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Sample records for active normal faults

  1. Kinematic indicators on active normal faults in Western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. L.; Barka, A. A.

    Quaternary normal fault zones in western Turkey comprise multiple slip planes and zone-parallel layers of fault breccia. They also contain several little-known kinematic indicators that are probably typical of many formed at shallow levels in extending terrains. The recent exhumation by contractors of about 2000 m 2 of slip planes in a SSE-dipping fault zone separating Quaternary colluvium from bedrock carbonates at Yavansu (7 km SE of Kuşadasi) permits an unusually complete inventory of the indicators to be compiled. The most spectacular indicators are metre-scale 69°W-pitching corrugations in slip planes and recemented breccia sheets underlying them. Corrugations, characterized by sinusoidal profiles normal to their long axes and, less commonly, culminations and depression along their axes possibly developed as a result of upwards-propagating slip planes seeking undemanding pathways through heterogeneous fault-precursor breccias that formed in advance of tip lines. Parallel to corrugation long axes are those of gutters, flat-floored, sleep-sided channels a few centimetres wide, probably related to the abrasion of subslip-plane breccia sheets. Centimetre-scale tool tracks scored in the uppermost subslip-plane breccia sheet by resistant colluvial clasts are irregular at their proximal ends but distally they swing into alignment with corrugation axes. Frictional-wear striae, centimetres long but only a few millimetres wide and pitching 78°W, are superimposed on the other slip-parallel lineations. Comb fractures nearly perpendicular to slip planes define an intersection lineation which is normal to corrugation axes. Fault-plane solutions of earthquakes on SSE-dipping active faults in the West Anatolian extensional province indicate that mainly normal, combined with minor dextral slip is the dominant mode, a conclusion in accord with the sense of slip inferred from the indicators exposed on the Yavansu slip planes.

  2. Anatomy of a microearthquake sequence on an active normal fault

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, T. A.; Satriano, C.; Orefice, A.; Festa, G.; Zollo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of similar earthquakes, such as events in a seismic sequence, is an effective tool with which to monitor and study source processes and to understand the mechanical and dynamic states of active fault systems. We are observing seismicity that is primarily concentrated in very limited regions along the 1980 Irpinia earthquake fault zone in Southern Italy, which is a complex system characterised by extensional stress regime. These zones of weakness produce repeated earthquakes and swarm-like microearthquake sequences, which are concentrated in a few specific zones of the fault system. In this study, we focused on a sequence that occurred along the main fault segment of the 1980 Irpinia earthquake to understand its characteristics and its relation to the loading-unloading mechanisms of the fault system. PMID:22606366

  3. Imaging the complexity of an active normal fault system: The 1997 Colfiorito (central Italy) case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiaraluce, L.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Chiarabba, C.; Cocco, M.

    2003-01-01

    Six moderate magnitude earthquakes (5 < Mw < 6) ruptured normal fault segments of the southern sector of the North Apennine belt (central Italy) in the 1997 Colfiorito earthquake sequence. We study the progressive activation of adjacent and nearby parallel faults of this complex normal fault system using ???1650 earthquake locations obtained by applying a double-difference location method, using travel time picks and waveform cross-correlation measurements. The lateral extent of the fault segments range from 5 to 10 km and make up a broad, ???45 km long, NW trending fault system. The geometry of each segment is quite simple and consists of planar faults gently dipping toward SW with an average dip of 40??-45??. The fault planes are not listric but maintain a constant dip through the entire seismogenic volume, down to 8 km depth. We observe the activation of faults on the hanging wall and the absence of seismicity in the footwall of the structure. The observed fault segmentation appears to be due to the lateral heterogeneity of the upper crust: preexisting thrusts inherited from Neogene's compressional tectonic intersect the active normal faults and control their maximum length. The stress tensor obtained by inverting the six main shock focal mechanisms of the sequence is in agreement with the tectonic stress active in the inner chain of the Apennine, revealing a clear NE trending extension direction. Aftershock focal mechanisms show a consistent extensional kinematics, 70% of which are mechanically consistent with the main shock stress field.

  4. Mineralogy and porosity transformation induced by normal fault activity, Pirgaki fault zone (Corinth rift, Greece).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Géraud, Y.; Diraison, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Pirgaki fault displays an average N095-100 strike direction and contributes to the south part of the Corinth graben. Several interconnected segments compose it and it forms a quite continuous fault scrap elevated up to 300 meters. The total length of outcropping fault zone is at least 30 km. The dip angle involves between 40° to 70° for the highest. The high angle part of the fault marks the contact between limestone and sediments of the rift series (Ghisetti et al. 2001). A large set of structural and sedimentological criteria are evidence of repeated activity of the Pirgaki fault during the whole Pliocene-Pleistocene period (Ghisetti et al., 2001). The studied part of the Pirgaki fault zone has low angle dip and affects limestones. These limestones, as well as in the hanging wall than in the footwall, are strongly affected by a previous neogene orogen with ductile (folds) and brittle (faults) structures. The sampling zone concerns the low dipping part of the fault. A set of 12 samples is analysed by Hg and water porosimetry, X-ray diffraction and SEM. Protolith is characterised by a very low porosity material, porous volume lower than 1% and threshold size lower 0.1µm. Clay fraction of the protolith material is formed by a set of interstratified illite-smectite and kaolinite minerals. The gouge zone is characterized by an important structural modification with formation of ductile strain part and a brittle strain part. Transformations of the clay content are important in this part of the fault zone. Interstratified phases disappear and are replaced by illite and chlorite phases. The highest illite content is measured for the brittle part of the gouge zone and the highest chlorite content is measured in the ductile part. These structural transformations are also associated with porosity modifications with an large increase of the porosity volume (10%) an of the threshold diameter (3µm) in the brittle part and a lower increase (porosity value, 2% and

  5. Unravelling the competing influence of regional uplift and active normal faulting in SW Calabria, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Alex; Roda Boluda, Duna; Boulton, Sarah; Erhardt, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The Neogene geological and geomorphological evolution of Southern Italy is complex and is fundamentally controlled by the subduction of the Ionian slab along the Apennine belt from the Calabrian Arc, and back-arc extension driven by trench rollback. In the area of Calabria and the Straits of Messina the presence of (i) uplifted, deformed and dissected basin sediments and marine terraces, ranging in age from the early to mid-Pleistocene and (ii) seismicity associated with NE-SW normal faults that have well-developed footwall topography and triangular facets have led workers to suggest that both significant regional uplift and extensional faulting in SW Calabria have played a role in generating relief in the area since the mid Pleistocene. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the rates of total surface uplift relative to sea level in both time and space, and the relative partitioning of this uplift between a mantle-driven regional signal, potentially related to a slab tear, and the active extensional structures. Additionally, despite the widespread recognition of normal faults in Calabria to which historical earthquakes are often linked, there is much less agreement on (i) which ones are active and for what length of time; (ii) how the faults interact; and (iii) what their throw and throw rates are. In particular, the ability to resolve both regional uplift and normal faulting in SW Calabria is essential in order to fully understand the tectonic history of the region, while an understanding of location and slip rate of active faults, in an area where the population numbers more than two million people, is essential to assess regional seismic hazards. Here we address these important questions using a combination of tectonic geomorphology and structural geology. We critically examine existing constraints on the rates and distribution of active normal faulting and regional uplift in the area, and we derive new constraints on the along-strike variation in throw

  6. Numerical simulation of coastal flooding after potential reactivation of an active normal fault in northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yu-Chang; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chang, Kuo-Jen; Chen, Rou-Fei; Hsieh, Yu-Chung

    2016-04-01

    Rapid coastal flooding from seawards may be resulted from storm surge, tsunamis, and sudden land subsidence due to fault activities. Many observations and numerical modeling of flooding have been made for cases resulted from storm surge and tsunami events; however, coastal flooding caused by a potential normal faulting event nearby coastal areas is rarely reported. In addition to the earthquake hazards from fault rupturing and ground shaking, the accompanied hazards of earthquake-induced flooding is also important to be investigated. The Jinshan area in northern Taiwan was reported to have been flooded by a tsunami event in the year of 1867 possibly resulted from the reactivation of the Shanchiao normal fault offshore. Historical records have shown that the Shanchiao Fault that extends from Shulin along the western edge of the Taipei Basin to the town of Jinshan may have also ruptured in the year of 1694. The rupturing event has created a depression on the western side of the Taipei Basin that was later filled by sea water called the Taipei Lake. The geological conditions in northern Taiwan provide an opportunity for numerically simulating the dynamic processes of sea water flooding nearby the coastal area immediately after an earthquake-induced normal faulting event. In this study, we focused on the potential active normal faulting that may occur and result in an expected catastrophic flooding in lowland area of Jinshan in northern Taiwan. We applied the continuum shallow water equation to evaluate the unknown inundation processes including location, extent, velocity and water depths after the flooding initiated and the final state of the flooding event. The modeling results were well compared with borehole observations of the extent of previous flooding events possibly due to tsunami events. In addition, the modeling results may provide a future basis for safety evaluation of the two nuclear power plants nearby the region.

  7. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Petricca, P.; Riguzzi, F.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors. PMID:26169163

  8. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, C; Carminati, E; Petricca, P; Riguzzi, F

    2015-07-14

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors.

  9. The three-dimensional pattern of crustal deformation associated with active normal fault systems observed using continuous GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Hreinsdottir, S.

    2009-12-01

    Geological examples of shallow dipping normal faults with large displacements are exposed at numerous locations throughout the world and it is widely recognized that extensional deformation at brittle crustal levels is most efficiently accomplished by slip across such structures. It has previously been shown that lower dip angles reduce the regional stresses required to drive large horizontal displacements. Nevertheless, the traditional theory of fault mechanics—based on Anderson’s classification of stress regimes, the Coulomb failure criterion, and Byerlee’s friction law—precludes such faults from slipping at low angle. Observational support for this traditional theory includes the absence of large unequivocally low-angle normal fault earthquakes in the global catalog; all well-determined normal fault earthquakes appear to have occurred on moderate to steeply dipping planes. However, precise measurements of 3D crustal motions based on continuous GPS in central Italy and Utah reveal deformation patterns across active normal fault systems that are inconsistent with active slip across steeply dipping planes. Instead, the combination of observed horizontal and vertical surface motions are consistent with slip across low angle surfaces independently imaged in the subsurface by seismic reflection and other geophysical data. For the Alto Tiberina fault in central Italy, active aseismic creep occurs at shallow crustal levels, most likely within the brittle-frictional regime at which Andersonian-Byerlee fault mechanics should be applicable. The actively creeping portion of the fault inferred using GPS geodesy correlates well with the observed pattern of micro-seismicity, which concentrates along the inferred subsurface fault plane. GPS measurements across the greater Wasatch fault zone in the vicinity of Salt Lake City, Utah, reveal crustal motions consistent with aseismic displacement across a shallow dipping fault or sub-horizontal shear zone at mid

  10. Mechanical stratigraphy and normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; McGinnis, Ronald N.; Smart, Kevin J.; Wigginton, Sarah S.; Hill, Nicola J.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stratigraphy encompasses the mechanical properties, thicknesses, and interface properties of rock units. Although mechanical stratigraphy often relates directly to lithostratigraphy, lithologic description alone does not adequately describe mechanical behavior. Analyses of normal faults with displacements of millimeters to 10's of kilometers in mechanically layered rocks reveal that mechanical stratigraphy influences nucleation, failure mode, fault geometry, displacement gradient, displacement distribution, fault core and damage zone characteristics, and fault zone deformation processes. The relationship between normal faulting and mechanical stratigraphy can be used either to predict structural style using knowledge of mechanical stratigraphy, or conversely to interpret mechanical stratigraphy based on characterization of the structural style. This review paper explores a range of mechanical stratigraphic controls on normal faulting illustrated by natural and modeled examples.

  11. Identifying past earthquakes on an active normal fault (Magnola, Italy) from the chemical analysis of its exhumed carbonate fault plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcaillet, Julien; Manighetti, Isabelle; Chauvel, Catherine; Schlagenhauf, Aloé; Nicole, Jean-Marc

    2008-07-01

    A normal fault scarp exhumed by repeated strong earthquakes is made of a series of rupture zones that were exposed, thus weathered, over significantly different time spans. We show that such differential weathering can be detected in the chemical content of the fault scarp rocks, and its signature used as a base to decipher the past earthquake history of the fault. We focus on the Magnola normal fault, Central Italy, whose Holocene seismic slip history has already been determined by Palumbo et al. (ESPL, 225, 163-176, 2004) from in situ36Cl cosmic ray exposure dating of the fault limestone scarp surface. Five major earthquakes were found to have occurred over the last 12 ka, with slips of 1.5-3 m and recurrence times of 0.7-3.1 ka. We analyze the major and trace element concentrations of 15 carbonate samples collected from base to top of the 10 m-high Magnola Holocene scarp, next to the previous sampling done by Palumbo et al. [Palumbo, L., Benedetti, L., Bourlès, D., Cinque, A., Finkel, R., 2004. Slip history of the Magnola fault (Apennines, Central Italy) from 36Cl surface exposure dating: evidence for strong earthquake over Holocene. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 225, 163-176.]. We find that most element concentrations decrease upscarp at a rate averaging 5%/m. This decrease is attributed to leaching and re-precipitation of purer calcite that increase with exposure time. Superimposed to the overall leaching, concentration peaks are found at the transition zones separating the earthquake ruptures. These concentration peaks likely result from enrichment of the scarp sections that remained stuck in the 30-50 cm-thick impurity-rich upper soil during the quiescence periods that separated the earthquakes. Because the rare earth elements (REE) are among those most significantly enriched at the earthquake transition zones, they are the best chemical markers of past large seismic events. We finally propose a first-order model that reproduces adequately the observations. Our

  12. Repeated surveys reveal nontectonic exposure of supposedly active normal faults in the central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastelic, Vanja; Burrato, Pierfrancesco; Carafa, Michele M. C.; Basili, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the geomorphic processes that expose bedrock fault surfaces from under their slope-deposit cover in the central Apennines (Italy). These bedrock fault surfaces are generally located at various heights on mountain fronts above the local base level of glacio-fluvial valleys and intermountain fluvio-lacustrine basins and are laterally confined to the extent of related mountain fronts. The process that led to the exposure of fault surfaces has often been exclusively attributed to coseismic earthquake slip and used as proxy for tectonic slip rates and earthquake recurrence estimations. We present the results of monitoring the contact between the exposed fault surfaces and slope deposits at 23 measurement points on 12 different faults over 3.4 year long observation period. We detected either downward or upward movements of the slope deposit with respect to the fault surface between consecutive measurements. During the entire observation period all points, except one, registered a net downward movement in the 2.9-25.6 mm/yr range, resulting in the progressive exposure of the fault surface. During the monitoring period no major earthquakes occurred in the region, demonstrating that the measured exposure process is disconnected from seismic activity. Our results indicate that the fault surface exposure rates are rather due to gravitational and landsliding movements aided by weathering and slope degradation processes. The so far neglected slope degradation and other (sub)surface processes should thus be carefully taken into consideration before attempting to recover fault slip rates using surface gathered data.

  13. The 2013 earthquake swarm in Helike, Greece: seismic activity at the root of old normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanidis, V.; Deschamps, A.; Papadimitriou, P.; Matrullo, E.; Karakonstantis, A.; Bozionelos, G.; Kaviris, G.; Serpetsidaki, A.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Voulgaris, N.; Bernard, P.; Sokos, E.; Makropoulos, K.

    2015-09-01

    The Corinth Rift in Central Greece has been studied extensively during the past decades, as it is one of the most seismically active regions in Europe. It is characterized by normal faulting and extension rates between 6 and 15 mm yr-1 in an approximately N10E° direction. On 2013 May 21, an earthquake swarm was initiated with a series of small events 4 km southeast of Aigion city. In the next days, the seismic activity became more intense, with outbursts of several stronger events of magnitude between 3.3 and 3.7. The seismicity migrated towards the east during June, followed by a sudden activation of the western part of the swarm on July 15th. More than 1500 events have been detected and manually analysed during the period between 2013 May 21 and August 31, using over 15 local stations in epicentral distances up to 30 km and a local velocity model determined by an error minimization method. Waveform similarity-based analysis was performed, revealing several distinct multiplets within the earthquake swarm. High-resolution relocation was applied using the double-difference algorithm HypoDD, incorporating both catalogue and cross-correlation differential traveltime data, which managed to separate the initial seismic cloud into several smaller, densely concentrated spatial clusters of strongly correlated events. Focal mechanism solutions for over 170 events were determined using P-wave first motion polarities, while regional waveform modelling was applied for the calculation of moment tensors for the 18 largest events of the sequence. Selected events belonging to common spatial groups were considered for the calculation of composite mechanisms to characterize different parts of the swarm. The solutions are mainly in agreement with the regional NNE-SSW extension, representing typical normal faulting on 30-50° north-dipping planes, while a few exhibit slip in an NNE-SSW direction, on a roughly subhorizontal plane. Moment magnitudes were calculated by spectral analysis

  14. Estimated likelihood of observing a large earthquake on a continental low-angle normal fault and implications for low-angle normal fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styron, Richard H.; Hetland, Eric A.

    2014-04-01

    The lack of observed continental earthquakes that clearly occurred on low-angle normal faults (LANFs) may indicate that these structures are not seismically active or that these earthquakes are simply rare events. To address this, we compile all potentially active continental LANFs (24 in total) and calculate the likelihood of observing a significant earthquake on them over periods of 1-100 years. This probability depends on several factors including the frequency-magnitude distribution. For either a characteristic or Gutenberg-Richter distribution, we calculate a probability of about 0.5 that an earthquake greater than M6.5 (large enough to avoid ambiguity in dip angle) will be observed on any LANF in a period of 35 years, which is the current length of the global centroid moment tensor catalog. We then use Bayes' Theorem to illustrate how the absence of observed significant LANF seismicity over the catalog period moderately decreases the likelihood that the structures generate large earthquakes.

  15. Active normal fault network of the Apulian Ridge (Eastern Mediterranean Sea) imaged by multibeam bathymetry and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Claudio; Marchese, Fabio; Savini, Alessandra; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The Apulian ridge (North-eastern Ionian margin - Mediterranean Sea) is formed by thick cretaceous carbonatic sequences and discontinuous tertiary deposits crosscut by a NNW-SSE penetrative normal fault system and is part of the present foreland system of both the Apennine to the west and the Hellenic arc to the east. The geometry, age, architecture and kinematics of the fault network were investigated integrating data of heterogeneous sources, provided by previous studies: regional scale 2D seismics and three wells collected by oil companies from the '60s to the '80s, more recent seismics collected during research projects in the '90s, very high resolution seismic (VHRS - Sparker and Chirp-sonar data), multi-beam echosounder bathymetry and results from sedimentological and geo-chronological analysis of sediment samples collected on the seabed. Multibeam bathymetric data allowed in particular assessing the 3D continuity of structures imaged in 2D seismics, thanks to the occurrence of continuous fault scarps on the seabed (only partly reworked by currents and covered by landslides), revealing the vertical extent and finite displacement associated to fault scarps. A penetrative network of relatively small faults, always showing a high dip angle, composes the NNW-SSE normal fault system, resulting in frequent relay zones, which are particularly well imaged by seafloor geomorphology. In addition, numerous fault scarps appear to be roughly coeval with quaternary submarine mass-wasting deposits colonised by Cold-Water Corals (CWC). Coral colonies, yielding ages between 11 and 14 kA, develop immediately on top of late Pleistocene mass-wasting deposits. Mutual cross-cutting relationships have been recognized between fault scarps and landslides, indicating that, at least in places, these features may be coeval. We suppose that fault activity lasted at least as far as the Holocene-Pleistocene boundary and that the NNW-SSW normal fault network in the Apulian Plateau can be

  16. Surface Morphology of Active Normal Faults in Hard Rock: Implications for the Mechanics of the Asal Rift, Djibouti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzuti, P.; Mignan, A.; King, G. C.

    2009-12-01

    Mechanical stretching models have been previously proposed to explain the process of continental break-up through the example of the Asal Rift, Djibouti, one of the few places where the early stages of seafloor spreading can be observed. In these models, deformation is distributed starting at the base of a shallow seismogenic zone, in which sub-vertical normal faults are responsible for subsidence whereas cracks accommodate extension. Alternative models suggest that extension results from localized magma injection, with normal faults accommodating extension and subsidence above the maximum reach of the magma column. In these magmatic intrusion models, normal faults have dips of 45-55° and root into dikes. Using mechanical and kinematics concepts and vertical profiles of normal fault scarps from an Asal Rift campaign, where normal faults are sub-vertical on surface level, we discuss the creation and evolution of normal faults in massive fractured rocks (basalt). We suggest that the observed fault scarps correspond to sub-vertical en echelon structures and that at greater depth, these scarps combine and give birth to dipping normal faults. Finally, the geometry of faulting between the Fieale volcano and Lake Asal in the Asal Rift can be simply related to the depth of diking, which in turn can be related to magma supply. This new view supports the magmatic intrusion model of early stages of continental breaking.

  17. Deep reaching versus vertically restricted Quaternary normal faults: Implications on seismic potential assessment in tectonically active regions: Lessons from the middle Aterno valley fault system, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcucci, E.; Gori, S.; Moro, M.; Fubelli, G.; Saroli, M.; Chiarabba, C.; Galadini, F.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the Middle Aterno Valley fault system (MAVF), a poorly investigated seismic gap in the central Apennines, adjacent to the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake epicentral area. Geological and paleoseismological analyses revealed that the MAVF evolved through hanging wall splay nucleation, its main segment moving at 0.23-0.34 mm/year since the Middle Pleistocene; the penultimate activation event occurred between 5388-5310 B.C. and 1934-1744 B.C., the last event after 2036-1768 B.C. and just before 1st-2nd century AD. These data define hard linkage (sensu Walsh and Watterson, 1991; Peacock et al., 2000; Walsh et al., 2003, and references therein) with the contiguous Subequana Valley fault segment, able to rupture in large magnitude earthquakes (up to 6.8), that did not rupture since about two millennia. By the joint analysis of geological observations and seismological data acquired during to the 2009 seismic sequence, we derive a picture of the complex structural framework of the area comprised between the MAVF, the Paganica fault (the 2009 earthquake causative fault) and the Gran Sasso Range. This sector is affected by a dense array of few-km long, closely and regularly spaced Quaternary normal fault strands, that are considered as branches of the MAVF northern segment. Our analysis reveals that these structures are downdip confined by a decollement represented by to the presently inactive thrust sheet above the Gran Sasso front limiting their seismogenic potential. Our study highlights the advantage of combining Quaternary geological field analysis with high resolution seismological data to fully unravel the structural setting of regions where subsequent tectonic phases took place and where structural interference plays a key role in influencing the seismotectonic context; this has also inevitably implications for accurately assessing seismic hazard of such structurally complex regions.

  18. Surface morphology of active normal faults in hard rock: Implications for the mechanics of the Asal Rift, Djibouti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzuti, Paul; Mignan, Arnaud; King, Geoffrey C. P.

    2010-10-01

    Tectonic-stretching models have been previously proposed to explain the process of continental break-up through the example of the Asal Rift, Djibouti, one of the few places where the early stages of seafloor spreading can be observed. In these models, deformation is distributed starting at the base of a shallow seismogenic zone, in which sub-vertical normal faults are responsible for subsidence whereas cracks accommodate extension. Alternative models suggest that extension results from localised magma intrusion, with normal faults accommodating extension and subsidence only above the maximum reach of the magma column. In these magmatic rifting models, or so-called magmatic intrusion models, normal faults have dips of 45-55° and root into dikes. Vertical profiles of normal fault scarps from levelling campaign in the Asal Rift, where normal faults seem sub-vertical at surface level, have been analysed to discuss the creation and evolution of normal faults in massive fractured rocks (basalt lava flows), using mechanical and kinematics concepts. We show that the studied normal fault planes actually have an average dip ranging between 45° and 65° and are characterised by an irregular stepped form. We suggest that these normal fault scarps correspond to sub-vertical en echelon structures, and that, at greater depth, these scarps combine and give birth to dipping normal faults. The results of our analysis are compatible with the magmatic intrusion models instead of tectonic-stretching models. The geometry of faulting between the Fieale volcano and Lake Asal in the Asal Rift can be simply related to the depth of diking, which in turn can be related to magma supply. This new view supports the magmatic intrusion model of early stages of continental breaking.

  19. A Comparison of Structural Data and Seismic Images For Low-Angle Normal Faults in the Northern Apennines (Central Italy): Constraints on Geometry and Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, C.; Barchi, M. R.

    2001-12-01

    During the last 20 Myr extensional tectonics in the Northern Apennines have moved from the Tyrrhenian sea toward east. Much of the extension is due to low-angle east-dipping normal faults now exhumed in the Tyrrhenian islands and Tuscany, while still accommodating deformation in the Apenninic chain (Umbria region 200 km eastward). This tectonic framework provide an example where exhumed structures can be compared with active extensional structures and processes affecting the Umbria region. It is here proposed the case study of two of these low angle normal faults, the Zuccale fault (Zf), cropping out in the Elba island and the Altotiberina fault (ATF) mainly detected by seismic profiles crossing the Umbria region. The Zf in the eastern part of the Elba island juxtaposes along a gently ( ~ 10° ) eastward dipping contact, the Upper Cretaceous Helminthoid flysch in its hangingwall over the Permian-Triassic (?) phyllitic basement in its footwall. Structural analysis of the brittle structures that characterise the fault zone has been used to constraint the state of stress under which the fault slipped. From the N-S trending vertical vein system perpendicular to the slickenlines of the fault plane and from the Andersonian normal faults present within the fault gouge, some of them rotated according to a top to the east movement, we infer that (1) the maximum principal stress was sub vertical during the fault activity (2) the fault accommodate slip under low values of differential stress and at dips similar to its present flat geometry (3) local fluid overpressures were attained during the fault activity favoured by a thick fault gouge. The geological scenario described in the Elba island shows similarities with the active deformation of the Umbria region. Seismic profiles crossing this area matched with surface geology highlight the presence of an east-dipping low-angle ( ~ 20° ) normal fault, the Altotiberina fault (ATF), and antithetic seismogenic structures bounding

  20. Active tectonics in southern Xinjiang, China: Analysis of terrace riser and normal fault scarp degradation along the Hotan-Qira fault system

    SciTech Connect

    Avouac, J.P.; Peltzer, G. |

    1993-12-01

    The northern piedmont of the western Kunlun mountains (Xinjiang, China) is marked at its easternmost extremity, south of the Hotan-Qira oases, by a set of normal faults trending N50E for nearly 70 km. Conspicuous on Landsat and SPOT images, these faults follow the southeastern border of a deep flexural basin and may be related to the subsidence of the Tarim platform loaded by the western Kunlun northward overthrust. The Hotan-Qira normal fault system vertically offsets the piedmont slope by 70 m. Highest fault scarps reach 20 m and often display evidence for recent reactivations about 2 m high. Successive stream entrenchments in uplifted footwallls have formed inset terraces. We have leveled topographic profiles across fault scarps and transverse abandoned terrace risers. The state of degradation of each terrace edge has been characterized by a degradation coefficient tau, derived by comparison with analytical erosion models. Edges of highest abandoned terraces yield a degradation coefficient of 33 +/- 4 sq.m. Profiles of cumulative fault scarps have been analyzed in a similar way using synthetic profiles generated with a simple incremental fault scarp model.

  1. Active tectonics in southern Xinjiang, China: Analysis of terrace riser and normal fault scarp degradation along the Hotan-Qira fault system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Peltzer, Gilles

    1993-01-01

    The northern piedmont of the western Kunlun mountains (Xinjiang, China) is marked at its easternmost extremity, south of the Hotan-Qira oases, by a set of normal faults trending N50E for nearly 70 km. Conspicuous on Landsat and SPOT images, these faults follow the southeastern border of a deep flexural basin and may be related to the subsidence of the Tarim platform loaded by the western Kunlun northward overthrust. The Hotan-Qira normal fault system vertically offsets the piedmont slope by 70 m. Highest fault scarps reach 20 m and often display evidence for recent reactivations about 2 m high. Successive stream entrenchments in uplifted footwallls have formed inset terraces. We have leveled topographic profiles across fault scarps and transverse abandoned terrace risers. The state of degradation of each terrace edge has been characterized by a degradation coefficient tau, derived by comparison with analytical erosion models. Edges of highest abandoned terraces yield a degradation coefficient of 33 +/- 4 sq.m. Profiles of cumulative fault scarps have been analyzed in a similar way using synthetic profiles generated with a simple incremental fault scarp model.

  2. Mechanical basis for slip along low-angle normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, Emmanuel; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Lacombe, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    The existence of active low-angle normal faults is much debated because (1) the classical theory of fault mechanics implies that normal faults are locked when the dip is less than 30° and (2) shallow-dipping extensional fault planes do not produce large earthquakes (M > 5.5). However, a number of field observations suggest that brittle deformation occurs on low-angle normal faults at very shallow dip. To reconcile observations and theory, we use an alternative model of fault reactivation including a thick elasto-plastic frictional fault gouge, and test it at large strain by the mean of 2D mechanical modeling. We show that plastic compaction allows reducing the effective friction of faults sufficiently for low-angle normal faults to be active at dip of 20°. As the model predicts that these faults must be active in a slip-hardening regime, it prevents the occurrence of large earthquakes. However, we also evidence the neoformation of Riedel-type shear bands within thick fault zone, which, we believe, may be responsible for repeated small earthquakes and we apply the model to the Gulf of Corinth (Greece).

  3. Frictional Properties of a Low-Angle Normal Fault Under In Situ Conditions: Thermally-Activated Velocity Weakening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, André R.; Collettini, Cristiano

    2014-10-01

    The Zuccale fault is a regional, low-angle, normal fault, exposed on the Isle of Elba in central Italy that accommodated a total shear displacement of 6-8 km. The fault zone structure and fault rocks formed at <8 km crustal depth. The present-day fault structure is the final product of several deformation processes superposed during the fault history. In this study, we report results from a series of rotary shear experiments performed on 1-mm thick powdered gouges made from several fault rock types obtained from the Zuccale fault. The tests were done under conditions ranging from room temperature to in situ conditions (i.e., at temperatures up to 300 °C, applied normal stresses up to 150 MPa, and fluid-saturated.) The ratio of fluid pressure to normal stress was held constant at either λ = 0.4 or λ = 0.8 to simulate an overpressurized fault. The samples were sheared at a constant sliding velocity of 10 μm/s for at least 5 mm, after which a velocity-stepping sequence from 1 to 300 μm/s was started to determine the velocity dependence of friction. This can be represented by the rate-and-state parameter ( a-b), which was determined by an inversion of the data to the rate-and-state equations. Friction of the various fault rocks varies between 0.3 and 0.8, similar to values obtained in previous studies, and decreases with increasing phyllosilicate content. Friction decreases mildly with temperature, whereas normal stress and fluid pressure do not affect friction values systematically. All samples exhibited velocity strengthening, conditionally stable behavior under room temperature conditions and ( a- b) increased with increasing sliding velocity. In contrast, velocity weakening, accompanied by stick-slips, was observed for the strongest samples at 300 °C and sliding velocities below 10 μm/s. An increase in fluid pressure under these conditions led to a further reduction in ( a-b) for all samples, so that they exhibited unstable, stick-slip behavior at low

  4. Active normal faulting during the 1997 seismic sequence in Colfiorito, Umbria: Did slip propagate to the surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildon, Zoë K.; Roberts, Gerald P.; Faure Walker, Joanna P.; Wedmore, Luke N. J.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.

    2016-10-01

    In order to determine whether slip during an earthquake on the 26th September 1997 propagated to the surface, structural data have been collected along a bedrock fault scarp in Umbria, Italy. These collected data are used to investigate the relationship between the throw associated with a debated surface rupture (observed as a pale unweathered stripe at the base of the bedrock fault scarp) and the strike, dip and slip-vector. Previous studies have suggested that the surface rupture was produced either by primary surface slip or secondary compaction of hangingwall sediments. Some authors favour the latter because sparse surface fault dip measurements do not match nodal plane dips at depth. It is demonstrated herein that the strike, dip and height of the surface rupture, represented by a pale unweathered stripe at the base of the bedrock scarp, shows a systematic relationship with respect to the geometry and kinematics of faulting in the bedrock. The strike and dip co-vary and the throw is greatest where the strike is oblique to the slip-vector azimuth where the highest dip values are recorded. This implies that the throw values vary to accommodate spatial variation in the strike and dip of the fault across fault plane corrugations, a feature that is predicted by theory describing conservation of strain along faults, but not by compaction. Furthermore, published earthquake locations and reported fault dips are consistent with the analysed surface scarps when natural variation for surface dips and uncertainty for nodal plane dips at depth are taken into account. This implies that the fresh stripe is indeed a primary coseismic surface rupture whose slip is connected to the seismogenic fault at depth. We discuss how this knowledge of the locations and geometry of the active faults can be used as an input for seismic hazard assessment.

  5. Preliminary Results on the Mechanics of the Active Mai'iu Low Angle Normal Fault (Dayman Dome), Woodlark Rift, SE Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, T. A.; Boulton, C. J.; Mizera, M.; Webber, S. M.; Oesterle, J.; Ellis, S. M.; Norton, K. P.; Wallace, L. M.; Biemiller, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid slip on the Mai'iu low-angle normal fault (LANF) has exhumed a smooth, corrugated fault surface contiguous for >24 km up-dip, rising from near sea level to ~2900 m. The fault emerges from the ground dipping ~21° N and flattens over the crest of the dome to dip south. Geomorphic analysis reveals a progressive back-tilting of the surface during exhumation accompanied by cross-cutting antithetic-sense high-angle faults—features that we attribute to "rolling-hinge" deformation of a once more steeply-dipping fault. Near the scarp base, the footwall exposes mafic mylonites that deformed at ~400-450°C. The younger Mai'iu fault cross-cuts this ductile mylonite zone, with most brittle slip being localized into a ~20 cm-thick, gouge-filled core. Near the range front, active faults bite across both the hangingwall and footwall of the Mai'iu fault and record overprinting across a dying, shallow (<~1 km deep) part of the fault by more optimally oriented, steeper faults. Such depth-dependent locking up of the fault suggests it weakens primarily by friction reduction rather than cohesion loss. Outcrop-scale fractures in the exhumed footwall reflect formation in an Andersonian stress regime. Previous campaign GPS data suggest the fault slips at up to ~1 cm/yr. To improve resolution and test for aseismic creep, we installed 12 GPS sites across the fault trace in 2015. Quantitative XRD indicates the gouges were derived primarily from mafic footwall, containing up to 65% corrensite and saponite. Hydrothermal friction experiments on two gouges from a relict LANF strand were done at varying normal stresses (30-120 MPa), temperatures (50-200oC), and sliding velocities (0.3-100 μm/s). Results reveal very weak frictional strength (μ=0.13-0.15 and 0.20-0.28) and velocity-strengthening behavior conducive to fault creep. At the highest temperatures (T≥150oC) and lowest sliding velocities (<3 μm/s), a transition to velocity-weakening behavior indicates the potential for

  6. Transfer zones in listric normal fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Shamik

    Listric normal faults are common in passive margin settings where sedimentary units are detached above weaker lithological units, such as evaporites or are driven by basal structural and stratigraphic discontinuities. The geometries and styles of faulting vary with the types of detachment and form landward and basinward dipping fault systems. Complex transfer zones therefore develop along the terminations of adjacent faults where deformation is accommodated by secondary faults, often below seismic resolution. The rollover geometry and secondary faults within the hanging wall of the major faults also vary with the styles of faulting and contribute to the complexity of the transfer zones. This study tries to understand the controlling factors for the formation of the different styles of listric normal faults and the different transfer zones formed within them, by using analog clay experimental models. Detailed analyses with respect to fault orientation, density and connectivity have been performed on the experiments in order to gather insights on the structural controls and the resulting geometries. A new high resolution 3D laser scanning technology has been introduced to scan the surfaces of the clay experiments for accurate measurements and 3D visualizations. Numerous examples from the Gulf of Mexico have been included to demonstrate and geometrically compare the observations in experiments and real structures. A salt cored convergent transfer zone from the South Timbalier Block 54, offshore Louisiana has been analyzed in detail to understand the evolutionary history of the region, which helps in deciphering the kinematic growth of similar structures in the Gulf of Mexico. The dissertation is divided into three chapters, written in a journal article format, that deal with three different aspects in understanding the listric normal fault systems and the transfer zones so formed. The first chapter involves clay experimental models to understand the fault patterns in

  7. Finite-element models on spatiotemporal variations in intraplate seismicity caused by postglacial unloading and rebound: Implications for active normal faults in the Basin and Range Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karow, T.; Hampel, A.

    2007-12-01

    The actively extending Basin and Range Province was covered by numerous pluvial lakes and glaciers on several of the higher ranges during the Last Glacial Maximum (Osburn and Bevis, QSR, 2001). The largest lakes were Lake Bonneville and Lake Lahontan, located in the eastern and western parts of the Basin and Range Province, respectively. Regression of these lakes at the end of last glacial period caused significant isostatic rebound of the lithosphere (Bills et al., JGR, 1994; Bills et al., JGR, 2007). The rebound associated with the regression of Lake Bonneville has been shown, using two-dimensional numerical models, to affect the stress field of the lithosphere and to cause a slip rate increase on the Wasatch normal fault (Hetzel and Hampel, Nature 2005). Here we use three-dimensional finite-element models of normal fault arrays to investigate spatiotemporal variations in the regional stress field and in the rate of normal faulting caused by glacial-interglacial variations of the surface load. Our models indicate that regression of Lake Lahontan but also of smaller lakes and glaciers alter the regional stress field and hence may ultimately affect the intraplate seismicity. Paleoseismological data from faults in the east-central and northern Basin and Range Province seem to support the idea of an increase in seismicity after the Last Glacial Maximum (Friedrich el al., JGR, 2003; Stickney and Bartholomew, BSSA, 1987; Wesnousky et al., JGR, 2005).

  8. Evidence for Holocene palaeoseismicity along the Basel-Reinach active normal fault (Switzerland): a seismic source for the 1356 earthquake in the Upper Rhine graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, Matthieu; Meghraoui, Mustapha; Delouis, Bertrand; Giardini, Domenico

    2005-02-01

    We conducted a palaeoseismic study with geomorphologic mapping, geophysical prospecting and trenching along an 8-km-long NNE-SSW trending fault scarp south of Basel. The city as well as 40 castles within a 20-km radius were destroyed or heavily damaged by the earthquake of 1356 October 18 (Io = IX-X), the largest historical seismic event in central Europe. Active river incisions as well as late Quaternary alluvial terraces are uplifted along the linear Basel-Reinach (BR) fault scarp. The active normal fault is comprised of at least two main branches reaching the surface as evident by resistivity profiles, reflection seismic data and direct observations in six trenches. In trenches, the normal fault rupture affects three colluvial wedge deposits up to the base of the modern soil. Radiocarbon as well as thermoluminescence (TL) age determinations from other trenches helped to reconstruct the Holocene event chronology. We identified three seismic events with an average coseismic movement of 0.5-0.8 m and a total vertical displacement of 1.8 m in the last 7800 yr and five events in the last 13 200 yr. The most recent event occurred in the interval AD 500-1450 (2σ) and may correspond to the 1356 earthquake. Furthermore, the morphology suggests both a southern and northern fault extensions that may reach 20 km across the Jura mountains and across the Rhine valley. Taking this fault length and a 10-km-thick seismogenic layer suggests a Mw 6.5 or greater event as a possible scenario for the seismic hazard assessment of the Basel region.

  9. Evidence for Holocene paleoseismicity along the Basel-Reinach Active Normal Fault (Switzerland): A Seismic Source for the 1356 Earthquake in the Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Meghraoui, M.; Delouis, B.; Giardini, D.

    2003-04-01

    We conducted a paleoseismic study with geomorphologic mapping, geophysical prospecting and trenching along an 8-km-long NNE-SSW trending fault scarp south of Basel. The city as well as 40 castles within a 20-km radius were destroyed or heavily damaged by the earthquake of 18th October 1356 (Io = IX-X MKS), the largest historical seismic event in central Europe. Active river incisions as well as late Quaternary alluvial terraces are uplifted along the linear Basel-Reinach fault scarp. The active normal fault shows at least two main branches reaching the surface as attested by resistivity profiles, reflection seismic data, and direct observations in six trenches. In trenches, the normal fault rupture affects three colluvial wedge deposits up to the base of the present day soil. Radiocarbon as well as thermoluminescence age determinations from other trenches helped reconstruct the Holocene events chronology. We identified three seismic events with an average coseismic movement of 0.5 - 0.8 m and a total vertical displacement of 1.8 m in the last 7800 years and five events in the last 13200 years. The most recent event occurred in the interval 610 - 1475 A.D. (2sigma) and may likely correspond to the 1356 earthquake. Furthermore, the morphology suggests both a southern and northern fault extensions that may reach 20 km across the Jura Mountains and across the Rhine Valley. Taking this fault length and a 10 km-thick seismogenic layer suggests a M 6.5 or greater event as a possible scenario for the seismic hazard assessment of the Basel region.

  10. Present activity and seismogenic potential of a low-angle normal fault system (Città di Castello, Italy): Constraints from surface geology, seismic reflection data and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, Francesco; Boncio, Paolo; Lavecchia, Giusy; Pace, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    We present new constraints on an active low-angle normal fault system in the Città di Castello-Sansepolcro basin (CSB) of the northern Apennines of Italy. New field data from the geological survey of the Carta Geologica d' Italia (CARG project) define the surface geometry of the normal fault system and lead to an interpretation of the CROP 03 deep-crust seismic reflection profile (Castiglion Fiorentino-Urbania segment), with particular attention paid to the geometry of the Plio-Quaternary extensional structures. Surface and sub-surface geological data are integrated with instrumental and historical seismicity in order to define the seismotectonics of the area. Low-angle east-dipping reflectors are the seismic expression of the well-known Altotiberina Fault (AF), a regional extensional detachment on which both east- and west-dipping high-angle faults, bounding the CSB, sole out. The AF breakaway zone is located ˜ 10 km west of the CSB. Within the extensional allochthon, synthetic east-dipping planes prevail. Displacement along the AF is ˜ 4.5 km, which agrees with the cumulative offset due to its synthetic splays. The evolution of the CSB has mainly been controlled by the east-dipping fault system, at least since Early Pleistocene time; this system is still active and responsible for the seismicity of the area. A low level of seismic activity was recorded instrumentally within the CSB, but several damaging earthquakes have occurred in historical times. The instrumental seismicity and the intensity data points of the largest historical earthquakes (5 events with maximum MCS intensity of IX to IX-X) allow us to propose two main seismogenic structures: the Monte Santa Maria Tiberina (Mmax = 5.9) and Città di Castello (Mmax up to 6.5) normal faults. Both are synthetic splays of the AF detachment, dipping to the NE at moderate (45-50°) to low (25-30°) angles and cutting the upper crust up to the surface. This study suggests that low-angle normal faults (at least

  11. 3D modelling of the active normal fault network in the Apulian Ridge (Eastern Mediterranean Sea): Integration of seismic and bathymetric data with implicit surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Pellegrini, Caludio; Savini, Alessandra; Marchese, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Apulian ridge (North-eastern Ionian Sea, Mediterranean), interposed between the facing Apennines and Hellenides subduction zones (to the west and east respectively), is characterized by thick cretaceous carbonatic sequences and discontinuous tertiary deposits crosscut by a penetrative network of NNW-SSE normal faults. These are exposed onshore in Puglia, and are well represented offshore in a dataset composed of 2D seismics and wells collected by oil companies from the '60s to the '80s, more recent seismics collected during research projects in the '90s, recent very high resolution seismics (VHRS - Sparker and Chirp-sonar data), multibeam echosounder bathymetry, and sedimentological and geo-chronological analyses of sediment samples collected on the seabed. Faults are evident in 2D seismics at all scales, and their along-strike geometry and continuity can be characterized with multibeam bathymetric data, which show continuous fault scarps on the seabed (only partly reworked by currents and covered by landslides). Fault scarps also reveal the finite displacement accumulated in the Holocene-Pleistocene. We reconstructed a 3D model of the fault network and suitable geological boundaries (mainly unconformities due to the discontinuous distribution of quaternary and tertiary sediments) with implicit surface methods implemented in SKUA/GOCAD. This approach can be considered very effective and allowed reconstructing in details complex structures, like the frequent relay zones that are particularly well imaged by seafloor geomorphology. Mutual cross-cutting relationships have been recognized between fault scarps and submarine mass-wasting deposits (Holocene-Pleistocene), indicating that, at least in places, these features are coeval, hence the fault network should be considered active. At the regional scale, the 3D model allowed measuring the horizontal WSW-ENE stretching, which can be associated to the bending moment applied to the Apulian Plate by the combined effect

  12. Configuration and Correlation of Fluvial Terrace Deposits In the Lower Rio Salado Valley: A Record of Magmatic Uplift and Active Normal Faulting in the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sion, B. D.; Axen, G. J.; Phillips, F. M.; Harrison, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Salado is a western tributary of the Rio Grande whose valley is flanked by six major terrace levels. The Rio crosses several active rift-related normal faults and the active, mid-crustal Socorro Magma Body (SMB; a sill at 19 km depth that is actively doming the land surface), providing an unusual opportunity to explore the effects of deep magma emplacement and active faulting on the terraces. Rio Salado terraces were mapped using a high-resolution DEM and digital color stereophotographs and were projected onto a valley-parallel vertical plane to construct longitudinal profiles. Three new soil pits were described to aid terrace correlation. A net incision rate of 0.41 ± 0.06 m/ka was inferred from the correlation of a major fill-cut terrace to the 122 ± 18 ka Airport surface ~25 km south of the Rio Salado. This incision rate is >1.5 times more rapid than estimated rates nearby or in other parts of New Mexico, but yields age estimates for other terraces that are consistent with soil development. Terrace gradients in the Rio Salado have increased through time, indicating either stream response to Rio Grande incision or footwall tilting from the Quaternary Loma Blanca fault (LBF). Two terraces in the LBF hanging wall are back-tilted relative to their footwall counterparts, suggesting a listric geometry for the LBF. However, two others (Qtf and Qtc) are east-tilted relative to their footwall counterparts. Both Qtf and Qtc merge eastward with the next youngest terrace in the flight, and Qtc is arched, consistent with an earlier episode of surface uplift above the SMB. Future work will involve (a) additional terrace mapping over the SMB, (b) cosmogenic 36Cl depth profile dating of the Rio Salado terraces to determine incision rates, allow regional terrace correlations, and constrain fault-slip slip rates and the record of SMB-related surface uplift, and (c) numerical modeling of SMB inflation constrained by uplift signals.

  13. Late Quaternary Range-Front Fault Scarps in the Western Sierra El Mayor, Baja California, Mexico: A Geomorphologic Expression of Slip Across an Active Low-Angle Normal Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spelz, R. M.; Fletcher, J.; Owen, L.

    2006-12-01

    The western margin of the Sierra El Mayor (SEM), in northeastern Baja California, is controlled by an active, top-to-the-west, low-angle normal fault named the Canada David detachment (CDD) that accommodates part of the extensional component of shearing between the Pacific and North American plates. The CDD has a length of 60 km and shows a curvilinear trace with two major antiformal and synformal megamullion pairs. Late Quaternary slip has produced a broad array of Quaternary scarps cutting alluvial fans along nearly the entire length of the CDD. Detailed mapping reveals eight regional strath terraces distinguished by surface weathering characteristics, soil profile development and relative elevation. Relative height between terraces increases in domains where the CDD and basin deposits are being uplifted due to either the basinward migration of faulting (e.g., rolling hinge) or flexural uplift in antiformal megamullion domains. Linear diffusion analysis of 46 synthetic fault scarps, with a calculated angle of repose Θo = 28.75°, reveal fault scarp domains exhibiting both multi-modal and unimodal distribution of diffusion ages (kt). Uni-modal domains are typically younger, but there is no systematic variation in scarp age with distance along the CDD. Scarps yielding negative kt ages (i.e. scarps steeper than Θo) are common in the north, near inferred locations of important historic seismic events. Microseismicity drops off significantly adjacent to these very young scarp arrays, which likely reflects a recent post-seismic stress drop. Domains of high seismic risk are identified by high microseismicity and lack of young scarps. Minimum estimates of the diffusivity constant (k) are calculated by coupling scarp diffusion ages and 10Be surface exposure ages of the faulted deposits. In the southernmost SEM a Q6 terrace with a minimum surface exposure age t = 233±6.6 ky (weighted mean of six rock samples) is cut by scarps with an average kt = 11.25±9.31 m2, which

  14. Plio-Quaternary changes of the normal fault architecture in the Central Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galadini, Fabrizio; Messina, Paolo

    The definition of the active fault geometry and kinematics in young evolving orogens may be difficult owing to changes in the structural architecture which may occur with a frequence of few hundred thousand years. Cases from the central Apennines well illustrate this problem. The Avezzano-Bussi and Vallelonga-Salto Valley fault systems (65 and 85 km long, respectively) show clear evidence of Pliocene-early Pleistocene activity and have been responsible for the formation of intermontane basins. Available geological data, however, indicate that only minor segments (the Tre Monti and Trasacco faults, both 7 km long) of the mentioned faults have to be considered active during the late Pleistocene-Holocene, as faults accommodating minor deformations inside an intermontane basin. The LˈAquila fault system underwent significant geometrical and kinematic modifications during the Quaternary, with the reactivation of minor portions of parallel normal faults to draw a new system of en-echelon normal-oblique left-lateral faults. The Laga Mts. fault experienced an along-fault activity migration. The portion of the fault which was active earlier during the Quaternary shows a significant decrease or end of the activity while a portion previously not active displays impressive evidence of late Pleistocene-Holocene displacements. Structural changes in the intermontane basins bounded by the Colfiorito fault system also indicate that the intensity of the tectonic activity decreased during the Quaternary. Not defining the structural evolution in the above mentioned cases would imply wrong conclusions for both the fault geometry and kinematics which may be delivered for seismotectonics and seismic hazard assessment. This typically leads to overestimate the fault length and the expected magnitude or to the increase in the number of seismogenic sources affecting an area. Finally, the definition of the structural evolution permits to select between different geometrical options in terms

  15. Fault linkage: Three-dimensional mechanical interaction between echelon normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet G.; Pollard, David D.

    1998-10-01

    Field observations of two overlapping normal faults and associated deformation document features common to many normal-fault relay zones: a topographic ramp between the fault segments, tapering slip on the faults as they enter the overlap zone, and associated fracturing, especially at the top of the ramp. These observations motivate numerical modeling of the development of a relay zone. A three-dimensional boundary element method numerical model, using simple fault-plane geometries, material properties, and boundary conditions, reproduces the principal characteristics of the observed fault scarps. The model, with overlapping, semicircular fault segments under orthogonal extension, produces a region of high Coulomb shear stress in the relay zone that would favor fault linkage at the center to upper relay ramp. If the fault height is increased, the magnitude of the stresses in the relay zone increases, but the position of the anticipated linkage does not change. The amount of fault overlap changes the magnitude of the Coulomb stress in the relay zone: the greatest potential for fault linkage occurs with the closest underlapping fault tips. Ultimately, the mechanical interaction between segments of a developing normal-fault system promote the development of connected, zigzagging fault scarps.

  16. Parameters of induced and natural seismicity recorded in the vicinity of an active low angle normal fault in the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, T.; Cesca, S.; Martirosian, A.; Dahm, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Upper Tiber Valley is situated in the northern part of the Central Apennines and is setting of a number of geological phenomena, like CO2 degassing, moderate earthquakes (M < 6) and a strong microseismicity. The major part of the recorded seismicity can be associated to a Low Angle Normal Fault (LANF) - the so called Alto Tiberina Fault - but some of the recorded seismograms show signals similar to those recorded on active volcanoes. In the vicinity of the ATF human activity provides a number of candidates, capable to influence the local stress regime and the seismic release in the area: (i) a huge barrier lake is directly situated on the ATF and is characterized by significant seasonal water level oscillations, (ii) a cement plant and decommissioned mines present in the area are in the direct vicinity of epicentres of tornillo-like seismograms and episodes of non-volcanic tremor, (iii) since July 2011, a private company extracts CO2 by a 4 km deep borehole (PSS1). Since 2003 different seismic network and array configurations have been deployed to monitor the local seismicity. Human related influences, as realized by the industrial activities of cement plants, quarries or superficial mines may produce seismic signals, but will not directly have an impact on the mechanical behaviour of an active fault system at crustal depth. However, water level changes in the huge barrier lake or long term CO2-extraction from the upper crust have the capability to directly influence the stress field at depth. Since summer 2011 the reservoir user produces about 4 tons per hour of reservoir gases for commercial usage and trading. This production lead to a pore pressure change and slow depletion of the reservoir formation, similar to many other gas fields under production. Since production volumes and pore pressure changes are relatively well known, we consider the local depletion-induced stress changes on the ATF and in the surrounding rock as driving forces to the system. The

  17. Structure of a normal seismogenic fault zone in carbonates: The Vado di Corno Fault, Campo Imperatore, Central Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demurtas, Matteo; Fondriest, Michele; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Clemenzi, Luca; Storti, Fabrizio; Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    The Vado di Corno Fault Zone (VCFZ) is an active extensional fault cutting through carbonates in the Italian Central Apennines. The fault zone was exhumed from ∼2 km depth and accommodated a normal throw of ∼2 km since Early-Pleistocene. In the studied area, the master fault of the VCFZ dips N210/54° and juxtaposes Quaternary colluvial deposits in the hangingwall with cataclastic dolostones in the footwall. Detailed mapping of the fault zone rocks within the ∼300 m thick footwall-block evidenced the presence of five main structural units (Low Strain Damage Zone, High Strain Damage Zone, Breccia Unit, Cataclastic Unit 1 and Cataclastic Unit 2). The Breccia Unit results from the Pleistocene extensional reactivation of a pre-existing Pliocene thrust. The Cataclastic Unit 1 forms a ∼40 m thick band lining the master fault and recording in-situ shattering due to the propagation of multiple seismic ruptures. Seismic faulting is suggested also by the occurrence of mirror-like slip surfaces, highly localized sheared calcite-bearing veins and fluidized cataclasites. The VCFZ architecture compares well with seismological studies of the L'Aquila 2009 seismic sequence (mainshock MW 6.1), which imaged the reactivation of shallow-seated low-angle normal faults (Breccia Unit) cut by major high-angle normal faults (Cataclastic Units).

  18. Landscape response to normal fault growth and linkage in the Southern Apennines, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roda-Boluda, Duna; Whittaker, Alex

    2016-04-01

    It is now well-established that landscape can record spatial and temporal variations in tectonic rates. However, decoding this information to extract detailed histories of fault growth is often a complex problem that requires careful integration of tectonic and geomorphic data sets. Here, we present new data addressing both normal fault evolution and coupled landscape response for two normal faults in the Southern Apennines: the Vallo di Diano and East Agri faults. By integrating published constraints with new data, we show that these faults have total throws of up to 2100 m, and Holocene throw rates of up to 1 mm/yr at their maximum. We demonstrate that geomorphology is effectively recording tectonics, with relief, channel and catchment slopes varying along fault strike as normal fault activity does. Therefore, valuable information about fault growth and interaction can be extracted from their geomorphic expression. We use the spatial distribution of knickpoints on the footwall channels to infer two episodes of base level change, which can be associated with distinct fault interaction events. From our detailed fault throw profiles, we reconstruct the amount of throw accumulated after each of these events, and the segments involved in each, and we use slip rate enhancement factors derived from fault interaction theory to estimate the magnitude of the tectonic perturbation in each case. From this approach, we are able to reconstruct pre-linkage throw rates, and we estimate that fault linkage events likely took place 0.7 ± 0.2 Ma and 1.9 ± 0.6 Ma in the Vallo di Diano fault, and 1.1 ± 0.1 and 2.3 ± 0.9 Ma in the East Agri fault. Our study suggests that both faults started their activity at 3.6 ± 0.5 Ma. These fault linkage scenarios are consistent with the knickpoint heights, and may relate to soft-linkage interaction with the Southern Apennines normal fault array, the existence of which has been the subject of considerable debate. Our combined geomorphic and

  19. Classifying helicopter gearbox faults using a normalized energy metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Paul D.; Pines, Darryll J.

    2001-02-01

    A normalized energy metric is used to classify seeded faults of the OH-58A main transmission. This gearbox comprises a two-stage transmission with an overall reduction of 17.44:1. Loaded gearbox test runs are used to evaluate the sensitivity of a non-stationary fault metric for early fault detection and classification. The non-stationary fault metric consists of a simple normalized energy index developed to account for a redistribution of sideband energy of the dominant mesh frequency and its harmonics in the presence of actual gearbox faults. This index is used to qualitatively assess the presence, type and location of gearbox faults. In this work, elements of the normalized energy metric are assembled into a feature vector to serve as input into a self-organizing Kohonen neural network classifier. This classifier maps vibration features onto a two-dimensional grid. A feedforward back propagation neural network is then used to classify different faults according to how they cluster on the two-dimensional self-organizing map. Gearbox faults of OH-58A main transmission considered in this study include sun gear spalling and spiral bevel gear scoring. Results from the classification suggest that the normalized energy metric is reasonably robust against false alarms for certain geartrain faults.

  20. Testing simple models of brittle normal faulting: slip rate, spacing, and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J.; Dawers, N. H.

    2005-05-01

    Fault growth and evolution is a complex process, however any predictable pattern will yield important information for assessing seismic hazard and clues to what controls fault behavior. Models of slip rate variation along strike, spacing of active faults, and scaling of segment length are investigated using data from faults located within the parabola of seismicity around the Yellowstone hotspot. Based on displacement-length relations and segment size, Cowie and Roberts used fault geometry to estimate along-strike slip rate variation in their 2001 paper (JSG,23,1901-1915). Following their model, along-strike slip rate profiles were calculated for three active normal faults: the Beaverhead, Lemhi, and Lost River faults. Though the method yields estimated slip rates, the results roughly mirror along-strike variation in total displacement, because the three faults are similar in size and age. The profiles indicate that the Beaverhead is underdisplaced, i.e. having a low slip rate relative to its length. This suggests that segment linkage occurred later in the development of the Beaverhead than in the others. Cowie and Roberts also proposed a model for fault spacing based on initial fault length and spacing, and maximum length and spacing of fully developed fault systems. Fault spacing is important in determining incidence and magnitude of fault movement. If the distance between faults is too small, strain becomes localized along one while the other exhibits a decrease in seismicity until no activity occurs. In practice it is impossible to know if the distance between the largest faults represents maximum fault spacing, because the fault population is still active and evolving; thus, it is difficult to test or implement the method. A relationship was found among faults within the study area, where spacing of adjacent active faults is proportional to the sums of their lengths. It was also observed that average segment length increases with increasing total fault length

  1. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  2. On the mechanical behaviour of a low-angle normal fault: the Alto Tiberina fault (Northern Apennines, Italy) system case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadacca, Luigi; Casarotti, Emanuele; Chiaraluce, Lauro; Cocco, Massimo

    2016-11-01

    Geological and seismological observations have been used to parameterize 2-D numerical elastic models to simulate the interseismic deformation of a complex extensional fault system located in the Northern Apennines (Italy). The geological system is dominated by the presence of the Alto Tiberina fault (ATF), a large (60 km along strike) low-angle normal fault dipping 20° in the brittle crust (0-15 km). The ATF is currently characterized by a high and constant rate of microseismic activity, and no moderate-to-large magnitude earthquakes have been associated with this fault in the past 1000 years. Modelling results have been compared with GPS data in order to understand the mechanical behaviour of this fault and a suite of minor syn- and antithetic normal fault segments located in the main fault hanging wall. The results of the simulations demonstrate the active role played by the Alto Tiberina fault in accommodating the ongoing tectonic extension in this sector of the chain. The GPS velocity profile constructed through the fault system cannot be explained without including the ATF's contribution to deformation, indicating that this fault, although misoriented, has to be considered tectonically active and with a creeping behaviour below 5 km depth. The low-angle normal fault also shows a high degree of tectonic coupling with its main antithetic fault (the Gubbio fault), suggesting that creeping along the ATF may control the observed strain localization and the pattern of microseismic activity.

  3. Naval Weapons Center Active Fault Map Series.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ’MiS PACE NWC TP 6828 CONTENTS Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... 2 Active Fault Definition ...established along the trace of the Little Take fault zone, within the City of Ridgecrest. ACTIVE FAULT DEFINITION Although it is a commonly used term...34active fault" lacks a pre- cise and universally accepted definition . Most workers, however, accept the following: "Active fault - a fault along

  4. Influence of Transcontinental arch on Cretaceous listric-normal faulting, west flank, Denver basin

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, T.L.

    1983-08-01

    Seismic studies along the west flank of the Denver basin near Boulder and Greeley, Colorado illustrate the interrelationship between shallow listric-normal faulting in the Cretaceous and deeper basement-controlled faulting. Deeper fault systems, primarily associated with the Transcontinental arch, control the styles and causative mechanisms of listric-normal faulting that developed in the Cretaceous. Three major stratigraphic levels of listric-normal faulting occur in the Boulder-Greeley area. These tectonic sensitive intervals are present in the following Cretaceous formations: Laramie-Fox Hills-upper Pierre, middle Pierre Hygiene zone, and the Niobrara-Carlile-Greenhorn. Documentation of the listric-normal fault style reveals a Wattenberg high, a horst block or positive feature of the greater Transcontinental arch, was active in the east Boulder-Greeley area during Cretaceous time. Paleotectonic events associated with the Wattenberg high are traced through analysis of the listric-normal fault systems that occur in the area. These styles are important to recognize because of their stratigraphic and structural influence on Cretaceous petroleum reservoir systems in the Denver basin. Similar styles of listric-normal faulting occur in the Cretaceous in many Rocky Mountain foreland basins.

  5. Tectonic geomorphology of a large normal fault: Akşehir fault, SW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topal, Savaş; Keller, Edward; Bufe, Aaron; Koçyiğit, Ali

    2016-04-01

    In order to better understand the activity of the Akşehir normal fault in SW Turkey and the associated seismic hazard, we investigated the tectonic geomorphology of a 60-km stretch of the 100-km-long Akşehir fault block. The fault can be separated into seven geomorphic segments (1 to 7 from NW to SE) along the mountain front. Segment length varies from about 9 to 14 km, and relief of the horst block varies from about 0.6 km in the SE to 1.0 km in the NW. Analysis of the tectonic geomorphology of 32 drainage basins and mountain front facets using a combination of geomorphic indices reveals a general pattern of high slip rates in the northern and central segments and low slip rates in the southern, probably older, segments. We show that mountain front sinuosity varies from about 1.1 to 1.4 on segments S1-S6 to 2.4 on segment S7, suggesting that the six northern segments are more active than the southernmost segment. Similarly, χ analysis and slope-area analysis of streams reveal a pattern of steepest channels draining the central and northern segments of the horst. The ratio of valley floor width to valley height varies from 0.2 to 0.6, which are typical values for tectonically active mountain fronts; and alluvial fans along segments S1, S2, and S4 are back-tilted. Finally, we show that (1) shapes of the ~ 100-900m high mountain front facets are mostly triangular (~ 80%) and partly trapezoidal (~ 20%); (2) facet slopes range from 6 to 22°; (3) facets at the NW and SE segment ends are larger than the intervening facets; and (4) steepest facets occur along the central segments. Uplift rates estimated from the slope of mountain front facets range from about 0.06 m/ky on the southernmost fault segment (S7) to 0.23 m/ky on the more central S5 and 0.16 m/ky on the northern segment (S1). The estimated pattern of uplift is consistent with the pattern of geomorphic indices. The vertical relief of the facets suggests that uplift of the mountain front initiated in the late

  6. Role of isostasy in the evolution of normal fault systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wernicke, B.; Axen, G.J.

    1988-09-01

    The footwalls of west-dipping normal faults that separate the west-central Colorado Plateau from the Basin and Range province record at least 5-7 km, and perhaps as much as 15-20 km, of west-side-up Neogene uplift, with an axis just 10-20 km west of undeformed plateau strata. The uplift is expressed as folding and steep faulting in pre-Tertiary cratonic and disconformably overlying Neogene strata, forming a basement-cored anticline and coincident topographic high on the western margin of the plateau. The authors interpret the uplift as a nonelastic response of the crust to buoyancy forces accompanying the tectonic denudation of the plateau margin. Profound, isostatically driven deformation of the footwalls of major normal faults may be common in extensional terrains, calling into question several assumptions fundamental to existing models of the evolution of normal fault systems.

  7. Earthquake nucleation on faults with nonconstant normal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Dieterich, J. H.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.; Xu, G.

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have found that earthquake nucleation on faults with rate-and-state dependent constitutive properties is a time dependent process involving evolution of slip rate v and frictional state variable θ. The evolution of θ is governed by an extended aging law, which accounts for the effects of normal stress variations. Assuming normal stress along the fault varies due to remote stressing, we derive a generalized simple patch (GSP) solution that explicitly describes quasi-static evolution of v and θ in the aseismic period, which is shown to agree well with simulation results from a 2D plane strain model. The GSP solution suggests that both initial and loading conditions affect time to instability ti. For initial conditions satisfying Ω = vθ/Dc > 1, ti is strongly dependent on initial slip rate but is insensitive to remote stressing rate. For Ω ≤ 1, ti is affected by initial slip rate, initial state variable and remote loading rate (both shear and normal). Using the GSP solution, we calculate aftershock rates following a Coulomb stress step, which generally agree with Omori's decay law. Our results show that nucleation process is strongly affected by normal stress variations purely originated from remote stressing, which implies that nucleation process on nonplanar faults may be quite different from those observed from planar fault models with pure shear loading conditions, since normal stress variations can arise due to both fault slip and remote stressing for nonplanar faults.

  8. a case of casing deformation and fault slip for the active fault drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, H.; Song, L.; Yuan, S.; Yang, W.

    2010-12-01

    Active fault is normally defined as a fault with displacement or seismic activity during the geologically recent period (in the last 10,000 years, USGS). Here, we refer the active fault to the fault that is under the post-seismic stress modification or recovery. Micro-seismic, fault slip would happen during the recovery of the active faults. It is possible that the drilling through this active fault, such as the Wenchuan Fault Scientific Drilling(WFSD), will be accompanied with some possible wellbore instability and casing deformation, which is noteworthy for the fault scientific drilling. This presentation gives a field case of the Wenchuan earthquake. The great Wenchuan earthquake happened on May 12, 2008. An oilfield is 400km apart from the epicenter and 260km from the main fault. Many wells were drilled or are under drilling. Some are drilled through the active fault and a few tectonic active phenomenons were observed. For instance, a drill pipe was cut off in the well which was just drilled through the fault. We concluded that this is due to the fault slip,if not, so thick wall pipe cannot be cut off. At the same time, a mass of well casings of the oilfield deformed during the great Wenchuan Earthquake. The analysis of the casing deformation characteristic, formation structure, seismicity, tectonic stress variation suggest that the casing deformation is closely related to the Wenchuan Earthquake. It is the tectonic stress variation that induces seismic activities, fault slip, salt/gypsum creep speedup, and deformation inconsistent between stratums. Additional earthquake dynamic loads were exerted on the casing and caused its deformation. Active fault scientific drilling has become an important tool to understand earthquake mechanism and physics. The casing deformation and wellbore instability is not only a consequence of the earthquake but also an indicator of stress modification and fault activity. It is noteworthy that tectonic stress variation and fault

  9. Evidence for Quaternary Slip on a Low Angle Normal Fault: Searles Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numelin, T.; Kirby, E.

    2004-12-01

    Low angle normal faults have been documented in extensional terranes worldwide, however conventional models of fault mechanics preclude slip on planes dipping less than 30 degrees. The global catalogue of earthquake focal mechanisms reveals very few occurrences of seismicity (active slip) on low angle structures, lending support to mechanical arguments against active slip on shallowly dipping planes. Recent field studies of low-angle normal faults in the Baja California and Death Valley regions of western North America, however, suggest that active slip on these structures may be more common than typically thought. Here we investigate the relationship between high angle alluvial scarps in Searles Valley and a low-angle detachment fault in order to determine if displacement on the detachment is active. The network of young and recent fault scarps along the eastern margin Searles Valley can be broadly separated into two primary segments with overlapping fault tips that form a range-scale relay zone in the vicinity of Sand Canyon. South of this relay, the active trace of the fault is marked by a series of graben developed within Late Pleistocene - Holocene alluvial fans. Within the bedrock of the Slate Range, and immediately along-strike of the graben system, is a west dipping, low-angle fault system (Sand Canyon `thrust' - Smith et al., 1968). This fault is continuous within the range for some 20 km and links with a west-dipping normal fault near Manly Pass, and is thus thought to have accommodated west directed normal-sense displacement during Plio-Quaternary time (Andrew and Walker, 2002). Mapping and structural observations at the intersection of the active fault system and the Sand Canyon fault reveals that high-angle scarps cutting Pleistocene alluvium root into a low-angle (10-15°), west-dipping gouge zone. Faults do not significantly displace the detachment surface, and thus, scarp-forming displacement must have been accommodated by slip on the detachment

  10. Porosity variations in and around normal fault zones: implications for fault seal and geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, David; Neilson, Joyce; Farrell, Natalie; Timms, Nick; Wilson, Moyra

    2015-04-01

    Porosity forms the building blocks for permeability, exerts a significant influence on the acoustic response of rocks to elastic waves, and fundamentally influences rock strength. And yet, published studies of porosity around fault zones or in faulted rock are relatively rare, and are hugely dominated by those of fault zone permeability. We present new data from detailed studies of porosity variations around normal faults in sandstone and limestone. We have developed an integrated approach to porosity characterisation in faulted rock exploiting different techniques to understand variations in the data. From systematic samples taken across exposed normal faults in limestone (Malta) and sandstone (Scotland), we combine digital image analysis on thin sections (optical and electron microscopy), core plug analysis (He porosimetry) and mercury injection capillary pressures (MICP). Our sampling includes representative material from undeformed protoliths and fault rocks from the footwall and hanging wall. Fault-related porosity can produce anisotropic permeability with a 'fast' direction parallel to the slip vector in a sandstone-hosted normal fault. Undeformed sandstones in the same unit exhibit maximum permeability in a sub-horizontal direction parallel to lamination in dune-bedded sandstones. Fault-related deformation produces anisotropic pores and pore networks with long axes aligned sub-vertically and this controls the permeability anisotropy, even under confining pressures up to 100 MPa. Fault-related porosity also has interesting consequences for the elastic properties and velocity structure of normal fault zones. Relationships between texture, pore type and acoustic velocity have been well documented in undeformed limestone. We have extended this work to include the effects of faulting on carbonate textures, pore types and P- and S-wave velocities (Vp, Vs) using a suite of normal fault zones in Malta, with displacements ranging from 0.5 to 90 m. Our results show a

  11. Does magmatism influence low-angle normal faulting?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Thompson, George A.

    1993-01-01

    Synextensional magmatism has long been recognized as a ubiquitous characteristic of highly extended terranes in the western Cordillera of the United States. Intrusive magmatism can have severe effects on the local stress field of the rocks intruded. Because a lower angle fault undergoes increased normal stress from the weight of the upper plate, it becomes more difficult for such a fault to slide. However, if the principal stress orientations are rotated away from vertical and horizontal, then a low-angle fault plane becomes more favored. We suggest that igneous midcrustal inflation occurring at rates faster than regional extension causes increased horizontal stresses in the crust that alter and rotate the principal stresses. Isostatic forces and continued magmatism can work together to create the antiformal or domed detachment surface commonly observed in the metamorphic core complexes of the western Cordillera. Thermal softening caused by magmatism may allow a more mobile mid-crustal isostatic response to normal faulting.

  12. Rare Earth Elements reveal past earthquakes on limestone normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manighetti, I.; Boucher, E.; Chauvel, C.; Schlagenhauf, A.; Benedetti, L.

    2009-12-01

    In 2008, we suggested that the chemical composition of the rocks which form well preserved, seismically exhumed fault scarps might record past major earthquakes (Carcaillet et al., 2008) because those scarp surfaces consist of a vertical succession of zones that have been exposed at different times by the repeating earthquakes, thus weathered over different time spans. In this pioneer study, we validated this hypothesis using the changes in chemical compositions (major and trace elements) of 15 carbonate rock samples collected from the base to the top of the seismically exhumed, 10 m-high Magnola normal fault scarp (Abruzzes, Central Italy). However, the number of available samples was insufficient to fully assess the validity of the model. Here we present trace element data on 27 additional samples collected systematically every 25 cm along the Magnola scarp, as well as on 7 scarp samples buried below the colluvium hence representing the first 4 meters of the scarp before exhumation. The scarp rocks buried in the first meter of the ground appear significantly enriched in Rare Earth elements (REE): they contain 60% more REE than the rocks located either deeper in the ground or immediately above the ground level. This concentration peak most probably results from enrichment of the scarp rocks by interaction with the impurity-doped, acidic, upper soil. Above the ground surface and along the scarp, most element concentrations (70%) decrease up-dip, generally by more than 50%; we attribute this trend to leaching and dissolution-recrystallization of purer calcite through time. The top of the scarp having been exposed for a longer period of time, its surface lost more of the trace elements contained in the rocks. However, the upward decrease in REE contents is not linear and 4 REE concentration peaks can be recognized along the exposed scarp. The position of these 4 peaks coincide with the zones identified by Schlagenhauf et al. (2009) and Palumbo et al. (2004) as

  13. Apparent stress, fault maturity and seismic hazard for normal-fault earthquakes at subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of apparent stress for normal-fault earthquakes at subduction zones is derived by examining the apparent stress (?? a = ??Es/Mo, where E s is radiated energy and Mo is seismic moment) of all globally distributed shallow (depth, ?? 1 MPa) are also generally intraslab, but occur where the lithosphere has just begun subduction beneath the overriding plate. They usually occur in cold slabs near trenches where the direction of plate motion across the trench is oblique to the trench axis, or where there are local contortions or geometrical complexities of the plate boundary. Lower ??a (< 1 MPa) is associated with events occurring at the outer rise (OR) complex (between the OR and the trench axis), as well as with intracrustal events occurring just landward of the trench. The average apparent stress of intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes is considerably higher than the average apparent stress of interplate-thrust-fault earthquakes. In turn, the average ?? a of strike-slip earthquakes in intraoceanic environments is considerably higher than that of intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes. The variation of average ??a with focal mechanism and tectonic regime suggests that the level of ?? a is related to fault maturity. Lower stress drops are needed to rupture mature faults such as those found at plate interfaces that have been smoothed by large cumulative displacements (from hundreds to thousands of kilometres). In contrast, immature faults, such as those on which intraslab-normal-fault earthquakes generally occur, are found in cold and intact lithosphere in which total fault displacement has been much less (from hundreds of metres to a few kilometres). Also, faults on which high ??a oceanic strike-slip earthquakes occur are predominantly intraplate or at evolving ends of transforms. At subduction zones, earthquakes occurring on immature faults are likely to be more hazardous as they tend to generate higher amounts of radiated energy per unit of moment than

  14. Active Fault Characterization in the Urban Area of Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Kurt; Grupe, Sabine; Hintersberger, Esther

    2016-04-01

    The identification of active faults that lie beneath a city is of key importance for seismic hazard assessment. Fault mapping and characterization in built-up areas with strong anthropogenic overprint is, however, a challenging task. Our study of Quaternary faults in the city of Vienna starts from the re-assessment of a borehole database of the municipality containing several tens of thousands of shallow boreholes. Data provide tight constraints on the geometry of Quaternary deposits and highlight several locations with fault-delimited Middle to Late Pleistocene terrace sediments of the Danube River. Additional information is obtained from geological descriptions of historical outcrops which partly date back to about 1900. The latter were found to be particularly valuable by providing unprejudiced descriptions of Quaternary faults, sometimes with stunning detail. The along-strike continuations of some of the identified faults are further imaged by industrial 2D/3D seismic acquired outside the city limits. The interpretation and the assessment of faults identified within the city benefit from a very well constrained tectonic model of the active Vienna Basin fault system which derived from data obtained outside the city limits. This data suggests that the urban faults are part of a system of normal faults compensating fault-normal extension at a releasing bend of the sinistral Vienna Basin Transfer Fault. Slip rates estimated for the faults in the city are in the range of several hundredths of millimetres per year and match the slip rates of normal faults that were trenched outside the city. The lengths/areas of individual faults estimated from maps and seismic reach up to almost 700 km² suggesting that all of the identified faults are capable of producing earthquakes with magnitudes M>6, some with magnitudes up to M~6.7.

  15. Spatiotemporal analysis of Quaternary normal faults in the Northern Rocky Mountains, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davarpanah, A.; Babaie, H. A.; Reed, P.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Tertiary Basin-and-Range extensional tectonic event developed most of the normal faults that bound the ranges in the northern Rocky Mountains within Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho. The interaction of the thermally induced stress field of the Yellowstone hot spot with the existing Basin-and-Range fault blocks, during the last 15 my, has produced a new, spatially and temporally variable system of normal faults in these areas. The orientation and spatial distribution of the trace of these hot-spot induced normal faults, relative to earlier Basin-and-Range faults, have significant implications for the effect of the temporally varying and spatially propagating thermal dome on the growth of new hot spot related normal faults and reactivation of existing Basin-and-Range faults. Digitally enhanced LANDSAT 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and Landsat 4 and 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) bands, with spatial resolution of 30 m, combined with analytical GIS and geological techniques helped in determining and analyzing the lineaments and traces of the Quaternary, thermally-induced normal faults in the study area. Applying the color composite (CC) image enhancement technique, the combination of bands 3, 2 and 1 of the ETM+ and TM images was chosen as the best statistical choice to create a color composite for lineament identification. The spatiotemporal analysis of the Quaternary normal faults produces significant information on the structural style, timing, spatial variation, spatial density, and frequency of the faults. The seismic Quaternary normal faults, in the whole study area, are divided, based on their age, into four specific sets, which from oldest to youngest include: Quaternary (>1.6 Ma), middle and late Quaternary (>750 ka), latest Quaternary (>15 ka), and the last 150 years. A density map for the Quaternary faults reveals that most active faults are near the current Yellowstone National Park area (YNP), where most seismically active faults, in the past 1.6 my

  16. Episodic activity of a dormant fault in tectonically stable Europe: The Rauw fault (NE Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeeck, Koen; Wouters, Laurent; Vanneste, Kris; Camelbeeck, Thierry; Vandenberghe, Dimitri; Beerten, Koen; Rogiers, Bart; Schiltz, Marco; Burow, Christoph; Mees, Florias; De Grave, Johan; Vandenberghe, Noël

    2017-03-01

    Our knowledge about large earthquakes in stable continental regions comes from studies of faults that generated historical surface rupturing earthquakes or were identified by their recent imprint in the morphology. Here, we evaluate the co-seismic character and movement history of the Rauw fault in Belgium, which lacks geomorphological expression and historical/present seismicity. This 55-km-long normal fault, with known Neogene and possibly Early Pleistocene activity, is the largest offset fault west of the active Roer Valley Graben. Its trace was identified in the shallow subsurface based on high resolution geophysics. All the layers within the Late Pliocene Mol Formation (3.6 to 2.59 Ma) are displaced 7 m vertically, without growth faulting, but deeper deposits show increasing offset. A paleoseismic trench study revealed cryoturbated, but unfaulted, late glacial coversands overlying faulted layers of Mol Formation. In-between those deposits, the fault tip was eroded, along with evidence for individual displacement events. Fragmented clay gouge observed in a micromorphology sample of the main fault evidences co-seismic faulting, as opposed to fault creep. Based on optical and electron spin resonance dating and trench stratigraphy, the 7 m combined displacement is bracketed to have occurred between 2.59 Ma and 45 ka. The regional presence of the Sterksel Formation alluvial terrace deposits, limited to the hanging wall of the Rauw fault, indicates a deflection of the Meuse/Rhine confluence (1.0 to 0.5 Ma) by the fault's activity, suggesting that most of the offset occurred prior to/at this time interval. In the trench, Sterksel Formation is eroded but reworked gravel testifies for its former presence. Hence, the Rauw fault appears as typical of plate interior context, with an episodic seismic activity concentrated between 1.0 and 0.5 Ma or at least between 2.59 Ma to 45 ka, possibly related to activity variations in the adjacent, continuously active Roer Valley

  17. Fault displacement rates and recent activity on the Ierapetra Fault Zone, Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veliz, V.

    2015-12-01

    Crete is an eastern Mediterranean island that includes the highest forearc topography of the Hellenic subduction margin, along which the African and Eurasian plates converge at rates of ~40 mm/yr. The island is currently experiencing regional uplift and is broken up by numerous active normal faults that contribute to the shaping of its topography. The largest of these onshore tectonic features is, the Ierapetra Fault Zone (IFZ), a normal fault that traverses the entire width of eastern Crete (>20 km) with a NNE strike and west diping. Here we use geomorphologic, structural and kinematic indicators to discuss fault segmentation along the IFZ and to provide quantitative constraints on the late Quaternary (~16.5 and 33 kyr) displacement rate on the fault, including evidence of Holocene earthquake activity on its central segment.

  18. Fault zone structure and inferences on past activities of the active Shanchiao Fault in the Taipei metropolis, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Lee, J.; Chan, Y.; Lu, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Taipei Metropolis, home to around 10 million people, is subject to seismic hazard originated from not only distant faults or sources scattered throughout the Taiwan region, but also active fault lain directly underneath. Northern Taiwan including the Taipei region is currently affected by post-orogenic (Penglai arc-continent collision) processes related to backarc extension of the Ryukyu subduction system. The Shanchiao Fault, an active normal fault outcropping along the western boundary of the Taipei Basin and dipping to the east, is investigated here for its subsurface structure and activities. Boreholes records in the central portion of the fault were analyzed to document the stacking of post- Last Glacial Maximum growth sediments, and a tulip flower structure is illuminated with averaged vertical slip rate of about 3 mm/yr. Similar fault zone architecture and post-LGM tectonic subsidence rate is also found in the northern portion of the fault. A correlation between geomorphology and structural geology in the Shanchiao Fault zone demonstrates an array of subtle geomorphic scarps corresponds to the branch fault while the surface trace of the main fault seems to be completely erased by erosion and sedimentation. Such constraints and knowledge are crucial in earthquake hazard evaluation and mitigation in the Taipei Metropolis, and in understanding the kinematics of transtensional tectonics in northern Taiwan. Schematic 3D diagram of the fault zone in the central portion of the Shanchiao Fault, displaying regional subsurface geology and its relation to topographic features.

  19. Deep pulverization along active faults ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Pulverization is a intensive damage observed along some active faults. Rarely found in the field, it has been associated with dynamic damage produced by large earthquakes. Pulverization has been so far only described at the ground surface, consistent with the high frequency tensile loading expected for earthquake occurring along bimaterial faults. However, we discuss here a series of hints suggesting that pulverization is expected also several hundred of meters deep. In the deep well drilled within Nojima fault after the 1995 Kobe earthquake, thin sections reveal non localized damage, with microfractured pervading a sample, but with little shear disturbing the initial microstructure. In the SAFOD borehole drilled near Parkfield, Wiersberg and Erzinger (2008) made gas monitoring while drilling found large amount of H2 gas in the sandstone west to the fault. They attribute this high H2 concentration to mechanochemical origin, in accordance with some example of diffuse microfracturing found in thin sections from cores of SAFOD phase 3 and from geophysical data from logs. High strain rate experiments in both dry (Yuan et al, 2011) and wet samples (Forquin et al, 2010) show that even under confining pressures of several tens of megapascals, diffuse damage similar to pulverization is possible. This could explain the occurrence of pulverization at depth.

  20. Normal faults, layering and elastic properties of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, V.; Homberg, C.; David, C.; Rocher, M.

    2014-05-01

    We study mesoscale normal faults cutting alternating limestone and clay-rich layers in several localities in the South-Eastern Mesozoic sedimentary basin (France). The displacement gradients, defined as the displacement variation per unit length along fault profile, and the mean fault dips are correlated to the structural and petrophysical properties of the host rock, including the carbonate content, the stiffness, the layering pattern and the maximum burial depth. Analysis of the fault dips indicates that the faults propagate (downward or upward) from an initial fracture from one unit to another rather than through connections of fractures that nucleated in different units. The fault dips are consistent with shear, mixed mode and tensile failures in limestone units. They are consistent with shear failure or are abnormally low in the clay-rich units. Among the studied attributes, in limestone units the failure mode is related to the contrast of the Young's modulus between the limestone and the clay-rich layers. A high contrast promotes tensile failure, whereas a low contrast promotes mixed mode or shear failures. In clay-rich layers, the dip is related to the layering pattern and abnormally low dips are promoted in thin clay-rich layers surrounded by thick limestone units. Specific displacement gradients characterize each lithology of the layered section. It ranges from 0.06 to 0.2 in the clay-rich units and it increases with Young's modulus. The analyses of the fault dips and the displacement gradients have implications in term of local stress. Both analyses converge and they can be related to a variation in stress controlled by the variation in stiffness through the layering.

  1. Hanging-wall deformation above a normal fault: sequential limit analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoping; Leroy, Yves M.; Maillot, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    The deformation in the hanging wall above a segmented normal fault is analysed with the sequential limit analysis (SLA). The method combines some predictions on the dip and position of the active fault and axial surface, with geometrical evolution à la Suppe (Groshong, 1989). Two problems are considered. The first followed the prototype proposed by Patton (2005) with a pre-defined convex, segmented fault. The orientation of the upper segment of the normal fault is an unknown in the second problem. The loading in both problems consists of the retreat of the back wall and the sedimentation. This sedimentation starts from the lowest point of the topography and acts at the rate rs relative to the wall retreat rate. For the first problem, the normal fault either has a zero friction or a friction value set to 25o or 30o to fit the experimental results (Patton, 2005). In the zero friction case, a hanging wall anticline develops much like in the experiments. In the 25o friction case, slip on the upper segment is accompanied by rotation of the axial plane producing a broad shear zone rooted at the fault bend. The same observation is made in the 30o case, but without slip on the upper segment. Experimental outcomes show a behaviour in between these two latter cases. For the second problem, mechanics predicts a concave fault bend with an upper segment dip decreasing during extension. The axial surface rooting at the normal fault bend sees its dips increasing during extension resulting in a curved roll-over. Softening on the normal fault leads to a stepwise rotation responsible for strain partitioning into small blocks in the hanging wall. The rotation is due to the subsidence of the topography above the hanging wall. Sedimentation in the lowest region thus reduces the rotations. Note that these rotations predicted by mechanics are not accounted for in most geometrical approaches (Xiao and Suppe, 1992) and are observed in sand box experiments (Egholm et al., 2007, referring

  2. Uniform pattern of normal faulting at the temporally distributed centers of eruption along the path of the Yellowstone hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davarpanah, Armita; Babaie, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    The northeasterly migration of the Yellowstone hotspot (YHS) has led both to the successive eruption of lava from a temporally ordered set of calderas, and related thermally-induced normal faulting along the Snake River Plain (SRP) over the past 16.6 Ma. We have applied a series of structural and statistical methods to analyze the spatial distribution and orientation of the normal faults to understand the kinematics of the mid-Tertiary-Quaternary faulting event along the SRP in the northern Rockies. The azimuths of the linear directional mean (LDM) and the directional (autocorrelation) anisotropy ellipses in the semivariograms, applying Ordinary Kriging, for different sets of normal fault traces give an estimate for the horizontal component of extension for normal faulting. The sub-parabolic spatial pattern of the normal fault LDMs, and their sub-parallel alignment with the minor axes of the Standard Deviation Ellipses (SDEs) in and around different caldera, suggest uniform normal faulting during thermally-induced extensions along the SRP. The asymmetric, sub-parabolic distribution of the spatial trajectories (form lines) of the LDMs and the major axes of the directional (anisotropy) ellipses of the traces of normal faults in the youngest three calderas are similar to the reported parabolic distribution of earthquake epicenters along active normal faults around the YHS. The parallelism of the axis of the sub-parabolic pattern with the trajectories of the LDMs, the major axes of the directional anisotropy ellipses, and the deduced extension directions for each caldera, suggest systematic and progressive normal faulting due to the thermal regime of the hotspot as it migrated to the northeast. This implies that the age of normal faulting progressively decreases to the northeast.

  3. Seismic evidence of conjugate normal faulting: The 1994 Devil Canyon earthquake sequence near Challis, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Suzette M.

    1994-08-01

    Aftershock hypocenters of the 1984 Devil Canyon, Idaho earthquake indicate the sequence was associated with conjugate normal faulting on two northwest-striking normal faults that bound the Warm Spring Creek graben.

  4. Architectural and microstructural characterization of a seismogenic normal fault in dolostones (Central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demurtas, Matteo; Fondriest, Michele; Clemenzi, Luca; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Storti, Fabrizio; Di Toro, Giulio

    2015-04-01

    Fault zones cutting carbonate sequences represent significant seismogenic sources worldwide (e.g. L'Aquila 2009, MW 6.1). Though seismological and geophysical techniques (double differences method, trapped waves, etc.) allow us to investigate down to the decametric scale the structure of active fault zones, further geological field surveys and microstructural studies of exhumed seismogenic fault zones are required to support interpretation of geophysical data, quantify the geometry of fault zones and identify the fault processes active during the seismic cycle. Here we describe the architecture (i.e. fault geometry and fault rock distribution) of the well-exposed footwall-block of the Campo Imperatore Fault Zone (CIFZ) by means of remote sensed analyses, field surveys, mineralogical (XRD, micro-Raman spectroscopy) and microstructural (FE-SEM, optical microscope cathodoluminescence) investigations. The CIFZ dips 58° towards N210 and its strike mimics that of the arcuate Gran Sasso Thrust Belt (Central Apennines). The CIFZ was exhumed from 2-3 km depth and accommodated a normal throw of ~2 km starting from the Early-Pleistocene. In the studied area, the CIFZ puts in contact the Holocene deposits at the hangingwall with dolomitized Jurassic carbonate platform successions (Calcare Massiccio) at the footwall. From remote sensed analyses, structural lineaments both inside and outside the CIFZ have a typical NW-SE Apenninic strike, which is parallel to the local trend of the Gran Sasso Thrust. Based on the density of the fracture/fault network and the type of fault zone rocks, we distinguished four main structural domains within the ~300 m thick CIFZ footwall-block, which include (i) a well-cemented (white in color) cataclastic zone (up to ~40 m thick) at the contact with the Holocene deposits, (ii) a well-cemented (brown to grey in color) breccia zone (up to ~15 m thick), (iii) an high strain damage zone (fracture spacing < 2-3 cm), and (iv) a low strain damage zone

  5. Fault stability under conditions of variable normal stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Linker, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    The stability of fault slip under conditions of varying normal stress is modelled as a spring and slider system with rate- and state-dependent friction. Coupling of normal stress to shear stress is achieved by inclining the spring at an angle, ??, to the sliding surface. Linear analysis yields two conditions for unstable slip. The first, of a type previously identified for constant normal stress systems, results in instability if stiffness is below a critical value. Critical stiffness depends on normal stress, constitutive parameters, characteristic sliding distance and the spring angle. Instability of the first type is possible only for velocity-weakening friction. The second condition yields instability if spring angle ?? <-cot-1??ss, where ??ss is steady-state sliding friction. The second condition can arise under conditions of velocity strengthening or weakening. Stability fields for finite perturbations are investigated by numerical simulation. -Authors

  6. Owens Valley fault kinematics: Right-lateral slip transfer via north-northeast trending normal faults at the northern end of the Owens Valley fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, T. P.; Dawers, N. H.

    2003-12-01

    The occurrence of several northeast trending normal faults along the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada escarpment are evidence of right-lateral slip transfer across northern Owens Valley from the Owens Valley fault to the White Mountains fault zone. Interaction between the Sierran frontal normal fault and these two fault zones has created a transtensional tectonic environment, which allows for right-lateral slip transfer via a population of northwest dipping normal faults within the Late Quaternary-Holocene alluvial valley fill of northern Owens Valley. A component of normal movement within the valley floor has been documented along fifteen faults. This includes the Tungsten Hills fault, two faults near Klondike Lake, and twelve or so, some possibly linked, small NNE trending scarps southeast of the town of Bishop. One fault segment, located just past the tip of the 1872 earthquake rupture, reveals a minimum of 3.2 meters of normal throw along much of its length. This fault shows evidence for at least three large ruptures, each exhibiting at least one meter of vertical slip. In addition, a large population of normal faults with similar orientations is mapped within the immediate vicinity of this scarp segment. These faults accommodate a substantial amount of normal movement allowing for eastward right lateral slip transfer. With the exception of the Tungsten Hills fault, they are primarily concentrated along a segment of the Sierran Escarpment known as the Coyote Warp. The pre-existing normal fault geometry along this segment acts to block the northward propagation of right-lateral movement, which is consequently forced across the valley floor to the White Mountain fault zone.

  7. Strain compatibility and fault linkage in relay zones on normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Jonathan J.; Imber, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    Relay zones on normal faults are unlikely to have tabular geometries as depicted in idealised models. Rotation of a relay ramp between non-parallel and non-planar relay-bounding faults will inevitably lead to strain compatibility problems causing open gaps or overlaps within the relay zone. Linkage of relay-bounding faults does not evolve from a single branch point. Rather, linkage occurs at multiple points along the fault tip lines giving rise to initially discontinuous branch lines. Where linkage occurs along a discontinuous slip-aligned branch line, displacement at different levels within the relay zone is partitioned between variable amounts of ramp rotation and slip across the branch line. The linking fault propagates when strain compatibility can no longer be maintained by continuous deformation processes, such as thickening or thinning of incompetent layers within the relay ramp. Step-like changes in vertical displacement vs. distance (D - x) profiles on horizons containing apparently intact relay ramps are probably indicative of incipient breaching and can be used predict the presence of a slip-aligned branch line in the sub-surface. Despite the complexity of the strain distribution within relay zones, the total vertical displacement across the relay remains geometrically coherent at all levels.

  8. Seismic reflection profiling around the hypocentral area of the 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu earthquake (Mj6.4): Reactivated thrust faulting of a Miocene normal fault.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokura, T.; Yamaguchi, K.; Kano, N.; Yokota, T.; Tanaka, A.; Ohtaki, T.

    2004-12-01

    The 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu (northern Miyagi) earthquake occurred on July 26, which was preceded by the largest foreshock of Mj5.6 and was followed by the largest aftershock of Mj5.5. Although these earthquakes were not so large in magnitude, they caused large damages. The earthquakes occurred just beneath the Asahiyama hills, where exist the active Asahiyama flexure. Aftershock observations delineate a clear fault plane that extends toward the Sue hills in the east, not toward the Asahiyama hills. However neither surface ruptures nor active fault assocciated with the earthquakes were observed in this region. To clarify both the surface extension of the fault and geologic structure of this region, we conducted 17km-long seismic reflection profiling, using a 17.5-ton vibrator. Geologically, this region was subjected rapid EW extension in middle Miocene and thus produced rift basin was filled by the Matsushima-wan Group (syn-rift sediments) which was bounded by a normal fault, the Ishinomaki-wan fault, in the eastern side of the basin. The Matsushima-wan Group was unconformably overlain by the Shida Group (Miocene post-rift sediments). The Shida Group was unconformably overlain by the Pliocene and post-Pliocene sediments. Deformed Pliocene strata show thrust faulting, indicating EW compression after early Pliocene. Detailed data processing reveals that the seismic profile is essentially concordant with the structure inferred from surface geology. A west-dipping fault with about 50 degrees is found beneath the southeastern extension of the Sue hills where the Ishinomaki-wan fault was supposed to extend. The deeper part of the fault extends toward the earthquake fault plane determined by aftershocks and the shallower part shows a thrust-like structure, which indicate basin inversion using this fault. Thus the 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu earthquake occurred as reactivated thrust faulting of the Miocene normal fault bounding the eastern side of the rift basin.

  9. Holocene Scarp on the Sawtooth Normal Fault, Central Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackray, G. D.; Rodgers, D. W.; Streutker, D. R.; Kemp, C. D.; Drabick, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of LiDAR, air photo, and field data indicates the east-dipping, range-front normal fault of the Sawtooth Mountains has previously unrecognized Holocene offset. A fault scarp is most clearly represented in a bare- earth digital elevation model (DEM) derived from high-resolution LiDAR data. First and last pulse LiDAR data with an average post spacing of 0.5 m were used to compute both bare-earth elevation and local slope values. As the area is forested, vegetation removal was performed using an iterative interpolation method. Holocene fault offset likely extends along at least 23 km of the range front. In the vicinity of Redfish Lake, the scarp can be traced discontinuously for ca. 13 km (the length of LiDAR coverage) along the eastern range-front and cuts glacial, fluvial, and hillslope landforms of Late Pleistocene to Holocene age. Air photo analysis of the range-front north and south of the LiDAR coverage area yields strong evidence, such as topographic offsets, vegetation lineaments, and stream alignments, that late Pleistocene and Holocene faulting likely extends ca. 23 km along the range front, from Decker Creek to Stanley Lake. This zone of clearest postglacial offset corresponds with the highest range front topography in the Sawtooth Range. Weaker evidence suggests that postglacial faulting may extend as much as 10 km further NW of and 17 km further SE of that 23 km section. Scarp geometry and offset vary with location. The fault scarp generally strikes 025 deg. but changes to 040 deg. north of Goat Creek. A single, east-facing scarp is present in some places, such as at Bench Lakes, but more commonly en echelon scarps define a fault zone about 20 m wide. Scarp height, as measured from LiDAR data, ranges from 2.5 to 8 m (typically 3-5 m). Late Pleistocene glacial landforms are offset 4-8 m, while uncommon Holocene fluvial surfaces (e.g., at Fishhook Creek) are offset 2.5 to 3 m. These relationships potentially document two fault ruptures since

  10. Naval weapons center active fault map series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquemore, G. R.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1987-08-01

    The NWC Active Fault Map Series shows the locations of active faults and features indicative of active faulting within much of Indian Wells Valley and portions of the Randsburg Wash/Mojave B test range areas of the Naval Weapons Center. Map annotations are used extensively to identify criteria employed in identifying the fault offsets, and to present other valuable data. All of the mapped faults show evidence of having moved during about the last 12,500 years or represent geologically young faults that occur within seismic gaps. Only faults that offset the surface or show other evidence of surface deformation were mapped. A portion of the City of Ridgecrest is recommended as being a Seismic Hazard Special Studies Zone in which detailed earthquake hazard studies should be required.

  11. Normal faulting in the northern Shanxi Grabens, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Tim; Walker, Richard; Parsons, Barry; Wang, Weitao; Schwenninger, Jean-Luc; Sherlock, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    The Ordos Plateau forms a piece of non-deforming continental lithosphere in northeastern China. Despite being thousands of kilometres from the nearest plate boundary, numerous devastating earthquakes have been recorded around the margins of the plateau over the past 2000 years. Continental deformation in this part of Asia is believed to be caused by the ongoing collision of India with Eurasia; India is currently moving northwards at 40 mm/a. The rate of deformation around the Ordos Plateau, however, is significantly less; typical slip rates for faults bordering the plateau are of the order of 1 mm/a. This deformation is nonetheless important because the adjacent North China Plain is one of the most densely populated regions on Earth. The combined population of Beijing, Hebei and Shanxi Provinces is in excess of 125 million people-all potentially at risk from future earthquakes. Assessing the seismic hazard is clearly of vital societal importance. The plateau is surrounded by extensional rift systems on all sides, except for the Liupanshan in the southwestern corner, where thrust faulting is dominant. The Hetao Graben lies to the north of the plateau, the Yinchuan Graben to the west, the Weihe Graben to the south and the Shanxi Grabens to the east, where they form an S-shaped series of en-echelon basins some 1200 km long. The northern portion of the Shanxi Grabens is characterised by east-northeast striking normal faults and asymmetric half-grabens with footwall blocks tilted to the south-southeast. GPS measurements in this region are sparse, but the existing data suggests a rate of extension across the northern Shanxi grabens of anywhere between 0 mm/a and 4 mm/a. We have used optically stimulated luminescence dating of sedimentary quartz grains and Ar-Ar dating of basaltic lavas to determine ages for features which have been offset by the faulting. Combined with scarp heights and field measurements of fault dip, this data suggest a total extension rate across the

  12. Illuminating Northern California's Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Whitehill, Caroline S.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón; Furlong, Kevin P.; Phillips, David A.

    2009-02-01

    Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic data along major active fault zones of northern California. These data are now freely available in point cloud (x, y, z coordinate data for every laser return), digital elevation model (DEM), and KMZ (zipped Keyhole Markup Language, for use in Google Earth™ and other similar software) formats through the GEON OpenTopography Portal (http://www.OpenTopography.org/data). Importantly, vegetation can be digitally removed from lidar data, producing high-resolution images (0.5- or 1.0-meter DEMs) of the ground surface beneath forested regions that reveal landforms typically obscured by vegetation canopy (Figure 2).

  13. Approximate active fault detection and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škach, Jan; Punčochář, Ivo; Šimandl, Miroslav

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with approximate active fault detection and control for nonlinear discrete-time stochastic systems over an infinite time horizon. Multiple model framework is used to represent fault-free and finitely many faulty models. An imperfect state information problem is reformulated using a hyper-state and dynamic programming is applied to solve the problem numerically. The proposed active fault detector and controller is illustrated in a numerical example of an air handling unit.

  14. Earthquake recurrence on the southern San Andreas modulated by fault-normal stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Randy; Weldon, Ray; Humphreys, Eugene; Saucier, Francois

    1995-01-01

    Earthquake recurrence data from the Pallett Creek and Wrightwood paleoseismic sites on the San Andreas fault appear to show temporal variations in repeat interval. We investigate the interaction between strike-slip faults and auxiliary reverse and normal faults as a physical mechanism capable of producing such variations. Under the assumption that fault strength is a function of fault-normal stress (e.g. Byerlee's Law), failure of an auxiliary fault modifies the strength of the strike-slip fault, thereby modulating the recurrence interval for earthquakes. In our finite element model, auxiliary faults are driven by stress accumulation near restraining and releasing bends of a strike-slip fault. Earthquakes occur when fault strength is exceeded and are incorporated as a stress drop which is dependent on fault-normal stress. The model is driven by a velocity boundary condition over many earthquake cycles. Resulting synthetic strike-slip earthquake recurrence data display temporal variations similar to observed paleoseismic data within time windows surrounding auxiliary fault failures. Our simple model supports the idea that interaction between a strike-slip fault and auxiliary reverse or normal faults can modulate the recurrence interval of events on the strike-slip fault, possibly producing short term variations in earthquake recurrence interval.

  15. The 2011 Hawthorne, Nevada, Earthquake Sequence; Shallow Normal Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. D.; Johnson, C.; Davies, J. A.; Agbaje, T.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kent, G.

    2011-12-01

    Range front fault at this latitude. At least two faults have been imaged within the sequence; these structures are at shallow depth (3-6 km), strike NE, and dip ~NW. Prior to temporary station installation event depths were poorly constrained, with the nearest network station 25 km from the source area. Early sequence moment tensor solutions show depths are on the order of 2-6 km and locations using the near source stations also confirm the shallow depths of the Hawthorne sequence. S-P times of 0.5 sec and less have been observed on a near-source station, illustrating extremely shallow source depths for some events. Along with the 2011 Hawthorne activity, very shallow depths in Nevada have been observed from near source stations in the 2008 west Reno earthquake sequence (primarily strike-slip faulting; main shock Mw 5.0) and the 1993 Rock Valley sequence in southern NNSS (strike-slip faulting; main shock Mw 4.0). These shallow sequences tend to include high rates of low magnitude earthquakes continuing over several months duration.

  16. Large Earthquake Repeat on Normal Faults: Insights from dense in-situ 36Cl Exposure Dating of Limestone Fault Scarps, Central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagenhauf, A.; Benedetti, L.; Manighetti, I.

    2007-12-01

    The only chance to learn how major earthquakes have repeated in the past on major active faults is to analyze their surface geological record, if any. We analyze such a record on 11 active normal faults to seek identifying, dating and measuring the large earthquake ruptures that have broken these faults in the last 10-20 kyrs, and determine how these major ruptures have followed in space and time on each fault and from one fault to another. As large earthquakes repeat on a normal fault, the fault plane is progressively exhumed and exposed at the free air, forming an escarpment at the surface. Provided that this escarpment is preserved from erosion, its surface holds the complete record of the successive ruptures (and possible aseismic slip) as they have broken the ground surface. We have started to analyze such a record on 11 neighboring, likely interacting active faults in the Fucino area, Central Italy, where seismic activity can be devastating (1915, M7 Avezzano earthquake, 30 000 casualties). Faults offset limestone rocks and form several hundred meters high cumulative escarpments, whose youngest parts (10-20 kyrs) are well preserved in the form of 10-20 m high, steep scarps running along the fault lengths (10-20 km). The Holocene seismic slip history of the faults can be recovered from base-to-top continuous in-situ 36Cl exposure dating of the limestone scarps (Benedetti et al. 2002, 2003; Palumbo et al. 2004). To reach that objective, we have sampled the faults in two different ways: two faults (Magnola and Roccapreturo) were sampled at several, regularly spaced sites along their length, so that to recover the earthquake slip variability in both space and time. Nine other faults (Fiamigniano, Campo-Felice, Velino, Tre- Monti, Trasacco, Parasano, San Sebastiano, Castel di Ieri, Roccacasale) were sampled at one single spot along their length, so that to examine the possible earthquake interactions within the entire fault system. Doing so, we have collected one

  17. Fault tolerant photodiode and photogate active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Cory; Chapman, Glenn H.; La Haye, Michelle L.; Djaja, Sunjaya; Cheung, Desmond Y. H.; Lin, Henry; Loo, Edward; Audet, Yves R.

    2005-03-01

    As the pixel counts of digital imagers increase, the challenge of maintaining high yields and ensuring reliability over an imager"s lifetime increases. A fault tolerant active pixel sensor (APS) has been designed to meet this need by splitting an APS in half and operating both halves in parallel. The fault tolerant APS will perform normally in the no defect case and will produce approximately half the output for single defects. Thus, the entire signal can be recovered by multiplying the output by two. Since pixels containing multiple defects are rare, this design can correct for most defects allowing for higher production yields. Fault tolerant photodiode and photogate APS" were fabricated in 0.18-micron technology. Testing showed that the photodiode APS could correct for optically induced and electrically induced faults, within experimental error. The photogate APS was only tested for optically induced defects and also corrects for defects within experimental error. Further testing showed that the sensitivity of fault tolerant pixels was approximately 2-3 times more sensitive than the normal pixels. HSpice simulations of the fault tolerant APS circuit did not show increased sensitivity, however an equivalent normal APS circuit with twice width readout and row transistors was 1.90 times more sensitive than a normal pixel.

  18. Paleoseismological analysis on the basis of precise sea bottom topography and sonic prospecting along the normal fault in the Beppu-Haneyama Fault Zone in Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, K.; Haraguchi, T.; Yamada, K.; Yoshinaga, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The subaqueous topography of bays or lakes along the large active faults are influenced by displacement on fault and strong motion related sediments such as land slide, turbidite etc. We carried out precise topographic survey using multi-beam sonic survey, and seismic reflection survey to about 40m deep sediments in Beppu Bay, which is a pull apart basin with normal faults related to right lateral movements of Median Tectonic Line in southwest Japan. In west central Kyushu, long active fault zone named as Beppu - Haneyama Fault zone runs with E-W direction normal fault zone. The southwest boundary of Beppu Bay is a part of Beppu-Haneyama Fault zone and normal fault of pull apart basin. The multi beam sonic data show the characteristic altitude distribution (topography) of steep inclining slope from shore side to the deepest part with 70m below sea level along the coast, and also submarine slidings occurred at off Beppu and off Oita. Within those areas, several blocks of more than 100m has preserved shape and developed to sliding direction. From the viewpoint of sliding topography, sliding movements are thought sector collapse during short interval, and main cause is thought the movement of directly below active fault and related strong seismic motion. The sonic prospecting data show several reflection horizons indicating volcanic ashes and sand seams. Around two submarine sliding deposit areas, continuation of clear reflections are sparse influenced by event sedimentation and thick coarse sediments. 88 m sediment cores from 7 sites (core length: 8m to 20m long per site) from deepest part and submarine sliding area in late July this year (2015) will make clear that construction age of these topography and construction mechanism from lithological characteristics, and comparison to historical record including large earthquake occurred in 1596.

  19. Active faults in southeastern Harris County, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clanton, U. S.; Amsbury, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Aerial color infrared photography was used to investigate active faults in a complex graben in southeastern Harris County, Tex. The graben extends east-west across an oil field and an interstate highway through Ellington Air Force Base (EAFB), into the Clear Lake oil field and on to LaPorte, Tex. It was shown that the fault pattern at EAFB indicates an appreciable horizontal component associated with the failure of buildings, streets, and runways. Another fault system appears to control the shoreline configuration of Clear Lake, with some of the faults associated with tectonic movements and the production of oil and gas, but many related to extensive ground water withdrawal.

  20. The role of antecedent drainage networks and isolated normal fault propagation on basin stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, E.; Brocklehurst, S. H.; Gawthorpe, R.

    2010-12-01

    The stratigraphy of an extensional basin reflects a history of fault activity, erosion, drainage network evolution, and sediment transport and deposition. Here a three-dimensional numerical model of erosion and clastic sedimentation is applied to investigate the effect of displacement on a normal fault to the distribution of deposition in an extensional basin. Material is eroded from the hinterland through a stream-power incision law and deposited in the basin using a modified diffusion algorithm. Experiments are implemented for 3Ma, in which the initial 1Ma are used to permit a drainage network to evolve to a topographic steady state. This system is then perturbed by the introduction of a propagating isolated normal fault at varying displacement rates (1.0m/kyr - 2.0m/kyr) to demonstrate the influence of fault propagation on drainage capture, network re-organisation, sediment routing and deposition. Faster displacement rates and smaller antecedent drainage networks cause footwall-derived deltas to be cut-off more rapidly from the hinterland source area. Drainage networks are re-organised such that sediment is then transported around the fault tips into axially sourced deltas. Sediments may continue to be deposited in the hanging wall at the fault centre, but this material has not been sourced directly from the adjacent footwall, even though the stratigraphic architecture might suggest that this is the case. Drainage networks are modified by drainage reversals in the antecedent channels, and the development of areas of abandoned/trapped drainage. These changes in sediment supply due to network re-organisation are also reflected in the basin stratigraphy, with rapid back-stepping of deltas when the source is removed in the adjacent footwall. Later incision and headward erosion of the footwall channels may cause re-capture of earlier channels, while network re-organisation may also cause depositional in-filling of earlier channels. The drainage divide shifts

  1. Geologic and geochemical study of the Picacho gold mine, California: gold in a low-angle normal fault environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losh, Steven; Purvance, Dan; Sherlock, Ross; Jowett, E. Craig

    2005-03-01

    The Picacho gold deposit, located in southeasternmost California, is a low-grade gold deposit in a nearly flat-lying denudational fault of regional extent and probable Oligocene age. The deposit is hosted by intensely fractured and faulted Mesozoic leucogranite and by chloritic augen gneiss and schist, and is overlain unconformably and in fault contact by unmineralized late Oligocene Quechan volcanic rocks. The deposit is structurally characterized by normal and normal-oblique faults of low to high dip at shallow depths in the mine, merging downward with a synchronous, low-dipping ore-stage extensional fault system (the Chocolate Mountains/Gatuna Fault) of probable Oligocene age in deeper portions of the deposit. The fault system was infiltrated during much of its active life by hot, dilute, highly exchanged meteoric water having temperatures of 170°-210° C, salinity <2 wt% NaCl equivalent and calculated δ18Ofluid between -2.6‰ and 5.2‰. This main-stage fluid precipitated quartz, pyrite, and specular hematite, accompanied by silicification and sericitization. Auriferous ore-stage pyrite was precipitated late in the fault evolution probably by mixing of reducing ore fluid with relatively oxidized main-stage fluid during regional Oligocene extension on the Chocolate Mountains/Gatuna Fault. The Picacho deposit is characterized by a gold-arsenic-antimony geochemical signature consistent with bisulfide complexing of gold in reducing fluid, in contrast with typical denudation fault-hosted base-metal-rich deposits associated with high-salinity fluids elsewhere in the southwestern United States. The deposit is overprinted by Miocene normal faults having a wide range of dips. These postore faults are associated with red earthy hematite precipitation, pyrite oxidation, and supergene enrichment of gold.

  2. Is there really an active fault (Cibyra Fault?) cutting the Stadion of the ancient city of Cibyra? (Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitez, İrem; Yaltırak, Cenk

    2013-04-01

    The Cibyra segment of the Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone (BFFZ) is in a tectonically very active region of southwestern Anatolia. The presence of the Cibyra Fault was firstly suggested by Akyüz and Altunel (1997, 2001). Researchers identified traces of historical earthquakes in Cibyra by taking into account the collapsed seat rows on the east side of the stadion as reference. They claimed that the NNE-SSW left lateral fault Cibyra Fault (related to Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone) continues through Pliocene sediments on both eastern and western sides of the stadion of Cibyra. The questionable left-lateral fault had been examined in detail by ourselves during our 60-days accommodation in the ancient city of Cibyra excavations for the Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone Project in 2008, 2009 and 2012. A left-lateral offset on the Stadion was firstly mentioned in a study whose aim is to find the traces of Burdur-Fethiye Fault (Akyüz and Altunel, 2001) and many researchers accepted this fault by reference (for example Alçiçek et al. 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006 and Karabacak, 2011). However as a result of the field observations it is understood that there is no fault cutting the Stadion. By the reason of the fact that there are a lot of faults in the region, however the fault that devastated the ancient city is unknown. The deformation traces on the ruins of the ancient city display a seismic movement occured in the region. It is strongly possible that this movement is related to the NE-SW left lateral oblique normal fault named as Cibyra Fault at the northwestern side of the city. Especially the ravages in the eastern part of the city indicate that the deformations are related to ground properties. If the rotation and overturn movement are considered and if both movements are the product of the same earthquake, the real Cibyra Fault is compatible with normal fault with left lateral compenent. After the 2011 excavations and 2012 field studies, the eastern wall of the Stadion showed that

  3. Mechanical interaction among normal faults: A numerical field and seismological investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet Gage

    1998-12-01

    The segmentation of normal faults influences both their structural development and seismogenic character. In this study, field and seismological observations of normal faults from southern Oregon are combined with three-dimensional numerical modeling to illuminate the effect of mechanical interaction among fault segments. Field observations of two overlapping normal faults and associated deformation document features common to many normal-fault relay zones. A boundary element method numerical model, using simple fault-plane geometries, material properties, and boundary conditions, reproduces the principal characteristics of the observed fault scarps. The model produces a region of high Coulomb shear stress in the relay zone. The results suggest that the mechanical interaction between segments of a normal-fault system promote the development of connected, zigzagging fault scarps. The interplay between tectonic tension and lithostatic compression should strongly influence the near-surface behavior of surface-breaking normal faults. Four simple boundary conditions are evaluated for application to modeling surface-breaking normal faults. Map patterns of normal fault linkages from Lake County, Oregon show a systematic relationship between echelon step-sense, oblique extension direction, and the position of linking faults. When the step sense is the same as the sense of oblique extension, the faults are linked in the lower part of their relay ramp. When the step-sense and extension-sense are opposite, the faults are linked in the upper part of the ramp. The calculated stress fields around echelon normal faults reveal a relationship similar to the field observations. Thus, oblique slip alters the mechanical interaction among segments and influences the geometry of fault linkage. The 1993 Klamath Falls, Oregon earthquake sequence shows evidence for fault segmentation in the occurrence of two main shocks and in the spatial distribution of aftershocks. Late stage, off fault

  4. Asymmetrical Growth of Footwall Topography in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru: Implications for Normal Fault Control on Landscape Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanni, M. K.; Horton, B. K.

    2007-12-01

    Morphometric parameters and hypsometry of the >5-km-high Cordillera Blanca in Peru provide insights into the topographic evolution of the uplifted footwall of an active, high-magnitude-slip, low-angle normal fault within a contractional orogenic belt. The modern tectonic activity, mappable fault trace, high relief, and uniform footwall lithology make the Cordillera Blanca an ideal locality to test models for the evolution of topography related to normal faulting. Most models for normal fault growth suggest a tectonic and geomorphic symmetry in which maximum slip and maximum surface uplift occur along the central segments of the fault, with net slip, footwall uplift, and hangingwall subsidence diminishing along strike toward the fault tips. A digital elevation model (DEM) of the Cordillera Blanca permits extraction of important geomorphic metrics for footwall transverse drainages and the hanging-wall axial river, including hypsometry, drainage area, drainage length, relief, channel gradient, surface slope, aspect ratio, and longitudinal profile. These data reveal a pronounced asymmetry in which footwall relief, exposed fault relief, channel gradient, and surface slope are greatest along the northern fault segment and become systematically lower southward along strike. In contrast to most models for normal fault growth, largely based on late Cenozoic systems in the Basin and Range province of the western United States, the Cordillera Blanca demonstrates that abrupt and significant along-strike variations in displacement and footwall uplift are possible in major normal fault systems. The causes of an asymmetric distribution of fault slip and footwall topography in the Cordillera Blanca may be related to: (a) mechanical coupling between the subducting flat Nazca slab and the overriding South American plate; (b) gravitational collapse of overthickened crust along reactivated thrust faults; (c) climatic processes linked to the effect of glacial erosion in the footwall

  5. Reactivation of inland normal faults triggered by extensional stress associated with the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, H.; Toda, S.; Fukushima, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The devastating 11 March 2011 Mw 9.0 earthquake ruptured a 500-km-long and 200-km-wide plate interface between the overlying North American plate and subducting Pacific plate along the Tohoku coast of northeast Japan. Because of its large source area and huge amount of slip up to 50 m, the earthquake drastically changed the crustal stress state of northeast Japan and triggered widespread seismic activity as far as 450 km from the source area. There are several areas of heightened seismicity in Tohoku district where there were few earthquakes prior to the March event. Iwaki City at the southeast corner of Fukushima Prefecture is one of the areas with significantly elevated seismic activity after the March earthquake. The most striking characteristics of the seismicity in Iwaki area are that the majority of the earthquakes show normal faulting mechanisms with the T-axes trending E-W to NE-SW. This marks a significant contrast to an E-W compressional stress field of northeast Japan demonstrated by geodetic, seismological and geological data. Therefore, the E-W tensional stress regime is interpreted to be temporal due to coseismic and post-seismic eastward movement of northeast Japan arc. The largest normal faulting event of Mw 6.6 occurred on April 11 and ruptured two previously mapped faults, the NW-trending Yunodake fault and NNW-trending Itozawa fault. Clear surface ruptures ~15 km long along the Yunodake fault and ~15 km long along the Itozawa fault appeared during the earthquake. Seismological data and interviews to the local residents reveal that the two sub-parallel faults ruptured simultaneously. The surface ruptures exhibit predominantly normal sense of slip down to the west although the Yunodake fault has systematic left-lateral component of displacement less than 1/5 of the vertical component. The maximum vertical offset on the Yunodake fault is ~80 cm whereas that on the Itozawa fault is ~2 m. The location of the ruptures and slip distribution by field

  6. Generic along-strike segmentation of Afar normal faults, East Africa: Implications on fault growth and stress heterogeneity on seismogenic fault planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manighetti, I.; Caulet, C.; Barros, L.; Perrin, C.; Cappa, F.; Gaudemer, Y.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how natural faults are segmented along their length can provide useful insights into fault growth processes, stress distribution on fault planes, and earthquake dynamics. We use cumulative displacement profiles to analyze the two largest scales of segmentation of ˜900 normal faults in Afar, East Africa. We build upon a prior study by Manighetti et al. (2009) and develop a new signal processing method aimed at recovering the number, position, displacement, and length of both the major (i.e., longest) and the subordinate, secondary segments within the faults. Regardless of their length, age, geographic location, total displacement, and slip rate, 90% of the faults contain two to five major segments, whereas more than 70% of these major segments are divided into two to four secondary segments. In each hierarchical rank of fault segmentation, most segments have a similar proportional length, whereas the number of segments slightly decreases with fault structural maturity. The along-strike segmentation of the Afar faults is thus generic at its two largest scales. We summarize published fault segment data on 42 normal, reverse, and strike-slip faults worldwide, and find a similar number (two to five) of major and secondary segments across the population. We suggest a fault growth scenario that might account for the generic large-scale segmentation of faults. The observation of a generic segmentation suggests that seismogenic fault planes are punctuated with a deterministic number of large stress concentrations, which are likely to control the initiation, arrest and hence extent and magnitude of earthquake ruptures.

  7. Tectonic origin for polygonal normal faults in pelagic limestones of the Cingoli anticline hinge (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petracchini, Lorenzo; Antonellini, Marco; Billi, Andrea; Scrocca, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Polygonal faults are a relatively-recent new class of normal faults which are thought to be formed during early burial and diagenesis as a consequence of heterogeneous lateral volume changes. Polygonal faults are non-systematically oriented and, in map view, they form rhombus-, pentagon-, or hexagon-like pattern, suggesting a non-tectonic origin. Furthermore, polygonal faults are layer bound and they are restricted to particular stratigraphic level. Predicting the pattern of polygonal normal fault results crucial for geofluid exploration and exploitation, but, despite the large number of studies, the origin of these faults remains still largely controversial. One of the main reason for this uncertainty is that they are poorly known in outcrops. Polygonal faults have been identified in few localities within Mesozoic chalk (United Kingdom, France, and Egypt), in Paleogene claystone (Belgium), and in the Cretaceous Khoman Formation (Egypt) where polygonal faults have been observed in an extensive exposure of chalk. In this study, we describe an outcrop in the Cingoli anticline hinge, which is located at external front of the northern Apennines fold-thrust belt (Italy), showing normal faults that we interpreted as syn-tectonically (syn-thrusting) polygonal faults. The outcrop shows three vertical exposures of sub-horizontal fine-grained marly limestones with chert interlayers of Albian-Turonian age. Intraformational short normal faults affect the carbonate and chert beds. These faults are poorly-systematic and they cut through the carbonate beds whereas usually stop against the chert layers. The fault surfaces are often characterized by slickolites, clayey residue, and micro-breccias including clasts of chert and carbonate. Fault displacement is partly or largely accommodated by pressure solution. At the fault tips, the displacement is generally transferred, via a lateral step, to an adjacent similar fault segment. The aim of our study is to understand the nucleation

  8. Meteoric water in normal fault systems: Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on authigenic phases in brittle fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. H.; Anderson, R.; Mulch, A.; Solum, J. G.; Valley, J. W.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of fluid circulation systems in normal fault systems is fundamental to understanding the nature of fluid movement within the upper crust, and has important implications for the on-going controversy about the strength of faults. Authigenic phases in clay gouges and fault breccias record the isotopic signature of the fluids they formed in equilibrium with, and can be used to understand the ‘plumbing system’ of brittle fault environments. We obtained paired oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on authigenic illite and/or smectite in clay gouge from normal faults in two geologic environments, 1.) low-angle normal faults (Ruby Mountains detachment, NV; Badwater Turtleback, CA; Panamint range-front detachment; CA; Amargosa detachment; CA; Waterman Hills detachment, CA), and 2.) An intracratonic high-angle normal fault (Moab Fault, UT). All authigenic phases in these clay gouges are moderately light isotopically with respect to oxygen (illite δ18O -2.0 - + 11.5 ‰ SMOW, smectite δ18O +3.6 and 17.9 ‰) and very light isotopically with respect to hydrogen (illite δD -148 to -98 ‰ SMOW, smectite δD -147 to -92 ‰). Fluid compositions calculated from the authigenic clays at temperatures of 50 - 130 ○C (as indicated by clay mineralogy) indicate that both illite and smectite in normal fault clay gouge formed in the presence of near-pristine to moderately-evolved meteoric fluids and that igneous or metamorphic fluids are not involved in clay gouge formation in these normal fault settings. We also obtained paired oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on chlorites derived from footwall chlorite breccias in 4 low-angle normal fault detachment systems (Badwater and Mormon Point Turtlebacks, CA, the Chemehuevi detachment, CA, and the Buckskin-Rawhide detachment, AZ). All chlorites are isotopically light to moderately light with respect to oxygen (δ18O +0.29 to +8.1 ‰ SMOW) and very light with respect to hydrogen (δD -97 to -113 ‰) and indicate

  9. A reconnaissance technique for estimating the slip rates of normal-slip faults in the Great Basin, and application to faults in Nevada, United States of America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depolo, Craig Michael

    The slip rates of 270 normal-slip faults in Nevada are estimated using a new procedure that uses geomorphic features. The slip rate estimation scheme is based on the existence and non-existence of alluvial fault scarps and fault facets, and the height of the maximum basal fault facet. Faults that lack alluvial fault scarps and fault facets are assigned a vertical slip rate of 0.001 m/kyr and a range of 0.0005 to 0.009 m/kyr. Fault with alluvial fault scarps that lack active fault facets are assigned a vertical slip rate of 0.01 m/kyr and a range of 0.003 to 0.07 m/kyr. Faults that have relict facets, that is facets left over from a prior, more active period of the fault, are included in the 0.01 m/kyr group. Faults with active facets have vertical slip rates of ≥0.1 m/kyr. Slip rates for these higher activity faults are estimated using the height of the largest basal fault facet and the relationship,$log\\ S = 0.00267 H - 0.963where S is vertical slip rate in m/kyr and H is maxiμm basal facet height in meters. One standard deviation in this relationship is equivalent to a multiplicative factor of 1.8 in vertical slip rate. In Nevada, the fastest normal-slip faults (geq0.5 m/kyr) are located along the province-boundary with the Sierra Nevada and in Western Nevada, in the Walker Lane belt. In regions that are relatively active within the Great Basin, faults have vertical slip rates of up to 0.5 m/kyr. Less active parts of Nevada are characterized by faults with vertical slip rates of 0.001 and 0.01 m/kyr. Strain rates calculated for subregions indicate the state is deforming at rates comparable to the overall strain rate of the Great Basin or less, and support the division of the state into different subprovinces. An east-west strain-rate transect was made at the Latitude of 40spcirc\\ 30spprimeN, from the Wasatch front in Utah to the western Nevada border. A cumulative horizontal slip vector of 3.9 mm/yr in a N79spcircW direction is estimated if the preferred

  10. Active faulting in the Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.

    2005-06-01

    Deformation across the San Andreas and Walker Lane fault systems accounts for most relative Pacific-North American transform plate motion. The Walker Lane is composed of discontinuous sets of right-slip faults that are located to the east and strike approximately parallel to the San Andreas fault system. Mapping of active faults in the central Walker Lane shows that right-lateral shear is locally accommodated by rotation of crustal blocks bounded by steep-dipping east striking left-slip faults. The left slip and clockwise rotation of crustal blocks bounded by the east striking faults has produced major basins in the area, including Rattlesnake and Garfield flats; Teels, Columbus and Rhodes salt marshes; and Queen Valley. The Benton Springs and Petrified Springs faults are the major northwest striking structures currently accommodating transform motion in the central Walker Lane. Right-lateral offsets of late Pleistocene surfaces along the two faults point to slip rates of at least 1 mm/yr. The northern limit of northwest trending strike-slip faults in the central Walker Lane is abrupt and reflects transfer of strike-slip to dip-slip deformation in the western Basin and Range and transformation of right slip into rotation of crustal blocks to the north. The transfer of strike slip in the central Walker Lane to dip slip in the western Basin and Range correlates to a northward broadening of the modern strain field suggested by geodesy and appears to be a long-lived feature of the deformation field. The complexity of faulting and apparent rotation of crustal blocks within the Walker Lane is consistent with the concept of a partially detached and elastic-brittle crust that is being transported on a continuously deforming layer below. The regional pattern of faulting within the Walker Lane is more complex than observed along the San Andreas fault system to the west. The difference is attributed to the relatively less cumulative slip that has occurred across the Walker

  11. The growth of facteted spurs at normal fault escarpments : Insights from analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strak, Vincent; Dominguez, Stéphane; Petit, Carole; Meyer, Bertrand

    2010-05-01

    In extensional tectonic contexts, interactions between crustal deformation, erosion and sedimentation often result in faceted spurs formation along active normal fault scarps. Those geomorphic markers are potentially of great interest to study active fault kinematics and the evolution of landscape morphology. Faceted spurs are generally observed in regions where rainfall rate is large enough to allow for the development of a mature drainage network (Basin and Range, Baikal Rift, Aegean region). Indeed, it seems that, in regions characterized by more arid climatic conditions, faceted spurs are very rare (e.g., several places of the East African Rift). To better constrain how facets arise and evolve depending on active deformation through time, we developed an approach based on experimental modeling. We constructed a mechanical device reproducing the growth of a single normal fault scarp. Erosion of the model was performed by using a rainfall system composed of 18 sprinklers. The experimental set-up includes a DEM acquisition system based on laser interferometry and allowed computing model topography and the erosion-sedimentation budget at several stages. A first set of experiments, designed with one rigid tray moving down along the fault plane, succeeded in reproducing the main morphologic features encountered in the field (faceted spurs, drainage basin, drainage network, alluvial fans). Facets grew and their number decreased with time during the experiment due to regressive erosion of the footwall and river valley capture processes. Nonetheless, the important falling of the base-level due to rigid block motion precluded a meaningful quantitative comparison with natural examples. Indeed, after a large fault offset, facets were sorely conserved because basin subsidence is too important. We performed, then, a second set of experiments including a flexure of the hanging-wall, which reduced the base level fall. This set of experiments showed more realistic facets

  12. The role of bed-parallel slip in the development of complex normal fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogkos, Efstratios; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom; Walsh, John J.; Pavlides, Spyros

    2017-04-01

    Normal faults exposed in Kardia lignite mine, Ptolemais Basin, NW Greece formed at the same time as bed-parallel slip-surfaces, so that while the normal faults grew they were intermittently offset by bed-parallel slip. Following offset by a bed-parallel slip-surface, further fault growth is accommodated by reactivation on one or both of the offset fault segments. Where one fault is reactivated the site of bed-parallel slip is a bypassed asperity. Where both faults are reactivated, they propagate past each other to form a volume between overlapping fault segments that displays many of the characteristics of relay zones, including elevated strains and transfer of displacement between segments. Unlike conventional relay zones, however, these structures contain either a repeated or a missing section of stratigraphy which has a thickness equal to the throw of the fault at the time of the bed-parallel slip event, and the displacement profiles along the relay-bounding fault segments have discrete steps at their intersections with bed-parallel slip-surfaces. With further increase in displacement, the overlapping fault segments connect to form a fault-bound lens. Conventional relay zones form during initial fault propagation, but with coeval bed-parallel slip, relay-like structures can form later in the growth of a fault. Geometrical restoration of cross-sections through selected faults shows that repeated bed-parallel slip events during fault growth can lead to complex internal fault zone structure that masks its origin. Bed-parallel slip, in this case, is attributed to flexural-slip arising from hanging-wall rollover associated with a basin-bounding fault outside the study area.

  13. Particle-size distributions of low-angle normal fault breccias: Implications for slip mechanisms on weak faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Amy; Axen, Gary; Selverstone, Jane

    2013-10-01

    Slip on low-angle normal faults is not well understood because they slip at high angles to the maximum principal stress directions. These faults are considered weak and their motion cannot be explained using standard Byerlee friction and Andersonian fault mechanics. One proposed mechanism for weak fault slip is reduction of effective normal stress induced by high pore-fluid pressure. This mechanism is likely to allow dilation of the fault zone and, therefore, affect the particle-size distribution of fault breccia, which has been shown to differ for unconstrained versus constrained comminution. High pore-fluid pressure can cause dilation which leads to unconstrained comminution. We analyze samples from the footwalls of two low-angle normal faults in southern California (West Salton and Whipple detachment faults) to determine the fault-rock textures and grain-size distributions (GSDs). The GSDs are fractal with fractal dimensions ranging from ˜2.6 to 3.4. The lower end of this range is thought to reflect constrained comminution and only occurs in samples from the footwall of a small-offset "minidetachment" fault about 100 m below the Whipple detachment. The higher fractal dimensions are common in cataclasites related to the main faults and also reflect constrained comminution but are overprinted by shear localization. Our GSDs are similar to those from natural and laboratory-deformed fault rocks from strong faults. We conclude that if high pore-fluid pressure aided slip on these faults, it did not strongly affect mechanisms by which brecciation occurs, implying that fluid pressure generally was sublithostatic. Independent evidence exists for lithostatic fluid pressure that having dropped or cycled to hydrostatic levelsin the minidetachment, but our GSD results suggest that periods of high fluid pressure were too short or infrequent for unconstrained comminution to have been the dominant cataclastic mechanism. Fractal dimensions of ˜2.6 for these samples suggest

  14. Forced folding and basement-detached normal faulting in the Haltenbanken area, offshore Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Withjack, M.O.; Meisling, K.E.; Russell, L.R.

    1988-02-01

    Triassic evaporites affected the structural development of the Haltenbanken area of offshore Norway during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous by mechanically isolating Triassic and younger strata from older strata and basement. Many folds in the Haltenbanken area are forced folds above basement-involved normal faults. Forced folds formed, at least in part, because Triassic evaporites behaved ductilely, decoupling overlying strata from underlying faulted strata and basement. Seismic data show that these forced folds are asymmetric flexures that affect Lower Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic strata. Strata beneath the Triassic evaporites are faulted. Some forced folds die out along strike into, and are cut by, basement-involved normal faults. Folding predominated above salt swells where decoupling was enhanced, whereas faulting occurred on the flanks of salt swells where salt thicknesses were reduced and decoupling was less effective. Many normal faults in the Haltenbanken area are basement-detached and flatten within the Triassic evaporites. Seismic data show that rollover anticlines and antithetic normal faults affect Lower Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic strata within the hanging walls of these basement-detached normal faults. Strata beneath the evaporites are not affected by this deformation. Some basement-detached normal faults may be secondary structures associated with forced folding. Others, especially those with large displacements, may have formed in response to gravity sliding.

  15. Forced folding and basement-detached normal faulting in the Haltenbanken area, offshore Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Withjack, M.O.; Meisling, K.E.; Russell, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Triassic evaporites affected the structural development of the Haltenbanken area of offshore Norway during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous by mechanically isolating Triassic and younger strata from older strata and basement. Many folds in the Haltenbanken area are forced folds above basement-involved normal faults. Forced folds formed, at least in part, because Triassic evaporites behaved ductilely, decoupling overlying strata from underlying faulted strata and basement. Seismic data show that these forced folds are asymmetric flexures that affect Lower Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic strata. Strata beneath the Traiassic evaporites are faulted. Some forced folds die out along strike into, and are cut by, basement-involved normal faults. Folding predominated above salt swells where decoupling was enhanced, whereas faulting occurred on the flanks of salt swells where salt thicknesses were reduced and decoupling was less effective. Many normal faults in the Haltenbanken area are basement-detached and flatten within the Triassic evaporites. Seismic data show that rollover anticlines and antithetic normal faults affect Lower Cretaceous, Jurassic, and Triassic strata within the hanging walls of these basement-detached normal faults. Strata beneath the evaporites are not affected by this deformation. Some basement-detached normal faults may be secondary structures associated with forced folding. Others, especially those with large displacements, may have formed in response to gravity sliding.

  16. A model for the geomorphic development of normal-fault facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, G. E.; Hobley, D. E. J.; McCoy, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    Triangular facets are among the most striking landforms associated with normal faulting. The genesis of facets is of great interest both for the information facets contain about tectonic motion, and because the progressive emergence of facets makes them potential recorders of both geomorphic and tectonic history. In this report, we present observations of triangular facets in the western United States and in the Italian Central Apennines. Facets in these regions typically form quasi-planar surfaces that are aligned in series along and above the trace of an active fault. Some facet surfaces consist mainly of exposed bedrock, with a thin and highly discontinuous cover of loose regolith. Other facets are mantled by a several-decimeter-thick regolith cover. Over the course of its morphologic development, a facet slope segment may evolve from a steep (~60 degree) bedrock fault scarp, well above the angle of repose for soil, to a gentler (~20-40 degree) slope that can potentially sustain a coherent regolith cover. This evolutionary trajectory across the angle of repose renders nonlinear diffusion theory inapplicable. To formulate an alternative process-based theory for facet evolution, we use a particle-based approach that acknowledges the possibility for both short- and long-range sediment-grain motions, depending on the topography. The processes of rock weathering, grain entrainment, and grain motion are represented as stochastic state-pair transitions with specified transition rates. The model predicts that facet behavior can range smoothly along the spectrum from a weathering-limited mode to a transport-limited mode, depending on the ratio of fault-slip rate to bare-bedrock regolith production rate. The model also implies that facets formed along a fault with pinned tips should show systematic variation in slope angle that correlates with along-fault position and slip rate. Preliminary observations from central Italy and the eastern Basin and Range are consistent

  17. Topological characteristics of simple and complex normal fault networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, C. K.; Nixon, C. W.

    2016-03-01

    2-D, map-view topological analysis of ten natural and two analogue fault networks was undertaken. The fault arrays range from simple, low-displacement systems, to complex systems arising from multiple stages of deformation, or exhibiting complex local rotation of stresses. Classification of fault arrays was based on fault terminations (I-nodes), splaying and abutting geometries (Y-nodes) and cross-cutting relationships (X-nodes), which permit relatively quick and simple ways of analysing fault terminations and connectivity. Many of the fault networks are predominantly composed of I- and Y-nodes with at most only a minor X-node population, hence discrimination of significant differences between fault networks using just this type of analysis is limited. Subdividing Y-nodes into splaying (Ys), abutting (Ya) and cross-cutting (Yc) types, displaying the data on Ys-Ya-Yc node triangles, as well as generating equivalent networks defined by vertices and edges provides additional information for defining fault networks. Comparison of the Ys-Ya-Yc node triangle and the excess kurtosis of vertice degree distribution identifies seven distinct types of network that show meaningful differences. Such quantitative descriptions are useful for comparing the results of analogue and numerical models with natural examples as well as assessing fault network connectivity, which has implications for the structural interpretation of reservoirs and aquifers. A wide variety of factors contribute to variations in fault networks such as variations in strain, stress rotation with time, fabric inheritance, and stress deflection. While topology cannot be used to identify specific mechanisms, some topological characteristics can help narrow the likely mechanism particularly when used in conjunction with more traditional techniques and observations.

  18. Active, capable, and potentially active faults - a paleoseismic perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, M.N.

    2000-01-01

    Maps of faults (geologically defined source zones) may portray seismic hazards in a wide range of completeness depending on which types of faults are shown. Three fault terms - active, capable, and potential - are used in a variety of ways for different reasons or applications. Nevertheless, to be useful for seismic-hazards analysis, fault maps should encompass a time interval that includes several earthquake cycles. For example, if the common recurrence in an area is 20,000-50,000 years, then maps should include faults that are 50,000-100,000 years old (two to five typical earthquake cycles), thus allowing for temporal variability in slip rate and recurrence intervals. Conversely, in more active areas such as plate boundaries, maps showing faults that are <10,000 years old should include those with at least 2 to as many as 20 paleoearthquakes. For the International Lithosphere Programs' Task Group II-2 Project on Major Active Faults of the World our maps and database will show five age categories and four slip rate categories that allow one to select differing time spans and activity rates for seismic-hazard analysis depending on tectonic regime. The maps are accompanied by a database that describes evidence for Quaternary faulting, geomorphic expression, and paleoseismic parameters (slip rate, recurrence interval and time of most recent surface faulting). These maps and databases provide an inventory of faults that would be defined as active, capable, and potentially active for seismic-hazard assessments.

  19. Was Himalayan normal faulting triggered by initiation of the Ramgarh-Munsiari Thrust?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Delores M.; Pearson, Ofori N.

    2013-01-01

    The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust is a major orogen-scale fault that extends for more than 1,500 km along strike in the Himalayan fold-thrust belt. The fault can be traced along the Himalayan arc from Himachal Pradesh, India, in the west to eastern Bhutan. The fault is located within the Lesser Himalayan tectonostratigraphic zone, and it translated Paleoproterozoic Lesser Himalayan rocks more than 100 km toward the foreland. The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust is always located in the proximal footwall of the Main Central thrust. Northern exposures (toward the hinterland) of the thrust sheet occur in the footwall of the Main Central thrust at the base of the high Himalaya, and southern exposures (toward the foreland) occur between the Main Boundary thrust and Greater Himalayan klippen. Although the metamorphic grade of rocks within the Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust sheet is not significantly different from that of Greater Himalayan rock in the hanging wall of the overlying Main Central thrust sheet, the tectonostratigraphic origin of the two different thrust sheets is markedly different. The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust became active in early Miocene time and acted as the roof thrust for a duplex system within Lesser Himalayan rocks. The process of slip transfer from the Main Central thrust to the Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust in early Miocene time and subsequent development of the Lesser Himalayan duplex may have played a role in triggering normal faulting along the South Tibetan Detachment system.

  20. An extensive region of off-ridge normal-faulting earthquakes in the southern Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, E. A.; Nabelek, J. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    A verified prediction of the theory of plate tectonics is that the focal mechanisms of earthquakes on the mid-ocean ridge system indicate either normal faulting on ridge segments or strike-slip faulting on transform faults. A broad region in the southern Indian Ocean which differs from typical ridge and intraplate regimes has been identified. In this region a number of large off-ridge earthquakes have occurred in the last 20 years. The mechanisms for these events, where known, all involve normal faulting. Nine of these earthquakes have been studied in detail using a formal inversion technique based on matching synthetic body waves to observed seismograms.

  1. Extensional step-over between the Zhongdian and Red River faults: kinematics of the Daju normal fault constrained by cosmogenic dating of the Yangtze terraces (Yulong Shan, Yunnan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woerd, J.; Perrineau, A.; Gaudemer, Y.; Leloup, P.-H.; Liu-Zeng, J.; Barrier, L.; Thuizat, R.

    2012-04-01

    Extension in western Yunnan, southeastern Tibet, is limited by two dextral strike-slip faults, the Zhongdian and Red River faults, to the north and south, respectively, and is characterized by N-S directed normal faults and basins. In the northwestern corner of this large extensional step-over, the Yangtze River crosses the Daju normal fault at the foot of the Yulong Shan. Due to uplift of the Yulong Shan, the Yangtze carved the huge Huxiao Jia (Tiger Leap) Gorges (˜3500 m deep) and abandoned sets of fluvial terraces across the fault zone and in the Daju basin to the north. Cosmogenic dating of blocks sampled on top of the terraces provide ages ranging from 8 to 30 ka. In the hanging wall basin to the north, the terraces may have been abandoned after the breach of a natural dam formed in the river (moraine or landslide) during the last glacial period. The average incision rate of the river in the basin is about 5.9 mm/yr, the vertical slip-rate on the Daju fault is 4.9±1.3 mm/yr, thus implying an incision rate of the river inside the gorge reaching about 11 mm/year. These rates may explain the exceptional size and steepness of the gorge. These results show that active faulting plays a major role in shaping the present relief of this region and that recent strain changes involve movement along the largest strike-slip faults of the region, in accordance with models implying large-scale block extrusion.

  2. Slip on normal faults induced by surface processes after the cessation of regional extension-Insights from three-dimensional numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpeinen, Heidi; Maniatis, Georgios; Hampel, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    In regions of active extension, normal faulting generates topography that is continuously modified by erosion, sediment transport and deposition. As shown by previous numerical models with full coupling between tectonics and surface processes, the redistribution of mass at the Earth's surface accelerates the rate of faulting by affecting the stress state of the crust. It remains unknown, however, how fault slip evolves as a result of ongoing surface processes if regional extension as the main driver of faulting ceases. Here we use three-dimensional finite-element modelling to show that surface processes acting on normal-fault bounded mountain ranges may sustain fault slip for millions of years even after regional extension has stopped. The models consist of two successive phases. During the first phase, the normal fault accumulates displacement owing to an extensional boundary condition, while erosion and sediment deposition are active on the model surface. At the beginning of the second phase, extension of the model is stopped while the surface processes remain active. The results show that in most models normal faulting continues during the second phase at rates of ~ 20 to ~ 70 m/Ma for more than 1 Ma. In some experiments, normal slip is maintained for ~ 3 Ma, whereas in other models, a short phase of normal faulting is followed by slow reverse slip. The maximum amount of normal slip in different experiments reaches up to 90 m during the second model phase. If erosion is intensified by increasing the diffusion constant by a factor of 5, the fault accumulates the additional normal slip at a faster rate, i.e. during a shorter time period. In contrast, a five-fold variation of the fluvial erosion constant does not significantly affect the fault slip evolution. Variations of the fault dip and length have a similar effect on the duration of the phase with additional normal slip as variations of the diffusion constant. The fault slip evolution is correlated with the

  3. InSAR measurements around active faults: creeping Philippine Fault and un-creeping Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analyses have been frequently applied to measure the time-series of small and quasi-steady displacements in wide areas. Large efforts in the methodological developments have been made to pursue higher temporal and spatial resolutions by using frequently acquired SAR images and detecting more pixels that exhibit phase stability. While such a high resolution is indispensable for tracking displacements of man-made and other small-scale structures, it is not necessarily needed and can be unnecessarily computer-intensive for measuring the crustal deformation associated with active faults and volcanic activities. I apply a simple and efficient method to measure the deformation around the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand, and the Philippine Fault in the Leyte Island. I use a small-baseline subset (SBAS) analysis approach (Berardino, et al., 2002). Generally, the more we average the pixel values, the more coherent the signals are. Considering that, for the deformation around active faults, the spatial resolution can be as coarse as a few hundred meters, we can severely 'multi-look' the interferograms. The two applied cases in this study benefited from this approach; I could obtain the mean velocity maps on practically the entire area without discarding decorrelated areas. The signals could have been only partially obtained by standard persistent scatterer or single-look small-baseline approaches that are much more computer-intensive. In order to further increase the signal detection capability, it is sometimes effective to introduce a processing algorithm adapted to the signal of interest. In an InSAR time-series processing, one usually needs to set the reference point because interferograms are all relative measurements. It is difficult, however, to fix the reference point when one aims to measure long-wavelength deformation signals that span the whole analysis area. This problem can be

  4. Identifying paleoseismic information from limestone normal faults with a handheld XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzon, Ruben; Stroeven, Arjen P.; Skelton, Alasdair; Goodfellow, Brad W.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2014-05-01

    Predicting earthquakes would help immensely in saving human lives and protecting economic interest but a reliable method has not yet been found. When making risk assessments scientists continue to rely on paleoseismic studies. Determining a fast and cheap proxy for paleoseismicity is therefore of much interest. Surface exposure dating is an emergent method for paleoseismic studies of active normal fault scarps in the Mediterranean region. This method gives crucial paleoearthquake information such as timing and vertical slip along the fault but the analysis of cosmogenic nuclides is costly and the sampling is both complicated and time consuming. In our study we employ an Olympus Innov-X DeltaTM handheld XRF to analyse the geochemistry of a scarp surface in order to determine the number and magnitude of slips along the fault. This method requires no drilling and it is possible to analyse the results at the fault scarp. Exposure dating is still required to yield the timeframe of the paleoearthquake record, but the number of sampling points may be significantly reduced since it would be possible to pin-point the sampling locations around suspected former soil horizons. We have analysed 200 sample points with the handheld XRF from a 6.8 m section of the limestone normal fault scarp surface close to Sparta, southern Greece. Our profile is taken next to the Benedetti et al.[Geophysical Research Letters, 29, 8 (2002)] sampling site. Our results show significant variations in Yttrium concentration along the profile with a strong peak just below the present soil cover at the base of the section and then repeated peaks up along the transect on the subaerially exposed scarp surface. These Yttrium concentrations at the surface are correlated with Yttrium concentrations in the rock determined from drill cores taken every 10 cm from the same profile. The preliminary dataset appears to indicate a good correlation between the Yttrium concentrations and the earthquake events

  5. The northwest trending north Boquerón Bay-Punta Montalva Fault Zone; A through going active fault system in southwestern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roig‐Silva, Coral Marie; Asencio, Eugenio; Joyce, James

    2013-01-01

    The North Boquerón Bay–Punta Montalva fault zone has been mapped crossing the Lajas Valley in southwest Puerto Rico. Identification of the fault was based upon detailed analysis of geophysical data, satellite images, and field mapping. The fault zone consists of a series of Cretaceous bedrock faults that reactivated and deformed Miocene limestone and Quaternary alluvial fan sediments. The fault zone is seismically active (local magnitude greater than 5.0) with numerous locally felt earthquakes. Focal mechanism solutions suggest strain partitioning with predominantly east–west left-lateral displacements with small normal faults striking mostly toward the northeast. Northeast-trending fractures and normal faults can be found in intermittent streams that cut through the Quaternary alluvial fan deposits along the southern margin of the Lajas Valley, an east–west-trending 30-km-long fault-controlled depression. Areas of preferred erosion within the alluvial fan trend toward the west-northwest parallel to the onland projection of the North Boquerón Bay fault. The North Boquerón Bay fault aligns with the Punta Montalva fault southeast of the Lajas Valley. Both faults show strong southward tilting of Miocene strata. On the western end, the Northern Boquerón Bay fault is covered with flat-lying Holocene sediments, whereas at the southern end the Punta Montalva fault shows left-lateral displacement of stream drainage on the order of a few hundred meters.

  6. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  7. Seismic imaging of deformation zones associated with normal fault-related folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapadat, Alexandru; Imber, Jonathan; Iacopini, David; Hobbs, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Folds associated with normal faulting, which are mainly the result of fault propagation and linkage of normal fault segments, can exhibit complex deformation patterns, with multiple synthetic splay faults, reverse faults and small antithetic Riedel structures accommodating flexure of the beds. Their identification is critical in evaluating connectivity of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and sealing capacity of faults. Previous research showed that seismic attributes can be successfully used to image complex structures and deformation distribution in submarine thrust folds. We use seismic trace and coherency attributes, a combination of instantaneous phase, tensor discontinuity and semblance attributes to identify deformation structures at the limit of seismic resolution, which accommodate seismic scale folding associated with normal faulting from Inner Moray Firth Basin, offshore Scotland. We identify synthetic splay faults and reverse faults adjacent to the master normal faults, which are localized in areas with highest fold amplitudes. This zone of small scale faulting is the widest in areas with highest fault throw / fold amplitude, or where a bend is present in the main fault surface. We also explore the possibility that changes in elastic properties of the rocks due to deformation can contribute to amplitude reductions in the fault damage zones. We analyse a pre-stack time-migrated 3D seismic data-set, where seismic reflections corresponding to a regionally-continuous and homogeneous carbonate layer display a positive correlation between strain distribution and amplitude variations adjacent to the faults. Seismic amplitude values are homogeneously distributed within the undeformed area of the footwall, with a minimum deviation from a mean amplitude value calculated for each seismic line. Meanwhile, the amplitude dimming zone is more pronounced (negative deviation increases) and widens within the relay zone, where sub-seismic scale faults, which accommodate

  8. Evidence for low-angle normal faulting in the Pumqu-Xianza Rift, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monigle, Patrick W.; Nabelek, John; Braunmiller, Jochen; Carpenter, N. Seth

    2012-09-01

    Low-angle normal faulting is widely discussed as a possible mechanism for continental extension, however, unambiguous evidence for seismogenic low-angle normal faulting is lacking. Here, we investigate seismicity along a short segment of the Pumqu-Xianza Rift (PXR) in southern Tibet, where the HiCLIMB seismic array recorded over 500 earthquakes between 2004 July and 2005 August. Hypocentres of the 40 best recorded earthquakes are approximately 20-25 km west of the rift and tightly clustered at about 10 km depth, consistent with moment tensor depths of the 11 largest (3.4 ≤Mw≤ 4.5) earthquakes. Events in this group have N-S striking normal faulting mechanisms with low-angle (29°) west dipping fault planes. Rupture along a west dipping, low-angle, planar normal fault (the eastern PXR boundary fault) is consistent with event hypocentres, fault dip from moment tensors, and prominent surface morphology. The dip of 29° is at the low end of physically possible values assuming normal frictional behaviour and state of stress. We suggest it is possible for a planar, low-angle fault to nucleate seismically at a low angle at depth in the presence of basal shear and work its way aseismically through the brittle crust to the surface with the aid of lubricating minerals.

  9. Control of fault plane geometry on the formation of a normal fault-related anticline: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Long, Wei; Li, Zhongquan; Li, Ying; Chen, Junliang; Li, Hongkui; Wan, Shuangshuang

    2017-12-01

    In one of the largest oil-gas fields in Daqing, China, the anticlines are important structures that hold natural gas. The origin of the symmetric anticlines, which have bends on both the limbs, remains under debate. This is especially true in the case of the anticline in Xujiaweizi (XJWZ), which has recently been the focus of gas exploration. A compressive force introduced by a ramp/flat fault was suggested as its origin of formation; however, this is inconsistent with the reconstruction of the regional stress fields, which show an extensive environment. An alternative explanation suggests a normal fault-related fold under extensive stress. However, this mechanism has difficulty explaining the very localized, rather than wide-spread, development of the anticline along the proposed controlling normal fault. The well-developed bends on both limbs of the anticline are also very different from the typical roll-over anticline. Here, we conduct an experimental study showing that the very localized development of the bent-on-both-limbs anticline is controlled by the geometry of the underlying fault-plane. A ramp/flat fault plane can introduce an anticline with bends on both limbs, while a smooth fault plane will develop a roll-over anticline with a bend on only one limb.

  10. Late Quaternary Normal Faulting and Hanging Wall Basin Evolution of the Southwestern Rift Margin from Gravity and Geology, B.C.S., MX and Exploring the Influence of Text-Figure Format on Introductory Geology Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Melanie M. D.

    2011-01-01

    An array of north-striking, left-stepping, active normal faults is situated along the southwestern margin of the Gulf of California. This normal fault system is the marginal fault system of the oblique-divergent plate boundary within the Gulf of California. To better understand the role of upper-crustal processes during development of an obliquely…

  11. Laboratory observations of fault strength in response to changes in normal stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilgore, Brian D.; Lozos, Julian; Beeler, Nicholas M.; Oglesby, David

    2012-01-01

    Changes in fault normal stress can either inhibit or promote rupture propagation, depending on the fault geometry and on how fault shear strength varies in response to the normal stress change. A better understanding of this dependence will lead to improved earthquake simulation techniques, and ultimately, improved earthquake hazard mitigation efforts. We present the results of new laboratory experiments investigating the effects of step changes in fault normal stress on the fault shear strength during sliding, using bare Westerly granite samples, with roughened sliding surfaces, in a double direct shear apparatus. Previous experimental studies examining the shear strength following a step change in the normal stress produce contradictory results: a set of double direct shear experiments indicates that the shear strength of a fault responds immediately, and then is followed by a prolonged slip-dependent response, while a set of shock loading experiments indicates that there is no immediate component, and the response is purely gradual and slip-dependent. In our new, high-resolution experiments, we observe that the acoustic transmissivity and dilatancy of simulated faults in our tests respond immediately to changes in the normal stress, consistent with the interpretations of previous investigations, and verify an immediate increase in the area of contact between the roughened sliding surfaces as normal stress increases. However, the shear strength of the fault does not immediately increase, indicating that the new area of contact between the rough fault surfaces does not appear preloaded with any shear resistance or strength. Additional slip is required for the fault to achieve a new shear strength appropriate for its new loading conditions, consistent with previous observations made during shock loading.

  12. A summary of the active fault investigation in the extension sea area of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault , N-S direction fault in south west Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we carried out two sets of active fault investigation by the request from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in the sea area of the extension of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault. We want to clarify the five following matters about both active faults based on those results. (1)Fault continuity of the land and the sea. (2) The length of the active fault. (3) The division of the segment. (4) Activity characteristics. In this investigation, we carried out a digital single channel seismic reflection survey in the whole area of both active faults. In addition, a high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection survey was carried out to recognize the detailed structure of a shallow stratum. Furthermore, the sampling with the vibrocoring to get information of the sedimentation age was carried out. The reflection profile of both active faults was extremely clear. The characteristics of the lateral fault such as flower structure, the dispersion of the active fault were recognized. In addition, from analysis of the age of the stratum, it was recognized that the thickness of the sediment was extremely thin in Holocene epoch on the continental shelf in this sea area. It was confirmed that the Kikugawa fault extended to the offing than the existing results of research by a result of this investigation. In addition, the width of the active fault seems to become wide toward the offing while dispersing. At present, we think that we can divide Kikugawa fault into some segments based on the distribution form of the segment. About the Nishiyama fault, reflection profiles to show the existence of the active fault was acquired in the sea between Ooshima and Kyushu. From this result and topographical existing results of research in Ooshima, it is thought that Nishiyama fault and the Ooshima offing active fault are a series of structure. As for Ooshima offing active fault, the upheaval side changes, and a direction changes too. Therefore, we

  13. The Nature and Evolution of Fluid-Related Weakening Mechanisms Along a Continental Low-Angle Normal Fault: the Zuccale Fault, Elba Island, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Collettini, C.; MacPherson, C. G.; Pearce, M. A.; Faulkner, D.

    2008-12-01

    Despite extensive research concerning the mechanical significance and geometric evolution of low-angle normal faults, few studies have focussed on the importance of the fault rock material which is generated during prolonged slip and exhumation. The Zuccale fault on the Island of Elba is closely associated with syn- tectonic igneous intrusions, and it possesses a complex fault rock 'stratigraphy' which records the interaction between multiple deformation mechanisms and fluids derived from distinct crustal reservoirs. Optical- and scanning-electron microscopy, combined with XRD and stable isotope analyses, reveal systematic changes in fault rock chemistry and texture: 1) Cataclasis and dissolution-precipitation creep were the dominant deformation mechanisms during the early stages of fault activity. Cataclasis facilitated the influx of chemically active fluids, leading to widespread syn-tectonic growth of weak phyllosilicate minerals, including talc and chlorite. Crystal-plasticity was important within calcite-rich fault rocks which initially deformed at depths of ~6-8km. Calcite grains (~10μm in diameter) possess a strong C-axis preferred orientation, suggesting that they experienced dynamic recrystallisation by dislocation creep. These calcite-mylonites were crosscut by vein material which was progressively sheared and recrystallised, indicating cyclic brittle-ductile deformation. During the later stages of fault activity, granular flow became an important deformation mechanism. Rolling and sliding of grains past one another was accommodated along clay-lined grain boundaries; 2) During exhumation, dolomite was superseded by calcite as the dominant syn- tectonic fault cement. Dolomite veins within the fault core record transiently high fluid pressures followed by mineral sealing and fault strengthening. The δ13CV-PDB signature of such vein dolomite is strongly clustered around a mean value of -5.7‰, whilst δ18OV-SMOW varies between 10‰ to14‰. These values

  14. Identification of recently active faults and folds in Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marliyani, G. I.; Arrowsmith, R.; Helmi, H.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze the spatial pattern of active deformation in Java, Indonesia with the aim of characterizing the deformation of the upper plate of the subduction zone in this region. The lack of detailed neotectonic studies in Java is mostly because of its relatively low rate of deformation in spite of significant historical seismic activity. In addition, the abundance of young volcanic materials as well as the region's high precipitation rate and vegetation cover obscure structural relationships and prevent reliable estimates of offset along active faults as well as exhumed intra-arc faults. Detailed maps of active faults derived from satellite and field-based neotectonic mapping, paleoseismic data, as well as new data on the fault kinematics and estimates of orientation of principal stresses from volcano morphology characterize recently active faults and folds. The structures in West Java are dominated by strike-slip faulting, while Central and northern part of East Java are dominated by folds and thrusting with minor normal faulting. The structures vary in length from hundreds meters to tens of kilometers and mainly trend N75°E, N8°E with some minor N45°W. Our preliminary mapping indicates that there are no large scale continuous structures in Java, and that instead deformation is distributed over wide areas along small structures. We established several paleoseismic sites along some of the identified structures. We excavated two shallow trenches along the Pasuruan fault, a normal fault striking NW-SE that forms a straight 13 km scarp cutting Pleistocene deltaic deposits of the north shore of East Java. The trenches exposed faulted and folded fluvial, alluvial and colluvial strata that record at least four ground-rupturing earthquakes since the Pleistocene. The Pasuruan site proves its potential to provide a paleoseismic record rarely found in Java. Abundant Quaternary volcanoes are emplaced throughout Java; most of the volcanoes show elongation in N100°E and N20

  15. Comparison between inversion of focal mecanisms and paleostress analysis, interpretation of normal fault in SW Alps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauve, Victorien; Rolland, Yann; Bethoux, Nicole; Sanchez, Guillaume; Darnault, Romain; Plateau, Romain

    2013-04-01

    Seismic hazard assessment of active faults in slow orogenic domains is a challenging issue and even more in regional with polyphase tectonic history. We present a multi-disciplinary approach combining geological observations and sismological analysis along the south-western flank of the Alpine arc (France and Italy). Statistical analysis of strieated fault planes and data inversion allow paleo-stress/strain analysis of fractures that mainly formed in the Miocene to present (20-0 Ma). These data are compared to 'modern' stress tensors computated from focal mechanisms of the 1968-2006 regional sismological database. The paleo-stress tensors are compared with modern stresses in terms of the distribution of orientations and stress ratios in the SW Alps space. In this study 46 new paleo-stress tensors are calculated based on more 850 faults measurements mainly from the edge and into the Argentera-Mercantour massif and 9 new inversions of focal mechanisms. Paleo-stress analysis provides orientations similar to those derived from the focal mechanisms of current regional seismicity, with the main stress 1 oriented north-south, in agreement with a major N140° right-lateral strike-slip active fault system (e.g., Sanchez et al.,2010). The ratios of normal and reverse focal mechanism are sensibly different between south Alps and western Alps. The study of deformation, fracturation and pebbles in Pliocene molasses basin of Nice is in agreement with ongoing strike-slip deformation at least since the early Pliocene (Bauve et al., 2012). With this study we better constrain the kinematics of SW Alps, and their bearing on seismological hazard. Since 20 Ma, the SW Alps are dominated by a transpressive strain characterised by permutation between reverse and stike-slip fault with high phi ratio ((2-3)/(1-3)). The extensional stress are clearly localized around the Tinée valley, on the NW edge of the crystalline basement, characterised by large slope instabilities and active

  16. Normal block faulting in the Airport Graben, Managua pull-apart rift, Nicaragua: gravity and magnetic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Zambrana Arias, X.; Keppie, D.; Ramón Márquez, V.

    2012-12-01

    Regional scale models have been proposed for the Nicaraguan depression: 1) parallel rifting of the depression (and volcanic front) due to roll back of the underlying subducted Cocos plate; 2) right-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the depression and locally offset by pull-apart basins; 3) right-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the depression and offset by left-lateral transverse or bookshelf faults. At an intermediate scale, Funk et al. (2011) interpret the depression as half graben type structures. The E-W Airport graben lies in the southeastern part of the Managua graben (Nicaragua), across which the active Central American volcanic arc is dextrally offset, possibly the result of a subducted transform fault where the subduction angle changes. The Managua graben lies within the late Quaternary Nicaragua depression produced by backarc rifting during roll back of the Middle American Trench. The Managua graben formed as a pull-apart rift associated with dextral bookshelf faulting during dextral shear between the forearc and arc and is the locus of two historical, large earthquakes that destroyed the city of Managua. In order to asses future earthquake risk, four E-W gravity and magnetic profiles were undertaken to determine its structure across the Airport graben, which is bounded by the Cofradia and Airport fault zones, to the east and west, respectively. These data indicated the presence of a series of normal faults bounding down-thrown and up-thrown fault blocks and a listric normal fault, Sabana Grande Fault. The models imply that this area has been subjected to tectonic extension. These faults appear to be part of the bookshelf suite and will probably be the locus of future earthquakes, which could destroy the airport and surrounding part of Managua. Three regional SW-NE gravity profiles running from the Pacific Ocean up to the Caribbean See indicate a change in crustal structure: from north to south the crust thins. According to these regional

  17. Selective reverse-reactivation of normal faults, and deformation around reverse-reactivated faults in the Mesozoic of the Somerset coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. G.; Peacock, D. C. P.; Sanderson, D. J.; McGurk, A. C.

    1999-05-01

    Normal faults exposed in the Triassic-Jurassic limestones and shales of the Somerset coast were formed during the Mesozoic development of the Bristol Channel Basin. Reverse-reactivation of some of these normal faults occurred during Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary north-south contraction. The contraction is also evident from thrusts and conjugate strike-slip faults. Preferential reactivation of the normal faults is attributed to: (1) decreased fault-plane friction, (2) domino block rotation, (3) displacement magnitude, and (4) fault connectivity. The geometries of overlapping and underlapping zones in reactivated fault zones are dependent on the existing structural geometry. Two distinctive styles of displacement accommodation occur between reverse-reactivated normal faults: (1) formation of a network of strike-slip faults, conjugate about NNE-SSW, and (2) oblique steeply-dipping reverse faults. Interaction between strike-slip and an existing fault is dependent on whether the normal fault was reactivated. The range of structures related to the north-south contraction has been incorporated into a single deformation model, controlled by the northwards movement of the hanging wall of the Quantock's Head Fault. Pure dip-slip movement occurred in the centre of its curved fault trace, with a sinistral component at the western tip, and a dextral component of displacement and strike-slip block rotations occurred at the eastern tip. Shortening of these blocks was achieved through development of a strike-slip fault network and NW-striking thrusts. In an underlap zone, loading of the footwall by the hanging wall block modified the local stress system to allow formation of oblique, steeply-dipping reverse faults.

  18. Evolution and dynamics of active faults in southeastern Egyptian Western Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeen, Mamdouh

    2016-07-01

    Remote sensing data processing and analysis together with interpretation of earthquake data that are followed by extensive field studies on some of the prevailing NS and EW striking faults indicate that these faults have an intimate relationship and were formed synchronously as a conjugate Riedel shears. Parallel to the NS and the EW faults open fractures filled with blown sand dominate the area of study. The Quaternary terraces adjacent to these faults are offset by the faults. Kinematic indicators on the NS striking faults indicate major sinistral (left-lateral) strike slip and minor dip-slip (normal) movement. On the other hand, kinematic indicators on the EW striking faults indicate major dextral (right-lateral) strike slip and minor dip-slip (normal) movement. Paleo-stress analysis of the fault striae measured on the NS and EW faults indicate that these faults were formed under NNE-SSW oriented extension. Instrumental earthquake data analysis shows a comparable extension direction to that derived from field measurements of slickenlineation. These observations indicate that the NS- and EW-striking faults are contemporaneous and are related to the Red Sea rifting that is currently active.

  19. Normal fault growth above pre-existing structures: insights from discrete element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Thilo; Finch, Emma; Bell, Rebecca; Jackson, Christopher; Gawthorpe, Robert; Phillips, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In extensional systems, pre-existing structures such as shear zones may affect the growth, geometry and location of normal faults. Recent seismic reflection-based observations from the North Sea suggest that shear zones not only localise deformation in the host rock, but also in the overlying sedimentary succession. While pre-existing weaknesses are known to localise deformation in the host rock, their effect on deformation in the overlying succession is less well understood. Here, we use 3-D discrete element modelling to determine if and how kilometre-scale shear zones affect normal fault growth in the overlying succession. Discrete element models use a large number of interacting particles to describe the dynamic evolution of complex systems. The technique has therefore been applied to describe fault and fracture growth in a variety of geological settings. We model normal faulting by extending a 60×60×30 km crustal rift-basin model including brittle and ductile interactions and gravitation and isostatic forces by 30%. An inclined plane of weakness which represents a pre-existing shear zone is introduced in the lower section of the upper brittle layer at the start of the experiment. The length, width, orientation and dip of the weak zone are systematically varied between experiments to test how these parameters control the geometric and kinematic development of overlying normal fault systems. Consistent with our seismic reflection-based observations, our results show that strain is indeed localised in and above these weak zones. In the lower brittle layer, normal faults nucleate, as expected, within the zone of weakness and control the initiation and propagation of neighbouring faults. Above this, normal faults nucleate throughout the overlying strata where their orientations are strongly influenced by the underlying zone of weakness. These results challenge the notion that overburden normal faults simply form due to reactivation and upwards propagation of pre

  20. Coexistence of low-angle normal and high-angle strike- to oblique-slip faults during Late Miocene mineralization in eastern Elba Island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotta, Domenico; Brogi, Andrea; Meccheri, Marco; Dini, Andrea; Bianco, Caterina; Ruggieri, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we deal with the kinematic and chronological relationships among low angle normal faults and high angle strike- to oblique-slip faults in an exhumed mineralized area, where shear veins and minor associated structures filled with the same mineral assemblage has been interpreted as indicators of coeval fault activities. The study area is located in the eastern Elba Island, where a mineralized late Miocene-early Pliocene low-angle normal fault (Zuccale fault) and high-angle strike- to oblique-slip faults extensively crop out, the latter giving rise to the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone. The field study highlighted that: (a) the damage zones of both fault sets are mineralized by syn-kinematic tourmaline, graphite, Fe-oxides and/or Fe-oxyhydroxides shear veins, thus indicating their coeval activity during the hydrothermal event (5.9-5.4 Ma); (b) the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone is constituted by a network of fractures, whose geometry and kinematics display the evolution of a NE-trending left-lateral oblique-slip transtensional shear zone; (c) its internal architecture is defined by tourmaline and Fe-oxides and/or Fe-oxyhydroxides mineralized veins, framed in the same kinematic field characterizing the Zuccale fault evolution; for this reason, the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone is interpreted as a transfer zone active during the low-angle fault activity; (d) the Capoliveri-Porto Azzurro shear zone played the role of a significant normal fault during the Late Pliocene-Pleistocene, therefore favouring the deepening of the Tyrrhenian Basin with respect to the uplift and exhumation of the mid-crustal rocks of the Elba Island. It is finally argued that the interaction between the low-angle normal fault and the almost vertical shear zone determined an increase of permeability, favouring the mineralizing fluid flow during the hydrothermal stage and, reasonably, the previous emplacement of the Porto Azzurro magmatic body.

  1. Active fault segments as potential earthquake sources: Inferences from integrated geophysical mapping of the Magadi fault system, southern Kenya Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuria, Z. N.; Woldai, T.; van der Meer, F. D.; Barongo, J. O.

    2010-06-01

    Southern Kenya Rift has been known as a region of high geodynamic activity expressed by recent volcanism, geothermal activity and high rate of seismicity. The active faults that host these activities have not been investigated to determine their subsurface geometry, faulting intensity and constituents (fluids, sediments) for proper characterization of tectonic rift extension. Two different models of extension direction (E-W to ESE-WNW and NW-SE) have been proposed. However, they were based on limited field data and lacked subsurface investigations. In this research, we delineated active fault zones from ASTER image draped on ASTER DEM, together with relocated earthquakes. Subsequently, we combined field geologic mapping, electrical resistivity, ground magnetic traverses and aeromagnetic data to investigate the subsurface character of the active faults. Our results from structural studies identified four fault sets of different age and deformational styles, namely: normal N-S; dextral NW-SE; strike slip ENE-WSW; and sinistral NE-SW. The previous studies did not recognize the existence of the sinistral oblique slip NE-SW trending faults which were created under an E-W extension to counterbalance the NW-SE faults. The E-W extension has also been confirmed from focal mechanism solutions of the swarm earthquakes, which are located where all the four fault sets intersect. Our findings therefore, bridge the existing gap in opinion on neo-tectonic extension of the rift suggested by the earlier authors. Our results from resistivity survey show that the southern faults are in filled with fluid (0.05 and 0.2 Ωm), whereas fault zones to the north contain high resistivity (55-75 Ωm) material. The ground magnetic survey results have revealed faulting activity within active fault zones that do not contain fluids. In addition, the 2D inversion of the four aero-magnetic profiles (209 km long) revealed: major vertical to sub vertical faults (dipping 75-85° east or west); an

  2. Tectonic geomorphology of large normal faults bounding the Cuzco rift basin within the southern Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Cuzco basin forms a 80-wide, relatively flat valley within the High Andes of southern Peru. This larger basin includes the regional capital of Cuzco and the Urubamba Valley, or "Sacred Valley of the Incas" favored by the Incas for its mild climate and broader expanses of less rugged and arable land. The valley is bounded on its northern edge by a 100-km-long and 10-km-wide zone of down-to-the-south systems of normal faults that separate the lower area of the down-dropped plateau of central Peru and the more elevated area of the Eastern Cordillera foldbelt that overthrusts the Amazon lowlands to the east. Previous workers have shown that the normal faults are dipslip with up to 600 m of measured displacements, reflect north-south extension, and have Holocene displacments with some linked to destructive, historical earthquakes. We have constructed topographic and structural cross sections across the entire area to demonstrate the normal fault on a the plateau peneplain. The footwall of the Eastern Cordillera, capped by snowcapped peaks in excess of 6 km, tilts a peneplain surface northward while the hanging wall of the Cuzco basin is radially arched. Erosion is accelerated along the trend of the normal fault zone. As the normal fault zone changes its strike from east-west to more more northwest-southeast, normal displacement decreases and is replaced by a left-lateral strike-slip component.

  3. Geophysical characterization of buried active faults: the Concud Fault (Iberian Chain, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo Anchuela, Óscar; Lafuente, Paloma; Arlegui, Luis; Liesa, Carlos L.; Simón, José L.

    2016-11-01

    The Concud Fault is a 14-km-long active fault that extends close to Teruel, a city with about 35,000 inhabitants in the Iberian Range (NE Spain). It shows evidence of recurrent activity during Late Pleistocene time, posing a significant seismic hazard in an area of moderate-to-low tectonic rates. A geophysical survey was carried out along the mapped trace of the southern branch of the Concud Fault to evaluate the geophysical signature from the fault and the location of paleoseismic trenches. The survey identified a lineation of inverse magnetic dipoles at residual and vertical magnetic gradient, a local increase in apparent conductivity, and interruptions of the underground sediment structure along GPR profiles. The origin of these anomalies is due to lateral contrast between both fault blocks and the geophysical signature of Quaternary materials located above and directly south of the fault. The spatial distribution of anomalies was successfully used to locate suitable trench sites and to map non-exposed segments of the fault. The geophysical anomalies are related to the sedimentological characteristics and permeability differences of the deposits and to deformation related to fault activity. The results illustrate the usefulness of geophysics to detect and map non-exposed faults in areas of moderate-to-low tectonic activity where faults are often covered by recent pediments that obscure geological evidence of the most recent earthquakes. The results also highlight the importance of applying multiple geophysical techniques in defining the location of buried faults.

  4. Magma influence on propagation of normal faults: Evidence from cumulative slip profiles along Dabbahu-Manda-Hararo rift segment (Afar, Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Klinger, Yann; Socquet, Anne; Doubre, Cécile; Jacques, Eric

    2017-02-01

    Measuring displacement-length profiles along normal faults provides crucial information on fault growth processes. Here, based on satellite imagery and topography we analyze 357 normal faults distributed along the active rift of Dabbahu-Manda-Hararo (DMH), Afar, which offers a unique opportunity to investigate the influence of magmatism on fault growth processes. Our measurements reveal a large variety of slip profiles that are not consistent with elastic deformation. Their analysis contributes towards a better understanding of the lateral propagation of faults, especially when nucleation points and existence of barriers are included. Using the fault growth model of Manighetti et al. (2001), we determine the preferred direction of lateral propagation for each fault. Our results suggest that lateral propagation of faults is easier away from areas where magma has been stored for long time at crustal depth, and has thus modified the thermo-mechanical properties of the host-rock. However, these areas correspond also to areas where the initiation of fault growth appears as easiest along the rift. In combining these results with the analysis of rift width and the position of magma reservoirs along DMH rift, we show that fault growth keeps track of the magma presence and/or movement in the crust.

  5. Evidence for propagating, active tensional faulting in Upper Kåfjord valley, Troms County, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, T. F.; Osmundsen, P. T.; Henderson, I. H. C.; Hermanns, R. L.

    2010-05-01

    New concepts governing margin extension and post-rift passive margin evolution are appearing from onshore and offshore studies. In Norway topographic escarpments, creation, preservation and destruction of landforms, and drainage patterns are related to structural templates created during the Jurassic rift phase. Contradicting the notion that post-rift isostatic compensation, thermal subsidence, and topographic degradation mark a passive margin's final evolutionary phases, we present geological evidence for currently-active tensional deformation, accommodated by release faulting, in uppermost Kåfjordalen and Signaldalen. In Signaldalen, propagation of the deformation tip has introduced active normal faulting to Finland. Ground observations indicate a large normal fault defines the eastern border of the Lyngen 'Alps' peninsula. There, a series of exceptionally well-preserved triangular facets adorn a sharp, elevated escarpment. To the east a swarm of small NE-trending normal faults are exposed in roadside outcrops near the mouth of Kåfjord, dipping both to the NW and SE. Displacement across the fault swarm is asymmetric, the greatest component of motion being down-to-the-NW in the direction of the Lyngen Fault. Another set of NE trending, NW dipping faults crop out at Revsdalfjellet. We interpret these faults to reflect splays to the Lyngen Fault. The hanging wall of the Lyngen Fault is characterized by numerous clusters of fault-controlled rockslides. We interpret the valleys of Signaldalen, Skibotndalen, and Kåfjordalen, located in the hanging wall of the Lyngen Fault, to have formed at least partly under the influence of release faults that accommodated hanging wall flexure and failure. Other fault scarps, trending more NW-SE, crop out at two Kåfjord rockslide sites, Nomandalstinden and Litledalen. Mineralized surfaces exhibiting dip-slip slickenlines indicate most of these faults are true tectonic features, not simply gravitationally-driven 'sackung' planes

  6. Geometry and architecture of faults in a syn-rift normal fault array: The Nukhul half-graben, Suez rift, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Paul; Gawthorpe, Rob L.; Hodgetts, David; Rarity, Franklin; Sharp, Ian R.

    2009-08-01

    The geometry and architecture of a well exposed syn-rift normal fault array in the Suez rift is examined. At pre-rift level, the Nukhul fault consists of a single zone of intense deformation up to 10 m wide, with a significant monocline in the hanging wall and much more limited folding in the footwall. At syn-rift level, the fault zone is characterised by a single discrete fault zone less than 2 m wide, with damage zone faults up to approximately 200 m into the hanging wall, and with no significant monocline developed. The evolution of the fault from a buried structure with associated fault-propagation folding, to a surface-breaking structure with associated surface faulting, has led to enhanced bedding-parallel slip at lower levels that is absent at higher levels. Strain is enhanced at breached relay ramps and bends inherited from pre-existing structures that were reactivated during rifting. Damage zone faults observed within the pre-rift show ramp-flat geometries associated with contrast in competency of the layers cut and commonly contain zones of scaly shale or clay smear. Damage zone faults within the syn-rift are commonly very straight, and may be discrete fault planes with no visible fault rock at the scale of observation, or contain relatively thin and simple zones of scaly shale or gouge. The geometric and architectural evolution of the fault array is interpreted to be the result of (i) the evolution from distributed trishear deformation during upward propagation of buried fault tips to surface faulting after faults breach the surface; (ii) differences in deformation response between lithified pre-rift units that display high competence contrasts during deformation, and unlithified syn-rift units that display low competence contrasts during deformation, and; (iii) the history of segmentation, growth and linkage of the faults that make up the fault array. This has important implications for fluid flow in fault zones.

  7. High-resolution imagery of active faulting offshore Al Hoceima, Northern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acremont, E.; Gutscher, M.-A.; Rabaute, A.; Mercier de Lépinay, B.; Lafosse, M.; Poort, J.; Ammar, A.; Tahayt, A.; Le Roy, P.; Smit, J.; Do Couto, D.; Cancouët, R.; Prunier, C.; Ercilla, G.; Gorini, C.

    2014-09-01

    Two recent destructive earthquakes in 1994 and 2004 near Al Hoceima highlight that the northern Moroccan margin is one of the most seismically active regions of the Western Mediterranean area. Despite onshore geodetic, seismological and tectonic field studies, the onshore-offshore location and extent of the main active faults remain poorly constrained. Offshore Al Hoceima, high-resolution seismic reflection and swath-bathymetry have been recently acquired during the Marlboro-2 cruise. These data at shallow water depth, close to the coast, allow us to describe the location, continuity and geometry of three active faults bounding the offshore Nekor basin. The well-expressed normal-left-lateral onshore Trougout fault can be followed offshore during several kilometers with a N171°E ± 3° trend. Westward, the Bousekkour-Aghbal normal-left-lateral onshore fault is expressed offshore with a N020°E ± 4° trending fault. The N030°E ± 2° Bokkoya fault corresponds to the western boundary of the Plio-Quaternary offshore Nekor basin in the Al Hoceima bay and seems to define an en échelon tectonic pattern with the Bousekkour-Aghbal fault. We propose that these three faults are part of the complex transtensional system between the Nekor fault and the Al-Idrissi fault zone. Our characterization of the offshore expression of active faulting in the Al Hoceima region is consistent with the geometry and nature of the active fault planes deduced from onshore geomorphological and morphotectonic analyses, as well as seismological, geodetic and geodynamic data.

  8. Segmentation and the coseismic behavior of Basin and Range normal faults: examples from east-central Idaho and southwestern Montana, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Haller, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    The range-front normal faults of the Lost River and Lemhi Ranges, and the Beaverhead and Tendoy Mountains in east-central Idaho and southwestern Montana have well-preserved fault scarps on Quaternary deposits along much of their lengths. Fault-scarp morphology, the age of deposits displaced by the faults, and the morphology of the range fronts provide a basis for dividing the faults into segments that are typically 20-25 km long. The Lost River, Lemhi and Beaverhead fault zones are 141-151 km long, and each has six segments. The 60-km-long Red Rock fault (the range-front fault of the Tendoy Mountains) has two central segments that have been active in late Quaternary time; these two segments span the central 27 km of the fault. We recognize four characteristics that help to identify segment boundaries: (1) major en e??chelon offsets or pronounced gaps in the continuity of fault scarps; (2) distinct, persistent, along-strike changes in fault-scarp morphology that indicate different ages of faulting; (3) major salients in the range front; and (4) transverse bedrock ridges where the cumulative throw is low compared to other places along the fault zone. Only features whose size is measured on the scale of kilometers are regarded as significant enough to represent a segment boundary that could inhibit or halt a propagating rupture. The ability to identify segments of faults that are likely to behave as independent structural entities will improve seismic-hazard assessment. However, one should not assume that the barriers at segment boundaries will completely stop all propagating ruptures. The topographic expression of mountain ranges is evidence that, at times during their history, all barriers fail. Some barriers apparently create 'leaky' segment boundaries that impede propagating ruptures but do not completely prevent faulting on adjacent segments. ?? 1991.

  9. Late Pleistocene to Present - normal and strike slip - faulting in the western Gulf of Corinth; data from high resolution seismic reflection SISCOR surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Arnaud; Bodeux, Sarah; Beck, Christian; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurélia; Tripsanas, Efthymios; Sakellariou, Dimitris; De Batist, Marc; De Rycker, Koen; Bascou, Pascale; Versteeg, Willem

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Corinth is one of the fastest-spreading intracontinental rift on Earth, a 120km long E-W structure propagating westward toward the Aegean subduction zone. Present day kinematics (GPS data) indicates an opening direction oriented NNE-SSW and an opening rate increasing westward from 11 mm y-1 in the central part to 16 mm y-1 in the westernmost part. The high extension rate in the western part of the rift would imply a high seismic hazard if faults are not creeping. Our work concerns this western extremity of the Gulf of Corinth, for which we propose an accurate map of submarine faults. The map is based on two high-resolution seismic reflection surveys (single channel sparker) performed aboard HCMR's R/V ALKYON, within the frame of SISCOR ANR Project. About 600 km of seismic lines were acquired, with a 200 mstwt maximum penetration, down to what we infer to represent the MIS 5 discontinuity. The highlighted faults network can be described as follows. In the eastern part, where the water depth reaches 450m, the sedimentary infill is faulted by the known North Eratini, South Eratini and West Channel faults. At the longitude of the Trizonia Island, the seafloor in mainly horizontal and the only fault is the south dipping Trizonia fault. Between the Trizonia Island and the Mornos Delta, the shallower northern part of the gulf shows a diffuse pattern of deformation with faults striking mainly E-W and ESE-WNW. It shows south and north dipping normal faults, strike-slip faults, as well as an inherited basement relief. To the south of this complex fault network, numerous mass transport deposits coming from the Mornos Delta and from steep slopes at the western end of the Trizonia fault make the identification of active faults difficult. In the southern part of the rift, no fault has been observed between the Psatopyrgos fault bounding the southern side of the Gulf and the Mornos Delta. To the West, between the Mornos Delta and the Rion Straits, three main south

  10. Numerical reconstruction of Late-Cenosoic evolution of normal-fault scarps in Baikal Rift Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byzov, Leonid; San'kov, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Numerical landscape development modeling has recently become a popular tool in geo-logic and geomorphic investigations. We employed this technique to reconstruct Late-Cenosoic evolution of Baikal Rift Zone mountains. The objects of research were Barguzin Range and Svyatoy Nos Upland. These structures are formed under conditions of crustal extension and bounded by active normal faults. In our experiments we used instruments, engineered by Greg Tucker (University of Colo-rado) - CHILD (Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development) and 'Bedrock Fault Scarp'. First program allowed constructing the complex landscape model considering tectonic uplift, fluvial and hillslope processes; second program is used for more accurate simulating of triangular facet evolution. In general, our experiments consisted in testing of tectonic parameters, and climatic char-acteristic, erosion and diffusion properties, hydraulic geometry were practically constant except for some special runs. Numerous experiments, with various scenarios of development, showed that Barguzin range and Svyatoy Nos Upland has many common features. These structures characterized by internal differentiation, which appear in height and shape of slopes. At the same time, individual segments of these objects are very similar - this conclusion refers to most developing parts, with pronounced facets and V-shaped valleys. Accordingly modelling, these landscapes are in a steady state and are undergoing a uplift with rate 0,4 mm/yr since Early Pliocene (this solution accords with AFT-dating). Lower segments of Barguzin Range and Svyatoy Nos Upland also have some general fea-tures, but the reasons of such similarity probably are different. In particular, southern segment of Svyatoy Nos Upland, which characterized by relative high slope with very weak incision, may be formed as result very rapid fault movement or catastrophic landslide. On the other hand, a lower segment of Barguzin Range (Ulun segment, for example

  11. Evaluation of fault-normal/fault-parallel directions rotated ground motions for response history analysis of an instrumented six-story building

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    According to regulatory building codes in United States (for example, 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground-motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of buildings. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHA analyses should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak responses of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were obtained for rotation angles ranging from 0° through 180° for evaluating the FN/FP directions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

  12. Quaternary Geology and Surface Faulting Hazard: Active and Capable Faults in Central Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcucci, E.; Gori, S.

    2015-12-01

    The 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (Mw 6.1), in central Italy, raised the issue of surface faulting hazard in Italy, since large urban areas were affected by surface displacement along the causative structure, the Paganica fault. Since then, guidelines for microzonation were drew up that take into consideration the problem of surface faulting in Italy, and laying the bases for future regulations about related hazard, similarly to other countries (e.g. USA). More specific guidelines on the management of areas affected by active and capable faults (i.e. able to produce surface faulting) are going to be released by National Department of Civil Protection; these would define zonation of areas affected by active and capable faults, with prescriptions for land use planning. As such, the guidelines arise the problem of the time interval and general operational criteria to asses fault capability for the Italian territory. As for the chronology, the review of the international literature and regulatory allowed Galadini et al. (2012) to propose different time intervals depending on the ongoing tectonic regime - compressive or extensional - which encompass the Quaternary. As for the operational criteria, the detailed analysis of the large amount of works dealing with active faulting in Italy shows that investigations exclusively based on surface morphological features (e.g. fault planes exposition) or on indirect investigations (geophysical data), are not sufficient or even unreliable to define the presence of an active and capable fault; instead, more accurate geological information on the Quaternary space-time evolution of the areas affected by such tectonic structures is needed. A test area for which active and capable faults can be first mapped based on such a classical but still effective methodological approach can be the central Apennines. Reference Galadini F., Falcucci E., Galli P., Giaccio B., Gori S., Messina P., Moro M., Saroli M., Scardia G., Sposato A. (2012). Time

  13. Geometric and morphologic evolution of normal fault planes and traces from 2D to 4D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, Denis; Guiraud, Michel; Rives, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The detailed 3D geometry of normal fault planes is described and analysed using datasets from outcrop studies (2D), seismic surveys (3D) and analogue models (4D). Different geometric configurations of simple isolated normal faults are studied by reference to processes of normal fault propagation. When a normal fault propagates without interacting with other fault zones, the entire border of the principal plane displays characteristic connected secondary structures. These secondary structures cause bifurcations of the principal fault terminations. The along-strike terminations of the principal plane display typical bifurcation configurations ('ear geometry'). The orientation of the bifurcations depends on the vertical direction of propagation (downwards and/or upwards). The along-dip terminations display en échelon secondary fault planes linked to the principal plane and are described as 'lobate geometry'. A 3D genetic model of isolated normal fault geometry is proposed with a new general terminology for the secondary structures. When two isolated normal faults propagate towards each other and overlap, the two principal planes connect up via a relay fault. The resulting geometry is a longer fault exhibiting a characteristic undulation with two inactive branches.

  14. Recent movements along the Main Boundary Thrust of the Himalayas: Normal faulting in an over-critical thrust wedge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnier, Jean-Louis; Huyghe, Pascale; Chalaron, Edouard; Mascle, Georges

    1994-11-01

    The Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) is one of the major Himalayan thrusts occurring during the Cainozoic, and it is presently incorporated within the Himalayan thrust wedge (Lesser and Outer Himalayas) displaced above the Indian lithosphere. Nonetheless the MBT shows recent normal displacement along most of its length. We suggest that the orientation of the major principal stress within the Himalayan thrust wedge deviates significantly from the horizontal and when this deviation exceeds the dip of the vectors normal to back-tilted thrusts, the normal component of displacement may act along these faults. Steep north-dipping segments of the MBT therefore show a normal component of displacement if a geometrical definition is used, but they are faults in a compressional regime where the major principal stress axis has deviated from the horizontal. Micro-structural data recorded along the Surkhet-Ghorahi segment of the MBT are consistent with a strong deviation of the state of stress. The presence of such peculiar normal faulting along the MBT is used to calibrate the mechanical characteristics of the belt considered as a Coulomb wedge. The following characteristics are suggested: (a) very poor strength contrast between basal decollement and rocks in the wedge body, (b) a high pore fluid pressure ratio (probably close to 0.8-0.9) and a higher fluid pressure ratio (close to 1.0) along the active normal faults if a high internal friction angle (close to the Byerlee value) is considered. The strong deviation in principal stress direction may have recently increased, due to a taper of the Himalayan wedge exceeding the stability boundary and may be controlled by erosion and isostatic uplift rebound of the Himalayan range.

  15. The mechanical paradox of low-angle normal faults: Current understanding and open questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano

    2011-10-01

    Low-angle normal faults, LANF, (dip < 30°) have been proposed as key-structures for accommodating crustal extension. In contrast, frictional fault reactivation theory predicts that slip on LANF is extremely unlikely: this prediction is consistent with the absence of moderate-to-large earthquakes on normal faults dipping less than 30°. In order to discuss this discrepancy I will analyse and integrate: 1) geological data from 9 LANF, 2) the dip-range of earthquake-ruptures in extensional environments, and 3) frictional fault mechanics. LANF fault zone structure is represented by two end members: a) a thick mylonitic shear zone superposed by cataclastic processes and some localization; 2) a discrete fault core separating hangingwall and footwall blocks affected by brittle processes. LANF act as preferential channels for fluid flow and in some cases they promoted fluid overpressure. Fluid-rock interactions along some detachments favour the development of phyllosilicates that in general are characterised by low frictional strength, μ < 0.4, and inherently stable, velocity-strengthening frictional behaviour. The low friction coefficient of the phyllosilicates can explain movements on LANF and the velocity strengthening behaviour of the phyllosilicates implies fault creep and therefore can be used to explain the absence of moderate-to-large earthquakes on LANF in seismological records. However in my view, the integration of the three datasets does not provide a simple mechanical solution for the LANF paradox since it leaves two important open questions. First a widespread development of phyllosilicates does not seem to be a common feature for most of the exhumed LANF that on the contrary show the typical fault rocks of the brittle and seismogenic crust. Second, although some brittle detachments reactivated pre-existing ductile shear zones, others formed as gently dipping structures within a brittle crust characterised by a vertical σ 1: a well constrained mechanical

  16. Probable slow slips in the mid-crust of Hsinchu, northwestern Taiwan: Temporal correlation between normal faulting earthquakes and relative uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, H. C.; Lin, C. H.

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the seismic behavior of crustal deformation, we deployed a dense seismic network at the Hsinchu area of northwestern Taiwan during the period between 2004 and 2006. Based on abundant local micro-earthquakes recorded at this seismic network, we have successfully determined 274 focal mechanisms among ∼1300 seismic events. It is very interesting to see that the dominant energy of both seismic strike-slip and normal faulting mechanisms repeatedly alternated with each other within two years. Also, the strike-slip and normal faulting earthquakes were largely accompanied with the surface slipping along N60°E and uplifting obtained from the continuous GPS data, individually. Those phenomena were probably resulted by the slow uplifts at the mid-crust beneath the northwestern Taiwan area. As the deep slow uplift was active below 10 km in depth along either the boundary fault or blind fault, the push of the uplifting material would simultaneously produce both of the normal faulting earthquakes in the shallow depths (0-10 km) and the slight surface uplifting. As the deep slow uplift was stop, instead, the strike-slip faulting earthquakes would be dominated as usual due to strongly horizontal plate convergence in the Taiwan. Since the normal faulting earthquakes repeatedly dominated in every 6 or 7 months between 2004 and 2006, it may conclude that slow slip events in the mid crust were frequent to release accumulated tectonic stress in the Hsinchu area.

  17. Slip rate depth distribution for active faults in Central Italy using numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finocchio, Debora; Barba, Salvatore; Basili, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Slip rate is a critical parameter for describing geologic and earthquake rates of known active faults. Although faults are inherently three-dimensional surfaces, the paucity of data allows for estimating only the slip rate at the ground surface and often only few values for an entire fault. These values are frequently assumed as proxies or as some average of slip rate at depth. Evidence of geological offset and single earthquake displacement, as well as mechanical requirements, show that fault slip varies significantly with depth. Slip rate should thus vary in a presumably similar way, yet these variations are rarely considered. In this work, we tackle the determination of slip rate depth distributions by applying the finite element method on a 2D vertical section, with stratification and faults, across the central Apennines, Italy. In a first step, we perform a plane-stress analysis assuming visco-elasto-plastic rheology and then search throughout a large range of values to minimize the RMS deviation between the model and the interseismic GPS velocities. Using a parametric analysis, we assess the accuracy of the best model and the sensitivity of its parameters. In a second step, we unlock the faults and let the model simulate 10 kyr of deformation to estimate the fault long-term slip rates. The overall average slip rate at depth is approximately 1.1 mm/yr for normal faults and 0.2 mm/yr for thrust faults. A maximum value of about 2 mm/yr characterizes the Avezzano fault that caused the 1915, Mw 7.0 earthquake. The slip rate depth distribution varies significantly from fault to fault and even between neighbouring faults, with maxima and minima located at different depths. We found uniform distributions only occasionally. We suggest that these findings can strongly influence the forecasting of cumulative earthquake depth distributions based on long-term fault slip rates.

  18. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  19. ­­Are current models for normal fault array evolution applicable to natural rifts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. E.; Jackson, C. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Conceptual models predicting the geometry and evolution of normal fault arrays are vital to assess rift physiography, syn-rift sediment dispersal and seismic hazard. Observations from data-rich rifts and numerical and physical models underpin widely used fault array models predicting: i) during rift initiation, arrays are defined by multiple, small, isolated faults; ii) as rifting progresses, strain localises onto fewer larger structures; and iii) with continued strain, faulting migrates toward the rift axis, resulting in rift narrowing. Some rifts display these characteristics whereas others do not. Here we present several case studies documenting fault migration patterns that do not fit this ideal. In this presentation we will begin by reviewing existing fault array models before presenting a series of case studies (including from the northern North Sea and the Gulf of Corinth), which document fault migration patterns that are not predicted by current fault evolution models. We show that strain migration onto a few, large faults is common in many rifts but that, rather than localising onto these structures until the cessation of rifting, strain may 'sweep' across the basin. Furthermore, crustal weaknesses developed in early tectonic events can cause faults during subsequent phases of extension to grow relatively quickly and accommodate the majority if not all of the rift-related strain; in these cases, strain migration does not and need not occur. Finally, in salt-influenced rifts, strain localisation may not occur at all; rather, strain may become progressively more diffuse due to tilting of the basement and intrastratal salt décollements, thus leading to superimposition of thin-skinned, gravity-driven and thick-skinned, plate-driven, basement-involved extension. We call for the community to unite to develop the next-generation of normal fault array models that include complexities such as the thermal and rheological properties of the lithosphere, specific

  20. Lithospheric Control on Spatial Patterns of Active Faulting in the Southeastern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, C. B.; Unruh, J. R.; Lutz, A.; Fisher, B.; Kelson, K. I.; Rood, D. H.; Jayko, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Patterns of active faulting in the southeastern Sierra Nevada of California reflect both far-field plate motion as well as localized forces that drive seismogenic deformation. Oblique divergence between the Sierra and the western Cordillera results in an overall pattern of dextral shear and northwest-directed extension in the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) and southern Walker Lane belt. Within the nominally rigid southern Sierra Nevada block, newly recognized active normal faulting, as well as seismicity, indicate primarily extensional deformation beneath the high topography of the southern range. Investigations of the northern Kern Canyon fault, the Little Lake fault, and the Sierra Nevada range-front faults in Rose Valley combine data from both aerial and ground-based laser scanning, paleoseismic trenching, geologic and geomorphic mapping, and surface exposure dating to define spatial and temporal patterns of fault slip. Taken together, these studies indicate that deformation kinematics along the southeastern Sierran escarpment undergo a pronounced shift at an approximate latitude of 36.5° N. To the north in Owens valley, range-front faults accommodate active extension and normal faulting, while the adjacent Owens Valley fault displays primarily dextral strike-slip motion. South of Lone Pine, however, a component of active normal faulting steps westward into the southern Sierra Nevada block to the Kern Canyon fault, while range-front faults in Rose Valley accommodate a significant component of oblique dextral extension. Focal mechanism inversion of earthquakes in the southern Sierra Nevada reveals a zone of horizontal extension and vertical crustal thinning coincident with this westward shift of normal faulting into the range. The zone of extension is directly east of the "Isabella Anomaly," a zone of anomalous high P-wave mantle velocities thought to reflect convectively downwelling or foundering lower Sierran lithosphere below the Central Valley. As such

  1. Modeling the effect of preexisting joints on normal fault geometries using a brittle and cohesive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, M.; van Gent, H. W.; Urai, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    , stereo-photography at the final stage of deformation enabled the creation of 3D models to preserve basic geometric information. The models showed that at the surface the deformation localized always along preexisting joints, even when they strike at an angle to the basement-fault. In most cases faults intersect precisely at the maximum depth of the joints. With increasing fault-joint angle the deformation occurred distributed over several joints by forming stepovers with fractures oriented normal to the strike of the joints. No fractures were observed parallel to the basement fault. At low angles stepovers coincided with wedge-shaped structures between two joints that remain higher than the surrounding joint-fault intersection. The wide opening gap along the main fault allowed detailed observations of the fault planes at depth, which revealed (1) changing dips according to joint-fault angles, (2) slickenlines, (3) superimposed steepening fault-planes, causing sharp sawtooth-shaped structures. Comparison to a field analogue at Canyonlands National Park, Utah/USA showed similar structures and features such as vertical fault escarpments at the surface coinciding with joint-surfaces. In the field and in the models stepovers were observed as well as conjugate faulting and incremental fault-steepening.

  2. Paleoseismicity of the Intermountain Seismic Belt from Late Quaternary faulting and parameter scaling of normal faulting earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.B.; Smith, R.B. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    The eastern Basin-Range, 1,300 km-long Intermountain Seismic Belt (ISB) is reflected by a [approximately]100 km-wide zone of scattered earthquakes that in general do not correlate with the mapped Quaternary faults. Yet this region has experienced two of the largest historic earthquakes in the western US, the M[sub S] = 7.3, Borah Peak, Idaho, and the M[sub S] = 7.5, Hebgen Lake, Montana, events, which occurred in areas that had previously low historical seismicity. These observations indicate the lack of spatial and temporal uniformity between the historical and Holocene seismic record. The authors have studied this problem by first investigating fault-magnitude scaling relationships using a global set of 16 large normal- to oblique-slip earthquakes, then applying the scaling laws to data from a compilation of well studied Late Quaternary faults of the ISB. Several regression models were evaluated but the authors found that magnitudes predicted by displacement alone were consistently 20% larger than those determined from lengths. They suggest that the best estimator is given by: M[sub S] = 0.47 log (d[sub sM]L[sub s]) + 6.1. These results revealed at least 24 large multiple-segment, paleoearthquakes, 6.3 [le] M[sub s] [le] 7.3, that were associated with faults within the dual-branched seismicity belt which surrounds the aseismic Snake River Plain in the central ISB. They believe this unusual bow-wave pattern of seismicity and faulting is related to plume-plate interaction associated with the Yellowstone hotspot with an additional component of concomitant Basin-Range extension. In the southern ISB, the 370 km-long Wasatch fault, Utah, experienced at least 7 multiple-segment paleoearthquakes, 7.1 [le] M[sub s] [le] 7.3, and contrasts with a historic record of seismic quiescence. Intraplate crustal extension is though to be the primary mode of regional strain release for this region of the ISB.

  3. Newly identified active faults in the Pollino seismic gap, southern Italy, and their seismotectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, Francesco; Cirillo, Daniele; de Nardis, Rita; Cardinali, Mauro; Lavecchia, Giusy; Orecchio, Barbara; Presti, Debora; Totaro, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The following is a geological study of a Quaternary and active normal fault-system, which crops out in the Pollino area, a seismogenic sector of the Southern Apennines, Italy. From 2010 to 2014, this area was affected by long lasting seismic activity characterized by three major events which occurred in May 2012 (Mw 4.3), in October 2012 (Mw 5.2) and in June 2014 (Mw 4.0). The integration of structural-geological data with morpho-structural and remote sensing analyses, led to define the geometry, the kinematics, the cross-cutting relationships and the slip rates of the inferred active fault segments within and near the epicentral area. We reconstructed an asymmetric extensional pattern characterized by low-angle, E and NNE-dipping faults, and by antithetic, high-angle, SW- to WSW-dipping faults. The geometry of the faults at depth was constrained using high-resolution hypocenter distributions. The overall system fits well with the deformation field obtained from focal mechanisms and geodetic data. Comparing the fault pattern with the time-space evolution of the Pollino seismic activity, we identified the seismogenic sources in two, near-parallel, WSW-dipping faults, whose seismogenic potential were assessed. The peculiar perpendicular-to-fault-strike evolution of the seismic activity, is discussed in the frame of the reconstructed seismotectonic model.

  4. Normal faulting in the Simav graben of western Turkey reassessed with calibrated earthquake relocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasözen, Ezgi; Nissen, Edwin; Bergman, Eric A.; Johnson, Kendra L.; Walters, Richard J.

    2016-06-01

    Western Turkey has a long history of large earthquakes, but the responsible faults are poorly characterized. Here we reassess the past half century of instrumental earthquakes in the Simav-Gediz region, starting with the 19 May 2011 Simav earthquake (Mw 5.9), which we image using interferometric synthetic aperture radar and regional and teleseismic waveforms. This event ruptured a steep, planar normal fault centered at 7-9 km depth but failed to break the surface. However, relocated main shock and aftershock hypocenters occurred beneath the main slip plane at 10-22 km depth, implying rupture initiation in areas of low coseismic slip. These calibrated modern earthquakes provide the impetus to relocate and reassess older instrumental events in the region. Aftershocks of the 1970 Gediz earthquake (Mw 7.1) form a narrow band, inconsistent with source models that invoke low-angle detachment faulting, and may include events triggered dynamically by the unilateral main shock rupture. Epicenters of the 1969 Demirci earthquakes (Mw 5.9, 6.0) are more consistent with slip on the south dipping Akdağ fault than the larger, north dipping Simav fault. A counterintuitive aspect of recent seismicity across our study area is that the largest event (Mw 7.1) occurred in an area of slower extension and indistinct surface faulting, yet ruptured the surface, while recent earthquakes in the well-defined and more rapidly extending Simav graben are smaller (Mw <6.0) and failed to produce surface breaks. Though our study area bounds a major metamorphic core complex, there is no evidence for involvement of low-angle normal faulting in any of the recent large earthquakes.

  5. Dependence of seismic coupling on normal fault style along the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, Jean-Arthur; Escartín, Javier

    2016-10-01

    While normal faults are essential in shaping the seafloor formed at slow spreading mid-ocean ridges, information on their behavior on short (seismic cycle) time scales is limited. Here we combine catalogs of hydro-acoustically and teleseismically recorded earthquakes to characterize the state of seismic coupling along the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between 12°N and 35°N. Along this portion of the MAR axis, tectonic extension is either taken up by steep conjugate faults that outline well-defined ridge-parallel abyssal hills, or dominantly by a large-offset detachment fault on one side of the axis. We investigate variations in seismicity and seismic moment release rates across 30 ridge sections that can be clearly characterized either as abyssal hill or detachment bearing. We find that detachment-bearing sections are associated with significantly greater seismicity and moment release rates than abyssal hill-bearing sections but show variability that may reflect the along-axis extent of individual detachment faults. Overall, the measured seismic moment release rates fail to account for the long-term fault slip rates. This apparent seismic deficit could indicate a mixed-mode of fault slip where earthquakes only account for ˜10-30% of offset buildup at abyssal hill faults, while the rest is accommodated by some form of transient aseismic creep. We find this seismic coupling fraction to be significantly greater (˜40-60%) at individual detachment systems, which is somewhat at odds with the common inference that detachment faults can sustain long-lived localized strain because they are weak. We therefore propose alternative interpretations for seismic coupling based on dynamic friction theory.

  6. A review of recently active faults in Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonilla, Manuel G.

    1975-01-01

    Six faults associated with five large earthquakes produced surface displacements ranging from 1 to 3 m in the period 1906 through 1951. Four of the ruptures occurred in the western coastal plain and foothills, and two occurred in the Longitudinal Valley of eastern Taiwan. Maps are included showing the locations and dimensions of the displacements. The published geological literature probably would not lead one to infer the existence of a fault along most of the 1906 rupture, except for descriptions of the rupture itself. Over most of its length the 1935 rupture on the Chihhu fault is parallel to but more than 0.5 km from nearby faults shown on geologic maps published in 1969 and 1971; only about 1.5 km of its 15 km length coincides with a mapped fault. The coastal plain part of the Tuntzuchio fault which ruptured in 1935 is apparently not revealed by landforms, and only suggested by other data. Part of the 1946 Hsinhua faulting coincides with a fault identified in the subsurface by seismic work but surface indications of the fault are obscure. The 1951 Meilun faulting occurred along a conspicuous pre-1951 scarp and the 1951 Yuli faulting occurred near or in line with pre-1951 scarps. More than 40 faults which, according to the published literature, have had Pleistocene or later movement are shown on a small-scale map. Most of these faults are in the densely-populated western part of Taiwan. The map and text calls attention to faults that may be active and therefore may be significant in planning important structures. Equivocal evidence suggestive of fault creep was found on the Yuli fault and the Hsinhua fault. Fault creep was not found at several places examined along the 1906 fault trace. Tectonic uplift has occurred in Taiwan in the last 10,000 years and application of eustatic sea level curves to published radiocarbon dates shows that the minimum rate of uplift is considerably different in different parts of the island. Incomplete data indicate that the rate is

  7. Illuminating Northern California’s Active Faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Whitehill, Caroline S.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Furlong, Kevin P.; Philips, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic data along major active fault zones of northern California. These data are now freely available in point cloud (x, y, z coordinate data for every laser return), digital elevation model (DEM), and KMZ (zipped Keyhole Markup Language, for use in Google EarthTM and other similar software) formats through the GEON OpenTopography Portal (http://www.OpenTopography.org/data). Importantly, vegetation can be digitally removed from lidar data, producing high-resolution images (0.5- or 1.0-meter DEMs) of the ground surface beneath forested regions that reveal landforms typically obscured by vegetation canopy (Figure 2)

  8. Inland Normal Faulting during the Mw 6.6 Iwaki Earthquake Induced By Temporal Change of Stress State after the Mw 9.0 2011 Tohoku Earthquake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, A.; Otsubo, M.

    2014-12-01

    A Mw 6.6 earthquake hit Iwaki area, northeastern Honshu arc, Japan on April 11, 2011 (here 2011 Iwaki earthquake). The 2011 Iwaki earthquake occurred one month after the 2011 Mw 9.0 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku (March 11, 2011; hereafter, 2011 Tohoku earthquake) (Ozawa et al., 2011; Simons et al., 2011). The 2011 Iwaki earthquake was followed by simultaneous slips of multi faults (the Itozawa fault and the Yunodake fault) (e.g. Toda and Tsutsumi, 2013). We examine the activity of the Itozawa fault and Yunodake fault and the mechanical preparation of the 2011 Iwaki earthquake from the temporal change of the stress state before and after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Furthermore, we quantitatively evaluate the role of crustal fluid beneath the faults and its supply mechanisms when the 2011 Iwaki earthquake occurred. We revealed that the generation of the slip on the Itozawa fault and simultaneous activity of faults cannot be occurred under the state of stress before the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, even though the both the state of stress is normal-faulting stress regimes before and after 2011 Tohoku earthquake. We show the importance of excess fluid pressure on the 2011 Iwaki earthquake, and we estimated the magnitude of excess fluid pressure ~30 MPa and ~20 MPa on the Itozawa and Yunodake fault respectively. We also show that the state of stress after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake favorably change the permeability of the Itozawa fault to be supplied the crustal fluid beneath the fault. A part of this research project has been conducted as the regulatory supporting research funded by the Secretariat of Nuclear Regulation Authority (Secretariat of NRA), Japan.

  9. Recent seismogenic fault activity in a Late Quaternary closed-lake graben basin (Albacete, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pascua, M. A.; Pérez-López, R.; Calvo, J. P.; García del Cura, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    The Cordovilla basin, located within the frontal thrust belt of the Betic Cordillera, SE Spain, is an elongated NW-SE graben showing discrete surface rupture generated by Holocene paleoearthquake activity. A main and an antithetic normal, NW-SE trending, active faults bound the basin. Paleoseismological evidence is reported on upslope-facing scarps of the antithetic fault, acting as dams to runoff, which contributed to temporary lacustrine conditions, as well as sediment uplift. The fluvial network in the area shows a poor drainage activity, whereas a present lake is dammed by the antithetic fault. The modern landscape is controlled by Holocene faulting, modifying the geological environment according to earthquake occurrence, from flat alluvial plains to lacustrine local basins. The application of the diffusion dating technique to unconsolidated sediments for the antithetic fault scarp indicates an age between 1 and 2 ka. Various geometric parameters have been obtained in order to reconstruct the paleoseismic history of the Cordovilla graben basin. The surface rupture and fault-offset values are associated with discrete active morpholineaments, parallel to the Pozohondo Fault. The Tobarra-Cordovilla segment (the structural boundary of the Cordovilla Basin) was generated by earthquakes with magnitudes (Mw) greater than 6.0, based on Wells and Coppersmith fault scarp relations.

  10. The Tjellefonna fault system of Western Norway: Linking late-Caledonian extension, post-Caledonian normal faulting, and Tertiary rock column uplift with the landslide-generated tsunami event of 1756

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, T. F.; Osmundsen, P. T.

    2009-09-01

    On February 22, 1756, approximately 15.7 million cubic meters of bedrock were catastrophically released as a giant rockslide into the Langfjorden. Subsequently, three ˜ 40 meter high tsunami waves overwhelmed the village of Tjelle and several other local communities. Inherited structures had isolated a compartment in the hanging wall damage zone of the fjord-dwelling Tjellefonna fault. Because the region is seismically active in oblique-normal mode, and in accordance with scant historical sources, we speculate that an earthquake on a nearby fault may have caused the already-weakened Tjelle hillside to fail. From interpretation of structural, geomorphic, and thermo-chronological data we suggest that today's escarpment topography of Møre og Trøndelag is controlled to a first order by post-rift reactivation of faults parallel to the Mesozoic passive margin. In turn, a number of these faults reactivated Late Caledonian or early post-Caledonian fabrics. Normal-sense reactivation of inherited structures along much of coastal Norway suggests that a structural link exists between the processes that destroy today's mountains and those that created them. The Paleozoic Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex was reactivated as a normal fault during the Mesozoic and, probably, throughout the Cenozoic until the present day. Its NE-SW trending strands crop out between the coast and the base of a c. 1.7 km high NW-facing topographic 'Great Escarpment.' Well-preserved kinematic indicators and multiple generations of fault products are exposed along the Tjellefonna fault, a well-defined structural and topographic lineament parallel to both the Langfjorden and the Great Escarpment. The slope instability that was formerly present at Tjelle, and additional instabilities currently present throughout the region, may be viewed as the direct product of past and ongoing development of tectonic topography in Møre og Trøndelag county. In the Langfjorden region in particular, structural geometry

  11. Extreme Hydrothermal Conditions Near an Active Geological Fault, DFDP-2B Borehole, Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, R.; Townend, J.; Toy, V.; Allen, M.; Baratin, L. M.; Barth, N. C.; Beacroft, L.; Benson, A.; Boese, C. M.; Boles, A.; Boulton, C. J.; Capova, L.; Carpenter, B. M.; Celerier, B. P.; Chamberlain, C. J.; Conze, R.; Cooper, A.; Coussens, J.; Coutts, A.; Cox, S.; Craw, L.; Doan, M. L.; Eccles, J. D.; Faulkner, D.; Grieve, J.; Grochowski, J.; Gulley, A.; Henry, G.; Howarth, J. D.; Jacobs, K. M.; Jeppson, T.; Kato, N.; Keys, S.; Kirilova, M.; Kometani, Y.; Lukács, A.; Langridge, R.; Lin, W.; Little, T.; Mallyon, D.; Mariani, E.; Marx, R.; Massiot, C.; Mathewson, L.; Melosh, B.; Menzies, C. D.; Moore, J.; Morales, L. F. G.; Morgan, C.; Mori, H.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Nishikawa, O.; Nitsch, O.; Paris Cavailhes, J.; Pooley, B.; Prior, D. J.; Pyne, A.; Sauer, K. M.; Savage, M. K.; Schleicher, A.; Schmitt, D. R.; Shigematsu, N.; Taylor-Offord, S.; Tobin, H. J.; Upton, P.; Valdez, R. D.; Weaver, K.; Wiersberg, T.; Williams, J. N.; Yeo, S.; Zimmer, M.; Broderick, N.

    2015-12-01

    The DFDP-2B borehole sampled rocks above and within the upper part of the Alpine Fault, New Zealand, to a depth of 893 m in late 2014. The experiment was the first to drill a major geological fault zone that is active and late in its earthquake cycle. We determined ambient fluid pressures 8-10% above hydrostatic and a geothermal gradient of 130-150 °C/km in rocks above the fault. These unusual ambient conditions can be explained by a combination of: rock advection that transports heat from depth by uplift and oblique slip on the fault; and fluid advection through fractured rock, driven by topographic forcing, which concentrates heat and causes fluid over-pressure in the valley. Highly-anomalous ambient conditions can exist in the vicinity of active faults, and earthquake and mineralization processes occur within these zones.

  12. Active faults of the Baikal depression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levi, K.G.; Miroshnichenko, A.I.; San'kov, V. A.; Babushkin, S.M.; Larkin, G.V.; Badardinov, A.A.; Wong, H.K.; Colman, S.; Delvaux, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Baikal depression occupies a central position in the system of the basins of the Baikal Rift Zone and corresponds to the nucleus from which the continental lithosphere began to open. For different reasons, the internal structure of the Lake Baikal basin remained unknown for a long time. In this article, we present for the first time a synthesis of the data concerning the structure of the sedimentary section beneath Lake Baikal, which were obtained by complex seismic and structural investigations, conducted mainly from 1989 to 1992. We make a brief description of the most interesting seismic profiles which provide a rough idea of a sedimentary unit structure, present a detailed structural interpretation and show the relationship between active faults in the lake, heat flow anomalies and recent hydrothermalism.

  13. 400My of Deformation Along Tibet Active Strike Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, N. O.

    2003-12-01

    While it is widely accepted that strike slip faults in Tibet accommodate a significant part of the tertiary convergence between India and Asia, the true Cenozoic magnitude of the offset is still largely debated. Direct dating of Cenozoic piercing points is the most powerful tool to assess the total offset, but their use is not always possible. Therefore one gets to use older markers although this leads to significant results ONLY at the supreme condition that pre-Cenozoic movement of those markers be accurately known. The Kunlun and Altyn Tagh faults for example form a prominent example of Tibetan presently active fault, but they also constitute geological frontiers between blocks of different geological histories accreted at various times since early Paleozoic. One may thus question how much of the visible offset is indeed Cenozoic. Although deformation facies agree with recent kinematics, multi-geochronological approach indicates a series of events from 280-230 Ma to 120+/-10 Ma. The former may be linked either with suturing of the Qiantang and Kunlun blocks farther to the south, or collision further to the north or east in the Qilian Shan and Bei Shan ranges, while the latter range appears to be growing in importance with ongoing work but is still largely unexplained. Oblique subductions of collision to the north of the Qilian Shan are adequate candidates. Argon loss suggests that deformation was associated to a 250-300° C thermal pulse that lasted 5 to 20 Ma after the onset of movement (Arnaud et al., 2003). Unroofing on all faults occurred much later, around 25 Ma ago when sudden cooling suggests a component of normal faulting (Mock et al., 1999). Strong inheritage was also found along the Ghoza active fault, in central western Tibet. Of course the fact that some of the deformation is much older than the Cretaceous and shares compatible deformation criteria with the present-day deformation leads to false appreciation of the pure Cenozoic offset, potentially

  14. Hydrogen Gas Emissions from Active Faults and Identification of Flow Pathway in a Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, T.; Niwa, M.; Kurosawa, H.; Shimada, K.

    2010-12-01

    It has been observed that hydrogen gas emissions from the subsurface along active faults exceed atmospheric concentrations (e.g. Sugisaki et. al., 1983). Experimental studies have shown that hydrogen gas is generated in a radical reaction of water with fractured silicate minerals due to rock fracturing caused by fault movement (e.g. Kita et al., 1982). Based on such research, we are studying an investigation method for an assessment of fault activity using hydrogen gas emissions from fracture zones. To start, we have devised portable equipment for rapid and simple in situ measurement of hydrogen gas emissions (Shimada et al., 2008). The key component of this equipment is a commercially available and compact hydrogen gas sensor with an integral data logger operable at atmospheric pressure. In the field, we have drilled shallow boreholes into incohesive fault rocks to depths ranging from 15 to 45 cm using a hand-operated drill with a 9mm drill-bit. Then, we have measured the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from active faults such as: the western part of the Atotsugawa fault zone, the Atera fault zone and the Neodani fault in central Japan; the Yamasaki fault zone in southwest Japan; and the Yamagata fault zone in northeast Japan. In addition, we have investigated the hydrogen gas concentrations in emissions from other major geological features such as tectonic lines: the Butsuzo Tectonic Line in the eastern Kii Peninsula and the Atokura Nappe in the Northeastern Kanto Mountains. As a result of the investigations, hydrogen gas concentration in emissions from the active faults was measured to be in the approximate range from 6,000 ppm to 26,000 ppm in two to three hours after drilling. A tendency for high concentrations of hydrogen gas in active faults was recognized, in contrast with low concentrations in emissions from tectonic lines that were observed to be in the range from 730 ppm to 2,000 ppm. It is inferred that the hydrogen gas migrates to ground

  15. Interactions between active faulting, volcanism, and sedimentary processes at an island arc: Insights from Les Saintes channel, Lesser Antilles arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, F.; Feuillet, N.; Deplus, C.

    2016-07-01

    New high-resolution marine geophysical data allow to characterize a large normal fault system in the Lesser Antilles arc, and to investigate the interactions between active faulting, volcanism, sedimentary, and mass-wasting processes. Les Saintes fault system is composed of several normal faults that form a 30 km wide half-graben accommodating NE-SW extension. It is bounded by the Roseau fault, responsible for the destructive Mw 6.3 21 November 2004 earthquake. The Roseau fault has been identified from the island of Basse-Terre to Dominica. It is thus 40 km long, and it could generate Mw 7 earthquakes in the future. Several submarine volcanoes are also recognized. We show that the fault system initiated after the main volcanic construction and subsequently controls the emission of volcanic products. The system propagates southward through damage zones. At the tip of the damage zones, several volcanic cones were recently emplaced probably due to fissures opening in an area of stress increase. A two-way interaction is observed between active faulting and sedimentary processes. The faults control the development of the main turbiditic system made of kilometer-wide canyons, as well as the location of sediment ponding. In turn, erosion and sedimentation prevent scarp growth at the seafloor. Faulting also enhances mass-wasting processes. Since its initiation, the fault system has consequently modified the morphologic evolution of the arc through perturbation of the sedimentary processes and localization of the more recent volcanic activity.

  16. Displacement-length relationship of normal faults in Acheron Fossae, Mars: new observations with HRSC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambakis, E.; Hauber, E.; Knapmeyer, M.; Grott, M.; Gwinner, K.

    2007-08-01

    For Earth, data sets and models have shown that for a fault loaded by a constant remote stress, the maximum displacement on the fault is linearly related to its length by d = gamma · l [1]. The scaling and structure is self-similar through time [1]. The displacement-length relationship can provide useful information about the tectonic regime.We intend to use it to estimate the seismic moment released during the formation of Martian fault systems and to improve the seismicity model [2]. Only few data sets have been measured for extraterrestrial faults. One reason is the limited number of reliable topographic data sets. We used high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM) [3] derived from HRSC image data taken from Mars Express orbit 1437. This orbit covers an area in the Acheron Fossae region, a rift-like graben system north of Olympus Mons with a "banana"-shaped topography [4]. It has a fault trend which runs approximately WNW-ESE. With an interactive IDL-based software tool [5] we measured the fault length and the vertical offset for 34 faults. We evaluated the height profile by plotting the fault lengths l vs. their observed maximum displacement (dmax-model). Additionally, we computed the maximum displacement of an elliptical fault scarp where the plane has the same area as in the observed case (elliptical model). The integration over the entire fault length necessary for the computation of the area supresses the "noise" introduced by local topographic effects like erosion or cratering. We should also mention that fault planes dipping 60 degree are usually assumed for Mars [e.g., 6] and even shallower dips have been found for normal fault planes [7]. This dip angle is used to compute displacement from vertical offset via d = h/(h*sinα), where h is the observed topographic step height, and ? is the fault dip angle. If fault dip angles of 30 degree are considered, the displacement differs by 40% from the one of dip angles of 60 degree. Depending on the data

  17. Supra-salt normal fault growth during the rise and fall of a diapir: Perspectives from 3D seismic reflection data, Norwegian North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvedt, Anette B. M.; Rotevatn, Atle; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.

    2016-10-01

    Normal faulting and the deep subsurface flow of salt are key processes controlling the structural development of many salt-bearing sedimentary basins. However, our detailed understanding of the spatial and temporal relationship between normal faulting and salt movement is poor due to a lack of natural examples constraining their geometric and kinematic relationship in three-dimensions. To improve our understanding of these processes, we here use 3D seismic reflection and borehole data from the Egersund Basin, offshore Norway, to determine the structure and growth of a normal fault array formed during the birth, growth and decay of an array of salt structures. We show that the fault array and salt structures developed in response to: (i) Late Triassic-to-Middle Jurassic extension, which involved thick-skinned, sub-salt and thin-skinned supra-salt faulting with the latter driving reactive diapirism; (ii) Early Cretaceous extensional collapse of the walls; and (iii) Jurassic-to-Neogene, active and passive diapirism, which was at least partly coeval with and occurred along-strike from areas of reactive diapirism and wall collapse. Our study supports physical model predictions, showcasing a three-dimensional example of how protracted, multiphase salt diapirism can influence the structure and growth of normal fault arrays.

  18. Deformed Neogene basins, active faulting and topography in Westland: Distributed crustal mobility west of the Alpine Fault transpressive plate boundary (South Island, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisetti, Francesca; Sibson, Richard H.; Hamling, Ian

    2016-12-01

    Tectonic activity in the South Island of New Zealand is dominated by the Alpine Fault component of the Australia-Pacific plate boundary. West of the Alpine Fault deformation is recorded by Paleogene-Neogene basins coeval with the evolution of the right-lateral/transpressive plate margin. Initial tectonic setting was controlled by N-S normal faults developed during Late Cretaceous and Eocene-early Miocene rifting. Following inception of the Alpine Fault (c. 25 Ma) reverse reactivation of the normal faults controlled tectonic segmentation that became apparent in the cover sequences at c. 22 Ma. Based on restored transects tied to stratigraphic sections, seismic lines and wells, we reconstruct the vertical mobility of the Top Basement Unconformity west of Alpine Fault. From c. 37-35 Ma to 22 Ma subsidence was controlled by extensional faulting. After 22 Ma the region was affected by differential subsidence, resulting from eastward crustal flexure towards the Alpine Fault boundary and/or components of transtension. Transition from subsidence to uplift started at c. 17 Ma within a belt of basement pop-ups, separated by subsiding basins localised in the common footwall of oppositely-dipping reverse faults. From 17 to 7-3 Ma reverse fault reactivation and uplift migrated to the WSW. Persistent reverse reactivation of the inherited faults in the present stress field is reflected by the close match between tectonic block segmentation and topography filtered at a wavelength of 25 km, i.e. at a scale comparable to crustal thickness in the region. However, topography filtered at wavelength of 75 km shows marked contrasts between the elevated Tasman Ranges region relative to regions to the south. Variations in thickness and rigidity of the Australian lithosphere possibly control N-S longitudinal changes, consistent with our estimates of increase in linear shortening from the Tasman Ranges to the regions located west of the Alpine Fault bend.

  19. Earthquake source parameters at the sumatran fault zone: Identification of the activated fault plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasmolan, Madlazim; Santosa, Bagus Jaya; Lees, Jonathan M.; Utama, Widya

    2010-12-01

    Fifteen earthquakes (Mw 4.1-6.4) occurring at ten major segments of the Sumatran Fault Zone (SFZ) were analyzed to identify their respective fault planes. The events were relocated in order to assess hypocenter uncertainty. Earthquake source parameters were determined from three-component local waveforms recorded by IRIS-DMC and GEOFON broadband lA networks. Epicentral distances of all stations were less than 10°. Moment tensor solutions of the events were calculated, along with simultaneous determination of centroid position. Joint analysis of hypocenter position, centroid position, and nodal planes produced clear outlines of the Sumatran fault planes. The preferable seismotectonic interpretation is that the events activated the SFZ at a depth of approximately 14-210 km, corresponding to the interplate Sumatran fault boundary. The identification of this seismic fault zone is significant to the investigation of seismic hazards in the region.

  20. Shallow seismicity migration in a normal fault test site in northern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, A.; Braun, T.; Cattaneo, M.; Chiaraluce, L.; Cocco, M.; D'Alema, E.; di Stefano, R.; Frapiccini, M.; Latorre, D.; Marzorati, S.; Monachesi, G.; Moretti, M.; Piana Agostinetti, N.; Piccinini, D.; Saccorotti, G.; Valoroso, L.; Selvaggi, G.

    2010-12-01

    In 2008-2010 a high-density, real-time seismic network has been installed in the northern Apennines, integrating the INGV permanent national network. While the national network uses satellite links and leased telephone lines, the additional stations are connected with WiFi radio links and INGV-made GAIA digitizers. In march 2010, 10 additional remote stations were installed to further improve the monitoring. At present, a total of 30 stations are operational in the area. The scientific target of the network, funded by INGV and by the Italian Ministry of Research (project Airplane RBPR05B2ZJ) is to understand the deformation process in the area, characterized by: i) extension at 2-3 mm/yr; ii) a regional east-dipping, low-angle normal fault (the Alto Tiberina Fault, ATF) that limits the seismicity downward in the upper 10-15 km of the crust; iii)historical earthquakes as large as M6.5; iv) a high rate of background seismicity. The extensional area is underlayed by the west-dipping Adriatic continental slab with seismicity down to 70-80 km below the belt. During the first year of operation, we located more than 3,000 local earthquakes with magnitude in the range -0.5 to 3.8. Part of the seismicity, located with both absolute and relative techniques, clusters on shallow high-angle normal faults above the ATF, and show a clear migration both along strike (at about 0.5 km/day) and in depth. This pattern has strong similarities with that observed in previous large normal faulting events in the Apennines, and is likely related to fluid migration. Such a dense network allows us to detect seismogenic processes with an unprecedented detail. Data are accumulating fast and will illuminate other parts of this complex fault system. Ongoing developments include a continuous GPS network and borehole seismometers.

  1. Evidence of multi-stage faulting by clay mineral analysis: Example in a normal fault zone affecting arkosic sandstones (Annot sandstones)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buatier, Martine D.; Cavailhes, Thibault; Charpentier, Delphine; Lerat, Jérémy; Sizun, Jean Pierre; Labaume, Pierre; Gout, Claude

    2015-06-01

    Fault affecting silicoclastic sediments are commonly enriched in clay minerals. Clays are sensitive to fluid-rock interactions and deformation mechanisms; in this paper, they are used as proxy for fault activity and behavior. The present study focuses on clay mineral assemblages from the Point Vert normal fault zone located in the Annot sandstones, a Priabonian-Rupelian turbidite succession of the Alpine foredeep in SE France. In this area, the Annot sandstones were buried around 6-8 km below the front of Alpine nappes soon after their deposition and exhumed during the middle-late Miocene. The fault affects arkosic sandstone beds alternating with pelitic layers, and displays throw of about thirty meters. The fault core zone comprises intensely foliated sandstones bounding a corridor of gouge about 20 cm thick. The foliated sandstones display clay concentration along S-C structures characterized by dissolution of K-feldspar and their replacement by mica, associated with quartz pressure solution, intense microfracturation and quartz vein precipitation. The gouge is formed by a clayey matrix containing fragments of foliated sandstones and pelites. However, a detailed petrographical investigation suggests complex polyphase deformation processes. Optical and SEM observations show that the clay minerals fraction of all studied rocks (pelites and sandstones from the damage and core zones of the fault) is dominated by white micas and chlorite. These minerals have two different origins: detrital and newly-formed. Detrital micas are identified by their larger shape and their chemical composition with a lower Fe-Mg content than the newly-formed white micas. In the foliated sandstones, newly-formed white micas are concentrated along S-C structures or replace K-feldspar. Both types of newly formed micas display the same chemical composition confirmed microstructural observations suggesting that they formed in the same conditions. They have the following structural formulas: Na0

  2. Active Fault Topography and Fault Outcrops in the Central Part of the Nukumi fault, the 1891 Nobi Earthquake Fault System, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Ueta, K.; Inoue, D.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yanagida, M.; Ichikawa, K.; Goto, N.

    2010-12-01

    It is important to evaluate the magnitude of earthquake caused by multiple active faults, taking into account the simultaneous effects. The simultaneity of adjacent active faults are often decided on the basis of geometric distances except for known these paleoseismic records. We have been studied the step area between the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault, which appeared as consecutive ruptures in the 1891 Nobi earthquake, since 2009. The purpose of this study is to establish innovation in valuation technique of the simultaneity of adjacent active faults in addition to the paleoseismic record and the geometric distance. Geomorphological, geological and reconnaissance microearthquake surveys are concluded. The present work is intended to clarify the distribution of tectonic geomorphology along the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault by high-resolution interpretations of airborne LiDAR DEM and aerial photograph, and the field survey of outcrops and location survey. The study area of this work is the southeastern Nukumi fault and the northwestern Neodani fault. We interpret DEM using shaded relief map and stereoscopic bird's-eye view made from 2m mesh DEM data which is obtained by airborne laser scanner of Kokusai Kogyo Co., Ltd. Aerial photographic survey is for confirmation of DEM interpretation using 1/16,000 scale photo. As a result of topographic survey, we found consecutive tectonic topography which is left lateral displacement of ridge and valley lines and reverse scarplets along the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault . From Ogotani 2km southeastern of Nukumi pass which is located at the southeastern end of surface rupture along the Nukumi fault by previous study to Neooppa 9km southeastern of Nukumi pass, we can interpret left lateral topographies and small uphill-facing fault scarps on the terrace surface by detail DEM investigation. These topographies are unrecognized by aerial photographic survey because of heavy vegetation. We have found several new

  3. Assessing active faulting by hydrogeological modeling and superconducting gravimetry: A case study for Hsinchu Fault, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Tzuyi; Cheng, Ching-Chung; Hwang, Cheinway; Crossley, David

    2014-09-01

    We develop a new hydrology and gravimetry-based method to assess whether or not a local fault may be active. We take advantage of an existing superconducting gravimeter (SG) station and a comprehensive groundwater network in Hsinchu to apply the method to the Hsinchu Fault (HF) across the Hsinchu Science Park, whose industrial output accounts for 10% of Taiwan's gross domestic product. The HF is suspected to pose seismic hazards to the park, but its existence and structure are not clear. The a priori geometry of the HF is translated into boundary conditions imposed in the hydrodynamic model. By varying the fault's location, depth, and including a secondary wrench fault, we construct five hydrodynamic models to estimate groundwater variations, which are evaluated by comparing groundwater levels and SG observations. The results reveal that the HF contains a low hydraulic conductivity core and significantly impacts groundwater flows in the aquifers. Imposing the fault boundary conditions leads to about 63-77% reduction in the differences between modeled and observed values (both water level and gravity). The test with fault depth shows that the HF's most recent slip occurred in the beginning of Holocene, supplying a necessary (but not sufficient) condition that the HF is currently active. A portable SG can act as a virtual borehole well for model assessment at critical locations of a suspected active fault.

  4. Low velocity normal fault structures associated with intermediate depth seismicity - insights from body wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Rietbrock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Low velocity structures in the upper slab have been inferred from guided wave studies (e.g Abers 2000) and subsequently resolved by a number of geophysical methods including receiver function analyses and high resolution seismic tomography . These low velocity structures are potentially explained by the presence of hydrous mineral assemblages in the subducted oceanic crust. This supports the long proposed theory that mineral dehydration during subduction may weaken the crust and allow for intermediate depth seismicity. Recently it has been proposed that normal faulting in the slab may provide a mechanism for hydration deep in the slab, as stress changes due to slab bending promotes the downward pumping of fluids (Faccenda et al. 2009). At greater depth, the reactivation of outer rise normal faults has been postulated by Ranero et al. (2005) as a cause Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity. However there is no direct seismological evidence of normal faults at intermediate depths. Here we present seismic evidence that these faults are in fact associated with low velocities, possibly caused by hydrous minerals or the presence of fluids. We analyse dispersive P-wave arrivals from intermediate depth events in Northern Japan. Finite difference wave propagation models are used to constrain the structure related to this dispersion. Dispersion of deeper events (>150 km) can be explained by a low velocity layer (LVL) at the top of the slab acting as a waveguide. This LVL has a thickness of ~8 km, and a 5 - 12% reduction in velocity. Shallower events (70 - 150 km depth) that occur well below the top of the slab also show dispersion. This cannot be attributed to the upper LVL as the event must be on or near to the waveguide for dispersion to occur. Numerical modeling shows that these shallower dispersive events can be explained by very low velocity structures dipping with a normal fault geometry. We propose that these dipping planes might indicate hydrated material along normal

  5. Spacing and strength of active continental strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuza, Andrew V.; Yin, An; Lin, Jessica; Sun, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Parallel and evenly-spaced active strike-slip faults occur widely in nature across diverse tectonic settings. Despite their common existence, the fundamental question of what controls fault spacing remains unanswered. Here we present a mechanical model for the generation of parallel strike-slip faults that relates fault spacing to the following parameters: (1) brittle-crust thickness, (2) fault strength, (3) crustal strength, and (4) crustal stress state. Scaled analogue experiments using dry sand, dry crushed walnut shells, and viscous putty were employed to test the key assumptions of our quantitative model. The physical models demonstrate that fault spacing (S) is linearly proportional to brittle-layer thickness (h), both in experiments with only brittle materials and in two-layer trials involving dry sand overlying viscous putty. The S / h slope in the two-layer sand-putty experiments may be controlled by the (1) rheological/geometric properties of the viscous layer, (2) effects of distributed basal loading caused by the viscous shear of the putty layer, and/or (3) frictional interaction at the sand-putty interface (i.e., coupling between the viscous and brittle layers). We tentatively suggest that this third effect exerts the strongest control on fault spacing in the analogue experiments. By applying our quantitative model to crustal-scale strike-slip faults using fault spacing and the seismogenic-zone thickness obtained from high-resolution earthquake-location data, we estimate absolute fault friction of active strike-slip faults in Asia and along the San Andreas fault system in California. We show that the average friction coefficient of strike-slip faults in the India-Asia collisional orogen is lower than that of faults in the San Andreas fault system. Weaker faults explain why deformation penetrates >3500 km into Asia from the Himalaya and why the interior of Asia is prone to large (M > 7.0) devastating earthquakes along major intra-continental strike

  6. Weakening mechanisms along Low-Angle Normal Faults in pelagic limestones (Southern Apennine, Italy): insights from microstructural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novellino, R.; Prosser, G.; Viti, C.; Spiess, R.; Agosta, F.; Tavarnelli, E.; Bucci, F.

    2013-12-01

    Low-Angle Normal Faults (LANFs) consist of shallowly-dipping extensional tectonic structures, whose origin relates to a mechanical paradox currently debated by a number of researches. The easy slip along these faults suggests a strain-weakening process active during fault nucleation and growth. Weakening mechanisms may include: i) presence of weak minerals; ii) high fluid pressure which, causing a drastic reduction of the effective stress, and iii) dynamic fault weakening during coseismic rupture. In the Basilicata portion of Southern Apennines, LANFs have been extensively studied by geological mapping and field structural analysis. Differently, a detailed microstructural observations are not hitherto available in the geological literature. For this reason, in this note, we summarize the results of microstructural analysis carried out on fault rock samples collected from a well-exposed mesoscopic LANFs. The present work is aimed at analyzing the weakening mechanisms that took place along the study faults. The incipient study LANFs are characterized by a narrow and discontinuous damage zone surrounding a very thin fault core that include a discrete slip-surface. The offset is in the range of tens of centimeters to few meters. At the microscope scale, the sampled rocks reveal the coexistence of different structural features such as: i) pervasive shape preferred orientation defined by elongated grains of calcite, producing a distinct foliation; ii) Crush Microbreccia (CM), formed of angular clasts locally in contact with each other; iii) several Ultracataclastic Veins (UV), departing from the slip-surfaces and cutting across the slip-zone. TEM investigation reveal the presence of ultrafine to calcite-nanoparticles (<200 nm) aggregate within UV, and iv) decarbonation features, where calcite grains exhibit irregular boundaries, vacuum and vesicles, most likely related to degassing processes. Thermal decomposition results in formation of a calcite aggregate made of

  7. Syn-orogenic extensional pulses within the contractional history of thrust wedges. The Val di Lima low-angle normal fault case study, Northern Apennines, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemenzi, Luca; Molli, Giancarlo; Storti, Fabrizio; Muchez, Philippe; Swennen, Rudy; Torelli, Luigi

    2014-05-01

    overpressures locally influenced active deformation processes and favored shear localization. We propose that the folded low-angle extensional fault system indicates the occurrence of an extensional pulse that affected this sector of the thrust wedge during the orogenic contractional history. In particular, the fault system is considered to be the flat portion of a stair-case extensional fault system developed in the shallower portion of the thrust wedge to compensate for its supercritical taper produced by uplift of the internal zone due to deep-rooted thrusting. Important pulses of wedge extension, similar to the one described here, are likely to occur during the geological history of most thrust wedges, because their long-term evolution is characterized by complex interactions among tectonics, gravitational body forces, and (sub)surface processes. The systems of brittle extensional fault zones, resulting from such extensional pulses, affect fluid circulation through the upper crust by producing articulated networks of hydraulic conduits, barriers, or mixed conduit-barrier systems. In particular, as demonstrated by our results, the effects of extensional fault zones on fluid circulation is twofold: i) they provide effective fluid pathways allowing deep infiltration of surface-derived marine or meteoric water; ii) they can trigger fluid overpressuring, especially in the footwall of shallow-dipping fault segments. Eventually, fluid circulation can exert a strong influence on the mechanical behavior of thrust wedges either by reducing the effective normal stress at depth or triggering the formation of hydrous clay minerals lowering the frictional properties of fault zones.

  8. Non-planar Fault Model of the 2008 Yutian Normal Faulting Earthquake (M7.2), Xinjiang, China, and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, M.; Yasuda, T.

    2010-12-01

    On 20 March 2008, a normal-faulting earthquake (M7.2/USGS) struck Yutian county, Xinjiang, China. The epicenter is close to the southern-edge of the Tarim basin, where three prominent fault systems, the Altyn-Tagh Fault, Karakax Fault, and Longmu-Gozha Co Fault, meet together at the northwest of the Tibetan plateau. The associated crustal deformation signals, if detected and examined in detail, will provide us with important constraints on how the continental crust in Tibetan plateau has been deforming, which has been contentious over the decades. Also, it could suggest clues on why normal faulting earthquakes prevail over the central to northern areas of Tibet. Here, based on our detected co-seismic crustal deformation signals by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, we report a non-planar kinematic fault source model that suggests the normal faulting rupture occurred in a dilatational step-over region of two oblique left-lateral strike slip faults. We used L-band ALOS/PALSAR data for the ascending track and C-band Envisat/ASAR data for the descending track. The observed data showed that the overall strike was from NE to SW, consistent with Shao and Ji (2008)'s preliminary source model. The largest slipped area in the InSAR data, however, indicates that the strike direction is almost NS, and that the rupture reached to the surface. The pixel-offset data also illustrate that the strike direction changed around the middle of the fault trace on the surface, suggesting that the fault slip occurred on a non-planar surface. In order to realistically represent the non-planar geometry, we employed an analytical formulation for the triangular dislocation element to invert the slip distribution (e.g., Mearten et al., 2005; Mead, 2007). In inverting the fault slip, both the non-negativity constraint on the slip direction and the smoothing constraint on the slip distribution were applied. Optimum fault source and its implications for regional tectonics and mechanism for the

  9. 3D seismic analysis of gravity-driven and basement influenced normal fault growth in the deepwater Otway Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, A. G.; King, R. C.; Holford, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    We use three-dimensional (3D) seismic reflection data to analyse the structural style and growth of a normal fault array located at the present-day shelf-edge break and into the deepwater province of the Otway Basin, southern Australia. The Otway Basin is a Late Jurassic to Cenozoic, rift-to-passive margin basin. The seismic reflection data images a NW-SE (128-308) striking, normal fault array, located within Upper Cretaceous clastic sediments and which consists of ten fault segments. The fault array contains two hard-linked fault assemblages, separated by only 2 km in the dip direction. The gravity-driven, down-dip fault assemblage is entirely contained within the 3D seismic survey, is located over a basement plateau and displays growth commencing and terminating during the Campanian-Maastrichtian, with up to 1.45 km of accumulated throw (vertical displacement). The up-dip normal fault assemblage penetrates deeper than the base of the seismic survey, but is interpreted to be partially linked along strike at depth to major basement-involved normal faults that can be observed on regional 2D seismic lines. This fault assemblage displays growth initiating in the Turonian-Santonian and has accumulated up to 1.74 km of throw. Our detailed analysis of the 3D seismic data constraints post-Cenomanian fault growth of both fault assemblages into four evolutionary stages: [1] Turonian-Santonian basement reactivation during crustal extension between Australia and Antarctica. This either caused the upward propagation of basement-involved normal faults or the nucleation of a vertically isolated normal fault array in shallow cover sediments directly above the reactivated basement-involved faults; [2] continued Campanian-Maastrichtian crustal extension and sediment loading eventually created gravitational instability on the basement plateau, nucleating a second, vertically isolated normal fault array in the cover sediments; [3] eventual hard-linkage of fault segments in both fault

  10. Faulting processes in active faults - Evidences from TCDP and SAFOD drill core samples

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, C.; Wirth, R.; Wenk, H. -R.; Morales, L.; Naumann, R.; Kienast, M.; Song, S. -R.; Dresen, G.

    2014-08-20

    The microstructures, mineralogy and chemistry of representative samples collected from the cores of the San Andreas Fault drill hole (SAFOD) and the Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling project (TCDP) have been studied using optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, XRD and XRF analyses. SAFOD samples provide a transect across undeformed host rock, the fault damage zone and currently active deforming zones of the San Andreas Fault. TCDP samples are retrieved from the principal slip zone (PSZ) and from the surrounding damage zone of the Chelungpu Fault. Substantial differences exist in the clay mineralogy of SAFOD and TCDP fault gouge samples. Amorphous material has been observed in SAFOD as well as TCDP samples. In line with previous publications, we propose that melt, observed in TCDP black gouge samples, was produced by seismic slip (melt origin) whereas amorphous material in SAFOD samples was formed by comminution of grains (crush origin) rather than by melting. Dauphiné twins in quartz grains of SAFOD and TCDP samples may indicate high seismic stress. The differences in the crystallographic preferred orientation of calcite between SAFOD and TCDP samples are significant. Microstructures resulting from dissolution–precipitation processes were observed in both faults but are more frequently found in SAFOD samples than in TCDP fault rocks. As already described for many other fault zones clay-gouge fabrics are quite weak in SAFOD and TCDP samples. Clay-clast aggregates (CCAs), proposed to indicate frictional heating and thermal pressurization, occur in material taken from the PSZ of the Chelungpu Fault, as well as within and outside of the SAFOD deforming zones, indicating that these microstructures were formed over a wide range of slip rates.

  11. Gently dipping normal faults identified with Space Shuttle radar topography data in central Sulawesi, Indonesia, and some implications for fault mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Space-shuttle radar topography data from central Sulawesi, Indonesia, reveal two corrugated, domal landforms, covering hundreds to thousands of square kilometers, that are bounded to the north by an abrupt transition to typical hilly to mountainous topography. These domal landforms are readily interpreted as metamorphic core complexes, an interpretation consistent with a single previous field study, and the abrupt northward transition in topographic style is interpreted as marking the trace of two extensional detachment faults that are active or were recently active. Fault dip, as determined by the slope of exhumed fault footwalls, ranges from 4?? to 18??. Application of critical-taper theory to fault dip and hanging-wall surface slope, and to similar data from several other active or recently active core complexes, suggests a theoretical limit of three degrees for detachment-fault dip. This result appears to conflict with the dearth of seismological evidence for slip on faults dipping less than ~. 30??. The convex-upward form of the gently dipping fault footwalls, however, allows for greater fault dip at depths of earthquake initiation and dominant energy release. Thus, there may be no conflict between seismological and mapping studies for this class of faults. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Internal structure, fault rocks, and inferences regarding deformation, fluid flow, and mineralization in the seismogenic Stillwater normal fault, Dixie Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caine, J.S.; Bruhn, R.L.; Forster, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Outcrop mapping and fault-rock characterization of the Stillwater normal fault zone in Dixie Valley, Nevada are used to document and interpret ancient hydrothermal fluid flow and its possible relationship to seismic deformation. The fault zone is composed of distinct structural and hydrogeological components. Previous work on the fault rocks is extended to the map scale where a distinctive fault core shows a spectrum of different fault-related breccias. These include predominantly clast-supported breccias with angular clasts that are cut by zones containing breccias with rounded clasts that are also clast supported. These are further cut by breccias that are predominantly matrix supported with angular and rounded clasts. The fault-core breccias are surrounded by a heterogeneously fractured damage zone. Breccias are bounded between major, silicified slip surfaces, forming large pod-like structures, systematically oriented with long axes parallel to slip. Matrix-supported breccias have multiply brecciated, angular and rounded clasts revealing episodic deformation and fluid flow. These breccias have a quartz-rich matrix with microcrystalline anhedral, equant, and pervasively conformable mosaic texture. The breccia pods are interpreted to have formed by decompression boiling and rapid precipitation of hydrothermal fluids whose flow was induced by coseismic, hybrid dilatant-shear deformation and hydraulic connection to a geothermal reservoir. The addition of hydrothermal silica cement localized in the core at the map scale causes fault-zone widening, local sealing, and mechanical heterogeneities that impact the evolution of the fault zone throughout the seismic cycle. ?? 2010.

  13. Normal-faulting slip maxima and stress-drop variability: a geological perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hecker, S.; Dawson, T.E.; Schwartz, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    We present an empirical estimate of maximum slip in continental normal-faulting earthquakes and present evidence that stress drop in intraplate extensional environments is dependent on fault maturity. A survey of reported slip in historical earthquakes globally and in latest Quaternary paleoearthquakes in the Western Cordillera of the United States indicates maximum vertical displacements as large as 6–6.5 m. A difference in the ratio of maximum-to-mean displacements between data sets of prehistoric and historical earthquakes, together with constraints on bias in estimates of mean paleodisplacement, suggest that applying a correction factor of 1.4±0.3 to the largest observed displacement along a paleorupture may provide a reasonable estimate of the maximum displacement. Adjusting the largest paleodisplacements in our regional data set (~6 m) by a factor of 1.4 yields a possible upper-bound vertical displacement for the Western Cordillera of about 8.4 m, although a smaller correction factor may be more appropriate for the longest ruptures. Because maximum slip is highly localized along strike, if such large displacements occur, they are extremely rare. Static stress drop in surface-rupturing earthquakes in the Western Cordillera, as represented by maximum reported displacement as a fraction of modeled rupture length, appears to be larger on normal faults with low cumulative geologic displacement (<2 km) and larger in regions such as the Rocky Mountains, where immature, low-throw faults are concentrated. This conclusion is consistent with a growing recognition that structural development influences stress drop and indicates that this influence is significant enough to be evident among faults within a single intraplate environment.

  14. The anatomy of the 2009 L'Aquila normal fault system (central Italy) imaged by high resolution foreshock and aftershock locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaraluce, L.; Valoroso, L.; Piccinini, D.; di Stefano, R.; de Gori, P.

    2011-12-01

    On 6 April (01:32 UTC) 2009 a MW 6.1 normal faulting earthquake struck the axial area of the Abruzzo region in central Italy. We study the geometry of fault segments using high resolution foreshock and aftershock locations. Two main SW dipping segments, the L'Aquila and Campotosto faults, forming an en echelon system 40 km long (NW trending). The 16 km long L'Aquila fault shows a planar geometry with constant dip (˜48°) through the entire upper crust down to 10 km depth. The Campotosto fault activated by three events with 5.0 ≤ MW ≤ 5.2 shows a striking listric geometry, composed by planar segments with different dips along depth rather than a smoothly curving single fault surface. The investigation of the spatiotemporal evolution of foreshock activity within the crustal volume where the subsequent L'Aquila main shock nucleated allows us to image the progressive activation of the main fault plane. From the beginning of 2009 the foreshocks activated the deepest portion of the fault until a week before the main shock, when the largest foreshock (MW 4.0) triggered a minor antithetic segment. Seismicity jumped back to the main plane a few hours before the main shock. Secondary synthetic and antithetic fault segments are present both on the hanging and footwall of the system. The stress tensor obtained by inverting focal mechanisms of the largest events reveals a NE trending extension and the majority of the aftershocks are kinematically consistent. Deviations from the dominant extensional strain pattern are observed for those earthquakes activating minor structures.

  15. Geochemistry, mineralization, structure, and permeability of a normal-fault zone, Casino mine, Alligator Ridge district, north central Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, K. Jill; Evans, James P.

    2003-05-01

    We examine the geochemical signature and structure of the Keno fault zone to test its impact on the flow of ore-mineralizing fluids, and use the mined exposures to evaluate structures and processes associated with normal fault development. The fault is a moderately dipping normal-fault zone in siltstone and silty limestone with 55-100 m of dip-slip displacement in north-central Nevada. Across-strike exposures up to 180 m long, 65 m of down-dip exposure and 350 m of along-strike exposure allow us to determine how faults, fractures, and fluids interact within mixed-lithology carbonate-dominated sedimentary rocks. The fault changes character along strike from a single clay-rich slip plane 10-20 mm thick at the northern exposure to numerous hydrocarbon-bearing, calcite-filled, nearly vertical slip planes in a zone 15 m wide at the southern exposure. The hanging wall and footwall are intensely fractured but fracture densities do not vary markedly with distance from the fault. Fault slip varies from pure dip-slip to nearly pure strike-slip, which suggests that either slip orientations may vary on faults in single slip events, or stress variations over the history of the fault caused slip vector variations. Whole-rock major, minor, and trace element analyses indicate that Au, Sb, and As are in general associated with the fault zone, suggesting that Au- and silica-bearing fluids migrated along the fault to replace carbonate in the footwall and adjacent hanging wall rocks. Subsequent fault slip was associated with barite and calcite and hydrocarbon-bearing fluids deposited at the southern end of the fault. No correlation exists at the meter or tens of meter scale between mineralization patterns and fracture density. We suggest that the fault was a combined conduit-barrier system in which the fault provides a critical connection between the fluid sources and fractures that formed before and during faulting. During the waning stages of deposit formation, the fault behaved as

  16. Contrasting strike-slip motions on thrust and normal faults: Implications for space-geodetic monitoring of surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Andrea; Li, Tao; Maniatis, Georgios

    2013-04-01

    Recent GPS records of surface deformation caused by earthquakes on intra-continental dip-slip faults revealed in unprecedented detail a significant strike-slip component near the fault tips, which is markedly different for thrust and normal faults. In the hanging wall of the thrust fault ruptured during the 2003 Chengkung (Taiwan) earthquake, a divergent displacement pattern was recorded (Hsu et al., 2009). In contrast, a convergent slip pattern was observed in the hanging wall of the normal fault that produced the 2009 L'Aquila (Italy) earthquake (Cheloni et al., 2010; Serpelloni et al., 2012). Remarkably, such convergent slip patterns are also evident in field records of cumulative fault slip (e.g., Jackson et al., 1982; Roberts & Koukouvelas 1996), which underlines the coseismic origin of the cumulative slip pattern. Here we use three-dimensional numerical modeling to demonstrate that the observed fault-parallel motions are a characteristic feature of the coseismic slip pattern on normal and thrust faults (Hampel et al., in press). Modeled slip vectors converge toward the center of normal faults whereas they diverge for thrust faults, which causes contrasting fault-parallel displacements at the model surface. Our model also predicts divergent movements in normal fault footwalls, which were recorded for the first time during the L'Aquila earthquake. During the postseismic phase, viscous flow in the lower crust induces fault-parallel surface displacements, which have the same direction as the coseismic displacements but are distributed over a larger area that extends far beyond the fault tips. Hence, detecting this signal requires GPS stations in the prolongation of the fault's strike. Postseismic velocities vary over several orders of magnitude depending on the lower-crustal viscosity and may reach tens of millimeters per year for low viscosities. Our study establishes the link between coseismic and cumulative slip patterns on normal and thrust faults and

  17. Insurance Applications of Active Fault Maps Showing Epistemic Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, G.

    2005-12-01

    Insurance loss modeling for earthquakes utilizes available maps of active faulting produced by geoscientists. All such maps are subject to uncertainty, arising from lack of knowledge of fault geometry and rupture history. Field work to undertake geological fault investigations drains human and monetary resources, and this inevitably limits the resolution of fault parameters. Some areas are more accessible than others; some may be of greater social or economic importance than others; some areas may be investigated more rapidly or diligently than others; or funding restrictions may have curtailed the extent of the fault mapping program. In contrast with the aleatory uncertainty associated with the inherent variability in the dynamics of earthquake fault rupture, uncertainty associated with lack of knowledge of fault geometry and rupture history is epistemic. The extent of this epistemic uncertainty may vary substantially from one regional or national fault map to another. However aware the local cartographer may be, this uncertainty is generally not conveyed in detail to the international map user. For example, an area may be left blank for a variety of reasons, ranging from lack of sufficient investigation of a fault to lack of convincing evidence of activity. Epistemic uncertainty in fault parameters is of concern in any probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard, not least in insurance earthquake risk applications. A logic-tree framework is appropriate for incorporating epistemic uncertainty. Some insurance contracts cover specific high-value properties or transport infrastructure, and therefore are extremely sensitive to the geometry of active faulting. Alternative Risk Transfer (ART) to the capital markets may also be considered. In order for such insurance or ART contracts to be properly priced, uncertainty should be taken into account. Accordingly, an estimate is needed for the likelihood of surface rupture capable of causing severe damage. Especially where a

  18. Miocene Metamorphism and Exhumation of the Granulite-Eclogite Anticlinorium of the Ama Drime Through Normal Faulting Associated to Large Scale E-W Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kali, E.; Arnaud, N. O.; Leloup, H. P.; Maheo, G.; Boutonnet, E.; Li, H.

    2007-12-01

    High grade rocks have been exhumed in the core of a foliation dome forming the Ama Drime range west of Dingye graben. This range is bordered on its western and eastern sides by two major presently active normal faults which cut the STDS, the eastern one forming the western border of the Dingye graben. The footwall of this fault consists of sillimanite-garnet bearing gneisses with kyanite relics, locally migmatitic and intruded by deformed and undeformed leucogranites. C/S relations show top to the east ductile normal shearing prior to brittle normal faulting presently active. Petrological study of gneisses via minerals microprobe analysis and pseudosections show minimum pressures of equilibration of 13.5 kbar and temperature of 800°C, followed by decompression to 6kbar and 700°C contemporaneous with the onset of ductile normal shearing and melting. SHRIMP U/Pb dating of monazite from migmatites give middle-miocene ages for the melting event while SIMS U/Pb dating of zircons from orthogneisses from the same unit reveal ages of more than 2 Ga. PT conditions and proterozoic ages indicate that this unit belong to Lower Himalayan Cristalline Series, (LHCS as in Groppo et al., 2007, J Metam. Geol) but also reveal that middle-miocene high grade rocks have been exhumed by the ductile normal fault. The same study was carried out on samples from the hanging-wall of the normal fault which consists of garnet- sillimanite micaschists with staurolite relics, locally intruded by undeformed and deformed tourmaline bearing leucogranites, and are sheared top to North probably in relation with the overlying STDS. U/Pb SIMS dating of zircons on undeformed and deformed leucogranite give middle Miocene ages for the end of the deformation associated with the STDS. Moreoever, Paleozoic inheritage in zircons show that the units located to the east of the active normal fault belong to the High Himalayan Crystallines series. PT paths constrained by garnet isopleths show decompression and

  19. Project DAFNE - Drilling Active Faults in Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkonen, I. T.; Ask, M. S. V.; Olesen, O.

    2012-04-01

    We are currently developing a new ICDP project 'Drillling Active Faults in Northern Europe' (DAFNE) which aims at investigating, via scientific drilling, the tectonic and structural characteristics of postglacial (PG) faults in northern Fennoscandia, including their hydrogeology and associated deep biosphere [1, 2]. During the last stages of the Weichselian glaciation (ca. 9,000 - 15,000 years B.P.), reduced ice load and glacially affected stress field resulted in active faulting in Fennoscandia with fault scarps up to 160 km long and 30 m high. These postglacial (PG) faults are usually SE dipping, SW-NE oriented thrusts, and represent reactivated, pre-existing crustal discontinuities. Postglacial faulting indicates that the glacio-isostatic compensation is not only a gradual viscoelastic phenomenon, but includes also unexpected violent earthquakes, suggestively larger than other known earthquakes in stable continental regions. The research is anticipated to advance science in neotectonics, hydrogeology and deep biosphere studies, and provide important information for nuclear waste and CO2 disposal, petroleum exploration on the Norwegian continental shelf and studies of mineral resources in PG fault areas. We expect that multidisciplinary research applying shallow and deep drilling of postglacial faults would provide significant scientific results through generating new data and models, namely: (1) Understanding PG fault genesis and controls of their locations; (2) Deep structure and depth extent of PG faults; (3) Textural, mineralogical and physical alteration of rocks in the PG faults; (4) State of stress and estimates of paleostress of PG faults; (5) Hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and hydraulic properties of PG faults; (6) Dating of tectonic reactivation(s) and temporal evolution of tectonic systems hosting PG faults; (7) Existence/non-existence of deep biosphere in PG faults; (8) Data useful for planning radioactive waste disposal in crystalline bedrock; (9) Data

  20. Miocene extension in the East Range, Nevada: A two-stage history of normal faulting in the northern basin and range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fosdick, J.C.; Colgan, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The East Range in northwestern Nevada is a large, east-tilted crustal block bounded by west-dipping normal faults. Detailed mapping of Tertiary stratigraphic units demonstrates a two-phase history of faulting and extension. The oldest sedimentary and volcanic rocks in the area record cumulative tilting of -30??-45??E, whereas younger olivine basalt flows indicate only a 15??-20??E tilt since ca. 17-13 Ma. Cumulative fault slip during these two episodes caused a minimum of 40% extensional strain across the East Range, and Quaternary fault scarps and seismic activity indicate that fault motion has continued to the present day. Apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He data presented here show that faulting began in the East Range ca. 17-15 Ma, coeval with middle Miocene extension that occurred across much of the Basin and Range. This phase of extension occurred contemporaneously with middle Miocene volcanism related to the nearby northern Nevada rifts, suggesting a link between magmatism and extensional stresses in the crust that facilitated normal faulting in the East Range. Younger fault slip, although less well constrained, began after 10 Ma and is synchronous with the onset of low-magnitude extension in many parts of northwestern Nevada and eastern California. These findings imply that, rather than migrating west across a discrete boundary, late Miocene extension in western Nevada is a distinct, younger period of faulting that is superimposed on the older, middle Miocene distribution of extended and unextended domains. The partitioning of such middle Miocene deformation may reflect the influence of localized heterogeneities in crustal structure, whereas the more broadly distributed late Miocene extension may reflect a stronger influence from regional plate boundary processes that began in the late Miocene. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  1. First direct observation of coseismic slip and seafloor rupture along a submarine normal fault and implications for fault slip history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartín, Javier; Leclerc, Frédérique; Olive, Jean-Arthur; Mevel, Catherine; Cannat, Mathilde; Petersen, Sven; Augustin, Nico; Feuillet, Nathalie; Deplus, Christine; Bezos, Antoine; Bonnemains, Diane; Chavagnac, Valérie; Choi, Yujin; Godard, Marguerite; Haaga, Kristian A.; Hamelin, Cédric; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jamieson, John W.; John, Barbara E.; Leleu, Thomas; MacLeod, Christopher J.; Massot-Campos, Miquel; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Paquet, Marine; Rommevaux-Jestin, Céline; Rothenbeck, Marcel; Steinführer, Anja; Tominaga, Masako; Triebe, Lars; Campos, Ricard; Gracias, Nuno; Garcia, Rafael; Andreani, Muriel; Vilaseca, Géraud

    2016-09-01

    Properly assessing the extent and magnitude of fault ruptures associated with large earthquakes is critical for understanding fault behavior and associated hazard. Submarine faults can trigger tsunamis, whose characteristics are defined by the geometry of seafloor displacement, studied primarily through indirect observations (e.g., seismic event parameters, seismic profiles, shipboard bathymetry, coring) rather than direct ones. Using deep-sea vehicles, we identify for the first time a marker of coseismic slip on a submarine fault plane along the Roseau Fault (Lesser Antilles), and measure its vertical displacement of ∼ 0.9 m in situ. We also map recent fissuring and faulting of sediments on the hangingwall, along ∼3 km of rupture in close proximity to the fault's base, and document the reactivation of erosion and sedimentation within and downslope of the scarp. These deformation structures were caused by the 2004 Mw 6.3 Les Saintes earthquake, which triggered a subsequent tsunami. Their characterization informs estimates of earthquake recurrence on this fault and provides new constraints on the geometry of fault rupture, which is both shorter and displays locally larger coseismic displacements than available model predictions that lack field constraints. This methodology of detailed field observations coupled with near-bottom geophysical surveying can be readily applied to numerous submarine fault systems, and should prove useful in evaluating seismic and tsunamigenic hazard in all geodynamic contexts.

  2. Research of Earthquake Potential from Active Fault Observation in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien-Liang, C.; Hu, J. C.; Liu, C. C.; En, C. K.; Cheng, T. C. T.

    2015-12-01

    We utilize GAMIT/GLOBK software to estimate the precise coordinates for continuous GPS (CGPS) data of Central Geological Survey (CGS, MOEA) in Taiwan. To promote the software estimation efficiency, 250 stations are divided by 8 subnets which have been considered by station numbers, network geometry and fault distributions. Each of subnets include around 50 CGPS and 10 international GNSS service (IGS) stations. After long period of data collection and estimation, a time series variation can be build up to study the effect of earthquakes and estimate the velocity of stations. After comparing the coordinates from campaign-mode GPS sites and precise leveling benchmarks with the time series from continuous GPS stations, the velocity field is consistent with previous measurement which show the reliability of observation. We evaluate the slip rate and slip deficit rate of active faults in Taiwan by 3D block model DEFNODE. First, to get the surface fault traces and the subsurface fault geometry parameters, and then establish the block boundary model of study area. By employing the DEFNODE technique, we invert the GPS velocities for the best-fit block rotate rates, long term slip rates and slip deficit rates. Finally, the probability analysis of active faults is to establish the flow chart of 33 active faults in Taiwan. In the past two years, 16 active faults in central and northern Taiwan have been assessed to get the recurrence interval and the probabilities for the characteristic earthquake occurred in 30, 50 and 100 years.

  3. Low Angle Normal Fault System Controls the Structure Evolution of Baiyun Deepwater Basin and Its Lithosphere Thinning, Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Ren, J.; Yang, L.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the transition area from ~30 km to weakly thinned continental crust (<12 km) in Baiyun deepwater basin, Northern South China Sea leads to two questions: What controls extreme crustal thinning and what is the nature of Baiyun basin. The 3D seismic data newly acquired show that Baiyun basin is an asymmetric half graben mainly controlled by a set of north-dipping normal faults converging in deep. By employing the principle of back-stripping, we estimate the fault dips and slip amount would be in the absence of post-rift sediments and seawater loading. Results show these Middle Eocene faults were extremely active, with a high accumulation horizontal displacement (> 10 km) and an initial very low angle (<7°), followed by a rotated into sub-horizontal. A general scenario for extension of the uppermost continental crust probably includes simultaneous operation of low angle normal fault (F1) as well as parallel arrays of step-faults (domino-faults, f2-f9). Under such a scenario, it shows no obvious extension discrepancy in Baiyun basin. Our results indicate that Baiyun sag preserves information recording the continent thinning before the seafloor spreading, and it could be an abandoned inner rifted basin.

  4. Coseismic Pit Crater, Normal Fault, and Extensional Fissure Formation in Unconsolidated Sediment and Basalt in Northern Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrill, D. A.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Smart, K. J.

    2008-12-01

    Two rifting-related seismic events in 1975 and 1978 along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near the northern coast of Iceland produced an array of surface deformation features in Holocene basalt flows and overlying unconsolidated sediments. New field mapping and aerial photograph interpretation is coupled with analysis of maps of seismic activity and level-line survey results to constrain the timing, style, and magnitude of this deformation. Fault scarps and fissures in basalts can be traced laterally down a gentle northward dip projecting into unconsolidated braided stream deposits, providing an impressive view of the deformation style in the two contrasting mechanical layers. We report on detailed field mapping of two of these laterally traceable structures conducted in the summer of 2008 and analysis of a suite of aerial photographs from 1958 to 1998. Map-scale structures in the basalts with little or no sedimentary cover include (i) fault scarps, (ii) fissures, and (iii) locally-developed gentle dip away from the related normal fault. Dilation of faults and extension fractures in the basalt has led to rock toppling and rock fall causing widening of fissures. Wedging of toppled rock blocks at the tops of fissures has locally produced keystone arches and bridges across the tops of open fissures. Different stages in the progression of fissure formation and collapse, including (i) fissure, (ii) widened fissure with cavern, (iii) localized collapse pit, and (iv) elongate collapsed fissure, can be observed over along-strike distances of 10's of meters. Where unconsolidated sand and gravel deposits >3 m thick cover the basalts (200 m to the north along strike) structural geomorphologic features are dominated by (i) grabens, (ii) pit craters, and (iii) elongate troughs. Graben-bounding normal faults cutting the sedimentary cover in many cases have displacements >1 m. Pit craters have cone to bowl shapes, commonly occur within grabens, and have depths up to 2.8 m. The mapped

  5. Geometry and faults tectonic activity of the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Evidence from magnetotelluric and electrical resistivity tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufford, Kelsey Mosley; Atekwana, Estella A.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Shemang, Elijah; Atekwana, Eliot A.; Mickus, Kevin; Moidaki, Moikwathai; Modisi, Motsoptse P.; Molwalefhe, Loago

    2012-04-01

    We used Magnetotelluric (MT) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to investigate the geometry and nature of faults activity of the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in Botswana, an incipient rift at the southern tip of the Southwestern Branch of the East African Rift System. The ORZ forms a subtle topographic depression filled with Quaternary lacustrine and fluvio-deltaic sediments and is bounded by NE-trending normal faults that are more prominent in the southeastern portion of the rift basin. An MT model from a regional (˜140 km) NW-SE trending MT transect shows that much of the rift basin is underlain by a broad asymmetrical low resistivity anomaly that slopes gently (˜1°) from NW to SE reaching a depth of ˜300 m. This anomaly suggests that faults in the southeastern part of the rift form a NW-dipping border fault zone and that the lacustrine and fluvio-deltaic sediments contain brackish to saline water filling the broad half-graben structure. Furthermore, MT and ERT models from detailed (4-13 km long) MT transects and resistivity profiles show that one border fault (Thamalakane) and two within-basin faults (Lecha and Tsau) in the southeastern part of the ORZ are characterized by a localized high conductivity anomaly while another border fault (Kunyere) lacks such an anomaly. These localized anomalies are attributed to channelized fresh surface water and saline groundwater percolating through these faults forming "fault zone conductors" and suggest actively displacing faults. The lack of a "fault zone conductor" in the Kunyere fault is interpreted as indicating diminishing displacement on this fault, and that strain was transferred to the Thamalakane fault further to the east. The fluids provide lubricant for the ORZ faults, hence preventing infrequent large magnitude earthquakes, but favoring frequent micro-seismicity.

  6. Timing of activity of two fault systems on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galluzzi, V.; Guzzetta, L.; Giacomini, L.; Ferranti, L.; Massironi, M.; Palumbo, P.

    2015-10-01

    Here we discuss about two fault systems found in the Victoria and Shakespeare quadrangles of Mercury. The two fault sets intersect each other and show probable evidence for two stages of deformation. The most prominent system is N-S oriented and encompasses several tens to hundreds of kilometers long and easily recognizable fault segments. The other system strikes NE- SW and encompasses mostly degraded and short fault segments. The structural framework of the studied area and the morphological appearance of the faults suggest that the second system is older than the first one. We intend to apply the buffered crater counting technique on both systems to make a quantitative study of their timing of activity that could confirm the already clear morphological evidence.

  7. Active faults and minor plates in NE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhurin, Andrey I.; Zelenin, Egor A.

    2014-05-01

    Stated nearly 40 yr ago the uncertainty with plate boundaries location in NE Asia (Chapman, Solomon, 1976) still remains unresolved. Based on the prepositions that a plate boundary must, first, reveal itself in linear sets of active structures, and, second, be continuous and closed, we have undertaken interpretation of medium-resolution KH-9 Hexagon satellite imageries, mostly in stereoscopic regime, for nearly the entire region of NE Asia. Main findings are as follows. There are two major active fault zones in the region north of the Bering Sea. One of them, the Khatyrka-Vyvenka zone, stretches NE to ENE skirting the Bering Sea from the Kamchatka isthmus to the Navarin Cape. Judging by the kinematics of the Olyutorsky 2006 earthquake fault, the fault zones move both right-laterally and reversely. The second active fault zone, the Lankovaya-Omolon zone, starts close to the NE margin of the Okhotsk Sea and extends NE up to nearly the margin of the Chukcha Sea. The fault zone is mostly right-lateral, with topographically expressed cumulative horizontal offsets amounting to 2.5-2.6 km. There may be a third NE-SW zone between the major two coinciding with the Penzhina Range as several active faults found in the southern termination of the Range indicate. The two active fault zones divide the NE Asia area into two large domains, which both could be parts of the Bering Sea plate internally broken and with uncertain western limit. Another variant implies the Khatyrka-Vyvenka zone as the Bering Sea plate northern limit, and the Lankovaya-Omolon zone as separating an additional minor plate from the North-American plate. The choice is actually not crucial, and more important is that both variants leave the question of where the Bering Sea plate boundary is in Alaska. The Lankovaya-Omolon zone stretches just across the proposed northern boundary of the Okhorsk Sea plate. NW of the zone, there is a prominent left-lateral Ulakhan fault, which is commonly interpreted to be a

  8. Multiple normal and reverse faulting along the Costa Rica margin - results from IODP Expedition 344 (CRISP 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Walter; Vannucchi, Paola; Yamamoto, Yuzuru; Millan, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    The primary objective of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344 offshore the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica was to sample and quantify the material entering the seismogenic zone of the Costa Rican erosive subduction margin. Fundamental to this objective is an understanding of the nature of both the subducting Cocos plate crust and of the overriding Caribbean plate. The Cocos plate is investigated trying to define its hydrologic system and thermal state. The forearc structures recorded within the sediments deposited on the forearc, instead, document periods of uplift and subsidence and provide important information about the processes of tectonic erosion. Brittle structures within the incoming plate (sites U1381, U1414) are mineralized extensional fractures and shear fractures. Shear fractures mainly show a normal component of shear. Within the sedimentary sequence both types of fractures dip subvertically and strike NNE-SSW. Deformation bands trend roughly ENE-WSW, sub-parallel to the Cocos ridge. The Cocos Ridge basalt contains mineralized veins at various orientations. A preferred orientation of strike directions was not observed. Vein mineralizations mainly consist of carbonate, quartz and pyrite. The top 150 m of the sediments in the prism-toe at about 2.5 km from the frontal thrust (Site U1412) are characterized by normal faults. These form distinct shear planes with little displacement and form conjugate sets with NW-SE and NNE-SSW trends. This reveals a subvertical orientation of the maximum principal stress, and a sub-horizontal, ENE-WSE orientation of the minimum principal stress, indicating a stress regime of normal faulting. We interpret these faults as compaction-related features. As the stratigraphic age within this interval is Pleistocene, the formation age of the normal faults is younger than Pleistocene. Deeper in the sediment sequence of the prism toe, fault zones are localized between 330 and 342 mbsf, and between 358 and 365 mbsf

  9. Spatio-temporal trends in normal-fault segmentation recorded by low-temperature thermochronology: Livingstone fault scarp, Malawi Rift, East African Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, Estelle; Kirstein, Linda A.; Stuart, Finlay M.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-12-01

    The evolution of through-going normal-fault arrays from initial nucleation to growth and subsequent interaction and mechanical linkage is well documented in many extensional provinces. Over time, these processes lead to predictable spatial and temporal variations in the amount and rate of displacement accumulated along strike of individual fault segments, which should be manifested in the patterns of footwall exhumation. Here, we investigate the along-strike and vertical distribution of low-temperature apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) cooling ages along the bounding fault system, the Livingstone fault, of the Karonga Basin of the northern Malawi Rift. The fault evolution and linkage from rift initiation to the present day has been previously constrained through investigations of the hanging wall basin fill. The new cooling ages from the footwall of the Livingstone fault can be related to the adjacent depocentre evolution and across a relay zone between two palaeo-fault segments. Our data are complimented by published apatite fission-track (AFT) data and reveal significant variation in rock cooling history along-strike: the centre of the footwall yields younger cooling ages than the former tips of earlier fault segments that are now linked. This suggests that low-temperature thermochronology can detect fault interactions along strike. That these former segment boundaries are preserved within exhumed footwall rocks is a function of the relatively recent linkage of the system. Our study highlights that changes in AHe (and potentially AFT) ages associated with the along-strike displacement profile can occur over relatively short horizontal distances (of a few kilometres). This is fundamentally important in the assessment of the vertical cooling history of footwalls in extensional systems: temporal differences in the rate of tectonically driven exhumation at a given location along fault strike may be of greater importance in controlling changes in rates of vertical exhumation

  10. Active Crustal Faults in the Forearc Region, Guerrero Sector of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Ramírez-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    This work explores the characteristics and the seismogenic potential of crustal faults on the overriding plate in an area of high seismic hazard associated with the occurrence of subduction earthquakes and shallow earthquakes of the overriding plate. We present the results of geomorphic, structural, and fault kinematic analyses conducted on the convergent margin between the Cocos plate and the forearc region of the overriding North American plate, within the Guerrero sector of the Mexican subduction zone. We aim to determine the active tectonic processes in the forearc region of the subduction zone, using the river network pattern, topography, and structural data. We suggest that in the studied forearc region, both strike-slip and normal crustal faults sub-parallel to the subduction zone show evidence of activity. The left-lateral offsets of the main stream courses of the largest river basins, GPS measurements, and obliquity of plate convergence along the Cocos subduction zone in the Guerrero sector suggest the activity of sub-latitudinal left-lateral strike-slip faults. Notably, the regional left-lateral strike-slip fault that offsets the Papagayo River near the town of La Venta named "La Venta Fault" shows evidence of recent activity, corroborated also by GPS measurements (4-5 mm/year of sinistral motion). Assuming that during a probable earthquake the whole mapped length of this fault would rupture, it would produce an event of maximum moment magnitude Mw = 7.7. Even though only a few focal mechanism solutions indicate a stress regime relevant for reactivation of these strike-slip structures, we hypothesize that these faults are active and suggest two probable explanations: (1) these faults are characterized by long recurrence period, i.e., beyond the instrumental record, or (2) they experience slow slip events and/or associated fault creep. The analysis of focal mechanism solutions of small magnitude earthquakes in the upper plate, for the period between 1995

  11. Tsunamigenic potential of Mediterranean fault systems and active subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, Patrizio; Babeyko, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Since the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean Tsunami Warning System (NEAMTWS) is under development by the European scientific community, it becomes necessary to define guidelines for the characterization of the numerous parameters must be taken into account in a fair assessment of the risk. Definition of possible tectonic sources and evaluation of their potential is one of the principal issues. In this study we systematically evaluate tsunamigenic potential of up-to-now known real fault systems and active subduction interfaces in the NEAMTWS region. The task is accomplished by means of numerical modeling of tsunami generation and propagation. We have simulated all possible uniform-slip ruptures populating fault and subduction interfaces with magnitudes ranging from 6.5 up to expected Mmax. A total of 15810 individual ruptures were processed. For each rupture, a tsunami propagation scenario was computed in linear shallow-water approximation on 1-arc minute bathymetric grid (Gebco_08) implying normal reflection boundary conditions. Maximum wave heights at coastal positions (totally - 23236 points of interest) were recorded for four hours of simulation and then classified according to currently adopted warning level thresholds. The resulting dataset allowed us to classify the sources in terms of their tsunamigenic potential as well as to estimate their minimum tsunamigenic magnitude. Our analysis shows that almost every source in the Mediterranean Sea is capable to produce local tsunami at the advisory level (i.e., wave height > 20 cm) starting from magnitude values of Mw=6.6. In respect to the watch level (wave height > 50 cm), the picture is less homogeneous: crustal sources in south-west Mediterranean as well as East-Hellenic arc need larger magnitudes (around Mw=7.0) to trigger watch levels even at the nearby coasts. In the context of the regional warning (i.e., source-to-coast distance > 100 km) faults also behave more heterogeneously in respect to the minimum

  12. Vertical deformation associated with normal fault systems evolved over coseismic, postseismic, and multiseismic periods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, George A.; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical deformation of extensional provinces varies significantly and in seemingly contradictory ways. Sparse but robust geodetic, seismic, and geologic observations in the Basin and Range province of the western United States indicate that immediately after an earthquake, vertical change primarily occurs as subsidence of the normal fault hanging wall. A few decades later, a ±100 km wide zone is symmetrically uplifted. The preserved topography of long-term rifting shows bent and tilted footwall flanks rising high above deep basins. We develop finite element models subjected to extensional and gravitational forces to study time-varying deformation associated with normal faulting. We replicate observations with a model that has a weak upper mantle overlain by a stronger lower crust and a breakable elastic upper crust. A 60° dipping normal fault cuts through the upper crust and extends through the lower crust to simulate an underlying shear zone. Stretching the model under gravity demonstrates that asymmetric slip via collapse of the hanging wall is a natural consequence of coseismic deformation. Focused flow in the upper mantle imposed by deformation of the lower crust localizes uplift under the footwall; the breakable upper crust is a necessary model feature to replicate footwall bending over the observed width ( < 10 km), which is predicted to take place within 1-2 decades after each large earthquake. Thus the best-preserved topographic signature of rifting is expected to occur early in the postseismic period. The relatively stronger lower crust in our models is necessary to replicate broader postseismic uplift that is observed geodetically in subsequent decades.

  13. Is the central Piedmont suture a low-angle normal fault

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, A.J. )

    1991-11-01

    In the crystalline southern Appalachians, the Carolina arc terrane is in fault contact with the Piedmont terrace along a seismically reflective surface dipping toward the hinterland and called the central Piedmont suture. The central Piedmont suture may be interpreted as a thrust, but existing data also support a Silurian-Devonian, normal-slip origin: (1) There are lower grade rocks in the hanging wall than in the footwall. (2) A normal-fault solution allows simultaneous metamorphism of the Piedmont terrane and Carolina terrane, prior to their juxtaposition along the central Piedmont suture. (3) Mineral ages in the Piedmont terrane are older in the west than in the east, consistent with an eastward-progressive unroofing. (4) Along the western edge of the Carolina terrane, a linear belt of Devonian subalkalic to alkalic granitoids and gabbro-norites with low initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios may represent mantle-derived magmas along the axis of rifting that are contemporary with major crustal extension. The westernmost Piedmont terrane includes the Chauga belt. The Chauga belt comprises metavolcanic and metaplutonic units similar in rock type and age to those of the western Carolina terrane. Chauga belt rocks are interpreted to be the westernmost exposures of the Carolina terrane, translated west on the lower plate by extension. The Piedmont and Carolina terranes may thus compose a single lithotectonic element. The Piedmont terrane would represent the basement on which the arc was constructed; the terrane was uplifted during extension along a major low-angle normal fault, recognized today as the central Piedmont suture.

  14. Vertical deformation associated with normal fault systems evolved over coseismic, postseismic, and multiseismic periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, George A.; Parsons, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Vertical deformation of extensional provinces varies significantly and in seemingly contradictory ways. Sparse but robust geodetic, seismic, and geologic observations in the Basin and Range province of the western United States indicate that immediately after an earthquake, vertical change primarily occurs as subsidence of the normal fault hanging wall. A few decades later, a ±100 km wide zone is symmetrically uplifted. The preserved topography of long-term rifting shows bent and tilted footwall flanks rising high above deep basins. We develop finite element models subjected to extensional and gravitational forces to study time-varying deformation associated with normal faulting. We replicate observations with a model that has a weak upper mantle overlain by a stronger lower crust and a breakable elastic upper crust. A 60° dipping normal fault cuts through the upper crust and extends through the lower crust to simulate an underlying shear zone. Stretching the model under gravity demonstrates that asymmetric slip via collapse of the hanging wall is a natural consequence of coseismic deformation. Focused flow in the upper mantle imposed by deformation of the lower crust localizes uplift under the footwall; the breakable upper crust is a necessary model feature to replicate footwall bending over the observed width (<10 km), which is predicted to take place within 1-2 decades after each large earthquake. Thus the best-preserved topographic signature of rifting is expected to occur early in the postseismic period. The relatively stronger lower crust in our models is necessary to replicate broader postseismic uplift that is observed geodetically in subsequent decades.

  15. Ductile deformation, boudinage and low angle normal faults. An overview of the structural variability at present-day rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, Camille; Jolivet, Laurent; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Ballard, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    High quality industrial seismic profiles acquired along most of the world's passive margins present stunningly increased resolution that leads to unravel an unexpected variety of structures. An important benefit of the increased resolution of recent seismic profiles is that they provide an unprecedented access to the processes occurring in the middle and lower continental crust. We present a series of so far unreleased profiles that allow the identification of various rift-related geological processes such as crustal boudinage, ductile shear and low angle detachment faulting. The lower crust in passive margins appears much more intensely deformed than usually represented. At the foot of both magma-rich and magma-poor margins, we observe clear indications of ductile deformation of the deep continental crust along large-scale shallow dipping shear zones. These shear zones generally show a top-to-the-continent sense of shear consistent with the activity of overlying continentward dipping normal faults observed in the upper crust. This pattern is responsible for a migration of the deformation and associated sedimentation and/or volcanic activity toward the ocean. In some cases, low angle shear zones define an anastomosed pattern that delineates boudin-like structures. The interboudins areas seem to localize the maximum of deformation. The lower crust is intensely boudinaged and the geometry of those boudins seems to control the position and dip of upper crustal normal faults. We present some of the most striking examples (Uruguay, West Africa, Barents sea…) and discuss their implications for the time-temperature-subsidence history of the margins.

  16. Seismic swarms and diffuse fracturing within Triassic evaporites fed by deep degassing along the low-angle Alto Tiberina normal fault (central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piana Agostinetti, Nicola; Giacomuzzi, Genny; Chiarabba, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    We present high-resolution elastic models and relocated seismicity of a very active segment of the Apennines normal faulting system, computed via transdimensional local earthquake tomography (trans-D LET). Trans-D LET, a fully nonlinear approach to seismic tomography, robustly constrains high-velocity anomalies and inversions of P wave velocity, i.e., decreases of VP with depth, without introducing bias due to, e.g., a starting model, and giving the possibility to investigate the relation between fault structure, seismicity, and fluids. Changes in seismicity rate and recurring seismic swarms are frequent in the Apennines extensional belt. Deep fluids, upwelling from the delaminating continental lithosphere, are thought to be responsible for seismicity clustering in the upper crust and lubrication of normal faults during swarms and large earthquakes. We focus on the tectonic role played by the Alto Tiberina low-angle normal fault (ATF), finding displacements across the fault consistent with long-term accommodation of deformation. Our results show that recent seismic swarms affecting the area occur within a 3 km thick, high VP/VS, densely cracked, and overpressurized evaporitic layer, composed of dolostones and anhydrites. A persistent low VP, low VP/VS volume, present on top of and along the ATF low-angle detachment, traces the location of mantle-derived CO2, the upward flux of which contributes to cracking within the evaporitic layer.

  17. Eocene activity on the Western Sierra Fault System and its role incising Kings Canyon, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Francis J.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Saleeby, Jason; Clark, Marin

    2016-04-01

    Combining new and published apatite (U-Th)/He and apatite 4He/3He data from along the Kings River canyon, California we rediscover a west-down normal fault on the western slope of the southern Sierra Nevada, one of a series of scarps initially described by Hake (1928) which we call the Western Sierra Fault System. Integrating field observations with apatite (U-Th)/He data, we infer a single fault trace 30 km long, and constrain the vertical offset across this fault to be roughly a kilometer. Thermal modeling of apatite 4He/3He data documents a pulse of footwall cooling near the fault and upstream in the footwall at circa 45-40 Ma, which we infer to be the timing of a kilometer-scale incision pulse resulting from the fault activity. In the context of published data from the subsurface of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys, our data from the Western Sierra Fault System suggests an Eocene tectonic regime dominated by low-to-moderate magnitude extension, surface uplift, and internal structural deformation of the southern Sierra Nevada and proximal Great Valley forearc.

  18. Active faulting in the Southwestern Venezuelan Andes and Colombia borderland

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, A.; Beltran, C.; Lugo, M. , Caracas )

    1993-02-01

    In the southern Andes, the Bocono fault shows a progressive disactivation of its right lateral movement, resulting from its attenuation against the transversal system of Bramon and its kinematic connection to the [open quotes]Pamplona indenter,[close quotes] considered as a part of the plate boundary between the Caribbean and South America. Near the Colombian frontier, the velocity of Bocono fault is probably less than 1 mm/yr. Such a decrease is explained because an increasing amount of the 1 cm/yr slip movement of the northern part of the fault is absorbed through a complex branching of the active trace, southwest Merida. Another significative amount of the rate movement of Bocono fault, considered as plate boundary, results absorbed by subparallel active faulting systems located to the east (Uribante and Caparo Systems) and to the west sides (San Simon-Seboruco, and San Pedro-Aguas Calientes-La Don Juana systems). The last system, extending beyond the frontier, shows a particular seimotectonic importance, as a probable source of the 1875 Cucata earthquake. In this way, the weight of the southwestern end of Bocono fault as a seismic source loses importance respect to the northern segment located between la Grita and Merida where the 1610 and 1894 earthquakes occurred, and also as compared to the faults that define the [open quotes]Pamplona indenter[close quotes] like probable source for several other destructive earthquakes.

  19. Spatial radon anomalies on active faults in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.; King, B.-S.; Evans, William C.; Zhang, W.

    1996-01-01

    Radon emanation has been observed to be anomalously high along active faults in many parts of the world. We tested this relationship by conducting and repeating soil air radon surveys with a portable radon meter across several faults in California. The results confirm the existence of fault-associated radon anomalies, which show characteristic features that may be related to fault structures but vary in time due to other environmental changes, such as rainfall. Across two creeping faults in San Juan Bautista and Hollister, the radon anomalies showed prominent double peaks straddling the fault gouge zone during dry summers, but the peak-to-background ratios diminished after significant rain fall during winter. Across a locked segment of the San Andreas fault near Olema, the anomaly has a single peak located several meters southwest of the slip zone associated with the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Across two fault segments that ruptured during the magnitude 7.5 Landers earthquake in 1992, anomalously high radon concentration was found in the fractures three weeks after the earthquake. We attribute the fault-related anomalies to a slow vertical gas flow in or near the fault zones. Radon generated locally in subsurface soil has a concentration profile that increases three orders of magnitude from the surface to a depth or several meters; thus an upward flow that brings up deeper and radon-richer soil air to the detection level can cause a significantly higher concentration reading. This explanation is consistent with concentrations of carbon dioxide and oxygen, measured in soil-air samples collected during one of the surveys.

  20. The Meers Fault: Tectonic activity in southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelli, A.R.; Slemmons, D.B.; Brocoum, S.J.

    1987-03-01

    The Meers Fault in Southwestern Oklahoma is capable of producing large, damaging earthquakes. By comparison to historical events, a minimum of M = 6-3/4 to 7-1/4 could be expected. The most recent surface rupturing event occurred in the late Holocene, and it appears that one or more pre-Holocene events preceded it. Surface rupture length is at least 37 km. Displacements comprising the present-day scarp have left-lateral and high-angle reverse components. Vertical separation of the ground surface reaches 5 m, while lateral separation exceeds the vertical by a ratio of about 3:1 to 5:1, reaching about 20 m. Individual events apparently had maximum displacements of several meters. The Meers Fault may be part of a larger active zone. Based on surface expressions, the Washita Valley, Oklahoma and Potter County, Texas Faults may also have ruptures during the late Quaternary, although not as recently as the Meers Fault. Low sun angle photography in Southwestern Oklahoma revealed no evidence of fault activity, other than that of the Meers Fault, although activity may be concealed by poor preservation or ductile surface deformation. This suggests that additional areas of activity may be sparse and rupture infrequently.

  1. Implementing a Finite-State Off-Normal and Fault Response System for Robust Tokamak Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Sammuli, B.; Walker, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    The initial implementation and testing of a finite state off-normal & fault response (ONFR) system on the DIII-D and KSTAR tokamaks is presented. Robust ONFR will be critical to the operation of ITER as the physical consequences of unexpected events will be far more extreme than in present devices. ``Off-normal'' refers to unexpected plasma events (e.g. disruptions) and plasma events that are expected but still require asynchronous response (e.g. neoclassical tearing modes). ``Fault'' refers to hardware failure. ONFR priorities are to (1) protect the device from damage, (2) minimize recovery time between shots by avoiding unnecessary initiation of mitigation procedures, and (3) maximize the useful pulse length of a given shot by providing for discharge recovery after deleterious events. The detailed implementation of finite-state ONFR using Matlab/Simulink and Stateflow exported to the DIII-D and KSTAR plasma control systems is described, as are initial tests of multi-stage locked mode handling on both devices. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  2. Characteristic fault zone architectures as result of different failure modes: first results from scale models of normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Urai, Janos L.

    2014-05-01

    It is known that fault zone architecture and structural style vary distinctly between tensile and shear failure modes, with strong effects on the associated fluid flow properties. A systematically comparative study in 3D has not been done so far, though. Inferring transport properties in sub-seismic scale from fault network geometries would have important applications in brittle lithologies such as carbonates or basalts. We present a method to investigate the structural properties of fault networks in 3D using cohesive hemihydrate powder (CaSO4 * 1/2H2O) embedded in two layers of dry fine grained sand. The material properties of the sand and powder are well known from previous studies. By increasing the overburden stress the failure mode of the powder can be changed from tensile to shear failure. Using hemihydrate powder allows us to harden and excavate the layer after the deformation by wetting the model slowly and brushing off the overburden sand. Visual investigation of the 3D structures is then possible in very high resolution. Analyses using photographs and 3D models from photogrammetry include qualitative observations as well as measurements of e.g. strike of fault segments, fault dip or graben width. We show a total of eight experiments that produce graben faults at four different overburden stresses (0, 1.5, 3, 6 cm overburden thickness) and at two increasing stages of strain (3 and 5 mm). In this set of models we describe two structural domains that show characteristic differences in their defining attributes. The tensile domain at small overburden stress (0 and 1.5 cm overburden) shows strongly dilatant faults with open fissures, vertical faults and large changes in strike at segment boundaries. The shear domain, formed by larger overburden stress (6 cm overburden), shows shallower fault dips around 65° with striations, numerous undulating fault branches and splays with low-angle fault intersections. Models with 3 cm overburden show a hybrid failure type

  3. Initiation and development of normal faults within the German alpine foreland basin: The inconspicuous role of basement structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Hartwig; Tanner, David C.; Schumacher, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    In a large seismic cube within the German Alpine Molasse Basin, we recognize large normal faults with lateral alternating dips that displace the Molasse sediments. They are disconnected but strike parallel to fault lineaments of the underlying carbonate platform. This raises the question how such faults could independently develop. Structural analysis suggests that the faults grew both upward and downward from the middle of the Molasse package, i.e., they newly initiated within the Molasse sediments and were not caused by reactivation of the faults in the carbonate platform and/or crystalline basement. Numerical modeling of the basin proves that temporarily and spatially confined extensional stresses existed within the Molasse sediments but not in the carbonate platform and basement during lithospheric bending. The workflow shown here gives a new and as yet undocumented insight in the tectonic and structural processes within a foreland basin that was affected by buckling and bending in front of the orogen.

  4. Fault mirrors of seismically active faults: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, L.; Song, S.; Suppe, J.

    2013-12-01

    Many faults are decorated with naturally polished and glossy surfaces named fault mirrors (FMs) formed during slips. The characterization of FMs is of paramount importance to investigate physico-chemical processes controlling dynamic fault mechanics during earthquakes. Here we present detailed microstructural and mineralogical observations of the FMs from borehole cores of seismically active faults. The borehole cores were recovered from 600 to 800 m depth located in the hanging wall of the Hsiaotungshi fault in Taiwan which ruptured during 1935 Mw7.1 Hsinchu-Taichung earthquake. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of FMs show that two distinct textural domains, fault gouge and coated materials (nanograins, melt patchs, and graphite), were cut by a well-defined boundary. Melt patches and graphite, determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscope (TEM), and SEM-EDS analysis, were found to be distributed heterogeneously on the slip surfaces. On the basis of the current kinematic cross section of the Hsiaotungshi fault, all the FMs were exhumed less than 5 km, where ambient temperatures are less than 150°C. It seems that the amorphous materials on the FMs were generated by seismic slips. The sintering nanograins coating the slip surfaces was also suggested to be produced at high slip rates from both natural observation and recent rock deformation experiments. In addition, graphite could be produced by seismic slips and lubricate the fault based on the rock deformation experiments. Our observation suggests that the FMs were composed of several indicators of coseismic events (melt patches, sintering nanograins, and graphite) corresponding to small thermal perturbation generated by seismic slips. Although the contribution of these coseismic indicators on frictional behavior remains largely unknown, it suggests that multiple dynamic weakening mechanisms such as flash heating, powder lubrication and graphitization may be involved during

  5. Influence of low-angle normal faulting on radial fracture pattern associated to pluton emplacement in Tuscany, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, F.; Rossetti, F.; Salvini, F.

    2003-04-01

    Fault-related fracture distribution significantly influences fluid flow in the sub-surface. Fault zone can act either as barriers or conduits to fluid migration, or as mixed conduit/barrier systems, depending on several factors that include the enviromental condition of deformation (pore fluid pressure, regional stress fields, overburden etc.), the kinematics of the fault and its geometry, and the rock type. The aim of this study is to estimate the boundary conditions of deformation along the Boccheggiano Fault, in the central Appennines. Seismic and deep well data are avaible for the Boccheggiano area, where a fossil geothermal system is exposed. The dominant structural feature of the studied area is a NW-SE trending low-angle detachment fault (Boccheggiano fault, active since the upper Miocene times), separating non-metamorphic sedimentary sequences of the Tuscan meso-cenozoic pelagiac succession and oceanic-derived Ligurids in the hangingwall, from green-schists facies metamorphic rocks of Paleozoic age in the footwall. Gouge-bearing mineralized damage zone (about 100 m thick) is present along the fault. The deep geometry of the Boccheggiano Fault is well imaged in the seismic profiles. The fault is shallow-dipping toward NE and flattens at the top of a magmatic intrusion, which lies at about 1000 m below the ground-level. Geometrical relationships indicate syn-tectonic pluton emplacement at the footwall of the Boccheggiano fault. Statistical analysis of fracture distribution pointed out a strong control of both azimuth and frequency by their position with respect to the Boccheggiano Fault: (i) a NW-SE trending fracture set within the fault zone, (ii) a radial pattern associated away from fault zone. Interpretation of structural and seismic data suggest an interplay between the near-field deformation associated with the rising intrusion during its emplacement (radial fracturing) and the NE-SW far-field extensional tectonic regime (NW-SE fractures) recognized in

  6. Changes in structural style of normal faults due to failure mode transition: First results from excavated scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Urai, Janos L.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of failure mode transition from tensile to shear on structural style and fault zone architecture have long been recognized but are not well studied in 3D, although the two modes are both common in the upper crust of Earth and terrestrial planets, and are associated with large differences in transport properties. We present a simple method to study this in physical scale models of normal faults, using a cohesive powder embedded in cohesionless sand. By varying the overburden thickness, the failure mode changes from tensile to hybrid and finally to shear. Hardening and excavating the cohesive layer allows post mortem investigation of 3D structures at high resolution. We recognize two end member structural domains that differ strongly in their attributes. In the tensile domain faults are strongly dilatant with steep open fissures and sharp changes in strike at segment boundaries and branch points. In the shear domain fault dips are shallower and fault planes develop striations; map-view fault traces undulate with smaller changes in strike at branches. These attributes may be recognized in subsurface fault maps and could provide a way to better predict fault zone structure in the subsurface.

  7. Discrete element modeling of Martian pit crater formation in response to extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Kevin J.; Wyrick, Danielle Y.; Ferrill, David A.

    2011-04-01

    Pit craters, circular to elliptical depressions that lack a raised rim or ejecta deposits, are common on the surface of Mars. Similar structures are also found on Earth, Venus, the Moon, and smaller planetary bodies, including some asteroids. While it is generally accepted that these pits form in response to material drainage into a subsurface void space, the primary mechanism(s) responsible for creating the void is a subject of debate. Previously proposed mechanisms include collapse into lave tubes, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. In this study, we employ two-dimensional discrete element models to assess both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting as mechanisms for forming pit craters. We also examine the effect of mechanical stratigraphy (alternating strong and weak layers) and variation in regolith thickness on pit morphology. Our simulations indicate that both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting are viable mechanisms. Both mechanisms lead to generally convex (steepening downward) slope profiles; extensional fracturing results in generally symmetric pits, whereas dilational normal faulting produces strongly asymmetric geometries. Pit width is established early, whereas pit depth increases later in the deformation history. Inclusion of mechanical stratigraphy results in wider and deeper pits, particularly for the dilational normal faulting, and the presence of strong near-surface layers leads to pits with distinct edges as observed on Mars. The modeling results suggest that a thicker regolith leads to wider but shallower pits that are less distinct and may be more difficult to detect in areas of thick regolith.

  8. Intersection patterns of normal faults in the Lufeng Sag of Pearl River Mouth Basin, China: Insights from 4D physical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fusheng; Koyi, Hemin; Zhang, Xiangtao

    2016-12-01

    Interpretation of seismic data from the Lufeng Sag of the Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB) in the northern part of South China Sea shows that different intersection patterns developed in the cover units above basement normal faults. A series of analogue models are used to investigate the intersection patterns and deformation in the sedimentary cover sequences above a basement horst bounded by two non-parallel faults. Modelling results show that during their upward propagation, the basement faults may intersect within the cover sequences and form a graben above the basement horst. Length and width of the graben increase with cover thickness. The strike and dip intersection points are controlled directly by the thickness of the cover sequences, dip and strike of the basement faults, and width of the basement horst. The intersection point migrates along the axis of the graben toward the wide end of the basement horst, when the cover sequence thickens. In contrast, it migrates toward the narrow end of the basement horst, where both fault dip and angle of strike difference increase. The intersection point moves upward with increasing width of the basement horst crest. Model profiles also indicate that in the presence of a ductile layer between the cover and basement such intersection patterns do not form. Interpretation of seismic data and model results show that the intersection pattern developed in the Lufeng Sag is a result of propagation of basement faults into cover units during different extension stages of the basin. Results of this study can be applied to many other sedimentary basins where such fault intersection patterns are likely to form when non-parallel conjugate basement faults are active during sedimentation.

  9. Active faults and induced seismicity in the Val d'Agri area (Southern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valoroso, L.; Improta, L.; Chiaraluce, L.; Di Stefano, R.; Ferranti, L.; Govoni, A.; Chiarabba, C.

    2009-07-01

    The NW-SE trending Val d'Agri extensional basin is one of the regions in Italy with the highest seismogenic potential. Field data do not univocally define which of the fault systems bordering the basin on the two opposite sides is accommodating the active deformation. In this study, we detect and locate, by using an automatic picking procedure, almost 2000 low-magnitude earthquakes (-0.2 < ML < 2.7) recorded by a dense network during a 13-months-long seismic experiment. Events are mostly located along the southwestern flank of the basin. To the south, intense swarm-type microseismicity defines a major cluster ~5km wide from 1 to 5km depth. To the west, a clear alignment of events, characterized by normal faulting kinematics, defines a NE-dipping normal fault between 1 and 6km depth. The upward continuation of this structure, ~5km long, matches a mapped active normal fault recognized by field and palaeoseismological surveys. A temporal correlation found between the intense swarm-type microseismicity and the water level changes in the nearby artificial Pertusillo lake suggests that this seismicity is reservoir-induced.

  10. Faults paragenesis and paleostress state in the zone of actively propagating continental strike-slip on the example of North Khangai fault (Northern Mongolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankov, Vladimir; Parfeevets, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Sublatitudinal North Khangai fault extends from Ubsunuur basin to the eastern part of the Selenga corridor trough 800 km. It is the northern boundary of the massive Mongolian block and limits of the Baikal rift system structures propagation in the south (Logatchev, 2003). Late Cenozoic and present-day fault activity are expressed in the left-lateral displacements of a different order of river valleys and high seismicity. We have carried out studies of the kinematics of active faults and palaeostresses reconstruction in the zone of the dynamic influence of North Khangai fault, the width of which varies along the strike and can exceeds 100 km. The result shows that the fault zone has a longitudinal and a transverse zoning. Longitudinal zonation presented gradual change from west to east regions of compression and transpression regimes (Khan-Khukhey ridge) to strike-slip regime (Bolnay ridge) and strike-slip and transtensive regimes (west of Selenga corridor). Strike-slip zones are represented by linearly concentrated rupture deformations. In contrast, near the termination of the fault the cluster fault deformation formed. Here, from north to south, there are radical changes in the palaeostress state. In the north-western sector (east of Selenga corridor) strike-slip faults, strike-slip faults with normal components and normal faults are dominated. For this sector the stress tensors of extensive, transtension and strike-slip regimes are typical. South-western sector is separated from the north-eastern one by massive Buren Nuruu ridge within which the active faults are not identified. In the south-western sector between the Orkhon and Tola rivers the cluster of NW thrusts and N-S strike-slip faults with reverse component are discovered. The faults are perfectly expressed by NW and N-S scarps in the relief. The most structures dip to the east and north-east. Holocene fault activity is demonstrated by the hanging river valleys and horizontal displacements with amplitudes

  11. Active faulting on the Wallula fault within the Olympic-Wallowa Lineament (OWL), eastern Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, B. L.; Lasher, J. P.; Barnett, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Several studies over the last 40 years focused on a segment of the Wallula fault exposed in a quarry at Finley, Washington. The Wallula fault is important because it is part of the Olympic-Wallowa lineament (OWL), a ~500-km-long topographic and structural lineament extending from Vancouver Island, British Columbia to Walla Walla, Washington that accommodates Basin and Range extension. The origin and nature of the OWL is of interest because it contains potentially active faults that are within 50 km of high-level nuclear waste facilities at the Hanford Site. Mapping in the 1970's and 1980's suggested the Wallula fault did not offset Holocene and late Pleistocene deposits and is therefore inactive. New exposures of the Finley quarry wall studied here suggest otherwise. We map three main packages of rocks and sediments in a ~10 m high quarry exposure. The oldest rocks are very fine grained basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (~13.5 Ma). The next youngest deposits include a thin layer of vesicular basalt, white volcaniclastic deposits, colluvium containing clasts of vesicular basalt, and indurated paleosols. A distinct angular unconformity separates these vesicular basalt-bearing units from overlying late Pleistocene flood deposits, two colluvium layers containing angular clasts of basalt, and Holocene tephra-bearing loess. A tephra within the loess likely correlates to nearby outcrops of Mazama ash. We recognize three styles of faults: 1) a near vertical master reverse or oblique fault juxtaposing very fine grained basalt against late Tertiary-Holocene deposits, and marked by a thick (~40 cm) vertical seam of carbonate cemented breccia; 2) subvertical faults that flatten upwards and displace late Tertiary(?) to Quaternary(?) soils, colluvium, and volcaniclastic deposits; and 3) flexural slip faults along bedding planes in folded deposits in the footwall. We infer at least two Holocene earthquakes from the quarry exposure. The first Holocene earthquake deformed

  12. Extensional deformation structures within a convergent orogen: The Val di Lima low-angle normal fault system (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemenzi, Luca; Molli, Giancarlo; Storti, Fabrizio; Muchez, Philippe; Swennen, Rudy; Torelli, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    A low-angle extensional fault system affecting the non metamorphic rocks of the carbonate dominated Tuscan succession is exposed in the Lima valley (Northern Apennines, Italy). This fault system affects the right-side-up limb of a kilometric-scale recumbent isoclinal anticline and is, in turn, affected by superimposed folding and late-tectonic high-angle extensional faulting. The architecture of the low-angle fault system has been investigated through detailed structural mapping and damage zone characterization. Pressure-depth conditions and paleofluid evolution of the fault system have been studied through microstructural, mineralogical, petrographic, fluid inclusion and stable isotope analyses. Our results show that the low-angle fault system was active during exhumation of the Tuscan succession at about 180°C and 5 km depth, with the involvement of low-salinity fluids. Within this temperature - depth framework, the fault zone architecture shows important differences related to the different lithologies involved in the fault system and to the role played by the fluids during deformation. In places, footwall overpressuring influenced active deformation mechanisms and favored shear strain localization. Our observations indicate that extensional structures affected the central sector of the Northern Apennines thrust wedge during the orogenic contractional history, modifying the fluid circulation through the upper crust and influencing its mechanical behavior.

  13. Evaluating knickpoint recession along an active fault for paleoseismological analysis: The Huoshan Piedmont, Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhanyu; Bi, Lisi; Xu, Yueren; He, Honglin

    2015-04-01

    Ground-rupturing earthquakes can generate tectonic knickpoints within upstream reaches of streams across active fault zones. These knickpoints are characteristic of upstream propagation of time-related process once generated by an earthquake, so analysis of knickpoint series in streams which cross fault zones can be used to infer paleoearthquake events. We studied the knickpoints along the Huoshan Piedmont Fault (HPF), which is an active normal fault in the Shanxi Faulted Basin zone, China, and demonstrate that analysis of knickpoints shows evidence for two paleoearthquakes in the HPF. First, we identified knickpoints in bedrock reaches upstream of the HPF using high-resolution DEMs derived from IRS-P5 stereo images and the stream-gradient method. After excluding non-faulting knickpoints, 47 knickpoints were identified in 23 bedrock reaches upstream from the HPF. Analysis of the most recent knickpoints caused by the 1303 CE Hongdong Earthquake allowed for local calibration of the retreat rates. Applying these retreat rates across the study area allows for the estimation of the age of other knickpoints, and constrains the age ranges of two knickpoint groups to be 2269-3336 a BP and 4504-5618 a BP. These ages constrain the ages of two paleoearthquake events at 2710 ± 102 and 4980 ± 646 a BP. The knickpoints along the HPF obey the parallel retreating model in which knickpoint morphology was roughly maintained during retreat, so the heights of knickpoints represent the coseismic vertical displacements generated by the earthquakes along the HPF. The vertical offsets for these three earthquake events are similar and are approximately 4 m, which indicates that the ruptures on the HPF obey a characteristic slip model with a similar slip distribution for several successive earthquakes. These results provide additional evidence of paleoearthquakes on the HPF and show that analysis of knickpoint recession along an active fault is a valuable tool for paleoseismology.

  14. Fault activation by hydraulic fracturing in western Canada.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xuewei; Eaton, David W

    2016-12-16

    Hydraulic fracturing has been inferred to trigger the majority of injection-induced earthquakes in western Canada, in contrast to the Midwestern United States, where massive saltwater disposal is the dominant triggering mechanism. A template-based earthquake catalog from a seismically active Canadian shale play, combined with comprehensive injection data during a 4-month interval, shows that earthquakes are tightly clustered in space and time near hydraulic fracturing sites. The largest event [moment magnitude (MW) 3.9] occurred several weeks after injection along a fault that appears to extend from the injection zone into crystalline basement. Patterns of seismicity indicate that stress changes during operations can activate fault slip to an offset distance of >1 km, whereas pressurization by hydraulic fracturing into a fault yields episodic seismicity that can persist for months.

  15. Fault activation by hydraulic fracturing in western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xuewei; Eaton, David W.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has been inferred to trigger the majority of injection-induced earthquakes in western Canada, in contrast to the Midwestern United States, where massive saltwater disposal is the dominant triggering mechanism. A template-based earthquake catalog from a seismically active Canadian shale play, combined with comprehensive injection data during a 4-month interval, shows that earthquakes are tightly clustered in space and time near hydraulic fracturing sites. The largest event [moment magnitude (MW) 3.9] occurred several weeks after injection along a fault that appears to extend from the injection zone into crystalline basement. Patterns of seismicity indicate that stress changes during operations can activate fault slip to an offset distance of >1 km, whereas pressurization by hydraulic fracturing into a fault yields episodic seismicity that can persist for months.

  16. Sliding mode fault detection and fault-tolerant control of smart dampers in semi-active control of building structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeganeh Fallah, Arash; Taghikhany, Touraj

    2015-12-01

    Recent decades have witnessed much interest in the application of active and semi-active control strategies for seismic protection of civil infrastructures. However, the reliability of these systems is still in doubt as there remains the possibility of malfunctioning of their critical components (i.e. actuators and sensors) during an earthquake. This paper focuses on the application of the sliding mode method due to the inherent robustness of its fault detection observer and fault-tolerant control. The robust sliding mode observer estimates the state of the system and reconstructs the actuators’ faults which are used for calculating a fault distribution matrix. Then the fault-tolerant sliding mode controller reconfigures itself by the fault distribution matrix and accommodates the fault effect on the system. Numerical simulation of a three-story structure with magneto-rheological dampers demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control system. It was shown that the fault-tolerant control system maintains the performance of the structure at an acceptable level in the post-fault case.

  17. Brittle extension of the continental crust along a rooted system of low-angle normal faults: Colorado River extensional corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, B. E.; Howard, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    A transect across the 100 km wide Colorado River extensional corridor of mid-Tertiary age shows that the upper 10 to 15 km of crystalline crust extended along an imbricate system of brittle low-angle normal faults. The faults cut gently down a section in the NE-direction of tectonic transport from a headwall breakaway in the Old Woman Mountains, California. Successively higher allochthons above a basal detachment fault are futher displaced from the headwall, some as much as tens of kilometers. Allochthonous blocks are tilted toward the headwall as evidenced by the dip of the cappoing Tertiary strata and originally horizontal Proterozoic diabase sheets. On the down-dip side of the corridor in Arizona, the faults root under the unbroken Hualapai Mountains and the Colorado Plateau. Slip on faults at all exposed levels of the crust was unidirectional. Brittle thinning above these faults affected the entire upper crust, and wholly removed it locally along the central corridor or core complex region. Isostatic uplift exposed metamorphic core complexes in the domed footwall. These data support a model that the crust in California moved out from under Arizona along an asymmetric, rooted normal-slip shear system. Ductile deformation must have accompanied mid-Tertiary crustal extension at deeper structural levels in Arizona.

  18. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  19. Constraining fault activity by investigating tectonically-deformed Quaternary palaeoshorelines using a synchronous correlation method: the Capo D'Orlando Fault as a case study (NE Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschis, Marco; Roberts, Gerald P.; Robertson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Long-term curstal extension rates, accommodated by active normal faults, can be constrained by investigating Late Quaternary vertical movements. Sequences of marine terraces tectonically deformed by active faults mark the interaction between tectonic activity, sea-level changes and active faulting throughout the Quaternary (e.g. Armijo et al., 1996, Giunta et al, 2011, Roberts et al., 2013). Crustal deformation can be calculated over multiple seismic cycles by mapping Quaternary tectonically-deformed palaeoshorelines, both in the hangingwall and footwall of active normal faults (Roberts et al., 2013). Here we use a synchronous correlation method between palaeoshorelines elevations and the ages of sea-level highstands (see Roberts et al., 2013 for further details) which takes advantage of the facts that (i) sea-level highstands are not evenly-spaced in time, yet must correlate with palaeoshorelines that are commonly not evenly-spaced in elevation, and (ii) that older terraces may be destroyed and/or overprinted by younger highstands, so that the next higher or lower paleoshoreline does not necessarily correlate with the next older or younger sea-level highstand. We investigated a flight of Late Quaternary marine terraces deformed by normal faulting as a result of the Capo D'Orlando Fault in NE Sicily (e.g. Giunta et al., 2011). This fault lies within the Calabrian Arc which has experienced damaging seismic events such as the 1908 Messina Straits earthquake ~ Mw 7. Our mapping and previous mapping (Giunta et al. (2011) demonstrate that the elevations of marine terraces inner edges change along the strike the NE - SW oriented normal fault. This confirms active deformation on the Capo D'Orlando Fault, strongly suggesting that it should be added into the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS, Basili et al., 2008). Giunta et al. (2011) suggested that uplift rates and hence faults lip-rates vary through time for this examples. We update the ages assigned to

  20. The character and reactivation history of the southern extension of the seismically active Clarendon Linden Fault System, western New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Robert D.; Fountain, John

    2002-08-01

    Integration of 11 types of data sets enabled us to determine the location, character and fault history of the southern extension of the Clarendon-Linden Fault System (CLF) in southwestern New York State. The data sets utilized include detailed stratigraphic and fracture measurements at more than 1000 sites, soil gas anomalies, seismic reflection profiles, well logs and lineaments on air photos, topographic maps, Landsat and SLAR images. The seismically active CLF consists of as many as 10 parallel, segmented faults across the fault system. The fault segments are truncated by NW-striking cross-strike discontinuities (CSDs). The faults of the CLF and intersecting CSDs form fault blocks that have semi-independent subsidence and uplift histories. East-dipping reflectors in the Precambrian basement indicate the southward continuation of thrusts of the intra-Grenvillian Elzevir-Frontenac Boundary Zone. These thrusts were reactivated during Iapetan rifting as normal (listric) growth faults. In Ordovician Black River to Trenton time, the southern CLF segments experienced a second phase of growth fault activity, with faults displaying a cumulative stratigraphic throw of as much as ˜170 m. Thrusting on the same east-dipping Precambrian reflectors typified the CLF in Taconic (post-Trenton) times. Detailed comparisons among the fault segments show that the fault activity in Silurian and Devonian times generally alternated between the western and central main faults. In Late Devonian time, the fault motion reversed from down-on-the-east to down-on-the-west about the time the Appalachian Basin axis passed across the CLF in its westward migration. The deep Precambrian faults of the CLF were thus reactivated as the Appalachian Basin developed in Acadian times. Finally, the CLF thrust fault imaged on seismic line CLF-1 offsets all bedrock (Devonian) units; thus, significant motion occurred along this fault during Late Acadian, or more likely, Alleghanian time.

  1. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  2. Mechanical Evolution of Relay Zones in Normal Faulted Terranes: Insights From Three Dimensional Elastoplastic Finite Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goteti, R.; Mitra, G.; Sussman, A.; Lewis, C.

    2009-05-01

    We present a 3D nonlinear finite element model to gain insights into the evolution of relay zones in normal faulted terranes. The model comprises two listric frictional sliding surfaces that act as faults and are arranged en echelon in an elastoplastic medium. We have investigated various Synthetic and Antithetic (both convergent and divergent) relay zone configurations to study the influence of (1) fault overlap/spacing ratio (-2 to 2), (2) material strength (3) coefficient of sliding friction on the faults (0.1 - 0.6) and (4) orthogonal vs. oblique extension, on the incremental evolution of stresses and strain paths in relay zones. The results suggest that a relay zone evolves in a three dimensional strain field under a combination of rotational and distortional strains. In isotropic rocks, the maximum extensional strains in the relay zone initiate oblique to regional extension and progressively rotate toward regional extension with increasing displacement on the faults. The relay zone evolves along a non-coaxial strain path and the total strain ellipsoid shape (oblate vs. prolate) is dependent on the relative orientation of the primary faults and amount of extension on them, and structural position in the relay zone. With all other parameters being identical, magnitudes of von Mises stresses at the ground surface are highest in convergent relay zones and lowest in divergent relay zones. Thus subsidiary oblique structures are more likely to develop in convergent relay zones than in synthetic or divergent relay zones. Assuming uniform fault propagation, it is possible to gain insights into relay zone evolution during fault tip propagation by comparing models with different fault overlap/spacing ratios. Model plastic strains suggest that hard linkage can develop between adjacent faults with a gap or minimal overlap; however, the occurrence of oblique, strain transferring structures increases with increasing fault overlap. The orientations of the maximum extensional

  3. Mechanisms of clay smear formation in unconsolidated sediments - insights from 3-D observations of excavated normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Thronberens, Sebastian; Juarez, Oscar; Lajos Urai, Janos; Ziegler, Martin; Asmus, Sven; Kruger, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Clay smears in normal faults can form seals for hydrocarbons and groundwater, and their prediction in the subsurface is an important problem in applied and basic geoscience. However, neither their complex 3-D structure, nor their processes of formation or destruction are well understood, and outcrop studies to date are mainly 2-D. We present a 3-D study of an excavated normal fault with clay smear, together with both source layers, in unlithified sand and clay of the Hambach open-cast lignite mine in Germany. The faults formed at a depth of 150 m, and have shale gouge ratios between 0.1 and 0.3. The fault zones are layered, with sheared sand, sheared clay and tectonically mixed sand-clay gouge. The thickness of clay smears in two excavated fault zones of 1.8 and 3.8 m2 is approximately log-normal, with values between 5 mm and 5 cm, without holes. The 3-D thickness distribution is heterogeneous. We show that clay smears are strongly affected by R and R' shears, mostly at the footwall side. These shears can locally cross and offset clay smears, forming holes in the clay smear, while thinning of the clay smear by shearing in the fault core is less important. The thinnest parts of the clay smears are often located close to source layer cut-offs. Locally, the clay smear consists of overlapping patches of sheared clay, separated by sheared sand. More commonly, it is one amalgamated zone of sheared sand and clay. A microscopic study of fault-zone samples shows that grain-scale mixing can lead to thickening of the low permeability smears, which may lead to resealing of holes.

  4. Microstructural Character and Strain Localization at Initiation of a Low-Angle Normal Fault in Crystalline Basement (Chemehuevi Mountains, SE California)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForge, J.; John, B. E.; Grimes, C. B.; MacDonald, C.

    2014-12-01

    Exposures of the Miocene Chemehuevi detachment (CDF) system provide a natural laboratory to study the initiation of low-angle normal faults (LANF) active near the base of the seismogenic zone (5-15 km paleodepth). The regional fault system formed at ≤20° dip in heterogeneous gneissic and granitoid rocks, with ambient footwall temperatures from <200 to >400°C. The fault system is characterized by three stacked low-angle normal faults; the CDF preferentially localized ≥ 18 km of NE directed slip rendering the deepest fault, the Mohave Wash Fault (MWF), inactive after 1-2 km of slip. At outcrop scale, damage zones to each fault are planar, but at map scale both the MWF and CDF are corrugated parallel to slip. Detailed macro- and microstructural studies of the MWF, sampled over 15 km down dip, provide insight into strain localization at initiation. At outcrop scale, the MWF is defined by a damage zone 10s of meters thick of fractured host rock cut by anastomosing principal slip zones of cohesive cataclasite (≤2 m thick), locally hosting chlorite, epidote and quartz. At structurally shallow levels (T 200-250° C; 6-8 km paleodepth at initiation), the MWF cuts isotropic granitic rocks, and exhibits dominantly cataclastic deformation overprinting localized crystal plasticity. Five km down dip (T 300-350° C), cataclasis remains the primary deformation mechanism; syntectonic dikes show plastic deformation with no brittle overprint. Rare pseudotachylite is present within meters of the principle slip zone. At the structurally deepest exposures of the MWF (T ≥ 400°C; 12-15 km paleodepth), gneissic basement cut by syntectonic dikes host a well-developed mylonitic lineation parallel to the extension direction, both reworked by cataclasis. Oxygen isotope data collected from fault rocks hosting quartz-epidote pairs indicate early infiltration of surface-derived fluids. Calculated oxygen isotope temperatures from the fault rocks and footwall are consistently 50-200° C

  5. Active faults crossing trunk pipeline routes: some important steps to avoid disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besstrashnov, V. M.; Strom, A. L.

    2011-05-01

    Assessment of seismic strong motion hazard produced by earthquakes originating within causative fault zones allows rather low accuracy of localisation of these structures that can be provided by indirect evidence of fault activity. In contrast, the relevant accuracy of localisation and characterisation of active faults, capable of surface rupturing, can be achieved solely by the use of direct evidence of fault activity. This differentiation requires strict definition of what can be classified as "active fault" and the normalisation of methods used for identification and localisation of active faults crossing oil and natural gas trunk pipelines.

  6. Aseismic slip and fault-normal strain along the central creeping section of the San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rolandone, F.; Burgmann, R.; Agnew, D.C.; Johanson, I.A.; Templeton, D.C.; d'Alessio, M. A.; Titus, S.J.; DeMets, C.; Tikoff, B.

    2008-01-01

    We use GPS data to measure the aseismic slip along the central San Andreas fault (CSAF) and the deformation across adjacent faults. Comparison of EDM and GPS data sets implies that, except for small-scale transients, the fault motion has been steady over the last 40 years. We add 42 new GPS, velocities along the CSAF to constrain the regional strain distribution. Shear strain rates are less than 0.083 ?? 0.010 ??strain/yr adjacent to the creeping SAF, with 1-4.5 mm/yr of contraction across the Coast Ranges. Dislocation modeling of the data gives a deep, long-term slip rate of 31-35 mm/yr and a shallow (0-12 km) creep rate of 28 mm/yr along the central portion of the CSAF, consistent with surface creep measurements. The lower shallow slip rate may be due to the effect of partial locking along the CSAF or reflect reduced creep rates late in the earthquake cycle of the adjoining SAF rupture zones. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Inferring Earthquake Physics from Deep Drilling Projects of Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A. F.; Kuo, L. W.; Mittempergher, S.; Remitti, F.; Spagnuolo, E.; Mitchell, T. M.; Gualtieri, A.; Hadizadeh, J.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Deep drilling projects of active faults offer the opportunity to correlate physical and chemical processes identified in core samples with experiments reproducing the seismic cycle in the laboratory and with high-resolution seismological and geophysical data. Here we discuss the constraints about earthquakes source processes at depth gained by fault cores retrieved from the deep drilling projects SAFOD (2.7 km depth, San Andreas Fault), J-FAST (0.9 km depth, following the Mw 9.0 Tohoku 2011 earthquake), TCDP (1.1 km depth, following the Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi 1999 earthquake) and WFSD (1.2 km depth, following the Mw 7.9 Wenchuan 2008 earthquake). Recovered samples were tested at room temperature with the rotary shear apparatus SHIVA installed in Rome (INGV, Italy). All the tested samples were made by clay-rich gouges (usually including smectite/illite), though their bulk mineralogy and modal composition were different (e.g., SAFOD samples included saponite, WFSD carbonaceous materials). The gouges were investigated before and after the experiments with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, etc. A common behavior of all the tested gouges was that their friction coefficient was low (often less than 0.1) under room-humidity and wet conditions when sheared at slip rates of ca. 1 m/s (seismic deformation conditions). Moreover, when the natural fault rocks next to the principal slipping zones were sheared from sub-seismic (few micrometers/s) to seismic slip rates, the experimental products had similar microstructures to those found in the principal slipping zones of the drilled faults. This included the formation of mirror-like surfaces, graphite-rich materials, foliated gouges, nanograins, amorphous materials, etc. In most cases the mechanical data were consistent with several seismological (> 50 m of seismic slip for the fault zone drilled by J-FAST) and geophysical observations (absence of a thermal anomaly in the fault

  8. Active faulting induced by the slip partitioning in the Lesser Antilles arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Frédérique; Feuillet, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    AGUADOMAR marine cruise data acquired 11 years ago allowed us to identified and map two main sets of active faults within the Lesser Antilles arc (Feuillet et al., 2002; 2004). The faults belonging to the first set, such as Morne-Piton in Guadeloupe, bound up to 100km-long and 50km-wide arc-perpendicular graben or half graben that disrupt the fore-arc reef platforms. The faults of the second set form right-stepping en echelon arrays, accommodating left-lateral slip along the inner, volcanic islands. The two fault systems form a sinistral horsetail east of the tip of the left-lateral Puerto Rico fault zone that takes up the trench-parallel component of convergence between the North-American and Caribbean plates west of the Anegada passage. In other words, they together accommodate large-scale slip partitioning along the northeastern arc, consistent with recent GPS measurements (Lopez et al., 2006). These intraplate faults are responsible for a part of the shallow seismicity in the arc and have produce damaging historical earthquakes. Two magnitude 6.3 events occurred in the last 25 years along the inner en echelon faults, the last one on November 21 2004 in Les Saintes in the Guadeloupe archipelago. To better constrain the seismic hazard related to the inner arc faults and image the ruptures and effects on the seafloor of Les Saintes 2004 earthquake, we acquired new marine data between 23 February and 25 March 2009 aboard the French R/V le Suroît during the GWADASEIS cruise. We present here the data (high-resolution 72 channel and very high-resolution chirp 3.5 khz seismic reflection profiles, EM300 multibeam bathymetry, Küllenberg coring and SAR imagery) and the first results. We identified, mapped and characterized in detail several normal to oblique fault systems between Martinique and Saba. They offset the seafloor by several hundred meters and crosscut all active volcanoes, among them Nevis Peak, Soufriere Hills, Soufriere de Guadeloupe and Montagne Pel

  9. Syn-Convergent Orogen-Parallel Low-Angle Normal-Sense Faults: One Process or Several?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellett, D. A.; Grujic, D.

    2010-12-01

    Low-angle normal-sense faults (LANFs) form in both extensional and contractional settings. Recent field and experimental studies have demonstrated that exhumed footwall tectonites in extensional LANFs are not necessarily down-dip equivalents of the surface detachment, instead they may deform during distributed flow in the mid- or lower crust. We propose that syn-contractional LANFs also need not result from a single, progressive deformation. The South Tibetan detachment system (STDS) is a network of low-angle normal sense faults and shear zones (LANFs) that formed in the Miocene coevally with and parallel to contractional structures during lithospheric shortening accompanying development of the Himalayan orogen. In the eastern Himalaya, the STDS is exposed multiple times across orogen strike, and each exposure is characterized by differences in: metamorphic grade between the footwall and hanging wall rocks; numbers of individual structures; amounts of ductile versus brittle deformation, and; times of activity. Using new and published geochronologic, geothermometric and structural data, we characterize and distinguish three different types of LANFs within the STDS: 1. Mid-crustal flow LANFs, formed by ductile flow of melt-weakened mid-crust between stronger upper and lower crust that produced a sub-horizontal diffuse, ductile shear zone separating high metamorphic grade mid-crustal anatectite from low metamorphic grade upper-crustal rocks. Such structures do not cut down-section and locally may preserve a reversal in shear sense. 2. Extrusion LANFs, formed during extrusion of a mid-crust slab along focused opposing-sense bounding shear zones. The extruding slab is roofed by discrete ductile-brittle to brittle faults that post-date and partly excise a mid-crustal flow LANF. 3. Destabilization LANFs, formed by local extension of the upper crust accompanying destabilization and doming of the mid-crust, and characterized by single or conjugate ductile-brittle to brittle

  10. Active Features of Guguan-Guizhen Fault at the Northeast Margin of Qinghai-Tibet Block since Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yaqin; Feng, Xijie; Li, Gaoyang; Ma, Ji; Li, Miao; Zhang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Guguan-Guizhen fault is located at the northeast margin of Qinghai-Tibet Block and northwest margin of Ordos Block; it is the boundary of the two blocks, and one of the multiple faults of northwest Haiyuan-Liupanshan-Baoji fault zone. Guguan-Guizhen fault starts from Putuo Village, Huating County, Gansu Province, and goes through Badu Town, Long County in Shaanxi Province ends in Guozhen Town in Baoji City, Shaanxi Province. The fault has a full length of about 130km with the strike of 310-330°, the dip of SW and the rake of 50-60°, which is a sinistral slip reverse fault in the north part, and a sinistral slip normal fault in the southeast part. Guguan-Guizhen fault has a clear liner structure in satellite images and significant landform elevation difference with a maximum difference of 80m, and is higher in the east lower in the west. The northwest side of Guguan-Guizhen fault is composed of purplish-red Lower Cretaceous sandstones and river terrace; the northeast side is composed of Ordovician Limestone. Shigou, Piliang, Songjiashan, Tianjiagou and Chenjiagou fault profiles are found to the south of Badu Village. After 14C and optically stimulated luminescence dating, the fault does not dislocate the stratum since late Pleistocene (90.5±4.4ka) in Shigou, Piliang and Songjiashan fault profiles, and does not dislocate the cobble layer of Holocene first terrace and recent sliderock (3180±30 BP). But the fault dislocated the stratum of middle Pleistocene in some of the fault profiles. All the evidences above indicate that the fault is active in middle Pleistocene, and being silence since late Pleistocene. It might be active in Holocene to the north of Badu Village due to collapses are found in a certain area. The cause of these collapses is Qinlong M6-7 earthquake in 600 A.D., and might be relevant with Guguan-Guizhen fault after analysis of the scale, feature and age determination of the collapse. If any seismic surface rupture and ancient earthquake traces

  11. A numerical modelling approach to investigate the surface processes response to normal fault growth in multi-rift settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechlivanidou, Sofia; Cowie, Patience; Finch, Emma; Gawthorpe, Robert; Attal, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    This study uses a numerical modelling approach to explore structural controls on erosional/depositional systems within rifts that are characterized by complex multiphase extensional histories. Multiphase-rift related topography is generated by a 3D discrete element model (Finch et al., Basin Res., 2004) of normal fault growth and is used to drive the landscape evolution model CHILD (Tucker et al., Comput. Geosci., 2001). Fault populations develop spontaneously in the discrete element model and grow by both tip propagation and segment linkage. We conduct a series of experiments to simulate the evolution of the landscape (55x40 km) produced by two extensional phases that differ in the direction and in the amount of extension. In order to isolate the effects of fault propagation on the drainage network development, we conduct experiments where uplift/subsidence rates vary both in space and time as the fault array evolves and compare these results with experiments using a fixed fault array geometry with uplift rate/subsidence rates that vary only spatially. In many cases, areas of sediment deposition become uplifted and vise-versa due to complex elevation changes with respect to sea level as the fault array develops. These changes from subaerial (erosional) to submarine (depositional) processes have implications for sediment volumes and sediment caliber as well as for the sediment routing systems across the rift. We also explore the consequences of changing the angle between the two phases of extension on the depositional systems and we make a comparison with single-phase rift systems. Finally, we discuss the controls of different erodibilities on sediment supply and detachment-limited versus transport-limited end-member models for river erosion. Our results provide insights into the nature and distribution of sediment source areas and the sediment routing in rift systems where pre-existing rift topography and normal fault growth exert a fundamental control on

  12. Buttressing and reverse reactivation of a normal fault in the Jurassic rocks of the Asturian Basin, NW Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzkeda, H.; Bulnes, M.; Poblet, J.; García-Ramos, J. C.; Piñuela, L.

    2013-06-01

    A detailed structural analysis was carried out on the Jurassic rocks cropping out along the cliffs of La Conejera Inlet (Asturias, Spain). It includes a geological map and a distortion-free cross-section constructed via photogrammetric methods. La Conejera Inlet is located within the Asturian Basin, a Permian-Mesozoic extensional basin partially formed during the opening of the Bay of Biscay. It suffered selective basin inversion during a Cenozoic contraction responsible for the Pyrenees and its western prolongation along the north margin of the Iberian Peninsula. The study of the structures (folds, faults, joints and veins) of the hangingwall of two normal faults with opposite dip senses reveals that it underwent a later compressional stage in which one fault block acted as a buttress. The contractional deformation in the hangingwall, interpreted as a deformed rollover anticline with an associated antithetic fault, diminishes on moving away from one of the main faults. The positive inversion tectonics produced not only a buttressing effect, but it also involved a certain amount of reverse reactivation of one of the main faults that still preserves a normal displacement. The original normal motion would have taken place during the Middle?-Late Jurassic, related to an embryonic stage of the opening of the Bay of Biscay. The later contractional stage would have been caused by the Cenozoic Alpine shortening. The good outcrop quality allows a relative chronology for the observed structures to be established. Employing all the available information we tried to reconstruct the structure at depth and predict the detachment depth, and to estimate the amounts of extension (the present-day value and that before the compression) and compression.

  13. Paleoseismology from Paleoshorelines: Combining Lidar Data and Geochronology to Resolve Displacement of Pleistocene Pluvial Shorelines along Normal Faults in the Northwestern Basin and Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, A. E.; Ibarra, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Paleoshorelines of pluvial lakes in the Basin and Range are commonly used to determine lake highstands and to assess past climate in a now-arid region. However, because paleoshorelines record a paleohorizontal datum, these features can provide insight into tectonic processes at a variety of scales as well. Deviations of a paleoshorelines from a modern horizontal plane may be caused by isostatic rebound of the crust resulting from lake removal or by offset along faults since a given lake stillstand. While isostatic rebound has a significant effect over large lake basins such as Bonneville and Lahontan, the effect is negligible in smaller lakes that fill a single valley, often within terminal basins. As a result, variability in shoreline elevations can be attributed primarily to offset along normal faults. Pluvial lakes occupied valleys in the Basin and Range between >1 Ma to <12 ka, a time range for which fault slip rates have proven difficult to determine using traditional paleoseismic and geologic records. Trenches provide paleoseismic records across a single fault, but a single valley may contain several seismically active faults, and the time resolution is typically limited by the maximum age of radiocarbon dating and the earthquake recurrence interval. Geologic records typically provide average slip rates over time rather than timing of individual seismic events. In the northwestern Basin and Range, where the strain rate is low and earthquake recurrence intervals are long, it is particularly critical to extend the traditional paleoseismic record as far back as possible. By precisely dating paleoshorelines and using high-resolution topographic data to correlate them across active faults, it is possible to greatly enhance the record of slip rate along normal fault systems. Newly acquired airborne lidar data in Surprise Valley, a small terminal basin in northeastern California, reveals a mappable series of shorelines that occur throughout the valley on both sides

  14. Measuring Active Faulting in Bolivia: the 1998 Aiquile Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funning, G. J.; Barke, R.; Lamb, S. H.; Minaya, E.; Parsons, B. E.; Woodhouse, J. H.

    2003-12-01

    The Aiquile region of central Bolivia is situated in the core of the actively deforming Bolivian Orocline. Palaeomagnetic data show that differential rotations consistent with oblique convergence have continued over the past 10 Myr. Structural mapping of the sub-Andean fold-and-thrust belt to the east shows that the majority of this convergence has occurred there as shortening; however there exists a significant transverse component of motion which must be accommodated as strike-slip faulting elsewhere. Many topographic lineations assumed to be related to strike-slip faulting have been identified in the area around Aiquile, however none has been associated with large earthquakes or demonstrated to be active over the past million years. On 22nd May 1998, a Mw = 6.5 earthquake struck the region, the largest shallow earthquake to occur in Bolivia for 50 years, resulting in over 105 fatalities and rendering thousands homeless in the towns of Aiquile and Totora and their surrounding villages. Seismic observations of the event are inconclusive; the correct orientation and style of the faulting -- either right-lateral strike-slip on a N--S fault, or left-lateral on an E--W fault -- cannot be determined as large uncertainties in earthquake location mean we do not know a priori which of the two nodal planes in the focal mechanism is the fault plane, or upon which structure the earthquake occurred. We present here the first study of a Bolivian earthquake using InSAR. Despite the rugged nature of the terrain in the Aiquile region, with its sharp changes of relief ( ˜ 3000 m over 20 km) -- a consequence of its location between the high Altiplano to the west and the foreland basin to the east -- we demonstrate that by using freely-available SRTM digital elevation data we can correct for topographic artifacts and generate a clear deformation signal. Our preferred model is for slip on a N--S-striking fault, with a location which validates Modified Mercalli Intensity maps

  15. Miocene south directed low-angle normal fault evolution on Kea Island (West Cycladic Detachment System, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglseder, Christoph; Grasemann, Bernhard; Rice, A. Hugh N.; Petrakakis, Konstantin; Schneider, David A.

    2011-08-01

    New structural, petrologic, and thermochronologic data from Kea, West Cyclades, define a crustal-scale ductile shear zone and ductile/brittle low-angle normal fault (LANF) system. Both the greenschist-facies shear zone forming the footwall and the overlying LANF zone formed during constrictional strains, with a consistent top-to-SW-S shear sense, with increasing finite strains toward higher structural levels but decreasing temperatures from footwall to hanging wall. The tectonostratigraphy comprises a ˜450 m thick footwall of shallowly dipping schists and calcite marbles representing the Intermediate Unit of the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline (ACC). Above the footwall is a ˜60 m thick highly strained LANF zone, consisting of phyllonites, cataclastic schists, ultramylonitic calcite marbles, (proto) mylonitic calcite marbles, and cohesive cataclasites that arch over the whole island. These fault rocks exhibit multistage LANFs, evolving from ductile to brittle conditions. An up to ˜50 m thick brecciated limestone and dolostone sequence forms the unmetamorphosed hanging wall which is most probably part of the Upper Unit of the ACC. Multiequilibrium P-T estimates on chlorite-white mica pairs in the footwall yield 7-5.5 kbar/360°C-450°C for inclusions in albite and epidote, 5.5-3 kbar/400°C-350°C for the main foliation, and 3-2 kbar/350°C-280°C in localized shear bands (C and C' foliations). The 40Ar/39Ar white mica footwall cooling ages demonstrate that greenschist-facies retrogression occurred between ˜21 and 17 Ma. Localized, late decimeter thick shear zones were active and dynamically recrystallized before ˜15 to 13 Ma. The LANF on Kea, together with similar structures in South Attica and the West Cyclades define the West Cycladic Detachment System, characterized by ductile to brittle top-SW-S shear sense.

  16. Age constraints on pre and synextensional Tertiary strata and normal faulting in the Windermere Hills, northeast Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, K.J. . Dept. of Geology); Cerveny, P.F. ); Snee, L.W. ); Brown, F.H. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Tertiary strata exposed in the eastern Windermere Hills and northern Pequop Mountains define the development of a widespread late eocene volcanic landscape and multiple generations of Oligocene-Miocene extensional half-grabens. 28 new [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and fission-track age determinations and tephrachronology analyses on ash-flow and air fall tuffs suggest a complex history of extensional strain. The oldest Tertiary rocks exposed in the region consist of a diverse suite of calc alkaline volcanic rocks and volcaniclastic sediments. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age determinations of volcanic strata in this sequence indicate that it ranges from 39.18 [+-] .12 to 40.38 [+-] 0.6 Ma in age; strata exposed in the Deadman Creek area include 260 meters of rhyolitic ash-flow tuff, andesitic flow breccia, a rhyodacite lava flow and volcaniclastic conglomerate and sandstone. Subsequent extension is defined by the development of west-tilted, extensional half-grabens between 34.79 [+-] .18 to 39.18 [+-] .12 Ma ([sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar). These basins evolved during the development of the Black Mountain fault (BMF), an east-rooted low-angle normal fault overlain by an array of synthetic tilt-blocks. Subsequent extension is defined by a poorly constrained, north-dipping normal fault of Oligocene or Miocene age. Both the BMF and the north-dipping normal fault are overprinted by two east-dipping listric normal faults which bound 1--3 km deep half-grabens filled with 11.9 [+-] 0.3 to about 15 Ma strata (zircon fission track, tephrachronology analyses and mammalian fossils). An important aspect of the thermal history of the Windermere Hills includes a middle Miocene (ca. 11--16 Ma) thermal event (200 [+-] 50 C > T > 280 C), which annealed, or partially annealed fission tracks in zircon grains in several of the extensional basins discussed above.

  17. Dilatant normal faulting in jointed cohesive rocks: insights from physical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; von Hagke, Christoph; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Dilatant faults often form in rocks containing pre-existing joints, but the effects of joints on fault segment linkage and fracture connectivity is not well understood. Studying evolution of dilatancy and influence of fractures on fault development provides insights on geometry of fault zones in brittle rocks and eventually allows for predicting their subsurface appearance. We assess the evolution of dilatant faults in fractured rocks using analogue models with cohesive powder. The upper layer contains pre-formed joint sets, and we vary the angle between joints and a rigid basement fault in our experiments. Analogue models were carried out in a manually driven deformation box (30x28x20 cm) with a 60° dipping pre-defined basement fault and 4.5 cm of displacement. To produce open joints prior to faulting, sheets of paper were mounted in the box to a depth of 5 cm at a spacing of 2.5 cm. Powder was then sieved into the box, embedding the paper almost entirely (column height of 19 cm), and the paper was removed. We tested the influence of different angles between the strike of the basement fault and the joint set (joint fault (JF) angles of 0°, 4°, 8°, 12°, 16°, 20°, and 25°). During deformation we captured structural information by time-lapse photography that allows particle imaging velocimetry analyses (PIV) to detect localized deformation at every increment of displacement. Post-mortem photogrammetry preserves the final 3-dimensional structure of the fault zone. Results show robust structural features in models: damage zone width increases by about 50 % and the number of secondary fractures within this zone by more than 100 % with increasing JF-angle. Interestingly, the map-view area fraction of open gaps increases by only 3%. Secondary joints and fault step-overs are oriented at a high angle to the primary joint orientation. Due to the length of the pre-existing open joints, areas far beyond the fractured regions are connected to the system. In contrast

  18. Two-dimensional distinct element modeling of the structure and growth of normal faults in multilayer sequences: 1. Model calibration, boundary conditions, and selected results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SchöPfer, Martin P. J.; Childs, Conrad; Walsh, John J.

    2007-10-01

    The distinct element method is used for modeling the growth of normal faults in layered sequences. The models consist of circular particles that can be bonded together with breakable cement. Size effects of the model mechanical properties were studied for a constant average particle size and various sample widths. The study revealed that the bulk strength of the model material decreases with increasing sample size. Consequently, numerical lab tests and the associated construction of failure envelopes were performed for the specific layer width to particle diameter ratios used in the multilayer models. The normal faulting models are composed of strong layers (bonded particles) and weak layers (nonbonded particles) that are deformed in response to movement on a predefined fault at the base of the sequence. The modeling reproduces many of the geometries observed in natural faults, including (1) changes in fault dip due to different modes of failure in the strong and weak layers, (2) fault bifurcation (splaying), (3) the flexure of strong layers and the rotation of associated blocks to form normal drag, and (4) the progressive linkage of fault segments. The model fault zone geometries and their growth are compared to natural faults from Kilve foreshore (Somerset, United Kingdom). Both the model and natural faults provide support for the well-known general trend that fault zone width increases with increasing displacement.

  19. Rapid Slip-Rate and Low Shear Strength of a High Finite-Slip Low-Angle Normal Fault: Normanby Island, Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, T. A.; Monteleone, B.; Baldwin, S. L.; Fitzgerald, P. G.

    2006-12-01

    A metamorphic core complex (MCC) punctuates the attenuated continental crust of Normanby Island in the D'Entrecasteaux Group of SE Papua New Guinea, 30 km west of the seafloor- spreading tip of the Woodlark Basin. The lower plate of this north-vergent MCC has been uplifted by as much as ~1100 m above sealevel and exposes a >1 km thick carapace of blueschist-derived quartzose mylonites that have a subhorizontal top-to-the-NNE shear fabric. Onshore, the variably back-tilted, inactive detachment fault capping these mylonites has been eroded away, but its corrugated geomorphology is preserved in the landscape of the asymmetric dome. Corrugations and stretching lineations parallel solutions for Woodlark- Australia plate motions from 3.6-0.52 Ma. North of the island, the detachment fault is preserved as a ~12° N-dipping scarp on the seafloor. The northern, submarine part of the Woodlark rift contains several active half-grabens, and has been the site of several >Mw 6.0 earthquakes on planes dipping 23-30° N. Focal depths in this part of the rift are <8-9 km (Abers {it et al.,} 1997). The ~40-km exhumed length of the fault, and estimates of the temperature and minimum depth (8-10 km) of mylonitization imply a finite dip-slip of at least 50 km. ODP stratigraphic data from nearby Moresby Seamount suggest that slip on the Normanby fault had begun by ~3.8 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar data from the lower plate have yielded plateau ages on mylonitic white mica of 3-4 Ma, interpreted as cooling ages. A preliminary estimate of the age gradient parallel to transport suggests a minimum slip-rate of ~24 ±5mm/yr (assumes a geotherm at dynamic equilibrium) on this rolling hinge-style MCC, one of the fastest slip-rates ever determined for a normal fault. This is ~70% of the rift's spreading rate during that interval, implying marked strain localization on a single, highly evolved low-angle normal fault. MCC's in the Woodlark Rift are bounded transversely by continental transform faults that

  20. Growth and linkage of the quaternary Ubrique Normal Fault Zone, Western Gibraltar Arc: role on the along-strike relief segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Bonilla, Alejandro; Balanya, Juan Carlos; Exposito, Inmaculada; Diaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Barcos, Leticia

    2015-04-01

    Strain partitioning modes within migrating orogenic arcs may result in arc-parallel stretching that produces along-strike structural and topographic discontinuities. In the Western Gibraltar Arc, arc-parallel stretching has operated from the Lower Miocene up to recent times. In this study, we have reviewed the Colmenar Fault, located at the SW end of the Subbetic ranges, previously interpreted as a Middle Miocene low-angle normal fault. Our results allow to identify younger normal fault segments, to analyse their kinematics, growth and segment linkage, and to discuss its role on the structural and relief drop at regional scale. The Colmenar Fault is folded by post-Serravallian NE-SW buckle folds. Both the SW-dipping fault surfaces and the SW-plunging fold axes contribute to the structural relief drop toward the SW. Nevertheless, at the NW tip of the Colmenar Fault, we have identified unfolded normal faults cutting quaternary soils. They are grouped into a N110˚E striking brittle deformation band 15km long and until 3km wide (hereafter Ubrique Normal Fault Zone; UNFZ). The UNFZ is divided into three sectors: (a) The western tip zone is formed by normal faults which usually dip to the SW and whose slip directions vary between N205˚E and N225˚E. These segments are linked to each other by left-lateral oblique faults interpreted as transfer faults. (b) The central part of the UNFZ is composed of a single N115˚E striking fault segment 2,4km long. Slip directions are around N190˚E and the estimated throw is 1,25km. The fault scarp is well-conserved reaching up to 400m in its central part and diminishing to 200m at both segment terminations. This fault segment is linked to the western tip by an overlap zone characterized by tilted blocks limited by high-angle NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE striking faults interpreted as "box faults" [1]. (c) The eastern tip zone is formed by fault segments with oblique slip which also contribute to the downthrown of the SW block. This kinematic

  1. Spatial Evolution of Neogene Normal Faults, Northern Owens Valley: Constraints on Oblique-slip Partioning Within the Eastern California Shear Zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, T. P.; Dawers, N.

    2005-05-01

    Simple geometric constraints can be used to predict fault interaction at depth. Such interaction within crustal scale fault populations plays an important role in the tectonic evolution of extensional tectonic settings. Here we use a theoretical relationship between fault dip, horizontal fault spacing, and depth to the base of the seismogenic zone to explain the late Cenozoic temporal and spatial evolution of faulting within the Eastern California shear zone, including the northern extent of Owens Valley, California. Our results show that during its evolution, the east-dipping Sierra Nevada frontal fault in northern Owens Valley became inactive due to intersection with the larger west-dipping range-bounding fault of the White Mountains. The horizontal spacing of 10 km between these two conjugate faults is such that they intersect within the brittle seismic layer resulting in the locking of this segment of Sierra Nevada frontal fault. Continued accumulation of normal displacement along the White Mountains fault zone has since resulted in the present-day half-graben basement structure of northern Owens Valley. This down-dropping along the eastern margin of the valley imposes a flexural tension across the surface of the Coyote Warp, which can be considered a large relay zone between the Sierra Nevada frontal fault and the Round Valley fault further west. It is suggested that this tension is responsible for the formation of west-dipping antithetic normal faults that are distributed locally around the Coyote Warp. This extensional fault geometry has imposed a kinematic restraint on the development and distribution of right-lateral shear within this part of the Eastern California shear zone, including northeastward transfer of right-lateral slip from the Owens Valley fault to the White Mountains fault.

  2. Late Quaternary reef growth history of Les Saintes submarine plateau: a key to constrain active faulting kinematics in Guadeloupe (FWI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, F.; Feuillet, N.; Deplus, C.; Cabioch, G.; Tapponnier, P.; LeBrun, J.; Bazin, S.; Beauducel, F.; Boudon, G.; Le Friant, A.; De Min, L.; Melezan, D.

    2012-12-01

    The damaging November 21 2004 earthquake (Mw 6.3) occurred on a large normal fault system offshore Les Saintes archipelago in Guadeloupe. To better constrain the seismic hazard related to this fault system, new data were acquired in 2009 and 2010 during the GWADASEIS and BATHYSAINTES cruises. Digital Elevation Models (DEM), with a horizontal resolution of 2.5 m, were calculated with the bathymetric data acquired at shallow depth on Les Saintes insular shelf. Together with seismic reflection profiles, this data makes it possible to identify and map the fault system and to understand its kinematics with respect to the plateau formation. The 15km wide, -45m deep drowned plateau of Les Saintes is composed of four coral terraces, down to 110 m bsl, piled-up on the Upper Pliocene to Quaternary Les Saintes volcanic centres. The shallowest terrace corresponds to a drowned Holocene reef system. Reef typical features, as double barriers, pinnacles, spurs and grooves, are well identified in the bathymetry. Seismic reflection profiles indicate that the Holocene terrace overlays Pleistocene ones. Geophysical data and reef growth modeling tend to show that the reef plateau has formed under subsidence conditions (~0.35 mm/yr) since Ionian ages, recording the main sea level highstands, before being drowned during the last sea level rise, around 11ka BP. The four terraces are crosscut by several NW-SE striking normal faults, which have scarps up to 8m. They offset them, the older, the more, inducing syntectonic sedimentation. The fault system extends from the northern plateau's edge to Les Saintes channel, toward Dominica, constituting the eastern side of Les Saintes graben. In the channel, the Roseau Fault, responsible for the 2004 earthquake, bounds the graben western side. The new data confirms its extent to the north, as the fault offsets the plateau's western cliff by several tens of meter, counter-slope like, dipping under Les Saintes islands and inducing a high seismic

  3. Active simultaneous uplift and margin-normal extension in a forearc high, Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallen, S. F.; Wegmann, K. W.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Pazzaglia, F. J.; Brandon, M. T.; Fassoulas, C.

    2014-07-01

    The island of Crete occupies a forearc high in the central Hellenic subduction zone and is characterized by sustained exhumation, surface uplift and extension. The processes governing orogenesis and topographic development here remain poorly understood. Dramatic topographic relief (2-6 km) astride the southern coastline of Crete is associated with large margin-parallel faults responsible for deep bathymetric depressions known as the Hellenic troughs. These structures have been interpreted as both active and inactive with either contractional, strike-slip, or extensional movement histories. Distinguishing between these different structural styles and kinematic histories here allows us to explore more general models for improving our global understanding of the tectonic and geodynamic processes of syn-convergent extension. We present new observations from the south-central coastline of Crete that clarifies the role of these faults in the late Cenozoic evolution of the central Hellenic margin and the processes controlling Quaternary surface uplift. Pleistocene marine terraces are used in conjunction with optically stimulated luminesce dating and correlation to the Quaternary eustatic curve to document coastal uplift and identify active faults. Two south-dipping normal faults are observed, which extend offshore, offset these marine terrace deposits and indicate active N-S (margin-normal) extension. Further, marine terraces preserved in the footwall and hanging wall of both faults demonstrate that regional net uplift of Crete is occurring despite active extension. Field mapping and geometric reconstructions of an active onshore normal fault reveal that the subaqueous range-front fault of south-central Crete is synthetic to the south-dipping normal faults on shore. These findings are inconsistent with models of active horizontal shortening in the upper crust of the Hellenic forearc. Rather, they are consistent with topographic growth of the forearc in a viscous orogenic

  4. Diachronous Growth of Normal Fault Systems in Multiphase Rift Basins: Structural Evolution of the East Shetland Basin, Northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claringbould, Johan S.; Bell, Rebecca E.; A-L. Jackson, Christopher; Gawthorpe, Robert L.; Odinsen, Tore

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to determine the structural evolution and interaction of fault systems (kinematically linked group of faults that are in the km to 10s of km scale) within a rift basin is typically limited by the spatial extent and temporal resolution of the available data and methods used. Physical and numerical models provide predictions on how fault systems nucleate, grow and interact, but these models need to be tested with natural examples. Although field studies and individual 3D seismic surveys can provide a detailed structural evolution of individual fault systems, they are often spatially limited and cannot be used examine the interaction of fault systems throughout the entire basin. In contrast, regional subsurface studies, commonly conducted on widely spaced 2D seismic surveys, are able to capture the general structural evolution of a rift basin, but lack the spatial and temporal detail. Moreover, these studies typically describe the structural evolution of rifts as comprising multiple discrete tectonic stages (i.e. pre-, syn- and post-rift). This simplified approach does not, however, consider that the timing of activity can be strongly diachronous along and between faults that form part of a kinematically linked system within a rift basin. This study focuses on the East Shetland Basin (ESB), a multiphase rift basin located on the western margin of the North Viking Graben, northern North Sea. Most previous studies suggest the basin evolved in response to two discrete phases of extension in the Permian-Triassic and Middle-Late Jurassic, with the overall geometry of the latter rift to be the result of selective reactivation of faults associated with the former rift. Gradually eastwards thickening intra-rift strata (deposited between two rift phases) that form wedges between and within fault blocks have led to two strongly contrasting tectonic interpretations: (i) Early-Middle Jurassic differential thermal subsidence after Permian-Triassic rifting; or (ii

  5. Seismic sources and stress transfer interaction among axial normal faults and external thrust fronts in the Northern Apennines (Italy): A working hypothesis based on the 1916-1920 time-space cluster of earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco; Corti, Giacomo; Donne, Dario Delle; Sani, Federico; Piccardi, Luigi; Vannucci, Gianfranco; Genco, Riccardo; Martelli, Luca; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    In this study we analyse the main potential seismic sources in some axial and frontal sectors of the Northern Apennines, in Italy. This region was hit by a peculiar series of earthquakes that started in 1916 on the external thrust fronts near Rimini. Later, in 1917-1921, seismicity (up to Mw ≈ 6.5) shifted into the axial zone and clearly migrated north-westward, along the belt of active normal faults. The collection of fault-slip data focused on the active normal faults potentially involved in this earthquake series. The acquired data allowed us to better characterize the geometry and kinematics of the faults. In a few instances, the installation of local seismic networks during recent seismic sequences allowed the identification of the causative faults that are hinted to be also responsible for past earthquakes, particularly in the Romagna region and north-eastern Mugello. The Coulomb stress changes produced by the historical earthquakes generally brought closer to failure all the faults that supposedly caused the main seismic events of 1916-1921. However, the stress change magnitude is generally small and thus the static stress interaction among the main seismic sources is not supported by a significant seismic correlation. Significant stress change loading may be instead inferred for the triggering of a number of seismic events on neighbouring normal faults by the Garfagnana 1920 earthquake. In addition, the computation of the seismic stress changes suggests that seismic events with magnitude ≥ 6 may transmit stresses from the axial normal faults to specific external thrusts and vice versa. It is possible that a correlation may be made between loading applied by the major 1917-1920 extensional ruptures and the increased seismicity on the distal external thrusts.

  6. Active tectonics of the Seattle fault and central Puget sound, Washington - Implications for earthquake hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Dadisman, S.V.; Childs, J. R.; Stanley, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    We use an extensive network of marine high-resolution and conventional industry seismic-reflection data to constrain the location, shallow structure, and displacement rates of the Seattle fault zone and crosscutting high-angle faults in the Puget Lowland of western Washington. Analysis of seismic profiles extending 50 km across the Puget Lowland from Lake Washington to Hood Canal indicates that the west-trending Seattle fault comprises a broad (4-6 km) zone of three or more south-dipping reverse faults. Quaternary sediment has been folded and faulted along all faults in the zone but is clearly most pronounced along fault A, the northernmost fault, which forms the boundary between the Seattle uplift and Seattle basin. Analysis of growth strata deposited across fault A indicate minimum Quaternary slip rates of about 0.6 mm/yr. Slip rates across the entire zone are estimated to be 0.7-1.1 mm/yr. The Seattle fault is cut into two main segments by an active, north-trending, high-angle, strike-slip fault zone with cumulative dextral displacement of about 2.4 km. Faults in this zone truncate and warp reflections in Tertiary and Quaternary strata and locally coincide with bathymetric lineaments. Cumulative slip rates on these faults may exceed 0.2 mm/yr. Assuming no other crosscutting faults, this north-trending fault zone divides the Seattle fault into 30-40-km-long western and eastern segments. Although this geometry could limit the area ruptured in some Seattle fault earthquakes, a large event ca. A.D. 900 appears to have involved both segments. Regional seismic-hazard assessments must (1) incorporate new information on fault length, geometry, and displacement rates on the Seattle fault, and (2) consider the hazard presented by the previously unrecognized, north-trending fault zone.

  7. Styles of footwall uplift along the Simplon and Brenner normal fault systems, central and Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyniec, Tim F.; Selverstone, Jane; Axen, Gary J.

    2001-10-01

    The Simplon and Brenner extensional shear zones of the central and Eastern Alps, respectively, are low-angle detachments that accommodated orogen-parallel extension and unroofed midcrustal rocks in their footwalls. An integrated field and fluid inclusion study of the Simplon low-angle shear zone reveals several postmylonitic structure types that are consistent with passage of a complex rolling hinge through the Simplon footwall, including synthetic (west down) and antithetic (east down) semibrittle and brittle structures, and strike-slip, extensional, and contractional structures, all of which are consistent with southwest directed extension along the main detachment zone. Fluid inclusion analysis of kinematically referenced inclusion arrays indicates that west down, semibrittle, and brittle shears were active at conditions above 300°-450°C and 14-26 km. Antithetic deformation along brittle faults occurred at much shallower conditions of <300°C and 3-7 km. Deformation along these structures accommodated footwall uplift by a subvertical simple shear mechanism in the southern part of the Simplon region. These results are strikingly similar to those from the Brenner shear zone. In contrast with the Brenner region, however, the northern Simplon footwall shows strike-slip dominated postmylonitic deformation related to slip along the Rhône Line. The footwalls of these detachment systems define a unique class of core complex characterized by the development of a midcrustal, synthetic lower hinge that acts to steepen the detachment system and accommodate footwall uplift by a subvertical simple shear mechanism. Both systems have poorly developed upper hinges that flatten the middle to upper crustal ramp by only a few degrees of dip, which is in contrast to detachment fault systems of the western United States, where evidence of a deep hinge is rarely observed, and the upper hinge acts to deactivate the flattened, updip part of the detachment. Our results emphasize the

  8. The complex architecture of the 2009 MW 6.1 L'Aquila normal fault system (Central Italy) as imaged by 64,000 high-resolution aftershock locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valoroso, L.; Chiaraluce, L.; Di Stefano, R.; Piccinini, D.; Schaff, D. P.; Waldhauser, F.

    2011-12-01

    On April 6th 2009, a MW 6.1 normal faulting earthquake struck the axial area of the Abruzzo region in Central Italy. We present high-precision hypocenter locations of an extraordinary dataset composed by 64,000 earthquakes recorded at a very dense seismic network of 60 stations operating for 9 months after the main event. Events span in magnitude (ML) between -0.9 to 5.9, reaching a completeness magnitude of 0.7. The dataset has been processed by integrating an accurate automatic picking procedure together with cross-correlation and double-difference relative location methods. The combined use of these procedures results in earthquake relative location uncertainties in the range of a few meters to tens of meters, comparable/lower than the spatial dimension of the earthquakes themselves). This data set allows us to image the complex inner geometry of individual faults from the kilometre to meter scale. The aftershock distribution illuminates the anatomy of the en-echelon fault system composed of two major faults. The mainshock breaks the entire upper crust from 10 km depth to the surface along a 14-km long normal fault. A second segment, located north of the normal fault and activated by two Mw>5 events, shows a striking listric geometry completely blind. We focus on the analysis of about 300 clusters of co-located events to characterize the mechanical behavior of the different portions of the fault system. The number of events in each cluster ranges from 4 to 24 events and they exhibit strongly correlated seismograms at common stations. They mostly occur where secondary structures join the main fault planes and along unfavorably oriented segments. Moreover, larger clusters nucleate on secondary faults located in the overlapping area between the two main segments, where the rate of earthquake production is very high with a long-lasting seismic decay.

  9. Safety enhancement of oil trunk pipeline crossing active faults on Sakhalin Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishkina, E.; Antropova, N.; Korotchenko, T.

    2015-11-01

    The article explores the issues concerning safety enhancement of pipeline active fault crossing on Sakhalin Island. Based on the complexity and analysis results, all the faults crossed by pipeline system are classified into five categories - from very simple faults to extremely complex ones. The pipeline fault crossing design is developed in accordance with the fault category. To enhance pipeline safety at fault crossing, a set of methods should be applied: use of pipes of different safety classes and special trench design in accordance with soil permeability characteristics.

  10. Quantifying fault-zone activity in arid environments with high-resolution topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskin, Michael E.; Le, Kimberly; Strane, Michael D.

    2007-11-01

    High-resolution airborne laser swath-mapping (ALSM) topography illuminates active faulting with unprecedented clarity. We contrast ALSM topography of two dextral faults in arid regions of California with slip rates that differ by an order of magnitude: The Lenwood fault, with rate of ~1 mm/yr, and the Clark fault, a strand of the San Jacinto fault with net slip rate >10 mm/yr. Visualization of ALSM data reveals abundant fault scarps and deflected channels that when reconstructed can yield powerful slip constraints. Though many of these features may also be detected in existing aerial photography, these data are limited by stereo depth resolution and fixed illumination angle.

  11. Normal faulting of the Daiichi-Kashima Seamount in the Japan Trench revealed by the Kaiko I cruise, Leg 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kobayashi, K.; Cadet, J.-P.; Aubouin, J.; Boulegue, J.; Dubois, J.; von, Huene R.; Jolivet, L.; Kanazawa, T.; Kasahara, J.; Koizumi, K.-i.; Lallemand, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Pautot, G.; Suyehiro, K.; Tani, S.; Tokuyama, H.; Yamazaki, T.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed topographic and geophysical survey of the Daiichi-Kashima Seamount area in the southern Japan Trench, northwestern Pacific margin, clearly defines a high-angle normal fault which splits the seamount into two halves. A fan-shaped zone was investigated along 2-4 km spaced, 100 km long subparallel tracks using narrow multi-beam (Seabeam) echo-sounder with simultaneous measurements of gravity, magnetic total field and single-channel seismic reflection records. Vertical displacement of the inboard half was clearly mapped and its normal fault origin was supported. The northern and southern extensions of the normal fault beyond the flank of the seamount were delineated. Materials on the landward trench slope are displaced upward and to sideways away from the colliding seamount. Canyons observed in the upper landward slope terminate at the mid-slope terrace which has been uplifted since start of subduction of the seamount. Most of the landward slope except for the landward walls aside the seamount comprises only a landslide topography in a manner similar to the northern Japan Trench wall. This survey was conducted on R/V "Jean Charcot" as a part of the Kaiko I cruise, Leg 3, in July-August 1984 under the auspices of the French-Japanese scientific cooperative program. ?? 1987.

  12. Numerical modelling of syntectonic subaqueous sedimentation: The effect of normal faulting and a relay ramp on sediment dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, Ana; Gratacós, Oscar; Clavera-Gispert, Roger; Muñoz, Josep Anton; Hardy, Stuart

    2016-08-01

    Relay ramps are common in extensional settings and play a significant role in sediment dispersal as they control sedimentary pathways. Unlike for subaerial settings, the impact of subaqueous relay ramps on sediment dispersal and clastic sedimentation is less studied. In these subaqueous cases, numerical approximations could be a good approach to understand syntectonic sedimentation. Considering this, a numerical model is used to study the sedimentary infill in an extensional basin, specifically related to a relay ramp system. The study is carried out using a novel program that merges a discrete element code for tectonic deformation, and a stratigraphic modelling code for sedimentation. To perform a test study two configurations are designed: with one normal fault, and with two overlapping normal faults linked by a relay ramp. To these initial configurations, three different deformation velocities, 10, 5 and 2 cm/y, are applied in dip-slip direction. These scenarios are considered as initially submerged. The same incoming amount of three different terrigenous sediments is considered in all the experiments. These sediments are transported basinward in suspension, by processes of advection, dispersion and diffusion. Finally, these examples also include four different boundary conditions for the sedimentary model, which define the source area location for the incoming water and sediment. Results show that the source area location in relation to the available accommodation space plays the major role in the distribution of different sediment types into the basin. Nonetheless, when the source area for water and sediment is defined as regional and parallel to the fault, the grain size distribution obtained by the two overlapping faults configuration has clear asymmetries when compared with the ones obtained by one-fault configurations. Therefore, the different extensional experiments allow concluding that the relay ramp configuration can play an important role in the

  13. Searching for Seismically Active Faults in the Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, S.; Antunes, V.; Arroucau, P.

    2015-12-01

    The repeated occurrence of large magnitude earthquakes in southwest Iberia in historical and instrumental times suggests the presence of active fault segments in the region. However, due to an apparently diffuse seismicity pattern defining a broad region of distributed deformation west of Gibraltar Strait, the question of the location, dimension and geometry of such structures is still open to debate. We recently developed a new algorithm for earthquake location in 3D complex media with laterally varying interface depths, which allowed us to relocate 2363 events having occurred from 2007 to 2013, using P- and S-wave catalog arrival times obtained from the Portuguese Meteorological Institute (IPMA, Instituto Portugues do Mar e da Atmosfera), for a study area lying between 8.5˚W and 5˚W in longitude and 36˚ and 37.5˚ in latitude. The most remarkable change in the seismicity pattern after relocation is an apparent concentration of events, in the North of the Gulf of Cadiz, along a low angle northward-dipping plane rooted at the base of the crust, which could indicate the presence of a major fault. If confirmed, this would be the first structure clearly illuminated by seismicity in a region that has unleashed large magnitude earthquakes. Here, we present results from the joint analysis of focal mechanism solutions and waveform similarity between neighboring events from waveform cross-correlation in order to assess whether those earthquakes occur on the same fault plane.

  14. Active Fault Tolerant Control for Ultrasonic Piezoelectric Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhnifer, Moussa

    2012-07-01

    Ultrasonic piezoelectric motor technology is an important system component in integrated mechatronics devices working on extreme operating conditions. Due to these constraints, robustness and performance of the control interfaces should be taken into account in the motor design. In this paper, we apply a new architecture for a fault tolerant control using Youla parameterization for an ultrasonic piezoelectric motor. The distinguished feature of proposed controller architecture is that it shows structurally how the controller design for performance and robustness may be done separately which has the potential to overcome the conflict between performance and robustness in the traditional feedback framework. A fault tolerant control architecture includes two parts: one part for performance and the other part for robustness. The controller design works in such a way that the feedback control system will be solely controlled by the proportional plus double-integral PI2 performance controller for a nominal model without disturbances and H∞ robustification controller will only be activated in the presence of the uncertainties or an external disturbances. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed fault tolerant control architecture.

  15. Active faulting at Delphi, Greece: Seismotectonic remarks and a hypothesis for the geologic environment of a myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, Luigi

    2000-07-01

    Historical data are fundamental to the understanding of the seismic history of an area. At the same time, knowledge of the active tectonic processes allows us to understand how earthquakes have been perceived by past cultures. Delphi is one of the principal archaeological sites of Greece, the main oracle of Apollo. It was by far the most venerated oracle of the Greek ancient world. According to tradition, the mantic proprieties of the oracle were obtained from an open chasm in the earth. Delphi is directly above one of the main antithetic active faults of the Gulf of Corinth Rift, which bounds Mount Parnassus to the south. The geometry of the fault and slip-parallel lineations on the main fault plane indicate normal movement, with minor right-lateral slip component. Combining tectonic data, archaeological evidence, historical sources, and a reexamination of myths, it appears that the Helice earthquake of 373 B.C. ruptured not only the master fault of the Gulf of Corinth Rift at Helice, but also the antithetic fault at Delphi, similarly to the Corinth earthquake of 1981. Moreover, the presence of an active fault directly below the temples of the oldest sanctuary suggests that the mythological oracular chasm might well have been an ancient tectonic surface rupture.

  16. The West Salton Detachment Fault, Salton Trough, California: a Primary Low-Angle Normal Fault in an Evolving Dextral Wrench Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axen, G. J.; Janecke, S.; Steely, A.; Shirvell, C.; Fluette, A.; Kairouz, M.; Housen, B.; Stockli, D.; Dorsey, R.; Grove, M.

    2006-12-01

    The west Salton detachment fault (WSDF), bounded the W rift flank, and was largely coeval with the southern San Andreas fault (SSAF). The WSDF is exposed in ~E-trending folds: broad, apparently primary corrugations S. Santa Rosa Mts., Borrego Valley-Pinyon Mts., Whale Peak, Vallecito Valley, and Tiera Blanca Mts) and narrow, post-WSDF folds (e.g., adjacent to San Felipe and Earthquake Valley faults). WSDF slip may have begun at ~12+, ~8.1, 5.5 or 4.6 Ma and was probably rapid from ~5 to 2 Ma. Two (U-Th)/He vertical transects from the WSDF footwall show rapid cooling since 12 Ma, and very rapid cooling between ~5.5-4.5 and ~2 Ma. Subsidence curves from the Fish Creek Vallecito basin (FCVB; Dorsey et al., this session) show increased rates at ~8.1 Ma, 5.5, and 4.6 Ma. Syntectonic conglomerate (base ~8.1 Ma) there records earliest extension, but may have been only local. Widespread marine deposits (~6.3 to 4.25 Ma) locally contain syndetachment fault-scarp facies; eustatic sea level rise may have controlled initial marine flooding. Subsidence was most rapid from ~4.6 to 3 Ma. Upper-plate normal faults are rare but folds formed locally. At Borrego Mtn. a WNW-trending anticline formed by ~6 Ma and persisted until after 4 Ma, coeval with WSDF slip. Folding at Split Mtn may have begun earlier. The WSDF has at least 5 km of E or NE slip, from offset basement but higher WSDF strands carry syntectonic conglomerates some additional distance. (U-Th)/He apatite ages from the upper and lower plates suggest ~2.4 km of footwall exhumation, yielding 5-15 km of slip, depending upon dip assumed. WSDF striae scatter widely, but concentrate at 090-110, probably the main or most recent slip direction. CW vertical- axis rotations have occurred (Housen et al., this session): ~3-4 m.y. old FCVB strata are rotated 19° ± 12°, and footwall La Posta pluton at Whale Peak rotated perhaps 36° (relative to the Peninsular Range La Posta). Similar rotations were common in N Baja CA in latest

  17. The effects of pre-existing discontinuities on the surface expression of normal faults: Insights from wet-clay analog modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Burrato, Pierfrancesco; Seno, Silvio; Valensise, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    We use wet-clay analog models to investigate how pre-existing discontinuities (i.e. structures inherited from previous tectonic phases) affect the evolution of a normal fault at the Earth's surface. To this end we first perform a series of three reference experiments driven by a 45° dipping master fault unaffected by pre-existing discontinuities to generate a mechanically isotropic learning set of models. We then replicate the experiment six times introducing a 60°-dipping precut in the clay cake, each time with a different attitude and orientation with respect to an initially-blind, 45°-dipping, master normal fault. In all experiments the precut intersects the vertical projection of the master fault halfway between the center and the right-hand lateral tip. All other conditions are identical for all seven models. By comparing the results obtained from the mechanically isotropic experiments with results from experiments with precuts we find that the surface evolution of the normal fault varies depending on the precut orientation. In most cases the parameters of newly-forming faults are strongly influenced. The largest influence is exerted by synthetic and antithetic discontinuities trending respectively at 30° and 45° from the strike of the master fault, whereas a synthetic discontinuity at 60° and an antithetic discontinuity at 30° show moderate influence. Little influence is exerted by a synthetic discontinuity at 45° and an antithetic discontinuity at 60° from the strike of the master fault. We provide a ranking chart to assess fault-to-discontinuity interactions with respect to essential surface fault descriptors, such as segmentation, vertical-displacement profile, maximum displacement, and length, often used as proxies to infer fault properties at depth. Considering a single descriptor, the amount of deviation induced by different precuts varies from case to case in a rather unpredictable fashion. Multiple observables should be taken into

  18. Detached strata in a Tertiary low-angle normal fault terrane, southeastern California: a sedimentary record of unroofing, breaching, and continued slip

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.M.G.; John, B.E.

    1988-07-01

    Miocene sedimentary strata exposed in the eastern Chemehuevi Mountains, southeastern California, record development of an evolving low-angle normal fault system. The sequence includes more than 1 km of conglomerate and sandstone with rare interbedded monolithologic breccia and volcanic flows. Clasts of Peach Springs Tuff in basal units indicate that this succession is younger than 18 Ma. These rocks have been displaced by a regionally extensive low-angle normal fault, the Chemehuevi detachment, and are folded and faulted. Structural reconstructions and the character of associated fault rocks indicate that the Chemeheuvi fault was initiated at a low angle and that the footwall was progressively unloaded through thinning and displacement of its cover during extensional deformation. The syntectonic sedimentary rocks described here provide evidence that movement continued on the gently dipping (< 15/sup 0/) fault even after part of the fault was breached and the footwall eroded. The Conglomerates and sandstones were deposited by stream flow and debris flow on alluvial fans. Synsedimentary faulting is suggested by angular discordance below one monolithologic breccia bed and by local coarsening-upward sequences. Clast types reveal progressive unroofing of hanging-wall rocks to exposer the Chemehuevi fault zone, from which chloritic, brecciated granite clasts were derived. Clasts were then derived from both the hanging wall and the footwall, footwall debris being dominant high in the section. Distinctive clasts show that late displacement on this evolving fault system was on the order of 1 to 5 km.

  19. Deformation mechanisms, architecture, and petrophysical properties of large normal faults in platform carbonates and their role in the release of carbon dioxide from earth's interior in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio

    2006-04-01

    A challenging theme of research in structural geology is the process of faulting in carbonate rocks: how do the resulting internal architecture and petrophysical properties of faults affect subsurface fluid flow. A better understanding of this process is important to evaluate the potential oil and gas recovery from carbonate reservoirs, and to plan CO 2 containment in the depleted reservoirs. Carbonate rocks may deform with different mechanisms depending primarily on their original sedimentary fabric, diagenetic history, fluid content, and tectonic environment. In this dissertation I investigate the deformation mechanisms, petrophysics, and internal fluid composition of large, seismic, basin-bounding normal faults in low porosity platform carbonates. Based on the nature, orientation, and abutting relationships of the structural elements preserved within the faults and in the surrounding carbonate host rocks, I was able to characterize the mechanisms of fault growth and the fault architecture. Incipient faulting occurred at shallow depths by sequential formation and shearing of pressure solution seams and joints/veins; with ongoing deformation and exhumation, the joint-based mechanism became predominant. The end result is a mature normal fault that juxtaposes basin sedimentary rocks of the hanging wall against deformed carbonates of the footwall. The deformed carbonates of the fault footwalls are composed of rocks with low porosity and permeability and major slip surfaces in the fault core, and fragmented carbonate matrices with high porosity and permeability, and small faults in the damage zone. The degree of fragmentation in the damage zone generally increases towards the fault hanging wall, forming structural domains characterized by different deformation intensity. The rocks of the fault core have sub-spherical pores, those of the damage zone have elongated, crack-like, pores. The permeability structure of the normal fault zones is therefore made up of a fault

  20. Aftershocks illuminate the 2011 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake causative fault zone and nearby active faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, Jr., J. Wright; Shah, Anjana K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Snyder, Stephen L.; Carter, Aina M

    2015-01-01

    Deployment of temporary seismic stations after the 2011 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake produced a well-recorded aftershock sequence. The majority of aftershocks are in a tabular cluster that delineates the previously unknown Quail fault zone. Quail fault zone aftershocks range from ~3 to 8 km in depth and are in a 1-km-thick zone striking ~036° and dipping ~50°SE, consistent with a 028°, 50°SE main-shock nodal plane having mostly reverse slip. This cluster extends ~10 km along strike. The Quail fault zone projects to the surface in gneiss of the Ordovician Chopawamsic Formation just southeast of the Ordovician–Silurian Ellisville Granodiorite pluton tail. The following three clusters of shallow (<3 km) aftershocks illuminate other faults. (1) An elongate cluster of early aftershocks, ~10 km east of the Quail fault zone, extends 8 km from Fredericks Hall, strikes ~035°–039°, and appears to be roughly vertical. The Fredericks Hall fault may be a strand or splay of the older Lakeside fault zone, which to the south spans a width of several kilometers. (2) A cluster of later aftershocks ~3 km northeast of Cuckoo delineates a fault near the eastern contact of the Ordovician Quantico Formation. (3) An elongate cluster of late aftershocks ~1 km northwest of the Quail fault zone aftershock cluster delineates the northwest fault (described herein), which is temporally distinct, dips more steeply, and has a more northeastward strike. Some aftershock-illuminated faults coincide with preexisting units or structures evident from radiometric anomalies, suggesting tectonic inheritance or reactivation.

  1. Moment magnitude, local magnitude and corner frequency of small earthquakes nucleating along a low angle normal fault in the Upper Tiber valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munafo, I.; Malagnini, L.; Chiaraluce, L.; Valoroso, L.

    2015-12-01

    The relation between moment magnitude (MW) and local magnitude (ML) is still a debated issue (Bath, 1966, 1981; Ristau et al., 2003, 2005). Theoretical considerations and empirical observations show that, in the magnitude range between 3 and 5, MW and ML scale 1∶1. Whilst for smaller magnitudes this 1∶1 scaling breaks down (Bethmann et al. 2011). For accomplishing this task we analyzed the source parameters of about 1500 (30.000 waveforms) well-located small earthquakes occurred in the Upper Tiber Valley (Northern Apennines) in the range of -1.5≤ML≤3.8. In between these earthquakes there are 300 events repeatedly rupturing the same fault patch generally twice within a short time interval (less than 24 hours; Chiaraluce et al., 2007). We use high-resolution short period and broadband recordings acquired between 2010 and 2014 by 50 permanent seismic stations deployed to monitor the activity of a regional low angle normal fault (named Alto Tiberina fault, ATF) in the framework of The Alto Tiberina Near Fault Observatory project (TABOO; Chiaraluce et al., 2014). For this study the direct determination of MW for small earthquakes is essential but unfortunately the computation of MW for small earthquakes (MW < 3) is not a routine procedure in seismology. We apply the contributions of source, site, and crustal attenuation computed for this area in order to obtain precise spectral corrections to be used in the calculation of small earthquakes spectral plateaus. The aim of this analysis is to achieve moment magnitudes of small events through a procedure that uses our previously calibrated crustal attenuation parameters (geometrical spreading g(r), quality factor Q(f), and the residual parameter k) to correct for path effects. We determine the MW-ML relationships in two selected fault zones (on-fault and fault-hanging-wall) of the ATF by an orthogonal regression analysis providing a semi-automatic and robust procedure for moment magnitude determination within a

  2. Discrete element modeling of the faulting in the sedimentary cover above an active salt diapir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hongwei; Zhang, Jie; Meng, Lingsen; Liu, Yuping; Xu, Shijing

    2009-09-01

    Geological mapping, seismic analyses, and analogue experiments show that active salt diapirism results in significant faulting in the overburden strata. Faults associated with active diapirism generally develop over the crest of the dome and form a radial pattern. In this study, we have created a 3-D discrete element model and used this model to investigate the fault system over active diapirs. The model reproduces some common features observed in physical experiments and natural examples. The discrete element results show that most faults initiate near the model surface and have displacement decreasing downward. In addition, model results indicate that the earliest fault, working as the master fault, has a strong influence on the subsequent fault pattern. The footwall of the master fault is mainly deformed by arc-parallel stretching and develops a subradial fault pattern, whereas the hanging wall is deformed by both arc-parallel stretching and gliding along the master fault and top of salt, and hence develops both parallel and oblique faults. Model results replicate the fault pattern and deformation mechanism of the Reitbrook dome, Germany.

  3. Characterization of gear faults in variable rotating speed using Hilbert-Huang Transform and instantaneous dimensionless frequency normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Wang, C. C.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of utilizing the instantaneous dimensionless frequency (DLF) normalization and Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) to characterize the different gear faults in case of variable rotating speed. The normalized DLF of the vibration signals are calculated based on the rotating speed of shaft and the instantaneous frequencies of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) which are decomposed by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) process. The faulty gear features on DLF-energy distribution of vibration signal can be extracted without the presence of shaft rotating speed, so that the proposed approach can be applied for characterizing the malfunctions of gearbox system under variable shaft rotating speed. A test rig of gear transmission system is performed to illustrate the gear faults, including worn tooth, broken tooth and gear unbalance. Different methods to determine the instantaneous frequency are employed to verify the consistence of characterization results. The DLF-energy distributions of vibration signals are investigated in different faulty gear conditions. The analysis results demonstrate the capability and effectiveness of the proposed approach for characterizing the gear malfunctions at the DLFs corresponding to the meshing frequency as well as the shaft rotating frequency. The support vector machine (SVM) is then employed to classify the vibration patterns of gear transmission system at different malfunctions. Using the energy distribution at the characteristic DLFs as the features, the different fault types of gear can be identified by SVM with high accuracy.

  4. Elastic-wave propagation and site amplification in the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, from simulated normal faulting earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benz, H.M.; Smith, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The two-dimensional seismic response of the Salt Lake valley to near- and far-field earthquakes has been investigated from simulations of vertically incident plane waves and from normal-faulting earthquakes generated on the basin-bounding Wasatch fault. The plane-wave simulations were compared with observed site amplifications in the Salt Lake valley, based on seismic recordings from nuclear explosions in southern Nevada, that show 10 times greater amplification with the basin than measured values on hard-rock sites. Synthetic seismograms suggest that in the frequency band 0.3 to 1.5 Hz at least one-half the site amplitication can be attributed to the impedance contrast between the basin sediments and higher velocity basement rocks. -from Authors

  5. Segmentation and the coseismic behavior of basin and range normal faults. Examples from east-central Idaho and southwestern Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, Anthony J.; Haller, Kathleen M.

    1991-01-01

    The range-front normal faults of the Lost River and Lemhi Ranges, and the Beaverhead and Tendoy Mountains in east-central Idaho and southwestern Montana have well-preserved fault scarps on Quaternary deposits along much of their lengths. Fault-scarp morphology, the age of deposits displaced by the faults, and the morphology of the range fronts provide a basis for dividing the faults into segments that are typically 20-25 km long. Four characteristics are recognized that help to identify segment boundaries: (1) major en echelon offsets or pronounced gaps in the continuity of fault scarps; (2) distinct, persistent, along-strike changes in fault-scarp morphology that indicate different ages of faulting; (3) major salients in the range front; and (4) transverse bedrock ridges where the cumulative throw is low compared to other places along the fault zone. Only features whose size is measured on the scale of kilometers are regarded as significant enough to represent a segment boundary that could inhibit or halt a propagating rupture. The ability to identify segments of faults that are likely to behave as independent structural entities will improve seismic-hazard assessment. However, one should not assume that the barriers at segment boundaries will completely stop all propagating ruptures.

  6. The 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Fairview Peak-Dixie Valley earthquakes: A triggered normal faulting sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkinson, K.M.; Stein, R.S.; King, G.C.P.

    1996-01-01

    In 1954, four earthquakes of M > 6.0 occurred within a 30 km radius in a period of six months. The Rainbow Mountain-Fairview Peak-Dixie Valley earthquakes are among the largest to have been recorded geodetically in the Basin and Range province. The Fairview Peak earthquake (M=7.2, December 12, 1954) followed two events in the Rainbow Mountains (M=6.2, July 6, and M=6.5, August 24, 1954) by 6 months. Four minutes later the Dixie Valley fault ruptured (M=6.7, December 12, 1954). The changes in static stresses caused by the events are calculated using the Coulomb-Navier failure criterion and assuming uniform slip on rectangular dislocations embedded in an elastic half-space. Coulomb stress changes are resolved on optimally oriented faults and on each of the faults that ruptured in the chain of events. These calculations show that each earthquake in the Rainbow Mountain-Fairview Peak-Dixie Valley sequence was preceded by a static stress change that encouraged failure. The magnitude of the stress increases transferred from one earthquake to another ranged from 0.01 MPa (0.1 bar) to over 0.1 MPa (1 bar). Stresses were reduced by up to 0.1 MPa over most of the Rainbow Mountain-Fairview Peak area as a result of the earthquake sequence. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Mantle-derived CO2 migration along active faults within an extensional basin margin (Fiumicino, Rome, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, S.; Beaubien, S. E.; Ciotoli, G.; D'Ambrogi, C.; Doglioni, C.; Ferrante, V.; Lombardi, S.; Milli, S.; Orlando, L.; Ruggiero, L.; Tartarello, M. C.; Sacco, P.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid migration along faults can be highly complex and spatially variable, with the potential for channeled flow, accumulation in capped porous units, fault cross-flow, lateral migration along strike, or complete sealing. Extensional basin margins can be important for such migration, given the associated crustal thinning and decompression that takes place combined with potential geothermal or mantle gas sources. One such example is near the urban area of Rome, situated along the active extensional continental margin of the Tyrrhenian back arc basin and surrounded by Middle-Upper Pleistocene K-rich and arc-related volcanoes. Recent research activities in the area around Fiumicino, a town 25 km to the west of Rome, has highlighted the close spatial link between degassing CO2 and the faults that provide the necessary vertical migration pathways. In particular, detailed soil gas and gas flux surveys have highlighted the release at surface of large volumes of asthenospheric mantle CO2 in correspondence with normal faults observed in a new seismic reflection profile acquired along the Tiber River. Detailed reconstruction of the Pleistocene-Holocene stratigraphy of the area dates fault activity from 20,000 to 9000 years BP. It is proposed that the gas migrates preferentially along the cataclastic tectonic breccias of the faults until it encounters recent, unconsolidated sediments; porous units within this shallow stratigraphy act as temporary secondary traps for the leaking gas, with local gas release at the ground surface occurring where the sealing of the overlying aquitards has been compromised. Degassing and active faults confirm the extensional tectonics affecting the area and the geodynamic scenario of a mantle wedge beneath the western Apennines, associated with ongoing W-directed subduction. Moreover, degassing highlights the potential geochemical and seismic risks for the highly populated urban areas near Rome.

  8. Estimation of active faulting in a slow deformation area: Culoz fault as a case study (Jura-Western Alps junction).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Taille, Camille; Jouanne, Francois; Crouzet, Christian; Jomard, Hervé; Beck, Christian; de Rycker, Koen; van Daele, Maarten; Lebourg, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The north-western Alps foreland is considered as still experiencing distal effects of Alpine collision, resulting in both horizontal and vertical relative displacements. Based on seismological and geodetic surveys, detailed patterns of active faulting (including subsurface décollements, blind ramps and deeper crustal thrusts have been proposed (Thouvenot et al., 1998), underlining the importance of NW-SE left-lateral strike-slip offsets as along the Vuache and Culoz faults (cf. the 1996 Epagny event: M=5.4; Thouvenot et al., 1998 and the 1822 Culoz event I=VII-VIII; Vogt, 1979). In parallel to this tectonic evolution, the last glaciation-deglaciation cycles contributed to develop large and over-deepened lacustrine basins, such as Lake Le Bourget (Perrier, 1980). The fine grain, post LGM (ie post 18 ky), sedimentary infill gives a good opportunity to evidence late quaternary tectonic deformations. This study focuses on the Culoz fault, extending from the Jura to the West, to the Chautagne swamp and through the Lake Le Bourget to the East. Historical earthquakes are known nearby this fault as ie the 1822 Culoz event. The precise location and geometry of the main fault is illustrated but its Eastern termination still needs to be determined. High resolution seismic sections and side-scan sonar images performed in the 90's (Chapron et al., 1996) showed that the Col du Chat and Culoz faults have locally deformed the quaternary sedimentary infill of the lake. These studies, mainly devoted to paleo-climate analysis were not able to determine neither the geometry of the fault, or to quantify the observed deformations. A new campaign devoted to highlight the fault geometry and associated deformation, has been performed in October 2013. Very tight profiles were performed during this high resolution seismic survey using seistec boomer and sparker sources. In several places the rupture reaches the most recent seismic reflectors underlying that these faults were active during

  9. Relative tectonic activity assessment along the East Anatolian strike-slip fault, Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Abdelrahman

    2016-04-01

    The East Anatolian transform fault is a morphologically distinct and seismically active left-lateral strike-slip fault that extends for ~ 500 km from Karlıova to the Maraş defining the boundary between the Anatolian Block and Syrian Foreland. Deformed landforms along the East Anatolian fault provide important insights into the nature of landscape development within an intra-continental strike-slip fault system. Geomorphic analysis of the East Anatolian fault using geomorphic indices including mountain front sinuosity, stream length-gradient index, drainage density, hypsometric integral, and the valley-width to valley height ratio helped differentiate the faulting into segments of differing degrees of the tectonic and geomorphic activity. Watershed maps for the East Anatolian fault showing the relative relief, incision, and maturity of basins along the fault zone help define segments of the higher seismic risk and help evaluate the regional seismic hazard. The results of the geomorphic indices show a high degree of activity, reveal each segment along the fault is active and represent a higher seismic hazard along the entire fault.

  10. Identifying buried segments of active faults in the northern Rio Grande Rift using aeromagnetic, LiDAR,and gravity data, south-central Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruleman, Cal; Grauch, V. J.

    2013-01-01

    Combined interpretation of aeromagnetic and LiDAR data builds on the strength of the aeromagnetic method to locate normal faults with significant offset under cover and the strength of LiDAR interpretation to identify the age and sense of motion of faults. Each data set helps resolve ambiguities in interpreting the other. In addition, gravity data can be used to infer the sense of motion for totally buried faults inferred solely from aeromagnetic data. Combined interpretation to identify active faults at the northern end of the San Luis Basin of the northern Rio Grande rift has confirmed general aspects of previous geologic mapping but has also provided significant improvements. The interpretation revises and extends mapped fault traces, confirms tectonic versus fluvial origins of steep stream banks, and gains additional information on the nature of active and potentially active partially and totally buried faults. Detailed morphology of surfaces mapped from the LiDAR data helps constrain ages of the faults that displace the deposits. The aeromagnetic data provide additional information about their extents in between discontinuous scarps and suggest that several totally buried, potentially active faults are present on both sides of the valley.

  11. Delineation of Urban Active Faults Using Multi-scale Gravity Analysis in Shenzhen, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    In fact, many cities in the world are established on the active faults. As the rapid urban development, thousands of large facilities, such as ultrahigh buildings, supersized bridges, railway, and so on, are built near or on the faults, which may change the balance of faults and induce urban earthquake. Therefore, it is significant to delineate effectively the faults for urban planning construction and social sustainable development. Due to dense buildings in urban area, the ordinary approaches to identify active faults, like geological survey, artificial seismic exploration and electromagnetic exploration, are not convenient to be carried out. Gravity, reflecting the mass distribution of the Earth's interior, provides a more efficient and convenient method to delineate urban faults. The present study is an attempt to propose a novel gravity method, multi-scale gravity analysis, for identifying urban active faults and determining their stability. Firstly, the gravity anomalies are decomposed by wavelet multi-scale analysis. Secondly, based on the decomposed gravity anomalies, the crust is layered and the multilayer horizontal tectonic stress is inverted. Lastly, the decomposed anomalies and the inverted horizontal tectonic stress are used to infer the distribution and stability of main active faults. For validating our method, a case study on active faults in Shenzhen City is processed. The results show that the distribution of decomposed gravity anomalies and multilayer horizontal tectonic stress are controlled significantly by the strike of the main faults and can be used to infer depths of the faults. The main faults in Shenzhen may range from 4km to 20km in the depth. Each layer of the crust is nearly equipressure since the horizontal tectonic stress has small amplitude. It indicates that the main faults in Shenzhen are relatively stable and have no serious impact on planning and construction of the city.

  12. Late Quaternary Normal Faulting and Hanging Wall Basin Evolution of the Southwestern Rift Margin From Gravity and Geology, B.C.S., MX and Exploring the Influence of Text-Figure Format on Introductory Geology Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Melanie M. D.

    2011-12-01

    An array of north-striking, left-stepping, active normal faults is situated along the southwestern margin of the Gulf of California. This normal fault system is the marginal fault system of the oblique-divergent plate boundary within the Gulf of California. To better understand the role of upper-crustal processes during development of an obliquely rifted plate margin, gravity surveys were conducted across the normal-fault-bounded basins within the gulf-margin array and, along with optically stimulated luminescence dating of offset surfaces, fault-slip rates were estimated and fault patterns across basins were assessed, providing insight into sedimentary basin evolution. Additionally, detailed geologic and geomorphic maps were constructed along two faults within the system, leading to a more complete understanding of the role of individual normal faults within a larger array. These faults slip at a low rate (0.1--1 mm/yr) and have relatively shallow hanging wall basins (˜500--3000 m). Overall, the gulf-margin faults accommodate protracted, distributed deformation at a low rate and provide a minor contribution to overall rifting. Integrating figures with text can lead to greater science learning than when either medium is presented alone. Textbooks, composed of text and graphics, are a primary source of content in most geology classes. It is essential to understand how students approach learning from text and figures in textbook-style learning materials and how the arrangement of the text and figures influences their learning approach. Introductory geology students were eye tracked while learning from textbook-style materials composed of text and graphics. Eye fixation data showed that students spent less time examining the figure than the text, but the students who more frequently examined the figure tended to improve more from the pretest to the posttest. In general, students tended to examine the figure at natural breaks in the reading. Textbook-style materials

  13. The January 2010 Efpalion earthquakes (Gulf of Corinth, Central Greece): earthquake interactions and blind normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganas, Athanassios; Chousianitis, Kostas; Batsi, Evaggelia; Kolligri, Maria; Agalos, Apostolos; Chouliaras, Gerassimos; Makropoulos, Kostas

    2013-04-01

    On 18 January 2010, 15:56 UTC, a M w = 5.1 (National Observatory of Athens; NOA) earthquake occurred near the town of Efpalion (western Gulf of Corinth, Greece), about 10 km to the east of Nafpaktos, along the north coast of the Gulf. Another strong event occurred on 22 January 2010, 00:46 UTC with M w = 5.1 (NOA) approximately 3 km to the NE of the first event. We processed the seismological and geodetic data to examine fault plane geometry, dip direction, and earthquake interactions at the western tip of the Corinth rift. Our data include relocated epicenters of 1,760 events for the period January-June 2010 and daily global positioning system observations from the Efpalio station for the period 1 December 2009-1 March 2010. We suggest that the first event ruptured a blind, north-dipping fault, accommodating north-south extension of the Western Gulf of Corinth. The dip direction of the second event is rather unclear, although a south dip plane is weakly imaged in the post-22 January 2010 aftershock distribution. A Coulomb stress model based on homogeneous slip distribution of the first event showed static stress triggering of the second event of the order of 22-34 KPa that was transferred along the plane of failure. We also point out the existence of north dipping, high-angle faults at 10-15 km depths, which were reactivated because of Coulomb stress transfer, to the west and south of Efpalion. The January 2010 earthquakes ended a 15-year-old quiescence in that area of the Gulf. The crustal volume near Efpalion was also characterized by b values in the range 0.6-0.8 (1970-2010 period).

  14. Active fault and water loading are important factors in triggering earthquake activity around Aswan Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebeasy, R. M.; Gharib, A. A.

    Aswan Lake started impounding in 1964 and reached the highest water level so far in 1978 with a capacity of 133.8 km 3, thus forming the second largest man-made lake in the world. An earthquake of magnitude 5.3 (Ms) took place on 14 November 1981 along the most active part of the E-W Kalabsha fault beneath the Kalabsha bay (the largest bay of the lake). This earthquake was followed by a tremendous number of smaller events that continue till now. A radio-telemetry network of 13 seismic short period stations and a piezometer network of six wells were established around the northern part of the lake. Epicenters were found to cluster around active faults near the lake. The space-time distribution and the relation of the seismicity with the lake water level fluctuations were studied. Six years after flooding the eastern segment of the Kalabsha fault, strong seismicity began following the main shock of 14 November 1981. It occurred four days after the reservoir had reached its seasonal max level. The effect of the North African drought (1982 to present) is clearly seen in the reservoir water level. As it decreased and left the most active fault segments uncovered, the activity (Gebel Marawa area) decreased sharply. Also, the shallow activity was found to be more sensitive to rapid discharging than to the filling. This study indicates that geology, topography, lineations in seismicity, offsets in the faults, changes in fault trends and focal mechanisms are closely related. No relation was found between earthquake activity and both-ground water table fluctuations and water temperatures measured in wells located around the Kalabsha area.

  15. A test of the longevity of impact-induced faults as preferred sites for later tectonic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Duxbury, Elizabeth D.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that impact-induced faults have been preferred sites for later deformation in response to lithospheric stresses has been suggested for several planets and satellites. This hypothesis is investigated on earth by examining whether terrestrial impact structures show higher rates of nearby earthquake activity than do surrounding intraplate regions. For 28 of 30 probable impact structures having an original crater 20 km or more in diameter, the rates of nearby seismicity have been no higher than the regional background rates. For two large probable impact structures, Vredefort and Charlevoix, with higher than normal rates of nearby seismicity, factors other than slip on impact-induced faults appear to control the occurrence of earthquakes. It is concluded that impact-induced faults, at least on earth, do not persist as lithospheric 'weak zones' for periods in excess of several million years after the impact event.

  16. Recent, slow normal and strike-slip faulting in the Pasto Ventura region of the southern Puna Plateau, NW Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, Renjie; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Cosca, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Recent normal and strike-slip faulting on the Puna Plateau of NW Argentina has been linked to lithospheric foundering, gravitational spreading, plate boundary forces and a decrease in crustal shortening from north to south. However, the timing, kinematics and rate of extension remain poorly constrained. We focus on the Pasto Ventura region (NW Argentina) located on the southern Puna Plateau and recent deformation (<1 Ma). Field mapping and kinematic analysis across offset volcanic cinder cones show that the overall extension direction is subhorizontal, is oriented NE-SW to NNE-SSW, and occurs at a slow, time-integrated rate of 0.02 to 0.08 mm/yr since at least 0.8–0.5 Ma. A regional compilation from this study and existing data shows that recent extension across the Puna Plateau is subhorizontal but varies in azimuthal orientation dramatically. Data from the Pasto Ventura region are consistent with a number of models to explain normal and strike-slip faulting on the Puna Plateau, all of which likely influence the region. Some role for lower lithospheric foundering through dripping appears to be seen based on the regional extension directions and ages of mafic volcanism in the southern Puna Plateau.

  17. Advanced InSAR and GPS measurements for the detection of surface movements along the Alto Tiberina (Italy) normal fault system: data modeling and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Polcari, M.; Bignami, C.; Pepe, A.; Solaro, G.; Serpelloni, E.; Moro, M.; Albano, M.; Chiaraluce, L.; Stramondo, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Alto Tiberina fault (ATF) is a low-angle (east-dipping at 15°), 70 km long normal fault (LANF) located in the Umbria-Marche Apennines (central Italy), an area characterized by a SW-NE oriented extension occurring at rates of ~2 mm/yr. Active extension is precisely measured by a dense distribution of GPS stations belonging to several networks, thanks also to additional sites recently installed in the framework of the INGV national RING network and of the ATF observatory. Advanced Interferometry SAR (A-InSAR) techniques play today a key role in Earth Sciences thanks to their capability to detect and monitor slow surface movements over wide areas. A-InSAR techniques, along with in-situ ground measurements, can provide suitable information on the causes of interseismic (seismic, creep) movements. Large datasets of SAR images of European (ERS 1-2 and ENVISAT) and Italian (COSMO-SKyMed) satellites have been used to retrieve surface velocity maps and relevant time series from 1992 to 2014, along both ascending and descending orbits. A network of artificial Corner Reflectors has also been deployed in the proximity of some GPS sites in order to calibrate the processing results of the COSMO-SkyMed SAR data-set and to derive velocity maps. We use an elastic Block Modeling (BM) approach in order to model GPS data by considering the major fault systems as bounds of rotating blocks, while estimating geodetic fault slip-rates.,Thanks to the latest imaging of its deep structure obtained from seismic profiles, the ATF is represented as a complex rough surface with the goal of evaluating the distribution of interseismic fault coupling. The preliminary results obtained show firstly that the observed extension is partially accommodated by interseismic deformation on the ATF, highlighting the important role of this LANF inside an active tectonic contest. Secondarily, using the ATF surface "topography", we found for the resolved areas an interesting correlation between

  18. Transition from collision to subduction in Western Greece: the Katouna-Stamna active fault system and regional kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérouse, E.; Sébrier, M.; Braucher, R.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Bourlès, D.; Briole, P.; Sorel, D.; Dimitrov, D.; Arsenikos, S.

    2016-06-01

    Transition from subduction to collision occurs in Western Greece and is accommodated along the downgoing plate by the Kefalonia right-lateral fault that transfers the Hellenic subduction front to the Apulian collision front. Here we present an active tectonic study of Aitolo-Akarnania (Western Greece) that highlights how such a transition is accommodated in the overriding plate. Based on new multi-scale geomorphic and tectonic observations, we performed an accurate active fault trace mapping in the region, and provide evidence for active normal and left-lateral faulting along the Katouna-Stamna Fault (KSF), a 65-km-long NNW-striking fault system connecting the Amvrakikos Gulf to the Patras Gulf. We further show that the Cenozoic Hellenide thrusts located west of the KSF are no longer active, either in field observation or in GPS data, leading us to propose that the KSF forms the northeastern boundary of a rigid Ionian Islands-Akarnania Block (IAB). Cosmic ray exposure measurements of 10Be and 36Cl were performed on a Quaternary alluvial fan offset along the KSF (~50 m left-lateral offset). A maximum abandonment age of ~12-14 ka for the alluvial fan surface can be determined, giving an estimated KSF minimum geological left-lateral slip rate of ~4 mm year-1, in agreement with high GPS slip rates (~10 mm year-1). Despite this high slip rate, the KSF is characterized by subdued morphological evidence of tectonic activity, a gypsum-breccia bedrock and a low level of seismicity, suggesting a dominantly creeping behavior for this fault. Finally, we discuss how the IAB appears to have been progressively individualized during the Pleistocene (younger than ~1.5 Ma).

  19. San Jacinto Fault Zone guided waves: A discrimination for recently active fault strands near Anza, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Gang; Aki, Keiiti; Vernon, Frank L.

    1997-06-01

    We deployed three 350-m-long eight-element linear seismic arrays in the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) near Anza, California, to record microearthquakes starting in August through December 1995. Two arrays were deployed 18 km northwest of Anza, across the Casa Loma fault (CLF) and the Hot Springs fault (HSF) strands of the SJFZ. The third array was deployed across the San Jacinto fault (SJF) in the Anza slip gap. We observed fault zone guided waves characterized by low-frequency, large amplitudes following S waves at the CLF array and the SJF array for earthquakes occurring within the fault zone. However, we did not observe guided waves at the HSF array for any events. The amplitude spectra of these guided waves showed peaks at 4 Hz at the CLF and 6 Hz at the SJF, which decreased sharply with the distance from the fault trace. In contrast, no spectral peaks at frequency lower than 6 Hz were registered at the HSF array. We used a finite difference method to simulate these guided modes as 5 waves trapped in a low-velocity waveguide sandwiched between high-velocity wall rocks. The guided mode data are adequately fit by a waveguide on the CLF with the average width of 120 m and S velocity of 2.5 km/s, about 25% reduced from the S velocity of the surrounding rock; this waveguide becomes 40 to 60 m wide with the 5 velocity of 2.8 km/s in the Anza slip gap. On the other hand, there is not a continuous waveguide on the HSF at depth. Locations of the events with guided modes suggest that the fault plane waveguide extends along the CLF between the towns of San Jacinto and Anza, dipping northeastward at 75°-80° to a depth of about 18 km; it becomes nearly vertical in the Anza gap. We speculate that the existence of a continuous low-velocity waveguide on the CLF can be caused by the rupture of the magnitude 6.9 earthquake on April 21, 1918, occurring near the towns of San Jacinto and Hemet. Further, the lack of a clear waveguide on the HSF suggests that it was not ruptured in

  20. Recently active traces of the Bartlett Springs Fault, California: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this map is to show the location of and evidence for recent movement on active fault traces within the Bartlett Springs Fault Zone, California. The location and recency of the mapped traces is primarily based on geomorphic expression of the fault as interpreted from large-scale aerial photography. In a few places, evidence of fault creep and offset Holocene strata in trenches and natural exposures have confirmed the activity of some of these traces. This publication is formatted both as a digital database for use within a geographic information system (GIS) and for broader public access as map images that may be browsed on-line or download a summary map. The report text describes the types of scientific observations used to make the map, gives references pertaining to the fault and the evidence of faulting, and provides guidance for use of and limitations of the map.

  1. Preservation of amorphous ultrafine material: A proposed proxy for slip during recent earthquakes on active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirono, Tetsuro; Asayama, Satoru; Kaneki, Shunya; Ito, Akihiro

    2016-11-01

    The criteria for designating an “Active Fault” not only are important for understanding regional tectonics, but also are a paramount issue for assessing the earthquake risk of faults that are near important structures such as nuclear power plants. Here we propose a proxy, based on the preservation of amorphous ultrafine particles, to assess fault activity within the last millennium. X-ray diffraction data and electron microscope observations of samples from an active fault demonstrated the preservation of large amounts of amorphous ultrafine particles in two slip zones that last ruptured in 1596 and 1999, respectively. A chemical kinetic evaluation of the dissolution process indicated that such particles could survive for centuries, which is consistent with the observations. Thus, preservation of amorphous ultrafine particles in a fault may be valuable for assessing the fault’s latest activity, aiding efforts to evaluate faults that may damage critical facilities in tectonically active zones.

  2. Preservation of amorphous ultrafine material: A proposed proxy for slip during recent earthquakes on active faults

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, Tetsuro; Asayama, Satoru; Kaneki, Shunya; Ito, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The criteria for designating an “Active Fault” not only are important for understanding regional tectonics, but also are a paramount issue for assessing the earthquake risk of faults that are near important structures such as nuclear power plants. Here we propose a proxy, based on the preservation of amorphous ultrafine particles, to assess fault activity within the last millennium. X-ray diffraction data and electron microscope observations of samples from an active fault demonstrated the preservation of large amounts of amorphous ultrafine particles in two slip zones that last ruptured in 1596 and 1999, respectively. A chemical kinetic evaluation of the dissolution process indicated that such particles could survive for centuries, which is consistent with the observations. Thus, preservation of amorphous ultrafine particles in a fault may be valuable for assessing the fault’s latest activity, aiding efforts to evaluate faults that may damage critical facilities in tectonically active zones. PMID:27827413

  3. Holocene activity and paleoseismicity of the Selaha Fault, southeastern segment of the strike-slip Xianshuihe Fault Zone, Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Lin, Aiming

    2017-01-01

    In this study we examine the Holocene activity, including slip rate and paleoseismicity, of the Selaha Fault, a branch of the left-lateral strike-slip Xianshuihe Fault Zone located along the southeastern segment of the Ganzhi-Yushu-Xianshuihe Fault System (GYXFS) of the Tibetan Plateau. Interpretation of high-resolution images and field investigations reveal that the Selaha Fault is characterized by left-lateral strike-slip faulting with an average horizontal slip-rate of 9.0 mm/year during the Holocene. Trench excavations and 14C dating results show that at least three morphogenic earthquakes occurred during the past millennium; the most recent event occurred in the past 450 years and corresponds to the 1786 M 7.75 earthquake. The penultimate seismic event (E2) occurred in the period between 560 and 820 year BP (i.e., 1166-1428 CE) and is probably associated with the 1327 M 7.5 earthquake. The antepenultimate event (E3) is inferred to have occurred in the period between 820 ± 30 and 950 ± 30 year BP. Our results confirm that the Selaha Fault, as a portion of the GYXFS, plays an important role as a tectonic boundary in releasing the strain energy accumulated during the northeastward motion of the Tibetan Plateau in response to the ongoing northward penetration of the Indian Plate into the Eurasian Plate. The strain energy is released in the form of repeated large earthquakes that are recorded by strike-slip displacements of stream channels and alluvial fans.

  4. Active faults in Lebanon : kinematics and interseismic behavior measured from radar interferometry (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasserre, C.; Pinel-Puysségur, B.; Vergnolle, M.; Klinger, Y.; Pathier, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Levant fault system, more than 1000 km-long, marks the limit between the Arabian and Sinaï tectonic plates, extending from the Aqaba gulf in the Red Sea to Turkey. Mostly left-lateral, it forms a transpression zone in Lebanon, associating strike-slip faults such as the Yammouneh fault and thrust faults such as the Mount Lebanon thrust. This fault system in Lebanon is at the origin of large historical earthquakes during the past two thousand years (551 AD on the thrust offshore and 1837 along the Roum fault inland, 1759 along the Rashaia and Sergaya faults). We aim at characterizing the present-day behavior of active faults in Lebanon, in particular the Yammouneh fault which did not break since 1202, to contribute to a better assessment of the seismic hazard in this region. Space geodesy techniques (GPS, InSAR) allow to quantify the present-day displacements across faults (a few mm/yr during the interseismic period), and to model stress loading and relaxation processes during the seismic cycle, at the fault scale and at the regional scale. GPS campaign measurements have been made along profiles perpendicular to the Yammouneh fault. In addition, an important archive of radar images covering Lebanon (acquired by the ERS and Envisat satellites, along descending and ascending orbits) is also available. We process ERS and Envisat radar data to obtain the average interseismic velocity field across faults over the past 15-20 years. Techniques of interferograms networks processing (MuLSAR), atmospheric phase delays correction from global atmospherical models, DEM correction and time series inversion (NSBAS) are used to overcome the main remaining limitations in the measurements accuracy (low coherence, strong atmospheric delays, long wavelength deformation signal). The final goal is to propose a modelling of the surface displacement field to quantify the present-day kinematics of active fauts in Lebanon, taking into account GPS data as well as tectonic and

  5. Active Faults, Modern Seismicity And Block Structure Of Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatinsky, Y.; Rundquist, D.

    2004-12-01

    The analysis of on active faults and seismicity shows that the only a northern part of Eurasia should be regarded as an indivisible lithosphere unit. We defined it as the North Eurasian plate (Gatinsky, Rundquist, 2004) unlike the Eurasian plate s.l., which can be used only for paleotectonic reconstructions. The North Eurasian plate is bordered by zones of seismic activity traced along the Gakkel ridge, the Chersky and Stanovoi ranges, the Baikal rift, Altai--Sayany region, northern Tien Shan, Pamir, Hindu Kush and Kopet Dagh, Great Caucasus, northern Anatolia, Rhodopes, Carpathians, eastern and central Alps. Relationships between this plate and Europe west of the Rhine grabens remain ambiguous. The satellite measurements for them seem to be similar (Nocquet, Calais, 2003), but structural and seismic evidences allow suggesting their incipient division. Wide zones between this plate and neighboring ones can be distinguished outside north Eurasia. These zones consist of numerous blocks of various sizes. Block boundaries are mainly characterized by the high seismicity and development of active wrench faults, thrusts or modern rifts. Some of such zones were named earlier as "diffuse plate boundaries" (Stein et al., 2002; Bird et al, 2003). We suggest to name them as "transit zones" because they are situated between large lithosphere plates and as if transfer the stress field of one of them to other. Blocks within the transit zones reveal local divergences in GPS vectors of their displacements in the ITRF system and especially with respect to fixed Eurasia. At the same time data of satellite measurements emphasize the unity of the North Eurasian plate, which moves eastward in absolute coordinates with some clockwise rotation. The stress distribution in inner parts of the continent is being affected by the interaction with different plates and blocks. It can be more effectively illustrated by a «triangle» of the maximal seismic activity of Eurasia in the central Asia

  6. Thermal Field Indicator for Identifying Active Faults and its Instability From Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, P.; Ma, S.

    2007-12-01

    The relationship between the thermal filed and strain field during deformation of faults is the physical basis to clarify whether satellite infrared information and the ground temperature field can be used to study fault activity. This study attempts to discuss these problems by experiments in the laboratory. The two-direction servo-control system was used to load on the samples with compressional and extensional en echelon faults. An infrared thermal image system and a contact-type thermometer recorded synchronously variations of the bright temperature field of infrared radiation and temperature field during deformation of the rock specimens. A digital CCD camera and a soft ware based on the digital speckle correlation method (DSCM) was utilized to capture images and to analyze them, yielding processes of displacement and strain fields. The experimental result shows as follows: 1 The temperature is highest at the jog area of the compressional en echelon faults, whereas that is lowest at the extensional en echelon faults prior to failure of the jog area. The record by DSCM displays that the mean strain of the jog area is largest for the compressional en echelon faults, while that is smallest for the extensional en echelon faults. These mean that the temperature field has clear responses to the opposite stress states at the jog areas of two kinds of en echelon faults, providing an indicator for determining whether the fault segment has slid. 2 The en echelon faults experience two deformation stages from stress building up and fault propagating at the jog area to unstable sliding along the fault. Correspondingly the mechanism of heating-up is turned from strain heating into frictional heating. Three kinds of phenomena have been observed at the jog area and its vicinity during the stage of transformation. They are temperature drop, fast fluctuation of temperature, and pulses of temperature rising, respectively. Mechanism of these phenomena is discussed. 3 These

  7. Active faulting, 3-D geological architecture and Plio-Quaternary structural evolution of extensional basins in the central Apennine chain, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Stefano; Falcucci, Emanuela; Ladina, Chiara; Marzorati, Simone; Galadini, Fabrizio

    2017-03-01

    The general basin and range Apennine topographic characteristic is generally attributed to the presently active normal fault systems, whose long-term activity (throughout the Quaternary) is supposed to have been responsible for the creation of morphological/structural highs and lows. By coupling field geological survey and geophysical investigations, we reconstructed the 3-D geological model of an inner tectonic basin of the central Apennines, the Subequana Valley, bounded to the northeast by the southern segment of one of the major active and seismogenic normal faults of the Apennines, known as the Middle Aterno Valley-Subequana Valley fault system. Our analyses revealed that, since the late Pliocene, the basin evolved in a double half-graben configuration through a polyphase tectonic development. An early phase, Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene in age, was controlled by the ENE-WSW-striking and SSE-dipping Avezzano-Bussi fault, that determined the formation of an early depocentre towards the N-NW. Subsequently, the main fault became the NW-SE-striking faults, which drove the formation during the Quaternary of a new fault-related depocentre towards the NE. By considering the available geological information, a similar structural evolution has likely involved three close tectonic basins aligned along the Avezzano-Bussi fault, namely the Fucino Basin, the Subequana Valley, and the Sulmona Basin, and it has been probably experienced by other tectonic basins of the chain. The present work therefore points out the role of pre-existing transverse tectonic structures, inherited by previous tectonic phases, in accommodating the ongoing tectonic deformation and, consequently, in influencing the structural characteristics of the major active normal faults. This has implications in terms of earthquake fault rupture propagation and segmentation. Lastly, the morpho-tectonic setting of the Apennine chain results from the superposition of deformation events whose

  8. SURFACE RUPTURE OF THE NORMAL SEISMIC FAULTS AND SLOPE FAILURES APPEARED IN APRIL 11th, 2011 FUKUSHIMA-PREFECTURE HAMADOORI EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmi, Zaheer Abbas; Konagai, Kazuo; Kyokawa, Hiroyuki; Tetik, Cigdem

    On April 11th, 2011, Iwaki region of Fukushima prefecture was jolted by Fukushima-Prefecture Hamadoori Earthquake. Surface ruptures were observed along causative Idosawa and Yunotake normal faults. In addition to numerous small slope failures, a coherent landslide and building structures of Tabito Junior High School, bisected by Idosawa Fault, were found along the causative faults. A precise digital elevation model of the coherent landslide was obtained through the ground and air-born LiDAR surveys. The measurements of perimeters of the gymnasium building and the swimming pool of Tabito Junior High School have shown that ground undergoes a slow and steady/continual deformation.

  9. Upper Pleistocene - Holocene activity of the Carrascoy Fault (Murcia, SE Spain): preliminary results from paleoseismological research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Banda, Raquel; Garcia-Mayordomo, Julian; Insua-Arevalo, Juan M.; Salazar, Angel; Rodriguez-Escudero, Emilio; Alvarez-Gomez, Jose A.; Martinez-Diaz, Jose J.; Herrero, Maria J.; Medialdea, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    The Carrascoy Fault is located in the Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera (Southern Spain). In particular, the Carrascoy Fault is one of the major faults forming the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, the main structure accommodating the convergence between Nubian and Eurasian plates in the westernmost Mediterranean. So far, the Carrascoy Fault has been defined as a left-lateral strike-slip fault. It extends for at least 31 km in a NE-SW trend from the village of Zeneta (Murcia) at its northeastern tip, to the Cañaricos village, controlling the northern edge of the Carrascoy Range and its linkage to the Guadalentin Depression towards the southwest. This is an area of moderate seismic activity, but densely populated, the capital of the region, Murcia, being settled very close to the fault. Hence, the knowledge of the structure and kinematics of the Carrascoy Fault is essential for assessing reliably the seismic hazard of the region. We present a detailed-scale geological and geomorphological map along the fault zone created from a LIDAR DEM combined with fieldwork, and geological and geophysical information. Furthermore, a number of trenches have been dug across the fault at different locations providing insights in the fault most recent activity as well as paleoseismic data. Preliminary results suggest that the Cararscoy Fault has recently changed its kinematic showing a near pure reverse motion. According to this, the fault can be divided into two distinct segments, the eastern one: Zeneta - Fuensanta, and the western one: Fuensanta - Cañaricos, each one having its own characteristic style and geodynamics. Some new active strands of the fault locate at the foot of the very first relief towards the North of the older strand, forming the current southern border of the Guadalentin Depression. These new faults show an increasingly reverse component westwards, so that the Fuensanta - Cañaricos segment is constituted by thrusts, which are blind at its western end

  10. Digital Database of Recently Active Traces of the Hayward Fault, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, James J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this map is to show the location of and evidence for recent movement on active fault traces within the Hayward Fault Zone, California. The mapped traces represent the integration of the following three different types of data: (1) geomorphic expression, (2) creep (aseismic fault slip),and (3) trench exposures. This publication is a major revision of an earlier map (Lienkaemper, 1992), which both brings up to date the evidence for faulting and makes it available formatted both as a digital database for use within a geographic information system (GIS) and for broader public access interactively using widely available viewing software. The pamphlet describes in detail the types of scientific observations used to make the map, gives references pertaining to the fault and the evidence of faulting, and provides guidance for use of and limitations of the map. [Last revised Nov. 2008, a minor update for 2007 LiDAR and recent trench investigations; see version history below.

  11. Active Fault Geometry and Crustal Deformation Along the San Andreas Fault System Through San Gorgonio Pass, California: The View in 3D From Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, C.; Hauksson, E.; Plesch, A.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the 3D geometry and deformation style of the San Andreas fault (SAF) is critical to accurate dynamic rupture and ground motion prediction models. We use 3D alignments of hypocenter and focal mechanism nodal planes within a relocated earthquake catalog (1981-2011) [Hauksson et al., 2012] to develop improved 3D fault models for active strands of the SAF and adjacent secondary structures. Through San Gorgonio Pass (SGP), earthquakes define a mechanically layered crust with predominantly high-angle strike-slip faults in the upper ~10 km, while at greater depth, intersecting sets of strike-slip, oblique slip and low-angle thrust faults define a wedge-shaped volume deformation of the lower crust. In some places, this interface between upper and lower crustal deformation may be an active detachment fault, and may have controlled the down-dip extent of recent fault rupture. Alignments of hypocenters and nodal planes define multiple principal slip surfaces through SGP, including a through-going steeply-dipping predominantly strike-slip Banning fault strand at depth that upward truncates a more moderately dipping (40°-50°) blind, oblique North Palm Springs fault. The North Palm Springs fault may be the active down-dip extension of the San Gorgonio Pass thrust offset at depth by the principal, through-going Banning strand. In the northern Coachella Valley, seismicity indicates that the Garnet Hill and Banning fault strands are most likely sub-parallel and steeply dipping (~70°NE) to depths of 8-10 km, where they intersect and merge with a stack of moderately dipping to low-angle oblique thrust faults. Gravity and water well data confirm that these faults are sub-parallel and near vertical in the upper 2-3 km. Although the dense wedge of deep seismicity below SGP and largely south of the SAF contains multiple secondary fault sets of different orientations, the predominant fault set appears to be a series of en echelon NW-striking oblique strike-slip faults

  12. Determination of paleoseismic activity over a large time-scale: Fault scarp dating with 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozafari Amiri, Nasim; Tikhomirov, Dmitry; Sümer, Ökmen; Özkaymak, Çaǧlar; Uzel, Bora; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Vockenhuber, Christof; Sözbilir, Hasan; Akçar, Naki

    2016-04-01

    Bedrock fault scarps are the most direct evidence of past earthquakes to reconstruct seismic activity in a large time-scale using cosmogenic 36Cl dating if built in carbonates. For this method, a surface along the fault scarp with a minimum amount of erosion is required to be chosen as an ideal target point. The section of the fault selected for sampling should cover at least two meters of the fault surface from the lower part of the scarp, where intersects with colluvium wedge. Ideally, sampling should be performed on a continuous strip along the direction of the fault slip direction. First, samples of 10 cm high and 15 cm wide are marked on the fault surface. Then, they are collected using cutters, hammer and chisel in a thickness of 3 cm. The main geometrical factors of scarp dip, scarp height, top surface dip and colluvium dip are also measured. Topographic shielding in the sampling spot is important to be estimated as well. Moreover, density of the fault scarp and colluvium are calculated. The physical and chemical preparations are carried in laboratory for AMS and chemical analysis of the samples. A Matlab® code is used for modelling of seismically active periods based on increasing production rate of 36Cl following each rupture, when a buried section of a fault is exposed. Therefore, by measuring the amount of cosmogenic 36Cl versus height, the timing of major ruptures and their offsets are determined. In our study, Manastır, Mugırtepe and Rahmiye faults in Gediz graben, Priene-Sazlı, Kalafat and Yavansu faults in Büyük Menderes graben and Ören fault in Gökava half-graben have been examined in the seismically active region of Western Turkey. Our results reconstruct at least five periods of high seismic activity during the Holocene time, three of which reveal seismic ruptures beyond the historical pre-existing data.

  13. Normalization and source separation of acoustic emission signals for condition monitoring and fault detection of multi-cylinder diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiliang; Lin, Tian Ran; Tan, Andy C. C.

    2015-12-01

    A signal processing technique is presented in this paper to normalize and separate the source of non-linear acoustic emission (AE) signals of a multi-cylinder diesel engine for condition monitoring applications and fault detection. The normalization technique presented in the paper overcomes the long-existing non-linearity problem of AE sensors so that responses measured by different AE sensors can be quantitatively analysed and compared. A source separation algorithm is also developed in the paper to separate the mixture of the normalized AE signals produced by a multi-cylinder diesel engine by utilising the system parameters (i.e., wave attenuation constant and the arrival time delay) of AE wave propagation determined by a standard pencil lead break test on the engine cylinder head. It is shown that the source separation algorithm is able to separate the signal interference of adjacent cylinders from the monitored cylinder once the wave attenuation constant and the arrival time delay along the propagation path are known. The algorithm is particularly useful in the application of AE technique for condition monitoring of small-size diesel engines where signal interference from the neighbouring cylinders is strong.

  14. Identifying active faults in Switzerland using relocated earthquake catalogs and optimal anisotropic dynamic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M.; Wang, Y.; Husen, S.; Woessner, J.; Kissling, E. H.; Ouillon, G.; Giardini, D.; Sornette, D.

    2010-12-01

    Active fault zones are the causal locations of most earthquakes, which release tectonic stresses. Yet, identification and association of faults and earthquakes is not straightforward. On the one hand, many earthquakes occur on faults that are unknown. On the other hand, systematic biases and uncertainties in earthquake locations hamper the association of earthquakes and known faults. We tackle the problem of linking earthquakes to faults by relocating them in a non-linear probabilistic manner and by applying a three-dimensional optimal anisotropic dynamic clustering approach to the relocated events to map fault networks. Non-linear probabilistic earthquake location allows to compute probability density functions that provide the complete probabilistic solution to the earthquake hypocenter location problem, including improved information on location uncertainties. To improve absolute earthquake locations we use a newly developed combined controlled-source seismology and local earthquake tomography model, which allows the use of secondary phases, such as PmP. Dynamic clustering is a very general image processing technique that allows partitioning a set of data points. Our improved optimal anisotropic dynamic clustering technique accounts for uncertainties in earthquake locations by the use of probability density functions, as provided by non-linear probabilistic earthquake location. Hence, number and size of the reconstructed faults is controlled by earthquake location uncertainty. We apply our approach to seismicity in Switzerland to identify active faults in the region. Relocated earthquake catalogs and associated fault networks will be compared to already existing information on faults, such as geological and seismotectonic maps, to derive a more complete picture of active faulting in Switzerland.

  15. Novel neural networks-based fault tolerant control scheme with fault alarm.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qikun; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Peng; Lim, Cheng-Chew

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the problem of adaptive active fault-tolerant control for a class of nonlinear systems with unknown actuator fault is investigated. The actuator fault is assumed to have no traditional affine appearance of the system state variables and control input. The useful property of the basis function of the radial basis function neural network (NN), which will be used in the design of the fault tolerant controller, is explored. Based on the analysis of the design of normal and passive fault tolerant controllers, by using the implicit function theorem, a novel NN-based active fault-tolerant control scheme with fault alarm is proposed. Comparing with results in the literature, the fault-tolerant control scheme can minimize the time delay between fault occurrence and accommodation that is called the time delay due to fault diagnosis, and reduce the adverse effect on system performance. In addition, the FTC scheme has the advantages of a passive fault-tolerant control scheme as well as the traditional active fault-tolerant control scheme's properties. Furthermore, the fault-tolerant control scheme requires no additional fault detection and isolation model which is necessary in the traditional active fault-tolerant control scheme. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed techniques.

  16. The Campania-Lucania Extensional Fault System, southern Italy: A suggestion for a uniform model of active extension in the Italian Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, F.

    2011-10-01

    By integrating new field data, seismic lines interpretation and a critical review of the literature, this work highlights a regional array of normal faults in the southern Apennines of Italy, which have been active during the Quaternary and are referred to as the "Campania-Lucania Extensional Fault System" (CLEFS). The CLEFS consists of three main NW-SE striking alignments of normal faults, which for the first time are considered genetically linked and methodically described in their geometry, kinematics and displacement. The CROP04 seismic profile, crossing the central part of the CLEFS, was strictly constrained by detailed geological surveys and reinterpreted to define the downdip trajectory of the major normal faults. These latter have been observed to splay from an east dipping low-angle detachment surface penetrating the upper crust to depths of 12-13 km. The time-space evolution of the faults and the associated basins was defined through a review of the stratigraphic data on the syntectonic deposits. As regards the overall geometry and the associate sense of shear (top-to-east), the CLEFS sensibly differs from the extensional features described previously in this region but shows surprising affinities with the "Etrurian Fault System," an extensional megastructure of the northern Apennines. Remarkable similarities concern the extent, the surface and subsurface geometry, the timing of activity and the amount of the associated deformation. These common characters recognized over a belt nearly 600 km long lead to formulation of a low-angle normal fault-driven extension geometrical-kinematic model, which is sound for the whole active extensional belt of Italy.

  17. Active fault, fault growth and segment linkage along the Janauri anticline (frontal foreland fold), NW Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Javed N.; Shah, Afroz A.; Sahoo, Ajit K.; Puhan, B.; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Shinde, Dattatraya P.; Juyal, Navin; Singhvi, Ashok K.; Rath, Shishir K.

    2010-03-01

    The 100 km long frontal foreland fold — the Janauri anticline in NW Himalayan foothills represents a single segment formed due to inter-linking of the southern (JS1) and the northern (JS2) Janauri segments. This anticline is a product of the fault related fold growth that facilitated lateral propagation by acquiring more length and linkage of smaller segments giving rise to a single large segment. The linked portion marked by flat-uplifted surface in the central portion represents the paleo-water gap of the Sutlej River. This area is comparatively more active in terms of tectonic activity, well justified by the occurrence of fault scarps along the forelimb and backlimb of the anticline. Occurrence of active fault scarps on either side of the anticline suggests that the slip accommodated in the frontal part is partitioned between the main frontal thrust i.e. the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) and associated back-thrust. The uplift in the piedmont zone along southern portion of Janauri anticline marked by dissected younger hill range suggests fore-landward propagation of tectonic activity along newly developed Frontal Piedmont Thrust (FPT), an imbricated emergent thrust branching out from the HFT system. We suggests that this happened because the southern segment JS1 does not linked-up with the northwestern end of Chandigarh anticline segment (CS). In the northwestern end of the Janauri anticline, due to no structural asperity the tectonic activity on HFT was taken-up by two (HF1 — in the frontal part and HF2 — towards the hinterland side) newly developed parallel active faults ( Hajipur Fault) branched from the main JS2 segment. The lateral propagation and movements along HF1 and HF2 resulted in uplift of the floodplain as well as responsible for the northward shift of the Beas River. GPR and trench investigations suggest that earthquakes during the recent past were accompanied with surface rupture. OSL (optical stimulated luminescence) dates from the trench

  18. Geomorphic features of active faults around the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, and no evidence of surface rupture associated with the 2015 Gorkha earthquake along the faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumahara, Yasuhiro; Chamlagain, Deepak; Upreti, Bishal Nath

    2016-04-01

    The M7.8 April 25, 2015, Gorkha earthquake in Nepal was produced by a slip on the low-angle Main Himalayan Thrust, a décollement below the Himalaya that emerges at the surface in the south as the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT). The analysis of the SAR interferograms led to the interpretations that the event was a blind thrust and did not produce surface ruptures associated with the seismogenic fault. We conducted a quick field survey along four active faults near the epicentral area around the Kathmandu Valley (the Jhiku Khola fault, Chitlang fault, Kulekhani fault, Malagiri fault and Kolphu Khola fault) from July 18-22, 2015. Those faults are located in the Lesser Himalaya on the hanging side of the HFT. Based on our field survey carried out in the area where most typical tectonic landforms are developed, we confirmed with local inhabitants the lack of any new surface ruptures along these faults. Our observations along the Jhiku Khola fault showed that the fault had some definite activities during the Holocene times. Though in the past it was recognized as a low-activity thrust fault, our present survey has revealed that it has been active with a predominantly right-lateral strike-slip with thrust component. A stream dissecting a talus surface shows approximately 7-m right-lateral offset, and a charcoal sample collected from the upper part of the talus deposit yielded an age of 870 ± 30 y.B.P, implying that the talus surface formed close to 870 y.B.P. Accordingly, a single or multiple events of the fault must have occurred during the last 900 years, and the slip rate we estimate roughly is around 8 mm/year. The fault may play a role to recent right-lateral strike-slip tectonic zone across the Himalayan range. Since none of the above faults showed any relationship corresponding to the April 25 Gorkha earthquake, it is possibility that a potential risk of occurrence of large earthquakes does exist close to the Kathmandu Valley due to movements of these active

  19. Late Cenozoic deformation of the Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone and its implications for the earthquake activities in the Songliao basin, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhongyuan, Yu; Peizhen, Zhang; Wei, Min; Qinghai, Wei; Limei, Wang; Bin, Zhao; Shuang, Liu; Jian, Kang

    2015-08-01

    The Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone is a major tectonic feature cutting through the Songliao Basin from south to north in NE China. Five earthquakes with magnitudes over 5 that occurred during the past 30 years suggest the fault zone is a seismogenic structure with future seismic potential. The structural pattern, tectonic history, Quaternary activity and seismic potential have previously been unknown due to the Quaternary sedimentary coverage and lack of large historic earthquakes (M > 7). In this paper, we use seismic reflection profiles and drilling from petroleum explorations and shallow-depth seismic reflections to study those problems. The total length of the Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone is more than 400 km; modern seismicity delineates it into 4 segments each with a length of 90-100 km. In cross-section view, the folds and associated faults form a complex structural belt with a width of more than 10 km. Shallow-level seismic reflection across the Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone reveals that the Late Quaternary sediments were folded and faulted, indicating its present tectonic activity. The Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone and Songliao Basin have been subjected to three stages of tectonic evolution: a rifting stage characterized by normal faulting and extension (∼145-112 Ma), a prolonged stage of thermal subsidence (∼112-65 Ma), and a tectonic reversal that has been taking place since ∼65 Ma. Our shallow-level reflection profiles show that the folding and reverse faulting have influenced the Late Quaternary sediments. The seismicity and moderate earthquakes suggest that the tectonic activity persists today. The deformation rate across the Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone, however, is measured to be very slow. In conjunction with the inference that most deformation in NE China may be taken up by the Yilan-Yitong Fault Zone bounding the Songliao Basin to the east, we suggest moderate earthquake potential and thus moderate seismic hazards along the Da'an-Dedu Fault Zone. The geological structures, which

  20. Active fault systems and tectono-topographic configuration of the central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szynkaruk, Ewa; Graduño-Monroy, Víctor Hugo; Bocco, Gerardo

    2004-07-01

    The central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) reflects the interplay between three regional fault systems: the NNW-SSE to NW-SE striking Taxco-Querétaro fault system, the NE-SW striking system, and the E-W striking Morelia-Acambay fault system. The latter is the youngest and consists of fault scarps up to 500 m high, whose formation caused structural and morphological reorganization of the region. In this paper, we investigate possible activity of the three systems within the central TMVB, and assess the role that they play in controlling the tectono-topographic configuration of the area. Our study is based on DEM-derived morphometric maps, longitudinal river profiles, geomorphologic mapping, and structural field data concerning recent faulting. We find that all three regional fault systems are active within the central TMVB, possibly with different displacement rates and/or type of motion; and that NNW-SSE and NE-SW striking faults control the major tectono-topographic elements that build up the region, which are being re-shaped by E-W striking faults. We also find that tectonic information can be deciphered from the topography of the youthful volcanic arc in question, regardless its complexity.

  1. Should ground-motion records be rotated to fault-normal/parallel or maximum direction for response history analysis of buildings?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reyes, Juan C.; Kalkan, Erol

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, regulatory seismic codes (for example, California Building Code) require at least two sets of horizontal ground-motion components for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of building structures. For sites within 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal and fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHAs should be performed separately—when FN and then FP direction are aligned with transverse direction of the building axes. This approach is assumed to lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. The validity of this assumption is examined here using 3D computer models of single-story structures having symmetric (torsionally stiff) and asymmetric (torsionally flexible) layouts subjected to an ensemble of near-fault ground motions with and without apparent velocity pulses. In this parametric study, the elastic vibration period is varied from 0.2 to 5 seconds, and yield-strength reduction factors, R, are varied from a value that leads to linear-elastic design to 3 and 5. Further validations are performed using 3D computer models of 9-story structures having symmetric and asymmetric layouts subjected to the same ground-motion set. The influence of the ground-motion rotation angle on several engineering demand parameters (EDPs) is examined in both linear-elastic and nonlinear-inelastic domains to form benchmarks for evaluating the use of the FN/FP directions and also the maximum direction (MD). The MD ground motion is a new definition for horizontal ground motions for use in site-specific ground-motion procedures for seismic design according to provisions of the American Society of Civil Engineers/Seismic Engineering Institute (ASCE/SEI) 7-10. The results of this study have important implications for current practice, suggesting that ground motions rotated to MD or FN/FP directions do not necessarily provide

  2. Active faulting in the frontal Rif Cordillera (Fes region, Morocco): Constraints from GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalouan, Ahmed; Gil, Antonio J.; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ahmamou, M.'Fedal; Ruano, Patricia; de Lacy, Maria Clara; Ruiz-Armenteros, Antonio Miguel; Benmakhlouf, Mohamed; Riguzzi, Federica

    2014-07-01

    The southern Rif cordillera front, between Fes and Meknes, is formed by the Prerif Ridges, which constitute a thrust and fold belt, in contact with the Saïss foreland basin. Geological evidence and regional GPS network data support recent and active tectonics of this Alpine cordillera, with a top-to-the-S-SW motion with respect to stable Africa. A local non-permanent GPS network was installed in 2007 around Fes to constrain the present-day activity of the mountain front. Six GPS sites are located in the Prerif mountain front (jbel Thratt and jbel Zalarh), the Saïss basin and the foreland constituted by the tabular Middle Atlas. Measurements of the GPS network in 2007, 2009 and 2012, over a five year span, seem to indicate that this region is tectonically active and is subjected to significant horizontal motions: (i) a regional displacement toward the SW with respect to stable Africa, showing an average rate of 2 mm/yr; (ii) a southwestward convergent motion between the jbel Thratt with respect to the Saïss basin and the eastern Zalarh ridge, with an average rate of about 4 mm/yr; and (iii) moderate NNE-SSW divergent dextral motion between the Saïss basin and the northern front of the tabular Middle Atlas with an average rate of about 1-2 mm/yr. The regional southwestward motion is related to the activity of the NE-SW sinistral North Middle Atlas-Kert fault zone, which follows the Moroccan Hot Line. Convergence between the Prerif ridges, located at the southern edge of the Rif, and the Saïss basin is accommodated by ENE-WSW striking northward dipping reverse sinistral faults and south vergent folds. In addition, increasing deformation toward the western ridges is in agreement with the stepped mountain front and the development of the arched structures of the Prerif ridges. Normal faults located south of the Saïss basin are responsible for local extension. Whereas the most active deformation occurs in the southern front of the jbel Thratt near Fes, the Sa

  3. The offshore Yangsan fault activity in the Quaternary, SE Korea: Analysis of high-resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Joon; Moon, Seonghoon; Jou, Hyeong-Tae; Lee, Gwang Hoon; Yoo, Dong Geun; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kwang Hee

    2016-12-01

    The NNE-trending dextral Yangsan fault is a > 190-km-long structure in the Korean Peninsula traced to the southeastern coast. The scarcity of Quaternary deposits onland precludes any detailed investigation of the Quaternary activity and structure of the Yangsan fault using seismic reflection profiling. We acquired offshore high-resolution seismic profiles to investigate the extension of the Yangsan fault and constrain its Quaternary activity using stratigraphic markers. The seismic profiles reveal a NNE-trending fault system consisting of a main fault and an array of subsidiary faults that displaced Quaternary sequences. Stratigraphic analysis of seismic profiles indicates that the offshore faults were activated repeatedly in the Quaternary. The up-to-the-east sense of throw on the main fault and plan-view pattern of the fault system are explained by dextral strike-slip faulting. The main fault, when projected toward the Korean Peninsula along its strike, aligns well with the Yangsan fault. We suggest that the offshore fault system is a continuation of the Yangsan fault and has spatial correlation with weak but ongoing seismicity.

  4. Distribution of fault activity in the early stages of continental breakup: an analysis of faults and volcanic products of the Natron Basin, East African Rift, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, J. D.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent magmatic-tectonic crises in Ethiopia (e.g. 2005 Dabbahu rifting episode, Afar) have informed our understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of strain in magmatic rifts transitioning to sea-floor spreading. However, the evolving contributions of magmatic and tectonic processes during the initial stages of rifting, is a subject of ongoing debate. The <5 Ma northern Tanzania and southern Kenya sectors of the East Africa Rift provide ideal locations to address this problem. We present preliminary findings from an investigation of fault structures utilizing aerial photography and satellite imagery of the ~35 km wide Natron rift-basin in northern Tanzania. Broad-scale structural mapping will be supplemented by field observations and 40Ar-39Ar dating of lava flows cut by faults to address three major aspects of magma-assisted rifting: (1) the relative timing of activity between the border fault and smaller faults distributed across the width of the rift; (2) time-averaged slip rates along rift-zone faults; and (3) the spatial distribution of faults and volcanic products, and their relative contributions to strain accommodation. Preliminary field observations suggest that the ~500 m high border fault system along the western edge of the Natron basin is either inactive or has experienced a reduced slip rate and higher recurrence interval between surface-breaking events, as evidence by a lack of recent surface-rupture along the main fault escarpments. An exception is an isolated, ~2 km-long segment of the Natron border fault, which is located in close proximity (< 5km) to the active Oldoinyo Lengai volcano. Here, ~10 m of seemingly recent throw is observed in volcaniclastic deposits. The proximity of the fault segment to Oldoinyo Lengai volcano and the localized distribution of fault-slip are consistent with magma-assisted faulting. Faults observed within the Natron basin and on the flanks of Gelai volcano, located on the eastern side of the rift, have

  5. Assessing the activity of faults in continental interiors: Palaeoseismic insights from SE Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützner, C.; Carson, E.; Walker, R. T.; Rhodes, E. J.; Mukambayev, A.; Mackenzie, D.; Elliott, J. R.; Campbell, G.; Abdrakhmatov, K.

    2017-02-01

    The presence of fault scarps is a first-order criterion for identifying active faults. Yet the preservation of these features depends on the recurrence interval between surface rupturing events, combined with the rates of erosional and depositional processes that act on the landscape. Within arid continental interiors single earthquake scarps can be preserved for thousands of years, and yet the interval between surface ruptures on faults in these regions may be much longer, such that the lack of evidence for surface faulting in the morphology may not preclude activity on those faults. In this study we investigate the 50 km-long 'Toraigyr' thrust fault in the northern Tien Shan. From palaeoseismological trenching we show that two surface rupturing earthquakes occurred in the last 39.9 ± 2.7 ka BP, but only the most recent event (3.15-3.6 ka BP) has a clear morphological expression. We conclude that a landscape reset took place in between the two events, likely as a consequence of the climatic change at the end of the last glacial maximum. These findings illustrate that in the Tien Shan evidence for the most recent active faulting can be easily obliterated by climatic processes due to the long earthquake recurrence intervals. Our results illustrate the problems related to the assessment of active tectonic deformation and seismic hazard assessments in continental interior settings.

  6. Modeling the Effects of a Normal-Stress-Dependent State Variable, Within the Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Framework, at Stepovers and Dip-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Kenny J.; Oglesby, David D.

    2017-03-01

    The development of the rate- and state-dependent friction framework (Dieterich Appl Geophys 116:790-806, 1978; J Geophys Res 84, 2161-2168, 1979; Ruina Friction laws and instabilities: a quasistatic analysis of some dry friction behavior, Ph.D. Thesis, Brown Univ., Providence, R.I., 1980; J Geophys Res 88:10359-10370, 1983) includes the dependence of friction coefficient on normal stress (Linker and Dieterich J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992); however, a direct dependence of the friction law on time-varying normal stress in dynamic stepover and dip-slip fault models has not yet been extensively explored. Using rate- and state-dependent friction laws and a 2-D dynamic finite element code (Barall J Int 178, 845-859, 2009), we investigate the effect of the Linker-Dieterich dependence of state variable on normal stress at stepovers and dip-slip faults, where normal stress should not be constant with time (e.g., Harris and Day J Geophys Res 98:4461-4472, 1993; Nielsen Geophys Res Lett 25:125-128, 1998). Specifically, we use the relation d ψ/d t = -( α/ σ)(d σ/d t) from Linker and Dieterich (J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992), in which a change in normal stress leads to a change in state variable of the opposite sign. We investigate a range of values for alpha, which scales the impact of the normal stress change on state, from 0 to 0.5 (laboratory values range from 0.2 to 0.56). For stepovers, we find that adding normal-stress dependence to the state variable delays or stops re-nucleation on the secondary fault segment when compared to normal-stress-independent state evolution. This inhibition of jumping rupture is due to the fact that re-nucleation along the secondary segment occurs in areas of decreased normal stress in both compressional and dilational stepovers. However, the magnitude of such an effect differs between dilational and compressional systems. Additionally, it is well known that the asymmetric geometry of reverse and normal faults can lead to greater

  7. Mapping Active Faults and Tectonic Geomorphology offshore central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hart, P. E.; Sliter, R. W.; Wong, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    In June 2008, and July 2009, the USGS conducted two high-resolution, marine, seismic-reflection surveys across the continental shelf and upper slope between Piedras Blancas and Point Sal, central California, in order to better characterize regional earthquake sources. More than 1,300 km of single-channel seismic data were acquired aboard the USGS R/V Parke Snavely using a 500-joule mini-sparker source fired at a 0.5-second shot interval and recorded with a 15-meter streamer. Most tracklines were run perpendicular to the coast at 800-meter spacing, extending from the nearshore (~ 10-15 m water depth) to as far as 20 km offshore. Sub-bottom imaging varies with substrate, ranging from outstanding (100 to 150 m of penetration) in inferred Quaternary shallow marine, shelf and upper slope deposits to poor (0 to 10 m) in the Mesozoic basement rocks. Marine magnetic data were collected simultaneously on this survey, and both data sets are being integrated with new aeromagnetic data, publicly available industry seismic-reflection data, onshore geology, seismicity, and high-resolution bathymetry. Goals of the study are to map geology, structure, and sediment distribution; to document fault location, length, segmentation, shallow geometry and structure; and to identify possible sampling targets for constraining fault slip rates, earthquake recurrence, and tsunami hazard potential. The structure and tectonic geomorphology of the >100-km-long, right-lateral, Hosgri fault zone and its connections to the Los Osos, Pecho, Oceano and other northwest-trending inboard faults are the focus of this ongoing work. The Hosgri fault forms the eastern margin of the offshore Santa Maria basin and coincides in places with the outer edge of the narrow (5- to 15-km-wide), structurally complex continental shelf. The Hosgri is imaged as a relatively continuous, vertical fault zone that extends upward to the seafloor; varies significantly and rapidly along strike; and incorporates numerous

  8. Quaternary tectonic activity in NW Jordan: Insights for a new model of transpression-transtension along the southern Dead Sea Transform Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Awabdeh, M.; Pérez-Peña, J. V.; Azañón, J. M.; Booth-Rea, G.; Abed, A.; Atallah, M.; Galve, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Dead Sea Transform Fault (DSTF) constitutes the transform plate boundary between the African and Arabian plates. The southern part of this fault has been traditionally divided into two main segments, the Wadi Araba Fault (WAF) and the Jordan Valley Fault (JVF), connected through the Dead Sea continental pull-apart basin. Active tectonic studies in NW Jordan have traditionally focused on these DSTF structures and have neglected other prominent structures in the region, such as the Amman Hallabat Structure (AHS) and Shueib Structure (SHS) fault systems, which have been considered inactive since the Cretaceous. However, some recent studies have suggested a possible local reactivation of the southern parts of these structures. In this work, we carried out a detailed geological study of the NE Dead Sea Basin to analyze the Quaternary activity of the AHS and SHS based on field observations and structural analyses. Our findings have revealed that the AHS and SHS structures present clear Quaternary activity and accommodate a small part of the deformation of the southern DSTF. In the Quaternary, the southwestern part of the AHS has acted as the northernmost continuation of the WAF, whereas the SHS has acted as a transfer fault associated with NW-SE normal faults with low to moderate throws (meters to decameters) that connect this structure to the JVF. These NW-SE normal faults constitute the northeastern border of the Dead Sea depression (Jericho Valley). They produce a topographic front and separate the sediments of the Jordan Valley in the hanging wall from the Mesozoic sedimentary sequence located in the footwall.

  9. Late Pleistocene-Holocene Faulting History Along the Northern El Carrizal Fault, Baja California Sur, Mexico: Earthquake Recurrence at a Persistently Active Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, S. J.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Gutiérrez, G. M.; Santillanez, A. U.; Rittenour, T. R.

    2007-12-01

    The El Carrizal fault is a NW striking, east dipping normal fault located 25 km west of the city of La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico and is the westernmost bounding fault of the gulf-margin system at this latitude. The fault is ~70 km long onshore and ~50 km long offshore to the north in La Paz Bay. As many as three Quaternary geomorphic surfaces formed on the footwall and were identified on the basis of mapping and topographic profiling. In the north, the El Carrizal fault splays into multiple strands and exhibits a pattern of alternating N-S and NW-trending segments. Results from geologic mapping, paleoseismic investigations, and preliminary optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) geochronology provide some of the first numerical constraints on late Pleistocene-Holocene faulting along the El Carrizal fault. A 20 m long, 2-3 m deep trench (Trench 28) was excavated across the fault 23 km south of La Paz Bay. The trench was photographed, hand logged, and sampled for OSL dating. The trench revealed a succession of fluvial and channel deposits of sands, gravels, and cobbles. The main fault zone is manifested by a 0.5 m thick wedge-shaped deposit that consists of silty-sand and also contains rotated blocks of caliche- cemented gravels. Preliminary OSL ages from a silty-sand unit offset 2 m by the fault average latest Pleistocene. A trench 4 km south of Trench 28 (Cuadradito Trench) was also documented and sampled for OSL analysis. Preliminary OSL ages from a fluvial sand unit deposited against faulted bedrock range from mid to late Holocene. Sedimentary comparisons and surficial mapping suggest that the Holocene unit at Cuadradito Trench may be correlative to sediment that overlies faulted units from Trench 28. Such a correlation would constrain the timing of the 2 m offset at Trench 28 to be between latest Pleistocene and mid Holocene. A quarry 10 km north of Trench 28 exposes Quaternary sand and gravels buttressed against a 5-10 m wide bedrock shear zone. Here

  10. Recent high-resolution seismic reflection studies of active faults in the Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    In the past four years, new high-resolution seismic surveys have filled in key gaps in our understanding of active structures beneath the Puget Lowland, western Washington State. Although extensive regional and high-resolution marine seismic surveys have been fundamental to understanding the tectonic framework of the area, these marine profiles lack coverage on land and in shallow or restricted waterways. The recent high-resolution seismic surveys have targeted key structures beneath water bodies that large ships cannot navigate, and beneath city streets underlain by late Pleistocene glacial deposits that are missing from the waterways. The surveys can therefore bridge the gap between paleoseismic and marine geophysical studies, and test key elements of models proposed by regional-scale geophysical studies. Results from these surveys have: 1) documented several meters of vertical displacement on at least two separate faults in the Olympia area; 2) clarified the relationship between the Catfish Lake scarp and the underlying kink band in the Tacoma fault zone; 3) provided a first look at the structures beneath the north portion of the western Tacoma fault zone, north of previous marine profiles; 4) documented that deformation along the Seattle fault extends well east of Lake Sammamish; 5) imaged the Seattle fault beneath the Vasa Park trench; and 6) documented multiple fault strands in and south of the Seattle fault zone south of Bellevue. The results better constrain interpretations of paleoseismic investigations of past earthquakes on these faults, and provide targets for future paleoseismic studies.

  11. Nature of Active Traces of the Hayward Fault at the University of California, Berkeley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, D. L.; Swan, F. H.; Thompson, S. C.; Baldwin, J. N.; Williams, P. L.; Rubin, R. S.; Lavine, A.; Hall, N. T.

    2007-12-01

    The location of the Hayward fault zone at the University of California Berkeley Campus is well defined by geomorphic features including offset stream channels, side-hill benches, and the break-in-slope at the base of the Berkeley Hills, as well as by fault-creep related deformation of curbs, buried culverts and utilities, and structures--most notably Memorial Stadium. Based on the mapped fault traces associated with these surficial features, more than 30 trenches have been excavated at various locations on the campus during the past twenty years to assess the exact location and width of the active fault zone near existing and planned structures. These trenches show that the active fault trace(s) range from well expressed to poorly expressed in various surficial materials as a function of (1) the local geometry of the fault, (2) the stability of the near-surface deposits (e.g., it is poorly expressed where it crosses active landslides), and (3) the age of the deposits (i.e., it is better expressed in older deposits). At locations near the Smyth-Fernwald Housing, Prospect Court, the Greek Theater, and Foothill Housing, trenches showed that the fault is characterized by multiple distinct traces that in many places bound alluvial/colluvial-filled depressions up to 6 meters wide, and are in-filled with Holocene deposits. Quaternary deposits and bedrock units are truncated, indicating that significant lateral and vertical displacement has occurred along these fault traces. The creeping trace of the fault generally coincides with these well expressed fault traces. Trenches also revealed that two sub-parallel active fault traces as much as 40 to 60 meters apart extend along the hillslope directly east of the Greek Theater and north and east of Bowles Hall. It remains uncertain as to how fault creep occurs along the two separate branches. Between Memorial Stadium and Bowles Hall, there is a small right bend or stepover in the fault. The location of the creeping trace is

  12. Extensive Submarine Active Fault and the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, T.; Kumamoto, T.; Muroi, S.; Watanabe, M.

    2013-12-01

    Active faults observed on seafloor along Japan Trench are resultants of repeated large earthquakes. We discuss on the relation between large earthquakes and their source faults based on a detailed active fault map along Japan Trench. Judging from location and continuation of active faults in the earthquake source area, we consider that one of the extensive thrust faults which extends from off-Sanriku to off-Ibaraki for about 500km, is directly related to the source fault of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. The 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake (Mw9.0) generated large tsunami with massive pulsating pattern of waves (Maeda et al. 2011). A leading hypothesis believed among many seismologists that an earthquake source fault that generated the earthquake, caused the near-surface fault rupture along the axis of Japan Trench, and large displacement ~50m eastward and ~7 to ~10m upward was estimated from comparison of data obtained before and after the earthquake in 2004 and 2011 by multibeam bathymetric surveys across the trench (Fujiwara et al. 2011). Satake et al. (2011) explained the large tsunami height by simultaneous faulting on two different fault planes, one on subducting plate boundary and the other near the trench axis. Since most of the workers hypothesized without any doubt believed that the earthquake was caused by the fault ruptured up to the trench axis, existence of submarine active fault is rather overlooked so far. However, we consider the large displacement is due to landslide and do not find any extensive fault scarp on the trench axis. We simulated pattern of seafloor deformation associated with the earthquake using a simple dislocation model for a single fault plane with uniform slip that dips 14 degree in depth and 33.6 degree beneath the tectonic bulge related to the extensive active fault. A result shows that an area of large uplift agrees more or less with the location of tectonic bulge with width of about 20km

  13. Assessing fault activity in intracontinental settings: paleoseismology and geomorphology in SE Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützner, Christoph; Carson, Emily; Mackenzie, David; Elliott, Austin; Campbell, Grace; Walker, Richard; Abdrakhmatov, Kanatbek

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake recurrence intervals of active faults often exceed the time span covered by instrumental, historical, and archaeological earthquake records in continental interiors. The identification of active faults then often relies on finding the geomorphological expression of surface faulting preserved in the landscape. In rather arid areas, single earthquake scarps can be preserved for thousands of years, but erosional and depositional processes will eventually obliterate features such as fault scarps and offset geological markers. Active faults with very long intervals between surface ruptures might therefore remain undetected, which constitutes a major problem for tectonic studies and seismic hazard assessment. Here we present data from the 50 km-long 'Charyn Canyon' thrust fault in the northern Tien Shan (SE Kazakhstan). Remote sensing, Structure-from-Motion (SfM), differential GPS, field mapping, and paleoseismic trenching were used to reveal the earthquake history of this fault. Radiocarbon dating, infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL), and scarp diffusion modelling were used for bracketing the occurrence of paleo-earthquakes. In the paleoseismological trenches we identified two surface rupturing events within the last ~37 ka BP. The most recent earthquake took place between 3.5 - 7.3 ka BP, the penultimate event occurred between ~17-37 ka BP. We estimate magnitudes of ~MW6.5-7.3. Only the younger event has a morphological expression as a 25 km-long fault scarp of ~2 m height. This implicates that a major landscape reset occurred between these two earthquakes, most likely related to the significant climatic change that marked the end of the last glacial maximum. Similar observations from other paleoseismic investigation sites in this area support this interpretation. Our study shows that faults in the northern Tien Shan tend to break in strong earthquakes with very long recurrence intervals. As a consequence, morphological evidence for the most recent

  14. Quantitative constraints on the formation of post-glacial normal-fault scarps in Greece determined by chlore 36 cosmogenic dating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, L.; King, G.; Finkel, R.; Papanastassiou, D.; Armijo, R.; Ryerson, F.; Farber, D.; Flerit, F.

    2003-04-01

    Recent activity of normal faults in Greece has produced steep limestone fault scarps at the base of the mountain fronts. For example, on the Sparta fault located in the Peloponnese, and responsible for the 464 B.C. M˜7 earthquake, a continuous fresh scarp cuts limestone bedrock and indurated conglomerates. The scarp is nearly continuous dipping at 65-68o with well-preserved slickensides. The maximum height of the scarp is 10-12 metres, progressively decreasing towards the ends. The few local variations are associated with active streams where hangingwall erosion causes the scarp to be locally higher. The regularity of the scarp is powerful evidence that the footwall and hangingwall surfaces were originally continuous and the scarp surface represents fault slip alone. It also suggests that there was no significant erosion or deposition on the hanging-wall (except near active gullies) since the scarp began to form. Such observations have led to the suggestion that numerous well-preserved limestone escarpments around the eastern Mediterranean, similar to those in Sparta, are post-glacial in age. Using 36Cl cosmogenic dating we tested the foregoing ideas. Limestones (largely calcite) contain an abundance of calcium, which is a major target element for cosmogenic 36Cl production. Samples were collected from the limestone scarp surface to recover the continuous exposure history of the scarp and also from the footwall and hanging wall surfaces as well as a depth profile in the hanging wall wedge. The concentration of 36Cl and of stable chlorine has been measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the LLNL-CAMS for each of the samples (about 150). The result confirm: 1- that the fault scarp was formed between about 2000 B.P. and 13 ka B.P. as the result of 5 earthquakes (including the known event in 464 B.C.) with similar slip amplitudes of about 2m and with time intervals ranging from 500yr to 4500yr (Benedetti et al., GRL, 2002), 2- that both hanging wall and

  15. Paleoseismologic and geomorphic constraints to the deformation style and activity of the Cittanova Fault (southern Calabria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peronace, Edoardo; Della Seta, Marta; Fredi, Paola; Galli, Paolo; Giaccio, Biagio; Messina, Paolo; Troiani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The western side of Southern Calabria is the epicentral region of the strongest earthquakes of Italy. These are mainly generated by extensional faults which are still poorly investigated and/or parameterized. In this study, we explore the potential of the combined analysis of geomorphic markers, stream network morphometry and paleosimological investigations, aimed at identifying and time-constraining the surface effects of the Calabrian seismogenic faults. In this perspective, we presents results from i) plano-altimetric analysis of geomorphic markers related to active tectonics (such as marine and fluvial terraces), ii) paleoseismological investigations, and iii) time-dependent river basin and long-profile metrics of the Cittanova Fault (CF). The CF, responsible for the catastrophic Mw 7.0 earthquake of 5 February 1783, is a N220° striking, 30 km-long normal fault that downthrows the crystalline-metamorphic basement of the Aspromonte massif (~1000 m asl) below the Gioia Tauro Plain, to elevations of ~500-800 m bsl. Radiocarbon dating allowed us to ascribe the depostion of a major terraced alluvial fan (Cittanova-Taurianova terrace, TAC) to the early Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and to date the avulsion of the depositional top surface of TAC to 28 ka. As we have found remnants of the TAC also in the CF footwall offset by 12-17 m, we estimate a vertical slip rate of 0.6 ± 0.1 mm/yr for the past 28 ka. Paleoseismological data across the fault scarp evidenced at least three surface ruptures associated to ~Mw 7.0 paleoearthquakes prior to the 1783 event. The recurrence time (~3.2 kyr) is rather longer than other Apennine normal faults (0.3-2.4 kyr), whereas it is consistent with the low slip rate of CF for the late Upper Pleistocene (0.6 mm/yr). On a longer time scale, the spatial configuration of river basin morphometry evidenced the morphodynamic rensponse to the higher slip in the central sector of CF. Furthermore, long-profile metrics, and in particular the spatial

  16. The Eastern Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone in central Portugal: Active faulting in a low-deformation region within a major river environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canora, Carolina; Vilanova, Susana P.; Besana-Ostman, Glenda M.; Carvalho, João; Heleno, Sandra; Fonseca, Joao

    2015-10-01

    Active faulting in the Lower Tagus Valley, Central Portugal, poses a significant seismic hazard that is not well understood. Although the area has been affected by damaging earthquakes during historical times, only recently has definitive evidence of Quaternary surface faulting been found along the western side of the Tagus River. The location, geometry and kinematics of active faults along the eastern side of the Tagus valley have not been previously studied. We present the first results of mapping and paleoseismic analysis of the eastern strand of the Lower Tagus Valley Fault Zone (LTVFZ). Geomorphological, paleoseismological, and seismic reflection studies indicate that the Eastern LTVFZ is a left-lateral strike-slip fault. The detailed mapping of geomorphic features and studies in two paleoseismic trenches show that surface fault rupture has occurred at least six times during the past 10 ka. The river offsets indicate a minimum slip rate on the order of 0.14-0.24 mm/yr for the fault zone. Fault trace mapping, geomorphic analysis, and paleoseismic studies suggest a maximum magnitude for the Eastern LTVFZ of Mw ~ 7.3 with a recurrence interval for surface ruptures ~ 1.7 ka. At least two events occurred after 1175 ± 95 cal yr BP. Single-event displacements are unlikely to be resolved in the paleoseismic trenches, thus our observations most probably represent the minimum number of events identified in the trenches.

  17. Quaternary strike-slip crustal deformation around an active fault based on paleomagnetic analysis: a case study of the Enako fault in central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Haruo; Itoh, Yasuto; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate cumulative strike-slip deformation around an active fault, we carried out tectonic geomorphic investigations of the active right-lateral strike-slip Enako fault in central Japan and paleomagnetic investigations of the Kamitakara pyroclastic flow deposit (KPFD; 0.6 Ma welded tuff) distributed around the fault. Tectonic geomorphic study revealed that the strike-slip displacement on the fault is ca. 150 m during the past 600 ka. We carried out measurements of paleomagnetic directions and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) within the pyroclastic flow deposit. Stable primary magnetic directions at each sampling site are well clustered and the AMS fabric is very oblate. We then applied tilt correction of paleomagnetic directions at 15 sites using tilting data obtained by the AMS property and orientations of eutaxitic structures. Within a distance of about 500 m from the fault trace, differential clockwise rotations were detected; the rotation angle is larger for zones closer to the fault. Because of this relation and absence of block boundary faults, a continuous deformation model explains the crustal deformation in the study area. The calculated minimum value of strike-slip displacement associated with this deformation detected within the shear zone is 210 m. The sum of this and offset on the Enako fault is 360 m and the slip rate is estimated at 0.6 mm/year.

  18. Model-based fault detection and isolation for intermittently active faults with application to motion-based thruster fault detection and isolation for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is a method for detecting and isolating fault modes in a system having a model describing its behavior and regularly sampled measurements. The models are used to calculate past and present deviations from measurements that would result with no faults present, as well as with one or more potential fault modes present. Algorithms that calculate and store these deviations, along with memory of when said faults, if present, would have an effect on the said actual measurements, are used to detect when a fault is present. Related algorithms are used to exonerate false fault modes and finally to isolate the true fault mode. This invention is presented with application to detection and isolation of thruster faults for a thruster-controlled spacecraft. As a supporting aspect of the invention, a novel, effective, and efficient filtering method for estimating the derivative of a noisy signal is presented.

  19. A large normal-fault earthquake at the junction of the Tonga trench and the Louisville ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eissler, H.; Kanamori, H.

    1982-01-01

    Long-period vertical-component Rayleigh waves are inverted in order to determine the source mechanism of the October 10, 1977 earthquake that occurred in the oceanic plate at the junction of the Tonga-Kermadec trench systems with the aseismic Louisville ridge. The cause was predominantly normal faulting on a plane striking roughly parallel to the trench, with a seismic moment of 1.7 x 10 to the 27th dyn cm. A focal depth of 20 km is determined by waveform modeling, but the actual rupture may have extended to 30 or 40 km. Two sources separated by 16 s comprised the event, which experienced an inferred rupture velocity of 3.5 km/sec. The interpretation that the earthquake was caused by gravitational pull due to the sinking slab implies that the Louisville ridge causes some degree of local decoupling between the plates. This event may be associated with the breakup of the Osbourn seamount. Alternatively, the earthquake may have resulted from tensional plate bending stress, as implied by its relatively shallow depth.

  20. Testing the influence of vertical, pre-existing joints on normal faulting using analogue and 3D discrete element models (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; von Hagke, Christoph; Virgo, Simon; Urai, Janos L.

    2015-04-01

    Brittle rocks are often affected by different generations of fractures that influence each other. We study pre-existing vertical joints followed by a faulting event. Understanding the effect of these interactions on fracture/fault geometries as well as the development of dilatancy and the formation of cavities as potential fluid pathways is crucial for reservoir quality prediction and production. Our approach combines scaled analogue and numerical modeling. Using cohesive hemihydrate powder allows us to create open fractures prior to faulting. The physical models are reproduced using the ESyS-Particle discrete element Modeling Software (DEM), and different parameters are investigated. Analogue models were carried out in a manually driven deformation box (30x28x20 cm) with a 60° dipping pre-defined basement fault and 4.5 cm of displacement. To produce open joints prior to faulting, sheets of paper were mounted in the box to a depth of 5 cm at a spacing of 2.5 cm. Powder was then sieved into the box, embedding the paper almost entirely (column height of 19 cm), and the paper was removed. We tested the influence of different angles between the strike of the basement fault and the joint set (0°, 4°, 8°, 12°, 16°, 20°, and 25°). During deformation we captured structural information by time-lapse photography that allows particle imaging velocimetry analyses (PIV) to detect localized deformation at every increment of displacement. Post-mortem photogrammetry preserves the final 3-dimensional structure of the fault zone. We observe that no faults or fractures occur parallel to basement-fault strike. Secondary fractures are mostly oriented normal to primary joints. At the final stage of the experiments we analyzed semi-quantitatively the number of connected joints, number of secondary fractures, degree of segmentation (i.e. number of joints accommodating strain), damage zone width, and the map-view area fraction of open gaps. Whereas the area fraction does not change

  1. U-series Dating of Syntectonic Calcite Veins Constrains the Time Scales of the Elements of the Seismic Cycle in an Intraplate Normal Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, L. B.; Williams, R. T.; Mozley, P.; Sharp, W. D.

    2015-12-01

    The link between fluid overpressure and the earthquake cycle has been documented through previous studies of vein arrays associated with faults and carefully designed experimental work. In the interseismic period, elevated pore fluid pressure (overpressure) will reduce the effective fault-normal stress, weakening the fault and promoting seismic rupture. Fractures produced during faulting will serve as fluid migration pathways until they are sealed by either collapse or precipitation of cement. Following sealing, pore fluid pressure is inferred to progressively increase until it reaches a level sufficient to start the cycle again. Though the rock record of this overpressure-driven seismic cycle is clear, the timescales of the different elements of the cycle have not been quantified. We have addressed this problem by dating calcite veins in the hanging wall damage zone of the Loma Blanca fault zone of the Socorro Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico. These veins exhibit crack-seal microstructures that record repeated episodes of fracture opening, fluid migration, and fracture sealing, suggesting a prolonged history of recurrent seismicity and post-failure fluid migration. Stable isotope analyses of these veins reveal distinct fluid chemistries associated with individual fluid migration events. Carbon isotope values as high as +6.00‰ suggest depressurization and degassing of CO2 charged fluids, supporting the interpretation that fracturing was associated with fault slip. Preliminary U-series dating of calcite veins show a well-defined periodicity of fault slip and fracture formation, with a slip recurrence interval of approximately 73 ± 17 ka, consistent with previous studies of other faults in the Rio Grande rift. Analyses of cements deposited during single crack-seal events record sealing times of approximately 16 ± 4 ka. These results suggest that the time required to re-establish sufficient pore fluid pressure for failure following sealing of damage zone

  2. Using core properties and seismic reflectivity to estimate pore pressure in an active decollement fault

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, H.J.; Moore, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    In the decollement zone of the Barbados accretionary prism, a 3-D seismic image exhibits patchy high-amplitude negative polarity reflections, which have been attributed to large overpressures confined to the fault zone. We collected laboratory P-wave velocity and porosity vs. pore pressure data, using core samples from and adjacent to the decollement zone at ODP Site 948. Logs constrain density and velocity through the decollement zone at Site 948. We use these data to calibrate the reflectivity of the fault zone to pore pressure through waveform and amplitude models of the fault plane reflections. Modeling of the positive polarity Site 948 reflection indicates that it can be explained by a lithologic boundary coincident with the decollement, without anomalous fault properties. By contrast, the dominantly-negative polarity waveform of the reflection {approx}2 km arcward (beneath Site 947) is best modeled by inserting a 16-19 m thick zone of extremely low impedance into the Site 948 impedance structure, with a gradational return to {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} impedance just above the positive boundary. Relative amplitudes in this reflection indicate a larger impedance contrast than can be accounted for at sub-lithostatic fluid pressure, based on the core properties data. We conclude that lithostatic pore pressure with attendant hydraulic dilation of the fault zone is required to generate the negative-polarity reflections. Mapping of these reflections thus delineates zones of elevated fluid content and zero effective stress in the fault zone.

  3. Using core properties and seismic reflectivity to estimate pore pressure in an active decollement fault

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, H.J. ); Moore, J.C. )

    1996-01-01

    In the decollement zone of the Barbados accretionary prism, a 3-D seismic image exhibits patchy high-amplitude negative polarity reflections, which have been attributed to large overpressures confined to the fault zone. We collected laboratory P-wave velocity and porosity vs. pore pressure data, using core samples from and adjacent to the decollement zone at ODP Site 948. Logs constrain density and velocity through the decollement zone at Site 948. We use these data to calibrate the reflectivity of the fault zone to pore pressure through waveform and amplitude models of the fault plane reflections. Modeling of the positive polarity Site 948 reflection indicates that it can be explained by a lithologic boundary coincident with the decollement, without anomalous fault properties. By contrast, the dominantly-negative polarity waveform of the reflection [approx]2 km arcward (beneath Site 947) is best modeled by inserting a 16-19 m thick zone of extremely low impedance into the Site 948 impedance structure, with a gradational return to [open quotes]normal[close quotes] impedance just above the positive boundary. Relative amplitudes in this reflection indicate a larger impedance contrast than can be accounted for at sub-lithostatic fluid pressure, based on the core properties data. We conclude that lithostatic pore pressure with attendant hydraulic dilation of the fault zone is required to generate the negative-polarity reflections. Mapping of these reflections thus delineates zones of elevated fluid content and zero effective stress in the fault zone.

  4. Connecting the Yakima fold and thrust belt to active faults in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Sherrod, B.L.; Weaver, C.S.; Wells, R.E.; Rohay, A.C.; Barnett, E.A.; Knepprath, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys of the Cascade Range and Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB), Washington, provide insights on tectonic connections between forearc and back-arc regions of the Cascadia convergent margin. Magnetic surveys were measured at a nominal altitude of 250 m above terrain and along flight lines spaced 400 m apart. Upper crustal rocks in this region have diverse magnetic properties, ranging from highly magnetic rocks of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group to weakly magnetic sedimentary rocks of various ages. These distinctive magnetic properties permit mapping of important faults and folds from exposures to covered areas. Magnetic lineaments correspond with mapped Quaternary faults and with scarps identified in lidar (light detection and ranging) topographic data and aerial photography. A two-dimensional model of the northwest striking Umtanum Ridge fault zone, based on magnetic and gravity data and constrained by geologic mapping and three deep wells, suggests that thrust faults extend through the Tertiary section and into underlying pre-Tertiary basement. Excavation of two trenches across a prominent scarp at the base of Umtanum Ridge uncovered evidence for bending moment faulting possibly caused by a blind thrust. Using aeromagnetic, gravity, and paleoseismic evidence, we postulate possible tectonic connections between the YFTB in eastern Washington and active faults of the Puget Lowland. We suggest that faults and folds of Umtanum Ridge extend northwestward through the Cascade Range and merge with the Southern Whidbey Island and Seattle faults near Snoqualmie Pass 35 km east of Seattle. Recent earthquakes (MW ≤ 5.3) suggest that this confluence of faults may be seismically active today.

  5. Multi-component Magnetization Of The Late Pliocene Pyroclastic Flow Deposit In Central Japan, Indicating Early Early Pleistocene Fault Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Funaki, M.; Hoshi, H.

    2003-12-01

    The Late Pliocene Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed in central Japan acquired three magnetization components. All of primary reverse intermediate temperature component, and secondary normal low and high temperature components show positive fold tests, indicating that fault-related folding structure postdated the Olduvai normal subchron. The northern segment of Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line that bounds the North American and Eurasian Plates in central Japan, comprises the geological Otari-Nakayama and active Kamishiro faults. The Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed intruded by the 2.1 Ma Taro-yama Andesite is subjected to the NE-SW trending folding structure adjacent to the Otari-Nakayama fault. PAFD and PThD were performed to the drilled samples of Taro-yama Andesite and the Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed at three and five sites on both limbs of the syncline, respectively. Positive fold test for the tilt-corrected site-mean directions of the andesite indicates prefolding magnetization. The fresh welded tuff bed at one site yields similar reverse direction. Whereas the greenly altered beds at four sites shows normal tilt-corrected site-mean directions by PAFD, and following three temperature-dependent directional components by PThD: normal below 350 degree, reverse from 350 to 530 degree, and normal above 530 degree, all which show positive fold test. IRM acquisition, thermal demagnetization of three orthogonal IRM, thermomagnetic analysis with VSM, and low temperature magnetization measurements with MPMS indicate that the Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed with single and three magnetization components contains titanomagnetites, and both titanomagnetites and magnetite, respectively. Magnetization of the Taro-yama Andesite is dominated by titanomagnetites under high temperature oxidation state and minor proportion of titanomaghemites. The Taro-yama Andesite and the Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed exhibit primary reverse magnetism corresponding to the Matsuyama Chron. The Ichiuda Welded Tuff Bed additionally

  6. Frictional evolution, acoustic emissions activity, and off-fault damage in simulated faults sheared at seismic slip rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelègue, François. X.; Spagnuolo, Elena; Violay, Marie; Nielsen, Stefan; Di Toro, Giulio; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    We present a series of high-velocity friction tests conducted on Westerly granite, using the Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA) installed at Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Roma with acoustic emissions (AEs) monitored at high frequency (4 MHz). Both atmospheric humidity and pore fluid (water) pressure conditions were tested, under effective normal stress σneff in the range 5-20 MPa and at target sliding velocities Vs in the range 0.003-3 m/s. Under atmospheric humidity two consecutive friction drops were observed. The first one is related to flash weakening, and the second one to the formation and growth of a continuous layer of melt in the slip zone. In the presence of fluid, a single drop in friction was observed. Average values of fracture energy are independent of effective normal stress and sliding velocity. However, measurements of elastic wave velocities on the sheared samples suggested that larger damage was induced for 0.1 < Vs<0.3 m/s. This observation is supported by AEs recorded during the test, most of which were detected after the initiation of the second friction drop, once the fault surface temperature was high. Some AEs were detected up to a few seconds after the end of the experiments, indicating thermal rather than mechanical cracking. In addition, the presence of pore water delayed the onset of AEs by cooling effects and by reducing of the heat produced, supporting the link between AEs and the production and diffusion of heat during sliding. Using a thermoelastic crack model developed by Fredrich and Wong (1986), we confirm that damage may be induced by heat diffusion. Indeed, our theoretical results predict accurately the amount of shortening and shortening rate, supporting the idea that gouge production and gouge comminution are in fact largely controlled by thermal cracking. Finally, we discuss the contribution of thermal cracking in the seismic energy balance. In fact, while a dichotomy exists in the literature regarding

  7. Southern San Andreas Fault evaluation field activity: approaches to measuring small geomorphic offsets--challenges and recommendations for active fault studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scharer, Katherine M.; Salisbury, J. Barrett; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    2014-01-01

    In southern California, where fast slip rates and sparse vegetation contribute to crisp expression of faults and microtopography, field and high‐resolution topographic data (<1  m/pixel) increasingly are used to investigate the mark left by large earthquakes on the landscape (e.g., Zielke et al., 2010; Zielke et al., 2012; Salisbury, Rockwell, et al., 2012, Madden et al., 2013). These studies measure offset streams or other geomorphic features along a stretch of a fault, analyze the offset values for concentrations or trends along strike, and infer that the common magnitudes reflect successive surface‐rupturing earthquakes along that fault section. Wallace (1968) introduced the use of such offsets, and the challenges in interpreting their “unique complex history” with offsets on the Carrizo section of the San Andreas fault; these were more fully mapped by Sieh (1978) and followed by similar field studies along other faults (e.g., Lindvall et al., 1989; McGill and Sieh, 1991). Results from such compilations spurred the development of classic fault behavior models, notably the characteristic earthquake and slip‐patch models, and thus constitute an important component of the long‐standing contrast between magnitude–frequency models (Schwartz and Coppersmith, 1984; Sieh, 1996; Hecker et al., 2013). The proliferation of offset datasets has led earthquake geologists to examine the methods and approaches for measuring these offsets, uncertainties associated with measurement of such features, and quality ranking schemes (Arrowsmith and Rockwell, 2012; Salisbury, Arrowsmith, et al., 2012; Gold et al., 2013; Madden et al., 2013). In light of this, the Southern San Andreas Fault Evaluation (SoSAFE) project at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) organized a combined field activity and workshop (the “Fieldshop”) to measure offsets, compare techniques, and explore differences in interpretation. A thorough analysis of the measurements from the

  8. Coordinated strike-slip and normal faulting in the Southern Ozark dome of Northern Arkansas: Deformation in a late Paleozoic foreland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Structures that formed on the southern flank of the Ozark dome, in the foreland of the late Paleozoic Ouachita orogeny, have received little modern study. New mapping of the western Buffalo River region of northern Arkansas identifies diversely oriented faults and monoclinal folds that displace the generally flat lying Mississippian Boone Formation over a 180 m elevation range. Kinematic measurements and spatial relations reveal the presence of both east-striking normal faults and broader northeast-striking dextral strike-slip fault zones that acted in a coordinated fashion to accommodate constrictional strain, in which north-south extension was balanced by vertical and east-directed shortening. North-south extension in the Buffalo River region probably reflects Pennsylvanian-Early Permian deformation within the flexural forebulge of the developing Ouachita orogeny, which closed progressively westward along the southern margin of the craton.

  9. Physicochemical Processes of Frictional Healing and Lithification: Effects of Normal Stress and Water on Stick-Slip Stress Drop and Friction in Synthetic Fault Gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Marone, C.

    2011-12-01

    Earthquakes are dynamic phenomena characterized by slip instability along a preexisting zone of weakness (fault zone) within more competent rock. Fault zones are characterized by granular and clay-rich wear material (fault gouge) produced by dynamic and quasi-static slip processes. The mechanical strength, frictional stability, and seismic potential of a fault are strongly influenced by the evolution of grain contacts within the fault zone. In this context, water plays an important role at mineral surfaces and within contact junction via processes such as hydrolithic weakening, adsorption/desorption and pressure solution. To investigate the role of water in faulting, we performed shear experiments using synthetic fault gouge as a function of relative humidity (RH) and normal stress (σn). We sheared layers of glass beads and granular rock of known initial grain size (dia. 105 to 149 μm) in a double direct shear configuration. Normal stress was kept constant during shear at values of 2.5, 5 and 10 MPa. Shear (τ) stress was applied via a constant displacement rate at the layer boundaries, and shearing velocity was varied from 0.3 to 300 μm/s. Careful calibration of apparatus stiffness plus an external DCDT, mounted directly across the shear zone, were used to measure slip velocity of the fault zone. During each experiment, RH was kept constant at values of 5, 50 and 100%. Our experiments were conducted in the stick-slip sliding regime. For σn = 2.5 MPa, stress drop, (Δτ), is constant from 0.3 to 10 μm/s and decreases linearly with log velocity above 10 μm/s. Maximum shear stress τmax shows the same trend. At σn = 10 MPa, Δτ decreases linearly with log velocity over the entire velocity range. We find that maximum friction μmax increases systematically with increasing RH, in contrast to previous results for angular quartz and nominally-bare surfaces. In agreement with previous studies, our results indicate that frictional behavior of simulated fault gouge

  10. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; ...

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismicmore » moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.« less

  11. Modeling of fault activation and seismicity by injection directly into a fault zone associated with hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted three-dimensional coupled fluid-flow and geomechanical modeling of fault activation and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing stimulation of a shale-gas reservoir. We simulated a case in which a horizontal injection well intersects a steeply dip- ping fault, with hydraulic fracturing channeled within the fault, during a 3-hour hydraulic fracturing stage. Consistent with field observations, the simulation results show that shale-gas hydraulic fracturing along faults does not likely induce seismic events that could be felt on the ground surface, but rather results in numerous small microseismic events, as well as aseismic deformations along with the fracture propagation. The calculated seismic moment magnitudes ranged from about -2.0 to 0.5, except for one case assuming a very brittle fault with low residual shear strength, for which the magnitude was 2.3, an event that would likely go unnoticed or might be barely felt by humans at its epicenter. The calculated moment magnitudes showed a dependency on injection depth and fault dip. We attribute such dependency to variation in shear stress on the fault plane and associated variation in stress drop upon reactivation. Our simulations showed that at the end of the 3-hour injection, the rupture zone associated with tensile and shear failure extended to a maximum radius of about 200 m from the injection well. The results of this modeling study for steeply dipping faults at 1000 to 2500 m depth is in agreement with earlier studies and field observations showing that it is very unlikely that activation of a fault by shale-gas hydraulic fracturing at great depth (thousands of meters) could cause felt seismicity or create a new flow path (through fault rupture) that could reach shallow groundwater resources.

  12. Definition and Paleoseismology of the Active, Left-Lateral Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault Zone Based on High-Resolution Chirp Profiles: Lakes Azuey and Mirogoane, Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Mann, P.; von Lignau, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    In July 2014, we obtained a total of 94 km of high-resolution Chirp profiles from the 129 km2, brackish Lake Azuey and 37 km of profiles from the 14 km2, fresh water Lake Mirogoane that both straddle the active trace of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ) of Haiti. 80% of the grid on Azuey and 85% on Mirogoane was dedicated to north-south profiles of the EPGFZ. In Azuey we defined the linear and east-west-striking fault trace in deformed Holocene sediments along with its landfalls west of Lake Azuey in Haiti and east of Lake Azuey in the Dominican Republic. All profiles showed the fault to be a sub-vertical flower structure whose active traces could be traced on Chirp data to a depth of 30 m below the lake floor. Previous workers have suggested that this fault ruptured during a large November, 1751, earthquake with a parallel and elongate felt zone. We hypothesize the most recent break of the fault several meters below the lake floor to have formed during the 1751 event but plan a coring program to precisely constrain the timing of historical and prehistorical events based on syn-faulting colluvial wedges observed on Chirp profiles. Our survey of Mirogoane confirmed its rhomboidal pull-apart structure with the basin center at a depth of 42-8 m making this basin the deepest lake in the Caribbean region. Deformational features include active folds at the lake bottom, large oblique-slip normal faults at an angle to the bounding east-west faults, and 30 m of recognizable stratigraphy. The 7 m of Holocene cored in the basin center in 1988 is observed to be highly deformed and locally folded and overlies with angular unconformity a well stratified and more folded lower basinal unit. Historical events are proposed to have ruptured on or near this segment of the EPGFZ in 1701 and 1770.

  13. Insights into the 3D architecture of an active caldera ring-fault at Tendürek volcano through modeling of geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathke, H.; Nikkhoo, M.; Holohan, E. P.; Walter, T. R.

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional assessment of ring-fault geometries and kinematics at active caldera volcanoes is typically limited by sparse field, geodetic or seismological data, or by only partial ring-fault rupture or slip. Here we use a novel combination of spatially dense InSAR time-series data, numerical models and sand-box experiments to determine the three-dimensional geometry and kinematics of a sub-surface ring-fault at Tendürek volcano in Turkey. The InSAR data reveal that the area within the ring-fault not only subsides, but also shows substantial westward-directed lateral movement. The models and experiments explain this as a consequence of a 'sliding-trapdoor' ring-fault architecture that is mostly composed of outward-inclined reverse segments, most markedly so on the volcano's western flanks but includes inward-inclined normal segments on its eastern flanks. Furthermore, the model ring-fault exhibits dextral and sinistral strike-slip components that are roughly bilaterally distributed onto its northern and southern segments, respectively. Our more complex numerical model describes the deformation at Tendürek better than an analytical solution for a single rectangular dislocation in a half-space. Comparison to ring-faults defined at Glen Coe, Fernandina and Bárðarbunga calderas suggests that 'sliding-trapdoor' ring-fault geometries may be common in nature and should therefore be considered in geological and geophysical interpretations of ring-faults at different scales worldwide.

  14. Delineation of Active Basement Faults in the Eastern Tennessee and Charlevoix Intraplate Seismic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.; Langston, C. A.; Cooley, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recognition of distinct, seismogenic basement faults within the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) and the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ) is now possible using local earthquake tomography and datasets containing a sufficiently large number of earthquakes. Unlike the New Madrid seismic zone where seismicity clearly defines active fault segments, earthquake activity in the ETSZ and CSZ appears diffuse. New arrival time inversions for hypocenter relocations and 3-D velocity variations using datasets in excess of 1000 earthquakes suggest the presence of distinct basement faults in both seismic zones. In the ETSZ, relocated hypocenters align in near-vertical segments trending NE-SW, parallel to the long dimension of the seismic zone. Earthquakes in the most seismogenic portion of the ETSZ delineate another set of near-vertical faults trending roughly E-ESE. These apparent trends and steep dips are compatible with ETSZ focal mechanism solutions. The solutions are remarkably consistent and indicate strike-slip motion along the entire length of the seismic zone. Relocated hypocenter clusters in the CSZ define planes that trend and dip in directions that are compatible with known Iapitan rift faults. Seismicity defining the planes becomes disrupted where the rift faults encounter a major zone of deformation produced by a Devonian meteor impact. We will perform a joint statistical analysis of hypocenter alignments and focal mechanism nodal plane orientations in the ETSZ and the CSZ to determine the spatial orientations of dominant seismogenic basement faults. Quantifying the locations and dimensions of active basement faults will be important for seismic hazard assessment and for models addressing the driving mechanisms for these intraplate zones.

  15. Paper 58714 - Exploring activated faults hydromechanical processes from semi-controled field injection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Nussbaum, C.

    2015-12-01

    The appreciation of the sensitivity of fractures and fault zones to fluid-induced-deformations in the subsurface is a key question in predicting the reservoir/caprock system integrity around fluid manipulations with applications to reservoir leakage and induced seismicity. It is also a question of interest in understanding earthquakes source, and recently the hydraulic behavior of clay faults under a potential reactivation around nuclear underground depository sites. Fault and fractures dynamics studies face two key problems (1) the up-scaling of laboratory determined properties and constitutive laws to the reservoir scale which is not straightforward when considering faults and fractures heterogeneities, (2) the difficulties to control both the induced seismicity and the stimulated zone geometry when a fault is reactivated. Using instruments dedicated to measuring coupled pore pressures and deformations downhole, we conducted field academic experiments to characterize fractures and fault zones hydromechanical properties as a function of their multi-scale architecture, and to monitor their dynamic behavior during the earthquake nucleation process. We show experiments on reservoir or cover rocks analogues in underground research laboratories where experimental conditions can be optimized. Key result of these experiments is to highlight how important the aseismic fault activation is compared to the induced seismicity. We show that about 80% of the fault kinematic moment is aseismic and discuss the complex associated fault friction coefficient variations. We identify that the slip stability and the slip velocity are mainly controlled by the rate of the permeability/porosity increase, and discuss the conditions for slip nucleation leading to seismic instability.

  16. Probabilistic seismic hazard study based on active fault and finite element geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastelic, Vanja; Carafa, Michele M. C.; Visini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    We present a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) that is exclusively based on active faults and geodynamic finite element input models whereas seismic catalogues were used only in a posterior comparison. We applied the developed model in the External Dinarides, a slow deforming thrust-and-fold belt at the contact between Adria and Eurasia.. is the Our method consists of establishing s two earthquake rupture forecast models: (i) a geological active fault input (GEO) model and, (ii) a finite element (FEM) model. The GEO model is based on active fault database that provides information on fault location and its geometric and kinematic parameters together with estimations on its slip rate. By default in this model all deformation is set to be released along the active faults. The FEM model is based on a numerical geodynamic model developed for the region of study. In this model the deformation is, besides along the active faults, released also in the volumetric continuum elements. From both models we calculated their corresponding activity rates, its earthquake rates and their final expected peak ground accelerations. We investigated both the source model and the earthquake model uncertainties by varying the main active fault and earthquake rate calculation parameters through constructing corresponding branches of the seismic hazard logic tree. Hazard maps and UHS curves have been produced for horizontal ground motion on bedrock conditions VS 30 ≥ 800 m/s), thereby not considering local site amplification effects. The hazard was computed over a 0.2° spaced grid considering 648 branches of the logic tree and the mean value of 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years hazard level, while the 5th and 95th percentiles were also computed to investigate the model limits. We conducted a sensitivity analysis to control which of the input parameters influence the final hazard results in which measure. The results of such comparison evidence the deformation model and

  17. Lysyl oxidase activity in human normal skins and postburn scars.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, T; Hino, N; Fuyamada, H; Nagatsu, T; Aoyama, H

    1976-09-06

    Lysyl oxidase activity of human normal skins derived from the frontal thighs of 33 subjects showed large variations and the mean value was 11 455 +/- 7 172 (S.D.) cpm/g of wet weight tissue. The age of lesion affected the lysyl oxidase activity in postburn scars. Granulation tissues showed a fairly low activity; however, the activity increased sharply within 2--3 months, and reached a significantly higher value than that of normal skin. The high level of activity continued for up to 2--3 years, then gradually decreased to normal range after 5 years or so. Lysyl oxidase activity was detected only after 4 M urea treatment of tissues. Benzylamine oxidase activity also showed large variations in both normal skins and postburn scars, with mean values of: 0.128 +/- 0.077 (S.D.) and 0.145 +/- 0.090 (S.D.) mmol/g of wet weight/h, respectively. No correlation was observed between lysyl oxidase and benzylamine oxidase activities. The granulation tissues showed significantly high values of benzylamine oxidase activity in contrast to the low values of lysyl oxidase activity.

  18. Holocene activity of the Rose Canyon fault zone in San Diego, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindvall, Scott C.; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    1995-12-01

    The Rose Canyon fault zone in San Diego, California, has many well-expressed geomorphic characteristics of an active strike-slip fault, including scarps, offset and deflected drainages and channel walls, pressure ridges, a closed depression, and vegetation lineaments. Geomorphic expression of the fault zone from Mount Soledad south to Mission Bay indicates that the Mount Soledad strand is the most active. A network of trenches excavated across the Mount Soledad strand in Rose Creek demonstrate a minimum of 8.7 m of dextral slip in a distinctive early to middle Holocene gravel-filled channel that crosses the fault zone. The gravel-filled channel was preserved within and east of the fault but was removed west of the fault zone by erosion or possibly grading during development. Consequently, the actual displacement of the channel could be greater than 8.7 m. Radiocarbon dates on detrital charcoal recovered from the sediments beneath the channel yield a maximum calibrated age of about 8.1±0.2 kyr. The minimum amount of slip along with the maximum age yield a minimum slip rate of 1.07±0.03 mm/yr on this strand of the Rose Canyon fault zone for much of Holocene time. Other strands of the Rose Canyon fault zone, which are east and west of our site, may also have Holocene activity. Based on an analysis of the geomorphology of fault traces within the Rose Canyon fault zone, along with the results of our trenching study, we estimate the maximum likely slip rate at about 2 mm/yr and a best estimate of about 1.5 mm/yr. Stratigraphie evidence of at least three events is present during the past 8.1 kyr. The most recent surface rupture displaces the modern A horizon (topsoil), suggesting that this event probably occurred within the past 500 years. Stratigraphie and structural relationships also indicate the occurrence of a scarp-forming event at about 8.1 kyr, prior to deposition of the gravel-filled channel that was used as a piercing line. A third event is indicated by the

  19. The role of mechanical heterogeneities in evaporite sequence during deformation initiated by basement fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Burliga, Stanisław

    2016-04-01

    Kłodawa Salt Structure (KSS) situated in the centre of the Polish Zechstein Basin started to rise above a basement fault in the Early Triassic. Geological studies of the KSS revealed significant differences in the deformation patterns between the PZ1-PZ2 (intensely deformed) and PZ3-PZ4 (less deformed) cycle evaporites. These two older and two younger cycle evaporite complexes are separated by the thick Main Anhydrite (A3) bed. We use numerical simulations to assess the impact of a thick anhydrite bed on intrasalt deformation. In our models, the overburden consists of clastic sediments. A normal fault located in the rigid basement beneath the salt is activated due to model extension. At the same time, the sedimentation process takes place. The evaporites consist of a salt bed intercalated with a thick anhydrite layer of varying position and geometry. To understand the role of anhydrite layer, we run comparative simulations, in which no anhydrite layer is present. In the study, we use our own numerical codes implemented in MATLAB combined with the MILAMIN and MUTILS numerical packages. Our investigations revealed a significant influence of the anhydrite on deformation style in the evaporate series. The supra-anhydrite domain is characterized by weaker deformation and lower rates of salt flow in comparison to the sub-anhydrite domain. The highest contrast in the rate of salt flow between the two domains is observed in the case of the anhydrite layer situated close to the bottom of the salt complex. The thick anhydrite layer additionally diminishes the deformation rate in the supra-anhydrite domain and can lead to detachment of the basement deformation from its overlay. Our numerical simulations showed that the presence of the A3 Main Anhydrite bed could be the dominant factor responsible for the decoupling of deformation in the KSS salt complex.

  20. Recently Active Traces of the Berryessa Fault, California: A Digital Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this map is to show the location of and evidence for recent movement on active fault traces within the Berryessa section and parts of adjacent sections of the Green Valley Fault Zone, California. The location and recency of the mapped traces is primarily based on geomorphic expression of the fault as interpreted from large-scale 2010 aerial photography and from 2007 and 2011 0.5 and 1.0 meter bare-earth LiDAR imagery (that is, high-resolution topographic data). In a few places, evidence of fault creep and offset Holocene strata in trenches and natural exposures have confirmed the activity of some of these traces. This publication is formatted both as a digital database for use within a geographic information system (GIS) and for broader public access as map images that may be browsed on-line or download a summary map. The report text describes the types of scientific observations used to make the map, gives references pertaining to the fault and the evidence of faulting, and provides guidance for use of and limitations of the map.

  1. Slip Rates of Main Active Fault Zones Through Turkey Inferred From GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, H.; Aktug, B.; Dogru, A.; Tasci, L.; Acar, M.; Emre, O.; Yilmaz, O.; Turgut, B.; Halicioglu, K.; Sabuncu, A.; Bal, O.; Eraslan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Active Fault Map of Turkey was revised and published by General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration in 2012. This map reveals that there are about 500 faults can generate earthquakes.In order to understand the earthquake potential of these faults, it is needed to determine the slip rates. Although many regional and local studies were performed in the past, the slip rates of the active faults in Turkey have not been determined. In this study, the block modelling, which is the most common method to produce slip rates, will be done. GPS velocities required for block modeling is being compiled from the published studies and the raw data provided then velocity field is combined. To form a homogeneous velocity field, different stochastic models will be used and the optimal velocity field will be achieved. In literature, GPS site velocities, which are computed for different purposes and published, are combined globally and this combined velocity field are used in the analysis of strain accumulation. It is also aimed to develop optimal stochastic models to combine the velocity data. Real time, survey mode and published GPS observations is being combined in this study. We also perform new GPS observations. Furthermore, micro blocks and main fault zones from Active Fault Map Turkey will be determined and homogeneous velocity field will be used to infer slip rates of these active faults. Here, we present the result of first year of the study. This study is being supported by THE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF TURKEY (TUBITAK)-CAYDAG with grant no. 113Y430.

  2. A rod-type creepmeter for measurement of displacement in active fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.-C.; Jeng, F.-S.; Chu, H.-T.; Angelier, J.; Hu, J.-C.

    2000-05-01

    A creepmeter has been developed to monitor gradual displacements of near-surface movement in an active fault zone. This rod-type creepmeter is a robust, low-cost instrument that is simple to construct and install. This creepmeter consists of two 3-m invar rods attached to anchored steel piers at each end, straddling the surface traces of active fault. The invar rods are supported by a pair of U-shaped solid steel girders. A mechanical dial-gauge sensor in the middle of the creepmeter is adopted to record the displacement of fault creep, and has a precision of 0.01 mm. Because the creepmeter is installed on the surface, the temperature effect is important. To calibrate and correct for the temperature effect, we carried out hourly measurements over a period of 30 hours to calculate the thermal expansion coefficients for each creepmeter. Thermal corrections could thus be made when readings were taken. Five of these creepmeters have been installed in the Chihshang active fault zone of eastern Taiwan, in the present collision suture zone between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate. Readings taken over one year have shown that this rod-type creepmeter is effective in providing a near-continuous record of active fault creep with a good precision.

  3. Basin inversion and contractional reactivation of inherited normal faults: A review based on previous and new experimental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco; Sani, Federico; Antonielli, Benedetta

    2012-02-01

    Compressional inversion of former extensional sedimentary basins is a particularly common phenomenon, given that passive margins share the same destiny of being subsequently incorporated into fold-and-thrust belts. During basin inversion pre-existing faults may concentrate stress and localise future thrust ramps, or may be reactivated recording reversal of movement from extension to reverse. This process has attracted attention largely because of its economic implications related to petroleum and ore deposit prospects, and seismic hazard assessment. Since more than two decades, analogue modelling has been used to indentify and/or test a number of parameters relevant for the inversion process. This paper aims therefore to offer a reasoned review of the analogue modelling work done on the subject, coupling such previous results with those of a new experimental series inspired to the Northern Apennines stratigraphy and evolution. Past models have explored the role of main factors governing fault reactivation susceptibility, such as fluid pressure, fault weakness, fault steepness, angle of shortening, and sediment loading. The new models have addressed the role played by geometry and strength of a basal ductile layer during inversion. Two sets of sand-silicone models were first extended orthogonally at different velocities to produce dissimilar pre-inversion internal geometries, and then shortened coaxially at different velocities to vary the brittle-ductile coupling. The experimental results confirm the selectiveness of fault inversion, and reveal strong similarities with structural styles of tectonic inversion reported from the Northern Apennines and various areas worldwide. The preferred geological model inferred from this modelling involves contribution of (1) syn-inversion rotation of pre-existing faults to shallower dip, and (2) rotation of principal stress axes, which could explain the invariable reactivation of only one of the two oppositely-dipping graben

  4. Seismological Constraints on Fault Plane Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, K.

    2015-12-01

    The down-dip geometry of seismically active normal faults is not well known. Many examples of normal faults with down-dip curvature exist, such as listric faults revealed in cross-section or in seismic reflection data, or the exposed domes of core complexes. However, it is not understood: (1) whether curved faults fail in earthquakes, and (2) if those faults have generated earthquakes, is the curvature a primary feature of the rupture or due to later modification of the plane? Even if an event is surface-rupturing, because of the limited depth-extent over which observations can be made, it is difficult to reliably constrain the change in dip with depth (if any) and therefore the fault curvature. Despite the uncertainty in seismogenic normal fault geometries, published slip inversions most commonly use planar fault models. We investigate the seismological constraints on normal fault geometry using a forward-modelling approach and present a seismological technique for determining down-dip geometry. We demonstrate that complexity in the shape of teleseismic body waveforms may be used to investigate the presence of down-dip fault plane curvature. We have applied this method to a catalogue of continental and oceanic normal faulting events. Synthetic models demonstrate that the shapes of SH waveforms at along-strike stations are particularly sensitive to fault plane geometry. It is therefore important to consider the azimuthal station coverage before modelling an event. We find that none of the data require significant down-dip curvature, although the modelling results for some events remain ambiguous. In some cases we can constrain that the down-dip fault geometry is within 20° of planar.

  5. Steady activity of microfractures on geological faults loaded by mining stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoi, Makoto; Nakatani, Masao; Otsuki, Kenshiro; Yabe, Yasuo; Kgarume, Thabang; Murakami, Osamu; Masakale, Thabang; Ribeiro, Luiz; Ward, Anthony; Moriya, Hirokazu; Kawakata, Hironori; Durrheim, Raymond; Ogasawara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic Emissions (AE) down to MW -4 were recorded at a site 1 km beneath the surface in the Cooke 4 Mine, South Africa. Several planar AE clusters with lateral extent of 10-100 m were identified. Most of them were located several tens of meters away from the mining front, and exhibited steady activity during the analysis period of about two months. Some of the clusters coincided with mapped faults. The planar-cluster AEs were sharply aggregated within a thickness of several decimeters, likely delineating the fracture interface of the fault and its higher-order morphology such as branches, bends, and stepovers. The composite focal mechanism evaluated for each cluster was consistent with slip events on the fracture interface. These results imply that numerous shear microfractures occur steadily on a natural fault surface subjected to a mining-related stress increase. The planar clusters consist of very small AEs (99.7% were smaller than MW -2), exhibiting high b-values much exceeding unity. This contrasts with the more usual b-values of the stope-cluster AEs, which were aggregated within 20 m of the mining front and exhibited a more scattered distribution. The size distribution of microfractures on a fracture interface may directly reflect fine-scale irregularities of the interface. On the other hand, many other mapped faults near the planar AE clusters were not accompanied by AE activities, despite the fact that these quiet faults were subjected to a similar stress history. The presence or absence of AE activities on a fault may reflect different states of the fault, including stress and strength.

  6. Low resistivity and permeability in actively deforming shear zones on the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Lockner, David A.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific drillhole near Parkfield, California crosses the San Andreas Fault at a depth of 2.7 km. Downhole measurements and analysis of core retrieved from Phase 3 drilling reveal two narrow, actively deforming zones of smectite-clay gouge within a roughly 200 m-wide fault damage zone of sandstones, siltstones and mudstones. Here we report electrical resistivity and permeability measurements on core samples from all of these structural units at effective confining pressures up to 120 MPa. Electrical resistivity (~10 ohm-m) and permeability (10-21 to 10-22 m2) in the actively deforming zones were one to two orders of magnitude lower than the surrounding damage zone material, consistent with broader-scale observations from the downhole resistivity and seismic velocity logs. The higher porosity of the clay gouge, 2 to 8 times greater than that in the damage zone rocks, along with surface conduction were the principal factors contributing to the observed low resistivities. The high percentage of fine-grained clay in the deforming zones also greatly reduced permeability to values low enough to create a barrier to fluid flow across the fault. Together, resistivity and permeability data can be used to assess the hydrogeologic characteristics of the fault, key to understanding fault structure and strength. The low resistivities and strength measurements of the SAFOD core are consistent with observations of low resistivity clays that are often found in the principal slip zones of other active faults making resistivity logs a valuable tool for identifying these zones.

  7. The effect of effective normal stress on particle breakage, porosity and permeability of sand: Evaluation of faults around methane hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Sho; Kaneko, Hiroaki; Ito, Takuma; Minagawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    To provide evaluation of faults around methane hydrate reservoirs, we used a ring-shear apparatus to examine the perpendicular permeability of silica sand. The effects of effective normal stress and artificial overconsolidation ratios on the permeability were investigated. We obtained measurements under constant effective normal stress ranging from 0.5 MPa to 8.0 MPa and under two overconsolidation ratios (OCR 1.6 and 16.0). Permeability and porosity after ring-shearing substantially decreased with increasing effective normal stress up to an effective normal stress of 2.0 MPa, and became constant for effective normal stress values greater than 2.0 MPa. Stress dependency of both permeability and porosity after large-displacement shearing was clearly observed. Significant changes in permeability after ring-shearing related to the artificial overconsolidation ratio were not observed. To observe the shear zone microstructure and grain crushing, we conducted analyses using field emission scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction. The stress dependency of permeability reduction after ring-shearing was reflected by the porosity and grain size reduction due to grain crushing in a finite shear zone. The results indicate that fault (shear zone) formed at the moderate effective normal stress may act as a sealing structure in gas production areas.

  8. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission: Fault Management Design Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Peter; Weitl, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    As a general trend, the complexities of modern spacecraft are increasing to include more ambitious mission goals with tighter timing requirements and on-board autonomy. As a byproduct, the protective features that monitor the performance of these systems have also increased in scope and complexity. Given cost and schedule pressures, there is an increasing emphasis on understanding the behavior of the system at design time. Formal test-driven verification and validation (V&V) is rarely able to test the significant combinatorics of states, and often finds problems late in the development cycle forcing design changes that can be costly. This paper describes the approach the SMAP Fault Protection team has taken to address some of the above-mentioned issues.

  9. Active fault detection and isolation of discrete-time linear time-varying systems: a set-membership approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojtaba Tabatabaeipour, Seyed

    2015-08-01

    Active fault detection and isolation (AFDI) is used for detection and isolation of faults that are hidden in the normal operation because of a low excitation signal or due to the regulatory actions of the controller. In this paper, a new AFDI method based on set-membership approaches is proposed. In set-membership approaches, instead of a point-wise estimation of the states, a set-valued estimation of them is computed. If this set becomes empty the given model of the system is not consistent with the measurements. Therefore, the model is falsified. When more than one model of the system remains un-falsified, the AFDI method is used to generate an auxiliary signal that is injected into the system for detection and isolation of faults that remain otherwise hidden or non-isolated using passive FDI (PFDI) methods. Having the set-valued estimation of the states for each model, the proposed AFDI method finds an optimal input signal that guarantees FDI in a finite time horizon. The input signal is updated at each iteration in a decreasing receding horizon manner based on the set-valued estimation of the current states and un-falsified models at the current sample time. The problem is solved by a number of linear and quadratic programming problems, which result in a computationally efficient algorithm. The method is tested on a numerical example as well as on the pitch actuator of a benchmark wind turbine.

  10. Increased radon-222 in soil gas because of cumulative seismicity at active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Yoshinaga, Tohru; Ueyama, Takayoshi; Asaue, Hisafumi

    2014-12-01

    This study demonstrates how the radon-222 (222Rn) concentration of soil gas at an active fault is sensitive to cumulative recent seismicity by examining seven active faults in western Japan. The 222Rn concentration was found to correlate well with the total earthquake energy within a 100-km radius of each fault. This phenomenon can probably be ascribed to the increase of pore pressure around the source depth of 222Rn in shallow soil caused by frequently induced strain. This increase in pore pressure can enhance the ascent velocity of 222Rn carrier gas as governed by Darcy's law. Anomalous 222Rn concentrations are likely to originate from high gas velocities, rather than increased accumulations of parent nuclides. The high velocities also can yield unusual young gas under the radioactive nonequilibrium condition of short elapsed time since 222Rn generation. The results suggest that ongoing seismicity in the vicinity of an active fault can cause accumulation of strain in shallow fault soils. Therefore, the 222Rn concentration is a possible gauge for the degree of strain accumulation.

  11. Characterising Active Fault Earthquake Sources Beneath the Coastal Environments of Christchurch and Wellington Cities, New Zealand, Using Seismic Reflection Profiles and Fault Displacement Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P.; Nodder, S.; Gorman, A. R.; Woelz, S.; Orpin, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal cities of Christchurch and Wellington, New Zealand, lie in different tectonic settings within the obliquely convergent Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone. Both cities have experienced damaging earthquakes in the last three years, which highlight the importance of locating and characterising hidden active faults close to urban areas. The devastating and geologically complex Canterbury earthquake sequence of 2010-2012 developed on the periphery of the plate boundary, and reactivated several previously unidentified strike-slip and reverse faults. Major aftershocks initially beneath land, generally migrated eastward over time, and finally advanced offshore into Pegasus Bay. A study of active submarine faulting beneath the bay highlights the role of inherited crustal structure and inversion tectonics. Marine seismic reflection data reveals that faults have very low slip rate and negligible post-glacial (<15 ka) deformation, which is consistent with inferred long recurrence intervals between large magnitude (Mw>6) earthquakes. Wellington City is surrounded by numerous high-slip rate strike-slip faults overlying the Hikurangi subduction zone. A dense network of secondary basement structures previously recognised throughout the region, mainly from tectonic geomorphology, have, until recently, been considered mostly inactive and excluded from seismic hazard models. We used high-resolution geophysical, bathymetric and sediment-core data to determine the structure, earthquake history and earthquake potential of a newly discovered active reverse fault beneath the inner reaches of Wellington Harbour. The fault has a slip rate of ~0.6 ± 0.3 mm/y, and a vertical displacement history indicating at least two large magnitude (Mw 6.3-7.1), surface-rupturing earthquakes in the last 10 ka. We infer that the fault extends southwards onshore beneath the city and potentially into Cook Strait, and represents a significant previously unrecognised seismic hazard.

  12. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey) for Disaster Management

    PubMed Central

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozener, Haluk

    2008-01-01

    Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE–SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters – standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space – is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems. PMID:27873783

  13. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey) for Disaster Management.

    PubMed

    Halicioglu, Kerem; Ozener, Haluk

    2008-08-19

    Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE-SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters - standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space - is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems.

  14. Eye-specific retinogeniculate segregation independent of normal neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Andrew D; Wang, Guo-Yong; Liets, Lauren C; Collins, Odell A; Chapman, Barbara; Chalupa, Leo M

    2003-05-09

    The segregation of initially intermingled left and right eye inputs to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (DLGN) during development is thought to be in response to precise spatial and temporal patterns of spontaneous ganglion cell activity. To test this hypothesis, we disrupted the correlated activity of neighboring ganglion cells in the developing ferret retina through immunotoxin depletion of starburst amacrine cells. Despite the absence of this type of correlated activity, left and right eye inputs segregated normally in the DLGN. By contrast, when all spontaneous activity was blocked, the projections from the two eyes remained intermingled. Thus, certain features of normal neural activity patterns are not required for the formation of eye-specific projections to the DLGN.

  15. A Normal-faulting Paleostress in the Vicinity of Up-dip Limit of Seismogenic Zone Detected by Meso-scale Fault Analysis in a Tectonic Mélange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Ikesawa, E.; Kimura, G.

    2003-12-01

    The Mugi mélange in the Shimanto Belt, SW Japan, is a mixture of terrigenous and oceanic materials of late Cretaceous to Paleocene. Intermittent bedding planes trend ENE-WSW to E-W (subparallel to the Nankai trough axis) and dip steeply northward. The Mugi mélange consists of several duplex units accompanied by shear zones of basalt layers at their boundaries. Systematic shear fabrics and P-T conditions estimated from analyses of vitrinite reflectance and fluid inclusions indicate that the Mugi mélange had once been subducted to a significant depth (6-7 km below sea floor, which appears to coincide with the up-dip limit of the seismogenic zone), then underplated to the Shimanto accretionary prism, and is now exhumed on ground surface. In this study, for the purpose of determining paleostress fields related to the processes in which subducted materials were deformed, underplated and uplifted to surface, orientations of meso-scale faults and striations were analyzed. Stress inversion techniques including Angelier's Inversion, Multiple Inversion and Ginkgo Method were applied to fault-slip data obtained in each duplex unit of the Mugi mélange, and the results were almost consistent with each other. Most of the resultant σ 1 axes trend N-S horizontally, and are parallel to poles of shale cleavages, which are roughly parallel to bedding planes. Although the cleavages slightly vary their orientations according to later rotation, σ 1 axis changes together with them. This cleavage-controlled paleostress has a low Bishop's stress ratio (i.e. low magnitude of σ 2), therefore is an axial compressional stress normal to cleavages. The restored paleostress was probably exerted just before or at the same time of the formation of duplex structure and the rotation of bedding planes. The meso-scale faults appear to have been formed as normal ones due to overburden. P-T conditions estimated by analysis of fluid inclusions, which occur in the mineral veins sealing measured

  16. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Pipeline Design and Risk Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo; Strom, Alexander

    2008-07-01

    Twin oil (20 & 24 inch) and gas (20 & 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)—the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. Detailed Design was performed with due regard to actual topography and to avoid the possibility of the trenches freezing in winter, the implementation of specific drainage solutions and thermal protection measures.

  17. Middle to Late Pleistocene activity of the northern Matese fault system (southern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Paolo; Giaccio, Biagio; Messina, Paolo; Peronace, Edoardo; Amato, Vincenzo; Naso, Giuseppe; Nomade, Sebastian; Pereira, Alison; Piscitelli, Sabatino; Bellanova, Jessica; Billi, Andrea; Blamart, Dominique; Galderisi, Antonio; Giocoli, Alessandro; Stabile, Tony; Thil, Francoise

    2017-03-01

    An integrated investigation including geological, geomorphological, geophysical and structural survey, tephra analyses, 14C and 40Ar/39Ar dating, as well as paleoseismic trenching along the N-Matese fault system is presented. The study allowed the characterization of the tectonic mobility of this structure as well as the associated Bojano basin sedimentary-tectonic evolution since the early Middle Pleistocene, providing also new clues concerning the fault historical activity and the associated Mw > 6.5 earthquakes. We have found lines of evidence for > 1 mm/yr slip rate along the presently buried Bojano fault during the mid Middle Pleistocene, and similar rates for the main fault segments paralleling the Matese flanks. The buried Bojano fault significantly slowed down during the last 300 kyr, ceasing its activity before the Holocene. In turn, the segments outcropping along the Matese flanks reactivated at the onset of Late Pleistocene, after a long period of quiescence (480-110 ka), with robust slip rates that would seem even accelerating in post LGM times. Paleoseismic data suggest the occurrence of four Mw > 6.6 earthquakes in the past 3 ka, three of which match the little known 280 BC event, and the devastating 1456 and 1805 earthquakes.

  18. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Analysis Methodology and Basic Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitali, Luigino; Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo

    2008-07-01

    Twin oil (20 & 24 inch) and gas (20 & 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)—the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. This Paper describes the steps followed to formulate the concept of the special trenches and the analytical characteristics of the Model.

  19. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Analysis Methodology and Basic Design

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali, Luigino; Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE)--the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. This Paper describes the steps followed to formulate the concept of the special trenches and the analytical characteristics of the Model.

  20. Crossing Active Faults on the Sakhalin II Onshore Pipeline Route: Pipeline Design and Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mattiozzi, Pierpaolo; Strom, Alexander

    2008-07-08

    Twin oil (20 and 24 inch) and gas (20 and 48 inch) pipeline systems stretching 800 km are being constructed to connect offshore hydrocarbon deposits from the Sakhalin II concession in the North to an LNG plant and oil export terminal in the South of Sakhalin island. The onshore pipeline route follows a regional fault zone and crosses individual active faults at 19 locations. Sakhalin Energy, Design and Construction companies took significant care to ensure the integrity of the pipelines, should large seismic induced ground movements occur during the Operational life of the facilities. Complex investigations including the identification of the active faults, their precise location, their particular displacement values and assessment of the fault kinematics were carried out to provide input data for unique design solutions. Lateral and reverse offset displacements of 5.5 and 4.5 m respectively were determined as the single-event values for the design level earthquake (DLE) - the 1000-year return period event. Within the constraints of a pipeline route largely fixed, the underground pipeline fault crossing design was developed to define the optimum routing which would minimize stresses and strain using linepipe materials which had been ordered prior to the completion of detailed design, and to specify requirements for pipe trenching shape, materials, drainage system, etc. Detailed Design was performed with due regard to actual topography and to avoid the possibility of the trenches freezing in winter, the implementation of specific drainage solutions and thermal protection measures.

  1. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangliang; Lavier, Luc L.

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  2. Paleoseismic and geomorphologic evidence of recent tectonic activity of the Pozohondo Fault (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez-Pascua, M.A.; Pérez-López, R.; Garduño-Monroy, V.H.; Giner-Robles, J.L.; Silva, P.G.; Perucha-Atienza, M.A.; Hernández-Madrigal, V.M.; Bischoff, J.

    2012-01-01

    Instrumental and historical seismicity in the Albacete province (External Prebetic Zone) has been scarcely recorded. However, major strike-slip faults showing NW-SE trending provide geomorphologic and paleoseismic evidence of recent tectonic activity (Late Pleistocene to Present). Moreover, these faults are consistently well oriented under the present stress tensor and therefore, they can trigger earthquakes of magnitude greater than M6, according to the lengths of surface ruptures and active segments recognized in fieldwork. Present landscape nearby the village of Hellin (SE of Albacete) is determined by the recent activity of the Pozohondo Fault (FPH), a NW-SE right-lateral fault with 90 km in length. In this study, we have calculated the Late Quaternary tectonic sliprate of the FPH from geomorphological, sedimentological, archaeoseimological, and paleoseismological approaches. All of these data suggest that the FPH runs with a minimum slip-rate of 0.1 mm/yr during the last 100 kyrs (Upper Pleistocene-Holocene). In addition, we have recognized the last two major paleoearthquakes associated to this fault. Magnitudes of these paleoearthquakes were gretarer than M6 and their recurrence intervals ranged from 6600 to 8600 yrs for the seismic cycle of FPH. The last earthquake was dated between the 1st and 6th centuries, though two earthquakes could be interpreted in this wide time interval, one at the FPH and other from a far field source. Results obtained here, suggest an increasing of the tectonic activity of the Pozohondo Fault during the last 10,000 yrs.

  3. Active Faults of the Northwest Himalaya: Pattern, Rate, and Timing of Surface Rupturing Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yule, J.; Madden, C.; Gavillot, Y.; Hebeler, A.; Meigs, A.; Hussein, A.; Malik, M.; Bhat, M.; Kausar, A.; Ramzan, S.; Sayab, M.; Yeats, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The 2005 Kashmir earthquake (Mw 7.6) is the only Himalayan earthquake to rupture the surface since the 15th to 16th century A.D. when >Mw 8.5 earthquakes ruptured the Himalayan Frontal thrust (HFT) in the central Himalaya. Megathrust-type earthquakes like these seem to relieve a majority of the accumulated interseismic strain and concentrate permanent strain across a narrow width at the deformation front (faults within the orogen appear to accommodate little strain). The 2005 within-plate rupture in Kashmir may be a clue that a different seismotectonic model applies to the northwest Himalaya where active deformation occurs on faults distributed more than 120 km across the orogen. An asymmetric anticline marks the deformation front in Kashmir where the HFT is inferred to be blind, though ~20 m-high escarpments suggest that unrecognized thrust fault(s) may reach the surface locally. Folded river terraces and dip data also suggest that this frontal fold contains a SW-dipping back thrust. In Pakistan the Salt Range thrust system (SRT) defines the thrust front. New mapping and preliminary OSL dates from deformed Holocene sediments exposed along the westernmost SRT reveal that the fault slips at 1-7 mm/yr and last ruptured within the last several thousand years. Within the orogenic wedge to the north of the deformation front, active shortening occurs along a system of surface-rupturing reverse faults, extending from the Balakot-Bagh fault (source of the 2005 Kashmir earthquake) to the Reasi fault (RF) in Indian Kashmir to the southeast. One strand of the RF displaces a 350 m-high, 80 ± 6 ka (preliminary OSL age) fluvial terrace, yielding a minimum shortening rate of 3-5 mm/yr. Trenches excavated across the RF nearby reveal a distinct angular unconformity that likely formed during a surface rupture ~4500 yrs BP. Farther north, three northeast-dipping reverse faults cut Quaternary terraces on the southwest side of the Kashmir Valley. Trenches expose evidence for at least

  4. GPS-derived slip rates of active faults in eastern Venezuela, along the southeastern Caribbean PBZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard, F. A.; Beck, C.; Jouanne, F.; Reinoza, C. E.; Fegag

    2013-05-01

    For over 20 years, GPS campaign measurements have been performed in eastern Venezuela, as well as in other areas of the country, by different scientific groups and in the frame of different either national or international efforts and/or projects, essentially aiming at the estimation of the rate of motion along the major Quaternary faults (i.e., Boconó, San Sebastián and El Pilar faults) composing the plate boundary zone (PBZ) between the Caribbean and South America, along onshore northern and western Venezuela. The slip rates and sense of slip of those major faults derived from the comparison of several GPS campaigns carried out through the years have confirmed the slip data (fault kinematics) previously derived from geologic data, through comprehensive neotectonic and paleoseismic studies mainly made by the FUNVISIS' Earth Sciences Dpt. staff. In a rough way, we could conclude that those faults are dextrally moving at a rate in the order of 10-12 mm/a. More recently, it has been shown that the El Pilar fault has a locking depth close to 10 km deep and that about half of the PBZ dextral motion is accommodated as creep, reducing the seismic hazard for northeastern Venezuela almost by half. On the contrary, in the near past, very little attention has been paid to the secondary active faulting in eastern Venezuela. In that sense, FUNVISIS, in collaboration with the Université de Savoie, started the monitoring of these secondary features by installing 36 brass benchmarks on bedrock in that region in 2003, which have been occupied 3 times, in late 2003 and 2005 and in early 2013. The comparison between the 2003 and 2005 occupations shows promising results, such as: a) The Charagato fault on Cubagua island is left-lateral with a slip rate of about 2 mm/a; b) slip vectors across the El Pilar fault tend to head to the ESE, suggesting that the tectonic regime is compressive transcurrent to transcurrent compressional (transpressional); c) The NW-SE-trending San Francisco

  5. Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie Kell, Graham Kent, Neal Driscoll, Robert Karlin, Rob Baskin, John Louie, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada: Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 35, 7 pp. Preprint at http://crack.seismo.unr.edu/geothermal/Eisses-GRCpaper-sm.pdf The Pyramid Lake fault zone lies within a vitally important area of the northern Walker Lane where not only can transtension can be studied through a complex arrangement of strike-slip and normal faults but also geothermal activity can be examined in the extensional regime for productivity. This study used advanced and economical seismic methods in attempt to develop the Paiute Tribe’s geothermal reservoir and to expand upon the tectonics and earthquake hazard knowledge of the area. 500 line-kilometers of marine CHIRP data were collected on Pyramid Lake combined with 27 kilometers of vibrator seismic on-land data from the northwest side of the basin were collected in 2010 that highlighted two distinct phases of faulting. Preliminary results suggest that the geothermal fluids in the area are controlled by the late Pleistoceneto Holocene-aged faults and not through the mid-Miocene-aged conduits as originally hypothesized.

  6. An Experiential Learning Activity Demonstrating Normal and Phobic Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canu, Will H.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an activity for an undergraduate abnormal psychology course that used student-generated data to illustrate normal versus clinically significant anxiety responses related to specific phobias. Students (N = 37) viewed 14 images of low- or high-anxiety valence and rated their subjective response to each. Discussion in a…

  7. Cenozoic Tectonic Activity of the "Passive" North America Margin: Evidence for Cenozoic Activity on Mesozoic or Paleozoic Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedorub, O. I.; Knapp, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    The tectonic history of the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) incorporates two cycles of continental assembly, multiple pulses of orogeny, rifting, and post-rift geodynamic evolution. This is reflected in the heterogeneous lithosphere of the ENAM which contains fault structures originated in Paleozoic to Mesozoic eras. The South Georgia Rift basin is probably the largest Mesozoic graben within its boundaries that is associated with the breakup of Pangea. It is composed of smaller sub-basins which appear to be bounded by high-angle normal faults, some of which may have been inverted in late Cretaceous and Cenozoic eras. Paleozoic structures may have been reactivated in Cenozoic time as well. The ENAM is characterized by N-NE maximum horizontal compressive stress direction. This maximum compressional stress field is sub-parallel to the strike of the Atlantic Coast province fault systems. Camden, Augusta, Allendale, and Pen Branch faults are four of the many such reactivated faults along the southern part of ENAM. These faults are now buried under the 0-400 m of loosely consolidated Cretaceous and Cenozoic age sediments and thus are either only partially mapped or currently not recognized. Some of the objectives of this study are to map the subsurface expression and geometry of these faults and to investigate the post Cretaceous deformation and possible causes of fault reactivation on a passive margin. This study employs an integrated geophysical approach to investigate the upper 200 m of identified locations of the above mentioned faults. 2-D high-resolution shallow seismic reflection and refraction methods, gravity surveys, GPR, 2-D electrical resistivity and well data are used for analyses and interpretation. Preliminary results suggest that Camden fault shows signs of Cenozoic reactivation through an approximately 30 m offset NW side up mainly along a steeply dipping fault zone in the basal contact of Coastal Plain sediments with the Carolina Piedmont. Drill

  8. Hidden faults in the Gobi Desert (Inner Mongolia, China) - evidence for fault activity in a previously tectonically stable zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudersdorf, Andreas; Haedke, Hanna; Reicherter, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    The Gaxun Nur Basin (GNB, also Ejina Basin, Hei River Basin, Ruoshui Basin) north of the Tibetan Plateau and the Hexi Corridor is an endorheic basin bounded by the Bei Shan ranges in the west, the Gobi Altai mountains in the north and the Badain Jaran sand desert in the east. The basin is fed from the south by the braided drainage system of the Hei He (Hei River) and its tributaries, which originate in the Qilian Shan; terminal lakes like the dried Gaxun Nur and Sogo Nur are and have been temporal. The sedimentary succession of up to 300 m comprises intercalations of not only alluvial deposits but also lake sediments and playa evaporites. The basin has been regarded as tectonically inactive by earlier authors; however, the dating of sediments from an earlier drill core in the basin center provided some implications for tectonic activity. Subsequent remote sensing efforts revealed large lineaments throughout the basin which are now considered as possible fault line fingerprints. We investigated well preserved Yardangs (clay terraces) in the northeastern part of the GNB, in the vicinity of the Juyanze (paleo) lake, and found evidence for Holocene active tectonics (seismites). We present a lithological analysis of the relevant sequences and conclusions on the recent tectonic activity within the study area.

  9. Identification of active faults in Abruzzo area (central Italy) through the analysis of geological, seismological and gravimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiso, Paola; Paoletti, Valeria; Gaudiosi, Germana; Nappi, Rosa; Cella, Federico; Fedi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Identification of active faults in abruzzo area (central italy) through the analysis of geological, seismological and gravimetric data The aim of this study is to identify and constrain the geometry of the seismogenic structures (active, outcropping and buried fault systems) of the Abruzzo area (central Italy), through an integrated analysis of geo-structural, seismic and gravimetric data. We generated three thematic: "faults", "earthquakes" and "gravimetric" data: i) The fault dataset consists of data extracted from the available structural and geological maps (ITHACA catalogue; the "Neotectonic Map of Italy" 1:500.000; several geological sheets 1:50.000 from ISPRA CARG project; the Geological Map 1:100.000 Sheet 1), and many geological studies. ii) The earthquakes datasets was created by merging the data from historical and instrumental Catalogues (CPTI04 and CPTI11; ISIDE - INGV). iii) The gravimetric datasets consists in the Multiscale Derivative Analysis (MDA) of the Bouguer anomaly map of the area, whose maxima show the presence of density lineaments. The merge of these datasets in GIS environment, highlighted four possible scenarios of correlation between faults, earthquakes and MDA maxima: 1) the existence of active faults, revealed by a strong correlation between epicentral location of seismic clusters, fault positions and MDA maxima; 2) the existence of buried active faults, highlighted by a good correlation between MDA maxima and epicentral positions, without correspondence with faults known from geological data; 3) the existence of inactive or silent faults, detected by the presence of faults reported in the geological datasets and literature which are associated with MDA maxima, without correlation of earthquakes; 4) the existence of faults not correlated with MDA maxima; this could be due to faults putting in contact two lithologies with a similar density. A comparison between seismic hypocentral locations and the fault geometry retrieved by DEXP

  10. Evolution of near-surface ramp-flat-ramp normal faults and implication during intramontane basin formation in the eastern Betic Cordillera (the Huércal-Overa Basin, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera, Antonio; Galindo-ZaldíVar, Jesús; Lamas, Francisco; Ruiz-ConstáN, Ana

    2012-08-01

    The nucleation, propagation, and associated folding of ramp-flat-ramp normal faults were analyzed from field examples developed in a brittle/ductile multilayer sequence of the Huércal-Overa Basin (SE Spain). Gently dipping sandy silt layers, which display a low cohesive strength (C0 = 7 kPa, μ= 34°), favor the development of extensional detachments. A tectonic origin instead of a possible gravitational origin is supported by the perpendicularity between the paleoslope direction of the fluvial-deltaic environment inferred from imbricated pebbles, and the senses of movement deduced from fault slicken-lines. The link between high-angle normal faults (HANFs) —formed at different levels in the layered sequence— with horizontal fault segments comes to develop ramp-flat-ramp normal faults with associated roll-over in the hanging wall. Observed extensional duplexes are formed by parallel detachments connected through synthetic Riedel faults. These Riedel faults would produce the back-rotation of the individual blocks (horses), i.e., extensional folding of the originally subhorizontal layers. There is no correlation between the analyzed ramp-flat-ramp normal faults, accommodating south-southeastward extension during Serravallian-lower Tortonian, and either the regional Alpujarride/Nevado-Filabride west-directed extensional shear zone or the top-to-the-north detachments within Alpujarride units, which are clearly sealed by Serravallian-lower Tortonian sediments. Therefore, the studied normal faults are restricted to the brittle/ductile multilayer fluvio/deltaic sequence and accommodate moderate late extension instead of belonging to a large crustal extensional system connected with a regional detachment at depth. Therefore, the basin formed in a moderate crustal thickness context where small and medium-scale extensional systems were subordinate structures. These natural examples support the development of low-angle normal faults at very shallow crustal levels in

  11. The Nisi Fault as a key structure for understanding the active deformation of the NW Peloponnese, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygouri, V.; Koukouvelas, I. K.; Kokkalas, S.; Xypolias, P.; Papadopoulos, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    The previously unknown Nisi Fault in NW Peloponnese was ruptured during the 2008 Movri Mountain earthquake attaining a maximum offset of 25 cm. The fault is interpreted as a branch of a flower structure above a blind strike-slip fault. We investigate the Nisi Fault seismotectonic evolution using morphotectonic analysis in order to determine whether the landscape is affected by tectonic forcing and paleoseismology to determine earthquake recurrence interval and fault slip rates. We applied several geomorphic indices, such as the asymmetry factor (AF), the stream length-gradient index (SL), the valley floor width to valley height ratio (Vf), the mountain-front sinuosity (Smf), the drainage basin shape (Bs) and the hypsometric curve (Hc), in four large drainage basins of the study area. The results show that fault-related vertical motions and the associated tilting influenced the drainage geometry and the landscape development. Values of stream-gradient indices (SL) are relatively high close to the fault trace. Mountain-front sinuosity (Smf) mean values along the fault zones range from 1.12 to 1.23. Valley floor width to valley height ratios (Vf) mean values along the studied fault range between 0.21 and 2.50. Drainage basin shape (BS) mean values along the fault range from 1.04 to 3.72. Lateral fault growth was likely achieved by propagation primarily towards north-northwestward. The paleoseismic history of the fault, investigated by a trench and 14C dating of seven samples, indicates two morphogenic earthquakes in the last 1 kyr. Therefore, we suggest that the Nisi Fault displays a slip rate on the order of 1 mm/yr and a recurrence interval ranging between 300 and 600 years. From a seismotectonic point of view, the fault is classified as high activity rate, with abundant but discontinuous geomorphic evidence of its activity. Other similar faults affecting the western Peloponnese can be envisaged with a similar procedure. Additionally, the seismic history and surface

  12. Fault mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent observational, experimental, and theoretical modeling studies of fault mechanics are discussed in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics examined include interseismic strain accumulation, coseismic deformation, postseismic deformation, and the earthquake cycle; long-term deformation; fault friction and the instability mechanism; pore pressure and normal stress effects; instability models; strain measurements prior to earthquakes; stochastic modeling of earthquakes; and deep-focus earthquakes. Maps, graphs, and a comprehensive bibliography are provided. 220 refs.

  13. Active faulting in low- to moderate-seismicity regions: the SAFE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebrier, M.; Safe Consortium

    2003-04-01

    SAFE (Slow Active Faults in Europe) is an EC-FP5 funded multidisciplinary effort which proposes an integrated European approach in identifying and characterizing active faults as input for evaluating seismic hazard in low- to moderate-seismicity regions. Seismically active western European regions are generally characterized by low hazard but high risk, due to the concentration of human and material properties with high vulnerability. Detecting, and then analysing, tectonic deformations that may lead to destructive earthquakes in such areas has to take into account three major limitations: - the typical climate of western Europe (heavy vegetation cover and/or erosion) ; - the subdued geomorphic signature of slowly deforming faults ; - the heavy modification of landscape by human activity. The main objective of SAFE, i.e., improving the assessment of seismic hazard through understanding of the mechanics and recurrence of active faults in slowly deforming regions, is achieved through four major steps : (1) extending geologic and geomorphic investigations of fault activity beyond the Holocene to take into account various time-windows; (2) developing an expert system that combines diverse lines of geologic, seismologic, geomorphic, and geophysical evidence to diagnose the existence and seismogenic potential of slow active faults; (3) delineating and characterising high seismic risk areas of western Europe, either from historical or geological/geomorphic evidence; (4) demonstrating and discussing the impact of the project results on risk assessment through a seismic scenario in the Basel-Mulhouse pilot area. To take properly into account known differences in source behavior, these goals are pursued both in extensional (Lower and Upper Rhine Graben, Catalan Coast) and compressional tectonic settings (southern Upper Rhine Graben, Po Plain, and Provence). Two arid compressional regions (SE Spain and Moroccan High Atlas) have also been selected to address the limitations

  14. Origin, Behavior and Texture of Clay Minerals in Mongolian Active Fault of Bogd and Comparison with SAFOD Fault Gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, H.; Buati