Science.gov

Sample records for active neutron measurements

  1. Neutron and proton activation measurements from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radioactivity induced by high-energy protons and secondary neutrons (from nuclear interactions) in various samples returned from different locations in Skylab was measured directly by gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of decay gamma rays from the samples. Incident fluxes were derived from the activation measurements, using known nuclear cross-section. Neutron and proton flux values were found to range from 0.2 to 5 particles/sq cm-sec, depending on the energy range and location in Skylab. The thermal neutron flux was less than 0.07 neutrons/sq cm-sec. The results are useful for data analysis and planning of future high-energy astronomy experiments.

  2. Neutron Yield Measurements via Aluminum Activation

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-08

    Neutron activation of aluminum may occur by several neutron capture reactions. Four such reactions are described here: {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(n, 2n){sup 26}Al and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg. The radioactive nuclei {sup 28}Al, {sup 24}Na, and {sup 27}Mg, which are produced via the {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg neutron reactions, beta decay to excited states of {sup 28}Si, {sup 24}Mg and {sup 27}Al respectively. These excited states then emit gamma rays as the nuclei de-excite to their respective ground states.

  3. Triton burnup measurements in KSTAR using a neutron activation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jungmin; Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Jun Young; Rhee, T.; Kim, Junghee; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of the time-integrated triton burnup for deuterium plasma in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) have been performed following the simultaneous detection of the d-d and d-t neutrons. The d-d neutrons were measured using a 3He proportional counter, fission chamber, and activated indium sample, whereas the d-t neutrons were detected using activated silicon and copper samples. The triton burnup ratio from KSTAR discharges is found to be in the range 0.01%-0.50% depending on the plasma conditions. The measured burnup ratio is compared with the prompt loss fraction of tritons calculated with the Lorentz orbit code and the classical slowing-down time. The burnup ratio is found to increase as plasma current and classical slowing-down time increase.

  4. Analysis of initial in-plant active neutron multiplicity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.; Harker, W.C.

    1993-08-01

    This paper analyzes initial in-plant measurements made by active neutron multiplicity counting, a new technique currently under development for the assay of bulk uranium containing kilograms of {sup 235}U. The measurements were made at Savannah River and Y-12 using active well coincidence counters and prototype multiplicity electronics and software from Los Alamos. For one of the sets of highly enriched uranium samples measured to data, we improved the assay accuracy by an order-of-magnitude by adding the multiplicity analysis to the conventional coincidence analysis. This paper summarizes our results and describes areas where further work is needed.

  5. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, J.; Koleška, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is an essential component of fluorescent lamps. Not all fluorescent lamps are recycled, resulting in contamination of the environment with toxic mercury, making measurement of the mercury mass used in fluorescent lamps important. Mercury mass measurement of lamps via instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) was tested under various conditions in the LVR-15 research reactor. Fluorescent lamps were irradiated in different positions in vertical irradiation channels and a horizontal channel in neutron fields with total fluence rates from 3×108 cm-2 s-1 to 1014 cm-2 s-1. The 202Hg(n,γ)203Hg nuclear reaction was used for mercury mass evaluation. Activities of 203Hg and others induced radionuclides were measured via gamma spectrometry with an HPGe detector at various times after irradiation. Standards containing an Hg2Cl2 compound were used to determine mercury mass. Problems arise from the presence of elements with a large effective cross section in luminescent material (europium, antimony and gadolinium) and glass (boron). The paper describes optimization of the NAA procedure in the LVR-15 research reactor with particular attention to influence of neutron self-absorption in fluorescent lamps.

  6. Measurements of DT and DD neutron yields by neutron activation on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Larson, A.R.; LeMunyan, G.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1994-05-05

    A variety of elemental foils have been activated by neutron fluence from TFTR under conditions with the DT neutron yield per shot ranging from 10{sup 12} to over 10{sup 18}, and with the DT/(DD+DT) neutron ratio varying from 0.5% (from triton burnup) to unity. Linear response over this large dynamic range is obtained by reducing the mass of the foils and increasing the cooling time, all while accepting greatly improved counting statistics. Effects on background gamma-ray lines from foil-capsule-material contaminants. and the resulting lower limits on activation foil mass, have been determined. DT neutron yields from dosimetry standard reactions on aluminum, chromium, iron, nickel, zirconium, and indium are in agreement within the {plus_minus}9% (one-sigma,) accuracy of the measurements: also agreeing are yields from silicon foils using the ACTL library cross-section. While the ENDF/B-V library has too low a cross-section. Preliminary results from a variety of other threshold reactions are presented. Use of the {sup 115}In(n,n) {sup 115m}In reaction (0.42 times as sensitive to DT neutrons as DD neutrons) in conjunction with pure-DT reactions allows a determination of the DT/(DD+DT) ratio in trace tritium or low-power tritium beam experiments.

  7. Self-shielding effects in neutron spectra measurements for neutron capture therapy by means of activation foils.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Krzysztof; Józefowicz, Krystyna; Pytel, Beatrycze; Koziel, Alina

    2004-01-01

    The design and optimisation of a neutron beam for neutron capture therapy (NCT) is accompanied by the neutron spectra measurements at the target position. The method of activation detectors was applied for the neutron spectra measurements. Epithermal neutron energy region imposes the resonance structure of activation cross sections resulting in strong self-shielding effects. The neutron self-shielding correction factor was calculated using a simple analytical model of a single absorption event. Such a procedure has been applied to individual cross sections from pointwise ENDF/B-VI library and new corrected activation cross sections were introduced to a spectra unfolding algorithm. The method has been verified experimentally both for isotropic and for parallel neutron beams. Two sets of diluted and non-diluted activation foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in the neutron field. The comparison of activation rates of diluted and non-diluted foils has demonstrated the correctness of the applied self-shielding model.

  8. RADSAT Benchmarks for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2011-07-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers are used in these applications to measure the spectrum of the emitted photon flux, which consists of both continuum and characteristic gamma rays with discrete energies. Monte Carlo transport is the most commonly used simulation tool for this type of problem, but computational times can be prohibitively long. This work explores the use of multi-group deterministic methods for the simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems. The main purpose of this work is to benchmark several problems modeled with RADSAT and MCNP to experimental data. Additionally, the cross section libraries for RADSAT are updated to include ENDF/B-VII cross sections. Preliminary findings show promising results when compared to MCNP and experimental data, but also areas where additional inquiry and testing are needed. The potential benefits and shortcomings of the multi-group-based approach are discussed in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  9. A neutron activation technique for manganese measurements in humans.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, C; Byun, S H; Chettle, D R; Inskip, M J; Prestwich, W V

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for humans, animals, and plants and is required for growth, development, and maintenance of health. Studies show that Mn metabolism is similar to that of iron, therefore, increased Mn levels in humans could interfere with the absorption of dietary iron leading to anemia. Also, excess exposure to Mn dust, leads to nervous system disorders similar to Parkinson's disease. Higher exposure to Mn is essentially related to industrial pollution. Thus, there is a benefit in developing a clean non-invasive technique for monitoring such increased levels of Mn in order to understand the risk of disease and development of appropriate treatments. To this end, the feasibility of Mn measurements with their minimum detection limits (MDL) has been reported earlier from the McMaster group. This work presents improvement to Mn assessment using an upgraded system and optimized times of irradiation and counting for induced gamma activity of Mn. The technique utilizes the high proton current Tandetron accelerator producing neutrons via the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at McMaster University and an array of nine NaI (Tl) detectors in a 4 π geometry for delayed counting of gamma rays. The neutron irradiation of a set of phantoms was performed with protocols having different proton energy, current and time of irradiation. The improved MDLs estimated using the upgraded set up and constrained timings are reported as 0.67 μgMn/gCa for 2.3 MeV protons and 0.71 μgMn/gCa for 2.0 MeV protons. These are a factor of about 2.3 times better than previous measurements done at McMaster University using the in vivo set-up. Also, because of lower dose-equivalent and a relatively close MDL, the combination of: 2.0 MeV; 300 μA; 3 min protocol is recommended as compared to 2.3 MeV; 400 μA; 45 s protocol for further measurements of Mn in vivo. PMID:25169978

  10. Measurements of neutrons at JET by means of the activation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopowicz, R.; Bienkowska, B.; Drozdowicz, K.; Jednorog, S.; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Pytel, K.; Scholz, M.; Szydlowski, A.; Syme, B.; Tracz, G.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2011-05-01

    The neutron diagnostics in tokamaks like Joint European Torus (JET) are essential in estimating fusion power. The neutron activation method, supported by neutron transport calculations, is particularly useful for the evaluation of the total neutron yield from a single plasma discharge. This paper presents the results of activation experiments and calculations carried out for JET plasmas, from the selection of the activation materials to their irradiations in the neutron field of JET discharges. Neutron transport calculations were performed, leading to activation coefficients for new materials. The results of the calculations were used to design new composite samples to obtain information on both the yield and the neutron spectrum. The neutron measurements using these new activation materials were performed during the last JET experimental campaigns. The results are compared with neutron transport calculations. Additionally, application of the cadmium difference method allows revelation of the part of thermal neutrons near the tokamak first wall. The advantages of new activation materials and benchmarking the activation method against neutron transport calculations are also discussed.

  11. Evaluation of Am-Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; Peerani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with (α, n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured and theoretical spectra of various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. The singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis, being dominated by scattering which is highly dependent on item placement.

  12. Evaluation of Am–Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    DOE PAGES

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; Peerani, Paolo

    2016-05-25

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with ( α,n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured spectra ofmore » various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. Finally, the singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis.« less

  13. An Analysis Technique for Active Neutron Multiplicity Measurements Based on First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William S; Peerani, Paolo

    2012-08-13

    Passive neutron multiplicity counting is commonly used to quantify the total mass of plutonium in a sample, without prior knowledge of the sample geometry. However, passive neutron counting is less applicable to uranium measurements due to the low spontaneous fission rates of uranium. Active neutron multiplicity measurements are therefore used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in a sample. Unfortunately, there are still additional challenges to overcome for uranium measurements, such as the coupling of the active source and the uranium sample. Techniques, such as the coupling method, have been developed to help reduce the dependence of calibration curves for active measurements on uranium samples; although, they still require similar geometry known standards. An advanced active neutron multiplicity measurement method is being developed by Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in an attempt to overcome the calibration curve requirements. This method can be used to quantify the {sup 235}U mass in a sample containing uranium without using calibration curves. Furthermore, this method is based on existing detectors and nondestructive assay (NDA) systems, such as the LANL Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). This method uses an inexpensive boron carbide liner to shield the uranium sample from thermal and epithermal neutrons while allowing fast neutrons to reach the sample. Due to the relatively low and constant fission and absorption energy dependent cross-sections at high neutron energies for uranium isotopes, fast neutrons can penetrate the sample without significant attenuation. Fast neutron interrogation therefore creates a homogeneous fission rate in the sample, allowing for first principle methods to be used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in the sample. This paper discusses the measurement method concept and development, including measurements and simulations performed to date, as well as the potential

  14. Measurements of activation induced by environmental neutrons using ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez Canet, M J; Hult, M; Köhler, M; Johnston, P N

    2000-03-01

    The flux of environmental neutrons is being studied by activation of metal discs of selected elements. Near the earth's surface the total neutron flux is in the order of 10(-2) cm(-2)s(-1), which gives induced activities of a few mBq in the discs. Initial results from this technique, involving activation at ground level for several materials (W, Au, Ta, In, Re, Sm, Dy and Mn) and ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in an underground laboratory located at 500 m.w.e., are presented. Diffusion of environmental neutrons in water is also measured by activation of gold at different depths.

  15. NOTE: Total body-calcium measurements: comparison of two delayed-gamma neutron activation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Ellis, K. J.; Yasumura, S.; Shypailo, R. J.; Pierson, R. N., Jr.

    1999-06-01

    This study compares two independently calibrated delayed-gamma neutron activation (DGNA) facilities, one at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York, and the other at the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), Houston, Texas that measure total body calcium (TBCa). A set of BNL phantoms was sent to CNRC for neutron activation analysis, and a set of CNRC phantoms was measured at BNL. Both facilities showed high precision (<2%), and the results were in good agreement, within 5%.

  16. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: Design, analysis, and sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, K. D. Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Smelser, R. M.; Torres, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Leeper, R. J.

    2014-04-15

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r{sup 2} decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm{sup 2} and is ∼ 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

  17. Measurement of residual 60Co activity induced by atomic-bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and background contribution by environmental neutrons.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi; Oka, Takamitsu; Shimazaki, Tatsuya; Okumura, Yutaka; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2002-12-01

    Residual 60Co activity in five steel samples induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured within about 1000 m from the hypocenter. The chemical separation of cobalt and nickel from steel samples was performed, and cobalt-enriched samples were prepared for all samples. Gamma-ray measurements were carried out with a low-background well-type germanium detector. The gamma-ray spectra for five samples were compared with the spectrum of a control sample to ensure that the observed 60Co was actually induced by A-bomb neutrons. The activation of cobalt by environmental neutrons was also investigated. It has been shown that the present 60Co data are consistent with earlier Hashizume's data. PMID:12674203

  18. Active-Interrogation Measurements of Induced-Fission Neutrons from Low-Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Dolan; M. J. Marcath; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester; A. Tomanin; P. Peerani; G. Nebbia

    2012-07-01

    Protection and control of nuclear fuels is paramount for nuclear security and safeguards; therefore, it is important to develop fast and robust controlling mechanisms to ensure the safety of nuclear fuels. Through both passive- and active-interrogation methods we can use fast-neutron detection to perform real-time measurements of fission neutrons for process monitoring. Active interrogation allows us to use different ranges of incident neutron energy to probe for different isotopes of uranium. With fast-neutron detectors, such as organic liquid scintillation detectors, we can detect the induced-fission neutrons and photons and work towards quantifying a sample’s mass and enrichment. Using MCNPX-PoliMi, a system was designed to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238. Measurements were then performed in the summer of 2010 at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. Fissions were induced with an associated particle D-T generator and an isotopic Am-Li source. The fission neutrons, as well as neutrons from (n, 2n) and (n, 3n) reactions, were measured with five 5” by 5” EJ-309 organic liquid scintillators. The D-T neutron generator was available as part of a measurement campaign in place by Padova University. The measurement and data-acquisition systems were developed at the University of Michigan utilizing a CAEN V1720 digitizer and pulse-shape discrimination algorithms to differentiate neutron and photon detections. Low-enriched uranium samples of varying mass and enrichment were interrogated. Acquired time-of-flight curves and cross-correlation curves are currently analyzed to draw relationships between detected neutrons and sample mass and enrichment. In the full paper, the promise of active-interrogation measurements and fast-neutron detection will be assessed through the example of this proof-of-concept measurement campaign. Additionally, MCNPX-PoliMi simulation results will be compared to the measured data to validate the MCNPX-PoliMi code

  19. Validation of the MCNP computational model for neutron flux distribution with the neutron activation analysis measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiyapun, K.; Chimtin, M.; Munsorn, S.; Somchit, S.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the method for validating the predication of the calculation methods for neutron flux distribution in the irradiation tubes of TRIGA research reactor (TRR-1/M1) using the MCNP computer code model. The reaction rate using in the experiment includes 27Al(n, α)24Na and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reactions. Aluminium (99.9 wt%) and gold (0.1 wt%) foils and the gold foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in 9 locations in the core referred to as CT, C8, C12, F3, F12, F22, F29, G5, and G33. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed using MCNP which consisted of the detailed geometrical model of the reactor core. The results from the experimental and calculated normalized reaction rates in the reactor core are in good agreement for both reactions showing that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled very well. The results indicated that the difference between the experimental measurements and the calculation of the reactor core using the MCNP geometrical model was below 10%. In conclusion the MCNP computational model which was used to calculate the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core can be used for others reactor core parameters including neutron spectra calculation, dose rate calculation, power peaking factors calculation and optimization of research reactor utilization in the future with the confidence in the accuracy and reliability of the calculation.

  20. Active-Interrogation Measurements of Fast Neutrons from Induced Fission in Low-Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Dolan; M. J. Marcath; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester; A. Tomanin; P. Peerani

    2014-02-01

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutron to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials.

  1. Absolute calibration method for laser megajoule neutron yield measurement by activation diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landoas, Olivier; Yu Glebov, Vladimir; Rossé, Bertrand; Briat, Michelle; Disdier, Laurent; Sangster, Thomas C.; Duffy, Tim; Marmouget, Jean Gabriel; Varignon, Cyril; Ledoux, Xavier; Caillaud, Tony; Thfoin, Isabelle; Bourgade, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The laser megajoule (LMJ) and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) plan to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The neutron yield is one of the most important parameters to characterize ICF experiment performance. For decades, the activation diagnostic was chosen as a reference at ICF facilities and is now planned to be the first nuclear diagnostic on LMJ, measuring both 2.45 MeV and 14.1 MeV neutron yields. Challenges for the activation diagnostic development are absolute calibration, accuracy, range requirement, and harsh environment. At this time, copper and zirconium material are identified for 14.1 MeV neutron yield measurement and indium material for 2.45 MeV neutrons. A series of calibrations were performed at Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) on a Van de Graff facility to determine activation diagnostics efficiencies and to compare them with results from calculations. The CEA copper activation diagnostic was tested on the OMEGA facility during DT implosion. Experiments showed that CEA and Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) diagnostics agree to better than 1% on the neutron yield measurement, with an independent calibration for each system. Also, experimental sensitivities are in good agreement with simulations and allow us to scale activation diagnostics for the LMJ measurement range.

  2. Measurement of residual 152Eu activity induced by atomic bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and the contribution of environmental neutrons to this activity.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Ishikawa, Masayori; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi; Oka, Takamitsu; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Yamashita, Tomoaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2003-06-01

    Residual 152Eu activities induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb were measured for nine mineral samples located up to 1,061 m in the slant range and one control sample at 2,850 m from the hypocenter. A chemical separation to prepare europium-enriched samples was performed for all samples, and gamma ray measurements were carried out with a low background well-type germanium detector. In this paper, the measured specific activities of 152Eu are compared with activation calculations based on the DS86 neutron fluence and the 93Rev one. The calculated-to-measured ratios are also compared with those of 60Co and 36Cl. The present results indicate that the measurements agree to the calculation within a factor of three as observed in the nuclear tests at Nevada. The activation level of environmental neutrons and the detection limit for 152Eu are also discussed. PMID:13678342

  3. Simulation of a Novel Active Target for Neutron-Unbound State Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Nathan; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Measurement of nuclei at extreme ratios of protons to neutrons is challenging due to the low production rate. New facilities will increase the production of neutron-rich isotopes, but still not reach the neutron dripline for heavier nuclei. We simulated a carbon-based active target system that could be constructed to both increase statistics while preserving the experimental resolution. This simulation is an adaptation of the in-house MoNA Collaboration C + + based simulation tool to extract the decay energy of neutron-unbound states. A number of experiments of this type have been carried out at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). In most experiments, we produce neutron-unbound nuclei by bombarding a Beryllium target with a radioactive beam. The nucleus of interest immediately decays into a charged particle and one or more neutrons. In this simulation, we have constructed a carbon-based active target that provides a measurement of energy loss, which is used to calculate the nuclear interaction point within the target. This additional information is used to improve the resolution or preserve the resolution of a thinner target while increasing statistics. This presentation will cover some aspects of the simulation process as well as show a resolution improvement of up to about 4 with a ~700 mg/cm2 active target compared to a Be-target. The simulation utilized experimental settings from published work. Work supported by National Science Foundation Grant #0969173.

  4. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (~0.2 wt% 235U) to high enriched (>20 wt% 235U); compositions consisting of U3O8, UO2, UF6, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since 235U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the 235U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the "known standard" method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U3O8 samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact 235U sample masses.

  5. Measuring neutron yield and ρR anisotropies with activation foils at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Cooper, G. W.; Drury, O. B.; Hagmann, C. A.; Knittel, K. M.; Leeper, R. J.; Ruiz, C. L.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2013-11-01

    Neutron yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are measured with a suite of diagnostics, including activation of ˜20-200 g samples of materials undergoing a variety of energy-dependent neutron reactions. Indium samples were mounted on the end of a Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM), 25-50 cm from the implosion, to measure 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutron yield. The 336.2 keV gamma rays from the 4.5 hour isomer of 115mIn produced by (n,n') reactions are counted in high-purity germanium detectors. For capsules producing D-T fusion reactions, zirconium and copper are activated via (n,2n) reactions at various locations around the target chamber and bay, measuring the 14 MeV neutron yield to accuracies on order of 7%. By mounting zirconium samples on ports at nine locations around the NIF chamber, anisotropies in the primary neutron emission due to fuel areal density asymmetries can be measured to a relative precision of 3%.

  6. Accurate and precise measurement of selenium by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jung; Watson, Russell P; Lindstrom, Richard M

    2011-05-01

    An accurate and precise measurement of selenium in Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3149, a primary calibration standard for the quantitative determination of selenium, has been accomplished by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in order to resolve a question arising during the certification process of the standard. Each limiting factor of the uncertainty in the activation analysis, including the sample preparation, irradiation, and γ-ray spectrometry steps, has been carefully monitored to minimize the uncertainty in the determined mass fraction. Neutron and γ-ray self-shielding within the elemental selenium INAA standards contributed most significantly to the uncertainty of the measurement. An empirical model compensating for neutron self-shielding and reducing the self-shielding uncertainty was successfully applied to these selenium standards. The mass fraction of selenium in the new lot of SRM 3149 was determined with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.6%.

  7. Neutron Activation Analysis: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLellan, Ryan

    2011-04-01

    The role of neutron activation analysis in low-energy low-background experimentsis discussed in terms of comparible methods. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is introduce. The procedure of instrumental neutron activation analysis is detailed especially with respect to the measurement of trace amounts of natural radioactivity. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters required for neutron activation analysis is also presented.

  8. Neutron Activation Analysis: Techniques and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, Ryan

    2011-04-27

    The role of neutron activation analysis in low-energy low-background experimentsis discussed in terms of comparible methods. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is introduce. The procedure of instrumental neutron activation analysis is detailed especially with respect to the measurement of trace amounts of natural radioactivity. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters required for neutron activation analysis is also presented.

  9. Validation of MCNP NPP Activation Simulations for Decommissioning Studies by Analysis of NPP Neutron Activation Foil Measurement Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volmert, Ben; Pantelias, Manuel; Mutnuru, R. K.; Neukaeter, Erwin; Bitterli, Beat

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an overview of the Swiss Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) activation methodology is presented and the work towards its validation by in-situ NPP foil irradiation campaigns is outlined. Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG) in The Netherlands has been given the task of performing the corresponding neutron metrology. For this purpose, small Aluminium boxes containing a set of circular-shaped neutron activation foils have been prepared. After being irradiated for one complete reactor cycle, the sets have been successfully retrieved, followed by gamma-spectrometric measurements of the individual foils at NRG. Along with the individual activities of the foils, the reaction rates and thermal, intermediate and fast neutron fluence rates at the foil locations have been determined. These determinations include appropriate corrections for gamma self-absorption and neutron self-shielding as well as corresponding measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the NPP Monte Carlo calculations with the results of the foil measurements is done by using an individual generic MCNP model functioning as an interface and allowing the simulation of individual foil activation by predetermined neutron spectra. To summarize, the comparison between calculation and measurement serve as a sound validation of the Swiss NPP activation methodology by demonstrating a satisfying agreement between measurement and calculation. Finally, the validation offers a chance for further improvements of the existing NPP models by ensuing calibration and/or modelling optimizations for key components and structures.

  10. Analysis of the neutron component at high altitude mountains using active and passive measurement devices.

    PubMed

    Hajek, M; Berger, T; Schoner, W; Vana, N

    2002-01-01

    The European Council directive 96/29/Euratom requires dosimetric precautions if the effective dose exceeds 1 mSv/a. On an average, this value is exceeded by aircrew members. Roughly half of the radiation exposure at flight altitudes is caused by cosmic ray-induced neutrons. Active (6LiI(Eu)-scintillator) and passive (TLDs) Bonner sphere spectrometers were used to determine the neutron energy spectra atop Mt. Sonnblick (3105 m) and Mt. Kitzsteinhorn (3029 m). Further measurements in a mixed radiation field at CERN as well as in a proton beam of 62 MeV at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, confirmed that not only neutrons but also charged particles contribute to the readings of active detectors, whereas TLD-600 and TLD-700 in pair allow the determination of the thermal neutron flux. Unfolding of the detector data obtained atop both mountains shows two relative maxima around 1 MeV and 85 MeV, which have to be considered for the assessment of the biologically relevant dose equivalent. By convoluting the spectra with appropriate conversion functions the neutron dose equivalent rate was determined to be 150 +/- 15 nSv/h. The total dose equivalent rate determined by the HTR-method was 210 +/- 15 nSv/h. The results are in good agreement with LET-spectrometer and Sievert counter measurements carried out simultaneously.

  11. Analysis of the neutron component at high altitude mountains using active and passive measurement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, M.; Berger, T.; Schöner, W.; Vana, N.

    2002-01-01

    The European Council directive 96/29/Euratom requires dosimetric precautions if the effective dose exceeds 1 mSv/a. On an average, this value is exceeded by aircrew members. Roughly half of the radiation exposure at flight altitudes is caused by cosmic ray-induced neutrons. Active ( 6LiI(Eu)-scintillator) and passive (TLDs) Bonner sphere spectrometers were used to determine the neutron energy spectra atop Mt. Sonnblick (3105 m) and Mt. Kitzsteinhorn (3029 m). Further measurements in a mixed radiation field at CERN as well as in a proton beam of 62 MeV at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, confirmed that not only neutrons but also charged particles contribute to the readings of active detectors, whereas TLD-600 and TLD-700 in pair allow the determination of the thermal neutron flux. Unfolding of the detector data obtained atop both mountains shows two relative maxima around 1 MeV and 85 MeV, which have to be considered for the assessment of the biologically relevant dose equivalent. By convoluting the spectra with appropriate conversion functions the neutron dose equivalent rate was determined to be 150±15 nSv/h. The total dose equivalent rate determined by the HTR-method was 210±15 nSv/h. The results are in good agreement with LET-spectrometer and Sievert counter measurements carried out simultaneously.

  12. Apparatus for the measurement of total body nitrogen using prompt neutron activation analysis with californium-252.

    PubMed

    Mackie, A; Hannan, W J; Smith, M A; Tothill, P

    1988-01-01

    Details of clinical apparatus designed for the measurement of total body nitrogen (as an indicator of body protein), suitable for the critically ill, intensive-care patient are presented. Californium-252 radio-isotopic neutron sources are used, enabling a nitrogen measurement by prompt neutron activation analysis to be made in 40 min with a precision of +/- 3.2% for a whole body dose equivalent of 0.145 mSv. The advantages of Californium-252 over alternative neutron sources are discussed. A comparison between two irradiation/detection geometries is made, leading to an explanation of the geometry adopted for the apparatus. The choice of construction and shielding materials to reduce the count rate at the detectors and consequently to reduce the pile-up contribution to the nitrogen background is discussed. Salient features of the gamma ray spectroscopy system to reduce spectral distortion from pulse pile-up are presented.

  13. Metabolic activity of sodium, measured by neutron activation, in the hands of patients suffering from bone diseases: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Spinks, T.J.; Bewley, D.K.; Paolillo, M.; Vlotides, J.; Joplin, G.F.; Ranicar, A.S.O.

    1980-01-01

    Turnover of sodium in the human hand was studied by neutron activation. Patients suffering from various metabolic abnormalities affecting the skeleton, who were undergoing routine neutron activation for the measurement of calcium, were investigated along with a group of healthy volunteers. Neutron activation labels the sodium atoms simultaneously and with equal probability regardless of the turnover time of individual body compartments. The loss of sodium can be described either by a sum of two exponentials or by a single power function. Distinctions between patients and normal subjects were not apparent from the exponential model but were brought out by the power function. The exponent of time in the latter is a measure of clearance rate. The mean values of this parameter in (a) a group of patients suffering from acromegaly; (b) a group including Paget's disease, osteoporosis, Cushing's disease, and hyperparathyroidism; and (c) a group of healthy subjects, were found to be significantly different from each other.

  14. A History of In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis in Measurement of Aluminum in Human Subjects.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Hedieh K; Chettle, David R

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum, as an abundant metal, has gained widespread use in human life, entering the body predominantly as an additive to various foods and drinking water. Other major sources of exposure to aluminum include medical, cosmetic, and occupational routes. As a common environmental toxin, with well-known roles in several medical conditions such as dialysis encephalopathy, aluminum is considered a potential candidate in the causality of Alzheimer's disease. Aluminum mostly accumulates in the bone, which makes bone an indicator of the body burden of aluminum and an ideal organ as a proxy for the brain. Most of the techniques developed for measuring aluminum include bone biopsy, which requires invasive measures, causing inconvenience for the patients. There has been a considerable effort in developing non-invasive approaches, which allow for monitoring aluminum levels for medical and occupational purposes in larger populations. In vivo neutron activation analysis, a method based on nuclear activation of isotopes of elements in the body and their subsequent detection, has proven to be an invaluable tool for this purpose. There are definite challenges in developing in vivo non-invasive techniques capable of detecting low levels of aluminum in healthy individuals and aluminum-exposed populations. The following review examines the method of in vivo neutron activation analysis in the context of aluminum measurement in humans focusing on different neutron sources, interference from other activation products, and the improvements made in minimum detectable limits and patient dose over the past few decades.

  15. HPGe well-type detectors for neutron activation measurements on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bertalot, L.; Damiani, M.; Esposito, B.; Lagamba, L.; Podda, S.; Batistoni, P.; De Felice, P.; Biagini, R.

    1997-01-01

    We describe an improvement of the neutron activation system in operation on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) tokamak for the measurement of the total neutron yield. A HPGe well-type detector (200 cm{sup 3} active volume) is used to detect the photoemission from neutron activated samples ({sup 115m}In336.2 keV {gamma} rays from DD neutrons on indium for FTU). Due to their high geometrical efficiency, HPGe well-type detectors are particularly suited to the FTU low-level activity measurements. A particular effort has been devoted to the calibration of the measuring system. In particular, a multi-{gamma} calibration source (59{endash}1332 keV energy range) with a density of 7.31 g/cm{sup 3} consisting of a stack of indium foils has been prepared. This assures that the shape and volume of the calibration source are the same as those of the samples used in the actual measurements. The full-energy-peak efficiency at the {sup 115m}In336.2 keV line is 0.197 with an overall uncertainty of 2{percent} (1{sigma}). For a better characterization of the detector response as a function of the sample density, a further calibration source with the same geometry has been prepared in a gel aqueous solution (density {approximately}1 g/cm{sup 3}). The calibration curves for the well-type detector at the two different density values are compared. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. The feasibility of well-logging measurements of arsenic levels using neutron-activation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oden, C.P.; Schweitzer, J.S.; McDowell, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic is an extremely toxic metal, which poses a significant problem in many mining environments. Arsenic contamination is also a major problem in ground and surface waters. A feasibility study was conducted to determine if neutron-activation analysis is a practical method of measuring in situ arsenic levels. The response of hypothetical well-logging tools to arsenic was simulated using a readily available Monte Carlo simulation code (MCNP). Simulations were made for probes with both hyperpure germanium (HPGe) and bismuth germanate (BGO) detectors using accelerator and isotopic neutron sources. Both sources produce similar results; however, the BGO detector is much more susceptible to spectral interference than the HPGe detector. Spectral interference from copper can preclude low-level arsenic measurements when using the BGO detector. Results show that a borehole probe could be built that would measure arsenic concentrations of 100 ppm by weight to an uncertainty of 50 ppm in about 15 min. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. NEUTRON MEASURING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Friedlander, G.; Gofman, J.W.

    1958-07-29

    A fast neutron fission detecting apparatus is described consisting of a source of fast neutrons, an ion chamber containing air, two electrodes within the ion chamber in confronting spaced relationship, a high voltage potential placed across the electrodes, a shield placed about the source, and a suitable pulse annplifier and recording system in the electrode circuit to record the impulse due to fissions in a sannple material. The sample material is coated onto the active surface of the disc electrode and shielding means of a material having high neutron capture capabilities for thermal neutrons are provided in the vicinity of the electrodes and about the ion chamber so as to absorb slow neutrons of thermal energy to effectively prevent their diffusing back to the sample and causing an error in the measurement of fast neutron fissions.

  18. SU-E-T-543: Measurement of Neutron Activation From Different High Energy Varian Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, T; Madsen, S; Sudowe, R; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Linear accelerators producing photons above 10 MeV may induce photonuclear reactions in high Z components of the accelerator. These liberated neutrons can then activate the structural components of the accelerator and other materials in the beam path through neutron capture reactions. The induced activity within the accelerator may contribute to additional dose to both patients and personnel. This project seeks to determine the total activity and activity per activated isotope following irradiation in different Varian accelerators at energies above 10 MeV. Methods: A Varian 21IX accelerator was used to irradiate a 30 cm × 30 cm × 20 cm solid water phantom with 15 MV x-rays. The phantom was placed at an SSD of 100 cm and at the center of a 20 cm × 20 cm field. Activation induced gamma spectra were acquired over a 5 minute interval after 1 and 15 minutes from completion of the irradiation. All measurements were made using a CANBERRA Falcon 5000 Portable HPGe detector. The majority of measurements were made in scattering geometry with the detector situated at 90° to the incident beam, 30 cm from the side of the phantom and approximately 10 cm from the top. A 5 minute background count was acquired and automatically subtracted from all subsequent measurements. Photon spectra were acquired for both open and MLC fields. Results: Based on spectral signatures, nuclides have been identified and their activities calculated for both open and MLC fields. Preliminary analyses suggest that activities from the activation products in the microcurie range. Conclusion: Activation isotopes have been identified and their relative activities determined. These activities are only gross estimates since efficiencies have not been determined for this source-detector geometry. Current efforts are focused on accurate determination of detector efficiencies using Monte Carlo calculations.

  19. Feasibility study of prompt gamma neutron activation for NDT measurement of moisture in stone and brick

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R. A.; Al-Sheikhly, M.; Grissom, C.; Aloiz, E.; Paul, R.

    2014-02-18

    The conservation of stone and brick architecture or sculpture often involves damage caused by moisture. The feasibility of a NDT method based on prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) for measuring the element hydrogen as an indication of water is being evaluated. This includes systematic characterization of the lithology and physical properties of seven building stones and one brick type used in the buildings of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. To determine the required dynamic range of the NDT method, moisture-related properties were measured by standard methods. Cold neutron PGNA was also used to determine chemically bound water (CBW) content. The CBW does not damage porous masonry, but creates an H background that defines the minimum level of detection of damaging moisture. The CBW was on the order of 0.5% for all the stones. This rules out the measurement of hygric processes in all of the stones and hydric processed for the stones with fine scale pore-size distributions The upper bound of moisture content, set by porosity through water immersion, was on the order of 5%. The dynamic range is about 10–20. The H count rates were roughly 1–3 cps. Taking into account differences in neutron energies and fluxes and sample volume between cold PGNA and a portable PGNA instrument, it appears that it is feasible to apply PGNA in the field.

  20. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  1. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  2. A new active method for the measurement of slow-neutron fluence in modern radiotherapy treatment rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Sánchez Doblado, F.

    2010-02-01

    This work focuses on neutron monitoring at clinical linac facilities during high-energy modality radiotherapy treatments. Active in-room measurement of neutron fluence is a complex problem due to the pulsed nature of the fluence and the presence of high photon background, and only passive methods have been considered reliable until now. In this paper we present a new active method to perform real-time measurement of neutron production around a medical linac. The device readout is being investigated as an estimate of patient neutron dose exposure on each radiotherapy session. The new instrument was developed based on neutron interaction effects in microelectronic memory devices, in particular using neutron-sensitive SRAM devices. This paper is devoted to the description of the instrument and measurement techniques, presenting the results obtained together with their comparison and discussion. Measurements were performed in several standard clinical linac facilities, showing high reliability, being insensitive to the photon fluence and EM pulse present inside the radiotherapy room, and having detector readout statistical relative uncertainties of about 2% on measurement of neutron fluence produced by 1000 monitor units irradiation runs.

  3. Direct Measurement of Neutron-Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapov, E.I.; Furman, W.I.; Lychagin, W.I.; Muzichka, G.V.; Nekhaev, G.V.; Safronov, Yu.V.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Strelkov, A.V.; Bowman, C.D.; Crawford, B.E.; Stephenson, S.L.; Howell, C.R.; Tornow, W.; Levakov, B.G.; Litvin, V.I.; Lyzhin, A.E.; Magda, E.P.; Mitchell, G.E.

    2003-08-26

    In order to resolve long-standing discrepancies in indirect measurements of the neutron-neutron scattering length ann and contribute to solving the problem of the charge symmetry of the nuclear force, the collaboration DIANNA (Direct Investigation of ann Association) plans to measure the neutron-neutron scattering cross section {sigma}nn. The key issue of our approach is the use of the through-channel in the Russia reactor YAGUAR with a peak neutron flux of 10{sup 18} /cm2/s. The proposed experimental setup is described. Results of calculations are presented to connect {sigma}nn with the nn-collision detector count rate and the neutron flux density in the reactor channel. Measurements of the thermal neutron fields inside polyethylene converters show excellent prospects for the realization of the direct nn-experiment.

  4. Neutron activation analyses and half-life measurements at the usgs triga reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Robert E.

    Neutron activation of materials followed by gamma spectroscopy using high-purity germanium detectors is an effective method for making measurements of nuclear beta decay half-lives and for detecting trace amounts of elements present in materials. This research explores applications of neutron activation analysis (NAA) in two parts. Part 1. High Precision Methods for Measuring Decay Half-Lives, Chapters 1 through 8 Part one develops research methods and data analysis techniques for making high precision measurements of nuclear beta decay half-lives. The change in the electron capture half-life of 51Cr in pure chromium versus chromium mixed in a gold lattice structure is explored, and the 97Ru electron capture decay half-life are compared for ruthenium in a pure crystal versus ruthenium in a rutile oxide state, RuO2. In addition, the beta-minus decay half-life of 71mZn is measured and compared with new high precision findings. Density Functional Theory is used to explain the measured magnitude of changes in electron capture half-life from changes in the surrounding lattice electron configuration. Part 2. Debris Collection Nuclear Diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility, Chapters 9 through 11 Part two explores the design and development of a solid debris collector for use as a diagnostic tool at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NAA measurements are performed on NIF post-shot debris collected on witness plates in the NIF chamber. In this application NAA is used to detect and quantify the amount of trace amounts of gold from the hohlraum and germanium from the pellet present in the debris collected after a NIF shot. The design of a solid debris collector based on material x-ray ablation properties is given, and calculations are done to predict performance and results for the collection and measurements of trace amounts of gold and germanium from dissociated hohlraum debris.

  5. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  6. Measurement of fluorine total concentration in dental enamel using fast-neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouadili, A.; Vernois, J.; Isabelle, D. B.

    1989-08-01

    Fluorine which is present in dental enamel, at the level of a few tens to a few hundred ppm, plays an important role in the behaviour of this tissue. Therefore its quantitative determination is of interest for particular studies of the dental system. We present a nuclear nondestructive method to determine the total fluorine content in dental enamel by cyclotron-produced fast-neutron activation. The 19F(n, 2n) reaction leads to 18F which is a β+ emitter with a 109.8 min half-life. The irradiated sample activity is measured by detecting in coincidence the annihilation photons. A fluorine standard is used for calibration. The detection limit is of the order of 1 ppm, while the reproducibility is better than 95%.

  7. Measurement of reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, G. P.; Rundberg, R.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, G.; Boswell, M.; Klein, A.; Wilhelmy, J.; Tonchev, A.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2014-09-01

    We report on the first observation of tertiary reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons produced in compressed deuterium and tritium filled capsules using the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA. RIF neutrons are produced by third-order, out of equilibrium ("in-flight") fusion reactions, initiated by primary fusion products. The rate of RIF reactions is dependent upon the range of the elastically scattered fuel ions and therefore a diagnostic of Coulomb physics within the plasma. At plasma temperatures of ˜5 keV, the presence of neutrons with kinetic energies greater than 15 MeV is a unique signature for RIF neutron production. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a threshold of 15.0 MeV, and a unique decay scheme making it a suitable diagnostic for observing RIF neutrons. RIF neutron production is quantified by the ratio of 167Tm/168Tm observed in a 169Tm foil, where the reaction 169Tm(n,2n)168Tm samples the primary neutron fluence. Averaged over 4 implosions1-4 at the NIF, the 167Tm/168Tm ratio is measured to be 1.5 +/- 0.3 x 10-5, leading to an average ratio of RIF to primary neutron ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10-4. These ratios are consistent with the predictions for charged particle stopping in a quantum degenerate plasma.

  8. Calibration of the Brookhaven National Laboratory delayed gamma neutron activation facility to measure total body calcium.

    PubMed

    Ma, R; Stamatelatos, I E; Yasumura, S

    2000-05-01

    Differences in body size and shape can cause large variances in the in vivo results of neutron activation analysis. To introduce corrections for body size for the delayed gamma neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, "reference man"-sized and "reference woman"-sized phantoms were constructed. Simulation results using the Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport code also provided correction factors for people of different sizes. For individuals with a body mass index (BMI = weight (kg)/height (m)2) between 20 and 30, no correction was required. At BMIs greater than 30, the effects of neutron attenuation were significant and a correction factor of CF = -0.0192 x BMI + 1.5635 can be applied. PMID:10865727

  9. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, A.; Angell, C. T.; Becker, J. A.; Boswell, M.; Crowell, A. S.; Dashdorj, D.; Fallin, B.; Fotiades, N.; Howell, C. R.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kiser, M.; Macri, R. A.; Nelson, R. O.; Pedroni, R. S.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Weisel, G. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2007-08-01

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on 235,238U and 241Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with En = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt γ rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  10. Measurement of neutron spectra in varied environments by the foil-activation method with arbitrary trials

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Vehar, D.W.

    1987-12-01

    Neutron spectra have been measured by the foil-activation method in 13 different environments in and around the Sandia Pulsed Reactor, the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor, and the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor. The spectra were obtained by using the SANDII code in a manner that was not dependent on the initial trial. This altered technique is better suited for the determination of spectra in environments that are difficult to predict by calculation, and it tends to reveal features that may be biased out by the use of standard trial-dependent methods. For some of the configurations, studies have also been made of how well the solution is determined in each energy region. The experimental methods and the techniques used in the analyses are thoroughly explained. 34 refs., 51 figs., 40 tabs.

  11. Enhanced NIF neutron activation diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Yeamans, C. B.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.

    2012-10-15

    The NIF neutron activation diagnostic suite relies on removable activation samples, leading to operational inefficiencies and a fundamental lower limit on the half-life of the activated product that can be observed. A neutron diagnostic system measuring activation of permanently installed samples could remove these limitations and significantly enhance overall neutron diagnostic capabilities. The physics and engineering aspects of two proposed systems are considered: one measuring the {sup 89}Zr/{sup 89m}Zr isomer ratio in the existing Zr activation medium and the other using potassium zirconate as the activation medium. Both proposed systems could improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the current system by at least a factor of 5 and would allow independent measurement of fusion core velocity and fuel areal density.

  12. Enhanced NIF neutron activation diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yeamans, C B; Bleuel, D L; Bernstein, L A

    2012-10-01

    The NIF neutron activation diagnostic suite relies on removable activation samples, leading to operational inefficiencies and a fundamental lower limit on the half-life of the activated product that can be observed. A neutron diagnostic system measuring activation of permanently installed samples could remove these limitations and significantly enhance overall neutron diagnostic capabilities. The physics and engineering aspects of two proposed systems are considered: one measuring the (89)Zr/(89 m)Zr isomer ratio in the existing Zr activation medium and the other using potassium zirconate as the activation medium. Both proposed systems could improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the current system by at least a factor of 5 and would allow independent measurement of fusion core velocity and fuel areal density.

  13. Enhanced NIF neutron activation diagnosticsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeamans, C. B.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.

    2012-10-01

    The NIF neutron activation diagnostic suite relies on removable activation samples, leading to operational inefficiencies and a fundamental lower limit on the half-life of the activated product that can be observed. A neutron diagnostic system measuring activation of permanently installed samples could remove these limitations and significantly enhance overall neutron diagnostic capabilities. The physics and engineering aspects of two proposed systems are considered: one measuring the 89Zr/89mZr isomer ratio in the existing Zr activation medium and the other using potassium zirconate as the activation medium. Both proposed systems could improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the current system by at least a factor of 5 and would allow independent measurement of fusion core velocity and fuel areal density.

  14. Accurate measurement of bromine contents in plastic samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, I J; Lee, K S; Hwang, E; Min, H S; Yim, Y H

    2013-03-26

    Accurate measurements of bromine contents in plastic samples were made by the direct comparator instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Individual factors affecting the measurements were comprehensively evaluated and compensated, including the volatility loss of bromine from standard comparators, the background bromine level in the filter papers used for preparation of the standard comparators, nuclear interference, γ-ray spectral interference and the variance among replicates of the samples. Uncertainty contributions from those factors were thoroughly evaluated and included in the uncertainty budgeting of the INAA measurement. (81)Br was chosen as the target isotope, and the INAA measurements for bromine were experimentally confirmed to exhibit good linearity within a bromine content range of 10-170 μg. The established method has been applied to the analysis of eight plastic samples: four commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) of polyethylene and polystyrene and four acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) samples prepared as the candidate reference materials (KRISS CRM 113-01-012, -013, -014 and -015). The bromine contents of the samples were calculated at three different γ-ray energies and compared, showing good agreement. The results of the four CRMs also showed good consistency with their certified values within the stated uncertainties. Finally, the bromine contents of the ABS samples were determined with expanded uncertainties (at a 95% level of confidence) between 2.5% and 5% in a bromine content range of 25-900 mg kg(-1).

  15. Accurate measurement of bromine contents in plastic samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, I J; Lee, K S; Hwang, E; Min, H S; Yim, Y H

    2013-03-26

    Accurate measurements of bromine contents in plastic samples were made by the direct comparator instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Individual factors affecting the measurements were comprehensively evaluated and compensated, including the volatility loss of bromine from standard comparators, the background bromine level in the filter papers used for preparation of the standard comparators, nuclear interference, γ-ray spectral interference and the variance among replicates of the samples. Uncertainty contributions from those factors were thoroughly evaluated and included in the uncertainty budgeting of the INAA measurement. (81)Br was chosen as the target isotope, and the INAA measurements for bromine were experimentally confirmed to exhibit good linearity within a bromine content range of 10-170 μg. The established method has been applied to the analysis of eight plastic samples: four commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) of polyethylene and polystyrene and four acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) samples prepared as the candidate reference materials (KRISS CRM 113-01-012, -013, -014 and -015). The bromine contents of the samples were calculated at three different γ-ray energies and compared, showing good agreement. The results of the four CRMs also showed good consistency with their certified values within the stated uncertainties. Finally, the bromine contents of the ABS samples were determined with expanded uncertainties (at a 95% level of confidence) between 2.5% and 5% in a bromine content range of 25-900 mg kg(-1). PMID:23498117

  16. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  17. Neutron activation for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Loughlin, M.J.; Nishitani, Takeo

    1996-04-29

    There are three primary goals for the Neutron Activation system for ITER: maintain a robust relative measure of fusion power with stability and high dynamic range (7 orders of magnitude); allow an absolute calibration of fusion power (energy); and provide a flexible and reliable system for materials testing. The nature of the activation technique is such that stability and high dynamic range can be intrinsic properties of the system. It has also been the technique that demonstrated (on JET and TFTR) the highest accuracy neutron measurements in DT operation. Since the gamma-ray detectors are not located on the tokamak and are therefore amenable to accurate characterization, and if material foils are placed very close to the ITER plasma with minimum scattering or attenuation, high overall accuracy in the fusion energy production (7--10%) should be achievable on ITER. In the paper, a conceptual design is presented. A system is shown to be capable of meeting these three goals, also detailed design issues remain to be solved.

  18. Analysis of calibration data for the uranium active neutron coincidence counting collar with attention to errors in the measured neutron coincidence rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Burr, Tom; Favalli, Andrea; Nicholson, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The declared linear density of 238U and 235U in fresh low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel assemblies can be verified for nuclear safeguards purposes using a neutron coincidence counter collar in passive and active mode, respectively. The active mode calibration of the Uranium Neutron Collar - Light water reactor fuel (UNCL) instrument is normally performed using a non-linear fitting technique. The fitting technique relates the measured neutron coincidence rate (the predictor) to the linear density of 235U (the response) in order to estimate model parameters of the nonlinear Padé equation, which traditionally is used to model the calibration data. Alternatively, following a simple data transformation, the fitting can also be performed using standard linear fitting methods. This paper compares performance of the nonlinear technique to the linear technique, using a range of possible error variance magnitudes in the measured neutron coincidence rate. We develop the required formalism and then apply the traditional (nonlinear) and alternative approaches (linear) to the same experimental and corresponding simulated representative datasets. We find that, in this context, because of the magnitude of the errors in the predictor, it is preferable not to transform to a linear model, and it is preferable not to adjust for the errors in the predictor when inferring the model parameters.

  19. Applicability of self-activation of an NaI scintillator for measurement of photo-neutrons around a high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machine.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Yahiro, Eriko; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Fukunaga, Junichi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Hosono, Makoto; Itoh, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of the activation of an NaI scintillator for neutron monitoring at a clinical linac was investigated experimentally. Thermal neutron fluence rates are derived by measurement of the I-128 activity generated in an NaI scintillator irradiated by neutrons; β-rays from I-128 are detected efficiently by the NaI scintillator. In order to verify the validity of this method for neutron measurement, we irradiated an NaI scintillator at a research reactor, and the neutron fluence rate was estimated. The method was then applied to neutron measurement at a 10-MV linac (Varian Clinac 21EX), and the neutron fluence rate was estimated at the isocenter and at 30 cm from the isocenter. When the scintillator was irradiated directly by high-energy X-rays, the production of I-126 was observed due to photo-nuclear reactions, in addition to the generation of I-128 and Na-24. From the results obtained by these measurements, it was found that the neutron measurement by activation of an NaI scintillator has a great advantage in estimates of a low neutron fluence rate by use of a quick measurement following a short-time irradiation. Also, the future application of this method to quasi real-time monitoring of neutrons during patient treatments at a radiotherapy facility is discussed, as well as the method of evaluation of the neutron dose.

  20. SU-E-T-557: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac Devices Irradiated During Proton Therapy Using Indium Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S; Christodouleas, J; Delaney, K; Diffenderfer, E; Brown, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac devices Irradiated during Proton Therapy using Indium Foils Methods: The foils had dimensions of 25mm x 25mm x 1mm. After being activated, the foils were placed in a Canberra Industries well chamber utilizing a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The resulting gamma spectrum was acquired and analyzed using Genie 2000 spectroscopy software. One activation foil was placed over the upper, left chest of RANDO where a pacemaker would be. The rest of the foils were placed over the midline of the patient at different distances, providing a spatial distribution over the phantom. Using lasers and BBs to align the patient, 200 MU square fields were delivered to various treatment sites: the brain, the pancreas, and the prostate. Each field was shot at least a day apart, giving more than enough time for activity of the foil to decay (t1=2 = 54.12 min). Results: The net counts (minus background) of the three aforementioned peaks were used for our measurements. These counts were adjusted to account for detector efficiency, relative photon yields from decay, and the natural abundance of 115-In. The average neutron flux for the closed multi-leaf collimator irradiation was measured to be 1.62 x 106 - 0.18 x 106 cm2 s-1. An order of magnitude estimate of the flux for neutrons up to 1 keV from Diffenderfer et al. gives 3 x 106 cm2 s-1 which does agree on the order of magnitude. Conclusion: Lower energy neutrons have higher interaction cross-sections and are more likely to damage pacemakers. The thermal/slow neutron component may be enough to estimate the overall risk. The true test of the applicability of activation foils is whether or not measurements are capable of predicting cardiac device malfunction. For that, additional studies are needed to provide clinical evidence one way or the other.

  1. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Maglieri, Robert Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John; Licea, Angel

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  2. Neutron flux measurements at the TRIGA reactor in Vienna for the prediction of the activation of the biological shield.

    PubMed

    Merz, Stefan; Djuricic, Mile; Villa, Mario; Böck, Helmuth; Steinhauser, Georg

    2011-11-01

    The activation of the biological shield is an important process for waste management considerations of nuclear facilities. The final activity can be estimated by modeling using the neutron flux density rather than the radiometric approach of activity measurements. Measurement series at the TRIGA reactor Vienna reveal that the flux density next to the biological shield is in the order of 10(9)cm(-2)s(-1) at maximum power; but it is strongly influenced by reactor installations. The data allow the estimation of the final waste categorization of the concrete according to the Austrian legislation. PMID:21646026

  3. Characteristics and application of spherical-type activation detectors in neutron spectrum measurements at a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Heng-Xiao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-03-01

    A set of spherical-type activation detectors was developed aiming to provide better determination of the neutron spectrum at the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) BNCT facility. An activation foil embedded in a specially designed spherical holder exhibits three advantages: (1) minimizing the effect of neutron angular dependence, (2) creating response functions with broadened coverage of neutron energies by introducing additional moderators or absorbers to the central activation foil, and (3) reducing irradiation time because of improved detection efficiencies to epithermal neutron beam. This paper presents the design concept and the calculated response functions of new detectors. Theoretical and experimental demonstrations of the performance of the detectors are provided through comparisons of the unfolded neutron spectra determined using this method and conventional multiple-foil activation techniques.

  4. Ultra Sensitive Neutron Activation Measurements of {sup 232}Th in Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Clemenza, M.; Previtali, E.; Borio di Tigliole, A.; Salvini, A.

    2011-04-27

    Copper, thanks to its low content in radioactive contaminations, is a material widely used for shielding, holders and other objects close to the sensitive parts of the detectors in many experiments in rare event physics. This implies that tools able to reach sensitivity of the order of <10{sup -12} gram of contaminants per gram of copper are of crucial importance. A methodology based in Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been developed to obtain an extremely high sensitivity in the analysis of {sup 232}Th in copper samples. A detection limit of 5x10{sup -13} g {sup 232}Th/g Cu has been achieved through the irradiation of 200 g of copper sample which subsequently was radio-chemically concentrated using nitric acid and then actinide resin from Eichrom Inc. Several elutions were performed with various inorganic acids to concentrate the {sup 232}Th activation product ({sup 233}Pa) from the copper matrix and to also eliminate the radioactive background induced by the neutron bombardment to reach higher sensitivity.

  5. A method for measuring tissue-equivalent dose using a pin diode and activation foil in epithermal neutron beams with EN < 100 keV.

    PubMed

    Carolan, Martin G; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2006-01-01

    Silicon (Si) pin diodes can be used for neutron dosimetry by observing the change in forward bias voltage caused by neutron induced displacement damage in the diode junction. Pin diode energy response depends on Si displacement damage KERMA (K(Si)). It is hypothesised that tissue-equivalent (TE) neutron dose could be expressed as a linear combination of K(Si) and foil activation terms. Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP) of parallel monoenergetic neutron beams incident on a cylindrical TE phantom were used to calculate TE dose, K(Si) and Au, Cu and Mn foil activations along the central axis of the phantom. For spectra with neutron energies <100 keV, it is possible to estimate the TE kerma based on silicon damage kerma and Cu or Mn foil measurements. More accurate estimates are possible for spectra where the maximum neutron energy does not exceed 30 keV. PMID:16644975

  6. European Neutron Activation System.

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  7. Neutron ion temperature measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Hendel, H.W.; Lovberg, J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.

    1986-11-01

    One important use of fusion product diagnostics is in the determination of the deuterium ion temperature from the magnitude of the 2.5 MeV d(d,n)/sup 3/He neutron emission. The detectors, calibration methods, and limitations of this technique are reviewed here with emphasis on procedures used at PPPL. In most tokamaks, the ion temperature deduced from neutrons is in reasonable agreement with the ion temperature deduced by other techniques.

  8. Neutron-emission measurements at a white neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    Data on the spectrum of neutrons emittcd from neutron-induced reactions are important in basic nuclear physics and in applications. Our program studies neutron emission from inelastic scattering as well as fission neutron spectra. A ''white'' neutron source (continuous in energy) allows measurements over a wide range of neutron energies all in one experiment. We use the tast neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for incident neutron energies from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV These experiments are based on double time-of-flight techniques to determine the energies of the incident and emitted neutrons. For the fission neutron measurements, parallel-plate ionization or avalanche detectors identify fission in actinide samples and give the required fast timing pulse. For inelastic scattering, gamma-ray detectors provide the timing and energy spectroscopy. A large neutron-detector array detects the emitted neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques are used to measure the energies of both the incident and emitted neutrons. Design considerations for the array include neutron-gamma discrimination, neutron energy resolution, angular coverage, segmentation, detector efficiency calibration and data acquisition. We have made preliminary measurements of the fission neutron spectra from {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. Neutron emission spectra from inelastic scattering on iron and nickel have also been investigated. The results obtained will be compared with evaluated data.

  9. Testing water in the soil of the Gale crater by DAN active neutron measurements onboard the Curiosity Mars Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Igor

    2013-04-01

    Active neutron measurements by DAN [1] are performing onboard the Curiosity Rover [2]. During active measurements, the Pulsing Neutron Generator of DAN is producing pulses of 14 MeV neutrons, which diffuse in a tested substance during a time as large as several milliseconds. Before escaping out from the martian surface, they make a large number of collisions with nuclei of the atoms of the substance encountered. This diffusion of neutrons results in a moderation of the neutron's energy, since particles lose a fraction of energy in each collision. When a substance contains atoms of hydrogen, neutrons lose about half of their energy at each collision with them. The method of neutron data deconvolution is based on the direct comparison between the measured die-away time profiles of the epithermal and thermal neutrons in the testing spot with the corresponding time profiles predicted by the numerical simulations (see [1]). For the preliminary analysis of DAN data, we used the standard composition of the soil (see [3]). The simplest model of regolith was one with the same content of hydrogen over each individual tested spot, both in length and in depth (homogeneous model). It has only one fitting parameter, the Water Equivalent Hydrogen (WEH) measured in wt% of water in the soil. It was found that data for only one measurement in the spot of Hottah agrees with this model: the WEH corresponds to about 2 wt% at this stop. The 2-layer model is the next after the homogeneous model in level of complexity: it corresponds to 2 layers with different contents of hydrogen. There are three free parameters of this model: WEH in the top layer, thickness of the top layer and WEH in the bottom layer below the top one. The content of hydrogen in the top layer was found to be practically the same at stops, the value of water in the uplayer was about 1.0 - 1.5 % WEH. The other two parameters of 2-layer model were found to vary from one testing spot to another. For the distance interval

  10. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  11. Development of an accelerator based system for in vivo neutron activation analysis measurements of manganese in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michelle Lynn

    2001-11-01

    Manganese is required by the human body, but as with many heavy elements, in large amounts it can be toxic, producing a neurological disorder similar to that of Parkinson's Disease. The primary industrial uses of the element are for the manufacturing of steel and alkali batteries. Environmental exposure may occur via drinking water or exhaust emissions from vehicles using gasoline with the manganese containing compound MMT as an antiknock agent (MMT has been approved for use in both Canada and the United States). Preclinical symptoms of toxicity have recently been detected in individuals occupationally exposed to airborne manganese at levels below the present threshold limit value set by the EPA. Evidence also suggests that early detection of manganese toxicity is crucial since once the symptoms have developed past a certain point, the syndrome will continue to progress even if manganese exposure ceases. The development of a system for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) measurement of manganese levels was investigated, with the goal being to have a means of monitoring both over exposed and manganese deficient populations. The McMaster KN-accelerator was used to provide low-energy neutrons, activation within an irradiation site occurred via the 55Mn(n,gamma) 56Mn capture reaction, and the 847 keV gamma-rays emitted when 56Mn decayed were measured using one or more Nal(TI) detectors. The present data regarding manganese metabolism and storage within the body are limited, and it is unclear what the optimal measurement site would be to provide a suitable biomarker of past exposure. Therefore the feasibility of IVNAA measurements in three sites was examined---the liver, brain and hand bones. Calibration curves were derived, minimum detectable limits determined and resulting doses calculated for each site (experimentally in the case of the liver and hand bones, and through computer simulations for the brain). Detailed analytical calculations of the 7Li(p,n) 7Be

  12. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Nishitani, Takeo; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-12

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  13. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Nishitani, Takeo; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-01

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  14. Fluence measurement of fast neutron fields with a highly efficient recoil proton telescope using active pixel sensors.

    PubMed

    Taforeau, J; Higueret, S; Husson, D; Kachel, M; Lebreton, L

    2014-10-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High-Energy Neutron metrology Applications) is being developed at the LNE-IRSN and aims at characterising energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a recoil proton telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50-µm-thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for proton tracking and a 3-mm-thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode, owing to a large detection solid angle, increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of 10 compared with conventional designs. The ability of the spectrometer to determine the neutron energy was demonstrated and reported elsewhere. This paper focuses on the fluence measurement of monoenergetic neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. Experimental investigations, performed at the AMANDE facility, indicate a good estimation of neutron fluence at various energies. In addition, a complete description of uncertainties budget is presented in this paper and a Monte Carlo propagation of uncertainty sources leads to a fluence measurement with a precision ∼3-5 % depending on the neutron energy.

  15. Precision neutron flux measurement with a neutron beam monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ino, T.; Otono, H.; Mishima, K.; Yamada, T.

    2014-07-01

    Neutron beam monitors are regularly used in various neutron beam experiments to compare two or more sets of data taken in different experimental conditions. A neutron lifetime experiment at BL05, the NOP beamline, in J-PARC requires to monitor the initial neutron intensity with an precision of 0.1% to measure the neutron lifetime with the same accuracy. The performance of a thin 3He gas neutron beam monitor used for the experiment was studied to estimate the systematic uncertainties in the neutron lifetime measurement.

  16. Evaluation of precision and accuracy of selenium measurements in biological materials using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials has become increasingly important in view of the essential nature of this element for human nutrition and its possible role as a protective agent against cancer. Unfortunately, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials is often difficult for most analytical techniques for a variety of reasons, including interferences, complicated selenium chemistry due to the presence of this element in multiple oxidation states and in a variety of different organic species, stability and resistance to destruction of some of these organo-selenium species during acid dissolution, volatility of some selenium compounds, and potential for contamination. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be one of the best analytical techniques for selenium determinations in biological materials for a number of reasons. Currently, precision at the 1% level (1s) and overall accuracy at the 1 to 2% level (95% confidence interval) can be attained at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) for selenium determinations in biological materials when counting statistics are not limiting (using the {sup 75}Se isotope). An example of this level of precision and accuracy is summarized. Achieving this level of accuracy, however, requires strict attention to all sources of systematic error. Precise and accurate results can also be obtained after radiochemical separations.

  17. Measuring the noble metal and iodine composition of extracted noble metal phase from spent nuclear fuel using instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Palomares, R I; Dayman, K J; Landsberger, S; Biegalski, S R; Soderquist, C Z; Casella, A J; Brady Raap, M C; Schwantes, J M

    2015-04-01

    Masses of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and radionuclides are identified and the masses quantified using neutron activation analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. PMID:25644079

  18. NEUTRON MULTIPLICITY AND ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED FOR MARCH 2009 SEMI-ANNUAL DOE INVENTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Ayers, J.; Tietze, F.; Klapper, K.

    2010-02-05

    The Analytical Development (AD) Section field nuclear measurement group performed six 'best available technique' verification measurements to satisfy a DOE requirement instituted for the March 2009 semi-annual inventory. The requirement of (1) yielded the need for SRNL Research Operations Department Material Control & Accountability (MC&A) group to measure the Pu content of five items and the highly enrich uranium (HEU) content of two. No 14Q-qualified measurement equipment was available to satisfy the requirement. The AD field nuclear group has routinely performed the required Confirmatory Measurements for the semi-annual inventories for fifteen years using sodium iodide and high purity germanium (HpGe) {gamma}-ray pulse height analysis nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments. With appropriate {gamma}-ray acquisition modeling, the HpGe spectrometers can be used to perform verification-type quantitative assay for Pu-isotopics and HEU content. The AD nuclear NDA group is widely experienced with this type of measurement and reports content for these species in requested process control, MC&A booking, and holdup measurements assays Site-wide. However none of the AD HpGe {gamma}-ray spectrometers have been 14Q-qualified, and the requirement of reference 1 specifically excluded a {gamma}-ray PHA measurement from those it would accept for the required verification measurements. The requirement of reference 1 was a new requirement for which the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Research Operations Department (ROD) MC&A group was unprepared. The criteria for exemption from verification were: (1) isotope content below 50 grams; (2) intrinsically tamper indicating or TID sealed items which contain a Category IV quantity of material; (3) assembled components; and (4) laboratory samples. Therefore all (SRNL) Material Balance Area (MBA) items with greater than 50 grams total Pu or greater than 50 grams HEU were subject to a verification measurement. The pass

  19. Design of a phantom equivalent to measure bone-fluorine in a human's hand via delayed neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, F; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R; Prestwich, W V; Inskip, M

    2013-05-01

    Fluorine is an element that can be either beneficial or harmful, depending on the total amount accumulated in the teeth or bones. In our laboratory, we have developed a non-invasive technique for the in vivo measurement of fluoride in bone using neutron activation analysis and performed the first pilot human study. Fluoride in humans is quantified by comparing the γ-ray signal from a person to the γ-ray signal obtained from appropriate anthropomorphic calibration phantoms. An identified problem with existing fluoride phantoms is contamination with aluminum. Aluminum creates an interfering γ-ray signal which, although it can be subtracted out, increases the uncertainty in the measurement and worsens the detection limit. This paper outlines a series of studies undertaken to develop a better calibration phantom for fluorine measurement, which does not have aluminum contamination. PMID:23587669

  20. Neutron radiation measurements on several international flights.

    PubMed

    Poje, Marina; Vuković, Branko; Radolić, Vanja; Miklavčić, Igor; Planinić, Josip

    2015-03-01

    The earth is continually exposed to cosmic radiation of both solar and galactic origin. High-energy particles interact with the constituents in the atmosphere producing secondary particles that create radiation fields at aircraft altitudes. These secondary particles consist mainly of photons, protons, neutrons, charged and uncharged pions, and muons. The neutron component dominates the hadron cascade at lower altitudes as a result of its longer mean free path. Since air transportation has become more available to a greater number of people, this has led to an increase in the number of persons exposed to ionizing radiation of cosmic origin. This concerns pilots and cabin crews as well as frequent flyers. A neutron component of cosmic radiation was measured using an LR 115/CR-39 track detector associated with a 10B converter foil. The measurement of the neutron dose is a good approximation of the total dose since neutrons carry about 50% of the total ambient dose equivalent at aircraft altitudes. Also, the results of the measurements were compared with the data obtained by EPCARD software simulation. The measured neutron dose rate had a span from 0.36 to 8.83 μSv h(-1) (dose enhancement due to high solar activity in the flight period). PMID:25627946

  1. Neutron radiation measurements on several international flights.

    PubMed

    Poje, Marina; Vuković, Branko; Radolić, Vanja; Miklavčić, Igor; Planinić, Josip

    2015-03-01

    The earth is continually exposed to cosmic radiation of both solar and galactic origin. High-energy particles interact with the constituents in the atmosphere producing secondary particles that create radiation fields at aircraft altitudes. These secondary particles consist mainly of photons, protons, neutrons, charged and uncharged pions, and muons. The neutron component dominates the hadron cascade at lower altitudes as a result of its longer mean free path. Since air transportation has become more available to a greater number of people, this has led to an increase in the number of persons exposed to ionizing radiation of cosmic origin. This concerns pilots and cabin crews as well as frequent flyers. A neutron component of cosmic radiation was measured using an LR 115/CR-39 track detector associated with a 10B converter foil. The measurement of the neutron dose is a good approximation of the total dose since neutrons carry about 50% of the total ambient dose equivalent at aircraft altitudes. Also, the results of the measurements were compared with the data obtained by EPCARD software simulation. The measured neutron dose rate had a span from 0.36 to 8.83 μSv h(-1) (dose enhancement due to high solar activity in the flight period).

  2. Neutron Fluence Monitoring by Foil Activation at the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Richard M. Lindstrom

    2000-11-12

    In a reactor facility such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research, it is occasionally necessary to measure the intensity and characteristics of neutron fields, inside and outside the reactor vessel. Design of thermal- and cold-neutron beam guides and filters, neutron activation analysis, and health physics calibrations are the most common needs. To meet these requirements, routine procedures have been developed for efficient and transparent measurements of slow neutrons.

  3. Neutron energy measurements in emergency response applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Hornish, Michael; Wilde, Scott; Stampahar, Tom; Reed, Michael

    2009-08-01

    We present significant results in recent advances in the measurement of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of importance. At the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) of National Security Technologies, LLC, a series of materials, viz., liquid organic scintillator (LOS), Lithium Gadolinium Borate (LGB) or Li6Gd(BO3)3 in a plastic matrix, a recently developed crystal of Cesium Lithium Yttrium Chloride, Cs2LiYCl6: Ce (called CLYC)[1], and normal plastic scintillator (BC-408) with 3He tubes have been used to study their effectiveness as a portable neutron energy spectrometer. Comparisons illustrating the strengths of the various materials will be provided. Of these materials, LGB offers the ability to tailor its response to the neutron spectrum by varying the isotopic composition of the key constituents (Lithium, Gadolinium [Yttrium], and Boron). All three of the constituent elements possess large neutron capture cross section isotopes for highly exothermic reactions. These compounds of composition Li6Gd(Y)(BO3)3 can be activated by Cerium ions Ce3+. CLYC, on the other hand, has a remarkable gamma response in addition to superb neutron discrimination, comparable to that of Europium-doped Lithium Iodide (6LiI: Eu). Comparing these two materials, CLYC has higher light output (4500 phe/MeV) than that from 6LiI: Eu and shows better energy resolution for both gamma and neutron pulse heights. Using CLYC, gamma energy pulses can be discriminated from the neutron signals by simple pulse height separation. For the cases of both LGB and LOS, careful pulse shape discrimination is needed to separate the gamma energy signals from neutron pulses. Both analog and digital

  4. An application of CCD read-out technique to neutron distribution measurement using the self-activation method with a CsI scintillator plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohtomi, Akihiro; Kurihara, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Honda, Soichiro; Tokunaga, Masaaki; Uno, Heita; Shinsho, Kiyomitsu; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Koba, Yusuke; Fukunaga, Junichi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Ohga, Saiji

    2016-10-01

    In our previous paper, the self-activation of an NaI scintillator had been successfully utilized for detecting photo-neutrons around a high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machine; individual optical pulses from the self-activated scintillator are read-out by photo sensors such as a photomultiplier tube (PMT). In the present work, preliminary observations have been performed in order to apply a direct CCD read-out technique to the self-activation method with a CsI scintillator plate using a Pu-Be source and a 10-MV linac. In conclusion, it has been revealed that the CCD read-out technique is applicable to neutron measurement around a high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machine with the self-activation of a CsI plate. Such application may provide a possibility of novel method for simple neutron dose-distribution measurement.

  5. Measurement of whole body cellular and collagen nitrogen, potassium, and other elements by neutron activation and whole body counting

    SciTech Connect

    James, H.M.; Fabricius, P.J.; Dykes, P.W.

    1987-09-01

    Whole body nitrogen can be measured by neutron activation analysis with an acceptable radiation dose; it is an index of body protein which, in normal subjects, is 65% cellular protein and 35% extracellular connective collagen. Whole body potassium can be measured by whole body counting without irradiating the subject; it is an index of body cell mass. We measured whole body nitrogen, potassium, extracellular water, intracellular water, and fat-folds. The differences between 37 malnourished patients and five normal subjects suggested that the patients had 9 kg less cell mass than normal, but no difference in extracellular mass. Measurements were made on eight patients before and after 14 days of total parenteral nutrition; balance of nitrogen intake and excretion also was measured. The changes were consistent with mean increases of 3 kg of cellular mass and 3 kg of fat with no change of extracellular mass. The accuracy and sensitivity of the whole body measurements need further confirmation for use in patients with changing body composition. Where tissue wasting is largely from the cellular compartment, potassium could be a more sensitive index of wasting than nitrogen. Multielement analysis of nitrogen, potassium, chlorine, and carbon will probably be valuable in elucidating body composition in malnutrition.

  6. Neutron counter based on beryllium activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowska, B.; Prokopowicz, R.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Paducha, M.; Scholz, M.; Igielski, A.; Karpinski, L.; Pytel, K.

    2014-08-21

    The fusion reaction occurring in DD plasma is followed by emission of 2.45 MeV neutrons, which carry out information about fusion reaction rate and plasma parameters and properties as well. Neutron activation of beryllium has been chosen for detection of DD fusion neutrons. The cross-section for reaction {sup 9}Be(n, α){sup 6}He has a useful threshold near 1 MeV, which means that undesirable multiple-scattered neutrons do not undergo that reaction and therefore are not recorded. The product of the reaction, {sup 6}He, decays with half-life T{sub 1/2} = 0.807 s emitting β{sup −} particles which are easy to detect. Large area gas sealed proportional detector has been chosen as a counter of β–particles leaving activated beryllium plate. The plate with optimized dimensions adjoins the proportional counter entrance window. Such set-up is also equipped with appropriate electronic components and forms beryllium neutron activation counter. The neutron flux density on beryllium plate can be determined from the number of counts. The proper calibration procedure needs to be performed, therefore, to establish such relation. The measurements with the use of known β–source have been done. In order to determine the detector response function such experiment have been modeled by means of MCNP5–the Monte Carlo transport code. It allowed proper application of the results of transport calculations of β{sup −} particles emitted from radioactive {sup 6}He and reaching proportional detector active volume. In order to test the counter system and measuring procedure a number of experiments have been performed on PF devices. The experimental conditions have been simulated by means of MCNP5. The correctness of simulation outcome have been proved by measurements with known radioactive neutron source. The results of the DD fusion neutron measurements have been compared with other neutron diagnostics.

  7. Neutron counter based on beryllium activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienkowska, B.; Prokopowicz, R.; Scholz, M.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Igielski, A.; Karpinski, L.; Paducha, M.; Pytel, K.

    2014-08-01

    The fusion reaction occurring in DD plasma is followed by emission of 2.45 MeV neutrons, which carry out information about fusion reaction rate and plasma parameters and properties as well. Neutron activation of beryllium has been chosen for detection of DD fusion neutrons. The cross-section for reaction 9Be(n, α)6He has a useful threshold near 1 MeV, which means that undesirable multiple-scattered neutrons do not undergo that reaction and therefore are not recorded. The product of the reaction, 6He, decays with half-life T1/2 = 0.807 s emitting β- particles which are easy to detect. Large area gas sealed proportional detector has been chosen as a counter of β-particles leaving activated beryllium plate. The plate with optimized dimensions adjoins the proportional counter entrance window. Such set-up is also equipped with appropriate electronic components and forms beryllium neutron activation counter. The neutron flux density on beryllium plate can be determined from the number of counts. The proper calibration procedure needs to be performed, therefore, to establish such relation. The measurements with the use of known β-source have been done. In order to determine the detector response function such experiment have been modeled by means of MCNP5-the Monte Carlo transport code. It allowed proper application of the results of transport calculations of β- particles emitted from radioactive 6He and reaching proportional detector active volume. In order to test the counter system and measuring procedure a number of experiments have been performed on PF devices. The experimental conditions have been simulated by means of MCNP5. The correctness of simulation outcome have been proved by measurements with known radioactive neutron source. The results of the DD fusion neutron measurements have been compared with other neutron diagnostics.

  8. Activation Measurements for Thermal Neutrons, U.S. Measurements of 36Cl in Mineral Samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and Measurement of 63 Ni in Copper Samples From Hiroshima by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tore Straume; Alfredo A. Marchetti; Stephen D. Egbert; James A. Roberts; Ping Men; Shoichiro Fujita; Kiyoshi Shizuma; Masaharu Hoshi; G. Rugel; W. Ruhm; G. Korschinek; J. E. McAninch; K. L. Carroll; T. Faestermann; K. Knie; R. E. Martinelli; A. Wallner; C. Wallner

    2005-01-14

    The present paper presents the {sup 36}Cl measurement effort in the US. A large number of {sup 36}Cl measurements have been made in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of {sup 36}Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results from these measurements are presented here and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. The production of {sup 36}Cl by bomb neutrons in mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki was primarily via the reaction {sup 35}Cl(n,{gamma}){sup 36}Cl. This reaction has a substantial thermal neutron cross-section (43.6 b at 0.025 eV) and the product has a long half-life (301,000 y). hence, it is well suited for neutron-activation detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using AMS more than 50 years after the bombings. A less important reaction for bomb neutrons, {sup 39}K(n,{alpha}){sup 36}Cl, typically produces less than 10% of the {sup 36}Cl in mineral samples such as granite and concrete, which contain {approx} 2% potassium. In 1988, only a year after the publication of the DS86 final report (Roesch 1987), it was demonstrated experimentally that {sup 36}Cl measured using AMS should be able to detect the thermal neutron fluences at the large distances most relevant to the A-bomb survivor dosimetry. Subsequent measurements in mineral samples from both Hiroshima and Nagasaki validated the experimental findings. The potential utility of {sup 36}Cl as a thermal neutron detector in Hiroshima was first presented by Haberstock et al. who employed the Munich AMS facility to measure {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a gravestone from near the hypocenter. That work subsequently resulted in an expanded {sup 36}Cl effort in Germany that paralleled the US work. More recently, there have also been {sup 36}Cl measurements made by a Japanese

  9. Neutron capture measurements for nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, Rene

    2005-04-01

    Almost all of the heavy elements are produced via neutron capture reactions in a multitude of stellar production sites. The predictive power of the underlying stellar models is currently limited because they contain poorly constrained physics components such as convection, rotation or magnetic fields. Neutron captures measurements on heavy radioactive isotopes provide a unique opportunity to largely improve these physics components, and thereby address important questions of nuclear astrophysics. Such species are branch-points in the otherwise uniquely defined path of subsequent n-captures along the s-process path in the valley of stability. These branch points reveal themselves through unmistakable signatures recovered from pre-solar meteoritic grains that originate in individual element producing stars. Measurements on radioactive isotopes for neutron energies in the keV region represent a stringent challenge for further improvements of experimental techniques. This holds true for the neutron sources, the detection systems and the technology to handle radioactive material. Though the activation method or accelerator mass spectroscopy of the reaction products could be applied in a limited number of cases, Experimental facilities like DANCE at LANL, USA and n-TOF at CERN, Switzerland are addressing the need for such measurements on the basis of the more universal method of detecting the prompt capture gamma-rays, which is required for the application of neutron time-of-flight (TOF) techniques. With a strongly optimized neutron facility at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) isotopes with half-lives down to tens of days could be investigated, while present facilities require half-lives of a few hundred days. Recent neutron capture experiments on radioactive isotopes with relevance for nuclear astrophysics and possibilities for future experimental setups will be discussed during the talk.

  10. Neutron activated switch

    DOEpatents

    Barton, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A switch for reacting quickly to a neutron emission. A rod consisting of fissionable material is located inside a vacuum tight body. An adjustable contact is located coaxially at an adjustable distance from one end of the rod. Electrical leads are connected to the rod and to the adjustable contact. With a vacuum drawn inside the body, a neutron bombardment striking the rod causes it to heat and expand longitudinally until it comes into contact with the adjustable contact. This circuit closing occurs within a period of a few microseconds.

  11. Neutron Unfolding Code System for Calculating Neutron Flux Spectra from Activation Data of Dosimeter Foils.

    1982-04-30

    Version 00 As a part of the measurement and analysis plan for the Dosimetry Experiment at the "JOYO" experimental fast reactor, neutron flux spectral analysis is performed using the NEUPAC (Neutron Unfolding Code Package) code system. NEUPAC calculates the neutron flux spectra and other integral quantities from the activation data of the dosimeter foils.

  12. A neutron activation spectrometer and neutronic experimental platform for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeamans, C. B.; Gharibyan, N.

    2016-11-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, the diagnostic instrument manipulator-based neutron activation spectrometer is used as a diagnostic of implosion performance for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Additionally, it serves as a platform for independent neutronic experiments and may be connected to fast recording systems for neutron effect tests on active electronics. As an implosion diagnostic, the neutron activation spectrometers are used to quantify fluence of primary DT neutrons, downscattered neutrons, and neutrons above the primary DT neutron energy created by reactions of upscattered D and T in flight. At a primary neutron yield of 1015 and a downscattered fraction of neutrons in the 10-12 MeV energy range of 0.04, the downscattered neutron fraction can be measured to a relative uncertainty of 8%. Significant asymmetries in downscattered neutrons have been observed. Spectrometers have been designed and fielded to measure the tritium-tritium and deuterium-tritium neutron outputs simultaneously in experiments using DT/TT fusion ratio as a direct measure of mix of ablator into the gas.

  13. Photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium.

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W. L.; Goulding, C. A.; Hollas, C. L.; Moss, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    The physics of photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) using the delayed neutron reinterrogation method is described in this paper. Two sets of active interrogation experiments were performed using a set of subcritical configurations of cocentric HEU metal hemishells. One set of measurements utilized a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator as the active source. The second set of measurements utilized a linear accelerator-based bremsstrahlung photon source as an active interrogation source. The neutron responses were measured for both sets of experiments. The operational details and results for both measurement sets are described.

  14. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  15. Measurement of neutron diffraction with compact neutron source RANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Y.; Takamura, M.; Taketani, A.; Sunaga, H.; Otake, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Kumagai, M.; Oba, Y.; Hama, T.

    2016-11-01

    Diffraction is used as a measurement technique for crystal structure. X-rays or electron beam with wavelength that is close to the lattice constant of the crystal is often used for the measurement. They have sensitivity in surface (0.01mm) of heavy metals due to the mean free path for heavy ions. Neutron diffraction has the probe of the internal structure of the heavy metals because it has a longer mean free path than that of the X-rays or the electrons. However, the neutron diffraction measurement is not widely used because large facilities are required in the many neutron sources. RANS (Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source) is developed as a neutron source which is usable easily in laboratories and factories. In RANS, fast neutrons are generated by 7MeV protons colliding on a Be target. Some fast neutrons are moderated with polyethylene to thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons of 10meV which have wavelength of 10nm can be used for the diffraction measurement. In this study, the texture evolution in steels was measured with RANS and the validity of the compact neutron source was proved. The texture of IF steel sheets with the thickness of 1.0mm was measured with 10minutes run. The resolution is 2% and is enough to analyze a evolution in texture due to compression/tensile deformation or a volume fraction of two phases in the steel sample. These results have proven the possibility to use compact neutron source for the analysis of mesoscopic structure of metallic materials.

  16. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are clean'' and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its data production'' phase.

  17. Age- and sex-related changes in bone mass measured by neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.; Aloia, J.F.; Vaswani, A.N.; Zanzi, I.; Vartsky, D.; Ellis, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    Total-body calcium (TBCa) measurements have been employed in two basic types of studies. In the first type, serial measurements made on an individual patient are used to trace the time variation in body calcium. In the second type of study, the absolute total body calcium of an individual is determined and compared to a standard or predicted value in order to determine the deficit or excess of calcium. Generally, the standards are derived from data obtained from normal populations and grouped by the parameters of age and sex (mean value denoted TBCa/sub m/). In the study reported in this paper, the clinical usefulness of predicted calcium (TBCa/sub p/) is evaluated. The predicted value (TBCa/sub p/) for an individual is obtained with an algorithm utilizing values of sex and age, height and lean body mass (as derived from /sup 40/K measurement). The latter two components characterize skeletal size and body habitus, respectively. For the study, 133 white women and 71 white men ranging in age from 20 to 80 years were selected from a larger population. Individuals with evidence of metabolic calcium disorders or osteoporosis were excluded. Additionally, the women and men selected were first judged to have total body potassium levels in the normal range. For each age decade, the variance of TBCa values of these individuals, when expressed in terms of TBCa/sub p/, was significantly less than when expressed in terms of TBCa/sub m/. Thus, erroneous conclusions based on Ca deficit in osteoporosis could be drawn for individuals whose height and body size differ markedly from the average, as the variation of their TBCa values often exceeds the variation in the age and sex cohort. Data on a group of osteoporotic women were compared with the normal skeletal baseline values both in terms of the TBCa and the TBCa/sub p/ values.

  18. Active Neutron Shielding R&D for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter; Dmtpc Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Neutrons are a dangerous background to direct dark matter detection searches because they can mimic exactly the signal signature. For this reason, it is desirable to measure the neutron flux directly at underground sites where dark matter experiments are active. We have developed a liquid scintillator-based neutron detector for this purpose, which is currently underground and taking data at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in NM. Before being commissioned underground, the response of this detector to neutrons with kinetic energies from 50 MeV to 800 MeV was determined in a beam test at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in NM. The goal of this R&D is to (i) demonstrate the feasibility of a large scale active and passive neutron shield for dark matter searches and (ii) to measure the neutron energy spectrum underground at WIPP above 50 MeV neutron kinetic energies.

  19. Cosmic Ray Neutron Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayananda, Mathes

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic rays are high-energetic particles originating from outer space that bombard the upper atmosphere of the Earth. Almost 90% of cosmic ray particles consist of protons, electrons and heavy ions. When these particles hit the Earth's atmosphere, cascade of secondary particles are formed. The most abundant particles reach to the surface of the Earth are muons, electrons and neutrons. In recent years many research groups are looking into potential applications of the effects of cosmic ray radiation at the surface of the Earth [1, 2]. At Georgia State University we are working on a long-term measurement of cosmic ray flux distribution. This study includes the simultaneous measurement of cosmic ray muons, neutrons and gamma particles at the Earth surface in downtown Atlanta. The initial effort is focusing on the correlation studies of the cosmic ray particle flux distribution and the atmospheric weather conditions. In this presentation, I will talk about the development of a cosmic ray detector using liquid scintillator and the preliminary results. [4pt] [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, ``Radiographic imaging with cosmic-ray muons'', Nature, Vol.422, p.277, Mar.2003[0pt] [2] Svensmark Henrik, Physical Review 81, 3, (1998)

  20. A Pilot Study Measuring Aluminum in Bone in Alzheimer's Disease and control Subjects Using in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Hedieh K; Cowan, David; Chettle, David R; Milić, Ana Pejović; Priest, Nicholas; Matysiak, Witold; Atanackovic, Jovica; Byun, Soo Hyun; Prestwich, William V

    2016-06-18

    Aluminum, being the most abundant metal in the earth's crust, is widely distributed in the environment, and is routinely taken up by the human body through ingestion and inhalation. Aluminum is not considered an essential element and it can be toxic in high concentrations. Most of the body burden of aluminum is stored in the bones. Aluminum has been postulated to be involved in the causality of Alzheimer's disease. A system for non-invasive measurement of bone aluminum using the in vivo neutron activation analysis technique has been developed and previously reported in the literature by our group. The results are reported as ratio of Al to Ca in order to eliminate the variations in beam parameters and geometry as well as the physical variations among the subjects such as size of the hand and bone structure. This pilot study included 30 subjects, 15 diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in mild and moderate stages and 15 control subjects, all of whom were 60 years of age or older. The mean value of aluminum for the control group was 2.7±8.2μg Al/g Ca (inverse-variance weighted mean 3.5±0.9μg Al/g Ca) and for the Alzheimer's disease subjects was 12.5±13.1μg Al/g Ca (inverse-variance weighted mean 7.6±0.6μg Al/g Ca). The difference between the mean of the Alzheimer's disease group and the mean of the control group was 9.8±15.9μg Al/g Ca, with a p-value of 0.02. An age-dependent linear increase in bone aluminum concentration was observed for all subjects. The difference in serum aluminum levels between the two groups did not reach significance. PMID:27340850

  1. Strategy for the absolute neutron emission measurement on ITER.

    PubMed

    Sasao, M; Bertalot, L; Ishikawa, M; Popovichev, S

    2010-10-01

    Accuracy of 10% is demanded to the absolute fusion measurement on ITER. To achieve this accuracy, a functional combination of several types of neutron measurement subsystem, cross calibration among them, and in situ calibration are needed. Neutron transport calculation shows the suitable calibration source is a DT/DD neutron generator of source strength higher than 10(10) n/s (neutron/second) for DT and 10(8) n/s for DD. It will take eight weeks at the minimum with this source to calibrate flux monitors, profile monitors, and the activation system.

  2. Strategy for the absolute neutron emission measurement on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Sasao, M.; Bertalot, L.; Ishikawa, M.; Popovichev, S.

    2010-10-15

    Accuracy of 10% is demanded to the absolute fusion measurement on ITER. To achieve this accuracy, a functional combination of several types of neutron measurement subsystem, cross calibration among them, and in situ calibration are needed. Neutron transport calculation shows the suitable calibration source is a DT/DD neutron generator of source strength higher than 10{sup 10} n/s (neutron/second) for DT and 10{sup 8} n/s for DD. It will take eight weeks at the minimum with this source to calibrate flux monitors, profile monitors, and the activation system.

  3. Neutron activation diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D. L.; Yeamans, C. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Caggiano, J. A.; Drury, O. B.; Hagmann, C. A.; Hatarik, R.; Knittel, K. M.; McNaney, J. M.; Moran, M.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Cooper, G. W.; Knauer, J. P.; Leeper, R. J.; Ruiz, C. L.

    2012-10-15

    Neutron yields are measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by an extensive suite of neutron activation diagnostics. Neutrons interact with materials whose reaction cross sections threshold just below the fusion neutron production energy, providing an accurate measure of primary unscattered neutrons without contribution from lower-energy scattered neutrons. Indium samples are mounted on diagnostic instrument manipulators in the NIF target chamber, 25-50 cm from the source, to measure 2.45 MeV deuterium-deuterium fusion neutrons through the {sup 115}In(n,n'){sup 115m} In reaction. Outside the chamber, zirconium and copper are used to measure 14 MeV deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons via {sup 90}Zr(n,2n), {sup 63}Cu(n,2n), and {sup 65}Cu(n,2n) reactions. An array of 16 zirconium samples are located on port covers around the chamber to measure relative yield anisotropies, providing a global map of fuel areal density variation. Neutron yields are routinely measured with activation to an accuracy of 7% and are in excellent agreement both with each other and with neutron time-of-flight and magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements. Relative areal density anisotropies can be measured to a precision of less than 3%. These measurements reveal apparent bulk fuel velocities as high as 200 km/s in addition to large areal density variations between the pole and equator of the compressed fuel.

  4. Neutron Spectrum Measurements from Irradiations at NCERC

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, Kevin Richard; Mosby, Michelle A.; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Hutchens, Gregory Joe; White, Morgan Curtis

    2015-04-15

    Several irradiations have been conducted on assemblies (COMET/ZEUS and Flattop) at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Configurations of the assemblies and irradiated materials changed between experiments. Different metallic foils were analyzed using the radioactivation method by gamma-ray spectrometry to understand/characterize the neutron spectra. Results of MCNP calculations are shown. It was concluded that MCNP simulated spectra agree with experimental measurements, with the caveats that some data are limited by statistics at low-energies and some activation foils have low activities.

  5. Utilization of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, R.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Popek, R.J.; Schulke, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) neutron scattering facility (NSF) has been investigated for its applicability to neutron activation analysis. A polyethylene insert has been added to the vertical hole VT3 which enhances the thermal neutron flux by a factor of two. The neutron spectral distribution at this position has been measured by the multiple-foil technique which utilized 28 activation reactions and the STAYSL computer code. The validity of this spectral measurement was tested by two irradiations of National Bureau of Standards SRM-1571 (orchard leaves), SRM-1575 (pine needles), and SRM-1645 (river sediment). The average thermal neutron flux for these irradiations normalized to 10 ..mu..amp proton beam is 4.0 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/-s. Concentrations of nine trace elements in each of these SRMs have been determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Agreement of measured values to certified values is demonstrated to be within experiment error.

  6. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  7. Neutron multiplication error in TRU waste measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, John; Stanfield, Sean B; Wachter, Joe; Ceo, Bob

    2009-01-01

    Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) in neutron assays of transuranic waste (TRU) are comprised of several components including counting statistics, matrix and source distribution, calibration inaccuracy, background effects, and neutron multiplication error. While a minor component for low plutonium masses, neutron multiplication error is often the major contributor to the TMU for items containing more than 140 g of weapons grade plutonium. Neutron multiplication arises when neutrons from spontaneous fission and other nuclear events induce fissions in other fissile isotopes in the waste, thereby multiplying the overall coincidence neutron response in passive neutron measurements. Since passive neutron counters cannot differentiate between spontaneous and induced fission neutrons, multiplication can lead to positive bias in the measurements. Although neutron multiplication can only result in a positive bias, it has, for the purpose of mathematical simplicity, generally been treated as an error that can lead to either a positive or negative result in the TMU. While the factors that contribute to neutron multiplication include the total mass of fissile nuclides, the presence of moderating material in the matrix, the concentration and geometry of the fissile sources, and other factors; measurement uncertainty is generally determined as a function of the fissile mass in most TMU software calculations because this is the only quantity determined by the passive neutron measurement. Neutron multiplication error has a particularly pernicious consequence for TRU waste analysis because the measured Fissile Gram Equivalent (FGE) plus twice the TMU error must be less than 200 for TRU waste packaged in 55-gal drums and less than 325 for boxed waste. For this reason, large errors due to neutron multiplication can lead to increased rejections of TRU waste containers. This report will attempt to better define the error term due to neutron multiplication and arrive at values that are

  8. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  9. Shock temperature measurement using neutron resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, V W; Bowman, J David; Funk, D J; Morgan, G L; Rabie, R L; Ragan, C E; Quintana, J P; Stacy, H L

    2005-04-01

    We report a direct measurement of temperature in a shocked metal using Doppler broadening of neutron resonances. The 21.1-eV resonance in 182W was used to measure the temperature in molybdenum shocked to approximately 63 GPa. An explosively launched aluminum flyer produced a planar shock in a molybdenum target that contained a 1-mm thick layer doped with 1.7 at. %(182)W. A single neutron pulse, containing resonant neutrons of less than 1 mus duration, probed the shocked material. Fits to the neutron time-of-flight data were used to determine the temperature of the shocked molybdenum.

  10. Measurement of activation cross-sections for high-energy neutron-induced reactions of Bi and Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Naik, Haladhara; Shahid, Muhammad; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-08-01

    The cross-sections for 209Bi(n, 4n)206Bi, 209Bi(n, 5n)205Bi, natPb(n, xn)204mPb, natPb(n, xn)203Pb, natPb(n, xn)202mPb,natPb(n, xn)201Pb, natPb(n, xn)200Pb, natPb(n, αxn)203Hg and natPb(n, p xn)202Tl reactions were determined at the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Korea in the neutron energy range of 15.2 to 37.2 MeV. The above cross-sections were obtained by using the activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The quasi-monoenergetic neutron used for the above reactions are based on the 9Be(p, n) reaction. Simulations of the spectral flux from the Be target were done using the MCNPX program. The cross-sections were estimated with the TALYS 1.6 code using the default parameter. The data from the present work and literature were compared with the data from the EAF-2010 and the TENDL-2013 libraries, and calculated values of TALYS 1.6 code. It shows that appropriate level density model, the γ-ray strength function, and the spin cut-off parameter are needed to obtain a good agreement between experimental data and theoretical values from TALYS 1.6 code.

  11. Identifying Nuclear Material via Prompt Photo-Neutron Multiplicity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hausladen, Paul; Mihalczo, John T; Blackburn, Brandon; Watson, Scott; Jones, James L.; Hunt, Alan W

    2009-01-01

    Proof-of-principle measurements are reported demonstrating that multiplicity techniques can be used to identify prompt fission neutrons from photonuclear interrogation under circumstances where the fission neutrons may be accompanied by photodissociated neutrons of an identical energy spectrum, and where the emitted neutrons are naturally bunched in time by the pulsed nature of the interrogating photon beam. The technique shows promise as a method for the detection of highly enriched uranium (HEU) compared to techniques based on delayed neutrons because prompt neutrons are orders of magnitude more abundant, and compared to passive multiplicity techniques because actively induced fission rates are orders of magnitude higher than spontaneous fission rates in HEU. The technique also shows promise in that multiplicity signatures can be used to distinguish HEU from other fissionable material.

  12. Low energy neutron measurements aboard encounter missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N.; Maksimovic, M.; Trottet, G.

    Neutrons in the MeV to GeV range are produced by interaction of flare accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. Because of their lifetime, only high energy neutrons (> 100 MeV) have a high probability to be detected at earth's orbit. So far, around fifteen solar neutron events have been observed either by high energy detectors aboard spacecrafts at 1 AU or by ground based neutron monitors. Neutrons between 10 and 100 MeV have also been detected for a few events through their proton decay. Measurements of solar neutrons closer to the Sun aboard encounter missions will allow to probe for the first time the MeV neutrons which are produced by the nuclear reactions of energetic ions with thresholds around 1 MeV/nuc and will provide information on the accelerated ion spectrum in the energy range between ˜ 1 MeV and 100 MeV/nuc in complementarity with what can be deduced from γ -ray line emission. The close proximity of the Sun would allow to measure neutron events for many more flares opening a new field of solar physics. Combined with near in-situ ion measurements and γ -ray observations, neutrons will bring information on the link between interacting and escaping ions while getting rid of most of the transport effects.

  13. Radioactive waste reality as revealed by neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J.

    1995-12-31

    To comprehend certain aspects of the contents of a radioactive waste container is not a trivial matter, especially if one is not allowed to open the container and peer inside. One of the suite of tools available to a practioner in the art of nondestructive assay is based upon neutron measurements. Neutrons, both naturally occuring and induced, are penertrating radiations that can be detected external to the waste container. The practioner should be skilled in applying the proper technique(s) to selected waste types. Available techniques include active and passive neutron measurements, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. The waste material itself can compromise the assay results by occluding a portion of the mass of fissile material present, or by multiplying the number of neutrons produced by a spontaneously fissioning mass. This paper will discuss the difficult, but albeit necessary marriage, between radiioactive waste types and alternative neutron measurement techniques.

  14. CALIBRATION OF THE HB LINE ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE COUNTER FOR MEASUREMENT OF LANL 3013 HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM PRODUCT SPLITS

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R; Donald02 Williams, D; Rstephen Lee, R; David-W Roberts, D; Leah Arrigo, L

    2008-01-22

    In this paper we describe set-up, calibration, and testing of the F-Area Analytical Labs active well neutron coincidence counter(HV-221000-NDA-X-1-DK-AWCC-1)in SRNL for use in HB-Line to enable assay of 3013EU/Pu metal product. The instrument was required within a three-month window for availability upon receipt of LANL Category IV uranium oxide samples into the SRS HB-Line facility. We describe calibration of the instrument in the SRNL nuclear nondestructive assay facility in the range 10-400 g HEU for qualification and installation in HB-Line for assay of the initial suite of product samples.

  15. Experimental neutronics tests for a neutron activation system for the European ITER TBM

    SciTech Connect

    Klix, A.; Fischer, U.; Gehre, D.; Kleizer, G.; Raj, P.; Rovni, I.; Ruecker, Tom

    2014-08-21

    We are investigating methods for neutron flux measurement in the ITER TBM. In particular we have tested sets of activation materials leading to induced gamma activities with short half-lives of the order of tens of seconds up to minutes and standard activation materials. Packages of activation foils have been irradiated with the intense neutron generator of Technical University of Dresden in a pure DT neutron field as well as in a neutronics mock-up of the European ITER HCLL TBM. An important aim was to check whether the gamma activity induced in the activation foils in these packages could be measured simultaneously. It was indeed possible to identify gamma lines of interest in gamma-ray measurements immediately after extraction from the irradiation.

  16. Total body nitrogen analysis. [neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of two potential in vivo neutron activation methods for determining total and partial body nitrogen in animals and humans are described. A method using the CO-11 in the expired air as a measure of nitrogen content was found to be adequate for small animals such as rats, but inadequate for human measurements due to a slow excretion rate. Studies on the method of measuring the induced N-13 in the body show that with further development, this method should be adequate for measuring muscle mass changes occurring in animals or humans during space flight.

  17. Measurement of neutron capture on 136Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J. B.; Daugherty, S. J.; Johnson, T. N.; O'Conner, T.; Kaufman, L. J.; Couture, A.; Ullmann, J. L.; Krtička, M.

    2016-09-01

    136Xe is a 0 ν β β decay candidate isotope, and is used in multiple experiments searching for this hypothetical decay mode. These experiments require precise information about neutron capture for their background characterization and minimization. Thermal and resonant neutron capture on 136Xe have been measured at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. A neutron beam ranging from thermal energy to greater than 100 keV was incident on a gas cell filled with isotopically pure 136Xe. The relative neutron capture cross sections for neutrons at thermal energies and the first resonance at 2.154 keV have been measured, yielding a new absolute measurement of 0.238 ±0.019 b for the thermal neutron capture cross section. Additionally, the γ cascades for captures at both energies have been measured, and cascade models have been developed which may be used by 0 ν β β experiments using 136Xe.

  18. Neutron spectral measurements in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobel, W.; Love, T. A.; Delorenzo, J. T.; Mcnew, C. O.

    1972-01-01

    An experiment to measure neutrons in the upper atmosphere was performed on a balloon flight from Palestine, Texas, at an altitude of about 32 km. The experimental arrangement is discussed briefly, and results of a preliminary analysis of the data for neutrons in the energy range 3 to 30 MeV are given.

  19. Neutron Activation Analysis of Water - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, John D.

    1971-01-01

    Recent developments in this field are emphasized. After a brief review of basic principles, topics discussed include sources of neutrons, pre-irradiation physical and chemical treatment of samples, neutron capture and gamma-ray analysis, and selected applications. Applications of neutron activation analysis of water have increased rapidly within the last few years and may be expected to increase in the future.

  20. Calibration Tools for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Oxide and Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide with a Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, M; O'Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P

    2003-06-13

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has completed an extensive effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler (Canberra Model JCC-92) for accountability measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide and HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. Earlier papers described the PAN shuffler calibration over a range of item properties by standards measurements and an extensive series of detailed simulation calculations. With a single normalization factor, the simulations agree with the HEU oxide standards measurements to within {+-}1.2% at one standard deviation. Measurement errors on mixed U-Pu oxide samples are in the {+-}2% to {+-}10% range, or {+-}20 g for the smaller items. The purpose of this paper is to facilitate transfer of the LLNL procedure and calibration algorithms to external users who possess an identical, or equivalent, PAN shuffler. Steps include (1) measurement of HEU standards or working reference materials (WRMs); (2) MCNP simulation calculations for the standards or WRMs and a range of possible masses in the same containers; (3) a normalization of the calibration algorithms using the standard or WRM measurements to account for differences in the {sup 252}Cf source strength, the delayed-neutron nuclear data, effects of the irradiation protocol, and detector efficiency; and (4) a verification of the simulation series trends against like LLNL results. Tools include EXCEL/Visual Basic programs which pre- and post-process the simulations, control the normalization, and embody the calibration algorithms.

  1. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  2. Measurement of 56Fe activity produced in inelastic scattering of neutrons created by cosmic muons in an iron shield.

    PubMed

    Krmar, M; Jovančević, N; Nikolić, D

    2012-01-01

    We report on the study of the intensities of several gamma lines emitted after the inelastic scattering of neutrons in (56)Fe. Neutrons were produced via nuclear processes induced by cosmic muons in the 20tons massive iron cube placed at the Earth's surface and used as a passive shield for the HPGe detector. Relative intensities of detected gamma lines are compared with the results collected in the same iron shield by the use of the (252)Cf neutrons. Assessment against the published data from neutron scattering experiments at energies up to 14MeV is also provided. It allowed us to infer the qualitative information about the average energy of muon-created neutrons in the iron shield.

  3. A magneto-gravitational neutron trap for the measurement of the neutron lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat, Daniel J.

    Neutron decay is the simplest example of nuclear beta-decay. The mean decay lifetime is a key input for predicting the abundance of light elements in the early universe. A precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, when combined with other neutron decay observables, can test for physics beyond the standard model in a way that is complimentary to, and potentially competitive with, results from high energy collider experiments. Many previous measurements of the neutron lifetime used ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in material bottles. In a material bottle experiment, UCN are loaded into the apparatus, stored for varying times, and the surviving UCN are emptied and counted. These measurements are in poor agreement with experiments that use neutron beams, and new experiments are needed to resolve the discrepancy and precisely determine the lifetime. Here we present an experiment that uses a bowl-shaped array of NdFeB magnets to confine neutrons without material wall interactions. The trap shape is designed to rapidly remove higher energy UCN that might slowly leak from the top of the trap, and can facilitate new techniques to count surviving UCN within the trap. We review the scientific motivation for a precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, and present the commissioning of the trap. Data are presented using a vanadium activation technique to count UCN within the trap, providing an alternative method to emptying neutrons from the trap and into a counter. Potential systematic effects in the experiment are then discussed and estimated using analytical and numerical techniques. We also investigate solid nitrogen-15 as a source of UCN using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy. We conclude with a discussion of forthcoming research and development for UCN detection and UCN sources.

  4. Measuring the Noble Metal and Iodine Composition of Extracted Noble Metal Phase from Spent Nuclear Fuel Using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palomares, R. I.; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Biegalski, Steven R.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Casella, Amanda J.; Brady Raap, Michaele C.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-04-01

    Mass quantities of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA). Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and mass quantification is derived from standard gamma spectroscopy and radionuclide decay analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. Lastly, the implications of the rapid analytic speed of instrumental NAA are discussed in relation to potential nuclear forensics applications.

  5. Neutron Imaging Calibration to Measure Void Fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick J; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Sharma, Vishaldeep; Fricke, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction is an intuitive parameter that describes the fraction of vapor in a two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in most heat transfer and pressure drop correlations used to design evaporating and condensing heat exchangers, as well as determining charge inventory in refrigeration systems. Void fraction measurement is not straightforward, however, and assumptions on the invasiveness of the measuring technique must be made. Neutron radiography or neutron imaging has the potential to be a truly non-invasive void fraction measuring technique but has until recently only offered qualitative descriptions of two-phase flow, in terms of flow maldistributions, for example. This paper describes the calibration approach necessary to employ neutron imaging to measure steady-state void fraction. Experiments were conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

  6. Measurements of Neutron Capture Cross-Section for Tantalum at the Neutron Filtered Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritzay, Olena; Libman, Volodymyr

    2009-08-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of tantalum have been measured for the neutron energies 2 and 59 keV using the WWR-M Kyiv Research Reactor (KRR) of the Institute for Nuclear Research of the National Academy of Science of Ukraine. The cross sections of 181Ta (n, γ) 182Ta reaction were obtained by the activation method using a gamma-spectrometer with Ge(Li)-detector. The obtained neutron capture cross sections were compared with the known experimental data from database EXFOR/CSISRS and the ENDF libraries.

  7. Active Neutron Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-05-01

    Portable electronic neutron generators (ENGs) may be used to interrogate suspicious items to detect, characterize, and quantify the presence fissionable material based upon the measurement of prompt and/or delayed emissions of neutrons and/or photons resulting from fission. The small size (<0.2 m3), light weight (<12 kg), and low power consumption (<50 W) of modern ENGs makes them ideally suited for use in field situations, incorporated into systems carried by 2-3 individuals under rugged conditions. At Idaho National Laboratory we are investigating techniques and portable equipment for performing active neutron interrogation of moderate sized objects less than ~2-4 m3 to detect shielded fissionable material. Our research in this area relies upon the use of pulsed deuterium-tritium ENGs and the measurement of die-away prompt fission neutrons and other neutron signatures in-between neutron pulses from the ENG and after the ENG is turned off.

  8. Measurements of the atmospheric neutron leakage rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; Ifedili, S. O.; Jenkins, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The atmospheric neutron leakage rate in the energy range from 0.01 to 10,000,000 eV has been measured as a function of latitude, altitude, and time with a neutron detector on board the Ogo 6 satellite. The latitude dependence of the neutron leakage is in reasonable agreement with that predicted by Lingenfelter (1963) and Light et al. (1973) if the neutron energy spectrum has the shape calculated by Newkirk (1963). The change in the neutron latitude dependence with the cosmic ray modulation agrees with the predictions of Lingenfelter and Light et al. For several solar proton events enhancements were observed in the neutron counting rates at lambda greater than or equal to 70 deg. Such events, however, provide an insignificant injection of protons at E less than or equal to 20 MeV into the radiation belts. An isotropic angular distribution of the neutron leakage in the energy range from 0.1 keV to 10 MeV best fits the observed altitude dependence of the neutron leakage flux.

  9. Full Scale Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-17

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. Reported here are the results of tests of the full-scale 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT) and Saint Gobain, and is a follow-up report to an earlier one on a smaller prototype system.

  10. Neutron activation studies and the effect of exercise on osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A technique is described to measure calcium content by in vivo neutron activation analysis of the trunk and upper thighs. In postmenopausal women, estrogen and calcium or fluoride reversed osteoporosis.

  11. Neutron spectral and angular distribution measurements for 113 and 256 MeV protons on range-thick Al and sup 238 U targets using the foil activation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Intasorn, A.

    1989-07-01

    Second neutron yields, energy spectra, and angular distributions have been measured at seven angles from 0 to 150{degree} for 113 and 256 MeV protons stopped in range-thick targets of aluminum and depleted uranium ({sup 238}U). Thin foil stacks of ten different materials were activated by secondary neutrons at distances of 20--30 cm from the targets. Following each irradiation, 30--40 different activation products were measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy. These activation rates were then used to adjust neutron energy spectra calculated by the HETC computer code. Activation cross sections were taken from ENDF/BV below 20 MeV, from literature values tested in Be(d,n) fields up to 50 MeV, and from proton spallation data and calculations from 50--250 MeV. Spectral adjustments were made with the STAY'SL computer code using a least-squares technique to minimize {chi}{sup 2} for a covariance matrix determined from uncertainties in the measured activities, cross sections, and calculated flux spectra. Neutron scattering effects were estimated from foil packets irradiated at different distances from the target. Proton effects were measured with (p,n) reactions. Systematic differences were found between the adjusted and calculated neutron spectra, namely, that HETC underpredicts the neutron flux at back angles by a factor of 2--3 and slightly overpredicts the flux at forward angles. 19 refs., 23 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population. PMID:26509624

  13. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  14. Neutron transfer measurements on neutron-rich N=82 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, Steven D; Jones, K. L.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, Robert; Kapler, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Michael Scott

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of r-process nucleosynthesis rely significantly on nuclear structure models as input, which are not well tested in the neutron-rich regime, due to the paucity of experimental data on the majority of these nuclei. High quality radioactive beams have recently made possible the measurement of (d,p) reactions on unstable nuclei in inverse kinematics, which can yield information on the development of single-neutron structure away from stability in close proximity to suggested r-process paths. The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) has been developed for the measurement of such reactions. An early partial implementation of ORRUBA has been utilized to measure the {sup 132}Sn(d,p){sup 133}Sn and {sup 134}Te(d,p){sup 135}Te reactions for the first time.

  15. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klupák, Vít; Viererbl, Ladislav; Lahodová, Zdena; Šoltés, Jaroslav; Tomandl, Ivo; Kudějová, Petra

    2016-02-01

    Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  16. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  17. Dual-fission chamber and neutron beam characterization for fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.; Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    A program has been initiated to measure the energy dependence of selected high-yield fission products used in the analysis of nuclear test data. We present out initial work of neutron activation using a dual-fission chamber with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and gamma-counting method. Quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of energies from 0.5 to 15 MeV using the TUNL 10 MV FM tandem to provide high-precision and self-consistent measurements of fission product yields (FPY). The final FPY results will be coupled with theoretical analysis to provide a more fundamental understanding of the fission process. To accomplish this goal, we have developed and tested a set of dual-fission ionization chambers to provide an accurate determination of the number of fissions occurring in a thick target located in the middle plane of the chamber assembly. Details of the fission chamber and its performance are presented along with neutron beam production and characterization. Also presented are studies on the background issues associated with room-return and off-energy neutron production. We show that the off-energy neutron contribution can be significant, but correctable, while room-return neutron background levels contribute less than <1% to the fission signal.

  18. Neutron detector simultaneously measures fluence and dose equivalent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, R. F.; Dyer, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Neutron detector acts as both an area monitoring instrument and a criticality dosimeter by simultaneously measuring dose equivalent and fluence. The fluence is determined by activation of six foils one inch below the surface of the moderator. Dose equivalent is determined from activation of three interlocked foils at the center of the moderator.

  19. Neutron measurements onboard the space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Keith, J E; Cleghorn, T F

    2001-06-01

    The radiation environment inside a shielded volume is highly complex, consisting of both charged and neutral particles. Since the inception of human space flights, the charged particle component has received virtually all of the attention. There is however, a significant production of secondary neutrons, particularly from the aluminum structure in low earth orbiting spacecrafts. The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and solar energetic particles with the earth's atmosphere produce a non-isotropic distribution of albedo neutrons. Inside any reasonable habitable module, the average radiation quality factor of neutrons is about 4-5 times larger than the corresponding average quality factor of charged particles. The measurement of neutrons and their energy spectra is a difficult problem due the intense sources of charged particles. This paper reviews the results of Shuttle flight experiments (made during both solar maximum and solar minimum) to measure the contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent, as well as theoretical calculations to estimate the appropriate range of neutron energies that contribute most to the dose equivalent.

  20. Neutron measurements onboard the space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Keith, J E; Cleghorn, T F

    2001-06-01

    The radiation environment inside a shielded volume is highly complex, consisting of both charged and neutral particles. Since the inception of human space flights, the charged particle component has received virtually all of the attention. There is however, a significant production of secondary neutrons, particularly from the aluminum structure in low earth orbiting spacecrafts. The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and solar energetic particles with the earth's atmosphere produce a non-isotropic distribution of albedo neutrons. Inside any reasonable habitable module, the average radiation quality factor of neutrons is about 4-5 times larger than the corresponding average quality factor of charged particles. The measurement of neutrons and their energy spectra is a difficult problem due the intense sources of charged particles. This paper reviews the results of Shuttle flight experiments (made during both solar maximum and solar minimum) to measure the contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent, as well as theoretical calculations to estimate the appropriate range of neutron energies that contribute most to the dose equivalent. PMID:11852943

  1. Neutron measurements onboard the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Keith, J. E.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2001-01-01

    The radiation environment inside a shielded volume is highly complex, consisting of both charged and neutral particles. Since the inception of human space flights, the charged particle component has received virtually all of the attention. There is however, a significant production of secondary neutrons, particularly from the aluminum structure in low earth orbiting spacecrafts. The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and solar energetic particles with the earth's atmosphere produce a non-isotropic distribution of albedo neutrons. Inside any reasonable habitable module, the average radiation quality factor of neutrons is about 4-5 times larger than the corresponding average quality factor of charged particles. The measurement of neutrons and their energy spectra is a difficult problem due the intense sources of charged particles. This paper reviews the results of Shuttle flight experiments (made during both solar maximum and solar minimum) to measure the contribution of neutrons to the dose equivalent, as well as theoretical calculations to estimate the appropriate range of neutron energies that contribute most to the dose equivalent. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Mixed Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, M; O'Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P; Dearborn, D; Endres, E

    2002-05-23

    As a follow-on to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler for measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide, a method has been developed to extend the use of the PAN shuffler to the measurement of HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. This method uses the current LLNL HEU oxide calibration algorithms, appropriately corrected for the mixed U-Pu oxide assay time, and recently developed PuO{sub 2} calibration algorithms to yield the mass of {sup 235}U present via differences between the expected count rate for the PuO{sub 2} and the measured count rate of the mixed U-Pu oxide. This paper describes the LLNL effort to use PAN shuffler measurements of units of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements] and CRM 146 [Uranium Isotopic Standard for Gamma Spectrometry Measurements] and a selected set of LLNL PuO{sub 2}-bearing containers in consort with Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to each to (1) establish and validate a correction to the HEU calibration algorithm for the mixed U-Pu oxide assay time, (2) develop a PuO{sub 2} calibration algorithm that includes the effect of PuO{sub 2} density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3}) and container size (8.57 cm to 9.88 cm inside diameter and 9.60 cm to 13.29 cm inside height) on the PAN shuffler response, and (3) develop and validate the method for establishing the mass of {sup 235}U present in an unknown of mixed U-Pu oxide.

  3. Measurements of neutron dose rates with a balloon in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, K; Hiraide, I; Sato, K; Yamagami, T; Nakamura, T; Yabutani, T

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of cosmic-ray neutron dose rates with a balloon in Sanriku, Japan (geographic location: 39 degrees N, 142 degrees E; corresponding geomagnetic latitude: 30 degrees N) were conducted at an altitude from 0.2 to 25 km on 25-26 August 2004 when solar activity was at an average level. Neutron dose rates given as ambient dose equivalent rates (H(10)) were measured with high-sensitive neutron dose equivalent counters and electronic silicon personal dosimeters (EPDs). The neutron dose rates increased with increasing altitude, but they were saturated around 15-20 km and decreased with increasing altitude beyond 20 km. The neutron ambient dose equivalent rate was 1.5 microSv/h(- 1) at 20 km. Measured values were corrected for the deviation of the energy response of the dose equivalent counter from the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient, and the corrected values were very close to the calculated values with EPCARD. On the other hand, neutron measurements by the EPDs gave about 10 times overestimation because of the high sensitivity to cosmic-ray protons.

  4. Determination of TFTR far-field neutron detector efficiencies by local neutron flux spectrum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, D. L.; Ascione, G.; Kugel, H. W.; Roquemore, A. L.; Barcelo, T. W.; Kumar, A.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron detectors have often been located on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) test cell floor 3 m or more from the vacuum vessel for ease of detector access, to reduce radiation damage, minimize count saturation problems, and to avoid high magnetic fields. These detectors include Si surface-barrier diodes, fission chambers, natural diamond detectors, and T2 production in a moderated 3He cell. To evaluate the performance of these detectors during deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation, we determined the neutron flux spectrum incident on the principal detector enclosure using nuclide sample sets containing Al, Ti, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni, Zr, Nb, In, and Au activation foils. Foils were installed and then removed after ample exposure to TFTR D-T neutrons. High efficiency, high purity Ge detectors were used for gamma spectroscopy of the irradiated foils. The incident neutron fluence and spectral distribution were unfolded from the measured results, and used to derive absolute detector efficiencies.

  5. Neutron apparatus for measuring strain in composites

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Faber, Jr., John F.; Singh, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for orienting a pulsed neutron source and a multi-angle diffractometer toward a sample of a ceramic-matrix or metal-matrix composite so that the measurement of internal strain (from which stress is calculated) is reduced to uncomplicated time-of-flight measurements.

  6. ACTIV87: Fast Neutron Activation Cross Section File

    1993-08-01

    4. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND AND INFORMATION ACTIV87 is a compilation of fast neutron induced activation reaction cross-sections. The compilation covers energies from threshold to 20 MeV and is based on evaluated data taken from other evaluated data libraries and individual evaluations. The majority of these evaluations were performed by using available experimental data. The aforementioned available experimental data were used in the selection of needed parameters for theoretical computations and for normalizing the results of suchmore » computations. Theoretical calculations were also used for interpolation and extrapolation of experimental cross-section data. All of the evaluated data curves were compared with experimental data that had been reported over the four year period preceding 1987. Only those cross-sections not in contradiction with experimental data that was current in 1987 were retained in the activation file, ACTIV87. In cases of several conflicting evaluations, that evaluation was chosen which best corresponded to the experimental data. A few evaluated curves were renormalized in accordance with the results of the latest precision measurements. 5. APPLICATION OF THE DATA 6. SOURCE AND SCOPE OF DATA The following libraries and individual files of evaluated neutron cross-section data were used for the selection of the activation cross-sections: the BOSPOR Library, the Activation File of the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, the Evaluated Neutron Data File (ENDF/B-V) Activation File, the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-82), and individual evaluations carried out under various IAEA research contracts. The file of selected reactions contains 206 evaluated cross-section curves of the (n,2n), (n,p) and (n,a) reactions which lead to radioactive products and may be used in many practical applications of neutron activation analysis. Some competing activation reactions, usually with low cross-section values, are given for completeness.« less

  7. Neutron dosimetric measurements in shuttle and MIR.

    PubMed

    Reitz, G

    2001-06-01

    Detector packages consisting of thermoluminescence detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions and plastic track detectors were exposed at identical positions inside MIR space station and on shuttle flights inside Spacelab and Spacehab during different phases of the solar cycle. The objectives of the investigations are to provide data on charge and energy spectra of heavy ions, and the contribution of events with low-energy deposit (protons, electrons, gamma, etc.) to the dose, as well as the contribution of secondaries, such as nuclear disintegration stars and neutrons. For neutron dosimetry 6LiF (TLD600) and 7LiF (TLD700) chips were used both of which have almost the same response to gamma rays but different response to neutrons. Neutrons in space are produced mainly in evaporation and knock-on processes with energies mainly of 1-10 MeV and up to several 100 MeV, respectively. The energy spectrum undergoes continuous changes toward greater depth in the attenuating material until an equilibrium is reached. In equilibrium, the spectrum is a wide continuum extending down to thermal energies to which the 6LiF is sensitive. Based on the difference of absorbed doses in the 6LiF and 7LiF chips, thermal neutron fluxes from 1 to 2.3 cm-2 s-1 are calculated using the assumption that the maximum induced dose in TLD600 for 1 neutron cm-2 is 1.6 x 10(-10) Gy (Horowitz and Freeman, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 157 (1978) 393). It is assumed that the flux of high-energy neutrons is at least of that quantity. Tissue doses were calculated taking as a mean ambient absorbed dose per neutron 6 x10(-12) Gy cm2 (for a10 MeV neutron). The neutron equivalent doses for the above-mentioned fluxes are 52 micro Gy d-1 and 120 micro Gy d-1. In recent experiments, a personal neutron dosimeter was integrated into the dosimeter packages. First results of this dosimeter which is based on nuclear track detectors with converter foils are reported. For future measurements, a scintillator counter with

  8. Neutron dosimetric measurements in shuttle and MIR.

    PubMed

    Reitz, G

    2001-06-01

    Detector packages consisting of thermoluminescence detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions and plastic track detectors were exposed at identical positions inside MIR space station and on shuttle flights inside Spacelab and Spacehab during different phases of the solar cycle. The objectives of the investigations are to provide data on charge and energy spectra of heavy ions, and the contribution of events with low-energy deposit (protons, electrons, gamma, etc.) to the dose, as well as the contribution of secondaries, such as nuclear disintegration stars and neutrons. For neutron dosimetry 6LiF (TLD600) and 7LiF (TLD700) chips were used both of which have almost the same response to gamma rays but different response to neutrons. Neutrons in space are produced mainly in evaporation and knock-on processes with energies mainly of 1-10 MeV and up to several 100 MeV, respectively. The energy spectrum undergoes continuous changes toward greater depth in the attenuating material until an equilibrium is reached. In equilibrium, the spectrum is a wide continuum extending down to thermal energies to which the 6LiF is sensitive. Based on the difference of absorbed doses in the 6LiF and 7LiF chips, thermal neutron fluxes from 1 to 2.3 cm-2 s-1 are calculated using the assumption that the maximum induced dose in TLD600 for 1 neutron cm-2 is 1.6 x 10(-10) Gy (Horowitz and Freeman, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 157 (1978) 393). It is assumed that the flux of high-energy neutrons is at least of that quantity. Tissue doses were calculated taking as a mean ambient absorbed dose per neutron 6 x10(-12) Gy cm2 (for a10 MeV neutron). The neutron equivalent doses for the above-mentioned fluxes are 52 micro Gy d-1 and 120 micro Gy d-1. In recent experiments, a personal neutron dosimeter was integrated into the dosimeter packages. First results of this dosimeter which is based on nuclear track detectors with converter foils are reported. For future measurements, a scintillator counter with

  9. Computer-automated neutron activation analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, M.M.; Garcia, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day. 5 references.

  10. Measurement of the Isoscalar Monopole Response in the Neutron-Rich Nucleus 68Ni using the Active Target MAYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Gibelin, J.; Khan, E.; Achouri, N. L.; Baba, H.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Colò, G.; Delaunay, F.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Keeley, N.; Mittig, W.; Pancin, J.; Raabe, R.; Roger, T.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thomas, J. C.

    We report the measurement of the isoscalar monopole strength in the unstable nucleus 68Ni using inelastic alpha scattering at 50A MeV in inverse kinematics. This experiment has been performed at GANIL with LISE spectrometer using a dedicated detector: the active target MAYA. A part of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) has been measured at 21.1 ± 1.9 MeV and indications for a soft monopole mode are provided for the first time at 12.9 ± 1.0 MeV. Distorted-wave born approximation (DWBA) with random-phase approximation (RPA) transition densities have been used to study angular distribution and indicate that the L = 0 multipolarity dominates the cross-section for the ISGMR, and significantly contributes to the soft mode.

  11. Neutron measurements of the OGO-VI Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The neutron measurements with the OGO-6 spacecraft are reported. Topics discussed include: the design and calibration of a neutron monitor for measuring the cosmic ray neutron leakages from the earth's atmosphere, determination of latitude dependence of cosmic ray leakage flux, determination of the angular distribution of neutron leakage flux as deduced by measurements of the altitude dependence, and verification of the solar modulation of the cosmic ray source for the neutron leakage.

  12. Lunar Elemental Abundances from Gamma-Ray and Neutron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Vaniman, D. T.

    1999-01-01

    The determination of elemental abundances is one of the highest science objectives of most lunar missions. Such multi-element abundances, ratios, or maps should include results for elements that are diagnostic or important in lunar processes, including heat-producing elements (such as K and Th), important incompatible elements (Th and rare earth elements), H (for polar deposits and regolith maturity), and key variable elements in major lunar provinces (such as Fe and Ti in the maria). Both neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy can be used to infer elemental abundances; the two complement each other. These elemental abundances need to be determined with high accuracy and precision from measurements such as those made by the gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) and neutron spectrometers (NS) on Lunar Prospector. As presented here, a series of steps, computer codes, and nuclear databases are needed to properly convert the raw gamma-ray and neutron measurements into good elemental abundances, ratios, and/or maps. Lunar Prospector (LP) is the first planetary mission that has measured neutrons escaping from a planet other than the Earth. The neutron spectrometers on Lunar Prospector measured a wide range of neutron energies. The ability to measure neutrons with thermal (E < 0.1 eV), epithermal (E about equal 0.1 - 1000 eV), and fast (E about 0.1-10 MeV) energies maximizes the scientific return, being especially sensitive to both H (using epithermal neutrons) and thermal-neutron-absorbing elements. Neutrons are made in the lunar surface by the interaction of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with the atomic nuclei in the surface. Most neutrons are produced with energies above about 0.1 MeV. The flux of fast neutrons in and escaping from the Moon depends on es the intensity of the cosmic rays (which vary with solar activity) and the elemental composition of the surface. Variations in the elemental composition of the lunar surface can affect the flux of fast neutrons by about 25

  13. Neutron beam characterization measurements at the Manuel Lujan Jr. neutron scattering center

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal; Muhrer, Guenter; Daemen, Luke L; Kelsey, Charles T; Duran, Michael A; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the neutron beam characteristics of neutron moderators at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE. The absolute thermal neutron flux, energy spectra and time emission spectra were measured for the high resolution and high intensity decoupled water, partially coupled liquid hydrogen and partially coupled water moderators. The results of our experimental study will provide an insight into aging of different target-moderator-reflector-shield components as well as new experimental data for benchmarking of neutron transport codes.

  14. Update on Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, M; O'Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P; Dearborn, D; Endres, E

    2002-05-17

    In October of 1999, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began an effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron (PAN) drum shuffler for measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide. A single unit of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [Uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements] was used to (1) develop a mass calibration curve for HEU oxide in the nominal range of 393 g to 3144 g {sup 235}U, and (2) perform a detailed axial and radial mapping of the detector response over a wide region of the PAN shuffler counting chamber. Results from these efforts were reported at the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 41st Annual Meeting in July 2000. This paper describes subsequent efforts by LLNL to use a unit of CRM 146 [Uranium Isotopic Standard for Gamma Spectrometry Measurements] in consort with Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to CRM 149 and CRM 146 units and a selected set of containers with CRM 149-equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to (1) extend the low range of the reported mass calibration curve to 10 g {sup 235}U, (2) evaluate the effect of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3}) and container size (5.24 cm to 12.17 cm inside diameter and 6.35 cm to 17.72 cm inside height) on the PAN shuffler response, and (3) develop mass calibration curves for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} enriched to 20.1 wt% {sup 235}U and 52.5 wt% {sup 235}U.

  15. Neutron capture and (n,2n) measurements on 241Am

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, D; Jandel, M; Bredeweg, T; Bond, E; Clement, R; Couture, A; Haight, R; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Ullmann, J; Wilhelmy, J; Wouters, J; Tonchev, A; Hutcheson, A; Angell, C; Crowell, A; Fallin, B; Hammond, S; Howell, C; Karowowski, H; Kelley, J; Pedroni, R; Tornow, W; Macri, R; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Dashdorj, D; Stoyer, M; Wu, C

    2007-07-18

    We report on a set of neutron-induced reaction measurements on {sup 241}Am which are important for nuclear forensics and advanced nuclear reactor design. Neutron capture measurements have been performed on the DANCE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering CEnter (LANSCE). In general, good agreement is found with the most recent data evaluations up to an incident neutron energy of {approx} 300 keV where background limits the measurement. Using mono-energetic neutrons produced in the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction at Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), we have measured the {sup 241}Am(n,2n) excitation function from threshold (6.7 MeV) to 14.5 MeV using the activation method. Good agreement is found with previous measurements, with the exception of the three data points reported by Perdikakis et al. around 11 MeV, where we obtain a much lower cross section that is more consistent with theoretical estimates.

  16. Development of Measurement Methods for Detection of Special Nuclear Materials using D-D Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Takahiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Kimura, Masaharu; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2015-10-01

    For detection of hidden special nuclear materials (SNMs), we have developed an active neutron-based interrogation system combined with a D-D fusion pulsed neutron source and a neutron detection system. In the detection scheme, we have adopted new measurement techniques simultaneously; neutron noise analysis and neutron energy spectrum analysis. The validity of neutron noise analysis method has been experimentally studied in the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), and was applied to a cargo container inspection system by simulation.

  17. Neutron activation analysis of Etruscan pottery

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.; Silverman, A.; Ouellet, C.G.; Clark, D.D.; Hossain, T.Z

    1992-07-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been widely used in archaeology for compositional analysis of pottery samples taken from sites of archaeological importance. Elemental profiles can determine the place of manufacture. At Cornell, samples from an Etruscan site near Siena, Italy, are being studied. The goal of this study is to compile a trace element concentration profile for a large number of samples. These profiles will be matched with an existing data bank in an attempt to understand the place of origin for these samples. The 500 kW TRIGA reactor at the Ward Laboratory is used to collect NAA data for these samples. Experiments were done to set a procedure for the neutron activation analysis with respect to sample preparation, selection of irradiation container, definition of activation and counting parameters and data reduction. Currently, we are able to analyze some 27 elements in samples of mass 500 mg with a single irradiation of 4 hours and two sequences of counting. Our sensitivity for many of the trace elements is better than 1 ppm by weight under the conditions chosen. In this talk, details of our procedure, including quality assurance as measured by NIST standard reference materials, will be discussed. In addition, preliminary results from data treatment using cluster analysis will be presented. (author)

  18. Measurements of fast neutrons by bubble detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, F.; Martinez, H.; Leal, B.; Rangel, J.; Reyes, P. G.

    2013-07-03

    Neutron bubble detectors have been studied using Am-Be and D-D neuron sources, which give limited energy information. The Bubble Detector Spectrometer (BDS) have six different energy thresholds ranging from 10 KeV to 10 Mev. The number of bubbles obtained in each measurement is related to the dose (standardized response R) equivalent neutrons through sensitivity (b / {mu}Sv) and also with the neutron flux (neutrons per unit area) through a relationship that provided by the manufacturer. Bubble detectors were used with six different answers (0.11 b/ {mu}Sv, 0093 b/{mu}Sv, 0.14 b/{mu}Sv, 0.17 b/{mu}Sv, 0051 b/{mu}Sv). To test the response of the detectors (BDS) radiate a set of six of them with different energy threshold, with a source of Am-Be, placing them at a distance of one meter from it for a few minutes. Also, exposed to dense plasma focus Fuego Nuevo II (FN-II FPD) of ICN-UNAM, apparatus which produces fusion plasma, generating neutrons by nuclear reactions of neutrons whose energy emitting is 2.45 MeV. In this case the detectors were placed at a distance of 50 cm from the pinch at 90 Degree-Sign this was done for a certain number of shots. In both cases, the standard response is reported (Dose in {mu}Sv) for each of the six detectors representing an energy range, this response is given by the expression R{sub i}= B{sub i} / S{sub i} where B{sub i} is the number of bubbles formed in each and the detector sensitivity (S{sub i}) is given for each detector in (b / {mu}Sv). Also, reported for both cases, the detected neutron flux (n cm{sup -2}), by a given ratio and the response involves both standardized R, as the average cross section sigma. The results obtained have been compared with the spectrum of Am-Be source. From these measurements it can be concluded that with a combination of bubble detectors, with different responses is possible to measure the equivalent dose in a range of 10 to 100 {mu}Sv fields mixed neutron and gamma, and pulsed generated fusion

  19. Measurements of fast neutrons by bubble detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, F.; Leal, B.; Martınez, H.; Rangel, J.; Reyes, P. G.

    2013-07-01

    Neutron bubble detectors have been studied using Am-Be and D-D neuron sources, which give limited energy information. The Bubble Detector Spectrometer (BDS) have six different energy thresholds ranging from 10 KeV to 10 Mev. The number of bubbles obtained in each measurement is related to the dose (standardized response R) equivalent neutrons through sensitivity (b / μSv) and also with the neutron flux (neutrons per unit area) through a relationship that provided by the manufacturer. Bubble detectors were used with six different answers (0.11 b/ μSv, 0093 b/μSv, 0.14 b/μSv, 0.17 b/μSv, 0051 b/μSv). To test the response of the detectors (BDS) radiate a set of six of them with different energy threshold, with a source of Am-Be, placing them at a distance of one meter from it for a few minutes. Also, exposed to dense plasma focus Fuego Nuevo II (FN-II FPD) of ICN-UNAM, apparatus which produces fusion plasma, generating neutrons by nuclear reactions of neutrons whose energy emitting is 2.45 MeV. In this case the detectors were placed at a distance of 50 cm from the pinch at 90° this was done for a certain number of shots. In both cases, the standard response is reported (Dose in μSv) for each of the six detectors representing an energy range, this response is given by the expression Ri = Bi / Si where Bi is the number of bubbles formed in each and the detector sensitivity (Si) is given for each detector in (b / μSv). Also, reported for both cases, the detected neutron flux (n cm-2), by a given ratio and the response involves both standardized R, as the average cross section sigma. The results obtained have been compared with the spectrum of Am-Be source. From these measurements it can be concluded that with a combination of bubble detectors, with different responses is possible to measure the equivalent dose in a range of 10 to 100 μSv fields mixed neutron and gamma, and pulsed generated fusion devices.

  20. Measurements of neutron radiation in aircraft.

    PubMed

    Vuković, B; Poje, M; Varga, M; Radolić, V; Miklavcić, I; Faj, D; Stanić, D; Planinić, J

    2010-12-01

    Radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of the solar and galactic origin, as well as of secondary particles created in an interaction of galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of the Earth's atmosphere. A radiation field at aircraft altitude consists of different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. In order to measure a neutron component of the cosmic radiation, we investigated a few combinations of a track etch detector (CR-39, LR-115) with a plastic converter or boron foil. Detector calibration was performed on neutrons coming from the nuclear reactor, as well as in the CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF) facility. From November 2007 to September 2008, the neutron dose equivalent was measured by the track detectors during five aircraft flights, in the north geographical latitude from 21° to 58°; the respective average dose rate, determined by using the D-4 detector (CR-39/B), was Ḣ(n)=5.9 μSv/h. The photon dose rate, measured by the electronic dosimeter RAD-60 SE, had the average value of Ḣ(f)=1.4 μSv/h.

  1. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  2. Neutron activation analysis of a penny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard E.

    2000-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis has been used for many years as an analysis tool and as an educational tool to teach students about nuclear properties. This article presents an exercise in the neutron activation analysis of a penny which, due to the simplicity of the resulting gamma-ray spectra, is appropriate for general physics classes. Students express a great deal of interest both in seeing the reactor in use as well as determining the composition of something that is familiar to them.

  3. Measurements of neutron distribution in neutrons-gamma-rays mixed field using imaging plate for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    The imaging plate (IP) technique is tried to be used as a handy method to measure the spatial neutron distribution via the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction for neutron capture therapy (NCT). For this purpose, IP is set in a water phantom and irradiated in a mixed field of neutrons and gamma-rays. The Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator is utilized for this experiment. The neutrons are moderated with 20-cm-thick D(2)O to obtain suitable neutron field for NCT. The signal for IP doped with Gd as a neutron-response enhancer is subtracted with its contribution by gamma-rays, which was estimated using IP without Gd. The gamma-ray response of Gd-doped IP to non-Gd IP is set at 1.34, the value measured for (60)Co gamma-rays, in estimating the gamma-ray contribution to Gd-doped IP signal. Then measured distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate agrees within 10% with the calculated value based on the method that has already been validated for its reproducibility of Au activation. However, the evaluated distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate is so sensitive to gamma-ray energy, e.g. the discrepancy of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate between measurement and calculation becomes 30% for the photon energy change from 33keV to 1.253MeV.

  4. Addressing Different Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures from Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-10-01

    In a continuing effort to examine portable methods for implementing active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded fissionable material research is underway to investigate the utility of analyzing multiple time-correlated signatures. Time correlation refers here to the existence of unique characteristics of the fission interrogation signature related to the start and end of an irradiation, as well as signatures present in between individual pulses of an irradiating source. Traditional measurement approaches in this area have typically worked to detect die-away neutrons after the end of each pulse, neutrons in between pulses related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products, or neutrons or gamma rays related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products after the end of an irradiation exposure. In this paper we discus the potential weaknesses of assessing only one signature versus multiple signatures and make the assertion that multiple complimentary and orthogonal measurements should be used to bolster the performance of active interrogation systems, helping to minimize susceptibility to the weaknesses of individual signatures on their own. Recognizing that the problem of detection is a problem of low count rates, we are exploring methods to integrate commonly used signatures with rarely used signatures to improve detection capabilities for these measurements. In this paper we will discuss initial activity in this area with this approach together with observations of some of the strengths and weaknesses of using these different signatures.

  5. Neutron-multiplication measurement instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, K.V.; Dowdy, E.J.; France, S.W.; Millegan, D.R.; Robba, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Advanced Nuclear Technology Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory is now using intelligent data-acquisition and analysis instrumentation for determining the multiplication of nuclear material. Earlier instrumentation, such as the large NIM-crate systems, depended on house power and required additional computation to determine multiplication or to estimate error. The portable, battery-powered multiplication measurement unit, with advanced computational power, acquires data, calculates multiplication, and completes error analysis automatically. Thus, the multiplication is determined easily and an available error estimate enables the user to judge the significance of results.

  6. Planetary Geochemistry Using Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detector (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth, The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asterOIds, comets and the satellites of the outer planets, Gamma-Ray Spectrometers have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially in the case of Mars Odyssey, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars, Neutron detectors have also been placed onboard orbital missions such as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and Lunar Prospector to measure the hydrogen content of the surface of the moon, The DAN in situ experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory not only includes neutron detectors, but also has its own neutron generator, However, no one has ever combined the three into one instrument PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine subsurface elemental composition without drilling. We are testing PNG-GRAND at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 m x 1 m granite structure in an empty field, We will present data from the operation of PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a known sample in a geometry that is identical to that which can be achieved on a planetary surface. We will also compare the material composition results inferred from our experiments to both an independent laboratory elemental composition analysis and MCNPX computer modeling results,

  7. Directional measurements for sources of fission neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, R.C.; Auchampaugh, G.F.; Feldman, W.C.

    1993-11-01

    Although penetrating neutron and gamma-ray emissions arguably provide the most effective signals for locating sources of nuclear radiation, their relatively low fluxes make searching for radioactive materials a tedious process. Even assuming lightly shielded sources and detectors with large areas and high efficiencies, estimated counting times can exceed several minutes for source separations greater than ten meters. Because determining the source position requires measurements at several locations, each with its own background, the search procedure can be lengthy and difficult to automate. Although directional measurements can be helpful, conventional collimation reduces count rates and increases the detector size and weight prohibitively, especially for neutron instruments. We describe an alternative approach for locating radiation sources that is based on the concept of a polarized radiation field. In this model, the presence of a source adds a directional component to the randomly oriented background radiation. The net direction of the local field indicates the source angle, and the magnitude provides an estimate of the distance to the source. The search detector is therefore seen as a device that responds to this polarized radiation field. Our proposed instrument simply substitutes segmented detectors for conventional single-element ones, so it requires little or no collimating material or additional weight. Attenuation across the detector creates differences in the count rates for opposite segments, whose ratios can be used to calculate the orthogonal components of the polarization vector. Although this approach is applicable to different types of radiation and detectors, in this report we demonstrate its use for sources of fission neutrons by using a prototype fast-neutron detector, which also provides background-corrected energy spectra for the incident neutrons.

  8. Bone mineral measurements: a comparison of delayed gamma neutron activation, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and direct chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Economos, C D; Nelson, M E; Fiatarone Singh, M A; Kehayias, J J; Dallal, G E; Heymsfield, S B; Wang, J; Yasumura, S; Ma, R; Pierson, R N

    1999-01-01

    A system in vitro consisting of a femur from a cadaver and soft-tissue equivalent material was used to test the agreement between several techniques for measuring bone mineral. Calcium values measured by delayed gamma neutron activation (DGNA) and bone mineral content (BMC) by Lunar, Hologic and Norland dual-energy X-ray absorptiometers (DXA) were compared with calcium and ash content determined by direct chemical analysis. To assess the effect of soft-tissue thickness on measurements of bone mineral, we had three phantom configurations ranging from 15.0 to 26.0 cm in thickness, achieved by using soft-tissue equivalent overlays. Chemical analysis of the femur gave calcium and ash content values of 61.83 g +/- 0.51 g and 154.120 +/- 0.004 g, respectively. Calcium measured by DGNA did not differ from the ashed amount of calcium at any of the phantom configurations. The BMC measured by DXA was significantly higher, by 3-5%, than the amount determined by chemical analysis for the Lunar densitometer and significantly lower, by 3-6%, for the Norland densitometer (p<0.001-0.024), but only 1% lower (not significant) for the Hologic densitometer. DXA instruments showed a decreasing trend in BMC as the thickness increased from 20.5 to 26.0 cm (p<0.05). However, within the entire thickness range (15.0-26.0 cm), the overall influence of thickness on BMC by DXA was very small. These findings offer insight into the differences in these currently available methods for bone mineral measurement and challenge the comparability of different methods. PMID:10525711

  9. Space Weather monitoring with Neutron Monitor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigies, C. T.

    2012-12-01

    Space Weather affects many areas of the modern society, advance knowledge about space weather events is important to protect personnel and infrastructure. Cosmic Rays (CR) measurements by ground-based Neutron Monitors are influenced by Coronal Mass Ejections (CME), the intensity of the ever present Cosmic Rays is reduced in a Forbush decrease (Fd). In the case of very energetic CMEs, the measured intensity can be significantly increased in a Ground Level Enhancement (GLE). By detecting the anisotropy of the CR environment, a CME can be detected hours before it arrives at Earth. During a GLE the high-energy particles from the Sun can be detected before the more abundant lower energy particles arrive at Earth, thus allowing to take protective measures. Since the beginning of the Neutron Monitor Database (NMDB) project, which has been started in 2008 with funding from the European Commission, real-time data from Neutron Monitors around the world has been made available through one web-portal. We have more than doubled the number of stations providing data since the start of the project to now over 30 stations. The effectiveness of the ALERT applications which are based on NMDB data has been shown by the recent GLE71. We will present different applications through which the measurements and different data products are accessible.

  10. Measurement of the Radius of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    A physical understanding of the behavior of cold ultra-dense matter -- at and above nuclear density -- can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars. The recent 1.97+/-0.04 Msun measurement for PSR 1614-2230 suggests that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of state (EoSs) are disfavored, in favor of hadronic EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, the latter EoSs produce lines of nearly constant radii (within about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. Our (preliminary) results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, in the range 7.5-10 km (90% confidence). The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to unmodelled spectrally hard components.

  11. Measurement of the Radius of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien; Rutledge, R. E.; Servillat, M.; Webb, N.

    2013-01-01

    A physical understanding of the behavior of cold ultra dense matter - at and above nuclear density - can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars. The recent 1.97 ± 0.04 M⊙ measurement for PSR 1614-2230 suggests that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of state (EoSs) are disfavored, in favor of hadronic EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, the latter EoSs produce lines of nearly constant radii (within about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. Our (preliminary) results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, in the range 7.5-10 km (90% confidence). The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to unmodeled spectrally hard components.

  12. New precision measurements of free neutron beta decay with cold neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Baeßler, Stefan; Bowman, James David; Penttilä, Seppo I.; Počanić, Dinko

    2014-10-14

    Precision measurements in free neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay, and offer several stringent tests of the standard model. This study describes the free neutron beta decay program planned for the Fundamental Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and finally puts it into the context of other recent and planned measurements of neutron beta decay observables.

  13. Measurements of fluorine in contemporary urban Canadians: a comparison of the levels found in human bone using in vivo and ex vivo neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, F; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R; Wainman, B C; Pidruczny, A E; Prestwich, W V

    2015-03-01

    Non-invasive in vivo neutron activation analysis (NAA) was used to measure the fluorine concentration in 35 people in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Measurement and precision data of this second generation NAA system were determined in 2013, and the results were compared with the performance of a first generation system used in a pilot study of 33 participants from the Hamilton area in 2008. Improvements in precision in line with those predicted by phantom studies were observed, but the use of fewer technicians during measurement seemed adversely to affect performance. We compared the levels of fluorine observed in people between the two studies and found them to be comparable. The average fluorine concentration in bone was found to be 3  ±  0.3 mg and 3.5  ±  0.4 mg F/g Ca for 2013 and 2008 measurements respectively. Ten people were measured in both studies; the observed average change in bone fluorine in this subgroup was consistent with that predicted by the observation of the relationship between bone fluorine and age in the wider group. In addition, we observed differences in the relationship between bone fluorine level and age between men and women, which may be attributable either to sex or gender differences. The rate of increase in fluorine content for men was found to be 0.096  ±  0.022 mg F/g Ca per year while the rate of increase for women was found to be slightly less than half that of men, 0.041  ±  0.017 mg F/g Ca per year. A discontinuity in the rate of increase in fluorine content with age was observed in women at around age 50. Bone fluorine content was significantly lower ([Formula: see text]) in women age 50 to 59 than in women age 40 to 49, which we suggest may be attributable to bone metabolism changes associated with menopause. We also observed increased fluorine levels in tea drinkers as compared to non-tea drinkers, suggesting tea may be a significant source of exposure in Canada. The rate of increase in fluorine

  14. Miniature Neutron-Alpha Activation Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar; Holloway, James Paul; He, Zhong; Goldsten, John

    2002-10-01

    We are developing a miniature neutron-alpha activation spectrometer for in-situ analysis of chem-bio samples, including rocks, fines, ices, and drill cores, suitable for a lander or Rover platform for Mars or outer-planet missions. In the neutron-activation mode, penetrating analysis will be performed of the whole sample using a γ spectrometer and in the α-activation mode, the sample surface will be analyzed using Rutherford-backscatter and x-ray spectrometers. Novel in our approach is the development of a switchable radioactive neutron source and a small high-resolution γ detector. The detectors and electronics will benefit from remote unattended operation capabilities resulting from our NEAR XGRS heritage and recent development of a Ge γ detector for MESSENGER. Much of the technology used in this instrument can be adapted to portable or unattended terrestrial applications for detection of explosives, chemical toxins, nuclear weapons, and contraband.

  15. Space Weather monitoring with Neutron Monitor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Athanasios; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Steigies, Christian T.

    2013-04-01

    Space Weather affects many areas of the modern society, advance knowledge about space weather events is important to protect personnel and infrastructure. Cosmic ray (CR) intensity measurements are routinely provided by the ground based Neutron Monitors. These measurements are influenced by the passage of the interplanetary counterparts of coronal mass ejections resulting into a significant reduction in the recorded intensity known as Forbush decreases. Furthermore, upon the release of high-energy particles at the Sun during a solar flare or a very energetic coronal mass ejection, the measured intensity can be significantly increased resulting into Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). By detecting the anisotropy of the CR environment, a CME can be detected hours before it arrives at Earth. During a GLE the high-energy particles from the Sun can be detected before the more abundant lower energy particles arrive at Earth, thus allowing to take protective measures. Since the beginning of the Neutron Monitor Database (NMDB) project, which has been started in 2008 with funding from the European Commission, real-time data from Neutron Monitors around the world has been made available through one web-portal. We have more than doubled the number of stations providing data since the start of the project to now over 30 stations. The effectiveness of the GLE Alert Service application which is based on NMDB data has been validated in real-time by the recent GLE71 on 17 May 2012. We will present different applications through which the measurements and different data products are accessible.

  16. Neutron background environment measured by the Mars Science Laboratory's Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons instrument during the first 100 sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, I.; Mitrofanov, I.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Kim, W.; Behar, A.; Boynton, W. V.; DeFlores, L.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C.; Harshman, K.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Malakhov, A.; Mischna, M.; Moersch, J.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Tate, C.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A.

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument on board Mars Science Laboratory has been operating successfully since the landing and has been making measurements regularly along Curiosity's traverse at the surface. DAN measures thermal (E < 0.4 eV) and epithermal neutrons (0.4 eV < E < ~1 keV) while operating in two different modes: active and passive. The active mode uses a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) to study the geological characteristics of the subsurface. In the passive mode, DAN measures the background neutron environment. This paper presents results of measurements in the passive mode from landing through to sol 100 and provides an interpretation of the data based on extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The main observations are summarized as follows: (1) the thermal neutron counts vary strongly along the rover traverse while the epithermal counts do not show much variation; (2) the neutrons from the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) are a larger contributor to the DAN passive data than the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR)-induced neutrons; (3) for the MMRTG neutrons, both the thermal and the epithermal counts increase as a function of the subsurface water content; (4) on the other hand, for the GCR-induced neutrons, the thermal counts increase but the epithermal counts decrease as a function of the subsurface water content; and (5) relative contributions by the MMRTG and GCR to the DAN thermal neutron counts at the Rocknest site, where the rover was stationed from sol 59 to sol 100, are estimated to be ~60% and ~40%, respectively.

  17. APPARATUS FOR MEASURING TOTAL NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Cranberg, L.

    1959-10-13

    An apparatus is described for measuring high-resolution total neutron cross sections at high counting rate in the range above 50-kev neutron energy. The pulsed-beam time-of-flight technique is used to identify the neutrons of interest which are produced in the target of an electrostatic accelerator. Energy modulation of the accelerator . makes it possible to make observations at 100 energy points simultaneously. 761O An apparatus is described for monitoring the proton resonance of a liquid which is particulariy useful in the continuous purity analysis of heavy water. A hollow shell with parallel sides defines a meander chamber positioned within a uniform magnetic fieid. The liquid passes through an inlet at the outer edge of the chamber and through a spiral channel to the central region of the chamber where an outlet tube extends into the chamber perpendicular to the magnetic field. The radiofrequency energy for the monitor is coupled to a coil positioned coaxially with the outlet tube at its entrance point within the chamber. The improvement lies in the compact mechanical arrangement of the monitor unit whereby the liquid under analysis is subjected to the same magnetic field in the storage and sensing areas, and the entire unit is shielded from external electrostatic influences.

  18. [Fast neutron cross section measurements]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are ``clean`` and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its ``data production`` phase.

  19. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER USING SPACED SEMICONDUCTORS FOR MEASURING TOTAL ENERGY OF NEUTRONS CAPTURED

    DOEpatents

    Love, T.A.; Murray, R.B.

    1964-04-14

    A fast neutron spectrometer was designed, which utilizes a pair of opposed detectors having a layer of /sup 6/LiF between to produce alpha and T pair for each neutron captured to provide signals, which, when combined, constitute a measure of neutron energy. (AEC)

  20. Sci—Fri PM: Dosimetry—02: A Nested Neutron Spectrometer to Measure Neutron Spectra in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J; Licea, A

    2014-08-15

    During high-energy radiotherapy treatments, neutrons are produced in the head of the linac through photonuclear interactions. This has been a concern for many years as photoneutrons contribute to the accepted, yet unwanted, out-of-field doses that pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel. Presently, in-room neutron measurements are difficult and time-consuming and have traditionally been carried out using Bonner spheres with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a new detector, the Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS) is tested for use in radiotherapy bunkers. The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional Bonner spheres. The NNS, operated in current mode, was used to measure the dose equivalent, average energy and energy spectrum at several positions in a radiotherapy bunker. The average energy and spectra were compared to Monte Carlo simulations while the dose equivalent was compared to bubble detector measurements. The average energies, as measured by the NNS and Monte Carlo simulations, differed by approximately 30% across the bunker. Measurements of the dose equivalent using the NNS and the bubble detectors agreed within 50% in the maze and less than 10% close to the linac head. Apart from some discrepancies at thermal energies, we also found reasonable agreement between NNS-measured and Monte Carlo-simulated spectra at a number of locations within our radiotherapy bunker. Our results demonstrate that the NNS is a suitable detector to be used in high dose-rate radiotherapy environments.

  1. Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime by Counting Trapped Protons

    PubMed Central

    Wietfeldt, F. E.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fei, X.; Snow, W. M.; Greene, G. L.; Pauwels, J.; Eykens, R.; Lamberty, A.; Van Gestel, J.

    2005-01-01

    We measured the neutron decay lifetime by counting in-beam neutron decay recoil protons trapped in a quasi-Penning trap. The absolute neutron beam fluence was measured by capture in a thin 6LiF foil detector with known efficiency. The combination of these measurements gives the neutron lifetime: τn = (886.8 ± 1.2 ± 3.2) s, where the first (second) uncertainty is statistical (systematic) in nature. This is the most precise neutron lifetime determination to date using an in-beam method. PMID:27308145

  2. Measurements of the thermal neutrons flux near the EAS core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhappuev, D. D.; Volchenko, V. I.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Mikhailova, O. I.; Petkov, V. B.; Stenkin, Yu V.; Tsyabuk, A. L.

    2013-02-01

    The characteristics of the thermal neutrons flux have been measured near the EAS core at the "Carpet-2" EAS array. The thermal neutron detectors were placed on the floor of the tunnel of the Muon Detector (MD) and showers with a core near the MD were selected. Thermal neutrons multiplicity spectrum has been obtained for these showers. Measurements of the lateral distribution function of thermal neutrons at distances of 1-16 m from the shower axis have been performed. The mean number of the recorded thermal neutrons as a function of the number of hadrons crossing the MD has been measured.

  3. A slow neutron polarimeter for the measurement of parity-odd neutron rotary power.

    PubMed

    Snow, W M; Anderson, E; Barrón-Palos, L; Bass, C D; Bass, T D; Crawford, B E; Crawford, C; Dawkins, J M; Esposito, D; Fry, J; Gardiner, H; Gan, K; Haddock, C; Heckel, B R; Holley, A T; Horton, J C; Huffer, C; Lieffers, J; Luo, D; Maldonado-Velázquez, M; Markoff, D M; Micherdzinska, A M; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; Sarsour, M; Santra, S; Sharapov, E I; Swanson, H E; Walbridge, S B; Zhumabekova, V

    2015-05-01

    We present the design, description, calibration procedure, and an analysis of systematic effects for an apparatus designed to measure the rotation of the plane of polarization of a transversely polarized slow neutron beam as it passes through unpolarized matter. This device is the neutron optical equivalent of a crossed polarizer/analyzer pair familiar from light optics. This apparatus has been used to search for parity violation in the interaction of polarized slow neutrons in matter. Given the brightness of existing slow neutron sources, this apparatus is capable of measuring a neutron rotary power of dϕ/dz = 1 × 10(-7) rad/m. PMID:26026552

  4. A slow neutron polarimeter for the measurement of parity-odd neutron rotary power

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, W. M.; Anderson, E.; Bass, T. D.; Dawkins, J. M.; Fry, J.; Haddock, C.; Horton, J. C.; Luo, D.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Walbridge, S. B.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Bass, C. D.; Crawford, B. E.; Crawford, C.; Esposito, D.; Gardiner, H.; Gan, K.; Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E. [University of Washington and others

    2015-05-15

    We present the design, description, calibration procedure, and an analysis of systematic effects for an apparatus designed to measure the rotation of the plane of polarization of a transversely polarized slow neutron beam as it passes through unpolarized matter. This device is the neutron optical equivalent of a crossed polarizer/analyzer pair familiar from light optics. This apparatus has been used to search for parity violation in the interaction of polarized slow neutrons in matter. Given the brightness of existing slow neutron sources, this apparatus is capable of measuring a neutron rotary power of dϕ/dz = 1 × 10{sup −7} rad/m.

  5. A slow neutron polarimeter for the measurement of parity-odd neutron rotary power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, W. M.; Anderson, E.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Bass, C. D.; Bass, T. D.; Crawford, B. E.; Crawford, C.; Dawkins, J. M.; Esposito, D.; Fry, J.; Gardiner, H.; Gan, K.; Haddock, C.; Heckel, B. R.; Holley, A. T.; Horton, J. C.; Huffer, C.; Lieffers, J.; Luo, D.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Markoff, D. M.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Sarsour, M.; Santra, S.; Sharapov, E. I.; Swanson, H. E.; Walbridge, S. B.; Zhumabekova, V.

    2015-05-01

    We present the design, description, calibration procedure, and an analysis of systematic effects for an apparatus designed to measure the rotation of the plane of polarization of a transversely polarized slow neutron beam as it passes through unpolarized matter. This device is the neutron optical equivalent of a crossed polarizer/analyzer pair familiar from light optics. This apparatus has been used to search for parity violation in the interaction of polarized slow neutrons in matter. Given the brightness of existing slow neutron sources, this apparatus is capable of measuring a neutron rotary power of dϕ/dz = 1 × 10-7 rad/m.

  6. In vivo assessment of magnesium status in human body using accelerator-based neutron activation measurement of hands: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam; Pejovic-Milic, A.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Chettle, D. R.

    2008-02-15

    Magnesium (Mg) is an element essential for many enzymatic reactions in the human body. Various human and animal studies suggest that changes in Mg status are linked to diseases such as cardiac arrhythmia, coronary heart disease, hypertension, premenstrual syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. Thus, knowledge of Mg levels in the human body is needed. A direct measurement of human blood serum, which contains only 0.3% of the total body Mg, is generally used to infer information about the status of Mg in the body. However, in many clinical situations, Mg stored in large levels, for example in bones, muscles, and soft tissues, needs to be monitored either to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment or to study the progression of diseases associated with the deficiency of total body Mg. This work presents a feasibility study of a noninvasive, in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) technique using the {sup 26}Mg(n,{gamma}){sup 27}Mg reaction to measure Mg levels in human hands. The technique employs the McMaster University high beam current Tandetron accelerator hand irradiation facility and an array of eight NaI (T1) detectors arranged in a 4{pi} geometry for delayed counting of the 0.844 and 1.014 MeV gamma rays emitted when {sup 27}Mg decays in the irradiated hand. Mg determination in humans using IVNAA of hands has been demonstrated to be feasible, with effective doses as low as one-quarter of those delivered in chest x rays. The overall experimental uncertainty in the measurements is estimated to be approximately 5% (1{sigma}). The results are found to be in the range of the in vitro measurements reported for other cortical bones collected from different sites of the human skeleton, which confirms that this technique mainly provides a measure of the amount of Mg in hand bones. The average concentration of Mg determined in human hands is 10.96{+-}1.25 ({+-}1 SD) mg Mg/g Ca. The coefficient of variation (11%) observed in this study is comparable with or lower than several

  7. In vivo assessment of magnesium status in human body using accelerator-based neutron activation measurement of hands: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Pejović-Milić, A; McNeill, F E; Byun, S H; Prestwich, W V; Chettle, D R

    2008-02-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is an element essential for many enzymatic reactions in the human body. Various human and animal studies suggest that changes in Mg status are linked to diseases such as cardiac arrhythmia, coronary heart disease, hypertension, premenstrual syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. Thus, knowledge of Mg levels in the human body is needed. A direct measurement of human blood serum, which contains only 0.3% of the total body Mg, is generally used to infer information about the status of Mg in the body. However, in many clinical situations, Mg stored in large levels, for example in bones, muscles, and soft tissues, needs to be monitored either to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment or to study the progression of diseases associated with the deficiency of total body Mg. This work presents a feasibility study of a noninvasive, in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) technique using the 26Mg (n, gamma) 27Mg reaction to measure Mg levels in human hands. The technique employs the McMaster University high beam current Tandetron accelerator hand irradiation facility and an array of eight NaI (T1) detectors arranged in a 4 pi geometry for delayed counting of the 0.844 and 1.014 MeV gamma rays emitted when 27Mg decays in the irradiated hand. Mg determination in humans using IVNAA of hands has been demonstrated to be feasible, with effective doses as low as one-quarter of those delivered in chest x rays. The overall experimental uncertainty in the measurements is estimated to be approximately 5% (1 sigma). The results are found to be in the range of the in vitro measurements reported for other cortical bones collected from different sites of the human skeleton, which confirms that this technique mainly provides a measure of the amount of Mg in hand bones. The average concentration of Mg determined in human hands is 10.96 +/- 1.25 (+/- 1 SD) mg Mg/g Ca. The coefficient of variation (11%) observed in this study is comparable with or lower than several studies using in

  8. In vivo assessment of magnesium status in human body using accelerator-based neutron activation measurement of hands: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Pejović-Milić, A; McNeill, F E; Byun, S H; Prestwich, W V; Chettle, D R

    2008-02-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is an element essential for many enzymatic reactions in the human body. Various human and animal studies suggest that changes in Mg status are linked to diseases such as cardiac arrhythmia, coronary heart disease, hypertension, premenstrual syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. Thus, knowledge of Mg levels in the human body is needed. A direct measurement of human blood serum, which contains only 0.3% of the total body Mg, is generally used to infer information about the status of Mg in the body. However, in many clinical situations, Mg stored in large levels, for example in bones, muscles, and soft tissues, needs to be monitored either to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment or to study the progression of diseases associated with the deficiency of total body Mg. This work presents a feasibility study of a noninvasive, in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) technique using the 26Mg (n, gamma) 27Mg reaction to measure Mg levels in human hands. The technique employs the McMaster University high beam current Tandetron accelerator hand irradiation facility and an array of eight NaI (T1) detectors arranged in a 4 pi geometry for delayed counting of the 0.844 and 1.014 MeV gamma rays emitted when 27Mg decays in the irradiated hand. Mg determination in humans using IVNAA of hands has been demonstrated to be feasible, with effective doses as low as one-quarter of those delivered in chest x rays. The overall experimental uncertainty in the measurements is estimated to be approximately 5% (1 sigma). The results are found to be in the range of the in vitro measurements reported for other cortical bones collected from different sites of the human skeleton, which confirms that this technique mainly provides a measure of the amount of Mg in hand bones. The average concentration of Mg determined in human hands is 10.96 +/- 1.25 (+/- 1 SD) mg Mg/g Ca. The coefficient of variation (11%) observed in this study is comparable with or lower than several studies using in

  9. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Dudkin, E. V.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.

    1995-01-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the (sup 6) Li(n.x)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%.

  10. Results on the neutron energy distribution measurements at the RECH-1 Chilean nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, P.; Molina, F.; Romero-Barrientos, J.

    2016-07-01

    Neutron activations experiments has been perform at the RECH-1 Chilean Nuclear Reactor to measure its neutron flux energy distribution. Samples of pure elements was activated to obtain the saturation activities for each reaction. Using - ray spectroscopy we identify and measure the activity of the reaction product nuclei, obtaining the saturation activities of 20 reactions. GEANT4 and MCNP was used to compute the self shielding factor to correct the cross section for each element. With the Expectation-Maximization algorithm (EM) we were able to unfold the neutron flux energy distribution at dry tube position, near the RECH-1 core. In this work, we present the unfolding results using the EM algorithm.

  11. Measurement of delayed-neutron yield from {sup 237}Np fission induced by thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gundorin, N. A.; Zhdanova, K. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Pikelner, L. B. Rebrova, N. V.; Salamatin, I. M.; Smirnov, V. I.; Furman, V. I.

    2007-06-15

    The delayed-neutron yield from thermal-neutron-induced fission of the {sup 237}Np nucleus was measured using a sample periodically exposed to a pulsed neutron beam with subsequent detection of neutrons during the time intervals between pulses. The experiment was realized on an Isomer-M setup mounted in the IBR-2 pulsed reactor channel equipped with a mirror neutron guide. The setup and the experimental procedure are described, the background sources are thoroughly analyzed, and the experimental data are presented. The total delayed-neutron yield from {sup 237}Np fission induced by thermal neutrons is {nu}{sub d} = 0.0110 {+-} 0.0009. This study was performed at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (JINR, Dubna)

  12. Nondestructive examination using neutron activated positron annihilation

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.; Denison, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    A method is provided for performing nondestructive examination of a metal specimen using neutron activated positron annihilation wherein the positron emitter source is formed within the metal specimen. The method permits in situ nondestructive examination and has the advantage of being capable of performing bulk analysis to determine embrittlement, fatigue and dislocation within a metal specimen.

  13. Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

    2009-04-30

    We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

  14. An improved method for estimating the neutron background in measurements of neutron capture reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žugec, P.; Bosnar, D.; Colonna, N.; Gunsing, F.

    2016-08-01

    The relation between the neutron background in neutron capture measurements and the neutron sensitivity related to the experimental setup is examined. It is pointed out that a proper estimate of the neutron background may only be obtained by means of dedicated simulations taking into account the full framework of the neutron-induced reactions and their complete temporal evolution. No other presently available method seems to provide reliable results, in particular under the capture resonances. An improved neutron background estimation technique is proposed, the main improvement regarding the treatment of the neutron sensitivity, taking into account the temporal evolution of the neutron-induced reactions. The technique is complemented by an advanced data analysis procedure based on relativistic kinematics of neutron scattering. The analysis procedure allows for the calculation of the neutron background in capture measurements, without requiring the time-consuming simulations to be adapted to each particular sample. A suggestion is made on how to improve the neutron background estimates if neutron background simulations are not available.

  15. CR-39 detector based thermal neutron flux measurements, in the photo neutron project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mameli, A.; Greco, F.; Fidanzio, A.; Fusco, V.; Cilla, S.; D'Onofrio, G.; Grimaldi, L.; Augelli, B. G.; Giannini, G.; Bevilacqua, R.; Totaro, P.; Tommasino, L.; Azario, L.; Piermattei, A.

    2008-08-01

    PhoNeS (photo neutron source) is a project aimed at the production and moderation of neutrons by exploiting high energy linear accelerators, currently used in radiotherapy. A feasibility study has been carried out with the scope in mind to use the high energy photon beams from these accelerators for the production of neutrons suitable for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Within these investigations, it was necessary to carry out preliminary measurements of the thermal neutron component of neutron spectra, produced by the photo-conversion of X-ray radiotherapy beams supplied by three LinAcs: 15 MV, 18 MV and 23 MV. To this end, a simple passive thermal neutron detector has been used which consists of a CR-39 track detector facing a new type of boron-loaded radiator. Once calibrated, this passive detector has been used for the measurement of both the thermal neutron component and the cadmium ratio of different neutron spectra. In addition, bubble detectors with a response highly sensitive to thermal neutrons have also been used. Both thermal neutron detectors are simple to use, very compact and totally insensitive to low-ionizing radiation such as electrons and X-rays. The resultant thermal neutron flux was above 10 6 n/cm 2s and the cadmium ratio was no greater than 15 for the first attempt of photo-conversion of X-ray radiotherapy beams.

  16. Neutron transmission measurements on hydrogen filled microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrnjaja, Eva; Hummel, Stefan; Keding, Marcus; Smolle, Marie-Theres; Gerger, Joachim; Zawisky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hollow microspheres are promising candidates for future hydrogen storage technologies. Although the physical process for hydrogen diffusion through glass is well understood, measurements of static quantities (e.q. hydrogen pressure inside the spheres) as well as dynamic properties (e.g. diffusion rate of hydrogen through glass) are still difficult to handle due to the small size of the spheres (d≈15μm). For diffusion rate measurements, the long-term stability of the experiment is also mandatory due to the relatively slow diffusion rate. In this work, we present an accurate and long-term stable measurement technique for static and dynamic properties, using neutron radiography. Furthermore, possible applications for hydrogen filled microspheres within the scope of radiation issues are discussed.

  17. Characterization of hydrogen in concrete by cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis and neutron incoherent scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.L.; Chen-Mayer, H.H.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Blaauw, M.

    2000-07-01

    A combination of cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) and neutron incoherent scattering (NIS) has been used for nondestructive characterization of hydrogen as a function of position in slabs of wet concrete of different composition. Hydrogen was determined by PGAA by scanning each sample across of 5 mm diameter neutron beam in 10 mm increments, and measuring the 2223 keV prompt gamma ray. NIS measurements were performed by scanning the samples across a 5 mm diameter neutron beam at 5 mm increments and detecting scattered neutrons. The measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the techniques for 2D compositional mapping of hydrogen and other elements in materials, and indicate the potential of these methods for monitoring the uniformity of drying concrete.

  18. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis system design: Effects of D-T versus D-D neutron generator source selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt-gamma neutron activation (PGNA) analysis is used for the non-invasive measurement of human body composition. Advancements in portable, compact neutron generator design have made those devices attractive as neutron sources. Two distinct generators are available: D-D with 2.5 MeV and D-T with...

  19. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis system design: effects of D-T versus D-D neutron generator source selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is used for the non-invasive measurement of human body composition. Advancements in portable, compact neutron generator design have made those devices attractive as neutron sources. Two distinct generators are available: D-D with 2.5 MeV, and D-T wi...

  20. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  1. Modeling of neutron spectrum in the gamma spectroscopy measurements with Ge-detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, D.; Jovančević, N.; Krmar, M.; Petrović, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we present a novel approach for estimation of neutron spectra that are present during gamma spectroscopy measurements performed by a Ge detector. This method is based on the calculation of the neutron spectra by using an unfolding procedure, where the activity of the Ge isotopes, produced by the neutron reactions, and the available cross section data for those reactions are the input parameters. This new approach was tested by background gamma spectroscopy measurements with a HPGe detector. Obtained results show that this method can provide useful information about the neutron spectra at the position of the Ge detectors.

  2. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.

    2009-03-10

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  3. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  4. Neutron Inelastic Scattering Mechanism and Measurement of Neutron Asymmetry Using Time of Flight Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Al Azzawe, A. J. M.

    2007-02-14

    Inelastic scattering is an essential reaction for other nuclear reactions to detect the optical model and compound nucleus formation within the range of (0.4- 5.0) MeV neutron incident energy by using time of flight technique. The time of flight system (TOFS) installed on the horizontal channel reactor RRA has been used to measure the asymmetry of scattered fast neutrons, when data acquisition and system control were recorded event by event by HP - computer via CAMAC system. Eight NE 213 neutron counters were used in order to detect neutron inelastic scattering in the forward direction (4 neutron counters at 0 deg. angle) and in the backward direction (4 neutron counters at 180 deg. angle) to measure the asymmetry of fast neutron. Each neutron counter was 50cm in length and 8cm in diameter, viewed by two (58 - DVP) photomultiplier tubes. The contribution of direct interaction to the compound nucleus formation was deduced from the asymmetry in the neutron detection at the same direction of these eight neutron counters. A time resolution of 8.2 ns between the eight neutron counters and one of the two Ge(Li) detectors has been obtained.

  5. Active helium target: Neutron scalar polarizability extraction via Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Meg Hornidge, David; Annand, John; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-12-31

    Precise measurement of the neutron scalar polarizabilities has been a lasting challenge because of the lack of a free-neutron target. Led by the University of Glasgow and the Mount Allison University groups of the A2 collaboration in Mainz, Germany, preparations have begun to test a recent theoretical model with an active helium target with the hope of determining these elusive quantities with small statistical, systematic, and model-dependent errors. Apparatus testing and background-event simulations have been carried out, with the full experiment projected to run in 2015. Once determined, these values can be applied to help understand quantum chromodynamics in the nonperturbative region.

  6. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C; Noda, Shusaku; Nelson, Ronald O; O' Donnell, John M; Devlin, Matt; Chatillon, Audrey; Granier, Thierry; Taieb, Julien; Laurent, Benoit; Belier, Gilbert; Becker, John A; Wu, Ching - Yen

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  7. Prompt neutron multiplicity measurements with portable detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald; Maurer, Richard; Mitchell, Stephen; Smith, Ethan X.; Guss, Paul; Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Sun, L.; Athanasiades, A.

    2011-09-01

    Mobile detection of kilogram quantities of special nuclear materials (SNM) during maritime transportation is a challenging problem for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Counting neutrons emitted by the SNM and partitioning them from background neutrons of multiple origins is the most effective passive means of detecting the SNM. Unfortunately, neutron detection, counting, and partitioning in a maritime environment is complex due to the presence of spallation neutrons (commonly known as "ship effect") and to the complicated nature of the neutron scattering in that environment. This work studied the possibilities of building a prototype neutron detector using boron- 10 (10B) as the converter in a novel form factor called "straws" that would address the above problem by examining multiplicity distributions of neutrons originating from a fissioning source. Currently, commercially manufactured fission meters (FM) are available that separate cosmic neutrons from non-cosmic neutrons and quantitatively determine the strength of a fissioning source; however, these FMs use 3He, which is becoming increasingly difficult to procure; also the size and weight of a commercial FM is not conducive to manual neutron detection operations in a maritime environment. The current project may provide a near-term solution to the crisis that has arisen from the global scarcity of 3He by offering a viable alternative to the FM. The prototype detector provides a large-area, efficient, lightweight, more granular neutron responsive detection surface (to facilitate imaging) to ease the application of the new FMs.

  8. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium

    SciTech Connect

    Roshan, M. V.; Springham, S. V.; Rawat, R. S.; Lee, P.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-08-15

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f{sub n}{approx}4.1x10{sup -4} with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10{sup 8} neutrons per discharge.

  9. Measurement of chromium VI and chromium III in stainless steel welding fumes with electrom spectroscopy for chemical analysis and neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lautner, G M; Carver, J C; Konzen, R B

    1978-08-01

    Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) was explored as a means of studying the oxidation state of chromium in SMAC (coated electrode) stainless steel welding fume collected on Nucleopore filters in the laboratory. Chromuim VI and III (as a percent of the total chromium) obtained from ESCA analysis was applied to results from Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) to yield an average of 69 microgram chromium VI per sample. Diphenylcarbazide/atomic absorption (DPC/AA) results are reported for samples submitted to an industrial laboratory. Possible chemical species and solubility of chromium VI in stainless steel fumes is discussed in light of analogy between the SMAC process and the manufacturing process for chromates.

  10. Measurements of delayed neutron parameters for U-235 and Np-237

    SciTech Connect

    Loaiza, D.

    1997-07-01

    Delayed neutrons are emitted by excited nuclei formed in beta decay of fission products called delayed neutron precursors. About 1% of the total neutrons released in fission are delayed neutrons; however, this small fraction plays an important role in nuclear reactor control. The delayed neutrons determine the time-dependent behavior of reactors, and knowledge of parameters used to predict neutron emission rate is essential for establishing reactivity worths. The delayed neutron yields, decay constants, and the absolute yield for the six-group delayed neutrons have been measured for U-235 and Np-237. This experiment has been called for in the forecast of experiments needed to support operations in the US. The bare U-235 metal assembly Godiva IV at the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF) provided the source of neutrons. Godiva IV generated about 10{sup 7} total fissions in the samples for the infinite and instantaneous irradiation needed to accentuate the shorter and longer-lived groups of delayed neutrons. The detection system used in the experiment consisted of 20 He-3 tubes embedded in a polyethylene cylinder. The delayed neutron activity resulting from the fast neutron-induced fission has been measured. The measured absolute yield for U-235 was determined to be 0.0163 {+-} 0.009 neutrons/fission. This value compares very well with the well-established Keepin absolute yield of 0.0165 {+-} 0.0005. The newly measured absolute yield value for Np-237 was 0.0126 {+-} 0.0007, which compares well to the recently reported value of 0.0129 {+-} 0.0004 by Saleh and Parish. The measured values for U-235 are corroborated with period (e-folding time) versus reactivity calculations.

  11. Effects of geochemical composition on neutron die-away measurements: Implications for Mars Science Laboratory's Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C.; Moersch, J.; Drake, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment, part of the scientific payload of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission, will have the ability to assess both the abundance and the burial depth of subsurface hydrogen as the rover traverses the Martian surface. DAN will employ a method of measuring neutron fluxes called “neutron die-away” that has not been used in previous planetary exploration missions. This method requires the use of a pulsed neutron generator that supplements neutrons produced via spallation in the subsurface by the cosmic ray background. It is well established in neutron remote sensing that low-energy (thermal) neutrons are sensitive not only to hydrogen content, but also to the macroscopic absorption cross-section of near-surface materials. To better understand the results that will be forthcoming from DAN, we model the effects of varying abundances of high absorption cross-section elements that are likely to be found on the Martian surface (Cl, Fe) on neutron die-away measurements made from a rover platform. Previously, the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) Spirit and Opportunity found that elevated abundances of these two elements are commonly associated with locales that have experienced some form of aqueous activity in the past, even though hydrogen-rich materials are not necessarily still present. By modeling a suite of H and Cl compositions, we demonstrate that (for abundance ranges reasonable for Mars) both the elements will significantly affect DAN thermal neutron count rates. Additionally, we show that the timing of thermal neutron arrivals at the detector can be used together with the thermal neutron count rates to independently determine the abundances of hydrogen and high neutron absorption cross-section elements (the most important being Cl). Epithermal neutron die-away curves may also be used to separate these two components. We model neutron scattering in actual Martian compositions that were determined by the MER Alpha

  12. Radioactivity measurements of ITER materials using the TFTR D-T neutron field

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A.; Barnes, C.W.; Kugel, H.W.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    The availability of high D-T fusion neutron yields at TFTR has provided a useful opportunity to directly measure D-T neutron-induced radioactivity in a realistic tokamak fusion reactor environment for materials of vital interest to ITER. These measurements are valuable for characterizing radioactivity in various ITER candidate materials. for validating complex neutron transport calculations, and for meeting fusion reactor licensing requirements. The radioactivity measurements at TFTR involve potential ITER materials including stainless steel 316, vanadium, titanium, chromium, silicon, iron, cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, aluminum, copper, zinc. zirconium, niobium, and tungsten. Small samples of these materials were irradiated close to the plasma and just outside the vacuum vessel wall of TFTR, locations of different neutron energy spectra. Saturation activities for both threshold and capture reactions were measured. Data from dosimetric reactions have been used to obtain preliminary neutron energy spectra. Spectra from the first wall were compared to calculations from ITER and to measurements from accelerator-based tests.

  13. Cosmic-ray neutron simulations and measurements in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2014-10-01

    This study used simulations of galactic cosmic ray in the atmosphere to investigate the neutron background environment in Taiwan, emphasising its altitude dependence and spectrum variation near interfaces. The calculated results were analysed and compared with two measurements. The first measurement was a mobile neutron survey from sea level up to 3275 m in altitude conducted using a car-mounted high-sensitivity neutron detector. The second was a previous measured result focusing on the changes in neutron spectra near air/ground and air/water interfaces. The attenuation length of cosmic-ray neutrons in the lower atmosphere was estimated to be 163 g cm(-2) in Taiwan. Cosmic-ray neutron spectra vary with altitude and especially near interfaces. The determined spectra near the air/ground and air/water interfaces agree well with measurements for neutrons below 10 MeV. However, the high-energy portion of spectra was observed to be much higher than our previous estimation. Because high-energy neutrons contribute substantially to a dose evaluation, revising the annual sea-level effective dose from cosmic-ray neutrons at ground level in Taiwan to 35 μSv, which corresponds to a neutron flux of 5.30 × 10(-3) n cm(-2) s(-1), was suggested. PMID:24573968

  14. Cosmic-ray neutron simulations and measurements in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2014-10-01

    This study used simulations of galactic cosmic ray in the atmosphere to investigate the neutron background environment in Taiwan, emphasising its altitude dependence and spectrum variation near interfaces. The calculated results were analysed and compared with two measurements. The first measurement was a mobile neutron survey from sea level up to 3275 m in altitude conducted using a car-mounted high-sensitivity neutron detector. The second was a previous measured result focusing on the changes in neutron spectra near air/ground and air/water interfaces. The attenuation length of cosmic-ray neutrons in the lower atmosphere was estimated to be 163 g cm(-2) in Taiwan. Cosmic-ray neutron spectra vary with altitude and especially near interfaces. The determined spectra near the air/ground and air/water interfaces agree well with measurements for neutrons below 10 MeV. However, the high-energy portion of spectra was observed to be much higher than our previous estimation. Because high-energy neutrons contribute substantially to a dose evaluation, revising the annual sea-level effective dose from cosmic-ray neutrons at ground level in Taiwan to 35 μSv, which corresponds to a neutron flux of 5.30 × 10(-3) n cm(-2) s(-1), was suggested.

  15. Neutron activation analysis; A sensitive test for trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, T.Z. . Ward Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses neutron activation analysis (NAA), an extremely sensitive technique for determining the elemental constituents of an unknown specimen. Currently, there are some twenty-five moderate-power TRIGA reactors scattered across the United States (fourteen of them at universities), and one of their principal uses is for NAA. NAA is procedurally simple. A small amount of the material to be tested (typically between one and one hundred milligrams) is irradiated for a period that varies from a few minutes to several hours in a neutron flux of around 10{sup 12} neutrons per square centimeter per second. A tiny fraction of the nuclei present (about 10{sup {minus}8}) is transmuted by nuclear reactions into radioactive forms. Subsequently, the nuclei decay, and the energy and intensity of the gamma rays that they emit can be measured in a gamma-ray spectrometer.

  16. Physical basis for prompt-neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The technique called prompt ..gamma..-ray neutron activation analysis has been applied to rapid materials analysis. The radiation following the neutron radiation capture is prompt in the sense that the nuclear decay time is on the order of 10/sup -15/ second, and thus the technique is not strictly activation, but should be called radiation neutron capture spectroscopy or neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy. This paper reviews the following: sources and detectors, theory of radiative capture, nonstatistical capture, giant dipole resonance, fast neutron capture, and thermal neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectra. 14 figures.

  17. On the measurement the neutron lifetime using ultra-cold neutrons in a vacuum quadrupole trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J. D.; Penttila, S. I.

    2004-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime ({approx}882 s) with an accuracy of 10{sup -4}. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of UCNs confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at LANL has developed a prototype ultra-cold neutron UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100 UCN/cm{sup 3}. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10{sup -4} in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic error in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap.

  18. On the Measurement of the Neutron Lifetime Using Ultracold Neutrons in a Vacuum Quadrupole Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. David; Penttila, S. I.

    2005-01-01

    We present a conceptual design for an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime (~886 s) with an accuracy of 10−4. The lifetime will be measured by observing the decay rate of a sample of ultracold neutrons (UCN) confined in vacuum in a magnetic trap. The UCN collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a prototype UCN source that is expected to produce a bottled UCN density of more than 100/cm3 [1]. The availability of such an intense source makes it possible to approach the measurement of the neutron lifetime in a new way. We argue below that it is possible to measure the neutron lifetime to 10−4 in a vacuum magnetic trap. The measurement involves no new technology beyond the expected UCN density. If even higher densities are available, the experiment can be made better and/or less expensive. We present the design and methodology for the measurement. The slow loss of neutrons that have stable orbits, but are not energetically trapped would produce a systematic uncertainty in the measurement. We discuss a new approach, chaotic cleaning, to the elimination of quasi-neutrons from the trap by breaking the rotational symmetry of the quadrupole trap. The neutron orbits take on a chaotic character and mode mixing causes the neutrons on the quasi-bound orbits to leave the trap. PMID:27308151

  19. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  20. Neutron measurements in search of cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Goulding, C.A.; Johnson, M.W.; Butterfield, K.B.; Gottesfeld, S.; Baker, D.A.; Springer, T.E.; Garzon, F.H.; Bolton, R.D.; Leonard, E.M.; Chancellor, T.

    1990-01-01

    We have conducted a research for neutron emission from cold fusion systems of the electrochemical type and, to a lesser extent, the high-pressure gas cell type. Using a high-efficiency well counter and an NE 213 scintillator, the experiments were conducted on the earth's surface and in a shielded cave approximately 50 ft underground. After approximately 6500 h of counting time, we have obtained no evidence for cold fusion processes leading to neutron production. However, we have observed all three types of neutron data that have been presented as evidence for cold fusion: large positive fluctuations in the neutron counting rate, weak peaks near 2.5 MeV in the neutron energy spectrum, and bursts of up to 145 neutrons in 500-{mu}s intervals. The data were obtained under circumstances that clearly show our results to be data encountered as a part of naturally occurring neutron background, which is due primarily to cosmic rays. Thus, observing these types of data does not, of itself, provide evidence for the existence of cold fusion processes. Artifacts in the data that were due to counter misbehavior were also to lead to long-term neutron bursts'' whose time duration varied from several hours to several days. We conclude that any experiments which attempt to observe neutron emission must include strong steps to ensure that the experiments deal adequately with both cosmic-ray processes and counter misbehavior. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  1. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  2. A precise method to determine the activity of a weak neutron source using a germanium detector.

    PubMed

    Duke, M J M; Hallin, A L; Krauss, C B; Mekarski, P; Sibley, L

    2016-10-01

    A standard high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to determine the previously unknown neutron activity of a weak americium-beryllium (AmBe) neutron source. γ rays were created through (27)Al(n,n'), (27)Al(n,γ) and (1)H(n,γ) reactions induced by the neutrons on aluminum and acrylic disks, respectively. These γ rays were measured using the HPGe detector. Given the unorthodox experimental arrangement, a Monte Carlo simulation was developed to model the efficiency of the detector system to determine the neutron activity from the measured γ rays. The activity of our neutron source was determined to be 307.4±5.0n/s and is consistent for the different neutron-induced γ rays.

  3. A precise method to determine the activity of a weak neutron source using a germanium detector.

    PubMed

    Duke, M J M; Hallin, A L; Krauss, C B; Mekarski, P; Sibley, L

    2016-10-01

    A standard high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to determine the previously unknown neutron activity of a weak americium-beryllium (AmBe) neutron source. γ rays were created through (27)Al(n,n'), (27)Al(n,γ) and (1)H(n,γ) reactions induced by the neutrons on aluminum and acrylic disks, respectively. These γ rays were measured using the HPGe detector. Given the unorthodox experimental arrangement, a Monte Carlo simulation was developed to model the efficiency of the detector system to determine the neutron activity from the measured γ rays. The activity of our neutron source was determined to be 307.4±5.0n/s and is consistent for the different neutron-induced γ rays. PMID:27474906

  4. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  5. Measurement of the lunar neutron density profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Burnett, D. S.; Furst, M.; Weiss, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Relatively small discrepancies between Apollo 17 lunar neutron probe experiment (LNPE) data and theoretical calculations by Lingenfelter, Canfield, and Hampel in the effect of Cd absorption on the neutron density, and in the relative Sm-149 to Gd-157 capture rates reported previously, imply that the true lunar Gd-157 capture rate is about one-half of that derived theoretically.

  6. Scintillation fiber array detector for measurement of neutron beam profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chong; Hong, Byungsik; Jo, Mihee; Lee, Kyong Sei; Sim, Kwang-Souk

    2009-10-01

    We built and tested a detector to measure the profile of fast-neutron beams delivered by the MC50 cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The core component of the detector is a 2×46 array of scintillation fibers. The light output of the scintillation fibers is transformed into a current signal by a 46-channel silicon photodiode and digitized by a current-mode signal processor. This scanning device was designed to cover a neutron beam area of 30×32 cm2. The detector was tested in a neutron beam delivered by the MC50 cyclotron at KIRAMS. We demonstrate that the detector can successfully measure the neutron beam profile at various beam currents from 10 to 20 μA. The proposed neutron beam profile detector will be useful, for example, in radiotherapy applications with neutron intensities above 107 Hz/cm2.

  7. Measurement of the Neutron's Beta Decay Asymmetry using Polarized Ultra-cold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelaar, R. B.; Makela, M.; Pitt, M.; Carr, R.; Filippone, B.; Ito, T. M.; Martin, J. W.; McKeown, R.; Tipton, B.; Yuan, J.; Geltenbort, P.; Soyama, K.; Bowles, T.; Fowler, M.; Hill, R.; Hime, A.; Hogan, G.; Kirch, K.; Lamoreaux, S.; Morris, C.; Pichlmaeir, A.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S.; Walstrom, P.; Wilhelmy, J.; Alduschenkov, A.; Kharitonov, A.; Lassakov, M.; Rudnev, Yu.; Serebrov, A.; Vasilev, A.; Hoedel, S.; Liu, C.-Y.; Smith, D.; Young, A. R.; Kitagaki, T.; Asahi, K.; Hino, M.; Kawai, T.; Utsuro, M.; Garcia, A.; Miyachi, T.

    2001-04-01

    A measurement of the beta decay asymmetry in polarized neutron decay, when combined with the neutron lifetime, provides a determination of the fundamental vector and axial vector weak coupling constants, GV and G_A. The value of GV can be compared to that obtained from other observables to check the consistency of the electroweak Standard Model and to search for physics beyond it. We describe a new neutron beta decay asymmetry experiment being prepared at LANSCE. The experiment will use ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) from a recently developed spallation driven solid deuterium UCN source. UCNs can be produced with 100polarization, and they can be efficiently transported over long distances, thus insuring a low background environment. These properties provide some important advantages over previous neutron beta decay asymmetry experiments performed using cold neutron beams from reactors. We will report on the details of the experimental setup and the expected precision.

  8. Actinide Targets for Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Baker; Christopher A. McGrath

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and the Generation IV Reactor Initiative have demonstrated a lack of detailed neutron cross-sections for certain "minor" actinides, those other than the most common (235U, 238U, and 239Pu). For some closed-fuel-cycle reactor designs more than 50% of reactivity will, at some point, be derived from "minor" actinides that currently have poorly known or in some cases not measured (n,?) and (n,f) cross sections. A program of measurements under AFCI has begun to correct this. One of the initial hurdles has been to produce well-characterized, highly isotopically enriched, and chemically pure actinide targets on thin backings. Using a combination of resurrected techniques and new developments, we have made a series of targets including highly enriched 239Pu, 240Pu, and 242Pu. Thus far, we have electrodeposited these actinide targets. In the future, we plan to study reductive distillation to achieve homogeneous, adherent targets on thin metal foils and polymer backings. As we move forward, separated isotopes become scarcer, and safety concerns become greater. The chemical purification and electodeposition techniques will be described.

  9. Neutron measurements in near-Earth orbit with COMPTEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. J.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Lockwood, J. A.; Mcconnell, M. L.; Ryan, J. M.; Schoenfelder, V.; Steinle, H.; Peng, X.

    1995-01-01

    The fast neutron flux in near-Earth orbit has been measured with the COMPTEL instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). For this measurement one of COMPTEL's seven liquid scintillator modules was used as an uncollimated neutron detector with threshold of 12.8 MeV. The measurements cover a range of 4.8 to 15.5 GV in vertical cutoff rigidity and 3 deg to 177 deg in spacecraft geocenter zenith angle. One of the measurements occurred near the minimum of the deepest Forbush decrease ever observed by ground-level neutron monitors. After correction for solar modulation, the total flux is well fitted by separable functions in rigidity and zenith angle. With the spacecraft pointed near the nadir the flux is consistent with balloon measurements of the atmospheric neutron albedo. The flux varies by about a factor of 4 between the extremes of rigidity and a factor of 2 between the extremes of zenith angle. The effect of the spacecraft mass in shielding the detector from the atmospheric neutron albedo is much more important than its role as a source of additional secondary neutrons. The neutron spectral hardness varies little with rigidity or zenith angle and lies in the range spanned by earlier atmospheric neutron albedo measurements.

  10. Engineering related neutron diffraction measurements probing strains, texture and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald W; Tome, Carlos N; Balogh, Levente; Vogel, Sven C

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used for engineering applications for nearly three decades. The basis of the technique is powder diffraction following Bragg's Law. From the measured diffraction patterns information about internal, or residual, strain can be deduced from the peak positions, texture information can be extracted from the peak intensities, and finally the peak widths can provide information about the microstructure, e.g. dislocation densities and grain sizes. The strains are measured directly from changes in lattice parameters, however, in many cases it is non-trivial to determine macroscopic values of stress or strain from the measured data. The effects of intergranular strains must be considered, and combining the neutron diffraction measurements with polycrystal deformation modeling has proven invaluable in determining the overall stress and strain values of interest in designing and dimensioning engineering components. Furthelmore, the combined use of measurements and modeling has provided a tool for elucidating basic material properties, such as critical resolved shear stresses for the active deformation modes and their evolution as a function of applied deformation.

  11. A Neutron Source Facility for Neutron Cross-Section Measurements on Radioactive Targets at RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L E; Bernstein, L; Rusnak, B; Berio, R

    2003-05-20

    The stockpile stewardship program is interested in neutron cross-section measurements on nuclei that are a few nucleons away from stability. Since neutron targets do not exist, radioactive targets are the only way to directly perform these measurements. This requires a facility that can provide high production rates for these short-lived nuclei as well as a source of neutrons. The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) promises theses high production rates. Thus, adding a co-located neutron source facility to the RIA project baseline would allow these neutron cross-section measurements to be made. A conceptual design for such a neutron source has been developed, which would use two accelerators, a Dynamitron and a linac, to create the neutrons through a variety of reactions (d-d, d-t, deuteron break-up, p-Li). This range of reactions is needed in order to provide the desired energy range from 10's of keV to 20 MeV. The facility would also have hot cells to perform chemistry on the radioactive material both before and after neutron irradiation. The present status of this design and direction of future work will be discussed.

  12. Measurement of the lunar neutron density profile. [Apollo 17 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Burnett, D. S.; Furst, M.; Weiss, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An in situ measurement of the lunar neutron density from 20 to 400 g/sq cm depth between the lunar surface was made by the Apollo 17 Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment using particle tracks produced by the B10(n, alpha)Li7 reaction. Both the absolute magnitude and depth profile of the neutron density are in good agreement with past theoretical calculations. The effect of cadmium absorption on the neutron density and in the relative Sm149 to Gd157 capture rates obtained experimentally implies that the true lunar Gd157 capture rate is about one half of that calculated theoretically.

  13. Active detection of shielded SNM with 60-keV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C; Dietrich, D; Hall, J; Kerr, P; Nakae, L; Newby, R; Rowland, M; Snyderman, N; Stoeffl, W

    2008-07-08

    Fissile materials, e.g. {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, can be detected non-invasively by active neutron interrogation. A unique characteristic of fissile material exposed to neutrons is the prompt emission of high-energy (fast) fission neutrons. One promising mode of operation subjects the object to a beam of medium-energy (epithermal) neutrons, generated by a proton beam impinging on a Li target. The emergence of fast secondary neutrons then clearly indicates the presence of fissile material. Our interrogation system comprises a low-dose 60-keV neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 6}/s), and a 1 m{sup 2} array of scintillators for fast neutron detection. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate the detectability of small quantities (370 g) of HEU shielded by steel (200 g/cm{sup 2}) or plywood (30 g/cm{sup 2}), with a typical measurement time of 1 min.

  14. Measurements of the neutron source strength at DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Taylor, P.L.; Phillips, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A set of neutron counters and a pair of scintillators measure the 2.5 MeV neutron emission produced by the DIII-D tokamak. The neutron counter set provides a large dynamic range ({approximately}7 orders of magnitude) while the scintillators provide the very fast resolution needed for studying transient events. The counters are absolutely calibrated {ital in situ} with a {sup 252}Cf source and the scintillators are cross calibrated to the counters. The historic variations in the emission measured by the various detectors have been compared and are consistent within the estimated accuracy of the absolute calibration (15{percent}). In the discharges with the highest emission levels (2.4{times}10{sup 16} n/s), the signals from the neutron counters and the scintillators agree well. Comparisons with other diagnostics also corroborate the neutron measurements.{copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Neutron scattering effects on fusion ion temperature measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Lee; Starner, Jason R.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Franklin, James Kenneth; Casey, Daniel T.

    2006-06-01

    To support the nuclear fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), a consistent and verifiable method to determine fusion ion temperatures needs to be developed. Since the fusion temperature directly affects the width in the spread of neutron energies produced, a measurement of the neutron energy width can yield the fusion temperature. Traditionally, the spread in neutron energies is measured by using time-of-flight to convert a spread in neutron energies at the source to a spread in time at detector. One potential obstacle to using this technique at the Z facility at SNL is the need to shield the neutron detectors from the intense bremsstrahlung produced. The shielding consists of eight inches of lead and the concern is that neutrons will scatter in the lead, artificially broaden the neutron pulse width and lead to an erroneous measurement. To address this issue, experiments were performed at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, which demonstrated that a reliable ion temperature measurement can be achieved behind eight inches of lead shielding. To further expand upon this finding, Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) was used to simulate the experimental geometric conditions and perform the neutron transport. MCNPX was able to confidently estimate results observed at the University of Rochester.

  16. Neutron spectrum measurements in the aluminum oxide filtered beam facility at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Becker, G K; Harker, Y D; Miller, L G; Anderl, R A; Wheeler, F J

    1990-01-01

    Neutron spectrum measurements were performed on the aluminum oxide filter installed in the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). For these measurements, activation foils were irradiated at the exit port of the beam facility. A technique based on dominant resonances in selected activation reactions was used to measure the epithermal neutron spectrum. The fast and intermediate-energy ranges of the neutron spectrum were measured by threshold reactions and 10B-shielded 235U fission reactions. Neutron spectral data were derived from the activation data by two approaches: (1) a short analysis which yields neutron flux values at the energies of the dominant or primary resonances in the epithermal activation reactions and integral flux data for neutrons above corresponding threshold or pseudo-threshold energies, and (2) the longer analysis which utilized all the activation data in a full-spectrum, unfolding process using the FERRET spectrum adjustment code. This paper gives a brief description of the measurement techniques, analysis methods, and the results obtained.

  17. PGNAA system preliminary design and measurement of In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator for boron concentration measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zizhu; Chong, Yizheng; Chen, Xinru; Jin, Congjun; Yang, Lijun; Liu, Tong

    2015-12-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system has been recently developed at the 30-kW research reactor In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator (IHNI) in Beijing. Neutrons from the specially designed thermal neutron beam were used. The thermal flux of this beam is 3.08×10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) at a full reactor power of 30 kW. The PGNAA system consists of an n-type high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector of 40% efficiency, a digital spectrometer, and a shielding part. For both the detector shielding part and the neutron beam shielding part, the inner layer is composed of (6)Li2CO3 powder and the outer layer lead. The boron-10 sensitivity of the PGNAA system is approximately 2.5 cps/ppm. Two calibration curves were produced for the 1-10 ppm and 10-50 ppm samples. The measurement results of the control samples were in accordance with the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) results.

  18. Actinide neutron-induced fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tovesson, Fredrik K; Laptev, Alexander B; Hill, Tony S

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate ionization chamber are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with ex isting evaluations and previous data.

  19. Prompt Neutron Multiplicity Measurements with Portable Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    S. Mukhopadhyay, R. Wolff, R. Maurer, S. Mitchell, E. X. Smith, P. Guss, J. L. Lacy, L. Sun, A. Athanasiades

    2011-09-01

    Mobile detection of kilogram quantities of special nuclear materials (SNM) during maritime transportation is a challenging problem for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Counting neutrons emitted by the SNM and partitioning them from background neutrons of multiple origins is the most effective passive means of detecting the SNM. Unfortunately, neutron detection, counting, and partitioning in a maritime environment is complex due to the presence of spallation neutrons (commonly known as “ship effect”) and to the complicated nature of the neutron scattering in that environment. This work studied the possibilities of building a prototype neutron detector using boron- 10 (10B) as the converter in a novel form factor called “straws” that would address the above problem by examining multiplicity distributions of neutrons originating from a fissioning source. Currently, commercially manufactured fission meters (FM) are available that separate cosmic neutrons from non-cosmic neutrons and quantitatively determine the strength of a fissioning source; however, these FMs use 3He, which is becoming increasingly difficult to procure; also the size and weight of a commercial FM is not conducive to manual neutron detection operations in a maritime environment. The current project may provide a near-term solution to the crisis that has arisen from the global scarcity of 3He by offering a viable alternative to the FM. The prototype detector provides a large-area, efficient, lightweight, more granular neutron responsive detection surface (to facilitate imaging) to ease the application of the new FMs. A novel prototype fission meter is being designed at National Security Technologies, LLC, using a thin uniform coating of 10B as neutron converter (only 1 micron thick) inside a large array of thin (4 mm diameter) copper tubes. The copper tubes are only 2-mil thick, and each holds the stretched anode wire under tension and high voltage. The tubes are filled with

  20. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Riva, M.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-21

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  1. Thermal neutron flux measurements in the STAR experimental hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisyak, Yuri; Tsai, Oleg; Videbæk, Flemming; Xu, Zhangbu

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of thermal neutron fluxes at different locations in the STAR experimental hall during RHIC Run 13 with proton-proton collisions at √{s}=510 GeV. We compare these measurements to calculations based on PYTHIA as a minimum bias event generator, detailed GEANT3 simulation of the STAR detector and experimental hall, and with GCALOR as the neutron transport code. A fairly good agreement was found between simulation and measurements.

  2. Fluence and dose measurements for an accelerator neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Byun, S. H.; McNeill, F. E.; Mothersill, C. E.; Seymour, C. B.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2007-10-01

    The 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at McMaster University accelerator laboratory is extended to a neutron irradiation facility for low-dose bystander effects research. A long counter and an Anderson-Braun type neutron monitor have been used as monitors for the determination of the total fluence. Activation foils were used to determine the thermal neutron fluence rate (around 106 neutrons s-1). Meanwhile, the interactions of neutrons with the monitors have been simulated using a Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code. Bystander effects, i.e. damage occurring in cells that were not traversed by radiation but were in the same radiation environment, have been well observed following both alpha and gamma irradiation of many cell lines. Since neutron radiation involves mixed field (including gamma and neutron radiations), we need to differentiate the doses for the bystander effects from the two radiations. A tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) filled with propane based tissue equivalent gas simulating a 2 μm diameter tissue sphere has been investigated to estimate the neutron and gamma absorbed doses. A photon dose contamination of the neutron beam is less than 3%. The axial dose distribution follows the inverse square law and lateral and vertical dose distributions are relatively uniform over the irradiation area required by the biological study.

  3. Neutron multiplicity measurements of Cf and Fm isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.; Ford, G.P.; Balagna, J.P.; Veeser, L.R.

    1980-02-01

    Prompt neutrons in coincidence with the fission fragments from the spontaneous fission of /sup 250,252,254/Cf and /sup 257/Fm were measured inside a 75-cm-diameter, Gd-loaded liquid scintillation counter having a neutron-detection efficiency of about 78%. Measurements for /sup 256/Fm were done just outside the counter with an efficiency of 31%. The kinetic energies of both fission fragments and the number of neutrons for each fission event were recorded. From these data, the fragment kinetic energies and masses and the neutron multiplicity distributions were determined for /sup 250,252,254/Cf and /sup 257/Fm. Variances of neutron multiplicity distributions as a function of total fragment kinetic energy and the ratio of fragment masses have been calculated and are presented for all the nuclides studied.

  4. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    DOE PAGES

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; et al

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dΩ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component)more » using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.« less

  5. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; Fry, J.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hamblen, J.; Hayes, C.; Kucuker, S.; Mahurin, R.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Martin, E.; McCrea, M.; Mueller, P. E.; Musgrave, M.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Snow, W. M.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dΩ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  6. An intercomparison of neutron measurments for a 25 MV x-ray radiotherapy accelerator.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Price, K W; Holeman, G R

    1980-01-01

    High-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines produce neutrons by photonuclear reactions which present a potential radiation hazard to the personnel and patient. A series of measurements of the neutron flux from a 25 MV x-ray linear accelerator, inside and outside the treatment room, have been performed using a multisphere spectrometer, Nemo dosimeter, and activation detectors. These results are compared with other mixed photon-neutron field measurements for the same machine performed using an argon/propane ionization chamber, silicon diode, track-etching detectors, and Monte Carlo calculations. It is found that these measurements agree with each other within a factor of two except for silicon diode measurements in the photon beam. Measured neutron spectra at various locations in the treatment room are also compared with the results of Monte Carlo transport calculations.

  7. Neutron activation analysis in archaeological chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, G.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has proven to be a convenient way of performing the chemical analysis of archaeologically-excavated artifacts and materials. It is fast and does not require tedious laboratory operations. It is multielement, sensitive, and can be made nondestructive. Neutron activation analysis in its instrumental form, i.e., involving no chemical separation, is ideally suited to automation and conveniently takes the first step in data flow patterns that are appropriate for many taxonomic and statistical operations. The future will doubtless see improvements in the practice of NAA in general, but in connection with archaeological science the greatest change will be the filling, interchange and widespread use of data banks based on compilations of analytical data. Since provenience-oriented data banks deal with materials (obsidian, ceramics, metals, semiprecious stones, building materials and sculptural media) that participated in trade networks, the analytical data is certain to be of interest to a rather broad group of archaeologists. It is to meet the needs of the whole archaeological community that archaeological chemistry must now turn.

  8. Search for reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, Gary; Rundberg, Robert; Tonchev, Anton; Fowler, Malcolm; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Archuleta, Tom; Bionta, Richard; Boswell, Mitzi; Gostic, Julie; Griego, Jeff; Knittel, Kenn; Klein, Andi; Moody, Ken; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Wilde, Carl; Yeamans, Charles

    2013-10-01

    We report on measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons at the National Ignition Facility. RIF neutrons are produced in cryogenically layered implision by up-scattered deuterium, or tritium ions that undergo subsequent fusion reactions. The rate of RIF neutron production is proportional to the fuel areal density (| | R) and ion-stopping length in the dense fuel assembly. Thus, RIF neutrons provide information on charge particle stopping in a strongly coupled plasma, where perturbative modeling breaks down. To measure RIF neutrons, a set of thulium activation foils was placed 50 cm from layered cryogenic implosions at the NIF. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a neutron kinetic energy threshold of 14.96 MeV. We will present results from initial experiments performed during the spring of 2013. Prepared by LANL under Contract DE-AC-52-06-NA25396, TSPA, LA-UR-13-22085.

  9. Neutron measurements in Spanish nuclear power plants with a Bonner sphere spectrometer system.

    PubMed

    Fernández, F; Domingo, C; Amgarou, K; Bouassoule, T; García, M J

    2007-01-01

    Neutron spectrometric measurements with an active Bonner Sphere System (BSS) allowed us to determine the reference dosimeter values in Ascó I and II and Cofrentes (PWR, BWR) Spanish nuclear power plants. Under a request from the Spanish National Nuclear Safety Council, the UAB group was in charge of characterising the neutron fields at several measurement points (a total of 10) inside the containment building of these nuclear installations using an active BSS and a home-made MITOM unfolding code. The measurement results in the three installations confirm the presence of low-energy neutron components in almost all selected points. This developed BSS can be considered as a reference system in neutron radiation protection when defining the corresponding protocols for a correct personal dosimetry in nuclear power plant installations.

  10. NEUTRON MEASUREMENTS AT HANFORD’S PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Conrady, Matthew M.; Berg, Randal K.; Scherpelz, Robert I.; Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2009-08-10

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted neutron measurements at Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The measurements were performed to evaluate the performance of the Hanford Standard Dosimeter (HSD) and the 8816 TLD component of the Hanford Combination Neutron Dosimeter (HCND) in the neutron fields responsible for worker neutron exposures. For this study, TEPC detectors and multisphere spectrometers were used to measure neutron dose equivalent rate, and multispheres were used to measure average neutron energy. Water-filled phantoms holding Hanford dosimeters were positioned at each measurement location. The phantoms were positioned in the same location where a multisphere measurement was taken and TEPCs were also positioned there. Plant survey meters were also used to measure neutron dose rates at all locations. Three measurement locations were chose near the HC-9B glovebox in room 228A of Building 234-5. The multisphere spectrometers measured average neutron energies in the range of 337 to 555 keV at these locations. Personal dose equivalent, Hp(10)n, as measured by the multisphere and TEPC, ranged from 2.7 to 9.7 mrem/h in the three locations. Effective dose assuming a rotational geometry (EROT) was substantially lower than Hp(10), ranging from 1.3 to 3.6 mrem/h. These values were lower than the reported values from dosimeters exposed on a rotating phantom. Effective dose assuming an AP geometry (EAP) was also substantially lower than Hp(10), ranging from 2.3 to 6.5 mrem/h. These values were lower than the reported values from the dosimeters on slab phantoms. Since the effective dose values were lower than reported values from dosimeters, the dosimeters were shown to be conservative estimates of the protection quantities.

  11. Determination of hydrogen in niobium by cold neutron prompt gamma ray activation analysis and neutron incoherent scattering

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Paul; H.H. Cheu-Maya; G.R. Myneni

    2002-11-01

    The presence of trace amounts of hydrogen in niobium is believed to have a detrimental effect on the mechanical and superconducting properties. Unfortunately, few techniques are capable of measuring hydrogen at these levels. We have developed two techniques for measuring hydrogen in materials. Cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) has proven useful for the determination of hydrogen and other elements in a wide variety of materials. Neutron incoherent scattering (NIS), a complementary tool to PGAA, has been used to measure trace hydrogen in titanium. Both techniques were used to study the effects of vacuum heating and chemical polishing on the hydrogen content of superconducting niobium.

  12. Measurement of the neutrino-spin correlation parameter B neutron decay using ultracold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilburn, Wesley S

    2009-01-01

    We present a new approach to measuring the neutrino-spin correlation parameter B in neutron decay. The approach combines the technology of large-area ion-implanted silicon detectors being developed for the abBA experiment, with an ultracold neutron source to provide more precise neutron polarimetry. The technique detects both proton and electron from the neutron decay in coincidence. B is determined from an electron-energy-dependent measurement of the proton spin asymmetry. This approach will provide a statistical precision of 1 x 10-4 . The systematic precision is still being evaluated, but is expected to be below 1 x 10-3 , and could approach 1 x 10-4 . A measurement of B with this precision would place constraints on supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model.

  13. A Kinematically Beamed, Low Energy Pulsed Neutron Source for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D; Hagmann, C; Kerr, P; Nakae, L; Rowland, M; Snyderman, N; Stoeffl, W; Hamm, R

    2004-10-07

    We are developing a new active interrogation system based on a kinematically focused low energy neutron beam. The key idea is that one of the defining characteristics of SNM (Special Nuclear Materials) is the ability for low energy or thermal neutrons to induce fission. Thus by using low energy neutrons for the interrogation source we can accomplish three goals, (1) Energy discrimination allows us to measure the prompt fast fission neutrons produced while the interrogation beam is on; (2) Neutrons with an energy of approximately 60 to 100 keV do not fission 238U and Thorium, but penetrate bulk material nearly as far as high energy neutrons do and (3) below about 100keV neutrons lose their energy by kinematical collisions rather than via the nuclear (n,2n) or (n,n') processes thus further simplifying the prompt neutron induced background. 60 keV neutrons create a low radiation dose and readily thermal capture in normal materials, thus providing a clean spectroscopic signature of the intervening materials. The kinematically beamed source also eliminates the need for heavy backward and sideway neutron shielding. We have designed and built a very compact pulsed neutron source, based on an RFQ proton accelerator and a lithium target. We are developing fast neutron detectors that are nearly insensitive to the ever-present thermal neutron and neutron capture induced gamma ray background. The detection of only a few high energy fission neutrons in time correlation with the linac pulse will be a clear indication of the presence of SNM.

  14. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-15

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

  15. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-01

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 × 10(5) n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He(4) nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T(3). PMID:23277984

  16. Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for Elemental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Robin P. Gardner

    2006-04-11

    This research project was to improve the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) measurement approach for bulk analysis, oil well logging, and small sample thermal enutron bean applications.

  17. Preliminary Pulsing Experiments to Measure Delayed Neutron Emission Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, W.S.; Parish, T.A.; Raman, S.

    1998-10-05

    Recent interest in delayed neutron parameters including comparisons between macroscopic (experimental) and microscopic (calculated) results have prompted a set of experiments using the 1MW Triga Reactor at the Texas A and M University (TAMU) Nuclear Science Center (NSC) designed to measure the complete set of seven-group delayed neutron parameters for several higher actinides. Operating the Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) in a pulsed mode, a complete set of delayed neutron parameters were measured for Np-237 and Am-243. The total delayed neutron yield per 100 fissions for Np-237 and Am-243 was found to be 1.14 {+-} 0.07 and 0.85 {+-} 0.05, respectively. Comparisons to previous measurements are made where such measurements are available.

  18. Higher Resolution Neutron Velocity Spectrometer Measurements of Enriched Uranium

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Rainwater, L. J.; Havens, W. W. Jr.

    1950-08-09

    The slow neutron transmission of a sample of enriched U containing 3.193 gm/cm2 was investigated with a resolution width of 1 microsec/m. Results of transmission measurements are shown graphically. (B.J.H.)

  19. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  20. Neutron activation of NIF Final Optics Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaraman, S.; Dauffy, L.; Khater, H.; Brereton, S.

    2010-08-01

    Analyses were performed to characterize the radiation field in the vicinity of the Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) due to neutron activation following Deuterium-Deuterium (DD), Tritium-Hydrogen-Deuterium (THD), and Deuterium-Tritium (DT) shots associated with different phases of the NIF operations. The activation of the structural components of the FOAs produces one of the larger sources of gamma radiation and is a key factor in determining the stay out time between shots to ensure worker protection. This study provides estimates of effective dose rates in the vicinity of a single FOA and concludes that the DD and THD targets produce acceptable dose rates within10 minutes following a shot while about 6-days of stay out time is suggested following DT shots. Studies are ongoing to determine the combined effects of multiple FOAs and other components present in the Target Bay on stay-out time and worker dose.

  1. Neutron-Induced Cross Sections Measurements of Calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Kauwenberghs, K.; Siegler, P.

    2013-01-01

    To support the US Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program neutron induced cross section experiments were performed at the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator of the Institute for Reference Material and Measurements of the Joint Research Centers, European Union. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were carried out using a metallic calcium sample. The obtained data will be used for a new calcium evaluation, which will be submitted with its covariances to the ENDBF/B nuclear data base.

  2. Development of a dual phantom technique for measuring the fast neutron component of dose in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Yoshinori Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Research and development of various accelerator-based irradiation systems for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is underway throughout the world. Many of these systems are nearing or have started clinical trials. Before the start of treatment with BNCT, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the fast neutrons (over 10 keV) incident to the irradiation field must be estimated. Measurements of RBE are typically performed by biological experiments with a phantom. Although the dose deposition due to secondary gamma rays is dominant, the relative contributions of thermal neutrons (below 0.5 eV) and fast neutrons are virtually equivalent under typical irradiation conditions in a water and/or acrylic phantom. Uniform contributions to the dose deposited from thermal and fast neutrons are based in part on relatively inaccurate dose information for fast neutrons. This study sought to improve the accuracy in the dose estimation for fast neutrons by using two phantoms made of different materials in which the dose components can be separated according to differences in the interaction cross sections. The development of a “dual phantom technique” for measuring the fast neutron component of dose is reported. Methods: One phantom was filled with pure water. The other phantom was filled with a water solution of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) capitalizing on the absorbing characteristics of lithium-6 (Li-6) for thermal neutrons. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the ideal mixing ratio of Li-6 in LiOH solution. Changes in the depth dose distributions for each respective dose component along the central beam axis were used to assess the LiOH concentration at the 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 wt. % levels. Simulations were also performed with the phantom filled with 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution for 95%-enriched Li-6. A phantom was constructed containing 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution based on the simulation results. Experimental characterization of the

  3. Neutron multiplicity measurements with 3He alternative: Straw neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald; Detwiler, Ryan; Maurer, Richard; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul; Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Sun, Liang; Athanasiades, Athanasios

    2015-01-27

    Counting neutrons emitted by special nuclear material (SNM) and differentiating them from the background neutrons of various origins is the most effective passive means of detecting SNM. Unfortunately, neutron detection, counting, and partitioning in a maritime environment are complex due to the presence of high-multiplicity spallation neutrons (commonly known as ‘‘ship effect ’’) and to the complicated nature of the neutron scattering in that environment. A prototype neutron detector was built using 10B as the converter in a special form factor called ‘‘straws’’ that would address the above problems by looking into the details of multiplicity distributions of neutrons originating from a fissioning source. This paper describes the straw neutron multiplicity counter (NMC) and assesses the performance with those of a commercially available fission meter. The prototype straw neutron detector provides a large-area, efficient, lightweight, more granular (than fission meter) neutron-responsive detection surface (to facilitate imaging) to enhance the ease of application of fission meters. Presented here are the results of preliminary investigations, modeling, and engineering considerations leading to the construction of this prototype. This design is capable of multiplicity and Feynman variance measurements. This prototype may lead to a near-term solution to the crisis that has arisen from the global scarcity of 3He by offering a viable alternative to fission meters. This paper describes the work performed during a 2-year site-directed research and development (SDRD) project that incorporated straw detectors for neutron multiplicity counting. The NMC is a two-panel detector system. We used 10B (in the form of enriched boron carbide: 10B4C) for neutron detection instead of 3He. In the first year, the project worked with a panel of straw neutron detectors, investigated its characteristics, and

  4. Measuring fast neutrons in Hiroshima at distances relevant to atomic-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Rugel, G; Marchetti, A A; Rühm, W; Korschinek, G; McAninch, J E; Carroll, K; Egbert, S; Faestermann, T; Knie, K; Martinelli, R; Wallner, A; Wallner, C

    2003-07-31

    Data from the survivors of the atomic bombs serve as the major basis for risk calculations of radiation-induced cancer in humans. A controversy has existed for almost two decades, however, concerning the possibility that neutron doses in Hiroshima may have been much larger than estimated. This controversy was based on measurements of radioisotopes activated by thermal neutrons that suggested much higher fluences at larger distances than expected. For fast neutrons, which contributed almost all the neutron dose, clear measurement validation has so far proved impossible at the large distances (900 to 1,500 m) most relevant to survivor locations. Here, the first results are reported for the detection of 63Ni produced predominantly by fast neutrons (above about 1 MeV) in copper samples from Hiroshima. This breakthrough was made possible by the development of chemical extraction methods and major improvements in the sensitivity of accelerator mass spectrometry for detection of 63Ni atoms (refs 8-11). When results are compared with 63Ni activation predicted by neutron doses for Hiroshima survivors, good agreement is observed at the distances most relevant to survivor data. These findings provide, for the first time, clear measurement validation of the neutron doses to survivors in Hiroshima. PMID:12891354

  5. Ship Effect Neutron Measurements And Impacts On Low-Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-10-01

    The primary particles entering the upper atmosphere as cosmic rays create showers in the atmosphere that include a broad spectrum of secondary neutrons, muons and protons. These cosmic-ray secondaries interact with materials at the surface of the Earth, yielding prompt backgrounds in radiation detection systems, as well as inducing long-lived activities through spallation events, dominated by the higher-energy neutron secondaries. For historical reasons, the multiple neutrons produced in spallation cascade events are referred to as “ship effect” neutrons. Quantifying the background from cosmic ray induced activities is important to low-background experiments, such as neutrino-less double beta decay. Since direct measurements of the effects of shielding on the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum are not available, Monte Carlo modeling is used to compute such effects. However, there are large uncertainties (orders of magnitude) in the possible cross-section libraries and the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum for the energy range needed in such calculations. The measurements reported here were initiated to validate results from Monte Carlo models through experimental measurements in order to provide some confidence in the model results. The results indicate that the models provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing density, but there is substantial disagreement between the model and experimental results for the lower-density materials of Al, Fe and Cu.

  6. Measuring fast neutrons in Hiroshima at distances relevant to atomic-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Rugel, G; Marchetti, A A; Rühm, W; Korschinek, G; McAninch, J E; Carroll, K; Egbert, S; Faestermann, T; Knie, K; Martinelli, R; Wallner, A; Wallner, C

    2003-07-31

    Data from the survivors of the atomic bombs serve as the major basis for risk calculations of radiation-induced cancer in humans. A controversy has existed for almost two decades, however, concerning the possibility that neutron doses in Hiroshima may have been much larger than estimated. This controversy was based on measurements of radioisotopes activated by thermal neutrons that suggested much higher fluences at larger distances than expected. For fast neutrons, which contributed almost all the neutron dose, clear measurement validation has so far proved impossible at the large distances (900 to 1,500 m) most relevant to survivor locations. Here, the first results are reported for the detection of 63Ni produced predominantly by fast neutrons (above about 1 MeV) in copper samples from Hiroshima. This breakthrough was made possible by the development of chemical extraction methods and major improvements in the sensitivity of accelerator mass spectrometry for detection of 63Ni atoms (refs 8-11). When results are compared with 63Ni activation predicted by neutron doses for Hiroshima survivors, good agreement is observed at the distances most relevant to survivor data. These findings provide, for the first time, clear measurement validation of the neutron doses to survivors in Hiroshima.

  7. Concentration of hydrogen in titanium measured by neutron incoherent scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen-Mayer, H.H.; Mildner, D.F.R.; Lamaze, G.P.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Paul, R.L.; Kvardakov, V.V.; Richards, W.J.

    1998-12-31

    Mass fractions of hydrogen in titanium matrices have been measured using neutron incoherent scattering (NIS) and compared with results from prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). Qualitatively, NIS is a more efficient technique than PGAA which involves neutron absorption, and the former may be suitable for on-line analysis. However, for NIS the scattering contribution comes from both the hydrogen and the matrix, whereas prompt gamma emission has minimal matrix effect. To isolate the signal due to hydrogen scattering, a set of polypropylene films is used to simulate the increasing amount of hydrogen, and the scattered intensity is monitored. From this response, an unknown amount of the hydrogen can be deduced empirically. The authors have further attempted a first principle calculation of the intensity of the scattered signal from the experimental systems, and have obtained good agreement between calculation and the measurements. The study can be used as a reference for future applications of the scattering method to other hydrogen-in-metal systems.

  8. Spatial corrections for pulsed-neutron reactivity measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Lee, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Michigan

    2010-07-01

    For pulsed-neutron experiments performed in a subcritical reactor, the reactivity obtained from the area-ratio method is sensitive to detector positions. The spatial effects are induced by the presence of both the prompt neutron harmonics and the delayed neutron harmonics in the reactor. The traditional kinetics distortion factor is only limited to correcting the spatial effects caused by the fundamental prompt-{alpha} mode. In this paper, we derive spatial correction factors fp and fd to account for spatial effects induced by the prompt neutron harmonics and the delayed neutron harmonics, respectively. Our numerical simulations with the FX2-TH time-dependent multigroup diffusion code indicate that the high-order prompt neutron harmonics lead to significant spatial effects and cannot be neglected in calculating the spatial correction factors. The prompt spatial correction factor fp can be simply determined by the ratio of the normalized detector responses corresponding to the fundamental k-mode and the prompt neutron flux integrated over the pulse period. Thus, it is convenient to calculate and provides physically intuitive explanations on the spatial dependence of reactivity measured in the MUSE-4 experiments: overestimation of the subcriticality in regions close to the external neutron source and underestimation of the subcriticality away from the source but within the fuel region.

  9. Determination of hydrogen in titanium alloys by cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.L.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Greenberg, R.R.; Privett, H.M. III; Richards, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    Cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (CNPGAA) has proven useful for the analysis of hydrogen in titanium alloys. The analysis is nondestructive, measures the entire sample, and the results are independent of the chemical form of hydrogen present. The authors have used the technique to measure H mass fractions as low as 50 mg/kg in titanium-alloy jet-engine compressor blades and to measure hydrogen in standards for neutron tomography.

  10. Residual stress measurement using the pulsed neutron source at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A. ); Holden, T.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The presence of residual stress in engineering components can effect their mechanical properties and structural integrity. Neutron diffraction is the only measuring technique which can make spatially resolved non-destructive strain measurements in the interior of components. By recording the change in the crystalline interplanar spacing, elastic strains can be measured for individual lattice reflections. Using a pulsed neutron source, all the lattice reflections are recorded in each measurement which allows anisotropic effects to be studied. Measurements made at the Manuel Lujan Jr Neutron Scattering Centre (LANSCE) demonstrate the potential for stress measurements on a pulsed source and indicate the advantages and disadvantages over measurements made on a reactor. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  12. Influence of thermal and resonance neutron on fast neutron flux measurement by 239Pu fission chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Li-Na; Wang, Qiang; Song, Ling-Li; Zheng, Chun

    2015-01-01

    The 239Pu fission chambers are widely used to measure fission spectrum neutron flux due to a flat response to fast neutrons. However, in the meantime the resonance and thermal neutrons can cause a significant influence on the measurement if they are moderated, which could be eliminated by using 10B and Cd covers. At a column enriched uranium fast neutron critical assembly, the fission reaction rates of 239Pu are measured as 1.791×10-16, 2.350×10-16 and 1.385×10-15 per second for 15 mm thick 10B cover, 0.5 mm thick Cd cover, and no cover respectively, while the fission reaction rate of 239Pu is rapidly increased to 2.569×10-14 for a 20 mm thick polythene covering fission chamber. The average 239Pu fission cross-section of thermal and resonance neutrons is calculated to be 500 b and 24.95 b with the assumption of 1/v and 1/E spectra respectively, then thermal, resonance and fast neutron flux are achieved to be 2.30×106, 2.24×106 and 1.04×108 cm-2·s-1.

  13. Updates for Gadolinium neutron capture measurements at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, Dugersuren; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chankova, R.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T.; Couture, A.; Haight, R.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Rundberg, R.; Wouters, J.; Ullmann, J.; Vieira, D.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.

    2007-10-01

    Neutron capture reactions for several isotopes of Gadolinium have been measured at DANCE array in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Progress on the analysis is discussed. The detector response function of DANCE array is presented in connection with the statistical gamma-ray decay cascade simulation. In the region of separated neutron resonances, the statistical gamma-ray decay cascade is simulated using the DICEBOX code. Various models for the photon strength function and level density are used as input. The output of simulations is compared with DANCE data.

  14. Spin measurement and neutron resonance spectroscopy for ^155Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Mitchell, G. E.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wouters, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Viera, D. J.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.

    2009-05-01

    The ^155Gd(n,γ) reaction has been measured with the DANCE calorimeter at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The highly segmented calorimeter provided detailed multiplicity distributions of the capture γ - rays. With this information the spins of the neutron capture resonances have been determined. The improved sensitivity of this method allowed the determination of the spins of even weak and unresolved resonances. With these new spin assignments as well as previously determined resonance parameters, level spacings and neutron strength functions are determined separately for s-wave resonances with J = 1 and 2.

  15. X-Ray Measurements Of A Thermo Scientific P385 DD Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharton, C. J.; Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Caffrey, A. J.; Simpson, J.; Lemchak, M.

    2011-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory is experimenting with electrical neutron generators, as potential replacements for californium-252 radioisotopic neutron sources in its PINS prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system for the identification of military chemical warfare agents and explosives. In addition to neutron output, we have recently measured the x-ray output of the Thermo Scientific P385 deuterium-deuterium neutron generator. X rays are a normal byproduct from neutron generators, but depending on their intensity and energy, x rays can interfere with gamma rays from the object under test, increase gamma-spectrometer dead time, and reduce PGNAA system throughput. The P385 x-ray energy spectrum was measured with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and a broad peak is evident at about 70 keV. To identify the source of the x rays within the neutron generator assembly, it was scanned by collimated scintillation detectors along its long axis. At the strongest x-ray emission points, the generator also was rotated 60° between measurements. The scans show the primary source of x-ray emission from the P385 neutron generator is an area 60 mm from the neutron production target, in the vicinity of the ion source. Rotation of the neutron generator did not significantly alter the x-ray count rate, and its x-ray emission appears to be axially symmetric. A thin lead shield, 3.2 mm (1/8 inch) thick, reduced the 70-keV generator x rays to negligible levels.

  16. X-Ray Measurements Of A Thermo Scientific P385 DD Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, C. J.; Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Caffrey, A. J.; Simpson, J.; Lemchak, M.

    2011-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory is experimenting with electrical neutron generators, as potential replacements for californium-252 radioisotopic neutron sources in its PINS prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system for the identification of military chemical warfare agents and explosives. In addition to neutron output, we have recently measured the x-ray output of the Thermo Scientific P385 deuterium-deuterium neutron generator. X rays are a normal byproduct from neutron generators, but depending on their intensity and energy, x rays can interfere with gamma rays from the object under test, increase gamma-spectrometer dead time, and reduce PGNAA system throughput. The P385 x-ray energy spectrum was measured with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and a broad peak is evident at about 70 keV. To identify the source of the x rays within the neutron generator assembly, it was scanned by collimated scintillation detectors along its long axis. At the strongest x-ray emission points, the generator also was rotated 60 deg. between measurements. The scans show the primary source of x-ray emission from the P385 neutron generator is an area 60 mm from the neutron production target, in the vicinity of the ion source. Rotation of the neutron generator did not significantly alter the x-ray count rate, and its x-ray emission appears to be axially symmetric. A thin lead shield, 3.2 mm (1/8 inch) thick, reduced the 70-keV generator x rays to negligible levels.

  17. Neutron capture measurements on unstable nuclei at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, R. C.; Fowler, M. M.; Miller, G. G.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    1999-06-10

    Although neutron capture by stable isotopes has been extensively measured, there are very few measurements on unstable isotopes. The intense neutron flux at the Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE enables us to measure capture on targets with masses of about 1 mg over the energy range from 1 eV to 100 keV. These measurements are important not only for understanding the basic physics, but also for calculations of stellar nucleosynthesis and Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship. Preliminary measurements on {sup 169}Tm and {sup 171}Tm have been made with deuterated benzene detectors. A new detector array at the Lujan center and a new radioactive isotope separator will combine to give Los Alamos a unique capability for making these measurements.

  18. Measuring the neutron star tidal Love number with inspiral waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Marc

    2014-03-01

    The tidal Love number parameterizes how easily a binary companion deforms a neutron star. This deformation modifies the gravitational field near the neutron star and imprints itself on the binary orbit and gravitational waveform. Measuring the Love number with LIGO or other detectors will help constrain the neutron star equation of state (which is uncertain at high densities). I will discuss an improved parameterization of the waveform's Love-number dependence. I will also discuss how systematic errors will make this number difficult to measure. These systematic errors could arise from unknown post-Newtonian terms that enter at lower orders than tidal effects, or from neglecting small neutron star spins or binary eccentricity.

  19. Measurements of fast neutrons in Hiroshima by use of (39)Ar.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Eckehart; Rühm, Werner; Loosli, H Hugo; Tolstikhin, Igor; Kato, Kazuo; Huber, Thomas C; Egbert, Stephen D

    2006-03-01

    The survivors of the A-bomb explosions over Hiroshima and Nagasaki were exposed to a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field. To validate the high-energy portion of the neutron field and thus the neutron dose to the survivors, a method is described that allows retrospective assessment of the fast neutrons from the A-bombs. This is accomplished by the extraction of the noble gas argon from biotites separated from Hiroshima granite samples, and then the detection of the (39)Ar activity that was produced by the capture of the fast neutrons on potassium. Adjusted to the year 1945, activities measured in the first samples taken at distances of 94, 818, 992, and 1,173 m from the hypocenter were 6.9+/-0.2, 0.32+/-0.01, 0.14+/-0.02, and 0.09+/-0.01 mBq/g K, respectively. All signals were significantly above detector background and show low uncertainties. Considering their uncertainties they agree with the calculated (39)Ar activation in the samples, based on the most recent dosimetry system DS02. It is concluded that this method can be used to investigate samples obtained from large distances in Hiroshima, where previous data on fast neutrons are characterized by considerable uncertainties. Additionally, the method can be used to reconstruct the fast neutron fluence in Nagasaki, where no experimental data exist.

  20. SPECTRON, a neutron noise measurement system in frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Izarra, G. de; Jammes, C. Destouches, C.; Geslot, B.; Di Salvo, J.

    2015-11-15

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation and validation of SPECTRON, a novel neutron noise measurement system developed at CEA Cadarache. The device is designed for the measurement of the β{sub eff} parameter (effective fraction of delayed neutrons) of experimental nuclear reactors using the Cohn-α method. An integrated electronic system is used to record the current from fission chambers. Spectra computed from measurement data are processed by a dedicated software in order to estimate the reactor transfer function and then the effective fraction of delayed neutrons as well as the prompt neutron generation time. After a review of the pile noise measurement method in current mode, the SPECTRON architecture is presented. Then, the validation procedure is described and experimental results are shown, supporting the proper functioning of this new measurement system. It is shown that every technical requirement needed for correct measurement of neutron noise is fulfilled. Measurements performed at MINERVE and EOLE, two experimental nuclear reactors at CEA Cadarache, in real conditions allowed us to validate SPECTRON.

  1. SPECTRON, a neutron noise measurement system in frequency domain.

    PubMed

    de Izarra, G; Jammes, C; Geslot, B; Di Salvo, J; Destouches, C

    2015-11-01

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation and validation of SPECTRON, a novel neutron noise measurement system developed at CEA Cadarache. The device is designed for the measurement of the β(eff) parameter (effective fraction of delayed neutrons) of experimental nuclear reactors using the Cohn-α method. An integrated electronic system is used to record the current from fission chambers. Spectra computed from measurement data are processed by a dedicated software in order to estimate the reactor transfer function and then the effective fraction of delayed neutrons as well as the prompt neutron generation time. After a review of the pile noise measurement method in current mode, the SPECTRON architecture is presented. Then, the validation procedure is described and experimental results are shown, supporting the proper functioning of this new measurement system. It is shown that every technical requirement needed for correct measurement of neutron noise is fulfilled. Measurements performed at MINERVE and EOLE, two experimental nuclear reactors at CEA Cadarache, in real conditions allowed us to validate SPECTRON. PMID:26628176

  2. SPECTRON, a neutron noise measurement system in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Izarra, G.; Jammes, C.; Geslot, B.; Di Salvo, J.; Destouches, C.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation and validation of SPECTRON, a novel neutron noise measurement system developed at CEA Cadarache. The device is designed for the measurement of the βeff parameter (effective fraction of delayed neutrons) of experimental nuclear reactors using the Cohn-α method. An integrated electronic system is used to record the current from fission chambers. Spectra computed from measurement data are processed by a dedicated software in order to estimate the reactor transfer function and then the effective fraction of delayed neutrons as well as the prompt neutron generation time. After a review of the pile noise measurement method in current mode, the SPECTRON architecture is presented. Then, the validation procedure is described and experimental results are shown, supporting the proper functioning of this new measurement system. It is shown that every technical requirement needed for correct measurement of neutron noise is fulfilled. Measurements performed at MINERVE and EOLE, two experimental nuclear reactors at CEA Cadarache, in real conditions allowed us to validate SPECTRON.

  3. SPECTRON, a neutron noise measurement system in frequency domain.

    PubMed

    de Izarra, G; Jammes, C; Geslot, B; Di Salvo, J; Destouches, C

    2015-11-01

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation and validation of SPECTRON, a novel neutron noise measurement system developed at CEA Cadarache. The device is designed for the measurement of the β(eff) parameter (effective fraction of delayed neutrons) of experimental nuclear reactors using the Cohn-α method. An integrated electronic system is used to record the current from fission chambers. Spectra computed from measurement data are processed by a dedicated software in order to estimate the reactor transfer function and then the effective fraction of delayed neutrons as well as the prompt neutron generation time. After a review of the pile noise measurement method in current mode, the SPECTRON architecture is presented. Then, the validation procedure is described and experimental results are shown, supporting the proper functioning of this new measurement system. It is shown that every technical requirement needed for correct measurement of neutron noise is fulfilled. Measurements performed at MINERVE and EOLE, two experimental nuclear reactors at CEA Cadarache, in real conditions allowed us to validate SPECTRON.

  4. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Cross Section Measurements Using the ORELA

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, R. R.

    2000-08-25

    This is the final report for a research program which has been continuously supported by the AEC, ERDA, or USDOE since 1973. The neutron total and capture cross sections for n + {sup 88}Sr have been measured over the neutron energy range 100 eV to 1 MeV. The report briefly summaries our results and the importance of this work for nucleosynthesis and the optical model.

  5. An ultracold neutron storage bottle for UCN density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, G.; Burri, F.; Daum, M.; Kirch, K.; Krempel, J.; Lauss, B.; Meier, M.; Ries, D.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a storage bottle for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in order to measure the UCN density at the beamports of the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) UCN source. This paper describes the design, construction and commissioning of the robust and mobile storage bottle with a volume comparable to typical storage experiments (32 L) e.g. searching for an electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  6. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  7. Energetic ion diagnostics using neutron flux measurements during pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron measurements during injection of deuterium pellets into deuterium plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) indicate that the fractional increase in neutron emission about 0.5 msec after pellet injection is proportional to the fraction of beam-plasma reactions to total fusion reactions in the unperturbed plasma. These observations suggest three diagnostic applications of neutron measurements during pellet injection: (1) measurement of the beam-plasma reaction rate in deuterium plasmas for use in determining the fusion Q in an equivalent deuterium-tritium plasma, (2) measurement of the radial profile of energetic beam ions by varying the pellet size and velocity, and (3) measurement of the ''temperature'' of ions accelerated during wave heating. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Measuring Underground Neutron Fluxes for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, Robert; Garrison, Lance; Thornton, Tyler; Steele, Ethan

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this project was to measure the muon-induced neutron flux in lead at sea level using the SciBath neutral particle detector. The muon-induced neutron rate is not well known, is challenging to measure and simulate, and potentially an important background for underground experiments such as the EXO neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment. A mass of 45 kg of lead was placed on top of the detector, and muon/neutron-capture correlated events were measured. Events with accidental neutron-capture signals were subtracted as were muon/neutron-capture correlated events from spallation in the detector liquid scintillator. This procedure resulted in a neutron yield from lead at sea level of 1 . 4 (+/- 1 . 1) ×10-5n/μ (gcm-2)-1 with the typical muon energy at sea level Eμ ~ 4 GeV. We compare this to parameterizations created for underground experimental sites extrapolated up to sea level. NSF funded.

  9. Activation of cobalt by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Pace, J.V. III ); Brodzinski, R.L. ); Marcum, J. )

    1990-02-01

    A study has been completed of cobalt activation in samples from two new locations in Hiroshima. The samples consisted of a piece of steel from a bridge located at a distance of about 1300 m from the hypocenter and pieces of both steel and concrete from a building located at approximately 700 m. The concrete was analyzed to obtain information needed to calculate the cobalt activation in the two steel samples. Close agreement was found between calculated and measured values for cobalt activation of the steel sample from the building at 700 m. It was found, however, that the measured values for the bridge sample at 1300 m were approximately twice the calculated values. Thus, the new results confirm the existence of a systematic error in the transport calculations for neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. 52 refs., 32 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Measurement result of the neutron monitor onboard the Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment - Attached Payload (SEDA-AP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, K.; Muraki, Y.; Shibata, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Okudaira, O.; Kawano, H.; Yumoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    To support future space activities, it is crucial to acquire space environmental data related to the space-radiation degradation of space parts and materials, and spacecraft anomalies. Such data are useful for spacecraft design and manned space activity. SEDA-AP was mounted on 'Kibo' of the ISS (International Space Station) to measure the space environment at a 400-kilometer altitude. Neutrons are very harmful radiation, with electrical neutrality that makes them strongly permeable. SEDA-AP measures the energy of neutrons from thermal to 100 MeV in real time using a Bonner Ball Detector (BBND) and a Scintillation Fiber Detector (FIB). BBND detects neutrons using He-3 counters, which have high sensitivity to thermal neutrons. Neutron energy is derived using the relative response function of polyethylene moderators of 6 different thicknesses. FIB measures the tracks of recoil protons caused by neutrons within a cubic arrayed sensor of 512 scintillation fibers. The charged particles are excluded using an anti-scintillator which surrounds the cube sensor, and the neutron energy is obtained from the track length of a recoil proton. There are three sources of neutrons in space; 1. Albedo Neutrons Produced by reactions of galactic cosmic rays or radiation belt particles with the atmosphere 2. Local Neutrons Produced by the reactions of galactic cosmic rays or radiation belt particles with spacecraft 3. Solar Neutrons Produced by accelerated particles in solar flares An accurate energy spectrum of the solar neutrons includes important information on high-energy particle generation mechanism in a solar flare, because neutrons are unaffected by interplanetary magnetic fields. These data will become useful to forecast solar energetic particles in future. Some candidate events involving solar neutrons were found as a result of analyzing data of the solar flare of M>2 since September 2009. Moreover, it is important to measure albedo neutrons, since protons generated by neutron

  11. Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2008-10-01

    Experiments have been performed at Idaho National Laboratory to study methodology and instrumentation for performing neutron active interrogation die-away analyses for the purpose of detecting shielded fissionable material. Here we report initial work using a portable DT electronic neutron generator with a He-3 fast neutron detector to detect shielded fissionable material including >2 kg quantities of enriched uranium and plutonium. Measurements have been taken of bare material as well as of material hidden within a large plywood cube. Results from this work have demonstrated the efficacy of the die-away neutron measurement technique for quickly detecting the presence of special nuclear material hidden within plywood shields by analyzing the time dependent neutron signals in-between neutron generator pulses. Using a DT electronic neutron generator operating at 300 Hz with a yield of approximately 0.36 x 10**8 neutrons per second, 2.2 kg of enriched uranium hidden within a 0.60 m x 0.60 m x 0.70 m volume of plywood was positively detected with a measurement signal 2-sigma above the passive background within 1 second. Similarly, for a 500 second measurement period a lower detection limit of approaching the gram level could be expected with the same simple set-up.

  12. From the similarities between neutrons and radon to advanced radon-detection and improved cold fusion neutron-measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasino, L.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    Neutrons and radon are both ubiquitous in the earth's crust. The neutrons of terrestrial origin are strongly related to radon since they originate mainly from the interactions between the alpha particles from the decays of radioactive-gas (namely Radon and Thoron) and the light nuclei. Since the early studies in the field of neutrons, the radon gas was used to produce neutrons by (α, n) reactions in beryllium. Another important similarity between radon and neutrons is that they can be detected only through the radiations produced respectively by decays or by nuclear reactions. These charged particles from the two distinct nuclear processes are often the same (namely alpha-particles). A typical neutron detector is based on a radiator facing a alpha-particle detector, such as in the case of a neutron film badge. Based on the similarity between neutrons and radon, a film badge for radon has been recently proposed. The radon film badge, in addition to be similar, may be even identical to the neutron film badge. For these reasons, neutron measurements can be easily affected by the presence of unpredictable large radon concentration. In several cold fusion experiments, the CR-39 plastic films (typically used in radon and neutron film-badges), have been the detectors of choice for measuring neutrons. In this paper, attempts will be made to prove that most of these neutron-measurements might have been affected by the presence of large radon concentrations.

  13. Measurement of Neutron Emissions from Nuclear Muon Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Damien; AlCap Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The AlCap collaboration is studying particle emission after muon capture on Al and Ti nuclei. Proton and neutron emission are an important source of accidental activity in the Mu2e and COMET experiments, which will search for charged lepton flavor violation (CLFV) in neutrino-less muon to electron conversion in the field of an atomic nucleus. A recent experiment was completed at the high intensity piE5 beamline at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) focusing on neutron and gamma emissions from Al. AlCap expects to obtain the bound muon lifetime, the low-energy neutron spectrum, and the neutron emission rates per muon capture. The current state of the analysis will be presented. Funded in part by US DoE.

  14. Neutron Capture and Fission Measurement on ^238Pu at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, Andrii; Wu, Ching-Yen; Kwan, Elaine; Henderson, Roger; Gostic, Jolie; Couture, Aaron; Young, Hye; Ullmann, John; O'Donnell, John; Jandel, Marian; Haight, Robert; Bredeweg, Todd

    2012-10-01

    Neutron capture and fission reactions on actinides are important in nuclear engineering and physics. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Measurement, LANL) combined with PPAC (avalanche technique based fission tagging detector, LLNL) were used to study the neutron capture reactions in ^238Pu. Because of extreme spontaneous α-radioactivity in ^238Pu and associated safety issues, 3 separate experiments were performed in 2010-2012. The 1st measurement was done without fission tagging on a 396-μg thick target. The 2nd one was with PPAC on the same target. The 3rd final measurement was done on a thin target with a mass of 40 μg in order to reduce α-background load on PPAC. This was the first such measurement in a laboratory environment. The absolute ^238Pu(n,γ) cross section is presented together with the prompt γ-ray multiplicity in the ^238Pu(n,f) reaction.

  15. Measuring Neutron-Star Spins via Burst Oscillations (core Program)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measuring the spin of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries is one of the great strengths and highest priorities for RXTE. We propose targeted observations of known thermonuclear burst sources which do not have confirmed burst oscillations, as well as previously unknown sources, in order to detect new examples of burst oscillations and thus add to the sample of neutron star spins. We will target sources in states of frequent, bright bursts by triggering on the detection of bursts by INTEGRAL and/or Swift. Detection of neutron stars spinning beyond the present maximum will allow us to significantly constrain the neutron-star equation of state, presently an area of major uncertainty.

  16. Basic Physics Data: Measurement of Neutron Multiplicity from Induced Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Haight, Robert

    2015-05-04

    From October 1 to October 17 a team of researchers from UM visited the LANSCE facility for an experiment during beam-time allotted from October 4 to October 17. A total of 24 detectors were used at LANSCE including liquid organic scintillation detectors (EJ-309), NaI scintillation detectors, and Li-6 enriched glass detectors. It is a double time-offlight (TOF) measurement using spallation neutrons generated by a target bombarded with pulsed high-energy protons. The neutrons travel to an LLNL-manufactured parallel plate avalanche chamber (PPAC) loaded with thin U-235 foils in which fission events are induced. The generated fission neutrons and photons are then detected in a detector array designed and built at UM and shipped to LANSCE. Preparations were made at UM, where setup and proposed detectors were tested. The UM equipment was then shipped to LANSCE for use at the 15L beam of the weapons neutron research (WNR) facility.

  17. Measurements of β-delayed neutron emission probabilities using a Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scielzo, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    Neutrons emitted following the β decay of neutron-rich isotopes play an important role in many fields of basic and applied science. Studies of these β-delayed neutrons are needed to better understand the structure of exotic nuclei and how the isotopes synthesized in r-process environments decay back to stability to produce the isotopic abundances observed today. In addition, precise studies of fission products provides valuable information for nuclear energy and stockpile stewardship applications. However, the data available today for individual nuclei is limited - for the vast majority of neutron emitters, the energy spectrum has not been measured and some recent measurements have uncovered discrepancies in β-delayed neutron branching ratios. Radioactive ions held in an ion trap are an appealing source of activity for improved studies of this β-delayed neutron emission process. When a radioactive ion decays in the trap, the recoil-daughter nucleus and emitted particles emerge from the approximately 1-mm3 trap volume with minimal scattering and propagate unobstructed through vacuum. These properties allow, for the first time, the momentum and energy of the emitted neutron to be precisely reconstructed from the nuclear recoil. By loading neutron-rich fission-product beams from the CARIBU facility at Argonne National Laboratory into a specially-designed radiofrequency quadrupole ion trap system, a program of β-delayed neutron spectroscopy in this largely unexplored region of the nuclear chart can be performed. This recoil-ion technique will be described and results from recent measurements at CARIBU and future prospects will be discussed. Neutrons emitted following the β decay of neutron-rich isotopes play an important role in many fields of basic and applied science. Studies of these β-delayed neutrons are needed to better understand the structure of exotic nuclei and how the isotopes synthesized in r-process environments decay back to stability to produce

  18. Measurements of effective delayed neutron fraction in a fast neutron reactor using the perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao-Jun; Yin, Yan-Peng; Fan, Xiao-Qiang; Li, Zheng-Hong; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2016-06-01

    A perturbation method is proposed to obtain the effective delayed neutron fraction β eff of a cylindrical highly enriched uranium reactor. Based on reactivity measurements with and without a sample at a specified position using the positive period technique, the reactor reactivity perturbation Δρ of the sample in β eff units is measured. Simulations of the perturbation experiments are performed using the MCNP program. The PERT card is used to provide the difference dk of effective neutron multiplication factors with and without the sample inside the reactor. Based on the relationship between the effective multiplication factor and the reactivity, the equation β eff = dk/Δρ is derived. In this paper, the reactivity perturbations of 13 metal samples at the designable position of the reactor are measured and calculated. The average β eff value of the reactor is given as 0.00645, and the standard uncertainty is 3.0%. Additionally, the perturbation experiments for β eff can be used to evaluate the reliabilities of the delayed neutron parameters. This work shows that the delayed neutron data of 235U and 238U from G.R. Keepin’s publication are more reliable than those from ENDF-B6.0, ENDF-B7.0, JENDL3.3 and CENDL2.2. Supported by Foundation of Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012AA01, 2014AA01), National Natural Science Foundation (11375158, 91326104)

  19. Quantifying the information measured by neutron scattering instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.W.

    1997-09-01

    The concept of the information content of a scientific measurement is introduced, and a theory is presented which enables the information that may be obtained by a neutron scattering instrument to be calculated. When combined with the time taken to perform the measurement the bandwidth of the instrument is obtained. This bandwidth is effectively a figure of merit which is of use in three respects: in the design of neutron instrumentation, the optimisation of measurements, and in the comparison of one instrument with another.

  20. Neutron activation analysis of an Egyptian monazite ore sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, E. A.; Rofail, N. B.; Ashmawy, L. S.; Hassan, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    The absolute sensitivity of a gamma-ray line following thermal or epithermal neutron activation is expressed as a product of four terms, namely, the intrinsic, irradiation, decay and measurement factors. The total absolute sensitivity is the sum of the absolute sensitivities due to thermal and epithermal activation. A. FORTRAN computer program was prepared on the TANDY 3000 NL PCA to calculate the total absolute sensitivity of the intensive gamma-ray lines from the thermal and epithermal neutron activation of all the naturally occurring nuclides. Another program was prepared for the determination of the total absolute sensitivity for gammarays emitted by radioactive daughters such as233Pa from233Th and239Np from239U. Long time irradiation periods (about 48 hours) for specimens of the monazite ore sample were carried out at the (ET-RR-1) reactor core periphery. The monazite ore sample was separated from the associating minerals in the sand of Abou-Khashaba of Rashied (Rosetta) area on the Mediterranean (North of Egypt). The separated monazite ore sample was provided by the Nuclear Material Authority of Egypt. The cadmium difference method was applied to thin gold foils for absolute thermal and epithermal neutron flux determination. The gamma-ray spectra were measured using a spectrometer with a HPGe coaxial detector. The evaluated absolute sensitivity tables were helpful in identifying the radioisotopes contributing to the gamma- ray spectra and in evaluating the elemental concentration of the monazite constitutents. Most of the rare earth elements were observed and their concentrations are reported. La, Ce, Nd, Sd and Th were found as major elements, U, Tb, Hf and Eu as minor elements.

  1. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  2. LVR-15 reactor epithermal neutron beam parameters--results of measurements.

    PubMed

    Burian, J; Klupak, V; Marek, M; Rejchrt, J; Viererbl, L; Gambarini, G; Bartesaghi, G

    2009-07-01

    The epithermal neutron beam of the LVR-15 reactor provides the appropriate conditions for varied BNCT activity. The principal parameters have been frequently determined. The following detectors have been used for the measurement: set of activation monitors of different nuclides irradiated in free beam and in the water phantom, Si semiconductor detector with (6)LiF converter, twin ionization chambers, thermoluminescence dosimeters, gel dosimeters used for imaging of separate part of dose, neutron spectrometer of Bonner type. Obtained results of measured parameters are presented in the paper.

  3. Realizing the Opportunities of Neutron Cross Section Measurements at RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L; Hausmann, M; Reifarth, R; Roberts, K; Roeben, M; Rusnak, B; Vieira, D

    2004-10-13

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator will produce many isotopes at never before seen rates. This will allow for the first time measurements on isotopes very far from stability and new measurement opportunities for unstable nuclei near stability. In fact, the production rates are such that it should be possible to collect 10 micrograms of many isotopes with a half-life of 1 day or more. This ability to make targets of short-lived nuclei enables the possibility of making neutron cross-section measurements important to the astrophysics and the stockpile stewardship communities. But to fully realize this opportunity, the appropriate infrastructure must be included at the RIA facility. This includes isotope harvesting capabilities, radiochemical areas for processing collected material, and an intense, ''mono-energetic'', tunable neutron source. As such, we have been developing a design for neutron source facility to be included at the RIA site. This facility would produce neutrons via intense beams of deuterons and protons on a variety of targets. The facility would also include the necessary radiochemical facilities for target processing. These infrastructure needs will be discussed in addition to the methods that would be employed at RIA for measuring these neutron cross-sections.

  4. Passive and Active Fast-Neutron Imaging in Support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Safeguards Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Blackston, Matthew A; Hausladen, Paul

    2010-04-01

    Results from safeguards-related passive and active coded-aperture fast-neutron imaging measurements of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) material configurations performed at Idaho National Laboratory s Zero Power Physics Reactor facility are presented. The imaging measurements indicate that it is feasible to use fast neutron imaging in a variety of safeguards-related tasks, such as monitoring storage, evaluating holdup deposits in situ, or identifying individual leached hulls still containing fuel. The present work also presents the first demonstration of imaging of differential die away fast neutrons.

  5. Application of active and passive neutron non destructive assay methods to concrete radioactive waste drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallu, F.; Passard, C.; Brackx, E.

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with the application of non-destructive neutron measurement methods to control and characterize 200 l radioactive waste drums filled with a concrete matrix. Due to its composition, and particularly to hydrogen, concrete penalizes the use of such methods to quantify uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) components, which are mainly responsible of the α-activity of the waste. The determination of the alpha activity is the main objective of neutron measurements, in view to verify acceptance criteria in surface storage. Calibration experiments of the Active Neutron Interrogation (ANI) method lead to Detection Limit Masses (DLM) of about 1 mg of 239Pu eff in the total counting mode, and of about 10 mg of 239Pu eff in the coincidence counting mode, in case of a homogeneous Pu source and measurement times between one and two hours. Monte Carlo calculation results show a very satisfactory agreement between experimental values and calculated ones. Results of the application of passive and active neutron methods to control two real drums are presented in the last part of the paper. They show a good agreement between measured data and values declared by the waste producers. The main difficulties that had to be overcome are the low neutron signal in passive and active coincidence counting modes due to concrete, the analysis of the passive neutron signal in presence of 244Cm in the drum, which is a strong spontaneous fission neutron emitter, the variation of the active background with the concrete composition, and the analysis of the active prompt neutron signal due to the simultaneous presence of U and Pu in the drums.

  6. Review of measurement techniques for the neutron radiative-capture process

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The experimental techniques applied in measurements of the neutron capture process are reviewed. The emphasis is on measurement techniques used in neutron capture cross section measurements. The activation technique applied mainly in earlier work has still its use in some cases, specifically for measurements of technologically important cross sections (/sup 238/U and /sup 232/Th) with high accuracy. Three major prompt neutron radioactive capture detection techniques have evolved: the total gamma radiation energy detection technique (mainly with large liquid scintillation detectors), the gamma-energy proportional detectors (with proportional counters or Moxon-Rae detectors), and the pulse-height weighting technique. These measurement techniques are generally applicable, however, shortcomings limit the achievable accuracy to a approx. = 5 to 15% uncertainty level.

  7. Sensitivity of Measured Fission Yields on Prompt-neutron Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Pomp, S.; Oberstedt, S.

    2014-05-01

    Although the number of emitted prompt neutrons from the fission fragments increases as a function of excitation energy, it is not fully understood whether the increase in νbar (A) as a function of En is mass dependent. The share of excitation energies among the fragments is still under debate, but there are reasons to believe that the excess in neutron emission originates only from the heavy fragments, leaving νbarlight (A) almost unchanged. We have investigated the consequences of a mass-dependent increase in νbar (A) on the final mass and energy distributions. The analysis have been performed on experimentally measured data on 234U (n, f). The assumptions concerning νbar (A) are essential when analysing measurements based on the 2E-technique, and impact significantly on the measured observables. For example, the post-neutron emission mass yield distribution revealed changes up to 10-30 %. The outcome of this work pinpoints the urgent need to determine νbar (A) experimentally, and in particular, how νbar (A) changes as a function of incident neutron energy. Many fission yields in the data libraries could be largely affected, since their analysis is based on a different assumption concerning the neutron emission.

  8. Measurements of the reactor neutron power in absolute units

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, G. V.

    2015-12-15

    The neutron power of the reactor of the Yenisei space nuclear power plant is measured in absolute units using the modernized method of correlation analysis during the ground-based tests of the Yenisei prototypes. Results of the experiments are given. The desired result is obtained in a series of experiments carried out at the stage of the plant preparation for tests. The acceptability of experimental data is confirmed by the results of measuring the reactor neutron power in absolute units at the nominal level by the thermal balance during the life cycle tests of the ground prototypes.

  9. Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P J

    2004-04-13

    In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

  10. First Measurement of Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, Anton; Cerjan, C.; Fortner, D.; Henry, E.; Shaughnessy, D.; Schnieder, D.; Stoeffl, W.; Stoyer, M.; Yeamans, C.; Boswell, M.; Bredeweg, T.; Grim, G.; Jungman, G.; Fowler, M.; Hayes, A.; Obst, A.; Rundberg, R.; Schulz, A.; Wilhelmy, J.; Wilde, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M.; Howell, C.; Toenow, W.; LLNL/LANL/TUNL Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The first measurement of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons, also known as tertiary neutrons, has been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using an activation technique. Thulium foils positioned at 50 cm from the burning deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule have been exposed to the characteristic DT neutron spectrum. The high-energy part of these neutrons with energies above 15.0 MeV can produce 167Tm via the 169Tm(n,3n) reaction. The 208-keV γ-ray, emitted from the decay of 167Tm with a half-life of 9.2 days, has been measured using two clover detectors. The first preliminary result implies that the ratio of RIF neutrons (En>15.0 MeV) versus the total neutrons is 1x10-4 +/- 3x10-5. The important implication of these measurements on our knowledge of the charged-particle stopping power in strongly coupled quantum-degenerate plasma will be presented.

  11. First Measurement of Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A.; Becker, J.; Bleuel, D.; Bionta, R.; Fortner, D.; Henry, E.; Khater, H.; Shaughnessy, D.; Schnider, D.; Stoeffl, W.; Yeamans, C.; Boswell, M.; Bredeweg, T.; Grim, G.; Jungman, G.; Fowler, M.; Hayes, A.; Obst, A.; Rundberg, R.; Schulz, A.; Wilhelmy, J.; Tornow, W.; Bhike, M.; Howell, C.; Gooden, M.; LLNL/LANL/TUNL Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The first measurement of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons, also known as tertiary neutrons, has been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using an activation technique. Thulium foils positioned at 50 cm from the burning deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule have been exposed to the characteristic DT neutron spectrum. The high-energy part of these neutrons with energies above 15.0 MeV can produce 167Tm via the 169Tm(n,3n) reaction. The 208-keV γ-ray, emitted from the decay of 167Tm with a half-life of 9.2 days, has been measured using two clover detectors. The first preliminary result implies that the ratio of RIF neutrons (En > 15.0 MeV) versus the total neutrons is 1 × 10 -4 +/- 3 × 10 -5. The important implication of these measurements on our knowledge of the charged-particle stopping power in strongly coupled quantum-degenerate plasma will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. National Ignition Facility neutron time-of-flight measurements (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R. A.; Moran, M. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Eckart, M. J.; Zacharias, R. A.; Haslam, J. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Yeoman, M. F.; Warwas, D. P.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2010-10-15

    The first 3 of 18 neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) channels have been installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The role of these detectors includes yield, temperature, and bang time measurements. This article focuses on nTOF data analysis and quality of results obtained for the first set of experiments to use all 192 NIF beams. Targets produced up to 2x10{sup 10} 2.45 MeV neutrons for initial testing of the nTOF detectors. Differences in neutron scattering at the OMEGA laser facility where the detectors were calibrated and at NIF result in different response functions at the two facilities. Monte Carlo modeling shows this difference. The nTOF performance on these early experiments indicates that the nTOF system with its full complement of detectors should perform well in future measurements of yield, temperature, and bang time.

  13. Analysis of a measured neutron background below 6 MeV for fast-neutron imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, K.; Becchetti, M. F.; Flaska, M.; Poitrasson-Riviere, A.; Hamel, M. C.; Polack, J. K.; Lawrence, C. C.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Detailed and accurate information on the neutron background is relevant for many applications that involve radiation detection, both for non-coincidence and coincidence countings. In particular, for the purpose of developing advanced neutron-detection techniques for nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear safeguards, the energy-dependent, ground-level, neutron-background information is needed. There are only a few previous studies available about the neutron background below 10 MeV, which is a typical neutron energy range of interest for nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear-safeguards applications. Thus, there is a potential for further investigation in this energy range. In this paper, neutron-background measurement results using organic-liquid scintillation detectors are described and discussed, with a direct application in optimization simulations of a fast-neutron imager based on liquid scintillators. The measurement was performed in summer 2011 in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, and the measurement setup consisted of several EJ-309 liquid scintillators and a fast waveform digitizer. The average neutron flux below 6 MeV was measured to be approximately 4e-4 counts/cm2/s. In addition, the relationship between the neutron-background count rate and various environmental quantities, such as humidity, at Earth's ground level was investigated and the results did not reveal any straightforward dependences. The measured pulse height distribution (PHD) was unfolded to determine the energy spectrum of the background neutrons. The unfolded neutron-background spectrum was implemented to a previously-created MCNPX-PoliMi model of the neutron-scatter camera and simple-backprojection images of the background neutrons were acquired. Furthermore, a simulated PHD was obtained with the MCNPX-PoliMi code using the "Cosmic-Ray Shower Library" (CRY) source sub-routine which returns various types of radiation, including neutrons and photons at a surface, and accounts for solar cycle

  14. Determination of (n,γ) Cross Sections of 241Am by Cold Neutron Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genreith, C.; Rossbach, M.; Révay, Zs.; Kudejova, P.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate cross section data of actinides are crucial for criticality calculations of GEN IV reactors and transmutation but also for analytical purposes such as nuclear waste characterization, decommissioning of nuclear installations and safeguard applications. Tabulated data are inconsistent and sometimes associated with large uncertainties. Neutron activation with external cold neutron beams from high flux reactors offers a chance for determination of accurate capture cross sections scalable to the whole 1/√{E}-region even for isotopes with low-lying resonances like 241Am. Preparation of 241Am samples for irradiation at the PGAA station of the FRM II in Garching has been optimized together with PTB in Braunschweig. Two samples were irradiated together with gold flux monitors to extract the thermal neutron capture cross section after appropriate corrections for attenuation of neutrons and photons in the sample. For one sample, the thermal ground state neutron capture cross section was measured as 663.0 ± 28.8 b. The thermal neutron capture cross section was calculated to 725.4 ± 34.4 b. For the other sample, a ground state neutron capture cross section of 649.9 ± 28.2 b was measured and a thermal neutron capture cross section of 711.1 ± 33.9 b was derived.

  15. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, K; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Oka, T; Hasai, H

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate 152Eu and 60Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. PMID:8083048

  16. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, K; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Oka, T; Hasai, H

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate 152Eu and 60Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen.

  18. Active Neutron Interrogation of Non-Radiological Materials with NMIS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mark E; Mihalczo, John T

    2012-02-01

    The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), although primarily designed for analyzing special nuclear material, is capable of identifying nonradiological materials with a wide range of measurement techniques. This report demonstrates four different measurement methods, complementary to fast-neutron imaging, which can be used for material identification: DT transmission, DT scattering, californium transmission, and active time-tagged gamma spectroscopy. Each of the four techniques was used to evaluate how these methods can be used to identify four materials: aluminum, polyethylene, graphite, and G-10 epoxy. While such measurements have been performed individually in the past, in this project, all four measurements were performed on the same set of materials. The results of these measurements agree well with predicted results. In particular, the results of the active gamma spectroscopy measurements demonstrate the technique's applicability in a future version of NMIS which will incorporate passive and active gamma-ray spectroscopy. This system, designated as a fieldable NMIS (FNMIS), is under development by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Verification.

  19. Development of a Neutron Spectroscopic System Utilizing Compressed Sensing Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Danilo; Cable Kurwitz, R.; Carron, Igor; DePriest, K. Russell

    2016-02-01

    A new approach to neutron detection capable of gathering spectroscopic information has been demonstrated. The approach relies on an asymmetrical arrangement of materials, geometry, and an ability to change the orientation of the detector with respect to the neutron field. Measurements are used to unfold the energy characteristics of the neutron field using a new theoretical framework of compressed sensing. Recent theoretical results show that the number of multiplexed samples can be lower than the full number of traditional samples while providing the ability to have some super-resolution. Furthermore, the solution approach does not require a priori information or inclusion of physics models. Utilizing the MCNP code, a number of candidate detector geometries and materials were modeled. Simulations were carried out for a number of neutron energies and distributions with preselected orientations for the detector. The resulting matrix (A) consists of n rows associated with orientation and m columns associated with energy and distribution where n < m. The library of known responses is used for new measurements Y (n × 1) and the solver is able to determine the system, Y = Ax where x is a sparse vector. Therefore, energy spectrum measurements are a combination of the energy distribution information of the identified elements of A. This approach allows for determination of neutron spectroscopic information using a single detector system with analog multiplexing. The analog multiplexing allows the use of a compressed sensing solution similar to approaches used in other areas of imaging. A single detector assembly provides improved flexibility and is expected to reduce uncertainty associated with current neutron spectroscopy measurement.

  20. Measurement of Neutrons Produced by Beam-Target Interactions via a Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, Scott; Poehlmann, Flavio; Rieker, Gregory; Cappelli, Mark

    2011-10-01

    This poster presents a method to measure neutron yield from a coaxial plasma accelerator. Stored electrical energies between 1 and 19 kJ are discharged within a few microseconds across the electrodes of the coaxial gun, accelerating deuterium gas samples to plasma beam energies well beyond the keV energy range. The focus of this study is to examine the interaction of the plasma beam with a deuterated target by designing and fabricating a detector to measure neutron yield. Given the strong electromagnetic pulse associated with our accelerator, indirect measurement of neutrons via threshold-dependent nuclear activation serves as both a reliable and definitive indicator of high-energy particles for our application. Upon bombardment with neutrons, discs or stacks of metal foils placed near the deuterated target undergo nuclear activation reactions, yielding gamma-emitting isotopes whose decay is measured by a scintillation detector system. By collecting gamma ray spectra over time and considering nuclear cross sections, the magnitude of the original neutron pulse is inferred.

  1. Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement on $^{238}$Pu at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y

    2011-02-14

    The proposed neutron capture measurement for {sup 238}Pu was carried out in Nov-Dec, 2010, using the DANCE array at LANSCE, LANL. The total beam-on-target time is about 14 days plus additional 5 days for the background measurement. The target was prepared at LLNL with the new electrplating cell capable of plating the {sup 238}Pu isotope simultaneously on both sides of the 3-{micro}m thick Ti backing foil. A total mass of 395 {micro}g with an activity of 6.8 mCi was deposited onto the area of 7 mm in diameter. The {sup 238}Pu sample was enriched to 99.35%. The target was covered by 1.4 {micro}m double-side aluminized mylar and then inserted into a specially designed vacuum-tight container, shown in Fig. 1, for the {sup 238}Pu containment. The container was tested for leaks in the vacuum chamber at LLNL. An identical container without {sup 238}Pu was made as well and used as a blank for the background measurement.

  2. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray-induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  3. Real-time active cosmic neutron background reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray‒induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the lowenergy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of manmade neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  4. Neutron Capture and Fission Measurements on Actinides at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, Andrii; Wu, Ching-Yen; Kwan, Elaine; Henderson, Rodger; Gostic, Julie; Ullmann, John; Jandel, Marian; Bredeweg, Todd; Couture, Aaron; Lee, Hye Young; Haight, Robert; O'Donnell, John

    2011-10-01

    Neutron capture and fission measurements on actinides are important in nuclear engineering and physics. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Measurement build at LANL) together with PPAC (avalanche technique based fission tagging detector designed and fabricated at LLNL) were used to measure the prompt γ-ray energy and multiplicity distributions in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. These measured spectra together with the unfolded ones will be presented. The unfolding technique will be described. In addition the 238Pu(n , γ) cross section will be presented, which was measured using DANCE alone and also is the first such measurement in a laboratory environment. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Neutron Measurements for Radiation Protection in Low Earth Orbit - History and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golightly, M. J.; Se,pmes. E/

    2003-01-01

    The neutron environment inside spacecraft has been of interest from a scientific and radiation protection perspective since early in the history of manned spaceflight. With 1:.1e exception of a few missions which carried plutonium-fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators, all of the neutrons inside the spacecraft are secondary radiations resulting from interactions of high-energy charged particles with nuclei in the Earth's atmosphere, spacecraft structural materials, and the astronaut's own bodies. Although of great interest, definitive measurements of the spacecraft neutron field have been difficult due to the wide particle energy range and the limited available volume and power for traditional techniques involving Bonner spheres. A multitude of measurements, however, have been made of the neutron environment inside spacecraft. The majority of measurements were made using passive techniques including metal activation fo ils, fission foils, nuclear photoemulsions, plastic track detectors, and thermoluminescent detectors. Active measurements have utilized proton recoil spectrometers (stilbene), Bonner Spheres eRe proportional counter based), and LiI(Eu)phoswich scintillation detectors. For the International Space Station (ISS), only the plastic track! thermoluminescent detectors are used with any regularity. A monitoring program utilizing a set of active Bonner spheres was carried out in the ISS Lab module from March - December 200l. These measurements provide a very limited look at the crew neutron exposure, both in time coverage and neutron energy coverage. A review of the currently published data from past flights will be made and compared with the more recent results from the ISS. Future measurement efforts using currently available techniques and those in development will be also discussed.

  6. DIVERSE ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE COUNTER UTILITY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-01-08

    In this paper we describe use of the Aquila active well neutron coincidence counter for nuclear material assays of {sup 235}U in multiple analytical techniques at Savannah River Site (SRS), at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and at Argonne West National Laboratory (AWNL). The uses include as a portable passive neutron counter for field measurements searching for evidence of {sup 252}Cf deposits and storage; as a portable active neutron counter using an external activation source for field measurements searching for trace {sup 235}U deposits and holdup; for verification measurements of U-Al reactor fuel elements; for verification measurements of uranium metal; and for verification measurements of process waste of impure uranium in a challenging cement matrix. The wide variety of uses described demonstrate utility of the technique for neutron coincidence verification measurements over the dynamic ranges of 100 g-5000 g for U metal, 200 g-1300 g for U-Al, and 8 g-35 g for process waste. In addition to demonstrating use of the instrument in both the passive and active modes, we also demonstrate its use in both the fast and thermal neutron modes.

  7. Thermal neutron imaging in an active interrogation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier,P.E.; Forman, L., and Norman, D.R.

    2009-03-10

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of xcitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutronemitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  8. Cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis at NIST - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.L.; Lindstrom, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    An instrument for cold neutron capture prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (CNPGAA), located in the cold neutron research facility (CNRF) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has proven useful for the analysis of hydrogen and other elements in a wide variety of materials. The intent of this paper is to provide an overview of the instrument, focusing on recent improvements and the impact of these improvement on measurements.

  9. Measurement of nuclear fuel pin hydriding utilizing epithermal neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.; Farkas, D.M.; Lutz, D.R.

    1996-12-31

    The measurement of hydrogen or zirconium hydriding in fuel cladding has long been of interest to the nuclear power industry. The detection of this hydrogen currently requires either destructive analysis (with sensitivities down to 1 {mu}g/g) or nondestructive thermal neutron radiography (with sensitivities on the order of a few weight percent). The detection of hydrogen in metals can also be determined by measuring the slowing down of neutrons as they collide and rapidly lose energy via scattering with hydrogen. This phenomenon is the basis for the {open_quotes}notched neutron spectrum{close_quotes} technique, also referred to as the Hysen method. This technique has been improved with the {open_quotes}modified{close_quotes} notched neutron spectrum technique that has demonstrated detection of hydrogen below 1 {mu}g/g in steel. The technique is nondestructive and can be used on radioactive materials. It is proposed that this technique be applied to the measurement of hydriding in zirconium fuel pins. This paper summarizes a method for such measurements.

  10. Experimental measurements with Monte Carlo corrections and theoretical calculations of neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Jun; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In has been measured by the activation technique at neutron energies of 2.95, 3.94, and 5.24 MeV with the neutron capture cross sections of 197Au as an internal standard. The effects of multiple scattering and flux attenuation were corrected using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. Based on the experimental values, the 115In neutron inelastic scattering cross sections data were theoretically calculated between the 1 and 15 MeV with the TALYS software code, the theoretical results of this study are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental results.

  11. Development of Nuclear Emulsion for Fast Neutron Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machii, Shogo; Kuwabara, Kenichi; Morishima, Kunihiro

    Nuclear emulsion is high sensitive photographic film used for detection of three-dimensional trajectory of charged particles. Energy resolution of nuclear emulsion is 21% (12%) FWHM against neutron energy of 2.8 MeV (4.9 MeV). Nuclear emulsion has high gamma ray rejection power. For now, at least 2×104 gamma rays/cm2, no increase of as a background for neutron measurement when scan using automatic nuclear emulsion read out system HTS. This value suggests that it is applicable even under high gamma ray environment, such as nuclear fusion reactor.

  12. Development of the prototype pneumatic transfer system for ITER neutron activation system.

    PubMed

    Cheon, M S; Seon, C R; Pak, S; Lee, H G; Bertalot, L

    2012-10-01

    The neutron activation system (NAS) measures neutron fluence at the first wall and the total neutron flux from the ITER plasma, providing evaluation of the fusion power for all operational phases. The pneumatic transfer system (PTS) is one of the key components of the NAS for the proper operation of the system, playing a role of transferring encapsulated samples between the capsule loading machine, irradiation stations, counting stations, and disposal bin. For the validation and the optimization of the design, a prototype of the PTS was developed and capsule transfer tests were performed with the developed system.

  13. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition.

  14. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress.

  15. Neutron dieaway methods for criticality safety measurements of fissile waste

    SciTech Connect

    Coop, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    The differential dieaway technique (DDT), which uses a pulsed neutron source to interrogate containers of fissile materials with thermal neutrons, is reviewed. This method is widely used for certifying transuranic nuclear wastes for eventual emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. For purposes of criticality safety, an upper limit of 200 g of fissile material is permitted in a 55-gal waste drum. Problems involving waste-matrix effects and self-shielding may severely limit the accuracy of the DDT measurement. A dieaway method that uses both thermal and epithermal neutron interrogation, which has the potential for reducing these problems, is being developed. Recent experimental and calculational results for this development are described. 14 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Response of thunderstorm activity in data of neutron monitoring at Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, Valentina; Kryukov, Sergey; Lutsenko, Vadim

    2015-04-01

    We present results of the study of data of the monitoring of high-energy and thermal neutrons at Tien Shan at different stages of thunderstorm activity. The data of the neutron monitoring were used taking into account the barometric effect. The intensity of the neutron component of cosmic rays is recorded in seven energy ranges. The electric field has values of ~ 100 V/m under fair weather conditions. Standard deviation of minute values of the neutron monitor data at the high altitude station does not exceed 0.5-0.6 %. Found that the standard deviation of the data during thunderstorms always exceeds these values. We selected events during the passage of thunderstorm clouds over the high altitude station without lightning discharges or with a small number of them. It was found that the particle rate of the neutron monitor changes in antiphase with the electric field changes. Atmospheric electric field of positive polarity decreases the count rate of the neutron monitor, and negative polarity - increases. Change of the count rate occurs at values of electric field ≥ 10-15 kV/m and reaches 2 %. The neutron monitor at the high-altitude station has the ability to measure the energy of recorded particles through determination of their multiplicity. We experimentally established that the sensitivity of the detected particles to change in Ez increases with decreasing their energy. The upper energy threshold of sensitivity of neutrons to change electric field is ~10 GeV. The physical mechanism of effect is based on lead nucleus capture of soft negative muons with the subsequent generation of neutrons. It is known that 7% of the neutron monitor count rate caused by negative muons. Absence of this effect in thermal neutrons data confirms the conclusion since the main difference of the thermal neutrons detector from the neutron monitor is the absence of the lead. In the active phase of a thunderstorm in the formed thundercloud the picture of distribution of charges is

  17. Average Soil Water Retention Curves Measured by Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chu-Lin; Perfect, Edmund; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Horita, Juske; Hussey, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Water retention curves are essential for understanding the hydrologic behavior of partially-saturated porous media and modeling flow transport processes within the vadose zone. In this paper we report direct measurements of the main drying and wetting branches of the average water retention function obtained using 2-dimensional neutron radiography. Flint sand columns were saturated with water and then drained under quasi-equilibrium conditions using a hanging water column setup. Digital images (2048 x 2048 pixels) of the transmitted flux of neutrons were acquired at each imposed matric potential (~10-15 matric potential values per experiment) at the NCNR BT-2 neutron imaging beam line. Volumetric water contents were calculated on a pixel by pixel basis using Beer-Lambert s law after taking into account beam hardening and geometric corrections. To remove scattering effects at high water contents the volumetric water contents were normalized (to give relative saturations) by dividing the drying and wetting sequences of images by the images obtained at saturation and satiation, respectively. The resulting pixel values were then averaged and combined with information on the imposed basal matric potentials to give average water retention curves. The average relative saturations obtained by neutron radiography showed an approximate one-to-one relationship with the average values measured volumetrically using the hanging water column setup. There were no significant differences (at p < 0.05) between the parameters of the van Genuchten equation fitted to the average neutron radiography data and those estimated from replicated hanging water column data. Our results indicate that neutron imaging is a very effective tool for quantifying the average water retention curve.

  18. Cryocup - Compact spherical neutron polarimetry device for small angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianhao

    In my thesis I describe my research work of developing a compact device for Spherical Neutron Polarimetry (SNP) measurements at small neutron scattering angles. The thesis first introduced the purpose of this research project, which is developing an easy to use and maintain version of an advanced neutron experiment technique (SNP). After the introduction, the design principle and construction detail of the prototype device is demonstrated. The design principle is based on our finite element simulation of the device's magnetic field profile, and is later verified by the performance test experiment. The prototype device is tested at the SESAME neutron beamline at Indiana University and the HB-2D beamline at Oak Ridge National laboratory. The performance test data are analyzed and proof that the design is successful and the prototype is capable of perform accurate SNP measurement. Based on the test result, the prototype device is utilized to perform SNP measurement on two types of magnetic film sample: Permalloy and Metglas. Combined with other characterization method such as SQUID and MFM, I study the magnetization of these two samples both at zero magnetic field environment and in external field. The SNP data provided by the prototype device is discussed in the thesis and provide detailed information about the magnetization, which is also not accessible through other method. In the end, the possible improvement and the future application of the device is discussed.

  19. Measurement of the argon-38(n,2n)argon-37 and calcium- 40(n,alpha)argon-37 cross sections, and National Ignition Facility concrete activation using the rotating target neutron source. The design of an experiment to measure the beryllium-9(n,gamma)beryllium-10 cross section at 14 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belian, Anthony Paul

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS) was used in experiments to measure neutron induced cross sections at 14 MeV, and the activation properties of a specific mix of concrete. The RTNS is an accelerator based DT fusion neutron source located at the University of California, Berkeley. Two of the experiments performed for this thesis were specifically of interest for the construction and operation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), they were the 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar cross section measurement, and the concrete activation measurement. The NIF is a large multi-beam laser facility that will study the effects of age on the nation's stockpile of nuclear weapons. The NIF, when fully operational, will focus the energy of 192 Neodymium glass lasers onto a 1 mm diameter pellet filled with deuterium and tritium fuel. This pellet is compressed by the laser energy giving some of the individual atoms of deuterium and tritium enough kinetic energy to overcome the coulomb barrier and fuse. The energy output from these pellet implosions will be in the range of tens of mega-joules (MJ). The 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar reaction will be useful to NIF scientists to measure important parameters such as target energy yield and areal density. In order to make these measurements precise, an accurate 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar cross section was necessary. The cross sections measured were: 74.9 +/- 3.8 millibarns (mb) at 13.3 +/- 0.01 MeV, 89.2 +/- 4.0 mb at 14.0 +/- 0.03 MeV, and 123.57 +/- 6.4 mb at 15.0 +/- 0.06 MeV. With anticipated energy yields in the tens of mega-joules per pellet implosion, the number of neutrons released is in the range of 1019 to 1020 neutrons per implosion. With such a large number of neutrons, minimizing the activation of the surrounding structure is very much of interest for the sake of personnel radiation safety. To benchmark the computer codes used to calculate the anticipated neutron activation of target bay concrete, samples were irradiated at the RTNS. Dose rates from each sample

  20. Implementation of an enhanced, permanently installed neutron activation diagnostic hardware for NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovec, Donald R.; Edwards, Ellen R.; Carrera, Jorge A.; Yeamans, Charles B.

    2015-08-01

    Neutron activation diagnostics are commonly employed as baseline neutron yield and relative spatial flux measurement instruments. Much insight into implosion performance has been gained by deployment of up to 19 identical activation diagnostic samples distributed around the target chamber at unique angular locations. Their relative simplicity and traceability provide neutron facilities with a diagnostic platform that is easy to implement and verify. However, the current National Ignition Facility (NIF) implementation relies on removable activation samples, creating a 1-2 week data turn-around time and considerable labor costs. The system described here utilizes a commercially-available lanthanum bromide (cerium-doped) scintillator with an integrated MCA emulator as the counting system and a machined zirconium-702 cap as the activation medium. The device is installed within the target bay and monitored remotely. Additionally, this system allows the placement of any activation medium tailored to the specific measurement needs. We discuss the design and function of a stand-alone and permanently installed neutron activation detector unit to measure the yield and average energy of a nominal 14 MeV neutron source with a pulse length less than one nanosecond.

  1. Neutron spectrum and yield of the Hiroshima A-bomb deduced from radionuclide measurements at one location.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Kato, K; Korschinek, G; Morinaga, H; Nolte, E

    1995-07-01

    In this paper measurements of the radionuclides of 36Cl, 41Ca, 60Co, 152Eu and 154Eu in samples from Hiroshima, which were exposed to neutrons of the A-bomb explosion, are interpreted. In order to calculate the neutron spectrum at the sample site, neutron transport calculations using Monte Carlo techniques were carried out. Activation profiles in a granite mock-up irradiated with reactor neutrons could be reproduced by this method using DS86 input parameters. The calculated neutron spectrum at the sample site for non-thermal neutrons is identical to that obtained in DS86, but contains some 50% more thermal neutrons. The influence of parameters like soil composition, source terms and air humidity on the activation of these radioisotopes is discussed. The granite-covered earth at the sample site, for example, hardens the spectrum in comparison with DS86 values. Even when using a fission spectrum pointing downward and neglecting air humidity one cannot explain our 36Cl measurements. If the effective thermal neutron fluences, that have a similar ratio of resonance integral to thermal neutron capture cross sections obtained from 36Cl, 41Ca and 152Eu, are averaged, a bomb yield of about 16 kt is deduced in agreement with a bomb yield of (15 +/- 3) kt estimated in DS86.

  2. Improving Epithermal Transmission Measurements by Optimizing Neutron Production and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piela, Sean Garrigan

    Methods of improving the neutron count rate in the energy range 3 to 100-300 [keV] at the 100 [m] detector station for the Gaerttner LINAC Center were studied. One part of this undertaking was the explore alterations to the main photonuclear target used for this energy range. Detailed simulations using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP, version 5) were carried out and the results used to synthesize an optimized target design. Simulation predicted a gain in neutron intensity of 1.63 at 4.49 [keV], above the current target capability. Experiment found a gain of 1.42 at 4.89 [keV] over the current target. An addition of 1% boric acid to the water in the moderating ring of the current target is predicted to result in a factor of 111 +/- 12 increase in the neutron to photon ratio above baseline for 3.51 [keV] neutrons at 100 [m]; this value is for photons above 700 [keV]. The gain in neutron intensity for the optimized target comes with a gain in photon intensity. A 1% boric acid addition to this design has same neutron to photon ratio as with the boric acid addition to the current target (for 3.51 [keV] neutrons). In an alternate approach to enhancing the neutron counts, a prototype plastic scintillator was studied as a possible replacement for the extant lithium glass scintillators, with experiments finding major increases to the neutron counts in the energy range of interest. The plastic scintillator prototype was found to produce gains of 1.86, 3.61, 1.76 and 3.16 at 70.1, 127, 219, and 307 [keV], respectively, over a lithium glass detector. However, at 24.5 [keV] the plastic prototype count rate was only 36% of that measured with the lithium glass detector. The prototype detector geometry and its associated electronics need to be altered in order to actualize the true potential of the plastic scintillator detector.

  3. Development of active environmental and personal neutron dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Nunomiya, T; Sasaki, M

    2004-01-01

    For neutron dosimetry in the radiation environment surrounding nuclear facilities, two types of environmental neutron dosemeters, the high-sensitivity rem counter and the high-sensitivity multi-moderator, the so-called Bonner ball, have been developed and the former is commercially available from Fuji Electric Co. By using these detectors, the cosmic ray neutrons at sea level have been sequentially measured for about 3 y to investigate the time variation of neutron spectrum and ambient dose equivalent influenced by cosmic and terrestrial effects. Our Bonner ball has also been selected as the neutron detector in the International Space Station and has already been used to measure neutrons in the US experimental module. The real time wide-range personal neutron dosemeter which uses two silicon semiconductor detectors has been developed for personal dosimetry and is commercially available from Fuji Electric Co. This dosemeter has good characteristics, fitted to the fluence-to-dose conversion factor in the energy range from thermal energies to several tens of mega-electron-volts and is now widely used in various nuclear facilities.

  4. The Probing In-Situ With Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument for Planetary Composition Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument (formerly named PNG-GRAND) [I] experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth over many decades. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring PING to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets and measure their bulk surface and subsurface elemental composition without the need to drill into the surface. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions. While orbital measurements can map a planet, they have low spatial and elemental sensitivity due to the low surface gamma ray emission rates reSUlting from using cosmic rays as an excitation source, PING overcomes this limitation in situ by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits significantly higher elemental sensitivity elemental composition measurements. PING combines a 14 MeV deuterium-tritium Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) with a gamma ray spectrometer and two neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine the elemental composition of a planet down to 30 - 50 cm below the planet's surface, The penetrating nature of .5 - 10 MeV gamma rays and 14 MeV neutrons allows such sub-surface composition measurements to be made without the need to drill into or otherwise disturb the planetary surface, thus greatly simplifying the lander design, We are cun'ently testing a PING prototype at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility at NASA/GSFC that provides two large (1.8 m x 1.8 m x ,9 m) granite and basalt test formations placed outdoors in an empty field, Since an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on both these

  5. A bounding estimate of neutron dose based on measured photon dose around single pass reactors at the Hanford site.

    PubMed

    Taulbee, Timothy D; Glover, Samuel E; Macievic, Gregory V; Hunacek, Mickey; Smith, Cheryl; DeBord, Gary W; Morris, Donald; Fix, Jack

    2010-07-01

    Neutron and photon radiation survey records have been used to evaluate and develop a neutron to photon (NP) ratio to reconstruct neutron doses to workers around Hanford's single pass reactors that operated from 1945 to 1972. A total of 5,773 paired neutron and photon measurements extracted from 57 boxes of survey records were used in the development of the NP ratio. The development of the NP ratio enables the use of the recorded dose from an individual's photon dosimeter badge to be used to estimate the unmonitored neutron dose. The Pearson rank correlation between the neutron and photon measurements was 0.71. The NP ratio best fit a lognormal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.8, a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.95, and the upper 95 th % of this distribution was 4.75. An estimate of the neutron dose based on this NP ratio is considered bounding due to evidence that up to 70% of the total photon exposure received by workers around the single pass reactors occurs during shutdown maintenance and refueling activities when there is no significant neutron exposure. Thus when this NP ratio is applied to the total measured photon dose from an individual film badge dosimeter, the resulting neutron dose is considered bounded.

  6. Using response characteristics of neutron measurement devices to improve neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Casson, W.H.; Hsu, H.H.; Hoffman, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    Recent administrative restrictions on personnel dose equivalent have resulted in increased pressure to more accurately report the neutron component without the traditional conservative added factors which sometimes inflate the reported values. Improvements include a new albedo neutron dosimeter which is capable of some limited energy discrimination. Also, additional emphasis has been placed on improving field measurements using traditional survey instrumentation and specialized spectroscopic techniques such as tissue equivalent proportional counters, Bonner spheres, and a modified 9 inches to 3 inches ratio technique. Improvements in these techniques along with a better understanding of the response of the TLD system have resulted in substantial reduction in the reported dose equivalent by improving the accuracy of the dosimeter system. The response characteristics of the TLD system and other instrumentation are obtained through modeling with the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. Neutron fields in work-areas are initially characterized with Bonner spheres. Routine updates are accomplished using a modified 9 inches to 3 inches ratio technique. These measurements are then used to predict the response of the TLD system when worn in that area. Correction curves are derived for the principal spectrum with various fractions of moderated or reflected neutrons. Work assignments are tracked through a database systems which is used to determine the principal spectrum that results in the neutron dose equivalent. The energy discrimination capability of the TLD system is used with the correction curve to derive an average correction appropriate to the readings of the dosimeter thus giving an energy corrected dose equivalent for the individual.

  7. Development of Enhanced, Permanently-Installed, Neutron Activation Diagnostic Hardware for NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, E. R.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Carrera, J. A.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Neutron activation diagnostics are baseline neutron yield and flux measurement instruments at the National Ignition Facility. Up to 19 activation samples are distributed around the target chamber. Currently the samples must be removed to be counted, creating a 1-2 week data turn-around time and considerable labor costs. An improved system consisting of a commercially available LaBr3(Ce) scintillator and Power over Ethernet electronics is under development. A machined zirconium-702 cap over the detector is the activation medium to measure the 90Zr(n,2n)89Zr reaction. The detectors are located at the current neutron activation diagnostic sites and monitored remotely. Because they collect data in real time yield values are returned within a few hours after a NIF shot.

  8. Measuring and monitoring KIPT Neutron Source Facility Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yan; Gohar, Yousry; Zhong, Zhaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on developing and constructing a neutron source facility at Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven subcritical system. The accelerator has a 100 kW electron beam using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has keff less than 0.98. To ensure the safe operation of this neutron source facility, the reactivity of the subcritical core has to be accurately determined and continuously monitored. A technique which combines the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method is purposed to determine the reactivity of the KIPT subcritical assembly at various conditions. In particular, the area-ratio method can determine the absolute reactivity of the subcritical assembly in units of dollars by performing pulsed-neutron experiments. It provides reference reactivities for the flux-to-current ratio method to track and monitor the reactivity deviations from the reference state while the facility is at other operation modes. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to simulate both methods using the numerical model of the KIPT subcritical assembly. It is found that the reactivities obtained from both the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method are spatially dependent on the neutron detector locations and types. Numerical simulations also suggest optimal neutron detector locations to minimize the spatial effects in the flux-to-current ratio method. The spatial correction factors are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for both measuring methods at the selected neutron detector locations. Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to verify the accuracy of the flux-to-current ratio method in monitoring the reactivity swing during a fuel burnup cycle.

  9. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  10. A neutron activation analysis of iridium concentration in Yamato carbonaceous chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabushita, S.; Wada, K.; Moriyama, H.; Takeuchi, K.

    1988-09-01

    Iridium concentration in extra-terrestrial bodies is an important quantity in relation to Ir-rich geological layers. Ir concentration of a Yamato carbonaceous chondrite (Y-793321) has been measured by a neutron activation method. The measurement yields a value (0.57±0.06) μg per gramme for the chondrite.

  11. Neutron intensity monitor with activation foil for p-Li neutron source for BNCT--Feasibility test of the concept.

    PubMed

    Murata, Isao; Otani, Yuki; Sato, Fuminobu

    2015-12-01

    Proton-lithium (p-Li) reaction is being examined worldwide as a candidate nuclear production reaction for accelerator based neutron source (ABNS) for BNCT. In this reaction, the emitted neutron energy is not so high, below 1 MeV, and especially in backward angles the energy is as low as about 100 keV. The intensity measurement was thus known to be difficult so far. In the present study, a simple method was investigated to monitor the absolute neutron intensity of the p-Li neutron source by employing the foil activation method based on isomer production reactions in order to cover around several hundreds keV. As a result of numerical examination, it was found that (107)Ag, (115)In and (189)Os would be feasible. Their features found out are summarized as follows: (107)Ag: The most convenient foil, since the half life is short. (115)In: The accuracy is the best at 0°, though it cannot be used for backward angles. And (189)Os: Suitable nuclide which can be used in backward angles, though the gamma-ray energy is a little too low. These would be used for p-Li source monitoring depending on measuring purposes in real BNCT scenes. PMID:26242557

  12. Time Dependent DD Neutrons Measurement Using a Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Detector on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tengfei; Peng, Xingyu; Chen, Zhongjing; Hu, Zhimeng; Ge, Lijian; Hu, Liqun; Zhong, Guoqiang; Pu, Neng; Chen, Jinxiang; Fan, Tieshuan

    2016-09-01

    A single crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector has been successfully employed for neutron measurements in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) plasmas. The scCVD diamond detector coated with a 5 μm 6LiF (95% 6Li enriched) layer was placed inside a polyethylene moderator to enhance the detection efficiency. The time-dependent neutron emission from deuteron plasmas during neutral beam injection (NBI) heating was obtained. The measured results are compared with that of fission chamber detectors, which always act as standard neutron flux monitors. The scCVD diamond detector exhibits good reliability, stability and the capability to withstand harsh radiation environments despite its low detection efficiency due to the small active volume. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106004 and 2012GB101003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91226102)

  13. Microdosimetric measurements for neutron-absorbed dose determination during proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; DeLuca, Paul M.; Thornton, Allan F.; Fitzek, Markus; Hecksel, Draik; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    This work presents microdosimetric measurements performed at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute in Bloomington, Indiana, USA. The measurements were done simulating clinical setups with a water phantom and for a variety of stopping targets. The water phantom was irradiated by a proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and by a proton pencil beam. Stopping target measurements were performed only for the pencil beam. The targets used were made of polyethylene, brass and lead. The objective of this work was to determine the neutron-absorbed dose for a passive and active proton therapy delivery, and for the interactions of the proton beam with materials typically in the beam line of a proton therapy treatment nozzle. Neutron doses were found to be higher at 45° and 90° from the beam direction for the SOBP configuration by a factor of 1.1 and 1.3, respectively, compared with the pencil beam. Meanwhile, the pencil beam configuration produced neutron-absorbed doses 2.2 times higher at 0° than the SOBP. For stopping targets, lead was found to dominate the neutron-absorbed dose for most angles due to a large production of low-energy neutrons emitted isotropically. PMID:22334761

  14. Measuring surface temperature of isolated neutron stars and related problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teter, Marcus Alton

    New and exciting results for measuring neutron star surface temperatures began with the successful launch of the Chandra X-ray observatory. Among these results are new detections of neutron star surface temperatures which have made it possible to seriously test neutron star thermal evolution theories. The important new temperature determination of the Vela pulsar (Pavlov, et al., 2001a) requires a non-standard cooling scenario to explain it. Apart from this result, we have measured PSR B1055-52's surface temperature in this thesis, determining that it can be explained by standard cooling with heating. Our spectral fit of the combined data from ROSAT and Chandra have shown that a three component model, two thermal blackbodies and an non-thermal power-law, is required to explain the data. Furthermore, our phase resolved spectroscopy has begun to shed light on the geometry of the hot spot on PSR B1055-52's surface as well as the structure of the magnetospheric radiation. Also, there is strong evidence for a thermal distribution over its surface. Most importantly, the fact that PSR B1055-52 does not have a hydrogen atmosphere has been firmly established. To reconcile these two key observations, on the Vela pulsar and PSR B1055-52, we tested neutron star cooling with neutrino processes including the Cooper pair neutrino emission process. Overall, it has been found that a phase change associated with pions being present in the cores of more massive neutron stars explains all current of the data. A transition from neutron matter to pion condensates in the central stellar core explains the difference between standard and non-standard cooling scenarios, because the superfluid suppression of pion cooling will reduce the emissivity of the pion direct URCA process substantially. A neutron star with a mass of [Special characters omitted.] with a medium stiffness equation of state and a T72 type neutron superfluid models the standard cooling case well. A neutron star of [Special

  15. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eamon; Alpha Gamma; BL2 Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n , t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  16. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eamon

    2016-03-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 Grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  17. Measurement of picosecond lifetimes in neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, S.; Kröll, Th.; Régis, J.-M.; Saed-Samii, N.; Blanc, A.; Bruce, A. M.; Fraile, L. M.; de France, G.; Hartig, A.-L.; Henrich, C.; Ignatov, A.; Jentschel, M.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Köster, U.; Lalkovski, S.; Lozeva, R.; Mach, H.; Mǎrginean, N.; Mutti, P.; Paziy, V.; Regan, P. H.; Simpson, G. S.; Soldner, T.; Thürauf, M.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Warr, N.

    2016-09-01

    Background: Lifetimes of nuclear excited states in fission fragments have been studied in the past following isotope separation, thus giving access mainly to the fragments' daughters and only to long-lived isomeric states in the primary fragments. For the first time now, short-lived excited states in the primary fragments, produced in neutron-induced prompt fission of 235U and 241Pu, were studied within the EXILL&FATIMA campaign at the intense neutron-beam facility of the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. Purpose: We aim to investigate the quadrupole collective properties of neutron-rich even-even 138,140,142Xe isotopes lying between the double shell closure N =82 and Z =50 and a deformed region with octupole collectivity. Method: The γ rays emitted from the excited fragments were detected with a mixed array consisting of 8 HPGe EXOGAM Clover detectors (EXILL) and 16 LaBr3(Ce) fast scintillators (FATIMA). The detector system has the unique ability to select the interesting fragment making use of the high resolution of the HPGe detectors and determine subnanosecond lifetimes using the fast scintillators. For the analysis the generalized centroid difference method was used. Results: We show that quadrupole collectivity increases smoothly with increasing neutron number above the closed N =82 neutron shell. Our measurements are complemented by state-of-the-art theory calculations based on shell-model descriptions. Conclusions: The observed smooth increase in quadrupole collectivity is similar to the evolution seen in the measured masses of the xenon isotopic chain and is well reproduced by theory. This behavior is in contrast to higher Z even-even nuclei where abrupt change in deformation occurs around N =90 .

  18. Simulation of Space Shuttle neutron measurements with FLUKA.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, L; Carminati, F; Ferrari, A

    2001-06-01

    FLUKA is an integrated particle transport code that has enhanced multigroup low-energy neutron transport capability similar to the well-known MORSE transport code. Gammas are produced in groups but many important individual lines are specifically included, and subsequently transported by the main FLUKA routines which use a modified version of EGS4 for electromagnetic (EM) transport. Recoil protons are also transported by the primary FLUKA transport simulation. The neutron cross-section libraries employed within FLUKA were supplied by Giancarlo Panini (ENEA, Italy) based upon the most recent data from JEF-1, JEF-2.2, ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3, etc. More than 60 different materials are included in the FLUKA databases with temperature ranges including down to cryogenic temperatures. This code has been used extensively to model the neutron environments near high-energy physics experiment shielding. A simulation of the Space Shuttle based upon a spherical aluminum equivalent shielding distribution has been performed with reasonable results. There are good prospects for extending this calculation to a more realistic 3-D geometrical representation of the Shuttle including an accurate representation of its composition, which is an essential ingredient for the improvement of the predictions. A proposed project to develop a combined analysis and simulation package based upon FLUKA and the analysis infrastructure provided by the ROOT software is under active consideration. The code to be developed for this project will be of direct application to the problem of simulating the neutron environment in space, including the albedo effects.

  19. Simulation of Space Shuttle neutron measurements with FLUKA.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, L; Carminati, F; Ferrari, A

    2001-06-01

    FLUKA is an integrated particle transport code that has enhanced multigroup low-energy neutron transport capability similar to the well-known MORSE transport code. Gammas are produced in groups but many important individual lines are specifically included, and subsequently transported by the main FLUKA routines which use a modified version of EGS4 for electromagnetic (EM) transport. Recoil protons are also transported by the primary FLUKA transport simulation. The neutron cross-section libraries employed within FLUKA were supplied by Giancarlo Panini (ENEA, Italy) based upon the most recent data from JEF-1, JEF-2.2, ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3, etc. More than 60 different materials are included in the FLUKA databases with temperature ranges including down to cryogenic temperatures. This code has been used extensively to model the neutron environments near high-energy physics experiment shielding. A simulation of the Space Shuttle based upon a spherical aluminum equivalent shielding distribution has been performed with reasonable results. There are good prospects for extending this calculation to a more realistic 3-D geometrical representation of the Shuttle including an accurate representation of its composition, which is an essential ingredient for the improvement of the predictions. A proposed project to develop a combined analysis and simulation package based upon FLUKA and the analysis infrastructure provided by the ROOT software is under active consideration. The code to be developed for this project will be of direct application to the problem of simulating the neutron environment in space, including the albedo effects. PMID:11855415

  20. Neutron spectral measurements in an intense photon field associated with a high-energy x-ray radiotherapy machine.

    PubMed

    Holeman, G R; Price, K W; Friedman, L F; Nath, R

    1977-01-01

    High-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines in the supermegavoltage region generate complex neutron energy spectra which make an exact evaluation of neutron shielding difficult. Fast neutrons resulting from photonuclear reactions in the x-ray target and collimators undergo successive collisions in the surrounding materials and are moderated by varying amounts. In order to examine the neutron radiation exposures quantitatively, the neutron energy spectra have been measured inside and outside the treatment room of a Sagittaire medical linear accelerator (25-MV x rays) located at Yale-New Haven Hospital. The measurements were made using a Bonner spectrometer consisting of 2-, 3-, 5-, 8-, 10- and 12-in.-diameter polyethylene spheres with 6Li and 7Li thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips at the centers, in addition to bare and cadmium-covered chips. The individual TLD chips were calibrated for neutron and photon response. The spectrometer was calibrated using a known PuBe spectrum Spectrometer measurements were made at Yale Electron Accelerator Laboratory and results compared with a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer and an activation technique. The agreement between the results from these independent methods is found to be good, except for the measurements in the direct photon beam. Quality factors have been inferred for the neutron fields inside and outside the treatment room. Values of the inferred quality factors fall primarily between 4 and 8, depending on location.

  1. Measurement of the 242Pu neutron capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Chyzh, A.; Dance Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Precision (n,f) and (n, γ) cross sections are important for the network calculations of the radiochemical diagnostic chain for the U.S. DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is relevant to the network calculations of Pu and Am. Additionally, new reactor concepts have catalyzed considerable interest in the measurement of improved cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on key actinides. To date, little or no experimental data has been reported on 242Pu(n, γ) for incident neutron energy below 50 keV. A new measurement of the 242Pu(n, γ) reaction was performed with the DANCE together with an improved PPAC for fission-fragment detection at LANSCE during FY14. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section spans four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ~ 30 keV. The absolute scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is set according to the measured 239Pu(n,f) resonance at 7.8 eV; the target was spiked with 239Pu for this measurement. The absolute 242Pu(n, γ) neutron capture cross section is ~ 30% higher than the cross section reported in ENDF for the 2.7 eV resonance. Latest results to be reported. Funded by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-AC52-06NA25396 (LANL). U.S. DOE/NNSA Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development. Isotopes (ORNL).

  2. Residual 152Eu and 60Co activities induced by neutrons from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, K; Iwatani, K; Hasai, H; Hoshi, M; Oka, T; Morishima, H

    1993-09-01

    Specific activities of 152Eu:Eu in stone samples exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb were determined for 70 samples up to a 1,500-m slant range from the epicenter. The specific activities of 60Co:Co were also determined for six samples near the Hiroshima hypocenter. First, the 152Eu data were investigated to find out the directional dependence of neutron activation. Directional anisotropy was not definite; however, there was an indication that the activation in the west-southwest was lower than in other directions. Second, measured 152Eu and 60Co radioactivity data were compared with activation calculations based on DS86 neutrons. It is clearly shown that the measured data are lower than the calculation near the hypocenter and vice versa at long distances beyond 1,000 m. The calculated-to-measured ratios of 152Eu are 1.6 at the hypocenter, 1.0 at approximately 900 m, and 0.05 at a 1,500-m slant range. Present results indicate that systematic errors exist in the DS86 neutrons concerning the source-term spectrum, neutron transport calculations in air, and/or activation measurements.

  3. Measurement and evaluation of selected 14-MeV neutron cross sections for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.; Cox, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental neutron-activation cross-section data in the vicinity of 14 MeV are evaluated for several reactions of fusion-related interest using a least-squares method. New experimental measurements are performed at 14.7 MeV for all of these considered reactions and for some commonly-used standard reactions as well. Comparison is made between measured and evaluated results.

  4. Toward precision D coefficient measurement in polarized neutron decay and the development of A helium-3 neutron polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Shenq-Rong

    1998-12-01

    I describe the search for possible time reversal symmetry violation by measurement of the coefficient D in polarized neutron decay. This relates to the triple product among the neutron polarization vector, electron momentum, and proton momentum in the neutron decay rate (w~[-]/σnċ(/vec pe×/vec pp)). With the improvements in neutron polarization (97%), an optimal octagonal detector geometry, and neutron spin transport system, about 15×106 decay events were selected from data acquired at the Cold Neutron Research Facility at NIST, Gaithersburg. I have developed techniques for extracting D from the positive and negative triple product decay rates. My preliminary result is D=(12.1/pm13.4)×10-4 where the uncertainty is statistical only. The false D resulting from the instrumental factor (σκ) and neutron polarization uncertainty (σP) are negligible. I also estimate the false D of the asymmetric transverse polarization (ATP) effect with an upper limit 5×10-4 for the preliminary analysis of the initial data. I also describe development of an optical pumping/spin exchange neutron spin filter and obtained 40% neutron polarization for 2 A neutrons with a 10 amagat-cm 35 cm3 polarized 3He cell.

  5. Neutron Measurements Using the Universal Radiation Spectrum Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Cummings; Byron Christiansen; Laird Bean

    2005-02-01

    The Universal Radiation Spectrum Analyzer (URSA-II), developed by Radiation Safety Associates, and manufactured by SE International (Figure 1) is an interface between a radiation detector and a personal computer. Originally, the URSA-II was developed for use with detectors that measure the energy of gamma rays. At the Idaho National Laboratory, the URSA-II is an integral part of standard measurement techniques to measure characteristics of neutron radiation fields. Those techniques are discussed briefly and spectra using the URSA-II are presented.

  6. Neutron and Gamma Ray Scattering Measurements for Subsurface Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Darwin V.

    1990-10-01

    Developed for the oil industry, well logging instrumentation based on electrical, acoustic, and nuclear measurements has been providing information about the localization and evaluation of hydrocarbon-bearing strata for petroleum geologists and engineers since 1927. This method of exploring properties of the earth's crust without taking physical samples is attracting a growing audience of geologists and geophysicists because of recent developments that permit nondestructive measurements of subsurface geochemistry. A combination of nuclear measurement techniques, which use gamma ray and neutron sources, can provide detailed information on rock composition of interest to both industry and academia.

  7. Neutron scattering and models: Iron. Nuclear data and measurements series

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.

    1995-08-01

    Differential elastic and inelastic neutron-scattering cross sections of elemental iron are measured from 4.5 to 10 MeV in increments of {approx} 0.5 MeV. At each incident energy the measurements are made at forty or more scattering angles distributed between {approx} 17{degrees} and 160{degrees}, with emphasis on elastic scattering and inelastic scattering due to the excitation of the yrast 2{sup +} state. The measured data is combined with earlier lower-energy results from this laboratory, with recent high-precision {approx} 9.5 {yields} 15 MeV results from the Physilalisch Technische Bundesanstalt and with selected values from the literature to provide a detailed neutron-scattering data base extending from {approx} 1.5 to 26 MeV. This data is interpreted in the context of phenomenological spherical-optical and coupled-channels (vibrational and rotational) models, and physical implications discussed. Deformation, coupling, asymmetry and dispersive effects are explored. It is shown that, particularly in a collective context, a good description of the interaction of neutrons with iron is achieved over the energy range {approx} 0 {yields} 26 MeV, avoiding the dichotomy between high and low-energy interpretations found in previous work.

  8. Plutonium Measurements with a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer L. Dolan; Marek Flaska; Alexis Poitrasson-Riviere; Andreas Enqvist; Paolo Peerani; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

    2014-11-01

    Measurements were performed at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy to field test a fast-neutron multiplicity counter developed at the University of Michigan. The measurements allowed the illustration of the system’s photon discrimination abilities, efficiency when measuring neutron multiplicity, ability to characterize 240Pueff mass, and performance relative to a currently deployed neutron coincidence counter. This work is motivated by the need to replace and improve upon 3He neutron detection systems for nuclear safeguards applications.

  9. Active Neutron and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, A.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of an instrument capable of detailed in situ bulk geochemical analysis of the surface of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. This instrument technology uses a pulsed neutron generator to excite the solid materials of a planet and measures the resulting neutron and gamma-ray emission with its detector system. These time-resolved neutron and gamma-ray data provide detailed information about the bulk elemental composition, chemical context, and density distribution of the soil within 50 cm of the surface. While active neutron scattering and neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have been used extensively for terrestrial nuclear well logging applications, our goal is to apply these techniques to surface instruments for use on any solid solar system body. As described, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center use a prototype neutron-induced gamma-ray instrument and the resulting data presented show the promise of this technique for becoming a versatile, robust, workhorse technology for planetary science, and exploration of any of the solid bodies in the solar system. The detection of neutrons at the surface also provides useful information about the material. This paper focuses on the data provided by the gamma-ray detector.

  10. Precision neutron interferometric measurement of the n- 3He coherent neutron scattering length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; Jacobson, D. L.; Schoen, K.; Arif, M.; Black, T. C.; Snow, W. M.; Werner, S. A.

    2004-07-01

    A measurement of the n- 3He coherent scattering length using neutron interferometry is reported. The result, bc =(5.8572±0.0072) fm , improves the measured precision of any single measurement of bc by a factor of eight; the previous world average, bc =(5.74±0.04) fm , now becomes bc =(5.853±0.007) fm . Measurements of the n-p , n-d , and n- 3He coherent scattering lengths have now been performed using the same technique, thus allowing one to extract the scattering length ratios: parameters that minimize systematic errors. We obtain values of bn 3He / bnp =(-1.5668±0.0021) and bnd / bnp =(-1.7828±0.0014) . Using the new world average value of bc and recent high-precision spin-dependent scattering length data also determined by neutron optical techniques, we extract new values for the bound singlet and triple scattering lengths of b0 =(9.949±0.027) fm and b1 =(4.488±0.017) fm for the n- 3He system. The free nuclear singlet and triplet scattering lengths are a0 =(7.456±0.020) fm and a1 =(3.363±0.013) fm . The coherent scattering cross section is σc =(4.305±0.007) b and the total scattering cross section is σs =(5.837±0.014) b . Comparisons of a0 and a1 to the only existing high-precision theoretical predictions for the n- 3He system, calculated using a resonating group technique with nucleon-nucleon potentials incorporating three-nucleon forces, have been performed. Neutron scattering length measurements in few-body systems are now sensitive enough to probe small effects not yet adequately treated in present theoretical models.

  11. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC.

    PubMed

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-11-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed (28)Al, (24)Na, (54)Mn and (60)Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is (28)Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several (28)Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received.

  12. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC.

    PubMed

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-11-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed (28)Al, (24)Na, (54)Mn and (60)Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is (28)Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several (28)Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  13. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC

    PubMed Central

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed 28Al, 24Na, 54Mn and 60Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is 28Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several 28Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  14. Validation of multigroup neutron cross sections for the Advanced Neutron Source against the FOEHN critical experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Gehin, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Renier, J.P.

    1994-04-01

    The FOEHN critical experiments were analyzed to validate the use of multigroup cross sections in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source. Eleven critical configurations were evaluated using the KENO, DORT, and VENTURE neutronics codes. Eigenvalue and power density profiles were computed and show very good agreement with measured values.

  15. Secondary fusion coupled deuteron/triton transport simulation and thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. B.; Wang, K.; Liu, H. G.; Li, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) was developed to simulate deuteron/triton transportation and reaction coupled problem. The 'Forced particle production' variance reduction technique was used to improve the simulation speed, which made the secondary product play a major role. The mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source was employed as a validation. Then the thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor was studied with our tool. Moreover, an in-core conversion efficiency measurement experiment was performed with {sup 6}LiD and {sup 6}LiH converters. Threshold activation foils was used to indicate the fast and fusion neutron flux. Besides, two other pivotal parameters were calculated theoretically. Finally, the conversion efficiency of {sup 6}LiD is obtained as 1.97x10{sup -4}, which matches well with the theoretical result. (authors)

  16. Neutron spectra measurement and comparison of the HFR and THOR BNCT beams.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Hong-Ming; Moss, Ray; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-07-01

    This paper aims to measure the spectra of HB11 (high flux reactor, HFR) and the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) beams by multiple activation foils. The self-shielding corrections were made with the aid of MCNP calculations. The initial spectra were adjusted by a sophisticated process named coarse-scaling adjustment using SAND-EX, which can adjust a given coarse-group spectrum into a fine-group structure, i.e. 640 groups, with excellent continuity. The epithermal neutron flux of the THOR beam is about three times of HB11. The thermal neutron flux, boron and gold reaction rates along the central axis of a PMMA phantom are calculated for both adjusted spectra for comparison.

  17. Neutron activation analysis for antimetabolites. [in food samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Determination of metal ion contaminants in food samples is studied. A weighed quantity of each sample was digested in a concentrated mixture of nitric, hydrochloric and perchloric acids to affect complete solution of the food products. The samples were diluted with water and the pH adjusted according to the specific analysis performed. The samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis, polarography, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The solid food samples were also analyzed by neutron activation analysis for increased sensitivity and lower levels of detectability. The results are presented in tabular form.

  18. Human hair neutron activation analysis: Analysis on population level, mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, L. I.; Kist, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is an outstanding analytical method having very wide applications in various fields. Analysis of human hair within last decades mostly based on neutron activation analysis is a very attractive illustration of the application of nuclear analytical techniques. Very interesting question is how the elemental composition differs in different areas or cities. In this connection the present paper gives average data and maps of various localities in the vicinity of drying-out Aral Sea and of various industrial cities in Central Asia.

  19. Cross-Section Measurements in the Fast Neutron Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plompen, Arjan

    2006-04-01

    Generation IV focuses research for advanced nuclear reactors on six concepts. Three of these concepts, the lead, gas and sodium fast reactors (LFR, GFR and SFR) have fast neutron spectra, whereas a fourth, the super-critical water reactor (SCWR), can be configured to have a fast spectrum. Such fast neutron spectra are essential to meet the sustainability objective of GenIV. Nuclear data requirements for GenIV concepts will therefore emphasize the energy region from about 1 keV to 10 MeV. Here, the potential is illustrated of the GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility and the Van de Graaff laboratory at IRMM to measure the relevant nuclear data in this energy range: the total, capture, fission and inelastic-scattering cross sections. In particular, measurement results will be shown for lead and bismuth inelastic scattering for which the need was recently expressed in a quantitative way by Aliberti et al. for Accelerator Driven Systems. Even without completion of the quantitative assessment of the data needs for GenIV concepts at ANL it is clear that this particular effort is of relevance to LFR system studies.

  20. Surrounding material effect on measurement of thunderstorm-related neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, H.

    2014-05-01

    Observations of strong flux of low-energy neutrons were made by 3He counters during thunderstorms (Gurevich et al., 2012) [11]. How the unprecedented enhancements were produced remains elusive. To better elucidate the mechanism, a simulation study of surrounding material impacts on measurement by 3He counters was performed with GEANT4. It was found that unlike previously thought, a 3He counter had a small sensitivity to high-energy gamma rays because of inelastic interaction with its cathode-tube materials (Al or stainless steel). A 3He counter with the intrinsic small sensitivity, if surrounded by thick materials, would largely detect thunderstorm-related gamma rays rather than those neutrons produced via photonuclear reaction in the atmosphere. On the other hand, the counter, if surrounded by thin materials and located away from a gamma-ray source, would observe neutron signals with little gamma-ray contamination. Compared with the Gurevich measurement, the present work allows us to deduce that the enhancements are attributable to gamma rays, if their observatory was very close to or inside a gamma-ray emitting region in thunderclouds.

  1. Measurement of the magnetic form factor of the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Alan; Ni, Benwen; Anderson, Brian; Flanders, Bruce; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Hyde, Charles; Manley, D.; Tieger, Daniel; Barkhuff, David; Keane, Declan; Dodson, George; Arenhovel, Hartmuth; Kelly, James; Mougey, Jean; Cameron, John; Dow, Karen; Beard, Kevin; Weinstein, Lawrence; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Spraker, Mark; Finn, Michael; Rutt, Paul; Ulmer, Paul; Markowitz, Pete; Pella, Peter; Whitney, R.; Madey, Richard; Lourie, Robert; Van Verst, Scott; Kowalski, Stanley; Eden, Thomas; Payerle, Thomas; Reichelt, Tilmann; Jiang, W.; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Bertozzi, William; Turchinetz, William; Watson, William; Korsch, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    The 2H(e,e'n)1H quasielastic cross section was measured at Q2 values of 0.109, 0.176, and 0.255 (GeV/c)2. The neutron detection efficiency was determined by the associated particle technique with the 2H( gamma ,pn) reaction for each of the three neutron kinetic energies. These 2H(e,e'n) measurements of the coincidence cross sections are the first at low Q2. The cross sections are sensitive primarily to the neutron magnetic form factor GnM at these kinematics. The extracted GnM values have smaller uncertainties than previous data and are consistent with the dipole parametrization at the two higher momentum transfers; at the lowest momentum transfer, the value of GnM is ~10% higher than t

  2. Analysis of active neutron multiplicity data for Y-12 skull oxide samples

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, M.S.; Ensslin, N.; Ceo, R.N.; May, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    Previous work on active neutron multiplicity measurements and analyses is summarized. New active multiplicity measurements are described for samples of Y-12 skull oxide using an Active Well Coincidence Counter and MSR4 multiplicity electronics. Neutron multiplication values for the samples were determined from triples/doubles ratios. Neutron multiplication values were also obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP code and the results compared with the experimental values. A calibration curve of AmLi source-sample coupling vs neutron multiplication was determined and used for active multiplicity assay of the skull oxides. The results are compared with those obtained from assay with the conventional calibration-curve technique, where the doubles rate is calibrated vs the {sup 235}U mass. The coupling-multiplication relationship determined for the skull oxides is compared with that determined earlier for pure high-enrichment uranium metal and pure uranium oxide. Conclusions are drawn about the application of active multiplicity techniques to uranium assay. Additional active multiplicity measurements and calculations are recommended.

  3. Determination of fission neutron transmission through waste matrix material using neutron signal correlation from active assay of {sup 239}Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Hollas, C.L.; Arnone, G.; Brunson, G.; Coop, K.

    1996-09-01

    The accuracy of TRU (transuranic) waste assay using the differential die-away technique depends upon significant corrections to compensate for the effects of the matrix material in which the TRU waste is located. The authors have used a new instrument, the Combined Thermal/Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) instrument for the assay of TRU waste, to develop methods to improve the accuracy of these corrections. Neutrons from a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator are moderated in the walls of the CTEN cavity and induce fission in the TRU material. The prompt neutrons from these fission events are detected in cadmium-wrapped {sup 3}He neutron detectors. They report new methods of data acquisition and analysis to extract correlation in the neutron signals resulting form fission during active interrogation. They use the correlation information in conjunction with the total number of neutrons to determine the fraction of fission neutrons transmitted through the matrix material into the {sup 3}He detectors. This determination allows them to cleanly separate the matrix effects into two processes: matrix modification upon the neutron interrogating flux and matrix modification upon the fraction of fission neutrons transmitted to the neutron detectors. This transmission information is also directly applied in a neutron multiplicity analysis in the passive assay of {sup 240}Pu.

  4. Measurement of the spin-rotation coupling in neutron polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Bülent; Sponar, Stephan; Hasegawa, Yuji

    2015-02-01

    The effect of spin-rotation coupling is measured for the first time with neutrons. The coupling of spin with the angular velocity of a rotating spin turner can be observed as a phase shift in a neutron polarimeter set-up. After the neutron’s spin is rotated by 2π through a rotating magnetic field, different phase shifts are induced for ‘up’ and ‘down’ spin eigenstates. This phase difference results in the rotation of the neutron’s spin-vector, which turns out to depend solely on the frequency of the rotation of the magnetic field. The experimental results agree well with the solutions acquired by the Pauli-Schrödinger equation.

  5. Measurement of gamma and neutron radiations inside spent fuel assemblies with passive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Voljanskij, A.; Klupák, V.; Koleška, M.; Cabalka, M.; Turek, K.

    2011-10-01

    During operation of a fission nuclear reactor, many radionuclides are generated in fuel by fission and activation of 235U, 238U and other nuclides present in the assembly. After removal of a fuel assembly from the core, these radionuclides are sources of different types of radiation. Gamma and neutron radiation emitted from an assembly can be non-destructively detected with different types of detectors. In this paper, a new method of measurement of radiation from a spent fuel assembly is presented. It is based on usage of passive detectors, such as alanine dosimeters for gamma radiation and track detectors for neutron radiation. Measurements are made on the IRT-2M spent fuel assemblies used in the LVR-15 research reactor. During irradiation of detectors, the fuel assembly is located in a water storage pool at a depth of 6 m. Detectors are inserted into central hole of the assembly, irradiated for a defined time interval, and after the detectors removed from the assembly, gamma dose or neutron fluence are evaluated. Measured profiles of gamma dose rate and neutron fluence rate inside of the spent fuel assembly are presented. This measurement can be used to evaluate relative fuel burn-up.

  6. Measurements of Neutron Radiation on the International Space Station: ISS-34 to ISS-40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Martin

    . The Radi-N2 dose and spectral measurements are not significantly different from the Radi-N results collected in the same ISS locations, despite the large difference in solar activity between 2009 and the present time. The experiments with the phantom in the Russian segment suggest that the dose inside the phantom is approximately 70% of the dose at its surface, while the spectrum inside the phantom contains a larger fraction of high-energy neutrons than the spectrum outside the phantom. Characterization using bubble detectors in both the USOS and the Russian segment will continue beyond the ISS-40 expedition. Results of the ongoing measurements, which reinforce the importance of neutrons to the dose received on the ISS, will be presented and discussed.

  7. Performing Neutron Cross-Section Measurements at RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L E

    2003-05-20

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is a proposed accelerator for the low energy nuclear physics community. Its goal is to understand the natural abundances of the elements heavier than iron, explore the nuclear force in systems far from stability, and study symmetry violation and fundamental physics in nuclei. To achieve these scientific goals, RIA promises to produce isotopes far from stability in sufficient quantities to allow experiments. It would also produce near stability isotopes at never before seen production rates, as much as 10{sup 12} pps. Included in these isotopes are many that are important to stockpile stewardship, such as {sup 87}Y, {sup 146-50}Eu, and {sup 231}Th. Given the expected production rates at RIA and a reasonably intense neutron source, one can expect to make {approx} 10 {micro}g targets of nuclei with a half-life of {approx}1 day. Thus, it will be possible at RIA to obtain experimental information on the neutron cross section for isotopes that have to date only been determined by theory. There are two methods to perform neutron cross-section measurements, prompt and delayed. The prompt method tries to measure each reaction as it happens. The exact technique employed will depend on the reaction of interest, (n,2n), (n,{gamma}), (n,p), etc. The biggest challenge with this method is designing a detector system that can handle the gamma ray background from the target. The delayed method, which is the traditional radiochemistry method for determining the cross-section, irradiates the targets and then counts the reaction products after the fact. While this allows one to avoid the target background, the allowed fraction of target impurities is extremely low. This is especially true for the desired reaction product with the required impurity fraction on the order of 10{sup -9}. This is particularly problematic for (n,2n) and (n,{gamma}) reactions, whose reaction production cannot be chemically separated from the target. In either case, the

  8. BOREHOLE NEUTRON ACTIVATION: THE RARE EARTHS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Senftle, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron-induced borehole gamma-ray spectroscopy has been widely used as a geophysical exploration technique by the petroleum industry, but its use for mineral exploration is not as common. Nuclear methods can be applied to mineral exploration, for determining stratigraphy and bed correlations, for mapping ore deposits, and for studying mineral concentration gradients. High-resolution detectors are essential for mineral exploration, and by using them an analysis of the major element concentrations in a borehole can usually be made. A number of economically important elements can be detected at typical ore-grade concentrations using this method. Because of the application of the rare-earth elements to high-temperature superconductors, these elements are examined in detail as an example of how nuclear techniques can be applied to mineral exploration.

  9. Testing of regolith of celestial bolides with active neutron gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrukhin, Andrey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Golovin, Dmitry; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Current space instruments for studying planet's surface include gamma ray spectrometers that detect natural radioactive isotopes as well as gamma-rays induced in subsurface by galactic cosmic rays. When measuring from celestial body's surface, statistics and amount of detected elements can be dramatically increased with active methods, where soil exposed to artificial flux of particles. One good example is the Russian Dynamic Albedo of Neutron (DAN) instrument onboard Martian Science Laboratory mission (Curiosity rover) developed in 2005-2011. It is the first active neutron spectrometer flown to another planet as part of a landed mission to investigate subsurface water distribution and which has now successfully operated for more than two years on the Martian surface. Presentation describes a number of space instruments for different landers and rovers being developed in Russian Space Research Institute for studying Moon and Mars, as well as method of active neutron and gamma spectrometry overview.

  10. Measurement of 14 MeV neutrons at TFTR with Si-diode detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ruskov, E.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Duong, H.H.; Roquemore, A.L.; Strachan, J.D. )

    1995-01-01

    A detector system based on partially depleted silicon surface barrier detectors and fast front-end electronics has been built and cross calibrated to a set of absolutely calibrated [sup 4]He recoil detectors. The cross-calibration factor for the channel with the widest dynamic range is 2.5[times]10[sup [minus]13] counts per 14 MeV source neutron. These data agree well with the independent neutron activation data. The new detector system covers a large dynamic range (corresponding to 10[sup 13]--10[sup 18] neutrons/s). The response is linear, except at the highest count rates where the detector dead time ([similar to]200 ns) causes departure from linearity. The noise discrimination against 2.5 MeV neutrons and [gamma] pileup is excellent. Measurements of D-T neutrons from a tritium gas puff experiment as well as from a high-power D-T discharge in the TFTR tokamak are presented.

  11. Characterization of indoor cooking aerosol using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Landsberger, S.; Larson, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Suspended particles in air are potentially harmful to human health, depending on their sizes and chemical composition. Residential indoor particles mainly come from (a) outdoor sources that are transported indoors, (b) indoor dust that is resuspended, and (c) indoor combustion sources, which include cigarette smoking, cooking, and heating. Jedrychowski stated that chronic phlegm in elderly women was strongly related to the cooking exposure. Kamens et al. indicated that cooking could generate small particles (<0.1 [mu]m), and cooking one meal could contribute [approximately]5 to 18% of total daytime particle volume exposure. Although cooking is a basic human activity, there are not many data available on the properties of particles generated by this activity. Some cooking methods, such as stir-frying and frying, which are the most favored for Chinese and other Far East people, generate a large quantity of aerosols. This research included the following efforts: 1. investigating particle number concentrations, distributions, and their variations with four different cooking methods and ventilation conditions; 2. measuring the chemical composition of cooking aerosol samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  12. The role of neutron activation analysis in nutritional biomonitoring programs

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, V.

    1988-01-01

    Nutritional biomonitoring is a multidisciplinary task and an integral part of a more general bioenvironmental surveillance. In its comprehensive form, it is a combination of biological, environmental, and nutrient monitoring activities. Nutrient monitoring evaluates the input of essential nutrients required to maintain vital bodily functions; this includes vigilance over extreme fluctuations of nutrient intake in relation to the recommended dietary allowances and estimated safe and adequate daily dietary intakes and adherence to the goals of provisional tolerance limits. Environmental monitoring assesses the external human exposure via ambient pathways, namely, air, water, soil, food, etc. Biological monitoring quantifies a toxic agent and its metabolites in representative biologic specimens of an exposed organ to identify health effects. In practice, coordinating all three components of a nutritional biomonitoring program is complex, expensive, and tedious. Experience gained from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys demonstrates the problems involved. By far the most critical challenge faced here is the question of analytical quality control, particularly when trace element determinations are involved. Yet, measures to ensure reliability of analytical data are mandatory, and there are no short-cuts to this requirement. The purpose of this presentation is to elucidate the potential of neutron activation analysis (NAA) in nutritional biomonitoring activities.

  13. Measuring neutron-star properties via gravitational waves from neutron-star mergers.

    PubMed

    Bauswein, A; Janka, H-T

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate by a large set of merger simulations for symmetric binary neutron stars (NSs) that there is a tight correlation between the frequency peak of the postmerger gravitational-wave (GW) emission and the physical properties of the nuclear equation of state (EoS), e.g., expressed by the radius of the maximum-mass Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkhoff configuration. Therefore, a single measurement of the peak frequency of the postmerger GW signal will constrain the NS EoS significantly. For optimistic merger-rate estimates a corresponding detection with Advanced LIGO is expected to happen within an operation time of roughly a year.

  14. "Influence Method" applied to measure a moderated neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector, in the count rate of another detector when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency. The method and its detailed mathematical description were recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015 [1]). In this article we apply it to the measurement of the moderated neutron flux produced by an 241AmBe neutron source surrounded by a light water sphere, employing a pair of 3He detectors. For this purpose, the method is extended for its application where particles arriving at the detector obey a Poisson distribution and also, for the case when efficiency is not constant over the energy spectrum of interest. Experimental distributions and derived parameters are compared with theoretical predictions of the method and implications concerning the potential application to the absolute calibration of neutron sources are considered.

  15. Neutron Radiography and Fission Mapping Measurements of Nuclear Materials with Varying Composition and Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Mullens, James Allen; McConchie, Seth M; Hausladen, Paul; Mihalczo, John T; Grogan, Brandon R; Sword, Eric D

    2011-01-01

    Neutron radiography and fission mapping measurements were performed on four measurement objects with varying composition and shielding arrangements at the Idaho National Laboratory's Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility. The measurement objects were assembled with ZPPR reactor plate materials comprising plutonium, natural uranium, or highly enriched uranium and were presented as unknowns for characterization. As a part of the characterization, neutron radiography was performed using a deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generator as a source of time and directionally tagged 14 MeV neutrons. The neutrons were detected by plastic scintillators placed on the opposite side of the object, using the time-correlation-based data acquisition of the Nuclear Materials Identification System developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Each object was measured at several rotations with respect to the neutron source to obtain a tomographic reconstruction of the object and a limited identification of materials via measurement of the neutron attenuation. Large area liquid scintillators with pulse shape discrimination were used to detect the induced fission neutrons. A fission site map reconstruction was produced by time correlating the induced fission neutrons with each tagged neutron from the D-T neutron generator. This paper describes the experimental configuration, the ZPPR measurement objects used, and the neutron imaging and fission mapping results.

  16. Low-level measuring techniques for neutrons: High accuracy neutron source strength determination and fluence rate measurement at an underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbal, Andreas; Reginatto, Marcel; Schuhmacher, Helmut; Wiegel, Burkhard; Degering, Detlev; Zuber, Kai

    2013-08-08

    We report on measuring techniques for neutrons that have been developed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German National Metrology Institute. PTB has characterized radioactive sources used in the BOREXINO and XENON100 experiments. For the BOREXINO experiment, a {sup 228}Th gamma radiation source was required which would not emit more than 10 neutrons per second. The determination of the neutron emission rate of this specially designed {sup 228}Th source was challenging due to the low neutron emission rate and because the ratio of neutron to gamma radiation was expected to be extremely low, of the order of 10{sup −6}. For the XENON100 detector, PTB carried out a high accuracy measurement of the neutron emission rate of an AmBe source. PTB has also done measurements in underground laboratories. A two month measurement campaign with a set of {sup 3}He-filled proportional counters was carried out in PTB's former UDO underground laboratory at the Asse salt mine. The aim of the campaign was to determine the intrinsic background of detectors, which is needed for the analysis of data taken in lowintensity neutron fields. At a later time, PTB did a preliminary measurement of the neutron fluence rate at the underground laboratory Felsenkeller operated by VKTA. By taking into account data from UDO, Felsenkeller, and detector calibrations made at the PTB facility, it was possible to estimate the neutron fluence rate at the Felsenkeller underground laboratory.

  17. Fast neutrons measured in copper from the Hiroshima atomic bomb dome.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, A A; McAninch, J E; Rugel, G; Rühm, W; Korschinek, G; Martinelli, R E; Faestermann, T; Knie, K; Egbert, S D; Wallner, A; Wallner, C; Tanaka, K; Endo, S; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Fujita, S; Hasai, H; Imanaka, T; Straume, T

    2009-01-01

    The first measurements of (63)Ni produced by A-bomb fast neutrons (above approximately 1 MeV) in copper samples from Hiroshima encompassed distances from approximately 380 to 5062 m from the hypocenter (the point on the ground directly under the bomb). They included the region of interest to survivor studies (approximately 900 to 1500 m) and provided the first direct validation of fast neutrons in that range. However, a significant measurement gap remained between the hypocenter and 380 m. Measurements close to the hypocenter are important as a high-value anchor for the slope of the curve for neutron activation as a function of distance. Here we report measurements of (63)Ni in copper samples from the historic Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome, which is located approximately 150 m from the hypocenter. These measurements extend the range of our previously published data for (63)Ni providing a more comprehensive and consistent A-bomb activation curve. The results are also in good agreement with calculations based on the current dosimetry system (DS02) and give further experimental support to the accuracy of this system that forms the basis for radiation risk estimates worldwide.

  18. Fast neutrons measured in copper from the Hiroshima atomic bomb dome.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, A A; McAninch, J E; Rugel, G; Rühm, W; Korschinek, G; Martinelli, R E; Faestermann, T; Knie, K; Egbert, S D; Wallner, A; Wallner, C; Tanaka, K; Endo, S; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Fujita, S; Hasai, H; Imanaka, T; Straume, T

    2009-01-01

    The first measurements of (63)Ni produced by A-bomb fast neutrons (above approximately 1 MeV) in copper samples from Hiroshima encompassed distances from approximately 380 to 5062 m from the hypocenter (the point on the ground directly under the bomb). They included the region of interest to survivor studies (approximately 900 to 1500 m) and provided the first direct validation of fast neutrons in that range. However, a significant measurement gap remained between the hypocenter and 380 m. Measurements close to the hypocenter are important as a high-value anchor for the slope of the curve for neutron activation as a function of distance. Here we report measurements of (63)Ni in copper samples from the historic Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome, which is located approximately 150 m from the hypocenter. These measurements extend the range of our previously published data for (63)Ni providing a more comprehensive and consistent A-bomb activation curve. The results are also in good agreement with calculations based on the current dosimetry system (DS02) and give further experimental support to the accuracy of this system that forms the basis for radiation risk estimates worldwide. PMID:19138052

  19. Benchmark test of transport calculations of gold and nickel activation with implications for neutron kerma at Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Sawada, S; Munaka, M; Kuramoto, A; Oka, T; Iwatani, K; Shizuma, K; Hasai, H

    1992-11-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a 252Cf fission neutron source to validate the use of the code for the energy spectrum analyses of Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons. Nuclear data libraries used in the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code calculation were ENDF/B-III, ENDF/B-IV, LASL-SUB, and ENDL-73. The neutron moderators used were granite (the main component of which is SiO2, with a small fraction of hydrogen), Newlight [polyethylene with 3.7% boron (natural)], ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), and water (H2O). Each moderator was 65 cm thick. The neutron detectors were gold and nickel foils, which were used to detect thermal and epithermal neutrons (4.9 eV) and fast neutrons (> 0.5 MeV), respectively. Measured activity data from neutron-irradiated gold and nickel foils in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which correspond to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For both gold and nickel detectors, the measured activities and the calculated values agreed within 10%. The slopes of the depth-yield relations in each moderator, except granite, were similar for neutrons detected by the gold and nickel foils. From the results of these studies, the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code was verified to be accurate enough for use with the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, chlorine, and cadmium, and for the incident 252Cf fission spectrum neutrons. PMID:1399639

  20. Benchmark test of transport calculations of gold and nickel activation with implications for neutron kerma at Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Sawada, S; Munaka, M; Kuramoto, A; Oka, T; Iwatani, K; Shizuma, K; Hasai, H

    1992-11-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a 252Cf fission neutron source to validate the use of the code for the energy spectrum analyses of Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons. Nuclear data libraries used in the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code calculation were ENDF/B-III, ENDF/B-IV, LASL-SUB, and ENDL-73. The neutron moderators used were granite (the main component of which is SiO2, with a small fraction of hydrogen), Newlight [polyethylene with 3.7% boron (natural)], ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), and water (H2O). Each moderator was 65 cm thick. The neutron detectors were gold and nickel foils, which were used to detect thermal and epithermal neutrons (4.9 eV) and fast neutrons (> 0.5 MeV), respectively. Measured activity data from neutron-irradiated gold and nickel foils in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which correspond to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For both gold and nickel detectors, the measured activities and the calculated values agreed within 10%. The slopes of the depth-yield relations in each moderator, except granite, were similar for neutrons detected by the gold and nickel foils. From the results of these studies, the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code was verified to be accurate enough for use with the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, chlorine, and cadmium, and for the incident 252Cf fission spectrum neutrons.

  1. Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

    2011-04-06

    A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources are available that

  2. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  3. Medical applications of in vivo neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation analysis: Technical similarities to detection of explosives and contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, J. J.

    2001-07-01

    Nutritional status of patients can be evaluated by monitoring changes in elemental body composition. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used in vivo to assess elements characteristic of specific body compartments. There are similarities between the body composition techniques and the detection of hidden explosives and narcotics. All samples have to be examined in depth and the ratio of elements provides a "signature" of the chemical of interest. The N/H and C/O ratios measure protein and fat content in the body. Similarly, a high C/O ratio is characteristic of narcotics and a low C/O together with a strong presence of N is a signature of some explosives. The available time for medical applications is about 20 min—compared to a few seconds for the detection of explosives—but the permitted radiation exposure is limited. In vivo neutron analysis is used to measure H, O, C, N, P, Na, Cl, and Ca for the study of the mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging and wasting diseases, and to investigate methods of preserving function and quality of life in the elderly.

  4. Status report of CPHS and neutron activities at Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Xing, Q.; Zheng, S.; Yang, Y.; Gong, H.; Xiao, Y.; Wu, H.; Guan, X.; Du, T.

    2016-11-01

    The Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) project that was launched in September 2009 at Tsinghua University has reached a first commissioning stage in conjunction with ongoing activities to fulfill the eventual design goal of a ˜ 1013 n/s epithermal-to-cold neutron yield for education, instrumentation development, and industrial applications. Here, we report the latest progress on the commissioning and applications of 3MeV proton and neutron beam lines in the last one and half years, and the design, fabrication, engineering of the 13MeV/16kW proton accelerator system.

  5. Development and testing of an active area neutron dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Brushwood, J M; Gow, J P D; Beeley, P A; Spyrou, N M

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development and testing of an active area neutron dosemeter (AAND). The classic moderator and central detector is retained but in AAND this arrangement is augmented by small thermal neutron detectors positioned within the moderating body. The outputs from these detectors are combined using an appropriately weighted linear superposition to fit both the ambient dose equivalent and the radiation weighting factor. Experimental verifications of both the modelled detector energy reponses and the overall AAND response are given. In the relatively soft D2O moderated 252Cf spectra, the AAND determined both the H*(10) and mean radiation weighting factor to better than +10%.

  6. Study of proton and neutron activation of metal samples in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress in the following activities has been made: the analysis of the gamma ray spectra taken from samples flown in Spacelab 2; the search for and review of neutron and proton activation cross sections needed to analyze the results of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) activation measurements; the consideration given to data analysis of the LDEF and Spacelab 2 samples; the plan to measure relevant cross sections with nuclear accelerator measurements; and the preparation of an extended gamma ray calibration sources continues through planning and direct measurement of gamma ray efficiency for a Ge(Li) as a function of position along the surface of the detector housing.

  7. The use of non-destructive passive neutron measurement methods in dismantling and radioactive waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Jallu, F.; Allinei, P. G.; Bernard, P.; Loridon, J.; Soyer, P.; Pouyat, D.; Torreblanca, L.; Reneleau, A.

    2011-07-01

    The cleaning up and dismantling of nuclear facilities lead to a great volume of technological radioactive wastes which need to be characterized in order to be sent to the adequate final disposal or interim storage. The control and characterization can be performed with non-destructive nuclear measurements such as gamma-ray spectrometry. Passive neutron counting is an alternative when the alpha-gamma emitters cannot be detected due to the presence of a high gamma emission resulting from fission or activation products, or when the waste matrix is too absorbing for the gamma rays of interest (too dense and/or made of high atomic number elements). It can also be a complement to gamma-ray spectrometry when two measurement results must be confronted to improve the confidence in the activity assessment. Passive neutron assays involve the detection of spontaneous fission neutrons emitted by even nuclides ({sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 242}Cm, {sup 244}Cm...) and neutrons resulting from ({alpha}, n) reactions with light nuclides (O, F, Be...). The latter is conditioned by the presence of high {alpha}-activity radionuclides ({sup 234}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am...) and low-Z elements, which depends on the chemical form (metallic, oxide or fluorine) of the plutonium or uranium contaminant. This paper presents the recent application of passive neutron methods to the cleaning up of a nuclear facility located at CEA Cadarache (France), which concerns the Pu mass assessment of 2714 historic, 100 litre radioactive waste drums produced between 1980 and 1997. Another application is the dismantling and decommissioning of an uranium enrichment facility for military purposes, which involves the {sup 235}U and total uranium quantifications in about a thousand, large compressors employed in the gaseous diffusion enrichment process. (authors)

  8. BNL Activities in Advanced Neutron Source Development: Past and Present

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Ludewig, H.; Montanez, P.; Todosow, M.; Smith, G.C.; Larese, J.Z.

    1998-06-14

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been involved in advanced neutron sources almost from its inception in 1947. These efforts have mainly focused on steady state reactors beginning with the construction of the first research reactor for neutron beams, the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor. This was followed by the High Flux Beam Reactor that has served as the design standard for all the subsequent high flux reactors constructed worldwide. In parallel with the reactor developments BNL has focused on the construction and use of high energy proton accelerators. The first machine to operate over 1 GeV in the world was the Cosmotron. The machine that followed this, the AGS, is still operating and is the highest intensity proton machine in the world and has nucleated an international collaboration investigating liquid metal targets for next generation pulsed spallation sources. Early work using the Cosmotron focused on spallation product studies for both light and heavy elements into the several GeV proton energy region. These original studies are still important today. In this report we discuss the facilities and activities at BNL focused on advanced neutron sources. BNL is involved in the proton source for the Spallation Neutron source, spectrometer development at LANSCE, target studies using the AGS and state-of-the-art neutron detector development.

  9. BNL ACTIVITIES IN ADVANCED NEUTRON SOURCE DEVELOPMENT: PAST AND PRESENT

    SciTech Connect

    HASTINGS,J.B.; LUDEWIG,H.; MONTANEZ,P.; TODOSOW,M.; SMITH,G.C.; LARESE,J.Z.

    1998-06-14

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been involved in advanced neutron sources almost from its inception in 1947. These efforts have mainly focused on steady state reactors beginning with the construction of the first research reactor for neutron beams, the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor. This was followed by the High Flux Beam Reactor that has served as the design standard for all the subsequent high flux reactors constructed worldwide. In parallel with the reactor developments BNL has focused on the construction and use of high energy proton accelerators. The first machine to operate over 1 GeV in the world was the Cosmotron. The machine that followed this, the AGS, is still operating and is the highest intensity proton machine in the world and has nucleated an international collaboration investigating liquid metal targets for next generation pulsed spallation sources. Early work using the Cosmotron focused on spallation product studies for both light and heavy elements into the several GeV proton energy region. These original studies are still important today. In the sections below the authors discuss the facilities and activities at BNL focused on advanced neutron sources. BNL is involved in the proton source for the Spallation Neutron source, spectrometer development at LANSCE, target studies using the AGS and state-of-the-art neutron detector development.

  10. Recent upgrade of the in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Dilmanian, F.A..; Rarback, H.; Meron, M.; Kamen, Y.; Yasumura, S.; Weber, D.A.; Stamatelatos, I.E.; Lidofsky, L.J.; Pierson, R.N. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of a delayed- and a prompt-gamma neutron activation (DGNA and PGNA) system and an inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. The total body contents of several basic elements, including potassium, calcium, chlorine, sodium, and phosphorus are measured at the DGNA system; total body carbon is measured at the INS system; and the nitrogen-tohydrogen ratio is measured at the PGNA system. Based on the elemental composition, body compartments, such as total body fat and total body protein can be computed with additional independently measured parameters, such as total body water, body size, and body weight. Information on elemental and compartmental body composition obtained through neutron activation analysis is useful, if not essential, for research on growth, malnutrition, aging diseases, such as osteoporosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in which the progression of the illness is closely related to changes in major body compartments, such as bone, adipose tissue, and muscle. The DGNA system has been modified and upgraded several times since it was first built. Recently, all three systems underwent major upgrades. This upgrading and some preliminary studies carried out with the modified facilities are reported here.

  11. Prototyping an Active Neutron Veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  12. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  13. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-01

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  14. High Rate Measurements of the Neutron Camera and Broadband Neutron Spectrometer at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Gorini, G.; Joffrin, E.; Kiptily, V.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Plyusnin, V. V.; Popovichev, S.; Reux, C.; Riva, M.; Syme, D. B.

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). At JET, the neutron emission profile of Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system (DAQ) based on Field Programmable Gated Array (FPGA). According to specifications, the DAQ is capable of high rate measurements up to 0.5 MCps. A new compact broadband spectrometer (KM12) based on BC501A organic liquid scintillating material was also installed in the same year and implements a similar DAQ as for KN3. This article illustrates the observations on the DAQ high count rate performance of both KN3 and KM12 in the latest JET D plasma experiments related to hybrid scenario and runaway electrons. For the latter, >1 MCps event rate was achieved with consequences on the behavior of the FPGA and on the reliability of the measurements.

  15. Development of a new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    A new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been developed by Adelphi Technology for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron activation analysis (NAA), and fast neutron radiography. The generator makes an excellent fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron source for laboratories and industrial applications that require the safe production of neutrons, a small footprint, low cost, and small regulatory burden. The generator has three major components: a Radio Frequency Induction Ion Source, a Secondary Electron Shroud, and a Diode Accelerator Structure and Target. Monoenergetic neutrons (2.5MeV) are produced with a yield of 10(10)n/s using 25-50mA of deuterium ion beam current and 125kV of acceleration voltage. The present study characterizes the performance of the neutron generator with respect to neutron yield, neutron production efficiency, and the ionic current as a function of the acceleration voltage at various RF powers. In addition the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) simulation code was used to optimize the setup with respect to thermal flux and radiation protection.

  16. Measurement of water content in polymer electrolyte membranes using high resolution neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John; Mukherjee, Partha P; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David

    2010-01-01

    Sufficient water content within a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is necessary for adequate ionic conductivity. Membrane hydration is therefore a fundamental requirement for fuel cell operation. The hydration state of the membrane affects the water transport within, as both the diffusion coefficient and electro-osmotic drag depend on the water content. Membrane's water uptake is conventionally measured ex situ by weighing free-swelling samples equilibrated at controlled water activity. In the present study, water profiles in Nafion{reg_sign} membranes were measured using the high-resolution neutron imaging. The state-of-the-art, 10 {micro}m resolution neutron detector is capable of resolving water distributions across N1120, N1110 and N117 membranes. It provides a means to measure the water uptake and transport properties of fuel cell membranes in situ.

  17. Measurement of Water Content in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes using High Resolution Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha P

    2010-01-01

    Sufficient water content within a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is necessary for adequate ionic conductivity. Membrane hydration is therefore a fundamental requirement for fuel cell operation. The hydration state of the membrane affects the water transport within, as both the diffusion coefficient and electroosmotic drag depend on the water content. Membrane s water uptake is conventionally measured ex situ by weighing freeswelling samples equilibrated at controlled water activity. In the present study, water profiles in Nafion membranes were measured using high-resolution neutron imaging. The state-of-theart, 13 m resolution neutron detector is capable of resolving water distributions across N1120, N1110 and N117 membranes. It provides a means to measure the water uptake and transport properties of fuel cell membranes in situ.

  18. Neutron Measurements and the Weak Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Snow, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    The weak interaction between nucleons remains one of the most poorly-understood sectors of the Standard Model. A quantitative description of this interaction is needed to understand weak interaction phenomena in atomic, nuclear, and hadronic systems. This paper summarizes briefly what is known about the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction, tries to place this phenomenon in the context of other studies of the weak and strong interactions, and outlines a set of measurements involving low energy neutrons which can lead to significant experimental progress. PMID:27308120

  19. SLAC measurements of the neutron spin-structure function

    SciTech Connect

    Petratos, G.G.; E142 Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    Results from a measurement of the neutron spin-dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) over a range in x from 0.03 to 0.6 and with Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} are presented. The experiment consisted of scattering a longitudinally polarized electron beam from the Stanford Linear Accelerator off a polarized {sup 3}He target and detecting scattered electrons in two magnetic spectrometers. The results are interpreted in the quark-parton model and used to test the Bjorken sum rule.

  20. Neutron spectrum measurements at a radial beam port of the NUR research reactor using a Bonner spheres spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Mazrou, H; Nedjar, A; Seguini, T

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the measurement campaign held around the neutron radiography (NR) facility of the Algerian 1MW NUR research reactor. The main objective of this work is to characterize accurately the neutron beam provided at one of the radial channels of the NUR research reactor taking benefit of the acquired CRNA Bonner spheres spectrometer (BSS). The specific objective was to improve the image quality of the NR facility. The spectrometric system in use is based on a central spherical (3)He thermal neutron proportional counter combined with high density polyethylene spheres of different diameters ranging from 3 to 12in. This counting system has good gamma ray discrimination and is able to cover an energy range from thermal to 20MeV. The measurements were performed at the sample distance of 0.6m from the beam port and at a height of 1.2m from the facility floor. During the BSS measurements, the reactor was operating at low power (100W) to avoid large dead times, pulse pileup and high level radiation exposures, in particular, during spheres handling. Thereafter, the neutron spectrum at the sample position was unfolded by means of GRAVEL and MAXED computer codes. The thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes, the total neutron flux, the mean energy and the Cadmium ratio (RCd) were provided. A sensitivity analysis was performed taking into account various defaults spectra and ultimately a different response functions in the unfolding procedure. Overall, from the obtained results it reveals, unexpectedly, that the measured neutron spectrum at the sample position of the neutron radiography of the NUR reactor is being harder with a predominance of fast neutrons (>100keV) by about 60%. Finally, those results were compared to previous and more recent measurements obtained by activation foils detectors. The agreement was fairly good highlighting thereby the consistency of our findings. PMID:27203706

  1. Neutron spectrum measurements at a radial beam port of the NUR research reactor using a Bonner spheres spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Mazrou, H; Nedjar, A; Seguini, T

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the measurement campaign held around the neutron radiography (NR) facility of the Algerian 1MW NUR research reactor. The main objective of this work is to characterize accurately the neutron beam provided at one of the radial channels of the NUR research reactor taking benefit of the acquired CRNA Bonner spheres spectrometer (BSS). The specific objective was to improve the image quality of the NR facility. The spectrometric system in use is based on a central spherical (3)He thermal neutron proportional counter combined with high density polyethylene spheres of different diameters ranging from 3 to 12in. This counting system has good gamma ray discrimination and is able to cover an energy range from thermal to 20MeV. The measurements were performed at the sample distance of 0.6m from the beam port and at a height of 1.2m from the facility floor. During the BSS measurements, the reactor was operating at low power (100W) to avoid large dead times, pulse pileup and high level radiation exposures, in particular, during spheres handling. Thereafter, the neutron spectrum at the sample position was unfolded by means of GRAVEL and MAXED computer codes. The thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes, the total neutron flux, the mean energy and the Cadmium ratio (RCd) were provided. A sensitivity analysis was performed taking into account various defaults spectra and ultimately a different response functions in the unfolding procedure. Overall, from the obtained results it reveals, unexpectedly, that the measured neutron spectrum at the sample position of the neutron radiography of the NUR reactor is being harder with a predominance of fast neutrons (>100keV) by about 60%. Finally, those results were compared to previous and more recent measurements obtained by activation foils detectors. The agreement was fairly good highlighting thereby the consistency of our findings.

  2. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft in low Earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Dudkin, V E; Potapov YuV; Akopova, A B; Melkumyan, L V; Benton, E V; Frank, A L

    1990-01-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the 6Li(n,alpha)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%. PMID:11537519

  3. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1990-01-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the 6Li(n,alpha)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%.

  4. Resistivity measurements on the neutron irradiated detector grade silicon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng

    1993-11-01

    Resistivity measurements under the condition of no or low electrical field (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) have been made on various device configurations on detector grade silicon materials after neutron irradiation. Results of the measurements have shown that the ENB resistivity increases with neutron fluence ({Phi}{sub n}) at low {phi}{sub n} (<10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}) and saturates at a value between 300 and 400 k{Omega}-cm at {phi}{sub n} {approximately}10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}. Meanwhile, the effective doping concentration N{sub eff} in the space charge region (SCR) obtained from the C-V measurements of fully depleted p{sup +}/n silicon junction detectors has been found to increase nearly linearly with {phi}{sub n} at high fluences ({phi}{sub n} > 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}). The experimental results are explained by the deep levels crossing the Fermi level in the SCR and near perfect compensation in the ENB by all deep levels, resulting in N{sub eff} (SCR) {ne} n or p (free carrier concentrations in the ENB).

  5. Development of fast neutron pinhole camera using nuclear emulsion for neutron emission profile measurement in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Y.; Tomita, H.; Nakayama, Y.; Hayashi, S.; Morishima, K.; Isobe, M.; Cheon, M. S.; Ogawa, K.; Nishitani, T.; Naka, T.; Nakano, T.; Nakamura, M.; Iguchi, T.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a compact fast neutron camera based on a stack of nuclear emulsion plates and a pinhole collimator. The camera was installed at J-port of Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research at National Fusion Research Institute, Republic of Korea. Fast neutron images agreed better with calculated ones based on Monte Carlo neutron simulation using the uniform distribution of Deuterium-Deuterium (DD) neutron source in a torus of 40 cm radius.

  6. Measurement and calculation of neutron leakage from a medical electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uwamino, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Hara, A.

    1986-05-01

    The leakage neutron spectra and dose equivalent were systematically measured in the irradiation field, treatment room, maze, and outside the shielding door at the microtron medical electron accelerator facility of the National Cancer Center, Tokyo. For these measurements, we used two types of multimoderator neutron spectrometers (Bonner spheres containing indium activation detectors and /sup 3/He detector), an aluminum activation detector, and a commercially available neutron rem counter. The measured results were compared with the combined calculation of the one-dimensional ANISN and two-dimensional DOT3.5 discrete ordinates transport codes. The calculation was performed by using a measured source spectrum in the irradiation field and by computer modeling of the maze entrance. The calculation indicated good agreement in spectral shape and agreement with experiment within a factor of 2 in absolute dose-equivalent values. This transport calculation was systematically repeated for different geometrical and material parameters, and simple analytical formulas and their parameters applicable for shielding design of a medical electron accelerator facility were obtained in general form.

  7. Measurements of secondary neutrons from cosmic radiation with a Bonner sphere spectrometer at 79 degrees N.

    PubMed

    Rühm, Werner; Mares, V; Pioch, C; Weitzenegger, E; Vockenroth, R; Paretzke, H G

    2009-04-01

    Air crew members and airline passengers are continuously exposed to cosmic radiation during their flights. Particles ejected by the sun during so-called solar particle events (SPEs) in periods of high solar activity can contribute to this exposure. In rare cases the dose from a single SPE might even exceed the annual dose limit of 1 mSv above which dose monitoring of air crews is legally required in Germany. Measurements performed by means of neutron monitors have already shown that the relative intensity of secondary neutrons from cosmic radiation is enhanced during an SPE, particularly at regions close to the magnetic poles of the Earth where shielding of the cosmic radiation by the geomagnetic field is low. Here we describe a Bonner sphere spectrometer installed at the Koldewey station at 79 degrees N, i.e. about 1,000 km from the geographic North pole, which is designed to provide first experimental data on the time-dependent energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the atmosphere during an SPE. This will be important to calculate doses from these neutrons to air crew members. The system is described in detail and first results are shown that were obtained during quiet periods of sun activity.

  8. Reaction Rate Measurement at the Californium User Facility (CUF) for unfolding the neutron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannan, Mohammad; Ortega, Ruben

    2011-03-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis was used to determine Reaction Rate measurement of several activation detectors at the ORNL Californium User Facility (CUF). The irradiations were performed with 34 mg Cf 252 neutron source strength.. Ten source capsules > 34 mgwerepositionedconcentricallyaroundasamplecavity . Wehavedeterminedabsoluteactivityperatomof 9 detectors : Au 197 (n , γ) Au 198 , Al 27 (n , α) Na 24 , Al 27 (n , p) Mg 27 , Fe 56 (n , p) Mn 5 , Fe 54 (n , p) Mn 54 , In 115 (n , γ) In 116 , Ti 46 (n , p) Sc 46 , Ni 60 (n , p) Co 60 , Fe 58 (n , γ) Fe 59 . Theerrorsarewithin 1.5 - 8 60 and Fe 58 have errors of 46% and 32 %. These high errors may be attributed to the counting statistics. These reaction rate values will be used to unfold the neutron spectrum of the CUF using the MAXED 2000, a computer code for the de convolution of multi sphere neutron spectrometer data and the results are discussed. The authors acknowledge help, advise, and using facility at ORNL-CUF to Dr. Rodger martin and Mr. David C. Galsgow.

  9. Measurements of neutron emission induced by muons stopped in metal deuteride targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Steadman, S. G.; Gaudreau, M. P. J.; Luckhardt, S. C.; Parker, R. R.; Albagli, D.; Cammarata, V.; Schloh, M.; Wrighton, M. S.; Kwok, K.; Thieme, C.; Lowenstein, D. I.; Debbe, R.; Reilly, J. J.

    1990-06-01

    An 80-MeV/c negative muon beam from the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory was used to investigate the stopping of muons inside Pd, Ti, and Y targets saturated with deuterium. Neutron emission from the targets was measured with an array of3He detectors, and in some runs, the temperature of the target was monitored as a function of time, with and without a flux of muons on the target. The neutron rates were also measured for Pd cathodes in an active electrochemical cell similar in design to those used in so-called “cold fusion” experiments, and the electrolyte solution was analyzed for excess tritium. No evidence was found for muon-catalyzed fusion at rates consistent with those claimed in “cold fusion” experiments. Neutron production from catalyzed fusion due to the presence of deuterium in palladium deuteride, PdD0.7, exposed to muons was determined to be 0.0±0.03 (stat.) ±0.25 (syst.) neutrons per stopped muon.

  10. Neutron spallation measurements and impacts on low-background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguayo, E.; Kouzes, R. T.; Siciliano, E. R.

    2014-09-01

    Ultralow-background experiments, such as neutrinoless double-β decay, solar neutrino, and dark-matter searches, are carried out deep underground to escape background events created by cosmic-ray muons passing through the detector volumes. However, such experiments may nevertheless be limited in sensitivity by cosmogenically induced backgrounds. This limit can be attributable to cosmogenically created radioactive isotopes produced either in situ during operation or prior to construction when the detector construction materials are above ground. An accurate knowledge of the production of the latter source of background is of paramount importance to be able to interpret the results of low-background experiments. One way to deal with the characterization of cosmogenic background production is to use Monte Carlo simulations to model the spallation reactions arising from cosmic-ray neutrons, protons, and muons. The objective of this work was to evaluate the degree of accuracy that such simulations could provide by comparing measurements for various materials to results from two standard Monte Carlo codes using the same physics model for generating intranuclear cascades. The simulated results from both codes provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing material density. However, there was substantial disagreement between the models and experimental results for lower-density materials of Al, Fe, and Cu. The model values, when normalized to the Pb experimental results, show disagreement with experiment by a factor of about two for Fe and Cu and significantly greater for Al. It is concluded that additional neutron-induced spallation measurements are required to refine models routinely employed in underground physics research. Further data collection against the above materials is an initial list for benchmarking.

  11. Proposed experiment to measure {gamma}-rays from the thermal neutron capture of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Takatomi; Ou, I.; Izumi, T.; Yamaguchi, R.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.

    2012-11-12

    Gadolinium-157 ({sup 157}Gd) has the largest thermal neutron capture cross section among any stable nuclei. The thermal neutron capture yields {gamma}-ray cascade with total energy of about 8 MeV. Because of these characteristics, Gd is applied for the recent neutrino detectors. Here, we propose an experiment to measure the multiplicity and the angular correlation of {gamma}-rays from the Gd neutron capture. With these information, we expect the improved identification of the Gd neutron capture.

  12. Determination of hydrogen in metals, semiconductors, and other materials by cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.L.; Lindstrom, R.M.

    1998-12-31

    Cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis has proven useful for nondestructive measurement of trace hydrogen. The sample is irradiated in a beam of neutrons; the presence of hydrogen is confirmed by the emission of a 2223 keV gamma-ray. Detection limits for hydrogen are 3 mg/kg in quartz and 8 mg/kg in titanium. The authors have used the technique to measure hydrogen in titanium alloys, germanium, quartz, fullerenes and their derivatives, and other materials.

  13. Studies of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The expected induced radioactivity of experimental material in low Earth orbit was studied for characteristics of activating particles such as cosmic rays, high energy Earth albedo neutrons, trapped protons, and secondary protons and neutrons. The activation cross sections for the production of long lived radioisotopes and other existing nuclear data appropriate to the study of these reactions were compiled. Computer codes which are required to calculate the expected activation of orbited materials were developed. The decreased computer code used to predict the activation of trapped protons of materials placed in the expected orbits of LDEF and Spacelab II. Techniques for unfolding the fluxes of activating particles from the measured activation of orbited materials are examined.

  14. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis for certification of ion-implanted phosphorus in silicon.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rick L; Simons, David S; Guthrie, William F; Lu, John

    2003-08-15

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis procedure has been developed, critically evaluated, and shown to have the necessary sensitivity, chemical specificity, matrix independence, and precision to certify phosphorus at ion implantation levels in silicon. 32P, produced by neutron capture of 31P, is chemically separated from the sample matrix and measured using a beta proportional counter. The method is used here to certify the amount of phosphorus in SRM 2133 (Phosphorus Implant in Silicon Depth Profile Standard) as (9.58 +/- 0.16) x 10(14) atoms x cm(-2). A detailed evaluation of uncertainties is given.

  15. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  16. High-energy in-beam neutron measurements of metal-based shielding for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Björgvinsdóttir, H.; Kokai, Z.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-based shielding plays an important role in the attenuation of harmful and unwanted radiation at an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source. At the European Spallation Source, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, metal-based materials are planned to be used extensively as neutron guide substrates in addition to other shielding structures around neutron guides. The usage of metal-based materials in the vicinity of neutron guides however requires careful consideration in order to minimize potential background effects in a neutron instrument at the facility. Therefore, we have carried out a combined study involving high-energy neutron measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of metal-based shielding, both to validate the simulation methodology and also to investigate the benefits and drawbacks of different metal-based solutions. The measurements were carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden, using a 174.1 MeV neutron beam and various thicknesses of aluminum-, iron-, and copper-based shielding blocks. The results were compared to geant4 simulations and revealed excellent agreement. Our combined study highlights the particular situations where one type of metal-based solution may be preferred over another.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and neutron activation of holmium metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Cagle, D.W.; Thrash, T.P.; Wilson, L.J.; Alford, M.; Chibante, L.P.F.; Ehrhardt, G.J.

    1996-08-28

    Isolation of the first macroscopic quantities of endohedral holmium metallofullerenes (principally Ho@C{sub 82}, Ho{sub 2}@C{sub 82}, and Ho{sub 3}@C{sub 82} by LD-TOF mass spectrometry) has been accomplished by carbon-arc and preparative HPLC methodologies. The detailed procedure for production and isolation of the metallofullerenes includes a new technique whereby holmium-impregnated electrodes are prepared simply by soaking porous graphite rods in an ethanolic solution of Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.xH{sub 2}O. Monoisotopic {sup 165}Ho offers a unique combination of advantages for neutron-activation studies of metallofullerenes, and purified samples containing {sup 165}Ho@C{sub 82}, {sup 165}Ho{sub 2}@C{sub 82}, and {sup 165}Ho{sub 3}@C{sub 82} have been activated by high-flux neutron irradiation ({Phi} = 4 x 10{sup 13}n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) to generate {sup 166}Ho metallofullerenes, which undergo {beta}{sup -} decay to produce stable {sup 166}Er. Chemical workup of the irradiated samples, followed by re-irradiation, has been used to demonstrate that observed decomposition of holmium metallofullerenes is due mainly to `fast` neutron damage rather than to holmium atom nuclear recoil (E{sub max} = 200 eV). This implies that metallofullerene damage can be minimized by using neutron fluxes with the highest possible thermal component. 60 refs., 4 figs.

  18. First measurements with the neutron decay spectrometer a SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeßler, S.; Ayala Guardia, F.; Borg, M.; Glück, F.; Heil, W.; Konrad, G.; Konorov, I.; Muñoz Horta, R.; Petzoldt, G.; Rich, D.; Simson, M.; Sobolev, Yu.; Wirth, H.-F.; Zimmer, O.

    2008-10-01

    The neutron decay spectrometer a SPECT has been built to perform a precise measurement of the proton spectrum shape in the decay of free neutrons. Such a measurement allows a determination of the neutrino electron angular-correlation coefficient a . The present best experiments have an uncertainty of Δ a/ a = 5% and since the seventies there is no substantial improvement. With a SPECT, we aim for an uncertainty which is lower by more than an order of magnitude, thus enabling us to perform several precise tests of the Standard Model. In our first beam time at the particle physics beam MEPHISTO at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, we studied the properties of the spectrometer. The most serious problem turned out to be the situation- and time-dependent behavior of the background. From the data sets from this beam time in which a background problem was not obvious, we could extract a value of a = - 0.1151±0.0040stat , but we could not quantify the background uncertainty. We show ways to deal with the background and other problems for future beam times.

  19. Study of proton and neutron activation of metal samples in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    The analysis of the gamma-ray spectra taken from samples flown in Spacelab 1; the search for and review of neutron and proton activation cross-sections needed to analyze the results of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) activation measurements; additional calculations of neutron induced activation for the LDEF samples; the data analysis plan for the LDEF and Spacelab 2 samples; the measurement of relevant cross-sections with activation of samples of V, Co, In, and Ta at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility; and the preparation of an extended gamma-ray calibration source through the development of a proper technique to accurately deposit equal quantities of radioactive material onto a large number of point on the source are discussed.

  20. Neutron spectrum measurements using proton recoil proportional counters: results of measurements of leakage spectra for the Little Boy assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of degraded fission-neutron spectra using recoil proportional counters are done routinely for studies involving fast reactor mockups. The same techniques are applicable to measurements of neutron spectra required for personnel dosimetry in fast neutron environments. A brief discussion of current applications of these methods together with the results of a measurement made on the LITTLE BOY assembly at Los Alamos are here described.

  1. Beta-decay measurements of neutron-deficient cesium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, R.F.

    1983-03-01

    Beta decay endpoint energy measurements of the neutron deficient cesium isotopes were done using an energy spectrum shape fitting technique. This was a departure from the typical method of endpoint energy analysis, the Fermi-Kurie plot. A discussion of the shape fitting procedure and its improved features are discussed. These beta endpoint measurements have led to total decay energies (Q/sub EC/) of the neutron deficient /sup 119/ /sup 123/Cs isotopes. The total decay energies of /sup 122m/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 6.95 +- 0.25 MeV) and /sup 119/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 6.26 +- 0.29 MeV) were new measurements. The total decay energies of /sup 123/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 4.05 +- 0.18 MeV), /sup 122g/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 7.05 +- 0.18 MeV), /sup 121/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 5.21 +- 0.22 MeV), and /sup 120/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 7.38 +- 0.23 MeV) were measurements with significantly improved uncertainties as compared to the literature. Further, a combination of the energy levels derived from previous literature gamma-gamma coincident measurements and the experimental beta-coincident gamma decay energies has supported an improved level scheme for /sup 121/Xe and the proposal of three new energy levels in /sup 119/Xe. Comparison of the experimental cesium mass excesses (determined with our Q/sub EC/ values and known xenon mass excesses) with both the literature and theoretical predicted values showed general agreement except for /sup 120/Cs. Possible explanations for this deviation are discussed.

  2. Measurement result of the neutron monitor onboard Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment - Attached Payload (SEDA-AP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Okudaira, O.; Obara, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Muraki, Y.

    2011-12-01

    To support future space activities, it is very important to acquire the space environmental data which causes the degradation of space parts and spacecraft anomalies. Such data are useful for spacecraft design and manned space activity. Space Environment Data Acquisition - Attached Payload (SEDA-AP) measures the space environment around the International Space Station (ISS) by being attached to the Exposed Facility(EF) of the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo"). The Neutron Monitor (NEM) is one of the detectors in SEDA-AP. This instrument was developed to measure the solar neutrons which are produced by solar flare event. The solar neutron is a good indicator to clarify the acceleration mechanism of charged particles at the solar flare. Because of the energy of solar neutron is not influenced by the interplanetary magnetic field, it has the information of the energy of the accelerated charged particle directly. We have been analyzing the neutron data at several M or X class solar flare from September 2009. The mission objectives, instrumentation and measurement status of the neutron monitor are reported.

  3. Measuring the free neutron lifetime to <= 0.3s via the beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, Jonathan; Fomin, Nadia; BL3 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Neutron beta decay is an archetype for all semi-leptonic charged-current weak processes. A precise value for the neutron lifetime is required for consistency tests of the Standard Model and is needed to predict the primordial 4He abundance from the theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. An effort has begun for an in-beam measurement of the neutron lifetime with an projected <=0.3s uncertainty. This effort is part of a phased campaign of neutron lifetime measurements based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the Sussex-ILL-NIST technique. Recent advances in neutron fluence measurement techniques as well as new large area silicon detector technology address the two largest sources of uncertainty of in-beam measurements, paving the way for a new measurement. The experimental design and projected uncertainties for the 0.3s measurement will be discussed.

  4. Measuring the free neutron lifetime to <= 0.3s via the beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia; Mulholland, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Neutron beta decay is an archetype for all semi-leptonic charged-current weak processes. A precise value for the neutron lifetime is required for consistency tests of the Standard Model and is needed to predict the primordial 4 He abundance from the theory of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. An effort has begun for an in-beam measurement of the neutron lifetime with an projected <=0.3s uncertainty. This effort is part of a phased campaign of neutron lifetime measurements based at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, using the Sussex-ILL-NIST technique. Recent advances in neutron fluence measurement techniques as well as new large area silicon detector technology address the two largest sources of uncertainty of in-beam measurements, paving the way for a new measurement. The experimental design and projected uncertainties for the 0.3s measurement will be discussed. This work is supported by the DOE office of Science, NIST and NSF.

  5. Characterization of a Pulse Neutron Source Yield under Field Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Womble, Phillip C.; Hopper, Lindsay

    2009-03-10

    Technique of rapid evaluation of a pulse neutron sources such as neutron generators under field conditions has been developed. The phoswich sensor and pulse-shape discrimination techniques have been used for the simultaneous measurements of fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons. The sensor has been calibrated using activation neutron detectors and a pulse deuterium-tritium fusion neutron source.

  6. Neutron Activation Analysis PRognosis and Optimization Code System.

    2004-08-20

    Version 00 NAAPRO predicts the results and main characteristics (detection limits, determination limits, measurement limits and relative precision of the analysis) of neutron activation analysis (instrumental and radiochemical). Gamma-ray dose rates for different points of time after sample irradiation and input count rate of the spectrometry system are also predicted. The code uses standard Windows user interface and extensive graphical tools for the visualization of the spectrometer characteristics (efficiency, response and background) and simulated spectrum.more » Optimization part is not included in the current version of the code. This release is designated NAAPRO, Version 01.beta. The MCNP code was used for generating detector responses. PREPRO-2000 and FCONV programs were used at the preparation of the program nuclear databases. A special program was developed for viewing, editing and updating of the program databases (not included into the present program package). The MCNP, PREPRO-2000 and FCONV software packages are not included in the NAAPRO package.« less

  7. Proposed experiment to measure the neutron spin-electron angular correlation in polarized neutron beta decay with ultra-cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; UCN A Collaboration

    1998-12-01

    One area in which the Standard Model can be probed is neutron beta decay. In particular, measurements of angular correlations in neutron beta decay can place constraints on the existence of right-handed currents, the presence of scalar and tensor terms in the weak interaction, and for evidence of Time Reversal Violation, which is expected from the observed violation of CP invariance in kaon decay. A measurement of A, the correlation between the neutron spin and the direction of emission of the electron in neutron decay, can be combined with the neutron lifetime to determine the fundamental vector and axial vector weak coupling constants G{sub A} and G{sub V}. The authors have presented the essential elements of their plans to carry out an A correlation measurement using the UCN source they have constructed at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC). Their goal is an initial measurement with an accuracy of about 0.2% of A (which has a value of about {minus}0.114). The count rate expected in the experiment will allow a determination at this statistical accuracy level in a running time of about four months.

  8. Radioactive targets for neutron-induced cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, A.; Bond, E. M.; Glover, S. E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Esch, E. I.; Reifarth, R.; Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, Robert C.; Rochmann, D.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements using radioactive targets are important for the determination of key reaction path ways associated with the synthesis of the elements in nuclear astrophysics (sprocess), advanced fuel cycle initiative (transmutation of radioactive waste), and stockpile stewardship. High precision capture cross-section measurements are needed to interpret observations, predict elemental or isotopical ratios, and unobserved abundances. There are two new detector systems that are presently being commissioned at Los Alamos National Laboratory for very precise measurements of (n,{gamma}) and (n,f) cross-sections using small quantities of radioactive samples. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments), a 4 {pi} gamma array made up of 160 BaF{sub 2} detectors, is designed to measure neutron capture cross-sections of unstable nuclei in the low-energy range (thermal to {approx}500 keV). The high granularity and high detection efficiency of DANCE, combined with the high TOF-neutron flux available at the Lujan Center provides a versatile tool for measuring many important cross section data using radioactive and isotopically enriched targets of about 1 milligram. Another powerful instrument is the Lead-slowing down spectrometer (LSDS), which will enable the measurement of neutron-induced fission cross-section of U-235m and other short-lived actinides in a energy range from 1-200 keV with sample sizes down to 10 nanograms. Due to the short half-life of the U-235m isomer (T{sub 1/2} = 26 minutes), the samples must be rapidly and repeatedly extracted from its {sup 239}Pu parent. Since {sup 239}Pu is itself highly fissile, the separation must not only be rapid, but must also be of very high purity (the Pu must be removed from the U with a decontamination factor >10{sup 12}). Once extracted and purified, the {sup 235m}U isomer would be electrodeposited on solar cells as a fission detector and placed within the LSDS for direct (n,f) cross section measurements. The

  9. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30/sup 0/ close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Neutron spectral measurements in the D0 collision hall

    SciTech Connect

    Yurista, P.M.; Elwyn, A.J.; Salsbury, W.C.

    1989-05-03

    The characterization of radiation fields is important to many applications. For example, in operational health physics, the choice of instrumentation for monitoring and of a personnel dosimeter for use by radiation workers depend on both the type and spectral characteristics of the radiation. Furthermore, the spectral distribution of the fluence affects radiation damage estimates for materials for new or replacement equipment within the radiation environment. At the same time, knowledge of the character of the radiation fields at a high-energy accelerator leads to a better theoretical understanding of its nature, and is important to the specification of civil construction requirements for future upgrades of the accelerator. At Fermilab as at many high-energy accelerators neutrons dominate the radiation fields outside of beam pipes within enclosures. In a continuing effort to characterize as completely as possible the fields at various locations around the site, we have measured the neutron spectrum within the DO collision hall. Both the fluence and dose-equivalent energy distributions are summarized in this note. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nunez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-21

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  12. DANCE : a 4[pi] barium fluoride detector for measuring neutron capture on unstable nuclei /.

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, Robert C.; Hunt, L. F.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Miller, G. G.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Chamberlin, E. P.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of neutron capture on unstable nuclei are important for studies of s-process nucleosynthesis, nuclear waste transmutation, and stewardship science. A 160-element, 4{pi} barium fluoride detector array, and associated neutron flight path, is being constructed to make capture measurements at the moderated neutron spallation source at LANSCE. Measurements can be made on as little as 1 mg of sample material over energies from near thermal to near 100 keV. The design of the DANCE array is described and neutron flux measurements from flight path commissioning are shown. The array is expected to be complete by the end of 2002.

  13. PING Gamma Ray and Neutron Measurements of a Meter-Sized Carbonaceous Asteroid Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    Determining the elemental composition of carbonaceous (spectral type C) asteroids is still one of the basic problems when studying these objects. The only main source of elemental composition information for asteroids is from their optical, NIR and IR properties, which include their spectral reflectance characteristics, albedo, polarization, and the comparison of optical spectroscopy with meteorite groups corresponding to asteroids of every spectral type. Unfortunately, these sources reflect observations from widely contrasting spatial scales that presently yield a void in the continuum of microscopic and macroscopic evidence, a lack of in situ measurement confirmation, and require deeper sensing techniques to discern the nature of these asteroids. The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is ideally suited to address this problem because it can be used to determine the bulk elemental composition, H and C content, the average atomic weight and density of the surface and subsurface layers of C-type asteroids, and can provide measurements used to determine the difference between and distinguish between different types of asteroids. We are currently developing the PING instrument that combines gamma ray and neutron detectors with a 14 Me V pulsed neutron generator to determine the in-situ bulk elemental abundances and geochemistry of C-type asteroids with a spatial resolution of 1 m down to depths of tens of cm to 1 m. One aspect of the current work includes experimentally testing and optimizing PING on a known meter-sized Columbia River basalt C-type asteroid analog sample that has a similar composition and the same neutron response as that of a C-type asteroid. An important part of this effort focuses on utilizing timing measurements to isolate gamma rays produced by neutron inelastic scattering, neutron capture and delayed activation processes. Separating the gamma ray spectra by nuclear processes results in higher precision and sensitivity

  14. Importance of neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis in relatively dry, low-porosity rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.; Philbin, P.W.; Boynton, G.R.; Wager, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of variations in the neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis, capture gamma-ray measurements were made in relatively dry, low-porosity gabbro of the Duluth Complex. Although sections of over a meter of solid rock were encountered in the borehole, there was significant fracturing with interstitial water leading to a substantial variation of water with depth in the borehole. The linear-correlation coefficients calculated for the peak intensities of several elements compared to the chemical core analyses were generally poor throughout the depth investigated. The data suggest and arguments are given which indicate that the variation of the thermal-to-intermediate-to-fast neutron flux density as a function of borehole depth is a serious source of error and is a major cause of the changes observed in the capture gamma-ray peak intensities. These variations in neutron energy may also cause a shift in the observed capture gamma-ray energy.

  15. Secondary neutron dose measurement for proton eye treatment using an eye snout with a borated neutron absorber

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We measured and assessed ways to reduce the secondary neutron dose from a system for proton eye treatment. Methods Proton beams of 60.30 MeV were delivered through an eye-treatment snout in passive scattering mode. Allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) etch detectors were used to measure the neutron dose in the external field at 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm depths in a water phantom. Secondary neutron doses were measured and compared between those with and without a high-hydrogen–boron-containing block. In addition, the neutron energy and vertices distribution were obtained by using a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation. Results The ratio of the maximum neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose (H(10)/D) at 2.00 cm from the beam field edge was 8.79 ± 1.28 mSv/Gy. The ratio of the neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose with and without a high hydrogen-boron containing block was 0.63 ± 0.06 to 1.15 ± 0.13 mSv/Gy at 2.00 cm from the edge of the field at depths of 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm. Conclusions We found that the out-of-field secondary neutron dose in proton eye treatment with an eye snout is relatively small, and it can be further reduced by installing a borated neutron absorbing material. PMID:23866307

  16. Electroweak Measurements of Neutron Densities in CREX and PREX at JLab, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Charles J.; Kumar, Krishna S.; Michaels, Robert W.

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of the parity-violating electron scattering asymmetry is an established technique at Jefferson Lab and provides a new opportunity to measure the weak charge distribution and hence pin down the neutron radius in nuclei in a relatively clean and model-independent way. This is because the Z boson of the weak interaction couples primarily to neutrons. We will describe the PREX and CREX experiments on ${}^{208}$Pb and ${}^{48}$Ca respectively; these are both doubly-magic nuclei whose first excited state can be discriminated by the high resolution spectrometers at JLab. The heavier lead nucleus, with a neutron excess, provides an interpretation of the neutron skin thickness in terms of properties of bulk neutron matter. For the lighter ${}^{48}$Ca nucleus, which is also rich in neutrons, microscopic nuclear theory calculations are feasible and are sensitive to poorly constrained 3-neutron forces.

  17. Cross-Section Measurements for Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons from Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmullin, Sean; Kidd, Mary; Tornow, Werner; Howell, Calvin; Brown, Michael; Henning, Reyco

    2010-11-01

    Neutron backgrounds are a significant concern to experiments that attempt to directly detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter. Recoil nuclei produced by neutron elastic scattering can mimic WIMP signatures. There is insufficient experimental data available for the scattering cross-sections of neutrons with noble gases (Ne, Ar, Xe), which are candidate target materials for such experiments. Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from neon of natural abundance was investigated at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory at neutron energies relevant to (α,n) and low-energy spallation neutron backgrounds in these experiments. The differential cross-section was measured using a time-of-flight technique at neutron energies of 8.0 and 5.0 MeV. Details of the experimental technique and current status of measurements will be presented.

  18. Cosmic-Ray-Induced Ship-Effect Neutron Measurements and Implications for Cargo Scanning at Borders

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Seifert, Allen; Siciliano, Edward R.; Weier, Dennis R.; Windsor, Lindsay K.; Woodring, Mitchell L.; Borgardt, James D.; Buckley, Elise D.; Flumerfelt, Eric L.; Oliveri, Anna F.; Salvitti, Matthew

    2008-03-11

    Neutron measurements are used as part of the interdiction process for illicit nuclear materials at border crossings. Even though the natural neutron background is small, its variation can impact the sensitivity of detection systems. The natural background of neutrons that is observed in monitoring instruments arises almost entirely from cosmic ray induced cascades in the atmosphere and the surrounding environment. One significant source of variation in the observed neutron background is produced by the “ship effect” in large quantities of cargo that transit past detection instruments. This paper reports on results from measurements with typical monitoring equipment of ship effect neutrons in various materials. One new result is the “neutron shadow shielding” effect seen with some low neutron density materials.

  19. Diagnostic Application of Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis in Hematology

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C.B.; Oliveira, L.C.; Dalaqua, L. Jr.

    2004-10-03

    The Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis (ANAA) technique was used to determine element concentrations of Cl and Na in blood of healthy group (male and female blood donators), select from Blood Banks at Sao Paulo city, to provide information which can help in diagnosis of patients. This study permitted to perform a discussion about the advantages and limitations of using this nuclear methodology in hematological examinations.

  20. Determination of indium in standard rocks by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, O; Steinnes, E

    1966-08-01

    A rapid neutron activation method for the determination of indium in rocks, based on 54 min (116m)In, is described. The method has been applied to a series of geochemical standards including granite G-1 and diabase W-1. The precision is better than +/- 5% for samples containing more than 5 x 10(-10)g indium. Good agreement with previously published values for G-1 and W-1 has been obtained.

  1. Neutron Flux Spectra Determination by Multiple Foil Activation - Iterative Method.

    1994-07-08

    Version 00 Neutron energy spectra are determined by an analysis of experimental activation detector data. As with the original CCC-112/SAND-II program, which was developed at Air Force Weapons Laboratory, this code system consists of four modules, CSTAPE, SLACTS, SLATPE, and SANDII. The first three modules pre-process the dosimetry cross sections and the trial function spectrum library. The last module, SANDII, actually performs the iterative spectrum characterization.

  2. Obsidian sources characterized by neutron-activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Gordus, A A; Wright, G A; Griffin, J B

    1968-07-26

    Concentrations of elements such as manganese, scandium, lanthanum, rubidium, samarium, barium, and zirconium in obsidian samples from different flows show ranges of 1000 percent or more, whereas the variation in element content in obsidian samples from a single flow appears to be less than 40 percent. Neutron-activation analysis of these elements, as well as of sodium and iron, provides a means of identifying the geologic source of an archeological artifact of obsidian.

  3. Determination of indium in standard rocks by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, O; Steinnes, E

    1966-08-01

    A rapid neutron activation method for the determination of indium in rocks, based on 54 min (116m)In, is described. The method has been applied to a series of geochemical standards including granite G-1 and diabase W-1. The precision is better than +/- 5% for samples containing more than 5 x 10(-10)g indium. Good agreement with previously published values for G-1 and W-1 has been obtained. PMID:18959988

  4. SU-E-T-542: Measurement of Internal Neutrons for Uniform Scanning Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M; Ahmad, S; Zheng, Y; Rana, S; Collums, T; Monsoon, J; Benton, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In proton radiotherapy, the production of neutrons is a wellknown problem since neutron exposure can lead to increased risk of secondary cancers later in the patient’s lifetime. The assessment of neutron exposure is, therefore, important for the overall quality of proton radiotherapy. This study investigates the secondary neutrons created inside the patient from uniform scanning proton beams. Methods: Dose equivalent due to secondary neutrons was measured outside the primary field as a function of distance from beam isocenter at three different angles, 45, 90 and 135 degree, relative to beam axis. Plastic track nuclear detector (CR-39 PNTD) was used for the measurement of neutron dose. Two experimental configurations, in-air and cylindrical-phantom, were designed. In a cylindrical-phantom configuration, a cylindrical phantom of 5.5 cm diameter and 35 cm long was placed along the beam direction and in an in-air configuration, no phantom was used. All the detectors were placed at nearly identical locations in both configurations. Three proton beams of range 5 cm, 18 cm, and 32 cm with 4 cm modulation width and a 5 cm diameter aperture were used. The contribution from internal neutrons was estimated from the differences in measured dose equivalent between in-air and cylindrical-phantom configurations at respective locations. Results: The measured ratio of neutron dose equivalent to the primary proton dose (H/D) dropped off with distance and ranged from 27 to 0.3 mSv/Gy. The contribution of internal neutrons near the treatment field edge was found to be up to 64 % of the total neutron exposure. As the distance from the field edge became larger, the external neutrons from the nozzle appear to dominate and the internal neutrons became less prominent. Conclusion: This study suggests that the contribution of internal neutrons could be significant to the total neutron dose equivalent.

  5. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF.

    PubMed

    Moran, M J; Bond, E J; Clancy, T J; Eckart, M J; Khater, H Y; Glebov, V Yu

    2012-10-01

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator∕photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y(n)) measurements from below 10(9) (DD) to nearly 10(15) (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y(n) precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of ± 10% and precision of ± 1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y(n) measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  6. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Khater, H. Y.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2012-10-15

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator/photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y{sub n}) measurements from below 10{sup 9} (DD) to nearly 10{sup 15} (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y{sub n} precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of {+-}10% and precision of {+-}1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y{sub n} measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  7. Operation Sun Beam shots Little Feller I and II, Johnie boy, and Small Boy. Project Officer's report. Project 2. 3. Neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rigotti, D.L.; McNeilly, J.H.; Brady, R.E.; Tarbox, J.L.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) to measure free-field neutron flux and spectrum as required in support of other projects; (2) to document the neutron flux versus ground range; and (3) to determine the effect of various blast containers and shields on detector activation.

  8. Fast neutron measurements with 7Li and 6Li enriched CLYC scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaz, A.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Cattadori, C.; Ceruti, S.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Mattei, I.; Mentana, A.; Million, B.; Pellegri, L.; Rebai, M.; Riboldi, S.; Salamida, F.; Tardocchi, M.

    2016-07-01

    The recently developed Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) crystals are interesting scintillation detectors not only for their gamma energy resolution (<5% at 662 keV) but also for their capability to identify and measure the energy of both gamma rays and fast/thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons were detected by the 6Li(n,α)t reaction while for the fast neutrons the 35Cl(n,p)35S and 35Cl(n,α)32P neutron-capture reactions were exploited. The energy of the outgoing proton or α particle scales linearly with the incident neutron energy. The kinetic energy of the fast neutrons can be measured using both the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique and using the CLYC energy signal. In this work, the response to monochromatic fast neutrons (1.9-3.8 MeV) of two CLYC 1″×1″ crystals was measured using both the TOF and the energy signal. The observables were combined to identify fast neutrons, to subtract the thermal neutron background and to identify different fast neutron-capture reactions on 35Cl, in other words to understand if the detected particle is an α or a proton. We performed a dedicated measurement at the CN accelerator facility of the INFN Legnaro National Laboratories (Italy), where the fast neutrons were produced by impinging a proton beam (4.5, 5.0 and 5.5 MeV) on a 7LiF target. We tested a CLYC detector 6Li-enriched at about 95%, which is ideal for thermal neutron measurements, in parallel with another CLYC detector 7Li-enriched at more than 99%, which is suitable for fast neutron measurements.

  9. Neutron noise measurements at the Delphi subcritical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Szieberth, M.; Klujber, G.; Kloosterman, J. L.; De Haas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The paper presents the results and evaluations of a comprehensive set of neutron noise measurements on the Delphi subcritical assembly of the Delft Univ. of Technology. The measurements investigated the effect of different source distributions (inherent spontaneous fission and {sup 252}Cf) and the position of the detectors applied (both radially and vertically). The evaluation of the measured data has been performed by the variance-to-mean ratio (VTMR, Feynman-{alpha}), the autocorrelation (ACF, Rossi-{alpha}) and the cross-correlation (CCF) methods. The values obtained for the prompt decay constant show a strong bias, which depends both on the detector position and on the source distribution. This is due to the presence of higher modes in the system. It has been observed that the {alpha} value fitted is higher when the detector is close to the boundary of the core or to the {sup 252}Cf point-source. The higher alpha-modes have also been observed by fitting functions describing two alpha-modes. The successful set of measurement also provides a good basis for further theoretical investigations including the Monte Carlo simulation of the noise measurements and the calculation of the alpha-modes in the Delphi subcritical assembly. (authors)

  10. TFT-Based Active Pixel Sensors for Large Area Thermal Neutron Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnen, George

    Due to diminishing availability of 3He, which is the critical component of neutron detecting proportional counters, large area flexible arrays are being considered as a potential replacement for neutron detection. A large area flexible array, utilizing semiconductors for both charged particle detection and pixel readout, ensures a large detection surface area in a light weight rugged form. Such a neutron detector could be suitable for deployment at ports of entry. The specific approach used in this research, uses a neutron converter layer which captures incident thermal neutrons, and then emits ionizing charged particles. These ionizing particles cause electron-hole pair generation within a single pixel's integrated sensing diode. The resulting charge is then amplified via a low-noise amplifier. This document begins by discussing the current state of the art in neutron detection and the associated challenges. Then, for the purpose of resolving some of these issues, recent design and modeling efforts towards developing an improved neutron detection system are described. Also presented is a low-noise active pixel sensor (APS) design capable of being implemented in low temperature indium gallium zinc oxide (InGaZnO) or amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor process compatible with plastic substrates. The low gain and limited scalability of this design are improved upon by implementing a new multi-stage self-resetting APS. For each APS design, successful radiation measurements are also presented using PiN diodes for charged particle detection. Next, detection array readout methodologies are modeled and analyzed, and use of a matched filter readout circuit is described as well. Finally, this document discusses detection diode integration with the designed TFT-based APSs.

  11. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n} (x, Q{sup 2}) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized {sup 3}He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 {le} x {le} 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 GeV{sup 2}. The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be {integral}{sub 0.014}{sup 0.7} dx g{sub 1}{sup n}(x, 5 GeV{sup 2}) = {minus}0.036 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g{sub 1}{sup n} at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x {r_arrow} 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup n} paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2}, determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule.

  12. NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING AN ISOTOPIC NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; C Diprete, C; Raymond Sigg, R

    2006-08-14

    NAA using {sup 252}Cf is used to address important areas of applied interest at SRS. Sensitivity needs for many of the applications are not severe; analyses are accomplished using a 21 mg {sup 252}Cf NAA facility. Because NAA allows analysis of bulk samples, it offers strong advantages for samples in difficult-to-digest matrices when its sensitivity is sufficient. Following radiochemical separation with stable carrier addition, chemical yields for a number methods are determined by neutron activation of the stable carrier. In some of the cases where no suitable stable carriers exist, the source has been used to generate radioactive tracers to yield separations.

  13. Neutron-induced nucleation inside bubble chambers using Freon 115 as the active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-08-01

    Neutron imaging is used in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments to measure the core symmetry of imploded targets. Liquid bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. Due to the fact that nucleation models used in gel detectors research cannot always give correct estimates for the neutron-induced bubble density inside a liquid bubble chamber, an improved theoretical model to describe the mechanism of bubble formation for Freon 115 as the active medium has been developed. It shows that the size of the critical radius for the nucleation process determines the mechanism of bubble formation and the sensitivity of the active medium to the 14.1-MeV incident neutrons resulting from ICF implosions. The bubble-growth mechanism is driven by the excitation of the medium electronic levels and not by electrons ejected from the medium's atoms as happens for the bubble chambers used to detect charged particles. The model accurately predicts the neutron-induced bubble density measured on OMEGA with both liquid bubble chambers and gel detectors.

  14. Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detectors (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA-GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Menus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially its the case of the Mars Odyssey GRS, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars. However, orbital gamma ray measurements have low spatial sensitivity (100's of km) due to their low surface emission rates from cosmic rays and subsequent need to be averaged over large surface areas. PNG-GRAND overcomes this impediment by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits high sensitivity surface and subsurface measurements of bulk elemental compositions. PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument to determine subsurface elemental composition without needing to drill into a planet's surface a great advantage in mission design. We are currently testing PNG-GRAND prototypes at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 in x 1 m granite structure placed outdoors in an empty field. Because an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on the material, this granite sample is a known standard with which to compare both Monte Carlo simulations and our experimentally measured elemental composition data. We will present data from operating PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a

  15. Neutron Capture and Fission Measurements on Actinides at Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, A.; Wu, C. Y.; Kwan, E.; Henderson, R. A.; Gostic, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Couture, A. J.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Lee, H. Y.

    2013-03-01

    The prompt γ-ray energy and multiplicity distributions in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf have been measured using a highly granular 4π γ-ray calorimeter. Corrections were made for both energy and multiplicity distributions according to the detector response, which is simulated numerically using a model validated with the γ-ray calibration sources. A comparison of the total γray energy distribution was made between the measurement and a simulation by random sampling of the corrected γ-ray energy and multiplicity distributions through the detector response. A reasonable agreement is achieved between the measurement and simulation, indicating weak correlations between γ-ray energy and multiplicity. Moreover, the increasing agreement with increasing multiplicity manifests the stochastic aspect of the prompt γ decay in spontaneous fission. This calorimeter was designed for the study of neutron capture reactions and an example is given, where the238Pu(n, γ) measurement was carried out in the laboratory environment for the first time.

  16. Collimated neutron probe for soil water content measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klenke, J.M.; Flint, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    A collimated neutron probe was designed to enable mesurements in specific directions from the access tube. To determine the size and shape of soil volume affecting the neutron counts, experiments were conducted to evaluate: 1) the vertical distance of soil above and below the probe that influences neutron counts; 2) the horizontal distance away from the probe into the soil that influences neutron counts; 3) the angle of soil viewed by the probe from the collimator; and 4) the three-dimensional thermal-neutron density field. The vertical distance was ~0.5m, the horizontal distance was ~0.2m, and the angle of soil viewed by the probe from the collimator was ~120??. Thermal neutrons detected from distances or angles larger than these values influence the determination of relative water content by 5% or less. -from Authors

  17. On the self-shielding factors in neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trkov, A.; Žerovnik, G.; Snoj, L.; Ravnik, M.

    2009-11-01

    Whenever the sample size in neutron activation analysis cannot be made small enough, self-shielding effects need to be taken into account. When several resonance absorbers are present in the sample, resonance interference must also be considered. Estimation of the self-shielding factors by the Monte Carlo technique is too cumbersome for routine application. Various simplified approaches were compared to rigorous Monte Carlo calculations, pointing out their potential limitations. Good results are obtained using self-shielding factors calculated from evaluated nuclear data libraries and tabulated as a function of the dilution cross-section. The dilution cross-section depends on the material composition and the sample dimensions through the equivalence principle, which is well known in reactor physics. Resonance interference is calculated by solving the neutron spectrum slowing-down equation from cross-sections in 640-group representation. The MATSSF code was written for the purpose and is available on request.

  18. Measurement of neutron radiation exposure of commercial airline pilots using bubble detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.J.; Kosierb, R. . Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering); Cousins, T. . Space Systems and Technology Section); Hudson, D.F. ); Guery, G. )

    1994-06-01

    Neutron bubble detectors have been used over a 1-yr period by commercial airline pilots from Air Canada and Air France to measure the high-altitude neutron radiation exposure produced by galactic cosmic rays. The present work yielded measurements of the neutron flux of 1.0 to 4.6 n/cm[sup 2][center dot]s, and the neutron dose equivalent rates of 1.7 to 7.7 [mu]S[nu]/h. These measurements are in agreement with previous studies using high-altitude aircraft and conventional neutron instrumentation. The total dose equivalents for the Air Canada flights are also consistent with predictions of the CARI code. Considering that the neutron component contributes [approximately] 50% of the total dose equivalent, this study indicates that the annual dose for the air crew member would exceed the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP-60) for the general public.

  19. Neutrons measure phase behavior in pores at Angstrom size

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have measured the phase behavior of green house gases in pores at the Angstrom-level, using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor. Yuri Melnichenko, an instrument scientist on the General Purpose Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GP SANS) Diffractometer at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor, his postdoctoral associate Lilin He and collaborators Nidia Gallego and Cristian Contescu from the Material Sciences Division (ORNL) were engaged in the work. They were studying nanoporous carbons to assess their attractiveness as storage media for hydrogen, with a view to potential use for on-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications. Nanoporous carbons can also serve as electrode material for supercapacitors and batteries. The researchers successfully determined that the most efficiently condensing pore size in a carbon nanoporous material for hydrogen storage is less than one nanometer. In a paper recently published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the collaborators used small angle neutron scattering to study how hydrogen condenses in small pores at ambient temperature. They discovered that the surface-molecule interactions create internal pressures in pores that may exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to 50. 'This is an exciting result,' Melnichenko said, 'as you achieve extreme densification in pores 'for free', i.e. without spending any energy. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored to maximize hydrogen storage capacities.' Another important factor that defines the adsorption capacity of sub-nanometer pores is their shape. In order to get accurate structural information and maximize sorption capacity, it is important that pores are small and of approximately uniform size. In collaboration with Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi who supplied the samples, Melnichenko and his collaborators used the GP SANS

  20. Neutron β Decay: Status and Future of the Asymmetry Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Takeyasu M.

    2007-04-04

    With more intense sources of cold and ultracold neutrons becoming available and with improved experimental techniques being developed, determination of ΙVud l from neutron β decay with a similar precision to that from from superallowed β decays is within reach. Determination of IVud l from neutron β decay, free from nuclear corrections, holds the most promise for a further improvement of the determination of IVud l· The current and future neutron β decay correlation experiments including the UCNA experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory are reviewed.

  1. A study of neutron radiation quality with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter for a low-energy accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation facility.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Waker, A J

    2011-02-01

    The accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation facility at McMaster University has been used successfully for the measurement of several minor and trace elements in human hand bones due to their importance to health. Most of these in vivo measurements have been conducted at a proton beam energy (E(p)) of 2.00 MeV to optimise the activation of the selected element of interest with an effective dose of the same order as that received in chest X rays. However, measurement of other elements at the same facility requires beam energies other than 2.00 MeV. The range of energy of neutrons produced at these proton beam energies comes under the region where tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) are known to experience difficulty in assessing the quality factor and dose equivalent. In this study, the response of TEPCs was investigated to determine the quality factor of neutron fields generated via the (7)Li(p, n)(7)Be reaction as a function of E(p) in the range 1.884-2.56 MeV at the position of hand irradiation in the facility. An interesting trend has been observed in the quality factor based on ICRP 60, Q(ICRP60), such that the maximum value was observed at E(p)=1.884 MeV (E(n)=33±16 keV) and then continued to decline with increasing E(p) until achieving a minimum value at E(p)=2.0 MeV despite a continuous increase in the mean neutron energy with E(p). This observation is contrary to what has been observed with direct fast neutrons where the quality factor was found to increase continuously with an increase in E(p) (i.e. increasing E(n)). The series of measurements conducted with thermal and fast neutron fields demonstrate that the (14)N(n, p)(14)C produced 580 keV protons in the detector play an important role in the response of the counter under 2.0 MeV proton energy (E(n) ≤ 250 keV). In contrast to the lower response of TEPCs to low-energy neutrons, the quality factor is overestimated in the range 1-2 depending on beam energy <2.0 MeV. This study provides

  2. Neutron Screening Measurements of 110 gallon drums at T Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Hilliard, James R.; Berg, Randal K.

    2011-01-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Nondestructive Assay (NDA) Service Center was contracted to develop and demonstrate a simple and inexpensive method of assaying 110 gallon drums at the Hanford Site’s T-Plant. The drums contained pucks of crushed old drums used for storage of transuranic (TRU) waste. The drums were to be assayed to determine if they meet the criteria for TRU or Low Level Waste (LLW). Because of the dense matrix (crushed steel drums) gamma measurement techniques were excluded and a mobile, configurable neutron system, consisting of four sequentially connected slab detectors was chosen to be used for this application. An optimum measurement configuration was determined through multiple test measurements with californium source. Based on these measurements the initial calibration of the system was performed applying the isotopic composition for aged weapon-grade plutonium. A series of background and blank puck drum measurements allowed estimating detection limits for both total (singles) and coincidence (doubles) counting techniques. It was found that even conservative estimates for minimum detection concentration using singles count rate were lower than the essential threshold of 100 nCi/g. Whereas the detection limit of coincidence counting appeared to be about as twice as high of the threshold. A series of measurements intended to verify the technique and revise the initial calibration obtained were performed at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility with plutonium standards. Standards with a total mass of 0.3 g of plutonium (which is estimated to be equivalent of 100 nCi/g for net waste weight of 300 kg) loaded in the test puck drum were clearly detected. The following measurements of higher plutonium loadings verified the calibration factors obtained in the initial exercise. The revised and established calibration factors were also confirmed within established uncertainties by additional measurements of plutonium

  3. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expandmore » the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.« less

  4. Scattered and (n,2n) neutrons as a measure of areal density in ICF capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. C.; Murphy, T. J.; Mead, W. C.; Disdier, L.; Houry, M.; Bayer, C.; Bourgade, J.-L.

    2001-10-01

    The fraction of low energy neutrons created from 14 MeV neutrons by elastic scattering and (n,2n) reactions on D and T can measure the areal density ρ r ( radial integral of density) of ICF targets. This may be crucial since for ignition capsules the fraction of reaction-in-flight neutrons is proportional to ρ r T and not simply ρ r^2 In simple situations the fraction of neutrons between 9.4 (the upper energy of T+T neutrons) and 13 MeV (below the Doppler broadened 14.1 MeV peak) is proportional to the ρ r at the time of neutron production. The ratio of neutrons at a specific energy (e.g. 13 MeV) to the their integral over all energies can be measured along different lines of sight. Because scattering is forward peaked, comparing these ratios provides a nearly linear measure of implosion asymmetry. Gamma rays can be a negligible background if the detector is placed inside the target chamber close enough to the target that measurements are made before the 14 MeV neutrons reach the chamber wall. Calculated gamma ray and scattered neutron backgrounds from a cryogenic target support or a diagnostic instrument do not pose a problem. A GaAs detector 2.5m from the target in the NIF chamber appears to have enough sensitivity and sufficiently rapid time response to make this measurement.

  5. Mass measurements of neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawitter, R.; Bader, A.; Brodeur, M.; Chowdhury, U.; Chaudhuri, A.; Fallis, J.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Lascar, D.; Leach, K. G.; Lennarz, A.; Macdonald, T. D.; Pearkes, J.; Seeraji, S.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Schultz, B. E.; Dilling, J.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the mass measurements of several neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes in the A ≈100 region with the TITAN Penning-trap mass spectrometer. By using highly charged ions in the charge state q =10 + , the masses of Rb,9998 and Sr-10098 have been determined with a precision of 6-12 keV, making their uncertainty negligible for r -process nucleosynthesis network calculations. The mass of 101Sr has been determined directly for the first time with a precision eight times higher than the previous indirect measurement and a deviation of 3 σ when compared to the Atomic Mass Evaluation. We also confirm the mass of 100Rb from a previous measurement. Furthermore, our data indicate the existence of a low-lying isomer with 80 keV excitation energy in 98Rb. We show that our updated mass values lead to minor changes in the r process by calculating fractional abundances in the A ≈100 region of the nuclear chart.

  6. Neutron measurements with ultra-thin 3D silicon sensors in a radiotherapy treatment room using a Siemens PRIMUS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardiola, C.; Gómez, F.; Fleta, C.; Rodríguez, J.; Quirion, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Lousa, A.; Martínez-de-Olcoz, L.; Pombar, M.; Lozano, M.

    2013-05-01

    The accurate detection and dosimetry of neutrons in mixed and pulsed radiation fields is a demanding instrumental issue with great interest both for the industrial and medical communities. In recent studies of neutron contamination around medical linacs, there is a growing concern about the secondary cancer risk for radiotherapy patients undergoing treatment in photon modalities at energies greater than 6 MV. In this work we present a promising alternative to standard detectors with an active method to measure neutrons around a medical linac using a novel ultra-thin silicon detector with 3D electrodes adapted for neutron detection. The active volume of this planar device is only 10 µm thick, allowing a high gamma rejection, which is necessary to discriminate the neutron signal in the radiotherapy peripheral radiation field with a high gamma background. Different tests have been performed in a clinical facility using a Siemens PRIMUS linac at 6 and 15 MV. The results show a good thermal neutron detection efficiency around 2% and a high gamma rejection factor.

  7. Precision Measurement of Parity Violation in Polarized Cold Neutron Capture on the Proton: the NPDGamma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Lauss; J.D. Bowman; R. Carlini; T.E. Chupp; W. Chen; S. Corvig; M. Dabaghyan; D. Desai; S.J. Freeman; T.R. Gentile; M.T. Gericke; R.C. Gillis; G.L. Greene; F.W. Hersman; T. Ino; T. Ito; G.L. Jones; M. Kandes; M. Leuschner; B. Lozowski; R. Mahurin; M. Mason; Y. Masuda; J. Mei; G.S. Mitchell; S. Muto; H. Nann; S.A. Page; S.I. Penttila; W.D. Ramsay; S. Santra; P.-N. Seo; E.I. Sharapov; T.B. Smith; W.M. Snow; W.S. Wilburn; V. Yuan; H. Zhu

    2005-10-24

    The NPD{gamma} experiment at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is dedicated to measure with high precision the parity violating asymmetry in the {gamma} emission after capture of spin polarized cold neutrons in para-hydrogen. The measurement will determine unambiguously the weak pion-nucleon-nucleon ({pi} NN) coupling constant (line integral){sub {pi}}{sup l}.

  8. Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, Ann M.; Arens, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Th ere is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time, com promising the thermal performance and possibly also structural integr ity of the tanks. Therefore an Non-destructive Testing (NDT) method for measuring the perlite density or void fraction is urgently needed. Methods based on neutrons are good candidates because they can readil y penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the ent ire 120 cm thickness of the perlite zone. Neutrons interact with the nuclei of materials to produce characteristic gamma rays which are the n detected. The gamma ray signal strength is proportional to the atom ic number density. Consequently, if the perlite is compacted then the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will i ncrease. Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simul taneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scatt ering which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, AI, Na, Kand H. Thus the two energy ranges produce complementary information. The R&D program has three phases: numerical simulations of neutron and gamma ray transport with MCNP s oftware, evaluation of the system in the laboratory on test articles and finally mapping of the perlite density in the cryogenic tanks at KSC. The preliminary MCNP calculations have shown that the fast/therma l neutron NDT method is capable of distinguishing between expanded an d compacted perlite with excellent statistics.

  9. Workplace testing of the new single sphere neutron spectrometer based on Dysprosium activation foils (Dy-SSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Chiti, M.; Palacios-Pérez, L.; Angelone, M.; Tana, L.

    2012-08-01

    A photon insensitive passive neutron spectrometer consisting of a single moderating polyethylene sphere with Dysprosium activation foils arranged along three perpendicular axes was designed by CIEMAT and INFN. The device is called Dy-SSS (Dy foil-based Single Sphere Spectrometer). It shows nearly isotropic response in terms of neutron fluence up to 20 MeV. The first prototype, previously calibrated with 14 MeV neutrons, has been recently tested in workplaces having different energy and directional distributions. These are a 2.5 MeV nearly mono-chromatic and mono-directional beam available at the ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) and the photo-neutron field produced in a 15 MV Varian CLINAC DHX medical accelerator, located in the Ospedale S. Chiara (Pisa). Both neutron spectra are known through measurements with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer. In both cases the experimental response of the Dy-SSS agrees with the reference data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the spectrometric capability of the new device are independent from the directional distribution of the neutron field. This opens the way to a new generation of moderation-based neutron instruments, presenting all advantages of the Bonner sphere spectrometer without the disadvantage of the repeated exposures. This concept is being developed within the NESCOFI@BTF project of INFN (Commissione Scientifica Nazionale 5).

  10. Determination of selected trace elements in foodstuffs and biological materials by destructive neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bayat, I; Etehadiyan, M; Ansar, M

    1995-01-01

    Concentration of trace elements in Nescafé, Fariman sugar, and Sadaf turmeric and mercury content in cancerous blood were determined by radiochemical, neutron activation analysis. By this separation method levels of 110mAg, 198Au, 203Hg, 76Se, 51Cr, 24Na, 42K, 99Mo, 122Sb, 82Br, 59Fe, 60Co were measured without interference in the gamma spectroscopy. A nondestructive method has also been used for the analysis of sodium, potassium, and bromine. PMID:8748216

  11. Analysis of the size, shape, and spatial distribution of microinclusions by neutron-activation autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Flitsiyan, E.S.; Romanovskii, A.V.; Gurvich, L.G.; Kist, A.A.

    1987-02-01

    The local concentration and spatial distribution of some elements in minerals, rocks, and ores can be determined by means of neutron-activation autoradiography. The local element concentration is measured in this method by placing an activated section of the rock to be analyzed, together with an irradiated standard, against a photographic emulsion which acts as a radiation detector. The photographic density of the exposed emulsion varies as a function of the tested element content in the part of the sample next to the detector. In order to assess the value of neutron-activation autoradiography in the analysis of element distribution, we considered the main factors affecting the production of selective autoradiographs, viz., resolution, detection limit, and optimal irradiation conditions, holding time, and exposure.

  12. Scattering length measurements from radiative pion capture and neutron-deuteron breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.F.; Tornow, W. |; Carman, T.S.

    1997-07-01

    The neutron-neutron and neutron-proton {sup 1}S{sub 0} scattering lengths a{sub nn} and a{sub np}, respectively, were determined simultaneously from the neutron-deuteron breakup reaction. Their comparison with the recommended values obtained from two body reactions gives a measure of the importance of three-nucleon force effects in the three-nucleon continuum. In order to check on the result obtained for a{sub nn} from the two-body {pi}{sup {minus}}-d capture reaction, a new measurement was performed at LANL. Preliminary results of the three experiments are given.

  13. Measurement of the fast neutron flux in the MNSR inner irradiation site.

    PubMed

    Khattab, K

    2007-01-01

    The WIMSD4 code was used to calculate the fast neutron flux spectrum and the fast neutron fission cross-sections for (238)U, using six energy groups ranging from 0.5 to 10 MeV. These results, with the measured radioactivities of the (140)Ba, (131)I, (103)Ru, (95)Zr and (97)Zr fission products emerging from the fission of the (238)U foil covered with a cadmium filter, were used to measure the fast neutron flux in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor inner irradiation site.

  14. Coincidence Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. gandner; C.W. Mayo; W.A. Metwally; W. Zhang; W. Guo; A. Shehata

    2002-11-10

    The normal prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis for either bulk or small beam samples inherently has a small signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio due primarily to the neutron source being present while the sample signal is being obtained. Coincidence counting offers the possibility of greatly reducing or eliminating the noise generated by the neutron source. The present report presents our results to date on implementing the coincidence counting PGNAA approach. We conclude that coincidence PGNAA yields: (1) a larger signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, (2) more information (and therefore better accuracy) from essentially the same experiment when sophisticated coincidence electronics are used that can yield singles and coincidences simultaneously, and (3) a reduced (one or two orders of magnitude) signal from essentially the same experiment. In future work we will concentrate on: (1) modifying the existing CEARPGS Monte Carlo code to incorporate coincidence counting, (2) obtaining coincidence schemes for 18 or 20 of the common elements in coal and cement, and (3) optimizing the design of a PGNAA coincidence system for the bulk analysis of coal.

  15. A militarily fielded thermal neutron activation sensor for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, E. T. H.; McFee, J. E.; Ing, H.; Andrews, H. R.; Tennant, D.; Harper, E.; Faust, A. A.

    2007-08-01

    The Canadian Department of National Defence has developed a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor system to detect anti-tank landmines on roads and tracks in peacekeeping operations. A key part of the system is a thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor which is placed above a suspect location to within a 30 cm radius and confirms the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.835 MeV gamma ray associated with thermal neutron capture on 14N. The TNA uses a 100 μg252Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62 cm×7.62 cm NaI(Tl) detectors. The system, consisting of the TNA sensor head, including source, detectors and shielding, the high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics and the data processing methodology are described. Results of experiments to characterize detection performance are also described. The experiments have shown that anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less can be detected in roughly a minute or less, but deeper mines and mines significantly displaced horizontally take considerably longer time. Mines as deep as 30 cm can be detected for long count times (1000 s). Four TNA detectors are now in service with the Canadian Forces as part of the four multi-sensor systems, making it the first militarily fielded TNA sensor and the first militarily fielded confirmation sensor for landmines. The ability to function well in adverse climatic conditions has been demonstrated, both in trials and operations.

  16. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent outside and inside of the treatment vault of GRID therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xudong; Charlton, Michael A.; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony Y.; Li, Ying; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rates at the treatment vault entrance (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}), and to study the secondary radiation to the patient in GRID therapy. The radiation activation on the grid was studied.Methods: A Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator was working at 18 MV mode with a grid manufactured by .decimal, Inc. The H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} were measured using an Andersson–Braun neutron REM meter, and a Geiger Müller counter. The radiation activation on the grid was measured after the irradiation with an ion chamber γ-ray survey meter. The secondary radiation dose equivalent to patient was evaluated by etched track detectors and OSL detectors on a RANDO{sup ®} phantom.Results: Within the measurement uncertainty, there is no significant difference between the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} with and without a grid. However, the neutron dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 35.3% lower than that without the grid when using the same field size and the same amount of monitor unit. The photon dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 44.9% lower. The measured average half-life of the radiation activation in the grid is 12.0 (±0.9) min. The activation can be categorized into a fast decay component and a slow decay component with half-lives of 3.4 (±1.6) min and 15.3 (±4.0) min, respectively. There was no detectable radioactive contamination found on the surface of the grid through a wipe test.Conclusions: This work indicates that there is no significant change of the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} in GRID therapy, compared with a conventional external beam therapy. However, the neutron and scattered photon dose equivalent to the patient decrease dramatically with the grid and can be clinical irrelevant. Meanwhile, the users of a grid should be aware of the possible high dose to the radiation worker from the radiation activation on the surface of the grid. A delay in handling the grid after the beam

  17. Measurement of the neutron spectrum and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R.

    2015-07-07

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement of the neutron spectral distribution and fluence from the 252Cf source (model NS-120, LLNL serial # 7001677, referred as the SMALL Cf source) and determination of the ambient neutron dose rate equivalent and kerma at 100 cm for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). The dosimetric quantities should be based on the neutron spectrum and the current neutron-to-dose conversion coefficients.

  18. Active and passive mode calibration of the Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J. M.

    2002-06-01

    The Combined Thermal/Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) non-destructive assay (NDA) system was designed to assay transuranic waste by employing an induced active neutron interrogation and/or a spontaneous passive neutron measurement. This is the second of two papers, and focuses on the passive mode, relating the net double neutron coincidence measurement to the plutonium mass via the calibration constant. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) calibration standards were used and the results verified with NIST-traceable verification standards. Performance demonstration program (PDP) 'empty' 208-L matrix drum was used for the calibration. The experimentally derived calibration constant was found to be 0.0735 {+-} 0.0059 g {sup 240}Pu effective per unit response. Using this calibration constant, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) criteria was satisfied with five minute waste assays in the range from 3 to 177g Pu. CTEN also participated in the PDP Cycle 8A blind assay with organic sludge and metal matrices and passed the criteria for accuracy and precision in both assay modes. The WIPP and EPA audit was completed March 1, 2002 and full certification is awaiting the closeout of one finding during the audit. With the successful closeout of the audit, the CTEN system will have shown that it can provide very fast assays (five minutes or less) of waste in the range from the minimum detection limit (about 2 mg Pu) to 177 g Pu.

  19. Neutron Background Measurements by the the MSL Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Instrument during the First 360 sols of the Surface Operation at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, I.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A.; Behar, A.; Boynton, W. V.; DeFlores, L.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C. J.; Harshman, K.; Kozyrev, A.; Kuzmin, R.; Malakhov, A.; Mischna, M. A.; Moersch, J.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Shvetsov, V.; Tate, C.; Vostrukhin, A.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Since first commissioned on sol 3 after landing in August 2012, DAN has been operating successfully and provided a wealth of surface measurement data both in Active mode and in Passive mode operations. Active mode measurements provide a means to determine the characteristics of subsurface in terms of layering structure, content of water equivalent hydrogen (WEH), and/or content of chlorine. Passive mode measurements provide a general background level of low energy (< ~1 keV) neutrons induced by Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) interactions with the Martian atmosphere and the surface material and from Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermonuclear Generator (MMRTG). Passive mode measurements have been done on almost every sols with durations ranging from 1 hour to ~9 hour, covering different times of a day. Extensive numerical simulations have been carried out to aid in interpreting the DAN passive data. Both surface operation and numerical simulations show that the passive data correlate very well with the active data. It was also found that the passive data alone could provide a general trend of WEH content variation along the rover traverse. A methodology to estimate the respective contribution from each source (i.e., MMRTG neutrons and GCR-induced neutrons) for the passive data has been developed and was used to understand the neutron background environment at the Rocknest site, where the rover stayed over an extended period of time (from sol 59 to sol 100). The result shows that the MMRTG contribution to the DAN passive counts was about 60% of the total, and the GCR-induced counts were estimated to be about 40%. Details of all these observations, modeling effort, and analysis and interpretation processes will be presented in the final paper by using the passive data collected through sol 360.

  20. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.