). Native biofilm was inhibited by concentrations ranging from 1 MIC to 1/8 MIC (32.77% +/- 2.37 to 11.39% +/- 1.46), and mature biofilm was inhibited by concentrations ranging from 1 MIC to 1/4 MIC (26.18% +/- 1.36 to 13.20% +/- 1.44). Nomarski interference contrast and fluorescence microscopy visually confirmed these findings. As biofilm is a multi-factorial phenomenon, the multiple mechanisms of thymol may act on different steps in the evolution of mature biofilm. PMID:21175040

  1. Altered glycosylation of complexed native IgG molecules is associated with disease activity of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sjöwall, C; Zapf, J; von Löhneysen, S; Magorivska, I; Biermann, M; Janko, C; Winkler, S; Bilyy, R; Schett, G; Herrmann, M; Muñoz, L E

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the redundancy of the receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, glycans result in potential ligands for a plethora of lectin receptors found in immune effector cells. Here we analysed the exposure of glycans containing fucosyl residues and the fucosylated tri-mannose N-type core by complexed native IgG in longitudinal serum samples of well-characterized patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Consecutive serum samples of a cohort of 15 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus during periods of increased disease activity and remission were analysed. All patients fulfilled the 1982 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. Sera of 15 sex- and age-matched normal healthy blood donors served as controls. The levels and type of glycosylation of complexed random IgG was measured with lectin enzyme-immunosorbent assays. After specifically gathering IgG complexes from sera, biotinylated lectins Aleuria aurantia lectin and Lens culinaris agglutinin were employed to detect IgG-associated fucosyl residues and the fucosylated tri-mannose N-glycan core, respectively. In sandwich-ELISAs, IgG-associated IgM, IgA, C1q, C3c and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected as candidates for IgG immune complex constituents. We studied associations of the glycan of complexed IgG and disease activity according to the physician's global assessment of disease activity and the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 documented at the moment of blood taking. Our results showed significantly higher levels of Aleuria aurantia lectin and Lens culinaris agglutinin binding sites exposed on IgG complexes of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus than on those of normal healthy blood donors. Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus correlated with higher exposure of Aleuria aurantia lectin-reactive fucosyl residues by immobilized IgG complexes. Top levels of Aleuria aurantia lectin-reactivity were found in samples taken during the

  2. Frequency and rates of outdoor activities, and perceptions of places to perform these activities by Native Americans and Caucasians interviewed in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Marchioni, Meredith

    2012-12-01

    Activity patterns and perceptions play a key role in human health risk, management, and planning. A sample of 233 people attending a Native American festival in Cookeville, Tennessee was interviewed to determine the types, percent participation, and outdoor activities rates, and their perceptions of the importance of characteristics of nuclear sites. Results indicate that: (1) a high percentage of respondents used outdoor environments, (2) they used them for consumptive (hunting, fishing), non-consumptive (hiking, walking, bird-watching), and religious/sacred activities, (3) a higher percentage of respondents engaged in non-consumptive than consumptive activities, (4) praying or meditating, communing with nature, and bird-watching had the highest uses rates (5) the environmental characteristics rated the highest were lack of radionuclides that presented a health risk, no visible smog, clean air, and unpolluted water, (6) the presence of people, buildings and roads were rated the lowest, and (7) Native Americans had higher outdoor participation rates, participated more frequently, and evaluated environmental characteristics higher than did Caucasians. This information can be used by managers to create and maintain outdoor habitats that fit the needs of local people. Planning and management require information on public policy, human needs and requirements, and human perceptions and evaluations of environmental characteristics. PMID:23229153

  3. Frequency and rates of outdoor activities, and perceptions of places to perform these activities by Native Americans and Caucasians interviewed in Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2015-01-01

    Activity patterns and perceptions play a key role in human health risk, management, and planning. A survey of 233 people attending a Native American festival in Cookeville Tennessee were interviewed to determine the types, percent participation, and outdoor activities rates, and their perceptions of the importance of characteristics of sites. The indicate that: 1) a high percentage of respondents used outdoor environments, 2) they used them for consumptive (hunting, fishing), non-consumptive (hiking, walking, bird-watching), and religious/sacred activities, 3) a higher percentage of respondents engaged in non-consumptive than consumptive activities, 4) praying or meditating, communing with nature, and bird-watching had the highest uses rates 5) the environmental characteristics rated the highest were lack of radionuclides that presented a health risk, no visible smog, clean air, and unpolluted water, 6) presence of people, buildings and roads were rated the lowest and 7) Native Americans had higher participation rates, participated more frequently, and evaluated environmental characteristics higher than did Caucasians. This information can be used by managers to create and maintain outdoor habitats that fit the needs of local people. Planning and management require information on public policy, human needs and requirements, and human perceptions and evaluations of environmental characteristics. PMID:23229153

  4. Frequency and rates of outdoor activities, and perceptions of places to perform these activities by Native Americans and Caucasians interviewed in Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2015-01-01

    Activity patterns and perceptions play a key role in human health risk, management, and planning. A survey of 233 people attending a Native American festival in Cookeville Tennessee were interviewed to determine the types, percent participation, and outdoor activities rates, and their perceptions of the importance of characteristics of sites. The indicate that: 1) a high percentage of respondents used outdoor environments, 2) they used them for consumptive (hunting, fishing), non-consumptive (hiking, walking, bird-watching), and religious/sacred activities, 3) a higher percentage of respondents engaged in non-consumptive than consumptive activities, 4) praying or meditating, communing with nature, and bird-watching had the highest uses rates 5) the environmental characteristics rated the highest were lack of radionuclides that presented a health risk, no visible smog, clean air, and unpolluted water, 6) presence of people, buildings and roads were rated the lowest and 7) Native Americans had higher participation rates, participated more frequently, and evaluated environmental characteristics higher than did Caucasians. This information can be used by managers to create and maintain outdoor habitats that fit the needs of local people. Planning and management require information on public policy, human needs and requirements, and human perceptions and evaluations of environmental characteristics. PMID:23229153

  5. Frequency and rates of outdoor activities, and perceptions of places to perform these activities by Native Americans and Caucasians interviewed in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Marchioni, Meredith

    2012-12-01

    Activity patterns and perceptions play a key role in human health risk, management, and planning. A sample of 233 people attending a Native American festival in Cookeville, Tennessee was interviewed to determine the types, percent participation, and outdoor activities rates, and their perceptions of the importance of characteristics of nuclear sites. Results indicate that: (1) a high percentage of respondents used outdoor environments, (2) they used them for consumptive (hunting, fishing), non-consumptive (hiking, walking, bird-watching), and religious/sacred activities, (3) a higher percentage of respondents engaged in non-consumptive than consumptive activities, (4) praying or meditating, communing with nature, and bird-watching had the highest uses rates (5) the environmental characteristics rated the highest were lack of radionuclides that presented a health risk, no visible smog, clean air, and unpolluted water, (6) the presence of people, buildings and roads were rated the lowest, and (7) Native Americans had higher outdoor participation rates, participated more frequently, and evaluated environmental characteristics higher than did Caucasians. This information can be used by managers to create and maintain outdoor habitats that fit the needs of local people. Planning and management require information on public policy, human needs and requirements, and human perceptions and evaluations of environmental characteristics.

  6. Weight-bearing activity and foot parameters in Native Americans with diabetes with and without foot sensation.

    PubMed

    Cuaderes, Elena; Lamb, Lyndon; Khan, Myrna; Lawrence, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Amputations from diabetic foot ulcers account for substantial health care costs and pain. At the point of neuropathy, it has been recommended that weight-bearing activities (WBA) be restricted to reduce the risk of ulcers. While regular WBA has been shown to control glycemia, stress from this exercise may lead to ulcers by various processes. This investigation compared Native Americans with diabetes, with or without foot sensation and who reported regular or no leisure-time WBA, with variables of significance for risk of diabetic foot ulcers. Analysis revealed that there were no differences in barefoot standing plantar pressure or plantar skin hardness between the four groups. Further study is recommended with a larger sample and the use of instruments that are more valid and reliable. PMID:20669398

  7. A Rapid Screening Analysis of Antioxidant Compounds in Native Australian Food Plants Using Multiplexed Detection with Active Flow Technology Columns.

    PubMed

    Rupesinghe, Emmanuel Janaka Rochana; Jones, Andrew; Shalliker, Ross Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan

    2016-01-01

    Conventional techniques for identifying antioxidant and phenolic compounds in native Australian food plants are laborious and time-consuming. Here, we present a multiplexed detection technique that reduces analysis time without compromising separation performance. This technique is achieved using Active Flow Technology-Parallel Segmented Flow (AFT-PSF) columns. Extracts from cinnamon myrtle (Backhousia myrtifolia) and lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) leaves were analysed via multiplexed detection using an AFT-PSF column with underivatised UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy (MS), and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) derivatisation for antioxidants as detection methods. A number of antioxidant compounds were detected in the extracts of each leaf extract. PMID:26805792

  8. Urinary Trypsin Inhibitor Ameliorates Seawater Immersion-Induced Intestinal Mucosa Injury via Antioxidation, Modulation of NF-κB Activity, and Its Related Cytokines in Rats with Open Abdominal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing Jian; Wang, Ya Li; Zhou, Song; Xue, Xiaojun; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Wen Hua; Zheng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the role of oxidative stress, NF-κB activity, and its related cytokines in the pathogenesis of seawater immersion after open abdominal injury (SI-OAI) and whether UTI treatment can attenuate SI-OAI induced IMI. Methods. Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: C group, S group, and U group. The rats in C group only suffered from anesthesia and surgical operation, whereas the rats in S group and U group received caudal vein injection of normal saline without/with 50,000 U/kg body weight of UTI. The activities of TNF-α, IL-6, SOD, MDA, ROS, NF-κB, and IκB-β were monitored by ELISA, biochemical methods, EMSA, and Western blot, respectively. Results. The plasma inflammatory mediators and the contents of MDA, ROS, and NF-κB in intestine as well as the pathological scores in ileal mucosa were significantly increased in rats after SI-OAI, accompanied by a reduction in SOD activities and IκB-β levels. UTI treatment significantly attenuated intestinal histopathological changes with evidence of a decrease in all of the parameters, except for upregulation of the levels of SOD and IκB-β protein. Conclusion. UTI can attenuate SI-OAI induced IMI via inhibition of NF-κB activity, subsequently inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and by combating oxidative stress. PMID:25210512

  9. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna; Miyagi, Masaru; Lodowski, David T.

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity.

  10. [Serological tests of functional activity of the digestive system (gastrin, pepsinogen-I, trypsin), general IgE and serum cortisol levels in children with hepatitis A and B].

    PubMed

    Kalagina, L S; Pavlov, Ch S; Fomin, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    The mild form of hepatitis A and B with children is attended by a functional activity of pancreatic gland (tripsin), mucous coats of stomach and duodenum (gastrin) which permits to consider them as a factor of the risk of digestive organs combined pathology starting with the disease acuity. Differences in gastrin levels with children depending on hepatitis etiology were specified. Highest levels of gastrin were observed with persons suffering from hepatitis B.

  11. Educational & Informative Competence of Schoolchildren: Modelling of Educational and Informative Activity at Native Language Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabiyeva, Shelale Z.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims at analysis an educational and informative competence, describing the components of schoolchildren's educational and informative activity and submitting an efficient set of exercises resulted from the educational and informative activity component analysis. The relevance of the study is determined by modernization of an educational…

  12. Purification, characterization and substrate specificity of a trypsin from the Amazonian fish tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum).

    PubMed

    Marcuschi, Marina; Espósito, Talita S; Machado, Maurício F M; Hirata, Izaura Y; Machado, Marcelo F M; Silva, Márcia V; Carvalho, Luiz B; Oliveira, Vitor; Bezerra, Ranilson S

    2010-06-01

    An enzyme was purified from the pyloric caecum of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) through heat treatment, ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 and p-aminobenzamidine-agarose affinity chromatography. The enzyme had a molecular mass of 23.9 kDa, NH(2)-terminal amino acid sequence of IVGGYECKAHSQPHVSLNI and substrate specificity for arginine at P1, efficiently hydrolizing substrates with leucine and lysine at P2 and serine and arginine at P1'. Using the substrate z-FR-MCA, the enzyme exhibited greatest activity at pH 9.0 and 50 degrees C, whereas, with BAPNA activity was higher in a pH range of 7.5-11.5 and at 70 degrees C. Moreover, the enzyme maintained ca. 60% of its activity after incubated for 3h at 60 degrees C. The enzymatic activity significantly decreased in the presence of TLCK, benzamidine (trypsin inhibitors) and PMSF (serine protease inhibitor). This source of trypsin may be an attractive alternative for the detergent and food industry. PMID:20438707

  13. Trypsin-mediated enzymatic degradation of type II collagen in the human vitreous

    PubMed Central

    van Deemter, Mariëlle; Kuijer, Roel; Harm Pas, Hendri; Jacoba van der Worp, Roelofje; Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Aging of the vitreous body can result in sight-threatening pathology. One aspect of vitreous aging is liquefaction, which results from the vanishing of collagen fibrils. We investigated the possibility that trypsins are involved in vitreous type II collagen degradation. Methods Immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used for detecting and locating trypsin isoforms in the vitreous and retina of human donor eyes. The capability of the retina to produce these trypsins was analyzed with polymerase chain reaction. Whether the different trypsins degraded type II collagen was tested in vitro. The sizes of the in vitro induced type II collagen degradation products were compared to those present in the vitreous of human eyes of different ages. Results Trypsin-1 and trypsin-2 were detected in the vitreous. In the retina, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) coding for trypsin-2, -3, and -4 was present. Using immunohistochemistry, trypsin-2 was detected in microglial cells located in the vitreous and the retina. All trypsin isoforms degraded type II collagen and produced degradation products of similar sizes as those present in the vitreous. Conclusions Trypsin-1 and trypsin-2 appear to have a function in the degradation of vitreous type II collagen. They could therefore have a role in the development of vitreous liquefaction. PMID:23882137

  14. Rabbit pulmonary angiotensin-converting enzyme: the NH2-terminal fragment with enzymatic activity and its formation from the native enzyme by NH4OH treatment.

    PubMed

    Iwata, K; Blacher, R; Soffer, R L; Lai, C Y

    1983-11-01

    The NH2-terminal sequence of 22 residues of rabbit lung angiotensin-converting enzyme has been determined as (NH2)Thr-Leu-Asp-Pro-Gly-Leu-Leu-Pro-Gly-Asp-Phe-Ala -Ala-Asp-Asn-Ala-Gly-Ala-Arg-Leu-Phe-Ala-. In the course of purification of the enzyme for structural analysis a protein of Mr = 82,000 with angiotensin-converting activity was separated from the major fraction containing the native enzyme (Mr = 140,000). This low-molecular-weight enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate Hip-His-Leu at a rate 23% of that with the native enzyme, and exhibited a similar Km value as well as behaviors towards various effectors of angiotensin-converting enzyme. Edman degradation of both the native and the 82K enzymes revealed that they contain identical amino acid sequences from the NH2-termini. This result and those of peptide mapping and carbohydrate and amino acid analyses indicate that the 82K enzyme is a fragment derived from the NH2-terminal portion of the native enzyme, and hence contains its catalytic site. Evidence has been obtained indicating that the active fragment was formed from the native enzyme during its elution from the antibody-affinity column with NH4OH: on treatment of the native enzyme (140K Mr) with 1 N NH4OH at room temperature, a cleavage occurred and two proteins with Mr = 82K and Mr = 62K were obtained. The 82K Mr fragment was found to be enzymatically active and to contain the same NH2-terminal sequence as the native enzyme. The other fragment (62K Mr) was devoid of the activity and was shown to derive from the COOH-terminal portion of the native enzyme by the peptide mapping and terminal analyses. Cleavage of a peptide bond with NH4OH is unusual and appears to be specific for the native angiotensin-converting enzyme from rabbit lung.

  15. Bio-potency of a 21 kDa Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica seeds on the developmental physiology of H. armigera.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prabhash K; Jamal, Farrukh

    2014-11-01

    A trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of Tamarindus indica by Sephadex G-75, DEAE-Sepharose and Trypsin-Sepharose CL-4B columns was studied for its antifeedant, larvicidal, pupicidal and growth inhibitory activities against Helicoverpa armigera larvae. Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor (TTI) exhibited inhibitory activity towards total gut proteolytic enzymes of H. armigera (~87%) and bovine trypsin (~84%). Lethal doses which caused mortality and weight reduction by 50% were 1% w/w and 0.50% w/w, respectively. IC50 of TTI against Helicoverpa midgut proteases and bovine trypsin were ~2.10 µg/ml and 1.68 µg/ml respectively. In larval feeding studies the 21 kDa Kunitz-type protein was found to retard growth and development, prolonged the larval-pupal development durations along with adversely affecting the fertility and fecundity of H. armigera. In artificial diet at 0.5% w/w TTI, the efficiency of conversion of ingested food as well as of digested food, relative growth rate, growth index declined whereas approximate digestibility, metabolic cost, relative consumption rate, consumption index and total developmental period enhanced for H. armigera larvae. These results suggest that TTI has toxic and adverse effect on the developmental physiology of H. armigera and could be useful in controlling the pest H. armigera.

  16. Bio-potency of a 21 kDa Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica seeds on the developmental physiology of H. armigera.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prabhash K; Jamal, Farrukh

    2014-11-01

    A trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of Tamarindus indica by Sephadex G-75, DEAE-Sepharose and Trypsin-Sepharose CL-4B columns was studied for its antifeedant, larvicidal, pupicidal and growth inhibitory activities against Helicoverpa armigera larvae. Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor (TTI) exhibited inhibitory activity towards total gut proteolytic enzymes of H. armigera (~87%) and bovine trypsin (~84%). Lethal doses which caused mortality and weight reduction by 50% were 1% w/w and 0.50% w/w, respectively. IC50 of TTI against Helicoverpa midgut proteases and bovine trypsin were ~2.10 µg/ml and 1.68 µg/ml respectively. In larval feeding studies the 21 kDa Kunitz-type protein was found to retard growth and development, prolonged the larval-pupal development durations along with adversely affecting the fertility and fecundity of H. armigera. In artificial diet at 0.5% w/w TTI, the efficiency of conversion of ingested food as well as of digested food, relative growth rate, growth index declined whereas approximate digestibility, metabolic cost, relative consumption rate, consumption index and total developmental period enhanced for H. armigera larvae. These results suggest that TTI has toxic and adverse effect on the developmental physiology of H. armigera and could be useful in controlling the pest H. armigera. PMID:25454525

  17. Trypsin-like enzymes during fertilization in the shrimp Rhynchocinetes typus.

    PubMed

    Rios, M; Barros, C

    1997-04-01

    The spermatozoon of Rhynchocinetes typus is atypical because it is nonmotile and lacks head and tail. The body has a rigid spike. Neither an acrosome-like structure nor changes during gamete interaction which could be interpreted as an acrosome reaction have been observed in this species. Nevertheless, the spermatozoon exerts a lytic effect on the extracellular envelope of the egg, and in this way it penetrates through egg-coats, forming a channel. In this research we found that crude spermatozoa extracts analyzed by gelatin SDS-PAGE developed one band of protease activity that was completely inhibited by SBTI (soybean trypsin inhibitor) and pAB (p-aminobenzamidine). In sperm extracts an enzymatic activity was determined, using BAEE (N-benzoil-L-arginine ethyl ester), but not ATEE, as substrate. This activity was inhibited by SBTI and pAB. We observed that in vitro fertilization was inhibited by spermatozoon incubation with the trypsin inhibitors SBTI, PMSF (phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride), and pAB. Additionally, we observed that when whole isolated egg-coats were incubated with sperm extract and then analyzed by SDS--PAGE, one band of the egg-coats disappeared. These results have been interpreted as sperm trypsinlike enzyme participation in R. typus sperm passage through the egg-coats. PMID:9094104

  18. Kinetic Dissection of the Pre-existing Conformational Equilibrium in the Trypsin Fold*

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Austin D.; Chakraborty, Pradipta; Di Cera, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Structural biology has recently documented the conformational plasticity of the trypsin fold for both the protease and zymogen in terms of a pre-existing equilibrium between closed (E*) and open (E) forms of the active site region. How such plasticity is manifested in solution and affects ligand recognition by the protease and zymogen is poorly understood in quantitative terms. Here we dissect the E*-E equilibrium with stopped-flow kinetics in the presence of excess ligand or macromolecule. Using the clotting protease thrombin and its zymogen precursor prethrombin-2 as relevant models we resolve the relative distribution of the E* and E forms and the underlying kinetic rates for their interconversion. In the case of thrombin, the E* and E forms are distributed in a 1:4 ratio and interconvert on a time scale of 45 ms. In the case of prethrombin-2, the equilibrium is shifted strongly (10:1 ratio) in favor of the closed E* form and unfolds over a faster time scale of 4.5 ms. The distribution of E* and E forms observed for thrombin and prethrombin-2 indicates that zymogen activation is linked to a significant shift in the pre-existing equilibrium between closed and open conformations that facilitates ligand binding to the active site. These findings broaden our mechanistic understanding of how conformational transitions control ligand recognition by thrombin and its zymogen precursor prethrombin-2 and have direct relevance to other members of the trypsin fold. PMID:26216877

  19. Effect of the native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate on murine peritoneal macrophage modulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Yamassaki, F T; Lenzi, R M; Campestrini, L H; Bovo, F; Seyfried, M; Soldera-Silva, A; Stevan-Hancke, F R; Zawadzki-Baggio, S F; Pettolino, F A; Bacic, A; Maurer, J B B

    2015-07-10

    The native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate (CNTG) and its arabinogalactan-protein component (CNTG-AGP) were tested by using immuno-stimulant and anti-inflammatory in vitro assays of murine peritoneal macrophage activities. In the assay for immuno-stimulant activity (without previous treatment with lipopolysaccharide; LPS), CNTG increased the production of interleukin (IL)-10 and both CNTG and CNTG-AGP decreased the concentrations of IL6. When the macrophages were incubated in the presence of LPS and CNTG a decrease in the levels of nitric oxide (NO(·)) and IFN-γ was observed. The results could explain the popular use of CNTG as an anti-inflammatory. In addition, CNTG is the main component of the cashew-nut tree gum exudate, which has been considered a versatile polymer with potential pharmaceutical and food industry applications. These data may contribute to the study of the immunomodulation activity of plant polysaccharides, as well as encourage future experiments in the field of cashew-nut tree gum exudate applications. PMID:25857980

  20. Effect of the native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate on murine peritoneal macrophage modulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Yamassaki, F T; Lenzi, R M; Campestrini, L H; Bovo, F; Seyfried, M; Soldera-Silva, A; Stevan-Hancke, F R; Zawadzki-Baggio, S F; Pettolino, F A; Bacic, A; Maurer, J B B

    2015-07-10

    The native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate (CNTG) and its arabinogalactan-protein component (CNTG-AGP) were tested by using immuno-stimulant and anti-inflammatory in vitro assays of murine peritoneal macrophage activities. In the assay for immuno-stimulant activity (without previous treatment with lipopolysaccharide; LPS), CNTG increased the production of interleukin (IL)-10 and both CNTG and CNTG-AGP decreased the concentrations of IL6. When the macrophages were incubated in the presence of LPS and CNTG a decrease in the levels of nitric oxide (NO(·)) and IFN-γ was observed. The results could explain the popular use of CNTG as an anti-inflammatory. In addition, CNTG is the main component of the cashew-nut tree gum exudate, which has been considered a versatile polymer with potential pharmaceutical and food industry applications. These data may contribute to the study of the immunomodulation activity of plant polysaccharides, as well as encourage future experiments in the field of cashew-nut tree gum exudate applications.

  1. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by native and activated bentonite: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Kul, Ali Riza; Koyuncu, Hülya

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of Pb(II) ions on native (NB) and acid activated (AAB) bentonites were examined. The specific surface areas, pore size and pore-size distributions of the samples were fully characterized. The adsorption efficiency of Pb(II) onto the NB and AAB was increased with increasing temperature. The kinetics of adsorption of Pb(II) ions was discussed using three kinetic models, the pseudo-first-order, the pseudo-second-order and the intra-particle diffusion model. The experimental data fitted very well the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The initial sorption rate and the activation energy were also calculated. The activation energy of the sorption was calculated as 16.51 and 13.66 kJ mol(-1) for NB and AAB, respectively. Experimental results were also analysed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Redushkevich (D-R) isotherm equations at different temperatures. R(L) separation factor for Langmuir and the n value for Freundlich isotherm show that Pb(II) ions are favorably adsorbed by NB and AAB. Thermodynamic quantities such as Gibbs free energy (DeltaG), the enthalpy (DeltaH) and the entropy change of sorption (DeltaS) were determined as about -5.06, 10.29 and 0.017 kJ mol(-1) K(-1), respectively for AAB. It was shown that the sorption processes were an endothermic reactions, controlled by physical mechanisms and spontaneously.

  2. In vivo efficacy of anuran trypsin inhibitory peptides against staphylococcal skin infection and the impact of peptide cyclization.

    PubMed

    Malik, U; Silva, O N; Fensterseifer, I C M; Chan, L Y; Clark, R J; Franco, O L; Daly, N L; Craik, D J

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a virulent pathogen that is responsible for a wide range of superficial and invasive infections. Its resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs is a global problem, and the development of novel antimicrobial agents is crucial. Antimicrobial peptides from natural resources offer potential as new treatments against staphylococcal infections. In the current study, we have examined the antimicrobial properties of peptides isolated from anuran skin secretions and cyclized synthetic analogues of these peptides. The structures of the peptides were elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, revealing high structural and sequence similarity with each other and with sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1). SFTI-1 is an ultrastable cyclic peptide isolated from sunflower seeds that has subnanomolar trypsin inhibitory activity, and this scaffold offers pharmaceutically relevant characteristics. The five anuran peptides were nonhemolytic and noncytotoxic and had trypsin inhibitory activities similar to that of SFTI-1. They demonstrated weak in vitro inhibitory activities against S. aureus, but several had strong antibacterial activities against S. aureus in an in vivo murine wound infection model. pYR, an immunomodulatory peptide from Rana sevosa, was the most potent, with complete bacterial clearance at 3 mg · kg(-1). Cyclization of the peptides improved their stability but was associated with a concomitant decrease in antimicrobial activity. In summary, these anuran peptides are promising as novel therapeutic agents for treating infections from a clinically resistant pathogen. PMID:25624332

  3. In vivo efficacy of anuran trypsin inhibitory peptides against staphylococcal skin infection and the impact of peptide cyclization.

    PubMed

    Malik, U; Silva, O N; Fensterseifer, I C M; Chan, L Y; Clark, R J; Franco, O L; Daly, N L; Craik, D J

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a virulent pathogen that is responsible for a wide range of superficial and invasive infections. Its resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs is a global problem, and the development of novel antimicrobial agents is crucial. Antimicrobial peptides from natural resources offer potential as new treatments against staphylococcal infections. In the current study, we have examined the antimicrobial properties of peptides isolated from anuran skin secretions and cyclized synthetic analogues of these peptides. The structures of the peptides were elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, revealing high structural and sequence similarity with each other and with sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1). SFTI-1 is an ultrastable cyclic peptide isolated from sunflower seeds that has subnanomolar trypsin inhibitory activity, and this scaffold offers pharmaceutically relevant characteristics. The five anuran peptides were nonhemolytic and noncytotoxic and had trypsin inhibitory activities similar to that of SFTI-1. They demonstrated weak in vitro inhibitory activities against S. aureus, but several had strong antibacterial activities against S. aureus in an in vivo murine wound infection model. pYR, an immunomodulatory peptide from Rana sevosa, was the most potent, with complete bacterial clearance at 3 mg · kg(-1). Cyclization of the peptides improved their stability but was associated with a concomitant decrease in antimicrobial activity. In summary, these anuran peptides are promising as novel therapeutic agents for treating infections from a clinically resistant pathogen.

  4. In Vivo Efficacy of Anuran Trypsin Inhibitory Peptides against Staphylococcal Skin Infection and the Impact of Peptide Cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Malik, U.; Silva, O. N.; Fensterseifer, I. C. M.; Chan, L. Y.; Clark, R. J.; Franco, O. L.; Daly, N. L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a virulent pathogen that is responsible for a wide range of superficial and invasive infections. Its resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs is a global problem, and the development of novel antimicrobial agents is crucial. Antimicrobial peptides from natural resources offer potential as new treatments against staphylococcal infections. In the current study, we have examined the antimicrobial properties of peptides isolated from anuran skin secretions and cyclized synthetic analogues of these peptides. The structures of the peptides were elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, revealing high structural and sequence similarity with each other and with sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1). SFTI-1 is an ultrastable cyclic peptide isolated from sunflower seeds that has subnanomolar trypsin inhibitory activity, and this scaffold offers pharmaceutically relevant characteristics. The five anuran peptides were nonhemolytic and noncytotoxic and had trypsin inhibitory activities similar to that of SFTI-1. They demonstrated weak in vitro inhibitory activities against S. aureus, but several had strong antibacterial activities against S. aureus in an in vivo murine wound infection model. pYR, an immunomodulatory peptide from Rana sevosa, was the most potent, with complete bacterial clearance at 3 mg · kg−1. Cyclization of the peptides improved their stability but was associated with a concomitant decrease in antimicrobial activity. In summary, these anuran peptides are promising as novel therapeutic agents for treating infections from a clinically resistant pathogen. PMID:25624332

  5. Spatiotemporal brain activation pattern during word/picture perception by native Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Yoon, Hyo Woon; Park, Hyun Wook

    2004-05-19

    The purpose of this study is to explore spatiotemporal brain activation patterns during perception of words from three different languages (Korean, English, Chinese) and pictures. Using 64 channel event-related potential (ERP) recording and source localization using distributed source model, we investigated, with high temporal resolution, whether similar or different spatiotemporal patterns of brain activation are involved in the perception of words of different languages and/or pictures. Experimental results seem to corroborate left hemispheric dominance in language processing, and temporal/spatial characteristics in word perception revealed by previous ERP and neuroimaging studies. Observed differences in spatial pattern of activation at specific time periods between English and Korean, and Korean and Chinese, could be explained in terms of required visual pattern analysis due to the orthographic characteristics of each language.

  6. Hydrophilic immobilized trypsin reactor with magnetic graphene oxide as support for high efficient proteome digestion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Yang, Kaiguang; Zhao, Qun; Wu, Qi; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Peng, Xiaojun; Zhang, Yukui

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, magnetic Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles modified graphene oxide nanocomposites (GO-CO-NH-Fe₃O₄) were prepared by covalent bonding, via the reaction between the amino groups of fuctionalized Fe₃O₄ and the carboxylic groups of GO, confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectra, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. With GO-CO-NH-Fe₃O₄ as a novel substrate, trypsin was immobilized via π-π stacking and hydrogen bonding interaction, and the binding capacity of trypsin reached as high as 0.275 mg/mg. Since GO-CO-NH-Fe₃O₄ worked as not only support for enzyme immobilization, but also as an excellent microwave irradiation absorber, the digestion efficiency could be further improved with microwave assistance. By such an immobilized enzymatic reactor (IMER), standard proteins could be efficiently digested within 15 s, with sequence coverages comparable or better than those obtained by conventional in-solution digestion (12 h). Since trypsin was immobilized under mild conditions, the enzymatic activity of IMER preserved at least for a month. In addition, due to the good hydrophilicity of GO, no peptide residue was observed in the sequent digestion of bovine serum albumin and myoglobin. To further confirm the efficiency of such an IMER for proteome analysis, it was applied to digest proteins extracted from rat liver, followed by nanoRPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. With only 5 min microwave-assisted digestion, in 3 parallel runs, totally 456 protein groups were identified, comparable to that obtained by 12 h in-solution digestion, indicating the great potential of IMERs with GO-CO-NH-Fe₃O₄ as the support for high throughput proteome study.

  7. Biostable agonists that match or exceed activity of native insect kinins on recombinant arthropod GPCRs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The multifunctional arthropod insect kinins share the evolutionarily conserved C-terminal pentapeptide motif Phe-X1-X2-Trp-Gly-NH2, where X1 = His, Asn, Ser, or Tyr and X2 = Ser, Pro, or Ala. Insect kinins regulate diuresis in many species of insects. Compounds with similar biological activity cou...

  8. Spinach thylakoid polyphenol oxidase isolation, activation, and properties of the native chloroplast enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Golbeck, J.H.; Cammarata, K.V.

    1981-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase activity (E.C. 1.14,18.1) has been found in two enzyme species isolated from thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts. The proteins were released from the membrane by sonication and purified >900-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes appear to be the tetramer and monomer of a subunit with a molecular weight of 42,500 as determined by lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Sonication releases polyphenol oxidase from the membrane largely in the latent state. In the absence of added fatty acids, the isolated enzyme spontaneously, but slowly, activates with time. Purified polyphenol oxidase utilizes o-diphenols as substrates and shows no detectable levels of monophenol or p-diphenol oxidase activities. Suitable substrates include chlorogenic acid, catechol, caffeic acid, pyrogallol, and dopamine; however, the enzyme is substrate-inhibited by the last four at concentrations near their K/sub m/. A large seasonal variation in polyphenol oxidase activity may result from a decrease in enzyme content rather than inhibition of the enzyme present.

  9. Art Activities to Improve Self-Esteem among Native Hawaiian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omizo, Michael M.; Omizo, Sharon A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigated effects of group counseling using art activities in improving self-esteem among Hawaiian elementary children (N=50). Found subjects who participated in counseling had higher Social Peer-Related and Academics/School-Related Self-Esteem scores than children who did not participate. (ABL)

  10. Trypsin, Tryptase, and Thrombin Polarize Macrophages towards a Pro-Fibrotic M2a Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael J. V.; Gomer, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    For both wound healing and the formation of a fibrotic lesion, circulating monocytes enter the tissue and differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes and pro-fibrotic M2a macrophages, which together with fibroblasts form scar tissue. Monocytes can also differentiate into classically activated M1 macrophages and alternatively activated M2 macrophages. The proteases thrombin, which is activated during blood clotting, and tryptase, which is released by activated mast cells, potentiate fibroblast proliferation and fibrocyte differentiation, but their effect on macrophages is unknown. Here we report that thrombin, tryptase, and the protease trypsin bias human macrophage differentiation towards a pro-fibrotic M2a phenotype expressing high levels of galectin-3 from unpolarized monocytes, or from M1 and M2 macrophages, and that these effects appear to operate through protease-activated receptors. These results suggest that proteases can initiate scar tissue formation by affecting fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and macrophages. PMID:26407067

  11. Community Health Representatives: A Valuable Resource for Providing Coronary Heart Disease Health Education Activities for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Vicki L.

    1989-01-01

    This article addresses select health issues of Native Americans, emphasizing coronary heart disease (CHD). The link between lifestyle and CHD is discussed. CHD risk data from a study of 67 Community Health Representatives is presented, and the role these paraprofessionals can play in health education among Native Americans is discussed. (IAH)

  12. Low affinity block of native and cloned hyperpolarization-activated Ih channels by Ba2+ ions.

    PubMed

    van Welie, Ingrid; Wadman, Wytse J; van Hooft, Johannes A

    2005-01-10

    Ba2+ is commonly used to discriminate two classes of ion currents. The classical inward-rectifying K+ current, I(Kir), is blocked by low millimolar concentrations of Ba2+, whereas the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, I(h), is assumed not to be sensitive to Ba2+. Here we investigated the effects of Ba2+ on I(h) currents recorded from rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, and on cloned I(h) channels composed of either HCN1 or HCN2 subunits transiently expressed in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) 293 cells. The results show that low millimolar concentrations of Ba2+ reduce the maximal I(h) conductance (IC50 approximately 3-5 mM) in both CA1 pyramidal neurons and in HEK 293 cells without specificity for HCN1 or HCN2 subunits. In addition, Ba2+ decreases the rate of activation and increases the rate of deactivation of I(h) currents. Neither the half-maximal voltage of activation, V(h), nor the reversal potential of the I(h) channels were affected by Ba2+. The combined results suggest that B2+, at concentrations commonly used to block I(Kir) currents, also reduces the conductance of I(h) channels without subunit specificity, and affects the kinetics of I(h) channel gating.

  13. Comparative effects of ohmic, induction cooker, and electric stove heating on soymilk trypsin inhibitor inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Luping; Zhang, Caimeng; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2015-03-01

    During thermal treatment of soymilk, a rapid incorporation of Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) into protein aggregates by covalent (disulfide bond, SS) and/or noncovalent interactions with other proteins is responsible for its fast inactivation of trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). In contrast, the slow cleavage of a single Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) peptide bond is responsible for its slow inactivation of TIA and chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (CIA). In this study, the effects of Ohmic heating (220 V, 50 Hz) on soymilk TIA and CIA inactivation were examined and compared to induction cooker and electric stove heating with similar thermal histories. It was found that: (1) TIA and CIA inactivation was slower from 0 to 3 min, and faster after 3 min as compared to induction cooker and electric stove. (2) The thiol (SH) loss rate was slower from 0 to 3 min, and similar to induction cooker and electric stove after 3 min. (3) Ohmic heating slightly increased protein aggregate formation. (4) In addition to the cleavage of one BBI peptide bond, an additional reaction might occur to enhance BBI inactivation. (5) Ohmic heating was more energy-efficient for TIA and CIA inactivation. (6) TIA and CIA inactivation was accelerated with increasing electric voltage (110, 165, and 220 V) of Ohmic heating. It is likely that the enhanced inactivation of TIA by Ohmic heating is due to its combined electrochemical and thermal effects. PMID:25678063

  14. Comparative effects of ohmic, induction cooker, and electric stove heating on soymilk trypsin inhibitor inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Luping; Zhang, Caimeng; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2015-03-01

    During thermal treatment of soymilk, a rapid incorporation of Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) into protein aggregates by covalent (disulfide bond, SS) and/or noncovalent interactions with other proteins is responsible for its fast inactivation of trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). In contrast, the slow cleavage of a single Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) peptide bond is responsible for its slow inactivation of TIA and chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (CIA). In this study, the effects of Ohmic heating (220 V, 50 Hz) on soymilk TIA and CIA inactivation were examined and compared to induction cooker and electric stove heating with similar thermal histories. It was found that: (1) TIA and CIA inactivation was slower from 0 to 3 min, and faster after 3 min as compared to induction cooker and electric stove. (2) The thiol (SH) loss rate was slower from 0 to 3 min, and similar to induction cooker and electric stove after 3 min. (3) Ohmic heating slightly increased protein aggregate formation. (4) In addition to the cleavage of one BBI peptide bond, an additional reaction might occur to enhance BBI inactivation. (5) Ohmic heating was more energy-efficient for TIA and CIA inactivation. (6) TIA and CIA inactivation was accelerated with increasing electric voltage (110, 165, and 220 V) of Ohmic heating. It is likely that the enhanced inactivation of TIA by Ohmic heating is due to its combined electrochemical and thermal effects.

  15. [Low-molecular cytolysins and trypsin inhibitors from sea anemone Radianthus macrodactylus. Isolation and partial characterization].

    PubMed

    Zykova, T A; Monastyrnaia, M M; Apalikova, O V; Shvets, T V; Kozlovskaia, E P

    1998-07-01

    Two low-molecular cytolytic toxins (RmI and RmII) and four trypsin inhibitors were isolated from the aqueous extract of sea anemone Radianthus macrodactylus. The method of isolation involved precipitation with acetone, gel filtration on acrylex P-4, ion-exchange chromatography on CM-32 cellulose, affinity chromatography on trypsin-binding sepharose 4B, ion exchange chromatography on an Ultrapore TSK CM-3SW column, and reversed phase HPLC on a Silasorb C18 column. RmI, RmII, and JnI inhibitor displayed molecular masses 5100, 6100, and 7100 Da, respectively, when subjected to SDS-PAGE. The isoelectric points were 9.2 and 9.3 for RmI and RmII, respectively. The amino acid composition and N-terminal amino acid residue (glycine) were determined for RmI, RmII, and JnI. Both proteins were nontoxic to mice and crabs. Hemolytic activity was determined to be 25 and 20 HU/mg for RmI and RmII, respectively, and their action on erythrocyte membrane was not inhibited by exogenous sphingomyelin. RmI and RmII exhibited antihistamine activity.

  16. Preparation and evaluation of dual-enzyme microreactor with co-immobilized trypsin and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Meller, Kinga; Pomastowski, Paweł; Grzywiński, Damian; Szumski, Michał; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2016-04-01

    The preparation of capillary microfluidic reactor with co-immobilized trypsin and chymotrypsin with the use of a low-cost commercially available enzymatic reagent (containing these proteases) as well as the evaluation of its usefulness in proteomic research were presented. The monolithic copolymer synthesized from glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) was used as a support. Firstly, the polymerization conditions were optimized and the monolithic bed was synthesized in the fused silica capillary modified with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (γ-MAPS). The polymer containing epoxy groups was then modified with 1,6-diaminohexane, followed by the attachment of glutaraldehyde and immobilization of enzymes. The efficiency of the prepared monolithic Immobilized Enzyme Microreactor (μ-IMER) with regard to trypsin activity was evaluated using the low-molecular mass compound (Nα-benzoyl-l-arginine ethyl ester, BAEE). The activities of both enzymes were investigated using a macromolecular protein (human transferrin, Tf) as a substrate. In the case of BAEE, the reaction product was separated from the substrate using the capillary liquid chromatography and the efficiency of the reaction was determined by the peak area of the substrate. The hydrolysis products of transferrin were analyzed with MALDI-TOF which allows for the verification of the prepared enzymatic system applicability in the field of proteomic research. PMID:26947160

  17. A conventional procedure to reduce Asn deamidation artifacts during trypsin peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Kori, Yekaterina; Patel, Rekha; Neill, Alyssa; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-01-15

    Asn deamidation is a common post-translational modification of proteins with significant biological consequences. Asn deamidation can cause changes in structure, stability and function of proteins. LC-MS peptide mapping is the most widely used method to detect and quantify Asn deamidation. However, a significant amount of deamidation can occur during sample preparation for peptide mapping, making it challenging to accurately determine the original level of deamidation. Although several protocols to reduce procedure-induced deamidation have been reported, they either require special procedural steps or are not optimal for maintaining trypsin activity. In the current study, several commonly used buffers that are optimal for trypsin activity were evaluated. The results demonstrated that much lower levels of Asn deamidation artifacts were observed when Tris buffer was used, especially at lower concentrations. The addition of 10% acetonitrile further reduced the levels of Asn deamidation artifacts. The utility of the optimized procedure was demonstrated by the digestion of a recombinant monoclonal antibody. The proposed procedure can be readily applied to any laboratory settings as it does not require any special reagents or procedures. PMID:26720699

  18. Characterization of DNA binding and pairing activities associated with the native SFPQ•NONO DNA repair protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Durga; Dynan, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We have previously shown that a complex of SFPQ (PSF) and NONO (p54nrb) cooperates with Ku protein at an early step of NHEJ, forming a committed preligation complex and stimulating end-joining activity by 10-fold or more. SFPQ and NONO show no resemblance to other repair factors, and their mechanism of action is uncertain. Here, we use an optimized microwell-based assay to characterize the in vitro DNA binding behavior of the native SFPQ•NONO complex purified from human (HeLa) cells. SFPQ•NONO and Ku protein bind independently to DNA, with little evidence of cooperativity and only slight mutual interference at high concentration. Whereas Ku protein requires free DNA ends for binding, SFPQ•NONO does not. Both Ku and SFPQ•NONO have pairing activity, as measured by the ability of DNA-bound protein to capture a second DNA fragment in a microwell-based assay. Additionally, SFPQ•NONO stimulates DNA-dependent protein kinase autophosphorylation, consistent with the ability to promote formation of a synaptic complex formation without occluding the DNA termini proper. These findings suggest that SFPQ•NONO promotes end joining by binding to internal DNA sequences and cooperating with other repair proteins to stabilize a synaptic pre-ligation complex. PMID:25998385

  19. Differential cellulolytic activity of native-form and C-terminal tagged-form cellulase derived from coptotermes formosanus and expressed in E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The endogenous cellulase gene (CfEG3a) of Coptotermes formosanus, an economically important pest termite, was cloned and overexpressed in both native form (nCfEG) and C-terminal His-tagged form (tCfEG) in E.coli. Both forms of recombinant cellulases showed hydrolytic activity on cellulosic substrate...

  20. Specific proteolysis of native alanine racemases from Salmonella typhimurium: identification of the cleavage site and characterization of the clipped two-domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Galakatos, N.G.; Walsh, C.T.

    1987-12-15

    Native DadB and Alr alanine racemases (M/sub r/ 39,000) from Salmonella typhimurium are proteolyzed at homologous positions by ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin, trypsin, and subtilisin to generate in all cases two nonoverlapping polypeptides of M/sub r/ 28,000 and 11,000. Under nondenaturing conditions, chymotryptic digest results in an associated form of the two fragments which possesses 3% of the original catalytic activity, incorporates 0.76 equiv of the mechanism-based inactivator ..beta..-chloro-(/sup 14/C)-D-alanine, and exhibits a UV circular dichroism profile identical with that of native enzyme. Protein sequence analysis of the denatured chymotryptic fragments indicates the presence of a tetrapeptide interdomain hinge (DadB, residues 254-257; Alr, residues 256-259) that is attacked at both ends during proteolysis. Under the previously employed digest conditions, NaB/sup 3/H/sub 4/-reduced DadB holoenzyme is resistant to ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin and trypsin and is labile only toward subtilisin. These data suggest that the hinge structure is essential for a catalytically efficient enzyme species and is sensitive to active site geometry. The sequence at the hinge region is also conserved in alanine racemases from Gram-positive bacteria.

  1. Role of native and exotic woody vegetation in soil restoration in active gully systems (southern Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja Ramon, Pablo; Alvarado Moncayo, Dario; Vanacker, Veerle; Cisneros, Pedro; Molina, Armando; Govers, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Revegetation projects in degraded lands have the potential to recover essential soil functions. If vegetation restoration is combined with bioengineering techniques, such as the construction of retention dams in active gully systems, soil restoration could be enhanced. One important aspect of this process is the role of vegetation on restoration of soil chemical and physical properties. There is currently a lack of knowledge on the potential of soil restoration in active badland systems, as most studies have concentrated on the direct and visible effect of revegetation on erosion control. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of revegetation and bioengineering works on the restoration of soil physical and chemical properties. The analyses are realized in a highly degraded area of 3 km2, located in the lower part of the Loreto catchment (Southern Ecuadorian Andes). First, the soil physical and/or chemical parameters that are most sensitive to track environmental change were evaluated. Second, the role of vegetation on soil restoration was quantified. . Soil samples were taken in sites with different vegetation cover, land use and physiographic position. The following physical and chemical parameters were measured: volumetric water content (θsat, θact), bulk density, pH, texture, organic matter, C and N content. Our first results do not show a clear relationship between volumetric water content at saturation (θsat), bulk density, or C content. The saturation water content does not vary significantly between different sites, or land use types. However, significant differences are found between sites at different stages of restoration; and this for most chemical and physical soil properties. Vegetation cover (%) appears to exert a strong control on the C content in the mineral soils. The highest C values are found in soils of forest plantations with Eucalyptus and Pinus species. These plantations are located in areas that were previously affected by active

  2. Visual cortex activation in bilingual blind individuals during use of native and second language.

    PubMed

    Ofan, Renana H; Zohary, Ehud

    2007-06-01

    Recent neuroimaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies indicate that the occipital cortex of congenitally blind humans is functionally relevant for nonvisual tasks. There are suggestions that the underlying cortical reorganization is restricted by a critical period. These results were based on comparison between early and late blind groups, thereby facing the problem of great variability among individuals within each group. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we studied bilingual congenitally blind individuals during use of 2 languages: one acquired early (Hebrew), the other later in life (English, at approximately 10 years). The subjects listened to chimeric words consisting of superimposed Hebrew and English nouns. They were instructed to either covertly generate a verb to the heard noun or repeat the noun, in either Hebrew or English. Lateralized activation during verb generation (vs. repeat) was found in classical language areas, in congruence with previous studies in sighted subjects. Critically, in our study, the blind participants typically also had robust left lateralized occipital differential activation during verb generation (vs. repeat), in both languages. This suggests that the critical period for plasticity persists beyond 10 years or that the visual cortex of the blind might be engaged in abstract levels of language processing, common to the 2 languages.

  3. Covalent immobilization of mixed proteases, trypsin and chymotrypsin, onto modified polyvinyl chloride microspheres.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Fang; Ding, Hao-Chen; Zhou, Tao

    2013-11-01

    A commercially available trypsin-chymotrypsin mixture was covalently immobilized onto modified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) microspheres, which were activated by the subsequent treatment of PVC microspheres with ethylenediamine and glutaraldehyde. The immobilized mixed protease was characterized by FT-IR and SEM analyses. Immobilization conditions were optimized by Box-Behnken design and the response surface method. The activity of the immobilized mixed protease prepared under optimal conditions (pH 6.6, 23 °C, 2 h) reached 1341 U/g. Compared with the free form, the immobilized enzyme possesses a slightly higher optimal pH value and a wider pH-activity profile, superior thermal stability, and a higher Km value. Reusability of the immobilized mixed protease indicated that >70% of the original activity was retained after having been recycled six times.

  4. Trypsin-like serine peptidase profiles in the egg, larval, and pupal stages of Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus, a ubiquitous mosquito, is one of the main vectors of dengue and yellow fever, representing an important threat to public health worldwide. Peptidases play key roles in processes such as digestion, oogenesis, and metamorphosis of insects. However, most of the information on the proteolytic enzymes of mosquitoes is derived from insects in the adult stages and is often directed towards the understanding of blood digestion. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of active peptidases from the preimaginal stages of Ae. albopictus. Methods Ae. albopictus eggs, larvae, and pupae were analyzed using zymography with susbtrate-SDS-PAGE. The pH, temperature and peptidase inhibitor sensitivity was evaluated. In addition, the proteolytic activities of larval instars were assayed using the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Results The proteolytic profile of the larval stage was composed of 8 bands ranging from 17 to 130 kDa. These enzymes displayed activity in a broad range of pH values, from 5.5 to 10.0. The enzymatic profile of the eggs was similar to that of the larvae, although the proteolytic bands of the eggs showed lower intensities. The pupal stage showed a complex proteolytic pattern, with at least 6 bands with apparent molecular masses ranging from 30 to 150 kDa and optimal activity at pH 7.5. Peptidases from larval instars were active from 10°C to 60°C, with optimal activity at temperatures between 37°C and 50°C. The proteolytic profile of both the larval and pupal stages was inhibited by phenyl-methyl sulfonyl-fluoride (PMSF) and Nα-Tosyl L-lysine chloromethyl ketone hydrochloride (TLCK), indicating that the main peptidases expressed during these developmental stages are trypsin-like serine peptidases. Conclusion The preimaginal stages of Ae. albopictus exhibited a complex profile of trypsin-like serine peptidase activities. A comparative analysis of the active peptidase profiles revealed differential expression

  5. A requirement for trypsin-sensitive cell-surface components for cell-cell interactions of embryonic neural retina cells

    PubMed Central

    McClay, DR; Godding, LR; Fransen, ME

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative assay was used to measure the rate of collection of a population of embryonic neural retina cells to the surface of cell aggregates. The rate of collection of freshly trysinized cells was limited in the initial stages by the rate of replacement of trypsin-sensitive cell- surface components. When cells were preincubated, or "recovered," and then added to cell aggregates, collection occurred at a linear rate and was independent of protein and glycoprotein synthesis. The adhesion of recovered cells was temperature and energy dependent, and was reversibly inhibited by cytochalasin B. Colchicine had little effect on collection of recovered cells. Antiserum directed against recovered cell membranes was shown to bind to recovered cells by indirect immunofluorescence. The antiserum also was shown to inhibit collection of recovered cells to aggregates, suggesting that at least some of the antigens identified might be involved in the adhesion process. The inhibitory effect of the antiserum was dose dependent . Freshly trypsinized cells absorbed neither the immunofluorescence activity nor the adhesion-inhibiting activity. Recovered cells absorbed away both activities. In specificity studies, dorsal neural retina cells adhered to aggregates of ventral optic tectum in preference to aggregates of dorsal optic tectum. The adhesive specificity of the dorsal retina cells was less sensitive to trypsin than the adhesive specificity of ventral retina cells which adhered preferentially to dorsal tectal aggregates only after a period of recovery. PMID:562349

  6. Native aggregation as a cause of origin of temporary cellular structures needed for all forms of cellular activity, signaling and transformations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    According to the hypothesis explored in this paper, native aggregation is genetically controlled (programmed) reversible aggregation that occurs when interacting proteins form new temporary structures through highly specific interactions. It is assumed that Anfinsen's dogma may be extended to protein aggregation: composition and amino acid sequence determine not only the secondary and tertiary structure of single protein, but also the structure of protein aggregates (associates). Cell function is considered as a transition between two states (two states model), the resting state and state of activity (this applies to the cell as a whole and to its individual structures). In the resting state, the key proteins are found in the following inactive forms: natively unfolded and globular. When the cell is activated, secondary structures appear in natively unfolded proteins (including unfolded regions in other proteins), and globular proteins begin to melt and their secondary structures become available for interaction with the secondary structures of other proteins. These temporary secondary structures provide a means for highly specific interactions between proteins. As a result, native aggregation creates temporary structures necessary for cell activity. "One of the principal objects of theoretical research in any department of knowledge is to find the point of view from which the subject appears in its greatest simplicity." Josiah Willard Gibbs (1839-1903) PMID:20534114

  7. U.S. Geological Survey activities related to American Indians and Alaska Natives-Fiscal years 2007 and 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcus, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1800s, John Wesley Powell, the second director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), followed his interest in the tribes of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau and studied their cultures, languages, and surroundings. From that early time, the USGS has recognized the importance of Native knowledge and living in harmony with nature as complements to the USGS mission to better understand the Earth. Combining traditional ecological knowledge with empirical studies allows the USGS and Native American governments, organizations, and people to increase their mutual understanding and respect for this land. The USGS is the earth and natural science bureau within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) and is not responsible for regulations or land management. Climate change is a major current issue affecting Native lives and traditions throughout the United States. Climate projections for the coming century indicate an increasing probability for more frequent and more severe droughts in the Southwest, including the Navajo Nation. Erosion has claimed Native homes in Alaska. Fish have become inedible due to diseases that turn their flesh mushy. Native people who rely on or who are culturally sustained by hunting, fishing, and using local plants are living with climate change now. The traditional knowledge of Native peoples enriches and confirms the work of USGS scientists. The results are truly synergistic-greater than the sum of their parts. Traditional ecological knowledge is respected and increasingly used in USGS studies-when the holders of that knowledge choose to share it. The USGS respects the rights of Native people to maintain their patrimony of traditional ecological knowledge. The USGS studies can help Tribes, Native organizations, and natural resource professionals manage Native lands and resources with the best available unbiased data and information that can be added to their traditional knowledge. Wise Native leaders have noted that traditional

  8. Comparative resistance and resilience of soil microbial communities and enzyme activities in adjacent native forest and agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Chaer, Guilherme; Fernandes, Marcelo; Myrold, David; Bottomley, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Degradation of soil properties following deforestation and long-term soil cultivation may lead to decreases in soil microbial diversity and functional stability. In this study, we investigated the differences in the stability (resistance and resilience) of microbial community composition and enzyme activities in adjacent soils under either native tropical forest (FST) or in agricultural cropping use for 14 years (AGR). Mineral soil samples (0 to 5 cm) from both areas were incubated at 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C, 60 degrees C, or 70 degrees C for 15 min in order to successively reduce the microbial biomass. Three and 30 days after the heat shocks, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis, cellulase and laccase activities, and phospholipid-derived fatty acids-based microbial community composition were measured. Microbial biomass was reduced up to 25% in both soils 3 days after the heat shocks. The higher initial values of microbial biomass, enzyme activity, total and particulate soil organic carbon, and aggregate stability in the FST soil coincided with higher enzymatic stability after heat shocks. FDA hydrolysis activity was less affected (more resistance) and cellulase and laccase activities recovered more rapidly (more resilience) in the FST soil relative to the AGR counterpart. In the AGR soil, laccase activity did not show resilience to any heat shock level up to 30 days after the disturbance. Within each soil type, the microbial community composition did not differ between heat shock and control samples at day 3. However, at day 30, FST soil samples treated at 60 degrees C and 70 degrees C contained a microbial community significantly different from the control and with lower biomass regardless of high enzyme resilience. Results of this study show that deforestation followed by long-term cultivation changed microbial community composition and had differential effects on microbial functional stability. Both soils displayed similar resilience to FDA hydrolysis, a

  9. Comparative resistance and resilience of soil microbial communities and enzyme activities in adjacent native forest and agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Chaer, Guilherme; Fernandes, Marcelo; Myrold, David; Bottomley, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Degradation of soil properties following deforestation and long-term soil cultivation may lead to decreases in soil microbial diversity and functional stability. In this study, we investigated the differences in the stability (resistance and resilience) of microbial community composition and enzyme activities in adjacent soils under either native tropical forest (FST) or in agricultural cropping use for 14 years (AGR). Mineral soil samples (0 to 5 cm) from both areas were incubated at 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C, 60 degrees C, or 70 degrees C for 15 min in order to successively reduce the microbial biomass. Three and 30 days after the heat shocks, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis, cellulase and laccase activities, and phospholipid-derived fatty acids-based microbial community composition were measured. Microbial biomass was reduced up to 25% in both soils 3 days after the heat shocks. The higher initial values of microbial biomass, enzyme activity, total and particulate soil organic carbon, and aggregate stability in the FST soil coincided with higher enzymatic stability after heat shocks. FDA hydrolysis activity was less affected (more resistance) and cellulase and laccase activities recovered more rapidly (more resilience) in the FST soil relative to the AGR counterpart. In the AGR soil, laccase activity did not show resilience to any heat shock level up to 30 days after the disturbance. Within each soil type, the microbial community composition did not differ between heat shock and control samples at day 3. However, at day 30, FST soil samples treated at 60 degrees C and 70 degrees C contained a microbial community significantly different from the control and with lower biomass regardless of high enzyme resilience. Results of this study show that deforestation followed by long-term cultivation changed microbial community composition and had differential effects on microbial functional stability. Both soils displayed similar resilience to FDA hydrolysis, a

  10. Estimating cotinine associations and a saliva cotinine level to identify active cigarette smoking in alaska native pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julia J; Robinson, Renee F; Khan, Burhan A; Sosnoff, Connie S; Dillard, Denise A

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate nicotine metabolism varies by race and can change during pregnancy. Given high rates of tobacco use and limited studies among Alaska Native (AN) women, we estimated associations of saliva cotinine levels with cigarette use and second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure and estimated a saliva cotinine cutoff to distinguish smoking from non-smoking pregnant AN women. Using questionnaire data and saliva cotinine, we utilized multi-variable linear regression (n = 370) to estimate cotinine associations with tobacco use, SHS exposure, demographic, and pregnancy-related factors. Additionally, we estimated an optimal saliva cotinine cutoff for indication of active cigarette use in AN pregnant women using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis (n = 377). Saliva cotinine significantly decreased with maternal age and significantly increased with cigarettes smoked per day, SHS exposure, and number of previous full term pregnancies. Using self-reported cigarette use in the past 7 days as indication of active smoking, the area under the ROC curve was 0.975 (95 % CI: 0.960-0.990). The point closest to 100 % specificity and sensitivity occurred with a cotinine concentration of 1.07 ng/mL, which corresponded to sensitivity of 94 % and specificity of 94 %. We recommend using a saliva cotinine cutoff of 1 ng/mL to distinguish active smoking in pregnant AN women. This cutoff is lower than used in other studies with pregnant women, most likely due to high prevalence of light or intermittent smoking in the AN population. Continued study of cotinine levels in diverse populations is needed.

  11. Estimating cotinine associations and a saliva cotinine level to identify active cigarette smoking in alaska native pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julia J; Robinson, Renee F; Khan, Burhan A; Sosnoff, Connie S; Dillard, Denise A

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate nicotine metabolism varies by race and can change during pregnancy. Given high rates of tobacco use and limited studies among Alaska Native (AN) women, we estimated associations of saliva cotinine levels with cigarette use and second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure and estimated a saliva cotinine cutoff to distinguish smoking from non-smoking pregnant AN women. Using questionnaire data and saliva cotinine, we utilized multi-variable linear regression (n = 370) to estimate cotinine associations with tobacco use, SHS exposure, demographic, and pregnancy-related factors. Additionally, we estimated an optimal saliva cotinine cutoff for indication of active cigarette use in AN pregnant women using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis (n = 377). Saliva cotinine significantly decreased with maternal age and significantly increased with cigarettes smoked per day, SHS exposure, and number of previous full term pregnancies. Using self-reported cigarette use in the past 7 days as indication of active smoking, the area under the ROC curve was 0.975 (95 % CI: 0.960-0.990). The point closest to 100 % specificity and sensitivity occurred with a cotinine concentration of 1.07 ng/mL, which corresponded to sensitivity of 94 % and specificity of 94 %. We recommend using a saliva cotinine cutoff of 1 ng/mL to distinguish active smoking in pregnant AN women. This cutoff is lower than used in other studies with pregnant women, most likely due to high prevalence of light or intermittent smoking in the AN population. Continued study of cotinine levels in diverse populations is needed. PMID:23423858

  12. Native Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seven, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Amid concerns from tribal leaders that No Child Left Behind testing is squeezing out electives that have traditionally covered their history and cultures, an ambitious brace of programs is making Native America part of the core curriculum at David Wolfle Elementary School and other schools in the western Washington State. By tapping into…

  13. Tannins, trypsin inhibitors and lectin cytotoxicity in tepary (Phaseolus acutifolius) and common (Phaseolus vulgaris) beans.

    PubMed

    De Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez; Del Carmen Valadez-Vega, Maria; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Loarca-Pina, Guadalupe

    2005-09-01

    This study compared the levels of antinutritional components and cytotoxic effect of extracts, from tepary (Phaseolus acutifolius) and common (Phaseolus vulgaris) beans. Antinutritional factors were evaluated by determining their effect on the viability of epithelial cells isolated from rat small intestine. The protein and carbohydrates content were similar in all the genotypes studied (20 and 60%, respectively). Common beans presented higher content of trypsin inhibitors, tannins and lectins than tepary beans. There was not a significant correlation between tannins and cooking time. However, water absorption and cooking time correlated significantly (p < 0.05). Considerable variation was observed in lectin activity (1302-18161 Ul/mg) of extracts from different beans. Tannins, lectins, trypsin inhibitors and fat content differed between bean varieties whereas protein content was similar. The percent cellularity on rat epithelial cells was significantly different among protein extracts from different bean cultivars and ranged between 53.5% and 87.4% (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the incorporation of tepary beans in the diet would not alter the current nutritional contribution of common beans or introduce adverse toxic effects. The agronomic characteristics of tepary beans make them attractive for cultivation. However, the harder to cook phenomenon may be a limiting factor that needs further consideration. PMID:16187017

  14. Expression of Aedes trypsin-modulating oostatic factor on the virion of TMV: A potential larvicide.

    PubMed

    Borovsky, Dov; Rabindran, Shailaja; Dawson, William O; Powell, Charles A; Iannotti, Donna A; Morris, Timothy J; Shabanowitz, Jeffry; Hunt, Donald F; DeBondt, Hendrik L; DeLoof, Arnold

    2006-12-12

    We report the engineering of the surface of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) virion with a mosquito decapeptide hormone, trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). The TMV coat protein (CP) was fused to TMOF at the C terminus by using a read-through, leaky stop codon that facilitated expression of CP and chimeric CP-TMOF (20:1 ratio) that were coassembled into virus particles in infected Nicotiana tabacum. Plants that were infected with the hybrid TMV RNA accumulated TMOF to levels of 1.3% of total soluble protein. Infected tobacco leaf discs that were fed to Heliothis virescens fourth-instar larvae stunted their growth and inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin activity in their midgut. Purified CP-TMOF virions fed to mosquito larvae stopped larval growth and caused death. Because TMV has a wide host range, expressing TMV-TMOF in plants can be used as a general method to protect them against agricultural insect pests and to control vector mosquitoes.

  15. A trypsin-sensitive receptor on membrane vesicles is required for nuclear envelope formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The reformation of functioning organelles at the end of mitosis presents a problem in vesicle targeting. Using extracts made from Xenopus laevis frog eggs, we have studied in vitro the vesicles that reform the nuclear envelope. In the in vitro assay, nuclear envelope growth is linear with time. Furthermore, the final surface area of the nuclear envelopes formed is directly dependent upon the amount of membrane vesicles added to the assay. Egg membrane vesicles could be fractionated into two populations, only one of which was competent for nuclear envelope assembly. We found that vesicles active in nuclear envelope assembly contained markers (BiP and alpha-glucosidase II) characteristic of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but that the majority of ER-derived vesicles do not contribute to nuclear envelope size. This functional distinction between nuclear vesicles and ER-derived vesicles implies that nuclear vesicles are unique and possess at least one factor required for envelope assembly that is lacking in other vesicles. Consistent with this, treatment of vesicles with trypsin destroyed their ability to form a nuclear envelope; electron microscopic studies indicate that the trypsin-sensitive proteins is required for vesicles to bind to chromatin. However, the protease- sensitive component(s) is resistant to treatments that disrupt protein- protein interactions, such as high salt, EDTA, or low ionic strength solutions. We propose that an integral membrane protein, or protein tightly associated with the membrane, is critical for nuclear vesicle targeting or function. PMID:3392106

  16. Immobilization of trypsin via graphene oxide-silica composite for efficient microchip proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2013-10-01

    In this report, trypsin was covalently immobilized in the graphene oxide (GO)-silica composite coating on the channel wall of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchips to fabricate microfluidic bioreactors for highly efficient proteolysis. A mixture solution containing GO nanosheets and silica gel was injected into the channels to form coating. 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide were used as carboxyl activating agents to crosslink the primary amino groups of trypsin to the carboxyl groups of the entrapped GO sheets in the composite to realize covalent immobilization. The feasibility and performance of the novel GO-based microfluidic bioreactors were demonstrated by the digestion of hemoglobin (HEM), cytochrome c (Cyt-c), myoglobin (MYO), and ovalbumin (OVA) and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5s. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS with the sequence coverages of 95%, 76%, 69%, and 55% for HEM, Cyt-c, MYO, and OVA, respectively. The suitability of the prepared bioreactors to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum.

  17. Laue diffraction as a tool in dynamic studies: Hydrolysis of a transiently stable intermediate in catalysis by trypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, P.T.; Berman, L.E.; Cai, Z.; Mangel, W.F.; Jones, K.W.; Sweet, R.M. ); Carty, R.P. . Dept. of Biochemistry); Schlichting, I. . Rosenstiel Basic Medical Science Center); Stock, A. (Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Piscataway, NJ (Un

    1992-01-01

    A transiently stable intermediate in trypsin catalysis, guanidinobenzyol-Ser-195 trypsin, can be trapped and then released by control of the pH in crystals of the enzyme. This effect has been investigated by static and dynamic white-beam Laue crystallography. Comparison of structures determined before and immediately after a pH jump reveals the nature of concerted changes that accompany activation of the enzyme. Careful analysis of the results of several structure determinations gives information about the reliability of Laue results in general. A study of multiple exposures taken under differing conditions of beam intensity, crystal quality, and temperature revealed information about ways to control damage of specimens by the x-ray beam.

  18. Laue diffraction as a tool in dynamic studies: Hydrolysis of a transiently stable intermediate in catalysis by trypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, P.T.; Berman, L.E.; Cai, Z.; Mangel, W.F.; Jones, K.W.; Sweet, R.M.; Carty, R.P.; Schlichting, I.; Stock, A.; Smalas, A.

    1992-11-01

    A transiently stable intermediate in trypsin catalysis, guanidinobenzyol-Ser-195 trypsin, can be trapped and then released by control of the pH in crystals of the enzyme. This effect has been investigated by static and dynamic white-beam Laue crystallography. Comparison of structures determined before and immediately after a pH jump reveals the nature of concerted changes that accompany activation of the enzyme. Careful analysis of the results of several structure determinations gives information about the reliability of Laue results in general. A study of multiple exposures taken under differing conditions of beam intensity, crystal quality, and temperature revealed information about ways to control damage of specimens by the x-ray beam.

  19. Phytochemical composition and metabolic performance-enhancing activity of dietary berries traditionally used by Native North Americans.

    PubMed

    Burns Kraft, Tristan F; Dey, Moul; Rogers, Randy B; Ribnicky, David M; Gipp, David M; Cefalu, William T; Raskin, Ilya; Lila, Mary Ann

    2008-02-13

    Four wild berry species, Amelanchier alnifolia, Viburnum trilobum, Prunus virginiana, and Shepherdia argentea, all integral to the traditional subsistence diet of Native American tribal communities, were evaluated to elucidate phytochemical composition and bioactive properties related to performance and human health. Biological activity was screened using a range of bioassays that assessed the potential for these little-known dietary berries to affect diabetic microvascular complications, hyperglycemia, pro-inflammatory gene expression, and metabolic syndrome symptoms. Nonpolar constituents from berries, including carotenoids, were potent inhibitors of aldose reductase (an enzyme involved in the etiology of diabetic microvascular complications), whereas the polar constituents, mainly phenolic acids, anthocyanins, and proanthocyanidins, were hypoglycemic agents and strong inhibitors of IL-1beta and COX-2 gene expression. Berry samples also showed the ability to modulate lipid metabolism and energy expenditure in a manner consistent with improving metabolic syndrome. The results demonstrate that these berries traditionally consumed by tribal cultures contain a rich array of phytochemicals that have the capacity to promote health and protect against chronic diseases, such as diabetes. PMID:18211018

  20. Chip electrophoresis of active banana ingredients with label-free detection utilizing deep UV native fluorescence and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohla, Stefan; Schulze, Philipp; Fritzsche, Stefanie; Belder, Detlev

    2011-02-01

    In the present work, we report on a rapid and straightforward approach for the determination of biologically active compounds in bananas applying microchip electrophoresis (MCE). For this purpose, we applied label-free detection utilizing deep UV fluorescence detection with excitation at 266 nm. Using this approach, we could identify dopamine and serotonin, their precursors tryptophan and tyrosine and also the isoquinoline alkaloid salsolinol in less than 1 min. In bananas, after 10 days of ripening, we additionally found the compound levodopa which is a metabolite of the tyrosine pathway. Quantitative analysis of extracts by external calibration revealed concentrations of serotonin, tryptophan, and tyrosine from 2.7 to 7.6 μg/mL with relative standard deviations of less than 3.5%. The corresponding calibration plots showed good linearity with correlation coefficients higher than 0.985. For reliable peak assignment, the compounds were also analyzed by coupling chip electrophoresis with mass spectrometry. This paper demonstrates exemplarily the applicability of MCE with native fluorescence detection for rapid analysis of natural compounds in fruits and reveals the potential of chip-based separation systems for the analysis of complex mixtures. PMID:21181134

  1. Proinflammatory genes expression in granulocytes activated by native proteinase-binding fragments of anti-proteinase 3 IgG.

    PubMed

    Surmiak, M; Kaczor, M; Sanak, M

    2015-08-01

    The classical pathway of neutrophils activation due to cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA) involves specific antigen binding to proteinase-3 and activation of the immunoglobulin G receptors by the constant fragment of the antibody. A requirement for this double signaling was suggested also because proteinase-3 is presented within a complex of NB-1 glycoprotein lacking transmembrane domain. An integrin Mac-1 receptor was postulated to cooperate in neutrophil stimulation by anti-proteinase 3 (anti-PR3). A characteristic profile of transcriptional activation of neutrophils by c-ANCA was described by us previously. We ascertained mRNA expression of neutrophils following stimulation with antigen-binding fragments of native anti-PR3 IgG. Expression of targeted transcripts was compared with our previous results, in which intact anti-PR3 IgG was used. Human neutrophils were isolated from healthy volunteers negative for ANCAs. Antigen-binding fragments of human anti-PR3 were prepared from sera of patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis. We analyzed reactive oxygen species production and abundance of mRNA of 151 genes by quantitative real time-PCR in neutrophils stimulated with anti-PR3 IgG F(ab)(2). We observed a consistent upregulation of 17 genes (CYSLTR1, HPGD, IL1R1, IL1RL1, MAPK1, MAPK8, NR3C1, PLA2G7, PTGDR, CD302, DNAJB1, F2R, F2RL1, IER3, RAC1, RPL41, PTGER3), whereas other 9 genes were up-regulated only in some donors. No reactive oxygen species production was observed in neutrophils stimulated with anti-PR3 F(ab)(2). Stimulation of neutrophils with F(ab)(2) of anti-PR3 autoantibodies activated cells to a lesser extent than intact IgG. However, several cellular pathways were up-regulated, involving calcium and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase AKT, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Interestingly, binding of F(ab)(2) to the PR-3 present on the surface of neutrophil is sufficient for lipid

  2. An anomalous behavior of trypsin immobilized in alginate network.

    PubMed

    Ganachaud, Chrystelle; Bernin, Diana; Isaksson, Dan; Holmberg, Krister

    2013-05-01

    Alginate is a biopolymer used in drug formulations and for surgical purposes. In the presence of divalent cations, it forms solid gels, and such gels are of interest for immobilization of cells and enzymes. In this work, we entrapped trypsin in an alginate gel together with a known substrate, N α-benzoyl-L-arginine-4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (L-BAPNA), and in the presence or absence of D-BAPNA, which is known to be a competitive inhibitor. Interactions between alginate and the substrate as well as the enzyme were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, rheology, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biocatalysis was monitored by spectrophotometry at temperatures ranging from 10 to 42 °C. It was found that at 37 and 42 °C a strong acceleration of the reaction was obtained, whereas at 10 °C and at room temperature, the presence of D-BAPNA leads to a retardation of the reaction rate. The same effect was found when the reaction was performed in a non-cross-linked alginate solution. In alginate-free buffer solution, as well as in a solution of carboxymethylcellulose, a biopolymer that resembles alginate, the normal behavior was obtained; however, with D-BAPNA acting as an inhibitor at all temperatures. A more detailed investigation of the reaction kinetics showed that at higher temperature and in the presence of alginate, the curve of initial reaction rate versus L-BAPNA concentration had a sigmoidal shape, indicating an allosteric behavior. We believe that the anomalous behavior of trypsin in the presence of alginate is due to conformational changes caused by interactions between the positively charged trypsin and the strongly negatively charged alginate.

  3. Development of Trypsin-Like Serine Protease Inhibitors as Therapeutic Agents: Opportunities, Challenges, and their Unique Structure-Based Rationales.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guyan; Bowen, J Phillip

    2016-01-01

    There has been a revolution in the development of effective, small-molecule anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents. Numerous trypsin-like serine proteases have been under active pursuit as therapeutic targets. Important examples include thrombin, factor VIIa, factor Xa, and β-tryptase with indications ranging from thrombosis and inflammation to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Trypsin-like serine proteases exhibit a highly similar tertiary folding pattern, especially for the region near the substrate binding pocket that includes the conserved catalytic triad consisting of histidine 57, aspartic acid 102, and serine 195. A rich collection of X-ray structures for many trypsin-like serine proteases is available, which greatly facilitated the optimization of small organic inhibitors as therapeutic agents. The present review surveyed those inhibitors disclosed in peer-reviewed scientific journals and patent publications with a special focus on structural features and protein-inhibitor interactions that implicated the inhibitor optimization process. The role played by the residue 190 of trypsin-like serine proteases is critical. While many inhibitors without a basic group have progressed into the clinic for ones with alanine 190, the task for those with serine 190 remains extremely challenging, if not impossible. In addition to warfarin, heparin, and low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs), treatment options have expanded with the development and approval of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs). The NOACs are superior to vitamin K antagonists in terms of rapid onset, pharmacokinetics, drug/food interactions, and regular coagulation monitoring; but one serious drawback is the lack of an effective antidote at this time. Apixaban (Eliquis), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and edoxaban (Savaysa) are the new Xa inhibitors that have been recently approved by the U.S. FDA and are in current clinical practice. These drugs bind to the active site of factor Xa (f

  4. Demonstration that 1-trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane (E-64) is one of the most effective low Mr inhibitors of trypsin-catalysed hydrolysis. Characterization by kinetic analysis and by energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulation of the E-64-beta-trypsin complex.

    PubMed Central

    Sreedharan, S K; Verma, C; Caves, L S; Brocklehurst, S M; Gharbia, S E; Shah, H N; Brocklehurst, K

    1996-01-01

    1-trans-Epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) was shown to inhibit beta-trypsin by a reversible competitive mechanism; this contrasts with the widely held view that E-64 is a class-specific inhibitor of the cysteine proteinases and reports in the literature that it does not inhibit a number of other enzymes including, notably, trypsin. The K1, value (3 x 10(-5) M) determined by kinetic analysis of the hydrolysis of N alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine 4-nitroanilide in Tris/HCl buffer, pH 7.4, at 25 degrees C, I = 0.1, catalysed by beta-trypsin is comparable with those for the inhibition of trypsin by benzamidine and 4-aminobenzamidine, which are widely regarded as the most effective low Mr inhibitors of this enzyme. Computer modelling of the beta-trypsin-E64 adsorptive complex, by energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulation and Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic-potential calculations, was used to define the probable binding mode of E-64; the ligand lies parallel to the active-centre cleft, anchored principally by the dominant electrostatic interaction of the guanidinium cation at one end of the E-64 molecule with the carboxylate anion of Asp-171 (beta-trypsin numbering from Ile-1) in the S1-subsite, and by the interaction of the carboxylate substituent on C-2 of the epoxide ring at the other end of the molecule with Lys-43; the epoxide ring of E-64 is remote from the catalytic site serine hydroxy group. The possibility that E-64 might bind to the cysteine proteinases clostripain (from Clostridium histolyticum) and alpha-gingivain (one of the extracellular enzymes from phyromonas gingivalis) in a manner analogous to that deduced for the beta-trypsin-E-64 complex is discussed. PMID:8670152

  5. Demonstration that 1-trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane (E-64) is one of the most effective low Mr inhibitors of trypsin-catalysed hydrolysis. Characterization by kinetic analysis and by energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulation of the E-64-beta-trypsin complex.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, S K; Verma, C; Caves, L S; Brocklehurst, S M; Gharbia, S E; Shah, H N; Brocklehurst, K

    1996-06-15

    1-trans-Epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) was shown to inhibit beta-trypsin by a reversible competitive mechanism; this contrasts with the widely held view that E-64 is a class-specific inhibitor of the cysteine proteinases and reports in the literature that it does not inhibit a number of other enzymes including, notably, trypsin. The K1, value (3 x 10(-5) M) determined by kinetic analysis of the hydrolysis of N alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine 4-nitroanilide in Tris/HCl buffer, pH 7.4, at 25 degrees C, I = 0.1, catalysed by beta-trypsin is comparable with those for the inhibition of trypsin by benzamidine and 4-aminobenzamidine, which are widely regarded as the most effective low Mr inhibitors of this enzyme. Computer modelling of the beta-trypsin-E64 adsorptive complex, by energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulation and Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic-potential calculations, was used to define the probable binding mode of E-64; the ligand lies parallel to the active-centre cleft, anchored principally by the dominant electrostatic interaction of the guanidinium cation at one end of the E-64 molecule with the carboxylate anion of Asp-171 (beta-trypsin numbering from Ile-1) in the S1-subsite, and by the interaction of the carboxylate substituent on C-2 of the epoxide ring at the other end of the molecule with Lys-43; the epoxide ring of E-64 is remote from the catalytic site serine hydroxy group. The possibility that E-64 might bind to the cysteine proteinases clostripain (from Clostridium histolyticum) and alpha-gingivain (one of the extracellular enzymes from phyromonas gingivalis) in a manner analogous to that deduced for the beta-trypsin-E-64 complex is discussed. PMID:8670152

  6. The chemical properties and functional role of a lysine residue within the active site of native sodium and potassium ion-activated adenosinetriphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, K.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The peptide, HLLVMKGAPER, which contains Lysine 501 of the {alpha} polypeptide can be released from intact sodium and potassium ion activated adenosinetriphosphatase by tryptic digestion. An immunoadsorbent directed against the carboxy-terminal, -GAPER, has been constructed. Sealed, right-side-out vesicles, prepared from canine renal kidneys, were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)borohydride in the absence or presence of saponin, respectively. Large increases in the incorporation of radioactivity into the peptides bound by the immunoadsorbent were observed in the digest obtained from the vesicles exposed to saponin. From the results of several control experiments examining the labeling reaction it could be concluded that the increase in the extent of modification was due to the cytoplasmic disposition of this segment in the native enzyme.

  7. Native Plants, Native Knowledge: Insights from Judy Bluehorse Skelton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Bracken

    2003-01-01

    Judy Bluehorse Skelton is an herbalist of Native American descent who conducts field trips to identify plants and classroom activities to demonstrate their uses. She also works with Portland (Oregon) schools developing culturally appropriate strategies for presenting Native American content. She encourages students to look at events such as the…

  8. Concentrations of trypsin inhibitor and immunoglobulins in colostrum of Jersey cows.

    PubMed

    Quigley, J D; Martin, K R; Dowlen, H H

    1995-07-01

    Colostrum samples from 49 Jersey cows were analyzed for concentrations of trypsin inhibitor, IgG, IgM, IgA, TS, fat, specific gravity, and N fractions. Colostrum (100 ml) was sampled from each cow as soon as possible after parturition. Mean concentrations of IgG, IgM, and IgA were 84.6, 3.4, and 4.5 g/L, respectively. Mean concentration of trypsin inhibitor was 56 mg of trypsin inhibited/dl of colostrum. Concentration of trypsin inhibitor was unaffected by lactation number and averaged 60, 53, and 54 mg of trypsin inhibited/dl of colostrum for cows in first, second, and third or later lactations, respectively. Colostral trypsin inhibitor and IgG were correlated (.54), although correlations between trypsin inhibitor and IgM and IgA were not significant. Trypsin inhibitor in colostrum was also positively correlated with fat, total N, protein N, noncasein N, and TS in colostrum. Variation in concentration of trypsin inhibitor from first-milking colostrum was closely related to colostral IgG concentration and may serve to protect IgG and other proteins from proteolytic degradation in the intestine of the neonatal calf.

  9. Probing the binding of trypsin to glutathione-stabilized gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gongke; Liu, Xingbing; Yan, Changling; Bai, Guangyue; Lu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the interaction of trypsin with glutathione-stabilized Au nanoparticles (NPs) using fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy. We find that trypsin binds strongly to the Au NPs with a static quenching mechanism, and that the interaction is characteristic of positive cooperative binding. Furthermore, we determine the binding constants and the thermodynamic parameters, which suggest that the main binding forces between the glutathione-stabilized Au NPs and trypsin are electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding. Analysis of UV-vis absorption spectra suggests that aggregation of the Au NPs occurs in the trypsin/Au NPs system, which significantly alters the conformation of the protein.

  10. Thromboplastin immobilized on polystyrene surface exhibits kinetic characteristics close to those for the native protein and activates in vitro blood coagulation similarly to thromboplastin on fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fadeeva, O A; Panteleev, M A; Karamzin, S S; Balandina, A N; Smirnov, I V; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2010-06-01

    A method for transmembrane protein thromboplastin (tissue factor) immobilization on polystyrene surface is described. Tissue factor is the main activating factor launching the blood coagulation process. It is a cofactor of factor VIIa, the first protease in the cascade of coagulation reactions. The proposed method preserves kinetic characteristics specific for native tissue factor on the fibroblast surface. The kinetics of binding to factor VIIa and enzymic activity of the formed complex follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, which is also characteristic of native complex. A small difference is that dissociation constant for tissue factor immobilized on polystyrene surface exceeds 2.7-fold that for native factor. The proposed technique of immobilization provides for protein density on the activating surface corresponding to the tissue factor density on the fibroblast surface. The immobilized tissue factor can be used to activate blood coagulation in methods simulating spatial dynamics of in vitro clot growth. Investigation in this direction will make it possible to register both hypo- and hypercoagulation states of the system. This approach is advantageous over traditional methods of estimation of the coagulation system conditions, which mainly register only hypocoagulation. Investigation of the storage time has shown that activators containing immobilized tissue factor can be stored and used during for at least 100 days in the method studying spatial dynamics of fibrin clot formation.

  11. Nonlocal interactions stabilize compact folding intermediates in reduced unfolded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, D S; Haas, E

    1992-12-15

    To further our understanding of the protein folding process, it is desirable to examine the structural intermediates (equilibrium and kinetic) that are populated between the statistical coil state and the folded molecule. X-ray crystallography and NMR structural studies are unable to determine long-range distances in proteins under denaturing solution conditions. Nonradiative (Förster) energy transfer, however, has been shown to be a spectroscopic ruler for the measurement of distance distributions and diffusion between selected sites in proteins under a range of different solution conditions. The distributions of distances between a donor probe at the N-terminal residue and an acceptor attached to one of the four lysine residues (15, 26, 41, 46) of reduced and unfolded (in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride and 20 mM dithiothreitol) bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) were measured as a function of temperature. Even in strong denaturant and reducing agent, BPTI does not exist as a statistical coil polypeptide. It appears that nonlocal (long-range) interactions are already beginning to "fold" the protein toward a more compact, native conformation. As the temperature is increased under these conditions, hydrophobic interactions lead to an even more compact structure consistent with the predictions of phase diagrams for globular proteins. PMID:1281424

  12. Native Electrophoresis-Coupled Activity Assays Reveal Catalytically-Active Protein Aggregates of Escherichia coli β-Glucuronidase

    PubMed Central

    Burchett, Gina G.; Folsom, Charles G.; Lane, Kimberly T.

    2015-01-01

    β-glucuronidase is found as a functional homotetramer in a variety of organisms, including humans and other animals, as well as a number of bacteria. This enzyme is important in these organisms, catalyzing the hydrolytic removal of a glucuronide moiety from substrate molecules. This process serves to break down sugar conjugates in animals and provide sugars for metabolism in bacteria. While β-glucuronidase is primarily found as a homotetramer, previous studies have indicated that the human form of the protein is also catalytically active as a dimer. Here we present evidence for not only an active dimer of the E. coli form of the protein, but also for several larger active complexes, including an octomer and a 16-mer. Additionally, we propose a model for the structures of these large complexes, based on computationally-derived molecular modeling studies. These structures may have application in the study of human disease, as several diseases have been associated with the aggregation of proteins. PMID:26121040

  13. Native Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benningfield, Damond

    2001-03-01

    People native to North America practiced their own version of astronomy. They tracked the motions of the Sun to help them decide when to plant crops, move their camps, and stage sacred rituals. Some tribes built great circles of stones to help them predict the changing seasons. Others built great mounds of earth to reflect the patterns they saw in the heavens and to align their ceremonial centers with the Sun and the Moon.

  14. Effect of cigarette smoke on human serum trypsin inhibitory capacity and antitrypsin concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, P.; Bone, R.C.; Louria, D.B.; Rayford, P.L.

    1982-07-01

    Investigation of the effect of cigarette smoke on the serum trypsin inhibitory capacity (TIC) and antitrypsin content in 89 smokers compared with 37 nonsmokers revealed that cigarette smoking is associated with a significantly lower level of TIC. No alteration in serum antitrypsin content was found because of cigarette smoking. Further analysis of the data indicated a correlation between the magnitude of smoking and the reduction in serum TIC. The reduction of TIC in cigarette smokers is consistent with the recent findings of decreased alpha 1-antitrypsin activity in rat lung and the reduced elastase inhibitory capacity per mg of alpha 1-antitrypsin found in the serum of smokers. The decrease in TIC in the serum of smokers, in addition to the reported decrease in elastolytic activity, may be useful in explaining the pathogenesis of emphysema frequently found in smokers.

  15. In-house phase determination of the lima bean trypsin inhibitor: a low-resolution sulfur-SAD case.

    PubMed

    Debreczeni, Judit E; Bunkóczi, Gábor; Girmann, Beatrix; Sheldrick, George M

    2003-02-01

    SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) has enormous potential for phasing proteins using only the anomalous signal of the almost ubiquitous native sulfur, but requires extremely precise data. The previously unknown structure of the lima bean trypsin inhibitor (LBTI) was solved using highly redundant data collected to 3 A using a CCD detector with a rotating-anode generator and three-circle goniometer. The seven 'super-S' atoms (disulfide bridges) were located by dual-space recycling with SHELXD and the high solvent content enabled the density-modification program SHELXE to generate high-quality maps despite the modest resolution. Subsequently, a 2.05 A synchrotron data set was collected and used for further phase extension and structure refinement.

  16. Effects of Concentration and Reaction Time of Trypsin, Pepsin, and Chymotrypsin on the Hydrolysis Efficiency of Porcine Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Hun; Choi, Ye-Chul; Chun, Ji-Yeon; Min, Sang-Gi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of three proteases (trypsin, pepsin and chymotrypsin) on the hydrolysis efficiency of porcine placenta and the molecular weight (Mw) distributions of the placental hydrolysates. Because placenta was made up of insoluble collagen, the placenta was gelatinized by applying thermal treatment at 90 ℃ for 1 h and used as the sample. The placental hydrolyzing activities of the enzymes at varying concentrations and incubation times were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Based on the SDS-PAGE, the best placental hydrolysis efficiency was observed in trypsin treatments where all peptide bands disappeared after 1 h of incubation as compared to 6 h of chymotrypsin. Pepsin hardly hydrolyzed the placenta as compared to the other two enzymes. The Mw distribution revealed that the trypsin produced placental peptides with Mw of 106 and 500 Da. Peptides produced by chymotrypsin exhibited broad ranges of Mw distribution (1-20 kDa), while the pepsin treatment showed Mw greater than 7 kDa. For comparisons of pre-treatments, the subcritical water processing (37.5 MPa and 200 ℃ of raw placenta improved the efficiency of tryptic digestions to a greater level than that of a preheating treatment (90 ℃ for 1 h). Consequently, subcritical water processing followed by enzymatic digestions has the potential of an advanced collagen hydrolysis technique. PMID:26760932

  17. The complete amino acid sequence of the major Kunitz trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of Prosopsis juliflora.

    PubMed

    Negreiros, A N; Carvalho, M M; Xavier Filho, J; Blanco-Labra, A; Shewry, P R; Richardson, M

    1991-01-01

    The major inhibitor of trypsin in seeds of Prosopsis juliflora was purified by precipitation with ammonium sulphate, ion-exchange column chromatography on DEAE- and CM-Sepharose and preparative reverse phase HPLC on a Vydac C-18 column. The protein inhibited trypsin in the stoichiometric ratio of 1:1, but had only weak activity against chymotrypsin and did not inhibit human salivary or porcine pancreatic alpha-amylases. SDS-PAGE indicated that the inhibitor has a Mr of ca 20,000, and IEF-PAGE showed that the pI is 8.8. The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automatic degradation, and by DABITC/PITC microsequence analysis of peptides obtained from enzyme digestions of the reduced and S-carboxymethylated protein with trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, the Glu-specific protease from S. aureus and the Lys-specific protease from Lysobacter enzymogenes. The inhibitor consisted of two polypeptide chains, of 137 residues (alpha chain) and 38 residues (beta chain) linked together by a single disulphide bond. The amino acid sequence of the protein exhibited homology with a number of Kunitz proteinase inhibitors from other legume seeds, the bifunctional subtilisin/alpha-amylase inhibitors from cereals and the taste-modifying protein miraculin. PMID:1367792

  18. Earth's Caretakers: Native American Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyberg, Lisa M., Ed.

    Written by Native American teachers and by teachers of Native Americans, this book presents examples of ways to learn respect for the Earth and its people. The hope is that students will learn to walk softly upon the Earth and to respect all living things. Lessons and activities engage elementary and middle school students in a four-step…

  19. Rescue of Murine F508del CFTR Activity in Native Intestine by Low Temperature and Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Martina; Bot, Alice; Jorna, Huub; Scholte, Bob J.; de Jonge, Hugo R.

    2012-01-01

    Most patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) carry at least one allele with the F508del mutation, resulting in a CFTR chloride channel protein with a processing, gating and stability defect, but with substantial residual activity when correctly sorted to the apical membranes of epithelial cells. New therapies are therefore aimed at improving the folding and trafficking of F508del CFTR, (CFTR correctors) or at enhancing the open probability of the CFTR chloride channel (CFTR potentiators). Preventing premature breakdown of F508del CFTR is an alternative or additional strategy, which is investigated in this study. We established an ex vivo assay for murine F508del CFTR rescue in native intestinal epithelium that can be used as a pre-clinical test for candidate therapeutics. Overnight incubation of muscle stripped ileum in modified William's E medium at low temperature (26°C), and 4 h or 6 h incubation at 37°C with different proteasome inhibitors (PI: ALLN, MG-132, epoxomicin, PS341/bortezomib) resulted in fifty to hundred percent respectively of the wild type CFTR mediated chloride secretion (forskolin induced short-circuit current). The functional rescue was accompanied by enhanced expression of the murine F508del CFTR protein at the apical surface of intestinal crypts and a gain in the amount of complex-glycosylated CFTR (band C) up to 20% of WT levels. Sustained rescue in the presence of brefeldin A shows the involvement of a post-Golgi compartment in murine F508del CFTR degradation, as was shown earlier for its human counterpart. Our data show that proteasome inhibitors are promising candidate compounds for improving rescue of human F508del CFTR function, in combination with available correctors and potentiators. PMID:23284872

  20. Native Prey and Invasive Predator Patterns of Foraging Activity: The Case of the Yellow-Legged Hornet Predation at European Honeybee Hives

    PubMed Central

    Monceau, Karine; Arca, Mariangela; Leprêtre, Lisa; Mougel, Florence; Bonnard, Olivier; Silvain, Jean-François; Maher, Nevile; Arnold, Gérard; Thiéry, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to native predators, which have co-evolved with their prey, alien predators often benefit from native prey naïveté. Vespa velutina, a honeybee predator originating from Eastern China, was introduced into France just before 2004. The present study, based on video recordings of two beehives at an early stage of the invasion process, intends to analyse the alien hornet hunting behaviour on the native prey, Apis mellifera, and to understand the interaction between the activity of the predator and the prey during the day and the season. Chasing hornets spent most of their time hovering facing the hive, to catch flying honeybees returning to the hive. The predation pressure increased during the season confirming previous study based on predator trapping. The number of honeybee captures showed a maximum peak for an intermediate number of V. velutina, unrelated to honeybee activity, suggesting the occurrence of competition between hornets. The number of honeybees caught increased during midday hours while the number of hornets did not vary, suggesting an increase in their efficacy. These results suggest that the impact of V. velutina on honeybees is limited by its own biology and behaviour and did not match the pattern of activity of its prey. Also, it could have been advantageous during the invasion, limiting resource depletion and thus favouring colonisation. This lack of synchronization may also be beneficial for honeybee colonies by giving them an opportunity to increase their activity when the hornets are less effective. PMID:23823754

  1. Crystallographic and kinetic evidence of allostery in a trypsin-like protease.

    PubMed

    Niu, Weiling; Chen, Zhiwei; Gandhi, Prafull S; Vogt, Austin D; Pozzi, Nicola; Pelc, Leslie A; Zapata, Fatima; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-07-26

    Protein allostery is based on the existence of multiple conformations in equilibrium linked to distinct functional properties. Although evidence of allosteric transitions is relatively easy to identify by functional studies, structural detection of a pre-existing equilibrium between alternative conformations remains challenging even for textbook examples of allosteric proteins. Kinetic studies show that the trypsin-like protease thrombin exists in equilibrium between two conformations where the active site is either collapsed (E*) or accessible to substrate (E). However, structural demonstration that the two conformations exist in the same enzyme construct free of ligands has remained elusive. Here we report the crystal structure of the thrombin mutant N143P in the E form, which complements the recently reported structure in the E* form, and both the E and E* forms of the thrombin mutant Y225P. The side chain of W215 moves 10.9 Å between the two forms, causing a displacement of 6.6 Å of the entire 215-217 segment into the active site that in turn opens or closes access to the primary specificity pocket. Rapid kinetic measurements of p-aminobenzamidine binding to the active site confirm the existence of the E*-E equilibrium in solution for wild-type and the mutants N143P and Y225P. These findings provide unequivocal proof of the allosteric nature of thrombin and lend strong support to the recent proposal that the E*-E equilibrium is a key property of the trypsin fold. PMID:21707111

  2. Production of barley endoprotease B2 in Pichia pastoris and its proteolytic activity against native and recombinant hordeins.

    PubMed

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine proteases are of fundamental biological importance during germination but may also have a large potential as commercial enzyme. Barley cysteine endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was expressed in Pichia pastoris from a pPICZαA based construct encoding a HvEPB2 C-terminal truncated version (HvEPB2ΔC) and a proteolytic resistant His6 tag. Maximum yield was obtained after 4 days of induction. Recombinant HvEPB2ΔC (r-HvEPB2ΔC) was purified using a single step of Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography. Purified protein was evaluated by SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and activity assays. A purification yield of 4.26 mg r-HvEPB2ΔC per L supernatant was obtained. r-HvEPB2ΔC follows first order kinetics (Km=12.37 μM) for the substrate Z-Phe-Arg-pNA and the activity was significantly inhibited by the cysteine protease specific inhibitors E64 and leupeptin. The temperature optimum for r-HvEPB2ΔC was 60°C, thermal stability T50 value was 44°C and the pH optimum was 4.5. r-HvEPB2ΔC was incubated with native purified barley seed storage proteins for up to 48 h. After 12h, r-HvEPB2ΔC efficiently reduced the C and D hordeins almost completely, as evaluated by SDS-PAGE. The intensities of the B and γ hordein bands decreased continuously over the 48 h. No degradation occurred in the presence of E64. Recombinant hordeins (B1, B3 and γ1) were expressed in Escherichia coli. After 2h of incubation with r-HvEPB2ΔC, an almost complete degradation of γ1 and partial digests of hordein B1 and B3 were observed. PMID:24268446

  3. Semi-synthesis of biologically active nisin hybrids composed of the native lanthionine ABC-fragment and a cross-stapled synthetic DE-fragment.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Jack C; Peters, Nienke; Quarles van Ufford, H Linda C; Breukink, Eefjan; Liskamp, Rob M J; Rijkers, Dirk T S

    2014-10-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin is a promising template for designing novel peptide-based antibiotics to improve its drug-like properties. First steps in that direction represent the synthesis of hybrid nisin derivatives that contain a native nisin ABC-part and synthesized cross-stapled DE-ring fragments and are described here. The biological activity of the newly synthesized nisin derivatives was evaluated in order to compare the bioactivity of the synthetic DE-ring containing mimic and native lanthionine-bridged DE-ring containing nisin. The native nisin ABC-ring system was obtained via chymotrypsin digestion of full-length nisin, and was subsequently functionalized at the C-terminal carboxylate with two different amino alkyne moieties. Next, nisin hybrids were successfully prepared using Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition 'click' chemistry by chemo-selective ligation of the ABC-alkyne with the N-terminal azido functionalized dicarba-DE ring mimic. The newly synthesized compounds were active as potent lipid II binders and retained antimicrobial activity in a growth inhibition assay. However, pore formation was not observed, possibly either due to the different character of the 'staples' as compared to the parent sulfides, or due to the triazole moiety as a sub-optimal amide bond isostere.

  4. Semi-synthesis of biologically active nisin hybrids composed of the native lanthionine ABC-fragment and a cross-stapled synthetic DE-fragment.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Jack C; Peters, Nienke; Quarles van Ufford, H Linda C; Breukink, Eefjan; Liskamp, Rob M J; Rijkers, Dirk T S

    2014-10-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin is a promising template for designing novel peptide-based antibiotics to improve its drug-like properties. First steps in that direction represent the synthesis of hybrid nisin derivatives that contain a native nisin ABC-part and synthesized cross-stapled DE-ring fragments and are described here. The biological activity of the newly synthesized nisin derivatives was evaluated in order to compare the bioactivity of the synthetic DE-ring containing mimic and native lanthionine-bridged DE-ring containing nisin. The native nisin ABC-ring system was obtained via chymotrypsin digestion of full-length nisin, and was subsequently functionalized at the C-terminal carboxylate with two different amino alkyne moieties. Next, nisin hybrids were successfully prepared using Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition 'click' chemistry by chemo-selective ligation of the ABC-alkyne with the N-terminal azido functionalized dicarba-DE ring mimic. The newly synthesized compounds were active as potent lipid II binders and retained antimicrobial activity in a growth inhibition assay. However, pore formation was not observed, possibly either due to the different character of the 'staples' as compared to the parent sulfides, or due to the triazole moiety as a sub-optimal amide bond isostere. PMID:25199583

  5. Requirement for pectin methyl esterase and preference for fragmented over native pectins for wall-associated kinase-activated, EDS1/PAD4-dependent stress response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Kohorn, Susan L; Saba, Nicholas J; Martinez, Victoriano Meco

    2014-07-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs) have a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that spans the plasma membrane and binds pectin in the extracellular matrix of plants. WAKs are required for cell expansion during Arabidopsis seedling development but are also an integral part of the response to pathogens and stress that present oligogalacturonides (OGs), which subsequently bind to WAKs and activate a MPK6 (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway. It was unclear how WAKs distinguish native pectin polymers and OGs to activate one or the other of these two pathways. A dominant allele of WAK2 constitutively activates the stress response, and we show here that the effect is dependent upon EDS1 and PAD4, transcriptional activators involved in the pathogen response. Moreover, the WAK2 dominant allele is suppressed by a null allele of a pectin methyl esterase (PME3) whose activity normally leads to cross-linking of pectins in the cell wall. Although OGs activate a transcriptional response in wild type, the response is enhanced in a pme3/pme3 null, consistent with a competition by OG and native polymers for activation of WAKs. This provides a plausible mechanism for WAKs to distinguish an expansion from a stress pathway.

  6. Invasive non-native plants have a greater effect on neighbouring natives than other non-natives.

    PubMed

    Kuebbing, Sara E; Nuñez, Martin A

    2016-09-12

    Human activity is creating a global footprint by changing the climate, altering habitats and reshuffling the distribution of species. The movement of species around the globe has led to the naturalization and accumulation of multiple non-native species within ecosystems, which is frequently associated with habitat disturbance and changing environmental conditions. However, interactions among species will also influence community composition, but little is known about the full range of direct and indirect interactions among native and non-native species. Here, we show through a meta-analysis of 1,215 pairwise plant interactions between 274 vascular plant species in 21 major habitat types that interactions between non-native plants are asymmetrical with interactions between non-native and native plants. Non-native plants were always bad neighbours, but the negative effect of non-natives on natives was around two times greater than the effect of non-natives on other non-natives. In contrast, the performance of non-native plants was five times higher in the presence of a neighbouring native plant species than in the presence of a neighbouring non-native plant species. Together, these results demonstrate that invaded plant communities may accumulate additional non-native species even if direct interactions between non-natives species are negative. Put another way, invasions may be more likely to lead to more invasions, requiring more active management of ecosystems by promoting native species restoration to undermine invasive positive feedback and to assist native species recovery in invaded ecosystems.

  7. Invasive non-native plants have a greater effect on neighbouring natives than other non-natives.

    PubMed

    Kuebbing, Sara E; Nuñez, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Human activity is creating a global footprint by changing the climate, altering habitats and reshuffling the distribution of species. The movement of species around the globe has led to the naturalization and accumulation of multiple non-native species within ecosystems, which is frequently associated with habitat disturbance and changing environmental conditions. However, interactions among species will also influence community composition, but little is known about the full range of direct and indirect interactions among native and non-native species. Here, we show through a meta-analysis of 1,215 pairwise plant interactions between 274 vascular plant species in 21 major habitat types that interactions between non-native plants are asymmetrical with interactions between non-native and native plants. Non-native plants were always bad neighbours, but the negative effect of non-natives on natives was around two times greater than the effect of non-natives on other non-natives. In contrast, the performance of non-native plants was five times higher in the presence of a neighbouring native plant species than in the presence of a neighbouring non-native plant species. Together, these results demonstrate that invaded plant communities may accumulate additional non-native species even if direct interactions between non-natives species are negative. Put another way, invasions may be more likely to lead to more invasions, requiring more active management of ecosystems by promoting native species restoration to undermine invasive positive feedback and to assist native species recovery in invaded ecosystems. PMID:27618506

  8. Inhibition of Plant-Pathogenic Fungi by a Corn Trypsin Inhibitor Overexpressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Brown, Robert L.; Lax, Alan R.; Cleveland, Thomas E.; Russin, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA of a 14-kDa trypsin inhibitor (TI) from corn was subcloned into an Escherichia coli overexpression vector. The overexpressed TI was purified based on its insolubility in urea and then refolded into the active form in vitro. This recombinant TI inhibited both conidium germination and hyphal growth of all nine plant pathogenic fungi studied, including Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus, and Fusarium moniliforme. The calculated 50% inhibitory concentration of TI for conidium germination ranged from 70 to more than 300 μg/ml, and that for fungal growth ranged from 33 to 124 μg/ml depending on the fungal species. It also inhibited A. flavus and F. moniliforme simultaneously when they were tested together. The results suggest that the corn 14-kDa TI may function in host resistance against a variety of fungal pathogens of crops. PMID:10049901

  9. Occurrence of trypsin-like protease in cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton).

    PubMed

    Josephrajkumar, A; Chakrabarty, Romit; Thomas, George

    2005-08-01

    Occurrence of trypsin-like protease in fresh cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton) seeds, as evidenced by the benzoyl-arg-p-nitroanilide (BApNA) hydrolyzing ability of the seed enzyme preparation under alkaline condition is reported for the first time. The enzyme has a pH and temperature optima as 8 and 45 degrees C, respectively. It is inhibited by aprotinin and phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the presence of serine residues at the active site. The enzyme had a V(max) of 98.01 nmoles p-nitroaniline released per min per mg protein and K(m) of 0.0684 mM with BApNA as substrate. Addition of aprotinin (75.75 microM) increased K(m) value by three-folds, whereas the V(max) was reduced by 23%.

  10. Enhancement of plaque formation and cell fusion of an enteropathogenic coronavirus by trypsin treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Storz, J; Rott, R; Kaluza, G

    1981-01-01

    Plaque formation, replication, and related cytopathic functions of the enteropathogenic bovine coronavirus strain L9 in bovine fetal thyroid (BFTy) and bovine fetal brain (BFB) cells were investigated in the presence and absence of trypsin. Plaque formation was enhanced in both cell types. Plaques reached a size with an average diameter of 5 mm within 4 days with trypsin in the overlay, whereas their diameter remained less than 1 mm at this time after plating without trypsin in the overlay. Fusion of both cell types was observed 12 to 18 h after infection when trypsin was present in the medium. Fusion was not observed in infected BFB cell cultures and was rarely observed 48 h after infection of BFTy cells maintained with the trypsin-free medium. The largest polycaryons formed had 15 to 22 nuclei. They then lysed and detached. Cell fusion depended on de novo synthesis of hemagglutinin and infectivity. Fusion from without was not observed. Virus produced under trypsin-enhancing conditions accompanied by cell fusion did not lyse mouse erythrocytes that reacted with L9 coronavirus hemagglutinin. Trypsin-treated, infected BFTy cultures produced coronaviral particles that excluded stain from the envelope confinement. These virions had uniformly shorter surface projections than did the viral forms generated by trypsin-free cell cultures. Images PMID:7228403

  11. Trypsin isozymes in the lobster Panulirus argus (Latreille, 1804): from molecules to physiology.

    PubMed

    Perera, Erick; Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Trypsin enzymes have been studied in a wide variety of animal taxa due to their central role in protein digestion as well as in other important physiological and biotechnological processes. Crustacean trypsins exhibit a high number of isoforms. However, while differences in properties of isoenzymes are known to play important roles in regulating different physiological processes, there is little information on this aspect for decapod trypsins. The aim of this review is to integrate recent findings at the molecular level on trypsin enzymes of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus, into higher levels of organization (biochemical, organism) and to interpret those findings in relation to the feeding ecology of these crustaceans. Trypsin in lobster is a polymorphic enzyme, showing isoforms that differ in their biochemical features and catalytic efficiencies. Molecular studies suggest that polymorphism in lobster trypsins may be non-neutral. Trypsin isoenzymes are differentially regulated by dietary proteins, and it seems that some isoenzymes have undergone adaptive evolution coupled with a divergence in expression rate to increase fitness. This review highlights important but poorly studied issues in crustaceans in general, such as the relation among trypsin polymorphism, phenotypic (digestive) flexibility, digestion efficiency, and feeding ecology.

  12. Trypsin isozymes in the lobster Panulirus argus (Latreille, 1804): from molecules to physiology.

    PubMed

    Perera, Erick; Rodríguez-Viera, Leandro; Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Trypsin enzymes have been studied in a wide variety of animal taxa due to their central role in protein digestion as well as in other important physiological and biotechnological processes. Crustacean trypsins exhibit a high number of isoforms. However, while differences in properties of isoenzymes are known to play important roles in regulating different physiological processes, there is little information on this aspect for decapod trypsins. The aim of this review is to integrate recent findings at the molecular level on trypsin enzymes of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus, into higher levels of organization (biochemical, organism) and to interpret those findings in relation to the feeding ecology of these crustaceans. Trypsin in lobster is a polymorphic enzyme, showing isoforms that differ in their biochemical features and catalytic efficiencies. Molecular studies suggest that polymorphism in lobster trypsins may be non-neutral. Trypsin isoenzymes are differentially regulated by dietary proteins, and it seems that some isoenzymes have undergone adaptive evolution coupled with a divergence in expression rate to increase fitness. This review highlights important but poorly studied issues in crustaceans in general, such as the relation among trypsin polymorphism, phenotypic (digestive) flexibility, digestion efficiency, and feeding ecology. PMID:25192870

  13. 21 CFR 524.2620 - Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.2620 Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil. (a)(1) Specifications. The drug is a liquid for direct application or an aerosol preparation formulated so that each...

  14. 21 CFR 524.2620 - Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.2620 Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil. (a)(1) Specifications. The drug is a liquid for direct application or an aerosol preparation formulated so that each...

  15. 21 CFR 524.2620 - Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.2620 Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil. (a)(1) Specifications. The drug is a liquid for direct application or an aerosol preparation formulated so that each...

  16. 21 CFR 524.2620 - Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.2620 Liquid crystalline trypsin, Peru balsam, castor oil. (a)(1) Specifications. The drug is a liquid for direct application or an aerosol preparation formulated so that each...

  17. Hui Malama O Ke Kai: A Positive Prevention-Based Youth Development Program Based on Native Hawaiian Values and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hishinuma, Earl S.; Chang, Janice Y.; Sy, Angela; Greaney, Malia F.; Morris, Katherine A.; Scronce, Ami C.; Rehuher, Davis; Nishimura, Stephanie T.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of after-school programs that are culturally and place-based and promote positive youth development among minority and indigenous youths has not been widely published. The present evaluation is the first of its kind of an after-school, youth-risk prevention program called Hui Malama O Ke Kai (HMK), that emphasizes Native Hawaiian values…

  18. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    PubMed Central

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna; Miyagi, Masaru; Lodowski, David T.

    2014-01-01

    With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity. PMID:24598752

  19. Trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling for quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-01

    Stable isotope labeling based on relative peptide/protein abundance measurements is commonly applied for quantitative proteomics. Recently, trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling has grown in popularity due to its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and its ability to universally label peptides with high sample recovery. In (18)O labeling, both C-terminal carboxyl group atoms of tryptic peptides can be enzymatically exchanged with (18)O, thus providing the labeled peptide with a 4 Da mass shift from the (16)O-labeled sample. Peptide (18)O labeling is ideally suited for generating a labeled "universal" reference sample used for obtaining accurate and reproducible quantitative measurements across large number of samples in quantitative discovery proteomics.

  20. Humidity adsorption kinetics of a trypsin gel film.

    PubMed

    Okur, Salih; Ceylan, Cagatay; Culcular, Evren

    2012-02-15

    This study focuses on the humidity adsorption kinetics of an isopropanol-induced and pH-triggered bovine pancreatic trypsin gel (BPTG). The BPTG was adsorbed on a gold coated Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) substrate with a thickness of 376 nm. The morphology of the film was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). QCM was used to investigate the humidity sensing properties of the BPTG film. The response of the humidity sensor was explained using the Langmuir model. The average values of adsorption and desorption rates between 11% RH (relative humidity) and 97% RH were calculated as 2482.5 M(-1) s(-1) and 0.02 s(-1), respectively. The equilibrium constant and average Gibbs Free Energy of humidity adsorption and desorption cycles were obtained as 133,000 and -11.8 kJ/mol, respectively.

  1. Precursor of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean seeds

    SciTech Connect

    McGrain, A.; Chen, J.; Tan-Wilson, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (KSTI) appears to be synthesized in precursor form which is converted by proteolytic digestion to the mature form of KSTI. Two forms of anti-cross-reacting material are evident when Western blots of extracts of developing seeds are analyzed. The precursor form increases to maximum levels as seed lengths increase to 11 mm. As the seed matures to 13 mm and turns yellow, precursor levels decrease while mature KSTI levels increase. The conversion of precursor to mature form could be demonstrated in vitro in seed extracts. The conversion could also be demonstrated in excised seeds pulse-labeled with ({sup 14}C)-leucine as loss of radioactivity from the precursor and appearance in the mature KSTI form.

  2. Sensitive sulfide sensor with a trypsin-stabilized gold nanocluster.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Li, Ruiping; Xu, Pingping; Di, Junwei; Tu, Yifeng; Yan, Jilin

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we synthesized a trypsin-stabilized fluorescent gold nanocluster. It was found that sulfide interacted with the nanocluster, which could result in significant fluorescence quenching. With this quenching effect, a fluorescence sulfide sensor was developed. This sensor responded linearly to sulfide in the range of 50 nM to 8 μM, and was capable of detecting sulfide as low as 5.5 nM. This provided a facile and sensitive scheme for sulfide analysis; the mechanism of the sensor was also provided. The sensor was then tested for real sample analysis, and good recoveries were obtained. Furthermore, persulfate was found to be effective to remove the quenching of sulfide, and this interaction was adopted for an indirect analysis of persulfate.

  3. [Chymotrypsin and trypsin inhibitor isolated from potato tubers].

    PubMed

    Revina, T A; Parfenov, I A; Gvozdeva, E L; Gerasimova, N G; Valueva, T A

    2011-01-01

    Potato Kunitz-type chymotrypsin inhibitor (PKCI-23) was isolated from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L., Zhukov's Jubilee breed) and purified to a homogenous state. The protein was purified by gel-filtration chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography using Sephadex G-75 and CM-Sepharose CL-6B, respectively. PKCI-23 protein has been shown to inhibit both chymotrypsin and trypsin with equal efficacy, forming equimolar complexes with these enzymes. However, much weaker inhibitory effect of PKCI-23 has been observed for Carlsberg subtilisin. The N-terminal 20 amino acid sequence of PKCI-23 has been sequenced. PKCI-23 has been shown to suppress, with different efficacy, the growth and development of pathogenic microorganisms Fusarium culmorum (Wm. G. Sm.) Sacc. and Phytophtora infestans (Mont.) de Bary that infect potato.

  4. Cytometric analysis of retinopathies in retinal trypsin digests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanian, Zahra; Staniszewski, Kevin; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Ranji, Mahsa

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this work was to design an automated image cytometry tool for determination of various retinal vascular parameters including extraction of features that are relevant to postnatal retinal vascular development, and the progression of diabetic retinopathy. To confirm the utility and accuracy of the software, retinal trypsin digest from TSP1-/- and diabetic Akita/+; TSP1-/- mice were analyzed. TSP1 is a critical inhibitor of development of retinopathies and lack of TSP1 exacerbates progression of early diabetic retinopathies. Loss of vascular cells of and gain more acellular capillaries as two major signs of diabetic retinopathies were used to classify a retina as normal or injured. This software allows quantification and high throughput assessment of retinopathy changes associated with diabetes.

  5. Antibodies with specificity to native gp120 and neutralization activity against primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates elicited by immunization with oligomeric gp160.

    PubMed Central

    VanCott, T C; Mascola, J R; Kaminski, R W; Kalyanaraman, V; Hallberg, P L; Burnett, P R; Ulrich, J T; Rechtman, D J; Birx, D L

    1997-01-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccine candidates elicit high antibody binding titers with neutralizing activity against T-cell line-adapted but not primary HIV-1 isolates. Serum antibodies from these human vaccine recipients were also found to be preferentially directed to linear epitopes within gp120 that are poorly exposed on native gp120. Systemic immunization of rabbits with an affinity-purified oligomeric gp160 protein formulated with either Alhydrogel or monophosphoryl lipid A-containing adjuvants resulted in the induction of high-titered serum antibodies that preferentially bound epitopes exposed on native forms of gp120 and gp160, recognized a restricted number of linear epitopes, efficiently bound heterologous strains of monomeric gp120 and cell surface-expressed oligomeric gp120/gp41, and neutralized several strains of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1. Additionally, those immune sera with the highest oligomeric gp160 antibody binding titers had neutralizing activity against some primary HIV-1 isolates, using phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell targets. Induction of an antibody response preferentially reactive with natively folded gp120/gp160 was dependent on the tertiary structure of the HIV-1 envelope immunogen as well as its adjuvant formulation, route of administration, and number of immunizations administered. These studies demonstrate the capacity of a soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein vaccine to elicit an antibody response capable of neutralizing primary HIV-1 isolates. PMID:9151820

  6. Differences in Overweight and Obesity among Children from Migrant and Native Origin: The Role of Physical Activity, Dietary Intake, and Sleep Duration.

    PubMed

    Labree, Wim; van de Mheen, Dike; Rutten, Frans; Rodenburg, Gerda; Koopmans, Gerrit; Foets, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was performed to examine to what degree differences in overweight and obesity between native Dutch and migrant primary school children could be explained by differences in physical activity, dietary intake, and sleep duration among these children. Subjects (n=1943) were primary school children around the age of 8-9 years old and their primary caregivers: native Dutch children (n=1546), Turkish children (n=93), Moroccan children (n=66), other non-western children (n=105), and other western children (n=133). Multivariate regressions and logistic regressions were used to examine the relationship between migrant status, child's behavior, and BMI or prevalence of overweight, including obesity (logistic). Main explanatory variables were physical activity, dietary intake, and sleep duration. We controlled for age, sex, parental educational level, and parental BMI. Although sleep duration, dietary intake of fruit, and dietary intake of energy-dense snacks were associated with BMI, ethnic differences in sleep duration and dietary intake did not have a large impact on ethnic differences in overweight and obesity among children from migrant and native origin. It is suggested that future preventive strategies to reduce overweight and obesity, in general, consider the role of sleep duration. Also, cross-cultural variation in preparation of food among specific migrant groups, focusing on fat, sugar, and salt, deserves more attention. In order to examine which other variables may clarify ethnic differences in overweight and obesity, future research is needed.

  7. Free-thiol Cys331 exposed during activation process is critical for native tetramer structure of cathepsin C (dipeptidyl peptidase I)

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Martin; Baudyš, Miroslav; Voburka, Zdeněk; Kluh, Ivan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Mareš, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The mature bovine cathepsin C (CC) molecule is composed of four identical monomers, each proteolytically processed into three chains. Five intrachain disulfides and three nonpaired cysteine residues per monomer were identified. Beside catalytic Cys234 in the active site, free-thiol Cys331 and Cys424 were characterized. Cys424 can be classified as inaccessible buried residue. Selective modification of Cys331 results in dissociation of native CC tetramer into dimers. The 3D homology-based model of the CC catalytic core suggests that Cys331 becomes exposed as the activation peptide is removed during procathepsin C activation. The model further shows that exposed Cys331 is surrounded by a surface hydrophobic cluster, unique to CC, forming a dimer–dimer interaction interface. Substrate/inhibitor recognition of the active site in the CC dimer differs significantly from that in the native tetramer. Taken together, a mechanism is proposed that assumes that the CC tetramer formation results in a site-specific occlusion of endopeptidase-like active site cleft of each CC monomeric unit. Thus, tetramerization provides for the structural basis of the dipeptidyl peptidase activity of CC through a substrate access-limiting mechanism different from those found in homologous monomeric exopeptidases cathepsin H and B. In conclusion, the mechanism of tetramer formation as well as specific posttranslational processing segregates CC in the family of papain proteases. PMID:11910036

  8. Surfactant protein C peptides with salt-bridges ("ion-locks") promote high surfactant activities by mimicking the α-helix and membrane topography of the native protein.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Waring, Alan J; Hernández-Juviel, José M; Ruchala, Piotr; Wang, Zhengdong; Notter, Robert H; Gordon, Larry M

    2014-01-01

    Background. Surfactant protein C (SP-C; 35 residues) in lungs has a cationic N-terminal domain with two cysteines covalently linked to palmitoyls and a C-terminal region enriched in Val, Leu and Ile. Native SP-C shows high surface activity, due to SP-C inserting in the bilayer with its cationic N-terminus binding to the polar headgroup and its hydrophobic C-terminus embedded as a tilted, transmembrane α-helix. The palmitoylcysteines in SP-C act as 'helical adjuvants' to maintain activity by overriding the β-sheet propensities of the native sequences. Objective. We studied SP-C peptides lacking palmitoyls, but containing glutamate and lysine at 4-residue intervals, to assess whether SP-C peptides with salt-bridges ("ion-locks") promote surface activity by mimicking the α-helix and membrane topography of native SP-C. Methods. SP-C mimics were synthesized that reproduce native sequences, but without palmitoyls (i.e., SP-Css or SP-Cff, with serines or phenylalanines replacing the two cysteines). Ion-lock SP-C molecules were prepared by incorporating single or double Glu(-)-Lys(+) into the parent SP-C's. The secondary structures of SP-C mimics were studied with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and PASTA, an algorithm that predicts β-sheet propensities based on the energies of the various β-sheet pairings. The membrane topography of SP-C mimics was investigated with orientated and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange FTIR, and also Membrane Protein Explorer (MPEx) hydropathy analysis. In vitro surface activity was determined using adsorption surface pressure isotherms and captive bubble surfactometry, and in vivo surface activity from lung function measures in a rabbit model of surfactant deficiency. Results. PASTA calculations predicted that the SP-Css and SP-Cff peptides should each form parallel β-sheet aggregates, with FTIR spectroscopy confirming high parallel β-sheet with 'amyloid-like' properties. The enhanced β-sheet properties for SP-Css and

  9. Gene transfer of master autophagy regulator TFEB results in clearance of toxic protein and correction of hepatic disease in alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Nunzia; Blomenkamp, Keith; Annunziata, Fabio; Piccolo, Pasquale; Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Maria Sepe, Rosa; Vetrini, Francesco; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Polishchuk, Elena; Iacobacci, Simona; Polishchuk, Roman; Teckman, Jeffrey; Ballabio, Andrea; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency is the most common genetic cause of liver disease in children and liver transplantation is currently the only available treatment. Enhancement of liver autophagy increases degradation of mutant, hepatotoxic alpha-1-anti-trypsin (ATZ). We investigated the therapeutic potential of liver-directed gene transfer of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master gene that regulates lysosomal function and autophagy, in PiZ transgenic mice, recapitulating the human hepatic disease. Hepatocyte TFEB gene transfer resulted in dramatic reduction of hepatic ATZ, liver apoptosis and fibrosis, which are key features of alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency. Correction of the liver phenotype resulted from increased ATZ polymer degradation mediated by enhancement of autophagy flux and reduced ATZ monomer by decreased hepatic NFκB activation and IL-6 that drives ATZ gene expression. In conclusion, TFEB gene transfer is a novel strategy for treatment of liver disease of alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency. This study may pave the way towards applications of TFEB gene transfer for treatment of a wide spectrum of human disorders due to intracellular accumulation of toxic proteins. PMID:23381957

  10. Squash trypsin inhibitors from Momordica cochinchinensis exhibit an atypical macrocyclic structure.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J F; Gagnon, J; Chiche, L; Nguyen, T M; Andrieu, J P; Heitz, A; Trinh Hong, T; Pham, T T; Le Nguyen, D

    2000-05-16

    Three trypsin inhibitors (TIs), from the seeds of the squash Momordica cochinchinensis (MCo), have been isolated and purified using gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography, and reverse-phase HPLC. Their sequences could be determined only after proteolytic cleavages. In the case of MCoTI-I and -II, it was shown that their polypeptide backbones are cyclic, a structure that has never been described in squash TIs. They contain 34 amino acid residues with 3 disulfide bridges and measured molecular masses of 3453.0 and 3480.7, respectively. They are the largest known macrocyclic peptides containing disulfide bridges. Their sequences show strong homology to other squash TIs, suggesting a similar three-dimensional structure and an analogous mechanism of action. A model of MCoTI-II was constructed by analogy to the crystal structure of the complex between bovine trypsin and CMTI-I, indicating that the linker connecting the two termini is flexible and does not impose significant geometrical constraints. This flexibility allows an Asp-Gly peptide bond rearrangement to occur in this region, giving rise to two isoforms of MCoTI-II. Although the importance of cyclization is not clear, it might confer increased stability and resistance to proteolysis. A minor species, MCoTI-III, was also characterized as containing 30 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 3379.6. This component possesses a linear backbone with a blocked N-terminus. MCoTIs represent interesting candidates for drug design, either by changing their specificity of inhibition or by using their structure as natural scaffolds bearing new binding activities. PMID:10801322

  11. Squash trypsin inhibitors from Momordica cochinchinensis exhibit an atypical macrocyclic structure.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J F; Gagnon, J; Chiche, L; Nguyen, T M; Andrieu, J P; Heitz, A; Trinh Hong, T; Pham, T T; Le Nguyen, D

    2000-05-16

    Three trypsin inhibitors (TIs), from the seeds of the squash Momordica cochinchinensis (MCo), have been isolated and purified using gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography, and reverse-phase HPLC. Their sequences could be determined only after proteolytic cleavages. In the case of MCoTI-I and -II, it was shown that their polypeptide backbones are cyclic, a structure that has never been described in squash TIs. They contain 34 amino acid residues with 3 disulfide bridges and measured molecular masses of 3453.0 and 3480.7, respectively. They are the largest known macrocyclic peptides containing disulfide bridges. Their sequences show strong homology to other squash TIs, suggesting a similar three-dimensional structure and an analogous mechanism of action. A model of MCoTI-II was constructed by analogy to the crystal structure of the complex between bovine trypsin and CMTI-I, indicating that the linker connecting the two termini is flexible and does not impose significant geometrical constraints. This flexibility allows an Asp-Gly peptide bond rearrangement to occur in this region, giving rise to two isoforms of MCoTI-II. Although the importance of cyclization is not clear, it might confer increased stability and resistance to proteolysis. A minor species, MCoTI-III, was also characterized as containing 30 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 3379.6. This component possesses a linear backbone with a blocked N-terminus. MCoTIs represent interesting candidates for drug design, either by changing their specificity of inhibition or by using their structure as natural scaffolds bearing new binding activities.

  12. [Development of a new soybean variety with null trypsin inhibitor and lipoxygenase 2.3 genes--zhonghuang 16 and its cultivation practices].

    PubMed

    Han, Fen-Xia; Ding, An-Lin; Sun, Jun-Ming

    2002-12-01

    Soybean protein is a kind of high-quality protein composed of balanced amino acids, which contains all kinds of amino acid, especially 8 amino acids necessary for human, but also contains some components that are not good for human and affect food quality, such as Trypsin inhibitor and Lipoxygenase. Nutritional value and processing quality of soybean can be improved by means of development of new variety with null Lox and Ti. In this paper, a new soybean variety Zhonghuang 16 (originally name as Zhongzuo 96-952) was developed by Institute of Crop Breeding and Cultivation Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences through years of biochemical marker assistant selection for null trypsin inhibitor by Native-polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (Native-PAGE) and null lipoxygenase by means of isoelectric focusing-polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (IEF-PAGE) in the hybrid progenies of "ti15176" (Female parent)--a high-yielding, mosaic virus resistant and null trypsin inhibitor line and "Century-2.3" (Male parent)--a null lipoxygenase near isogene line of an elite American variety "Century". This variety was subjected to Beijing regional trial for summer-sowing soybean during 1999-2000, and to Beijing demonstration test in 2001. In 2002, it was passed the examination and approval by the Beijing Committee of Crop Variety Examination and Approval because of its outstanding characteristics such as high and stable yielding, good quality (high protein and fat content, high protein content and good protein quality-null Ti and Lox2.3), disease resistant and good general character. It is the first new soybean variety with null Ti and Lox2.3 genes in our country. In this paper, the development process and cultivation of Zhonghuang 16 were described. PMID:12693103

  13. Comparative analysis of expression profiling of the trypsin and chymotrypsin genes from Lepidoptera species with different levels of sensitivity to soybean peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Souza, Thais P; Dias, Renata O; Castelhano, Elaine C; Brandão, Marcelo M; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2016-01-01

    Peptidase inhibitors (PIs) are essential proteins involved in plant resistance to herbivorous insects, yet many insect species are able to escape the negative effects of these molecules. We compared the effects of acute and chronic ingestion of soybean peptidase inhibitors (SPIs) on Spodoptera frugiperda and Diatraea saccharalis, two Lepidoptera species with different sensitivities to SPI ingestion. We analyzed the trypsin and chymotrypsin gene expression profiles in both species. Acute exposure of S. frugiperda to the inhibitors activated seven genes (SfChy5, SfChy9, SfChy19, SfChy22, SfTry6, SfTry8, and SfTry10), whereas chronic exposure activated 16 genes (SfChy2, SfChy4, SfChy5, SfChy8, SfChy9, SfChy11, SfChy12, SfChy15, SfChy17, SfChy21, SfChy22, SfTry6, SfTry8, SfTry9, SfTry10, and SfTry12). By contrast, the challenge of D. saccharalis with SPIs did not differentially induce the expression of trypsin- or chymotrypsin-encoding genes, with the exception of DsChy7. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of S. frugiperda trypsin protein sequences revealed two gene clades: one composed of genes responsive to the SPIs and a second composed of the unresponsive genes. D. saccharalis trypsin proteins were clustered nearest to the S. frugiperda unresponsive genes. Overall, our findings support a hypothesized mechanism of resistance of Noctuidae moths to SPIs, involving gene number expansion of trypsin and chymotrypsin families and regulation of gene expression, which could also explain the variable susceptibility between S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis to these plant inhibitors. PMID:26944308

  14. Depth and orientational dependencies of MRI T(2) and T(1ρ) sensitivities towards trypsin degradation and Gd-DTPA(2-) presence in articular cartilage at microscopic resolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nian; Xia, Yang

    2012-04-01

    Depth and orientational dependencies of microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T(2) and T(1ρ) sensitivities were studied in native and trypsin-degraded articular cartilage before and after being soaked in 1 mM Gd-DTPA(2-) solution. When the cartilage surface was perpendicular to B(0), a typical laminar appearance was visible in T(2)-weighted images but not in T(1ρ)-weighted images, especially when the spin-lock field was high (2 kHz). At the magic angle (55°) orientation, neither T(2)- nor T(1ρ)-weighted image had a laminar appearance. Trypsin degradation caused a depth- and orientational-dependent T(2) increase (4%-64%) and a more uniform T(1ρ) increase at a sufficiently high spin-lock field (55%-81%). The presence of the Gd ions caused both T(2) and T(1ρ) to decrease significantly in the degraded tissue (6%-38% and 44%-49%, respectively) but less notably in the native tissue (5%-10% and 16%-28%, respectively). A quantity Sensitivity was introduced that combined both the percentage change and the absolute change in the relaxation analysis. An MRI experimental protocol based on two T(1ρ) measurements (without and with the presence of the Gd ions) was proposed to be a new imaging marker for cartilage degradation.

  15. Anti-inflammatory Activity of the Invasive Neophyte Polygonum Cuspidatum Sieb. and Zucc. (Polygonaceae) and the Chemical Comparison of the Invasive and Native Varieties with regard to Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peihong; Zhang, Tao; Hostettmann, Kurt

    2013-07-01

    Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. and Zucc. has been traditionally used as a member of many anti-inflammatory polyherbal formulations, but is now a widespread invasive neophyte in Europe and America. To discuss if the invasive variety is chemically identical to the native one in traditional medicine, the different constituents of the invasive variety compared to the native variety were isolated and their anti-inflammatory activity was tested. Resveratroloside and catechin-(4α→8)-catechin, the newly found constituents in the invasive variety, have similar nitric oxide (NO) inhibition potency as that of piceid (the major constituent of P. cuspidatum), but the newly found major constituent, i.e., piceatannol glucoside, showed no apparent effect. On the other hand, as a marker, the total content of resveratrol in the methanol root extract after glucosidase hydrolysis was measured and compared between the invasive and native varieties. The total content of resveratrol measured in the root extracts of the Swiss sample was about 2.5 times less than that of the Chinese one. This study brings attention to the point that when the invasive variety of P. cuspidatum is used in traditional medicine, the chemical difference should be kept in mind. PMID:24716176

  16. Plants used in Guatemala for the treatment of protozoal infections. I. Screening of activity to bacteria, fungi and American trypanosomes of 13 native plants.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, A; López, B; González, S; Berger, I; Tada, I; Maki, J

    1998-10-01

    Extracts were prepared from 13 native plants used for the treatment of protozoal infections. Activity against bacteria and fungi was demonstrated by dilution procedures; Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated in vitro against epimastigote and trypomastigotes and in vivo against trypomastigotes. In active extracts, toxicity was evaluated by Artemia salina nauplii, oral acute toxicity (1-5 g/kg) and oral and intraperitoneal subacute toxicity in mice (500 mg/kg). From the plants screened, six showed activity (< or = 2 mg/ml) against bacteria, three against yeasts, five against Microsporum gypseum and five against T. cruzi in vitro and/or in vivo. In vitro and in vivo activity was demonstrated by Neurolaena lobata and Solanum americanum; in vitro or in vivo activity was shown by Acalypha guatemalensis, Petiveria alliacea and Tridax procumbens. Toxicity studies showed that extracts from S. americanum are toxic to A. salina (aqueous, 160 ppm). None showed acute or oral toxicity to mice; S. americanum showed intraperitoneal subacute toxicity.

  17. JcTI-I: a novel trypsin inhibitor from Jatropha curcas seed cake with potential for bacterial infection treatment

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Helen P. S.; Oliveira, Jose T. A.; Sousa, Daniele O. B.; Morais, Janne K. S.; Moreno, Frederico B.; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O.; Viegas, Ricardo A.; Vasconcelos, Ilka M.

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha curcas seed cake is a low-value by-product resulting from biodiesel production. The seed cake is highly toxic, but it has great potential for biotechnology applications as it is a repository of biomolecules that could be important in agriculture, medicine, and industry. To explore this potential, a novel trypsin inhibitor called JcTI-I was purified by fractionation of the crude extract with trichloroacetic acid (2.5%, v/v) followed by affinity chromatography (Trypsin-Sepharose 4B) and molecular exclusion (Sephacryl S-200). Non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration showed that JcTI-I has approximately 20.0~kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the intact molecular mass of JcTI-I is 10.252~kDa. Moreover, JcTI-I is a glycoprotein with 6.4% (m/m) carbohydrates, pI of 6.6, N-terminal sequence similarity around 60% to plant albumins and high stability to heat, pH, and salinity. JcTI-I presented antibacterial activity against the human pathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar choleraesuis and Staphylococcus aureus, with minimum inhibitory concentration less than 5~μg/mL. Furthermore, JcTI-I did have inhibitory activity against the serine proteases from the tested bacteria. Otherwise, no hemolytic activity of human erythrocytes and signs of acute toxicity to mice were observed for JcTI-I. The results demonstrate the benefits of J. curcas seed cake as a source of trypsin inhibitor with potential for biotechnological application as a new antimicrobial agent against human pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24523715

  18. Single-channel biophysical and pharmacological characterizations of native human large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in freshly isolated detrusor smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Malysz, John; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) function in vitro and in vivo. However, in-depth characterization of human native DSM single BK channels has not yet been provided. Here, we conducted single-channel recordings from excised patches from native human DSM cells. Inside-out and outside-out recordings in high K(+) symmetrical solution (containing 140 mM KCl and ~300 nM free Ca(2+)) showed single-channel conductance of 215-220 pS, half-maximum constant for activation of ~+75 to +80 mV, and low probability of opening (P o) at +20 mV that increased ~10-fold at +40 mV and ~60-fold at +60 mV. Using the inside-out configuration at +30 mV, reduction of intracellular [Ca(2+)] from ~300 nM to Ca(2+)-free decreased the P o by ~85 %, whereas elevation to ~800 nM increased P o by ~50-fold. The BK channel activator NS1619 (10 μM) enhanced the P o by ~10-fold at +30 mV; subsequent application of the selective BK channel inhibitor paxilline (500 nM) blocked the activity. Changes in intracellular [Ca(2+)] or the addition of NS1619 did not significantly alter the current amplitude or single-channel conductance. This is the first report to provide biophysical and pharmacological profiles of native human DSM single BK channels highlighting their importance in regulating human DSM excitability.

  19. Fish skin gelatin hydrolysates produced by visceral peptidase and bovine trypsin: Bioactivity and stability.

    PubMed

    Ketnawa, Sunantha; Benjakul, Soottawat; Martínez-Alvarez, Oscar; Rawdkuen, Saroat

    2017-01-15

    The peptidase from the viscera of farmed giant catfish was used for producing gelatin hydrolysates (HG) and compared with those produced from commercial bovine trypsin (HB). The degree of hydrolysis (DH) observed suggests that proteolytic cleavage rapidly occurred within the first 120min of incubation, and there was higher DH in HG than in HB. HG demonstrated the highest ACE-inhibitory activity, DPPH, ABTS radical scavenging activity, and FRAP. HB showed the highest FRAP activity. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of HG was quite stable over the pH range of 1-11, but it increased slightly when the heating duration time reached 240min at 100°C. The ACE-inhibitory activity of HG showed the highest stability at a pH of 7, and it remained very stable at 100°C for over 15-240min. The visceral peptidase from farmed giant catfish could be an alternative protease for generating protein hydrolysates with desirable bioactivities. The resulting hydrolysates showed good stability, making them potential functional ingredients for food formulations. PMID:27542490

  20. Resolution of two native monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Philippa J.L.; McKinzie, Audra A.; Codd, Rachel

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Two monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina. {yields} Sequence of napA from napEDABC-type operon and napA from NapDAGHB-type operon. {yields} Isolation of NAP as NapA or NapAB correlated with NapA P47E amino acid substitution. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90 kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90 kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90 kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  1. Quantitation of residual trypsin in cell-based therapeutics using immobilized α-1-antitrypsin or SBTI in an ELISA format.

    PubMed

    Braatz, James A; Elias, Christopher; Finny, Joseph G; Tran, Huan; McCaman, Michael

    2015-02-01

    An Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) has been developed for the quantitation of porcine trypsin as a process residual in cell therapy products based on its capture by either of two immobilized anti-trypsins, α-1-antitrypsin (α1AT) or soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) followed by detection with a polyclonal goat anti-porcine trypsin-IgG conjugated with peroxidase. It was demonstrated that an extended range of antigen quantitation could be achieved that covered nearly three orders of magnitude of trypsin concentration. The utility of the assay was demonstrated by its application to samples generated in a cell-based therapeutic manufacturing setting.

  2. [Stability of the structure and antigenic determinants of adenovirus type 1 native hexon to proteases].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, E K; Khil'ko, S N; Grigor'ev, V G; Diachenko, N S; Vantsak, N P

    1986-08-01

    Hexon capsomers of human adenovirus type 1 (h1) labeled by iodine 125 were digested in a native state (trimers) by trypsin, chymotrypsin or papain, and the resulting hydrolysates were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In each case, a discrete and temporally stable pattern of relatively large fragments was revealed. The degree of hexon polypeptide hydrolysis was maximal for papain, intermediate for chymotrypsin and minimal for trypsin, the largest fragments in the digest being 32, 40 and 80 kD, respectively. At room temperature, all the electrophoretically discernible hexon proteolytical fragments were held together in structures resembling intact hexon trimers and could be regarded as "hexon cores", of which papain hexon cores were the most stable during SDS-PAGE. Radioimmunoprecipitation analysis revealed a complete absence of native hexon antigenicity in thermodenaturated fragments of hexon protease digests, while native trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain hexon cores could be precipitated by hexon-specific antibodies. The immunoprecipitated material contained all of the hexon fragments found in appropriate hexon cores and retained the structure of the original cores. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain hexon cores were shown to possess at least part of native Ad h1 hexon antigenic determinants of each of the following specificities: species-specific (epsilon), cross-reactive with hexon of human adenoviruses (h3 and h6), simian adenovirus (sim 16), bovine adenoviruses (bos 3 and bos 7) and avian adenovirus (Aviadenovirus gal 1 or CELO). Thus, the full spectrum of known hexon antigenic determinants (species-specific to intergenus-crossreactive) is at least portly stable against protease attack of native hexon capsomers.

  3. Functional divergence in tandemly duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Clauss, M J; Mitchell-Olds, T

    2004-01-01

    In multigene families, variation among loci and alleles can contribute to trait evolution. We explored patterns of functional and genetic variation in six duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor (ATTI) loci. We demonstrate significant variation in constitutive and herbivore-induced transcription among ATTI loci that show, on average, 65% sequence divergence. Significant variation in ATTI expression was also found between two molecularly defined haplotype classes. Population genetic analyses for 17 accessions of A. thaliana showed that six ATTI loci arranged in tandem within 10 kb varied 10-fold in nucleotide diversity, from 0.0009 to 0.0110, and identified a minimum of six recombination events throughout the tandem array. We observed a significant peak in nucleotide and indel polymorphism spanning ATTI loci in the interior of the array, due primarily to divergence between the two haplotype classes. Significant deviation from the neutral equilibrium model for individual genes was interpreted within the context of intergene linkage disequilibrium and correlated patterns of functional differentiation. In contrast to the outcrosser Arabidopsis lyrata for which recombination is observed even within ATTI loci, our data suggest that response to selection was slowed in the inbreeding, annual A. thaliana because of interference among functionally divergent ATTI loci. PMID:15082560

  4. Immunoreactive trypsin in the adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Deby-Dupont, G; Haas, M; Pincemail, J; Braun, M; Lamy, M; Deby, C; Franchimont, P

    1984-01-01

    With the purpose of studying the role of proteinases in the development of ARDS, plasma levels of immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) and amylase were measured in 43 intensive care patients at risk of developing ARDS (22 polytrauma, seven abdominal surgery, four burns, two DIC and eight pancreatitis). Twenty four of these 43 patients developed ARDS and 31 presented abnormal IRT values (above 70 micrograms/L). Twenty-one of these 31 patients had ARDS; a significant correlation thus appeared between ARDS and abnormal IRT values. In nine patients, IRT values were higher than 800 micrograms/L and remained high for 3 to 4 days. A statistically significant correlation also appeared between abnormal IRT and septic phenomena: 20 patients with high IRT values presented septic problems. When IRT values were high, amylase values were often also abnormal: 12 of 23 patients with high IRT had abnormal amylase levels (the eight patients with documented pancreatitis were excluded); no other clinical signs or symptoms of pancreatitis were present in these patients. IRT could be one of the mediators of ARDS in septic patients. It is not clear that the pancreas is the origin of IRT in all cases.

  5. A comparison of the pupariation acceleration activity of pyrokinin-like peptides native to the flesh fly: Which peptide represents the primary pupariation factor?

    PubMed

    Nachman, Ronald J; Strey, Allison; Zubrzak, Pawel; Zdarek, Jan

    2006-03-01

    Five native pyrokinin-like peptides (Neb-PK-1, Neb-PK-2, Neb-PVK-1, [L9]Neb-PVK-2, [I9]Neb-PVK-2) identified in the neuropeptidome of the flesh fly Neobellieria bullata were compared for their quantitative and/or qualitative effects on puparium formation (pupariation). In a standard pupariation bioassay, both Neb-PVK-1 and [I9]Neb-PVK-2 proved inactive, whereas [L9]Neb-PVK-2 demonstrated only weak activity. In contrast, both Neb-PK-1 and Neb-PK-2 demonstrated potent threshold doses, with Neb-PK-2 about 10-fold more active than Neb-PK-1. Analysis of neuromuscular activity during pupariation using a tensiometric technique demonstrates that the two native Neb-PKs accelerate the onset of immobilization and cuticular shrinkage more than motor programs associated with retraction of the anterior segments and longitudinal body contraction. It was further determined that the sensitivity of various components of the pupariation process to these peptides decreases in the following order: immobilization>cuticular shrinkage>motor program for anterior retraction>motor program for longitudinal contraction congruent to tanning of cuticle of the newly formed puparium. A paradoxical situation was observed whereby the motor programs of pupariation are temporally dissociated from actual morphogenesis of the puparium. The tensiometric data suggest that the most likely candidate for a primary pupariation factor is Neb-PK-2, rather than Neb-PK-1.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the complex of Kunitz-type tamarind trypsin inhibitor and porcine pancreatic trypsin.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Sakshi; Patil, Dipak N; Datta, Manali; Tapas, Satya; Preeti; Chaudhary, Anshul; Sharma, Ashwani K; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-11-01

    The complex of Tamarindus indica Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor and porcine trypsin has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium acetate as precipitant and sodium acetate as buffer. The homogeneity of complex formation was checked by size-exclusion chromatography and further confirmed by reducing SDS-PAGE. The crystals diffracted to 2.0 angstrom resolution and belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(1), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.1, c = 120.1 angstrom. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the presence of one unit of inhibitor-trypsin complex per asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 45%.

  7. Nonlocal interactions stabilize long range loops in the initial folding intermediates of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ittah, V; Haas, E

    1995-04-01

    A search for the topology of the chain folding of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), in unfolded and partially folded states, was done by means of time resolved dynamic nonradiative excitation energy transfer (ET) measurements. Four double labeled BPTI derivatives were used in which the donor was attached to the N-terminal arginine residue and the acceptor was specifically attached to one of the lysine residues. The four derivatives form a series of labeled backbone segments of increasing length spanning the full lengths of the BPTI chain: 15, 26, 41, and 46 residues. The intramolecular segmental end-to-end distance (EED) distributions were determined for all the derivatives by global analysis of the decay curves of both the donor and the acceptor in the reduced state, in low (0.5 M) guanidinium chloride (GuHCl) concentrations at pH 3.6 and 2.1 (R and A states, respectively). The results show that, in the partial folding conditions of low GuHCl concentration, reduced BPTI is in a compact state, but in this state the polypeptide chain is not in a condensed statistical coil conformation. Two distinct subpopulations were found for the four intramolecular EED distributions. One subpopulation was compact, with native-like EED distribution, while the second was unfolded. The pairs of sites, residues 1 and 26 and residues 1 and 46, showed close proximity in the dominant subpopulation. These contacts form two loops (probably collapsed): one consists of the first 26 residues, and the second comprises the full length of the chain from the N- to the C-terminal segments, which is in fact made up to two shorter loops (1-26 and 27-46). The N-terminal 15 residue segment was relaxed into statistical coil-like non-native conformation, in contrast to its extended conformation in the native state. The effect of temperature in the range of 2-60 degrees C was small; the folded subpopulations were stable over this range. These results show that in BPTI the compact

  8. Effect of nitrate, acetate, and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Rolston, Dennis E; Hristova, Krassimira R; Scow, Kate M

    2011-05-01

    The effect of nitrate, acetate, and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared with unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting that the PRB preferentially use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In contrast, nitrate eliminated the inhibitory effect of acetate amendment on perchlorate reduction and increased the rate and the extent, possibly because the preceding nitrate reduction/denitrification decreased the acetate concentration that was inhibitory to the native PRB. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, perchlorate reductase gene (pcrA) copies, representing PRB densities, increased with either perchlorate or nitrate reduction, suggesting that either perchlorate or nitrate stimulates the growth of the PRB. In contrast, in acetate-amended soil pcrA increased only when perchlorate was depleted: a large portion of the PRB may have not utilized nitrate in this amendment. Nitrate addition did not alter the distribution of the dominant pcrA clones in hydrogen-amended soil, likely because of the functional redundancy of PRB as nitrate-reducers/denitrifiers, whereas acetate selected different pcrA clones from those with hydrogen amendment.

  9. Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Rolston, Dennis E.; Hristova, Krassimira R.; Scow, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared to unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting the PRB preferentially use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In contrast, nitrate eliminated the inhibitory effect of acetate amendment on perchlorate reduction and increased the rate and the extent, possibly because the preceding nitrate reduction/denitrification decreased the acetate concentration which was inhibitory to the native PRB. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, perchlorate reductase gene (pcrA) copies, representing PRB densities, increased with either perchlorate or nitrate reduction, suggesting either perchlorate or nitrate stimulates growth of the PRB. In contrast, in acetate-amended soil pcrA increased only when perchlorate was depleted: a large portion of the PRB may have not utilized nitrate in this amendment. Nitrate addition did not alter the distribution of the dominant pcrA clones in hydrogen-amended soil, likely because of the functional redundancy of PRB as nitrate-reducers/denitrifiers, whereas acetate selected different pcrA clones from those with hydrogen amendment. PMID:21284679

  10. Phonetic perceptual identification by native- and second-language speakers differentially activates brain regions involved with acoustic phonetic processing and those involved with articulatory-auditory/orosensory internal models.

    PubMed

    Callan, Daniel E; Jones, Jeffery A; Callan, Akiko M; Akahane-Yamada, Reiko

    2004-07-01

    This experiment investigates neural processes underlying perceptual identification of the same phonemes for native- and second-language speakers. A model is proposed implicating the use of articulatory-auditory and articulatory-orosensory mappings to facilitate perceptual identification under conditions in which the phonetic contrast is ambiguous, as in the case of second-language speakers. In contrast, native-language speakers are predicted to use auditory-based phonetic representations to a greater extent for perceptual identification than second-language speakers. The English /r-l/ phonetic contrast, although easy for native English speakers, is extremely difficult for native Japanese speakers who learned English as a second language after childhood. Twenty-two native English and twenty-two native Japanese speakers participated in this study. While undergoing event-related fMRI, subjects were aurally presented with syllables starting with a /r/, /l/, or a vowel and were required to rapidly identify the phoneme perceived by pushing one of three buttons with the left thumb. Consistent with the proposed model, the results show greater activity for second- over native-language speakers during perceptual identification of /r/ and /l/ relative to vowels in brain regions implicated with instantiating forward and inverse articulatory-auditory articulatory-orosensory models [Broca's area, anterior insula, anterior superior temporal sulcus/gyrus (STS/G), planum temporale (PT), superior temporal parietal area (Stp), SMG, and cerebellum]. The results further show that activity in brain regions implicated with instantiating these internal models is correlated with better /r/ and /l/ identification performance for second-language speakers. Greater activity found for native-language speakers especially in the anterior STG/S for /r/ and /l/ perceptual identification is consistent with the hypothesis that native-language speakers use auditory phonetic representations more

  11. Proteinases involved in the degradation of trypsin inhibitor in germinating mung beans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K A; Tan-Wilson, A L

    1983-01-01

    The mung bean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) trypsin inhibitor (MBTI) is rapidly modified by limited proteolysis during the early stages of seedling growth. Using an electrophoretic assay that separates the unmodified inhibitor (MBTI-F) and the first two modified species (MBTI-E and -C), a pH optimum of approximately 4 was found for the modification reaction. The inhibitor modifying activity is initially low in ungerminated seeds, with the reaction F leads to E being the primary reaction catalyzed. Activity catalyzing the production of MBTI-C appears on the first day of germination. This activity (F leads to E leads to C) increases up to 6 days after inhibition, at which time the cotyledons begin to abscise. The activity converting MBTI-F and -E to MBTI-C was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (3.3 mM) but only weakly by iodoacetate (9 mM) and not at all by pepstatin A (9 microM), leupeptin (18 microM), or EDTA (5 mM). These results suggest the involvement of proteinases other than the major endopeptidase of the germinating seed, vicilin peptidohydrolase. This conclusion is further supported by gel filtration of the extracts of cotyledons on Sephacryl S-200. At least three proteinases are present in germinated cotyledons capable of modifying MBTI-F to MBTI-C and/or -E. All are distinguishable from vicilin peptidohydrolase on the basis of their molecular weight and inhibition by low molecular weight organic reagents.

  12. Differential Complement Activation Pathways Promote C3b Deposition on Native and Acetylated LDL thereby Inducing Lipoprotein Binding to the Complement Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Klop, Boudewijn; van der Pol, Pieter; van Bruggen, Robin; Wang, Yanan; de Vries, Marijke A.; van Santen, Selvetta; O'Flynn, Joseph; van de Geijn, Gert-Jan M.; Njo, Tjin L.; Janssen, Hans W.; de Man, Peter; Jukema, J. Wouter; Rabelink, Ton J.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; van Kooten, Cees; Cabezas, Manuel Castro

    2014-01-01

    Lipoproteins can induce complement activation resulting in opsonization and binding of these complexes to complement receptors. We investigated the binding of opsonized native LDL and acetylated LDL (acLDL) to the complement receptor 1 (CR1). Binding of complement factors C3b, IgM, C1q, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), and properdin to LDL and acLDL were investigated by ELISA. Subsequent binding of opsonized LDL and acLDL to CR1 on CR1-transfected Chinese Hamster Ovarian cells (CHO-CR1) was tested by flow cytometry. Both native LDL and acLDL induced complement activation with subsequent C3b opsonization upon incubation with normal human serum. Opsonized LDL and acLDL bound to CR1. Binding to CHO-CR1 was reduced by EDTA, whereas MgEGTA only reduced the binding of opsonized LDL, but not of acLDL suggesting involvement of the alternative pathway in the binding of acLDL to CR1. In vitro incubations showed that LDL bound C1q, whereas acLDL bound to C1q, IgM, and properdin. MBL did neither bind to LDL nor to acLDL. The relevance of these findings was demonstrated by the fact that ex vivo up-regulation of CR1 on leukocytes was accompanied by a concomitant increased binding of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins to leukocytes without changes in LDL-receptor expression. In conclusion, CR1 is able to bind opsonized native LDL and acLDL. Binding of LDL to CR1 is mediated via the classical pathway, whereas binding of acLDL is mediated via both the classical and alternative pathways. Binding of lipoproteins to CR1 may be of clinical relevance due to the ubiquitous cellular distribution of CR1. PMID:25349208

  13. Trypsin inhibition by macrocyclic and open-chain variants of the squash inhibitor MCoTI-II.

    PubMed

    Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Le Nguyen, Dung; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2005-12-01

    MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis are inhibitors of trypsin-like proteases and the only known members of the large family of squash inhibitors that are cyclic and contain an additional loop connecting the amino- and the carboxy-terminus. To investigate the contribution of macrocycle formation to biological activity, we synthesized a set of open-chain variants of MCoTI-II that lack the cyclization loop and contain various natural and non-natural amino acid substitutions in the reactive-site loop. Upon replacement of P1 lysine residue #10 within the open-chain variant of MCoTI-II by the non-natural isosteric nucleo amino acid AlaG [beta-(guanin-9-yl)-L-alanine], a conformationally restricted arginine mimetic, residual inhibitory activity was detected, albeit reduced by four orders of magnitude. While the cyclic inhibitors MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II were found to be very potent trypsin inhibitors, with picomolar inhibition constants, the open-chain variants displayed an approximately 10-fold lower affinity. These data suggest that the formation of a circular backbone in the MCoTI squash inhibitors results in enhanced affinity and therefore is a determinant of biological activity. PMID:16336125

  14. Trypsin inhibition by macrocyclic and open-chain variants of the squash inhibitor MCoTI-II.

    PubMed

    Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Le Nguyen, Dung; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2005-12-01

    MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis are inhibitors of trypsin-like proteases and the only known members of the large family of squash inhibitors that are cyclic and contain an additional loop connecting the amino- and the carboxy-terminus. To investigate the contribution of macrocycle formation to biological activity, we synthesized a set of open-chain variants of MCoTI-II that lack the cyclization loop and contain various natural and non-natural amino acid substitutions in the reactive-site loop. Upon replacement of P1 lysine residue #10 within the open-chain variant of MCoTI-II by the non-natural isosteric nucleo amino acid AlaG [beta-(guanin-9-yl)-L-alanine], a conformationally restricted arginine mimetic, residual inhibitory activity was detected, albeit reduced by four orders of magnitude. While the cyclic inhibitors MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II were found to be very potent trypsin inhibitors, with picomolar inhibition constants, the open-chain variants displayed an approximately 10-fold lower affinity. These data suggest that the formation of a circular backbone in the MCoTI squash inhibitors results in enhanced affinity and therefore is a determinant of biological activity.

  15. Allogeneic lymphocyte stimulation in rabbits: induction of a low MW inhibitor for trypsin and for a concurrently induced alpha-macroglobulin-proteinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, D; Teodorescu, M; Dray, S

    1985-01-01

    We have shown previously that the i.v. inoculation of allogeneic lymph node cells in rabbits induces the appearance in the serum of an alpha M-serine proteinase complex which behaves in an Ig-turnover assay as any polyclonal B-cell activator (PBA), and that this PBA activity is due to the enzyme. Here, we show that the allogeneic stimulation also induces the appearance in the low molecular weight fraction of the serum (1000-110,000 MW) of an inhibitor which blocks the PBA activity of the complex without affecting the PBA activity of LPS or dextran sulphate. The inhibitor blocked the ability of the enzyme associated with alpha M to degrade Chromozym TRY, a low MW trypsin substrate. The inhibitor also blocked the enzymatic activity of trypsin for large as well as for low MW substrates. Thus, allogeneic stimulation in vivo results in the production, not only of an alpha M-proteinase complex, but also of an inhibitor for this proteinase as well as for trypsin. The appearance of the inhibitor, along with the alpha M-serine proteinase complex as a result of allogeneic stimulation in rabbits, is of interest since a similar alpha M-serine proteinase complex and inhibitor may appear in the serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:2410355

  16. Effect of syntactic similarity on cortical activation during second language processing: a comparison of English and Japanese among native Korean trilinguals.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Sugiura, Motoaki; Sassa, Yuko; Haji, Tomoki; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato; Horie, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2007-03-01

    In this study of native Korean trilinguals we examined the effect of syntactic similarity between first (L1) and second (L2) languages on cortical activation during the processing of Japanese and English, which are, respectively, very similar to and different from Korean. Subjects had equivalent proficiency in Japanese and English. They performed auditory sentence comprehension tasks in Korean, Japanese, and English during functional MRI (fMRI). The bilateral superior temporal cortex was activated during the comprehension of three languages. The pars triangularis of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was additionally activated for L2 processing. Furthermore, the right cerebellum, the pars opercularis of the left IFG, and the posteriomedial part of the superior frontal gyrus were activated during the English tasks only. We observed significantly greater activation in the pars opercularis of the left IFG, the right cerebellum, and the right superior temporal cortex during the English than Japanese task; activation in these regions did not differ significantly between Korean and Japanese. Differential activation of the pars opercularis of the left IFG and the right cerebellum likely reflects syntactic distance and differential activation in the right superior temporal cortex may reflect the prosodic distance between English from Korean and Japanese. Furthermore, in the pars oparcularis of the left IFG and the right cerebellum, significant negative correlation between the activation and duration of exposure was observed for English, but not for Japanese. Our research supports the notion that linguistic similarity between L1 and L2 affects the cortical processing of second language.

  17. Changes in soil diversity and global activities following invasions of the exotic invasive plant, Amaranthus viridis L., decrease the growth of native sahelian Acacia species.

    PubMed

    Sanon, Arsene; Béguiristain, Thierry; Cébron, Aurelie; Berthelin, Jacques; Ndoye, Ibrahima; Leyval, Corinne; Sylla, Samba; Duponnois, Robin

    2009-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether the invasive plant Amaranthus viridis influenced soil microbial and chemical properties and to assess the consequences of these modifications on native plant growth. The experiment was conducted in Senegal at two sites: one invaded by A. viridis and the other covered by other plant species. Soil nutrient contents as well as microbial community density, diversity and functions were measured. Additionally, five sahelian Acacia species were grown in (1) soil disinfected or not collected from both sites, (2) uninvaded soil exposed to an A. viridis plant aqueous extract and (3) soil collected from invaded and uninvaded sites and inoculated or not with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices. The results showed that the invasion of A. viridis increased soil nutrient availability, bacterial abundance and microbial activities. In contrast, AM fungi and rhizobial development and the growth of Acacia species were severely reduced in A. viridis-invaded soil. Amaranthus viridis aqueous extract also exhibited an inhibitory effect on rhizobial growth, indicating an antibacterial activity of this plant extract. However, the inoculation of G. intraradices was highly beneficial to the growth and nodulation of Acacia species. These results highlight the role of AM symbiosis in the processes involved in plant coexistence and in ecosystem management programs that target preservation of native plant diversity.

  18. Clonidine displacement from type 1 imidazoline receptor by p-aminobenzamidine, the prototype of trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pallottini, Valentina; Marino, Maria; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2002-11-01

    p-Aminobenzamidine inhibits competitively the catalytic activity of enzymes that recognize preferentially the L-arginyl side chain and related structures. Notably, p-aminobenzamidine is considered as the prototype of trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, p-aminobenzamidine inhibits the catalytic activity of nitric oxide synthase type I and type II as well as copper amine oxidase. Taking into account the structural similarity between p-aminobenzamidine, agmatine (the putative endogenous ligand of the membrane type 1 imidazoline receptor (I1-R)), and N-amidino-2-hydroxypyrrolidine (the product of agmatine oxidation by copper amine oxidase), the [3H]clonidine displacement from I1-R in rat heart membranes by p-aminobenzamidine was investigated. p-Aminobenzamidine is as effective as agmatine and N-amidino-2-hydroxypyrrolidine and more effective than the antihypertensive drug clonidine to displace [3H]clonidine from I1-R. Therefore, trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors structurally related to p-aminobenzamidine should be administrated under careful control. PMID:12587981

  19. Native American Discursive Tactic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jason Edward

    2013-01-01

    This essay derives from a course called ‘"The Rhetoric of Native America,’" which is a historical-critical survey of Native American primary texts. The course examines the rhetoric employed by Natives to enact social change and to build community in the face of exigencies. The main goal of exploring a native text (particularly, Simon Pokagon's…

  20. Protein surface softness is the origin of enzyme cold-adaptation of trypsin.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2014-08-01

    Life has effectively colonized most of our planet and extremophilic organisms require specialized enzymes to survive under harsh conditions. Cold-loving organisms (psychrophiles) express heat-labile enzymes that possess a high specific activity and catalytic efficiency at low temperatures. A remarkable universal characteristic of cold-active enzymes is that they show a reduction both in activation enthalpy and entropy, compared to mesophilic orthologs, which makes their reaction rates less sensitive to falling temperature. Despite significant efforts since the early 1970s, the important question of the origin of this effect still largely remains unanswered. Here we use cold- and warm-active trypsins as model systems to investigate the temperature dependence of the reaction rates with extensive molecular dynamics free energy simulations. The calculations quantitatively reproduce the catalytic rates of the two enzymes and further yield high-precision Arrhenius plots, which show the characteristic trends in activation enthalpy and entropy. Detailed structural analysis indicates that the relationship between these parameters and the 3D structure is reflected by significantly different internal protein energy changes during the reaction. The origin of this effect is not localized to the active site, but is found in the outer regions of the protein, where the cold-active enzyme has a higher degree of softness. Several structural mechanisms for softening the protein surface are identified, together with key mutations responsible for this effect. Our simulations further show that single point-mutations can significantly affect the thermodynamic activation parameters, indicating how these can be optimized by evolution.

  1. Protein surface softness is the origin of enzyme cold-adaptation of trypsin.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2014-08-01

    Life has effectively colonized most of our planet and extremophilic organisms require specialized enzymes to survive under harsh conditions. Cold-loving organisms (psychrophiles) express heat-labile enzymes that possess a high specific activity and catalytic efficiency at low temperatures. A remarkable universal characteristic of cold-active enzymes is that they show a reduction both in activation enthalpy and entropy, compared to mesophilic orthologs, which makes their reaction rates less sensitive to falling temperature. Despite significant efforts since the early 1970s, the important question of the origin of this effect still largely remains unanswered. Here we use cold- and warm-active trypsins as model systems to investigate the temperature dependence of the reaction rates with extensive molecular dynamics free energy simulations. The calculations quantitatively reproduce the catalytic rates of the two enzymes and further yield high-precision Arrhenius plots, which show the characteristic trends in activation enthalpy and entropy. Detailed structural analysis indicates that the relationship between these parameters and the 3D structure is reflected by significantly different internal protein energy changes during the reaction. The origin of this effect is not localized to the active site, but is found in the outer regions of the protein, where the cold-active enzyme has a higher degree of softness. Several structural mechanisms for softening the protein surface are identified, together with key mutations responsible for this effect. Our simulations further show that single point-mutations can significantly affect the thermodynamic activation parameters, indicating how these can be optimized by evolution. PMID:25165981

  2. Location of the binding site for the allosteric activator IMP in the COOH-terminal domain of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphates synthetase.

    PubMed

    Bueso, J; Lusty, C J; Rubio, V

    1994-09-15

    Using UV-irradiation we cross-linked IMP, the allosteric activator of E. coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase (a heterodimer of 117.7 and 41.4 kDa subunits), to the large subunit of the enzyme. As in the native enzyme-IMP complex, the cross-linked complex was resistant to attack by trypsin. Thus, IMP is attached to its normal site and induces the normal conformational changes. Limited digestion of the [3H]IMP-labeled enzyme with V8 staphylococcal protease or with trypsin in the presence of SDS, and NH2-terminal sequencing, showed that [3H]IMP is cross-linked to the COOH-terminal 20 kDa domain of the large subunit, downstream of residue 912, supporting the proposal that this domain is specialized in effector binding and regulation. PMID:8093025

  3. Beneficial effects of trypsin inhibitors derived from a spider venom peptide in L-arginine-induced severe acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ning, Weiwen; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Hengyun; Wang, Fan; Wang, Xiaojuan; Tang, Huaxin; Liang, Songping; Shi, Xiaoliu; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    HWTI is a 55-residue protein isolated from the venom of the spider Ornithoctonus huwena. It is a potent trypsin inhibitor and a moderate voltage-gated potassium channel blocker. Here, we designed and expressed two HWTI mutants, HWTI-mut1 and HWTI-mut2, in which the potassium channel inhibitory activity was reduced while the trypsin inhibitory activity of the wild type form (approximately 5 EPU/mg) was retained. Animal studies showed that these mutants were less toxic than HWTI. The effects of HWTI and HWTI-mut1 were examined in a mouse model of acute pancreatitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of a large dose of L-arginine (4 mg/kg, twice). Serum amylase and serum lipase activities were assessed, and pathological sections of the pancreas were examined. Treatment with HWTI and HWTI-mut1 significantly reduced serum amylase and lipase levels in a dose dependent manner. Compared with the control group, at 4 mg/kg, HWTI significantly reduced serum amylase level by 47% and serum lipase level by 73%, while HWTI-mut1 significantly reduced serum amylase level by 59% and serum lipase level by 72%. Moreover, HWTI and HWTI-mut1 effectively protected the pancreas from acinar cell damage and inflammatory cell infiltration. The trypsin inhibitory potency and lower neurotoxicity of HWTI-mut1 suggest that it could potentially be developed as a drug for the treatment of acute pancreatitis with few side effects. PMID:23613780

  4. Structure of the dinuclear active site of urease. X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of native and 2-mercaptoethanol-inhibited bacterial and plant enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shengke; Scott, R.A. ); Lee, M.H.; Hausinger, R.P. ); Clark, P.A.; Wilcox, D.E. )

    1994-04-13

    The structures of the dinuclear Ni(II) active sites of urease from jack bean and Klebsiella aerogenes are compared with and without the addition of the inhibitor 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). No significant differences are observed by nickel K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy between the plant and bacterial enzymes. The Ni X-ray absorption edge spectra display an 8332-eV 1s[yields]3d peak intensity similar to that observed for five-coordinate Ni(II) compounds[sup 1] for both native and 2-ME-bound derivatives. Curve-fitting of Ni EXAFS data indicates that the average Ni(II) coordination environment in native urease can be described as Ni(imidazole)[sub x](N,O)[sub 5[minus]x], with x = 2 or 3. Addition of 2-ME results in replacement of one of the non-imidazole (N,O) ligands with (S,Cl) (most likely the thiolate sulfur of 2-ME) and results in the appearance of a new peak in the Fourier transforms that can only be fit with a Ni[center dot][center dot][center dot]Ni scattering component at a Ni-Ni distance of [approximately]3.26 [angstrom]. A structure for this 2-ME-bound dinuclear site is proposed to contain the two Ni(II) ions bridged by the thiolate sulfur of 2-ME.

  5. Phenotypes of trypsin- and collagenase-prepared bovine corneal endothelial cells in the presence of a selective Rho kinase inhibitor, Y-27632

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chien-Chia; Chen, Chun-Wen; Ho, Wei-Ting; Hu, Fung-Rong; Lee, Shwu-Huey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To optimize isolation of viable bovine corneal endothelial cells (BCECs), we evaluated the effectiveness of various preparation protocols. This entailed comparing the effects of collagenase A and trypsin in the presence and absence of a Rho kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, on proliferation and tight junctional and cytoskeletal integrity during their expansion. Methods 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation evaluated cell proliferation. Western blot analysis evaluated F-actin, zonule occludin, and ZO-1 associated nucleic acid binding protein (ZONAB) and RhoA expression. Rho A pulldown assay evaluated Rho A activity. Results In the trypsin (TrypLE)-prepared BCECs, BrdU incorporation decreased whereas nuclear ZONAB expression increased and became stable from day 3 to 7. In contrast, in the collagenase-A-prepared BCECs, we observed preserved ZO-1 integrity, invariant nuclear ZONAB expression, and dense cortical F-actin expression, and BrdU incorporation was invariant from days 1 to 7. Y-27632 did not increase BrdU incorporation and nuclear ZONAB expression in the TrypLE-prepared and the collagenase-A-prepared BCECs. Moreover, Y-27632 increased irregular cellular morphology and downregulated the expression of ZO-1 in the collagenase-A-prepared BCECs from days 1 to 7. Y-27632 inhibited RhoA activation irrespective of whether the cells were isolated with trypsin or collagenase A. Conclusions It is preferable to isolate BCECs with collagenase A and expand them without Y-27632. With this protocol, proliferative activity and tight junctional and cytoskeletal integrity are better preserved than if trypsin is used in the presence or absence of Y-27632. PMID:26097378

  6. Astronomy in the Native-Oriented Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Murray R.

    1984-01-01

    Outlines background, materials, operation, and evaluation of four activities for grades six-nine designed to illustrate how curriculum activities can enhance astronomy concepts and native awareness: "Were Native People Aware of Milky Way Galaxy?,""Constellation Cans,""Travels of the Big Dipper," and "How Did the Indians Study the Heavenly Bodies?"…

  7. Relation between coumarate decarboxylase and vinylphenol reductase activity with regard to the production of volatile phenols by native Dekkera bruxellensis strains under 'wine-like' conditions.

    PubMed

    Sturm, M E; Assof, M; Fanzone, M; Martinez, C; Ganga, M A; Jofré, V; Ramirez, M L; Combina, M

    2015-08-01

    Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis is considered a major cause of wine spoilage, and 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol are the most abundant off-aromas produced by this species. They are produced by decarboxylation of the corresponding hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs), followed by a reduction of the intermediate 4-vinylphenols. The aim of the present study was to examine coumarate decarboxylase (CD) and vinylphenol reductase (VR) enzyme activities in 5 native D. bruxellensis strains and determine their relation with the production of ethylphenols under 'wine-like' conditions. In addition, biomass, cell culturability, carbon source utilization and organic acids were monitored during 60 days. All strains assayed turned out to have both enzyme activities. No significant differences were found in CD activity, whilst VR activity was variable among the strains. Growth of D. bruxellensis under 'wine-like' conditions showed two growth phases. Sugars were completely consumed during the first growth phase. Transformation of HCAs into ethylphenols also occurred during active growth of the yeast. No statistical differences were observed in volatile phenol levels produced by the strains growing under 'wine-like' conditions, independently of the enzyme activity previously recorded. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a relationship between the physiological state of D. bruxellensis and its ability to produce ethylphenols. Inhibition of growth of D. bruxellensis in wine seems to be the most efficient way to avoid ethylphenol production and the consequent loss of wine quality.

  8. Distribution of Genes Encoding the Trypsin-Dependent Lantibiotic Ruminococcin A among Bacteria Isolated from Human Fecal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Marcille, F.; Gomez, A.; Joubert, P.; Ladiré, M.; Veau, G.; Clara, A.; Gavini, F.; Willems, A.; Fons, M.

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen bacterial strains capable of producing a trypsin-dependent antimicrobial substance active against Clostridium perfringens were isolated from human fecal samples of various origins (from healthy adults and children, as well as from adults with chronic pouchitis). Identification of these strains showed that they belonged to Ruminococcus gnavus, Clostridium nexile, and Ruminococcus hansenii species or to new operational taxonomic units, all from the Clostridium coccoides phylogenetic group. In hybridization experiments with a probe specific for the structural gene encoding the trypsin-dependent lantibiotic ruminococcin A (RumA) produced by R. gnavus, seven strains gave a positive response. All of them harbored three highly conserved copies of rumA-like genes. The deduced peptide sequence was identical to or showed one amino acid difference from the hypothetical precursor of RumA. Our results indicate that the rumA-like genes have been disseminated among R. gnavus and phylogenetically related strains that can make up a significant part of the human fecal microbiota. PMID:12089024

  9. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of trypsin-like serine protease from triangle-shell pearl mussel (Hyriopsis cumingii).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongquan; Liang, Jian; Zhao, Yurong; Liu, Qiaolin; Li, Yaoguo; Yi, Zili; Chen, Kaijian; Xiao, Tiaoyi

    2014-10-01

    Trypsin-like serine protease (TLS) is ubiquitous in animals and plays a number of diverse roles, including dietary protein digestion, hemolymph coagulation, antimicrobial activity and immune responses, among others. This study reports the isolation of a 1048 bp full-length cDNA sequence of TLS from triangle-shell pearl mussel (Hyriopsis cumingii), including a 12 bp 5' UTR (untranslated region), a 172 bp 3' UTR, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 864 bp by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Bioinformatic analysis shows that the gene belongs to the trypsin-like serine protease superfamily, and contains a 15 residues N-terminal signal peptide and a conserved C-terminal domain. In comparison to other serine proteases, the catalytic triad were identified as His-98, Asp-149, and Ser-240. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) showed a broad expression of the TLS gene in ten tested tissues. Time-course expression analysis demonstrated that the expression level of the TLS mRNA was significantly up-regulated in eight tested tissues (liver, intestine, gill, heart, axe foot, adductor muscle, kidney and gonad), but down-regulated in mantle and stomach after Aeromonas hydrophila injection. This is one of the results indicate that TLS may be involved in innate defense reactions against A. hydrophila in triangle-shell pearl mussel. PMID:25149589

  10. Effects of tobacco genetically modified to express protease inhibitor bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor on non-target soil organisms.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Maureen; Brownbridge, Michael; Stilwell, Wendy B; Gerard, Emily M; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Barraclough, Emma I; Christeller, John T

    2007-01-01

    Effects of tobacco genetically modified to express the protease inhibitor bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor (BSTI) were examined in laboratory assays against three earthworm and one collembolan species. BSTI is a serine protease inhibitor that can bind to the digestive trypsins of insects feeding on modified plants, resulting in reduced growth and survival. Protease inhibitors are active against a broad range of insects, so may have a large impact on non-target organisms. Survival and fecundity of the collembolan Folsomia candida were unaffected by consumption of artificial diet containing BSTI-expressing tobacco leaf or powdered freeze-dried BSTI-expressing tobacco leaf that was added to soil. Similarly, mortality and growth of earthworms Aporrectodea caliginosa and Lumbricus rubellus did not differ significantly between soil augmented with BSTI-expressing tobacco leaves or unmodified control leaves. The redworm Eisenia fetida gained less weight when provided with BSTI-expressing leaves in one assay, but when the experiment was repeated, there was no significant difference between treatments. BSTI-expressing tobacco and unmodified control leaves decomposed at the same rate, indicating that the inhibitor had no effect on the overall function of the decomposer community of micro-flora and fauna in soil. PMID:18001685

  11. Alginate as a protease inhibitor in vitro and in a model gut system; selective inhibition of pepsin but not trypsin

    PubMed Central

    Chater, Peter Ian; Wilcox, Mathew D.; Brownlee, Iain A.; Pearson, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Alginates are widely used in the food and medical industries, including as a Gastro-Oesophagul Reflux treatment. This work investigates the inhibitory effects of alginate on the reflux aggressors trypsin and pepsin and the role of alginate-substrate binding, pH and alginate structure on inhibition. Alginates were shown to reduce pepsin activity by up to 53.9% (±9.5SD) in vitro. Strong positive correlation between alginate mannuronate residue frequency and levels of pepsin inhibition was observed. Limited inhibition of trypsin was shown. Viscometric observations of pH dependent interactions between alginate and protein suggest a mechanism whereby pH dependent ionic interactions reduce substrate availability to enzyme at acidic pH. To understand how dietary protein digestion is affected by alginate, proteolytic digestion was investigated in an in vitro model of the upper digestive tract. Significant inhibition of proteolysis was shown in the gastric phase of digestion, but not the small intestinal phase. PMID:26256170

  12. Effects of tobacco genetically modified to express protease inhibitor bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor on non-target soil organisms.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Maureen; Brownbridge, Michael; Stilwell, Wendy B; Gerard, Emily M; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Barraclough, Emma I; Christeller, John T

    2007-01-01

    Effects of tobacco genetically modified to express the protease inhibitor bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor (BSTI) were examined in laboratory assays against three earthworm and one collembolan species. BSTI is a serine protease inhibitor that can bind to the digestive trypsins of insects feeding on modified plants, resulting in reduced growth and survival. Protease inhibitors are active against a broad range of insects, so may have a large impact on non-target organisms. Survival and fecundity of the collembolan Folsomia candida were unaffected by consumption of artificial diet containing BSTI-expressing tobacco leaf or powdered freeze-dried BSTI-expressing tobacco leaf that was added to soil. Similarly, mortality and growth of earthworms Aporrectodea caliginosa and Lumbricus rubellus did not differ significantly between soil augmented with BSTI-expressing tobacco leaves or unmodified control leaves. The redworm Eisenia fetida gained less weight when provided with BSTI-expressing leaves in one assay, but when the experiment was repeated, there was no significant difference between treatments. BSTI-expressing tobacco and unmodified control leaves decomposed at the same rate, indicating that the inhibitor had no effect on the overall function of the decomposer community of micro-flora and fauna in soil.

  13. Preparation of a novel polymer monolith with functional polymer brushes by two-step atom-transfer radical polymerization for trypsin immobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Zheng, Wei; Shen, Ying; Qi, Li; Li, Yaping; Qiao, Juan; Wang, Fuyi; Chen, Yi

    2014-12-01

    Novel porous polymer monoliths grafted with poly{oligo[(ethylene glycol) methacrylate]-co-glycidyl methacrylate} brushes were fabricated via two-step atom-transfer radical polymerization and used as a trypsin-based reactor in a continuous flow system. This is the first time that atom-transfer radical polymerization technique was utilized to design and construct polymer monolith bioreactor. The prepared monoliths possessed excellent permeability, providing fast mass transfer for enzymatic reaction. More importantly, surface properties, which were modulated via surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization, were found to have a great effect on bioreactor activities based on Michaelis-Menten studies. Furthermore, three model proteins were digested by the monolith bioreactor to a larger degree within dramatically reduced time (50 s), about 900 times faster than that by free trypsin (12 h). The proposed method provided a platform to prepare porous monoliths with desired surface properties for immobilizing various enzymes.

  14. Interaction between wheat alpha-amylase/trypsin bi-functional inhibitor and mammalian digestive enzymes: Kinetic, equilibrium and structural characterization of binding.

    PubMed

    Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Ali, Ishtiaq; Bonfili, Laura; Cecarini, Valentina; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2016-12-15

    Alpha-amylase/trypsin bi-functional inhibitors (ATIs) are non-gluten protein components of wheat and other cereals that can hypersensitise the human gastrointestinal tract, eventually causing enteropathies in predisposed individuals. These inhibitory proteins can act both directly by targeting specific pro-inflammatory receptors, and indirectly by impairing the activity of digestive enzymes, the latter event causing the accumulation of undigested peptides with potential immunogenic properties. Herein, according to a concerted approach based on in vitro and in silico methods we characterized kinetics, equilibrium parameters and modes of binding of the complexes formed between wheat ATI and two representative mammalian digestive enzymes, namely trypsin and alpha-amylase. Interestingly, we demonstrated ATI to target both enzymes with independent binding sites and with moderately high affinity. PMID:27451220

  15. Targeting the S1 and S3 subsite of trypsin with unnatural cationic amino acids generates antimicrobial peptides with potential for oral administration.

    PubMed

    Karstad, Rasmus; Isaksen, Geir; Wynendaele, Evelien; Guttormsen, Yngve; De Spiegeleer, Bart; Brandsdal, Bjørn-Olav; Svendsen, John Sigurd; Svenson, Johan

    2012-07-26

    This study investigates how the S1 and S3 site of trypsin can be challenged with cationic amino acid analogues to yield active antimicrobial peptides with stability toward tryptic degradation. It is shown that unnatural analogues can be incorporated to generate stable peptides with maintained bioactivity to allow for a potential oral uptake. Selected peptides were studied using isothermal calorimetry and computational methods. Both stable and unstable peptides were found to bind stoichiometrically to trypsin with dissociation constants ranging 2-60 μM, suggesting several different binding modes. The stability of selected peptides was analyzed in whole organ extracts and the incorporation of homoarginine and 2-amino-(3-guanidino)propanoic acid resulted in a 14- and 50-fold increase in duodenal stability. In addition, a 40- and 70-fold increase in stomach stability is also reported. Overall, these results illustrate how the incorporation of cationic side chains can be employed to generate bioactive peptides with significant systemic stability.

  16. Native Geoscience: Pathways to Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolman, J. R.; Seielstad, G.

    2006-12-01

    We are living in a definite time of change. Distinct changes are being experienced in our most sacred and natural environments. This is especially true on Native lands. Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways. The knowledge of balancing the needs of people with the needs of our natural environments is paramount in all tribal societies. This inherent accumulated knowledge has become the foundation on which to build a "blended" contemporary understanding of western science. The Dakota's and Northern California have embraced the critical need of understanding successful tribal strategies to engage educational systems (K-12 and higher education), to bring to prominence the professional development opportunities forged through working with tribal peoples and ensure the continued growth of Native earth and environmental scientists The presentation will highlight: 1) past and present philosophies on building and maintaining Native/Tribal students in earth and environmental sciences; 2) successful educational programs/activities in PreK-Ph.D. systems; 3) current Native leadership development in earth and environmental sciences; and 4) forward thinking for creating proaction collaborations addressing sustainable environmental, educational and social infrastructures for all people. Humboldt State University (HSU) and the University of North Dakota's Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment and the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium (UMAC) have been recognized nationally for their partnerships with Native communities. Unique collaborations are emerging "bridging" Native people across geographic areas in developing educational/research experiences which integrate the distinctive earth/environmental knowledge of tribal people. The presentation will highlight currently funded projects and initiatives as well as success stories of emerging Native earth system students and scientists.

  17. Relative importance of phytohemagglutinin (lectin) and trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) protein absorption and utilization by the rat.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M R; Sgarbieri, V C

    1998-10-01

    The main objective of this work was to perform a comparative study of the antinutritional and/or toxic properties of phytohemagglutinin and trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor extracted from the seed of a commercial cultivar of edible bean used in Brazil. Bean proteins were extracted in acidic salt solution and fractionated by dialysis and centrifugation, then freeze-dried. The total freeze-dried bean extract and the globulin or albumin protein fraction were resuspended in distilled water and heated (100 degrees C, 30 min) for inactivation of hemagglutinin. Diets were prepared with unheated bean protein fractions and heated ones (100% trypsin inhibitor activity, but 0% phytohemagglutinin activity). As a result, the inhibition of growth and poor dietary protein utilization were observed in rats fed diets containing unheated bean protein fractions, but not in rats fed diets containing heated fractions. It was thus assumed that phytohemagglutinin is the main antinutritional and toxic factor that in dry bean (Phaseolus) protein and that trypsin inhibitor (Bowman-Birk type) did not interfere with rat growth. PMID:9919488

  18. Trypsin inhibitor from Moringa oleifera flowers interferes with survival and development of Aedes aegypti larvae and kills bacteria inhabitant of larvae midgut.

    PubMed

    Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; de Lima Santos, Nataly Diniz; de Moura, Maiara Celine; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; do Amaral Ferraz Navarro, Daniela Maria; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes

    2014-02-01

    Moringa oleifera flower extract, with trypsin inhibitor activity, is a larvicidal agent on Aedes aegypti. This work reports the isolation of trypsin inhibitor (M. oleifera flower trypsin inhibitor (MoFTI)) and its effect on A. aegypti egg hatching, viability of newly hatched larvae, survival of pupae, and growth of inhabitant bacteria from midgut of fourth-instar larvae (L4). MoFTI (K i, 2.4 μM), isolated by affinity chromatography on trypsin-agarose column, was an 18.2 kDa polypeptide on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Flower extract (at concentrations of 8.5-17.0 mg/mL) reduced egg hatchability while MoFTI (0.05-0.5 mg/mL) did not affect the hatching rate. Mortality of newly hatched larvae ranged from 3.5 to 19.1 % in the presence of the extract (4.0-17.0 mg/mL) and was also promoted by MoFTI (LC50, 0.3 mg/mL). After 72 h, larvae incubated with extract at 13.0 and 17.0 mg/mL were at stages L2 and L1, respectively, while in control they reached L3 instar. In the presence of MoFTI, at all concentrations tested, the larvae did not pass the first instar. Flower extract and MoFTI did not interfere on pupae survival. The extract and MoFTI inhibited the growth of L4 gut bacteria (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 3.47 and 0.031 mg/mL, respectively) but only the inhibitor showed bactericide effect (minimum bactericidal concentration of 1.0 mg/mL). The findings reported herein indicate that MoFTI constitutes a larvicidal principle from M. oleifera flowers against A. aegypti newly hatched larvae and is an antibacterial agent active against the microbiota from L4 gut. PMID:24271154

  19. Influence of γ-radiation on the structure and function of soybean trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mallikarjunan, N; Marathe, Sushama; Deshpande, R; Jamdar, S N; Sharma, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) is a known antinutrient and food allergen present in soybean. γ-Radiation has the potential to inactivate the TI protein. However, a systematic study on the influence of different moisture levels during γ radiation on structure and function of the molecule has not been reported. Pure STI was irradiated up to 200 kGy, in dry state, with 50% moisture and in aqueous solution. The radiation damage in molecular structure was assessed using, SDS-PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, fluorescence measurement, and circular dichroism, while functional damage was assessed by the TI assay. In aqueous solution, both the structure and function of TI were almost destroyed at the 10 kGy dose. While with 50% moisture and in dry state, the loss in functional and structural attributes was discernible only at 30 and 100 kGy, respectively. The TI activity was found to be unaffected in dry and soaked seeds of soybean as well as other legumes up to irradiation doses of 100 and 50 kGy, respectively.

  20. Less is More: Membrane Protein Digestion Beyond Urea–Trypsin Solution for Next-level Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The goal of next-level bottom-up membrane proteomics is protein function investigation, via high-coverage high-throughput peptide-centric quantitation of expression, modifications and dynamic structures at systems scale. Yet efficient digestion of mammalian membrane proteins presents a daunting barrier, and prevalent day-long urea–trypsin in-solution digestion proved insufficient to reach this goal. Many efforts contributed incremental advances over past years, but involved protein denaturation that disconnected measurement from functional states. Beyond denaturation, the recent discovery of structure/proteomics omni-compatible detergent n-dodecyl-β-d-maltopyranoside, combined with pepsin and PNGase F columns, enabled breakthroughs in membrane protein digestion: a 2010 DDM-low-TCEP (DLT) method for H/D-exchange (HDX) using human G protein-coupled receptor, and a 2015 flow/detergent-facilitated protease and de-PTM digestions (FDD) for integrative deep sequencing and quantitation using full-length human ion channel complex. Distinguishing protein solubilization from denaturation, protease digestion reliability from theoretical specificity, and reduction from alkylation, these methods shifted day(s)-long paradigms into minutes, and afforded fully automatable (HDX)-protein-peptide-(tandem mass tag)-HPLC pipelines to instantly measure functional proteins at deep coverage, high peptide reproducibility, low artifacts and minimal leakage. Promoting—not destroying—structures and activities harnessed membrane proteins for the next-level streamlined functional proteomics. This review analyzes recent advances in membrane protein digestion methods and highlights critical discoveries for future proteomics. PMID:26081834

  1. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas.

  2. The incomplete anti-Rh antibody agglutination mechanism of trypsinized ORh+ red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R A; Leoni, J; Bazzurro, M

    1977-01-01

    The capacity for binding to trypsinized and non-trypsinized ORh+ red cells, of the IgG incomplete anti-Rh antibody and its F(ab')2 and Fc fragments has been investigated. An analysis has also been made of the capacity of non-specific human IgG, aggregated non-specific human IgG, human IgM (19S) and IgM (7S), and of fragments Fcgamma, Fcmu and Fc5mu to inhibit the agglutination of trypsinized ORh+ red cells by the IgG incomplete anti-Rh antibody. The results obtained indicate that these antibodies behave in a similar manner to that of nonprecipitating antibodies, and that the agglutination of trypsinized red cells seems to be a mixed reaction due to the interaction of an Fab fragment with its Rh antigenic determinant present in the surface of a red cell and the Fc of the same molecule with a receptor for Fc present in adjacent red cells. The trypsin treatment apparently results in the liberation of occult Fc receptors. It has also been demonstrated that in the agglutination of ORh+ red cells by IgG incomplete anti-Rh antibody in the presence of albumin, interaction must occur in some manner between the albumin and the Fc fragment since the F(ab')2 fragment does not give rise to agglutination under such conditions. Images Figure 1 PMID:415968

  3. Crystallization, data collection and processing of the chymotrypsin–BTCI–trypsin ternary complex

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves, Gisele Ferreira; Teles, Rozeni Chagas Lima; Cavalcante, Nayara Silva; Neves, David; Ventura, Manuel Mateus; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Freitas, Sonia Maria de

    2007-12-01

    A ternary complex of the proteinase inhibitor (BTCI) with trypsin and chymotrypsin was crystallized and its crystal structure was solved by molecular replacement. A ternary complex of the black-eyed pea trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitor (BTCI) with trypsin and chymotrypsin was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with 0.1 M HEPES pH 7.5, 10%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 6000 and 5%(v/v) 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol as precipitant. BTCI is a small protein with 83 amino-acid residues isolated from Vigna unguiculata seeds and is able to inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin simultaneously by forming a stable ternary complex. X-ray data were collected from a single crystal of the trypsin–BTCI–chymotrypsin ternary complex to 2.7 Å resolution under cryogenic conditions. The structure of the ternary complex was solved by molecular replacement using the crystal structures of the BTCI–trypsin binary complex (PDB code) and chymotrypsin (PDB code) as search models.

  4. Trypsin inhibitor from tamarindus indica L. seeds reduces weight gain and food consumption and increases plasmatic cholecystokinin levels

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento Campos Ribeiro, Joycellane Alline; Serquiz, Alexandre Coellho; dos Santos Silva, Priscila Fabíola; Barbosa, Patrícia Batista Barra Medeiros; Sampaio, Tarcísio Bruno Montenegro; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Oliveira, Adeliana Silva; Machado, Richele Janaina Araújo; Maciel, Bruna Leal Lima; Uchôa, Adriana Ferreira; dos Santos, Elizeu Antunes; de Araújo Morais, Ana Heloneida

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Seeds are excellent sources of proteinase inhibitors, some of which may have satietogenic and slimming actions. We evaluated the effect of a trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica L. seeds on weight gain, food consumption and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. METHODS: A trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus was isolated using ammonium sulfate (30–60%) following precipitation with acetone and was further isolated with Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses were conducted to assess the in vivo digestibility, food intake, body weight evolution and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. Histological analyses of organs and biochemical analyses of sera were performed. RESULTS: The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduced food consumption, thereby reducing weight gain. The in vivo true digestibility was not significantly different between the control and Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor-treated groups. The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus did not cause alterations in biochemical parameters or liver, stomach, intestine or pancreas histology. Rats treated with the trypsin inhibitor showed significantly elevated cholecystokinin levels compared with animals receiving casein or water. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the isolated trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduces weight gain by reducing food consumption, an effect that may be mediated by increased cholecystokinin. Thus, the potential use of this trypsin inhibitor in obesity prevention and/or treatment should be evaluated. PMID:25789523

  5. Use of cholinesterase activity as a biomarker of pesticide exposure used on Costa Rican banana plantations in the native tropical fish Astyanax aeneus (Günther, 1860).

    PubMed

    Mena, F; Azzopardi, M; Pfennig, S; Ruepert, C; Tedengren, M; Castillo, L E; Gunnarsson, J S

    2014-01-01

    In Costa Rica, thousands of tones of agricultural pesticides have been used for decades and their use is continuously increasing due to intensive and expanding production of coffee, pineapple, rice, ornamental plants and bananas. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether choline esterase (ChE) activity could be used as a biomarker of exposure to pesticides in the Costa Rican native fish Astyanax aeneus (characidae). Three methods used in order to evaluate the ChE biomarker were as follows: Laboratory studies where A. aeneus was exposed to organophosphate pesticide (ethoprophos); In situ 48 hr exposure assessment using caging experiments with fish exposed upstream and downstream of banana plantations and ChE activity estimation of in fish captured directly at sites with different degrees of pesticide exposure. Results from the laboratory studies showed that ChE activity in both brain and muscle tissue was significantly lower in fish exposed to ethoprophos than in controls. Fish from the caging experiments showed no difference in ChE activity neither in brain nor in muscle tissue between the four tested sites and was attributed to the short duration of the exposure. Asignificant difference in ChE activity was determined in muscle of fish captured from Laguna Madre de Dios compared to fish from Canal Batán. Although our laboratory results revealed that ChE activity in A. aeneus was highly responsive to ethoprophos, results from field experiments were less conclusive and showed that the captured fish showed large variability in ChE activity and that more research is needed before ChE activity can be used as reliable biomarker of pesticide exposure. PMID:24579519

  6. Use of cholinesterase activity as a biomarker of pesticide exposure used on Costa Rican banana plantations in the native tropical fish Astyanax aeneus (Günther, 1860).

    PubMed

    Mena, F; Azzopardi, M; Pfennig, S; Ruepert, C; Tedengren, M; Castillo, L E; Gunnarsson, J S

    2014-01-01

    In Costa Rica, thousands of tones of agricultural pesticides have been used for decades and their use is continuously increasing due to intensive and expanding production of coffee, pineapple, rice, ornamental plants and bananas. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether choline esterase (ChE) activity could be used as a biomarker of exposure to pesticides in the Costa Rican native fish Astyanax aeneus (characidae). Three methods used in order to evaluate the ChE biomarker were as follows: Laboratory studies where A. aeneus was exposed to organophosphate pesticide (ethoprophos); In situ 48 hr exposure assessment using caging experiments with fish exposed upstream and downstream of banana plantations and ChE activity estimation of in fish captured directly at sites with different degrees of pesticide exposure. Results from the laboratory studies showed that ChE activity in both brain and muscle tissue was significantly lower in fish exposed to ethoprophos than in controls. Fish from the caging experiments showed no difference in ChE activity neither in brain nor in muscle tissue between the four tested sites and was attributed to the short duration of the exposure. Asignificant difference in ChE activity was determined in muscle of fish captured from Laguna Madre de Dios compared to fish from Canal Batán. Although our laboratory results revealed that ChE activity in A. aeneus was highly responsive to ethoprophos, results from field experiments were less conclusive and showed that the captured fish showed large variability in ChE activity and that more research is needed before ChE activity can be used as reliable biomarker of pesticide exposure.

  7. Development of microwave-assisted protein digestion based on trypsin-immobilized magnetic microspheres for highly efficient proteolysis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuang; Lin, Zhenxin; Yao, Guoping; Deng, Chunhui; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2007-01-01

    In this study, very easily prepared trypsin-immobilized magnetic microspheres were applied in microwave-assisted protein digestion and firstly applied for proteome analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Magnetic microspheres with small size were synthesized and modified by 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO). Trypsin was immobilized onto magnetic microspheres through only a one-step reaction of its amine group with GLYMO. When these easily prepared trypsin-immobilized magnetic microspheres were applied in microwave-assisted protein digestion, the magnetic microspheres not only functionalized as substrate for trypsin immobilization, but also as an excellent microwave absorber and thus improved the efficiency of microwave-assisted digestion greatly. Cytochrome c was used as a model protein to verify its digestion efficiency. Without any additives such as organic solvents or urea, peptide fragments produced in 15 s could be confidently identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and better digestion efficiency was obtained comparing to conventional in-solution digestion (12 h). Besides, with an external magnet, trypsin could be used repeatedly and at the same time no contaminants were introduced into the sample solution. It was verified that the enzyme maintained high activity after seven runs. Furthermore, reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) fractions of rat liver extract were also successfully processed using this novel method. These results indicated that this fast and efficient digestion method, which combined the advantages of immobilized trypsin and microwave-assisted protein digestion, will greatly hasten the application of top-down proteomic techniques for large-scale analysis in biological and clinical research.

  8. Increased (/sup 125/I)trypsin-binding in serum from cystic fibrosis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, K.L.; Frates, R.C. Jr.; Sheikholislam, B.M.; Iwahashi-Hosoda, C.K.

    1982-01-01

    The capacities of normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) sera to bind to exogenous human (/sup 125/I)trypsin were compared. Sera from eight older CF patients bound significantly more exogenous human (/sup 125/I)trypsin than did sera from eight normal subjects (p less than 0.001). Disregarding the increased trypsin-binding (TB) of CF sera, serum immunoreactive trypsinogen (SIRT) levels were not detectable in these eight older CF patients. However, when SIRT levels were corrected for TB, four CF patients had normal SIRT concentrations and four had low but detectable SIRT levels. As compared to five normal newborns' sera, serum from a newborn with CF had normal TB and the SIRT levels were very high. In conclusion, increased TB in CF serum lowers results of SIRT assays. Therefore, unless SIRT levels are corrected for TB, results obtained from currently available SIRT kits may be invalid.

  9. Alaska Natives & the Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Robert D.; And Others

    Pursuant to the Native land claims within Alaska, this compilation of background data and interpretive materials relevant to a fair resolution of the Alaska Native problem seeks to record data and information on the Native peoples; the land and resources of Alaska and their uses by the people in the past and present; land ownership; and future…

  10. Native American Healing Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell A. A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous healing practices among Native Americans have been documented in the United States since colonisation. Cultural encapsulation has deterred the acknowledgement of Native American medicinal practices as a precursor to folk medicine and many herbal remedies, which have greatly influenced modern medicine. Understanding Native American…

  11. In vitro activities of native and designed peptide antibiotics against drug sensitive and resistant tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Sukwon S; Bang, Yung Jue; Kim, Seong Jin; Lee, Byeong Jae

    2003-07-01

    In order to develop peptide agents with reduced length and enhanced tumoricidal activity, we have designed gaegurin 6 (GGN6) derivatives through deletions and/or substitutions of amino acids. The deletion of hydrophobic amino terminal region completely abolished antitumor activity whereas the deletion of carboxy terminal region had little influence on antitumor activity. Antitumor activity of the PTP peptides did not correlate with antibacterial activity. PTP7, the most potent derivative, was found to have comparable antitumor activity to GGN6 in spite of reduced number of amino acids which is about half the size of gaegurin 6; furthermore, it showed little cytotoxicity on PBMCs and RBCs. GGN6 and PTP7 also showed equivalent cytotoxicity against drug sensitive (MCF-7) and multidrug-resistant cell lines (MCF-7/DOX). Plasma membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation of peptide-treated tumor cells indicated that the peptides could induce apoptosis in tumor cells. These results suggest that GGN6 and its derivatives can be developed as new anticancer agents and may provide a new strategy for overcoming MDR which is a major problem in cancer therapy.